Science.gov

Sample records for alzheimer disease victim

  1. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  2. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research. PMID:26921134

  3. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  4. Natural distribution of environmental radon daughters in the different brain areas of an Alzheimer Disease victim

    PubMed Central

    Momčilović, Berislav; Lykken, Glenn I; Cooley, Marvin

    2006-01-01

    Background Radon is a ubiquitous noble gas in the environment and a primary source of harmful radiation exposure for humans; it decays in a cascade of daughters (RAD) by releasing the cell damaging high energy alpha particles. Results We studied natural distribution of RAD 210Po and 210Bi in the different parts of the postmortem brain of 86-year-old woman who had suffered from Alzheimer's disease (AD). A distinct brain map emerged, since RAD distribution was different among the analyzed brain areas. The highest RAD irradiation (mSv·year-1) occurred in the decreasing order of magnitude: amygdale (Amy) >> hippocampus (Hip) > temporal lobe (Tem) ~ frontal lobe (Fro) > occipital lobe (Occ) ~ parietal lobe (Par) > substantia nigra (SN) >> locus ceruleus (LC) ~ nucleus basalis (NB); generally more RAD accumulated in the proteins than lipids of gray and white (gray > white) brain matter. Amy and Hip are particularly vulnerable brain structure targets to significant RAD internal radiation damage in AD (5.98 and 1.82 mSv·year-1, respectively). Next, naturally occurring RAD radiation for Tem and Fro, then Occ and Par, and SN was an order of magnitude higher than that in LC and NB; the later was within RAD we observed previously in the healthy control brains. Conclusion Naturally occurring environmental RAD exposure may dramatically enhance AD deterioration by selectively targeting brain areas of emotions (Amy) and memory (Hip). PMID:16965619

  5. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  6. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    De-Paula, Vanessa J; Radanovic, Marcia; Diniz, Breno S; Forlenza, Orestes V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with well-defined pathophysiological mechanisms, mostly affecting medial temporal lobe and associative neocortical structures. Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles represent the pathological hallmarks of AD, and are respectively related to the accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in brain tissues, and to cytoskeletal changes that arise from the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated Tau protein in neurons. According to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, the overproduction of Aβ is a consequence of the disruption of homeostatic processes that regulate the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Genetic, age-related and environmental factors contribute to a metabolic shift favoring the amyloidogenic processing of APP in detriment of the physiological, secretory pathway. Aβ peptides are generated by the successive cleavage of APP by beta-secretase (BACE-1) and gamma-secretase, which has been recently characterized as part of the presenilin complex. Among several beta-amyloid isoforms that bear subtle differences depending on the number of C-terminal amino acids, Aβ (1-42) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. The neurotoxic potential of the Aβ peptide results from its biochemical properties that favor aggregation into insoluble oligomers and protofibrils. These further originate fibrillary Aβ species that accumulate into senile and neuritic plaques. These processes, along with a reduction of Aβ clearance from the brain, leads to the extracellular accumulation of Aβ, and the subsequent activation of neurotoxic cascades that ultimately lead to cytoskeletal changes, neuronal dysfunction and cellular death. Intracerebral amyloidosis develops in AD patients in an age-dependent manner, but recent evidence indicate that it may be observed in some subjects as early as in the third or fourth decades of life, with increasing magnitude in late middle age

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Duke University Medical Center MalaCards: alzheimer disease MalaCards: alzheimer disease risk factor Merck Manual Consumer Version: Alzheimer Disease Quick Facts ...

  8. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of urinary tract and other serious infections. Malnutrition or dehydration: People who have Alzheimer’s disease may ... swallow. It’s important to watch for signs of malnutrition. If you think that a loved one might ...

  9. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition.

  10. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition. PMID:25579215

  11. Telephone Networks Connect Caregiving Families of Alzheimer's Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Catherine Chase; Pynoos, Jon

    1988-01-01

    Describes telephone network bringing family caregivers of Alzheimer's victims together over telephone in rotating pattern of twosomes. Explains how five caregiving spouses and five adult children were matched and connected over three months. Describes program's 25 telephone-accessed audiotapes that guided networks and provided information on…

  12. Neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perl, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer first pointed out that the disease which would later bear his name has a distinct and recognizable neuropathological substrate. Since then, much has been added to our understanding of the pathological lesions associated with the condition. The 2 primary cardinal lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease are the neurofibrillary tangle and the senile plaque. The neurofibrillary tangle consists of abnormal accumulations of abnormally phosphorylated tau within the perikaryal cytoplasm of certain neurons. The senile plaque consists of a central core of beta-amyloid, a 4-kD peptide, surrounded by abnormally configured neuronal processes or neurites. Other neuropathological lesions are encountered in cases of Alzheimer's disease, but the disease is defined and recognized by these 2 cardinal lesions. Other lesions include poorly understood changes such as granulovacuolar degeneration and eosinophilic rodlike bodies (Hirano bodies). The loss of synaptic components is a change that clearly has a significant impact on cognitive function and represents another important morphological alteration. It is important to recognize that distinguishing between Alzheimer's disease, especially in its early stages, and normal aging may be very difficult, particularly if one is examining the brains of patients who died at an advanced old age. It is also noted that instances of pure forms of Alzheimer's disease, in the absence of other coexistent brain disease processes, such as infarctions or Parkinson's disease-related lesions, are relatively uncommon, and this must be taken into account by researchers who employ postmortem brain tissues for research.

  13. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about ... time Thoughts about death or suicide What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common type ...

  14. Progress in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio

    2012-02-01

    After more than one century from Alois Alzheimer and Gaetano Perusini's first report, progress has been made in understanding the pathogenic steps of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as in its early diagnosis. This review discusses recent findings leading to the formulation of novel criteria for diagnosis of the disease even in a preclinical phase, by using biological markers. In addition, treatment options will be discussed, with emphasis on new disease-modifying compounds and future trial design suitable to test these drugs in an early phase of the disease.

  15. Treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Bradford T; Onysko, Mary K; Stob, Christian M; Hazlewood, Kathleen A

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly one-half [corrected] of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among the pathologic manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Although there are no proven modalities for preventing Alzheimer disease, hypertension treatment, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, physical activity, and cognitive engagement demonstrate modest potential. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are first-line medications for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, and are associated with mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living; however, the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. The most common adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. Short-term use of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine can modestly improve measures of cognition, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer disease. Memantine can also be used in combination with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Memantine is generally well tolerated, but whether its benefits produce clinically meaningful improvement is controversial. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can slow the progression of Alzheimer disease, no pharmacologic agents can reverse the progression. Atypical antipsychotics can improve some behavioral symptoms, but have been associated with increased mortality rates in older patients with dementia. There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of selegiline, testosterone, and ginkgo for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. There is no evidence supporting the beneficial effects of vitamin E, estrogen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

  16. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  18. Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Antón Álvarez, X; Fuentes, Patricio

    2011-07-01

    Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation mimicking the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors. Positive effects of Cerebrolysin on β-amyloid- and tau-related pathologies, neuroinflammation, neurotrophic factors, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neurotransmission, brain metabolism, neuroplasticity, neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, neurogenesis and cognition were demonstrated in experimental conditions. These pleiotropic effects of Cerebrolysin on Alzheimer's disease-related pathogenic events are consistent with a neurotrophic-like mode of action, and seems to involve the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 β intracellular signaling pathway. The clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease was evaluated in several randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, showing consistent benefits on global clinical function and cognition, improvements in behavior at high doses, and minor effects on daily living activities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, as well as in subgroups of moderate to moderately severe patients. In addition, the clinical benefits of Cerebrolysin were largely maintained for several months after ending treatment, a finding that supports its discontinuous administration. Cerebrolysin was generally well tolerated and did not induce significant adverse events in Alzheimer's patients. Although long-term studies are needed, the data available suggest that Cerebrolysin is effective as monotherapy and constitutes a promising option for combined therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. [Overview on Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yasuo

    2007-11-01

    It is now one hundred years since the first publication on Alzheimer's disease by Alois Alzheimer. Since 1980's deciphering Alzheimer's disease has greatly quickened, and investigators currently think that it becomes possible to treat or prevent Alzheimer's disease that is the major socioeconomical concern in all the developed countries. We owe this current understanding to three major advances, development of Abeta vaccination and gamma-modifiers, and a series of large-scale prospective studies. J-ADNI is being undertaken from this fall, which follows the protocols by US-ADNI. The major goal is establishment of the surrogate marker for AD based on MRI data. In addition, this project would provide more clarification of MCI and dementia themselves and their differentiation. In view of the temporal profile of Alzheimer disease, it is essential to detect at-risk people who carry senile plaques (amyloid) but are cognitively normal. Even in MCI more than 50% of neurons in layer 2 is already lost. For such very early detection of at-risk people biomaker would be helpful. According to sink hypothesis, there is chemical equilibrium of Abeta between in plasma, CSF and senile plaques. Thus what we should do is to find insoluble Abeta-specific fragments or modifications in the peripheral blood.

  20. Prediabetes and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bitra, V. R.; Rapaka, Deepthi; Akula, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Aging patients with diabetes are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Emerging evidences demonstrate the role of brain insulin resistance, which is a key mediator in prediabetes and diabetes mellitus that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Insulin and insulin-like growth factors regulate many biological processes such as axonal growth, protein synthesis, cell growth, gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, and development. Among these, the energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity are the major transduction processes regulated by insulin, which are the core objectives for learning and memory. It was also proposed that hyper insulinemia induced insulin resistance results in injury to the central nervous system by the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β which is the key ailment in the cognitive decline. Hence, the endogenous brain specific insulin impairments and signaling account for the majority of Alzheimer's abnormalities. PMID:26798163

  1. [Update on Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Dubois, B

    2009-03-01

    As the general population ages, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease increases steadily. In France, 850,000 people are affected, with an annual incidence of 165,000 new cases. It is estimated that in 2020, 1.2 million people will be concerned in France. Nearly half of these patients, about 400,000, will have moderate to severe disease. These figures, issuing from the Eurodem group and the Paquid study, are estimates but clearly forecast an increase in upcoming years. While the disease generally affects elderly subjects, it is also known to occur early, before the age of 60. Nearly 20,000 patients will have an early onset form of the disease. Alzheimer's disease is first and foremost a brain disease, with lesions starting early in life. These early onset forms raise difficult diagnostic problems since these patients' problems are often mistakenly thought to arise from psychiatric disorders and treated as such in institutions inadapted to the patients' conditions.

  2. [Alzheimer's disease and depression].

    PubMed

    Gallarda, T

    1999-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent cause of dementia (60% of all dementias) and affects nearly 300,000 people in France. Alzheimer's disease is a disease of the elderly which generally begins after 60 years and whose prevalence increases markedly after age 75 years. The elderly population is increasing in all Western countries. Alzheimer's disease thus constitutes a veritable emergent public health problem. The rapid inflation of the epidemiological and etiopathogenetic data have contributed to enhanced nosographic definition and finer semiological characterization of the disease. Thus, the classic concept of senile dementia has been totally abandoned. In contrast, the concept of depressive pseudodementia as defined by Kiloh (1961) remains present in the "psychiatric culture". The concept refers to rare clinical situations in which the controversial concept of "test therapy" with antidepressants retains, in the author's opinion, some utility. Depressive or psychobehavioral signs and symptoms frequently inaugurate Alzheimer's disease giving rise to first-line psychiatric management. The use of multidimensional evaluation instruments such as the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) has enabled demonstration of the signs and symptoms and their quantification through the course of the disease. In the dementia stage, the psychobehavioral symptoms are related to the patient's awareness of the degradation in his intellectual functions and the loss of independence and to specific neuropathological lesions responsible for "frontal deafferentation". Certain clinical forms of depression of late onset are also characterized by symptoms reflecting hypofrontal signs (blunted affect, apathy, defective initiative, etc.) and severe cognitive disorders. Those depressions are associated with risk factors shared with Alzheimer's disease (sex, age, vascular function, APOE 4) and constitute a risk factor for progression to dementia, requiring regular clinical and neuropsychological

  3. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  4. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Farlow, Martin R; Brosch, Jared R

    2013-08-01

    The immune system plays a significant role in Alzheimer disease (AD). β-Amyloid deposition in the cortex is thought to be an initiating event in AD and the widely believed amyloid hypothesis proposes removal of amyloid may delay disease progression. Human trials of active or passive immune agents have failed to show benefit and increased adverse events of vasogenic edema and microhemorrhages. Evidence suggests the illness may be too advanced by the time patients are symptomatic with dementia. Future directions include better understanding of how and where immunotherapies should be targeted and treating patients at earlier stages of the illness.

  5. [Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-18

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing. Subsequent analysis of pooled data from both phase III trials with solanezumab showed a reduction in cognitive decline in patients with mild AD. Solanezumab and new monoclonal antibodies are being tested in patients with prodromal and preclinical AD in search for a disease-modifying treatment. PMID:26815584

  6. Metamemory in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Souchay, Céline

    2007-10-01

    Alois Alzheimer's first publication describes his patient's inability to be aware of her condition. One hundred years later, whether or not Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients show impaired awareness of their memory deficits is still of debate. This review makes a novel contribution, arguing that the ideal empirical tool to assess this question is the metamemory framework. The fact that the metamemory framework offers models of healthy memory and metamemory function and ready-developed measures mapped onto theoretical constructs, means that it is a useful paradigm to explore the question of memory awareness. The review focuses on two as yet separate approaches: the neuropsychological models of anosognosia as well as the metamemory framework. Metamemory constructs and measures are used to evaluate Alzheimer's patients' awareness of their memory difficulties by relating the main findings to the existing neuropsychological model of anosognosia. With this approach, only very specific deficits in awareness are found: a failure to update self-beliefs, and a deficit in monitoring episodic memory, possibly related to a deficit in effortful, conscious control processes. This review also considers how the exploration of the neural correlates of metamemory can help to draw novel hypotheses on the brain regions implicated in anosognosia in AD.

  7. [Diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Salacz, Pál; Csibri, Eva

    2011-03-27

    The incidence of Alzheimer's disease and diabetes is increasing with age. Thus, in light of demographic change and aging societies, they are becoming a growing issue for public health. Further, there are linkages between the two diseases. In particular, risk assessment studies suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor of Alzheimer's disease. Hence, even though Alzheimer's disease can only be influenced to a limited extent, optimal treatment of diabetes mellitus may have also a positive effect on Alzheimer's disease. While the relationship between the two diseases is not yet completely clear, in addition to the known vascular effects of diabetes mellitus recent results shed light on central nervous system effects directly influencing the neurodegenerative process. Treatment of central insulin resistance, a phenomenon explored in recent years, may be a promising avenue, not only in addressing metabolic disorder, but also Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta.

    PubMed

    Town, Terrence

    2010-05-01

    Many of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials have made it far enough down the pipeline to allow conclusions about targeting the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) as a therapeutic approach. Based on these results, it is becoming clear that a multifocal approach to AD treatment is probably necessary. However, critical discussion beyond Abeta is necessary to enable the next wave of AD therapeutic targets. For this reason, the 2010 Keystone Symposium, 'Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta', was organized by JoAnne McLaurin and Tony Wyss-Coray to spark topical discussion and debate. While researchers struggled to get beyond that ever-present pathognomonic feature of AD, new and exciting evidence was presented that raised our awareness of what is around the corner for next-generation AD therapeutics beyond Abeta. This report will describe some of the highlights from Copper Mountain Resort throughout the meeting period of 10-15 January 2010 in Colorado (USA). Despite illuminating scientific presentations and intense discussions, a number of important questions remain concerning the best biomarkers and targets to focus on, and when and how to therapeutically intervene. PMID:20429127

  9. [Alzheimer's disease and olfaction].

    PubMed

    Naudin, Marine; Mondon, Karl; Atanasova, Boriana

    2013-09-01

    Although olfactory disorders are not at the forefront of the clinical description of Alzheimer's disease (AD), they are common and often overlooked by clinicians and by patients who are largely unaware of their deficits. The past 30 years, the literature has shown early olfactory deficits in AD that is spreading across the olfactory spectrum with disease worsening. Partial overlap between brain areas implies both in olfaction and AD - especially limbic system - motivating these researches. This study describes olfactory parameters and tests using to investigate peripheral (odor threshold) and central (hedonicity, familiarity, intensity, discrimination, identification, olfactory memory) levels. Besides, this article takes an inventory of olfactory disorders in AD including odor threshold, discrimination, identification and olfactory memory capacities with controversial results observed in literature. At last, we discuss which type of olfactory dysfunction could have a clinical interest.

  10. Seizures in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, H A

    2015-02-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases the risk for late-onset seizures and neuronal network abnormalities. An elevated co-occurrence of AD and seizures has been established in the more prevalent sporadic form of AD. Recent evidence suggests that nonconvulsive network abnormalities, including seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities, may be more commonly found in patients than previously thought. Patients with familial AD are at an even greater risk for seizures, which have been found in patients with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP, as well as with APP duplication. This review also provides an overview of seizure and electroencephalography studies in AD mouse models. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been identified as a possible link between AD and seizures, and while Aβ is known to affect neuronal activity, the full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and other APP cleavage products may be important for the development and maintenance of cortical network hyperexcitability. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity, such as seizures or network abnormalities that are shorter in duration but may occur with higher frequency, may contribute to cognitive impairments characteristic of AD, such as amnestic wandering. Finally, the review discusses recent studies using antiepileptic drugs to rescue cognitive deficits in AD mouse models and human patients. Understanding the mechanistic link between epileptiform activity and AD is a research area of growing interest. Further understanding of the connection between neuronal hyperexcitability and Alzheimer's as well as the potential role of epileptiform activity in the progression of AD will be beneficial for improving treatment strategies.

  11. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review. PMID:27698682

  12. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review.

  13. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  14. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  15. Personality changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Strauss, M E; Smyth, K A; Whitehouse, P J

    1992-05-01

    How personality changes in Alzheimer's disease is not well understood. Accentuations of premorbid personality, systematic shifts in personality traits, and specific personality changes affecting subtypes of patients have been postulated. To investigate which of these alternatives occurs in Alzheimer's disease, caregivers were given a comprehensive personality inventory standardized for use by informants. Caregivers observed more neurotic, less extroverted, and less conscientious behavior. To a smaller extent, patients with Alzheimer's disease were reported as becoming less agreeable and less open. The changes in reports of neuroticism, extroversion, agreeableness, and openness suggested consistent systematic shifts across all patients. Patients with depressive features were reported to have been more neurotic; those with paranoid delusions were reported as having been more hostile. Premorbid personality traits may predispose to subsequent psychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. [Proceeding memory in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Anlló, Eva Ma; Chamorro-Sánchez, Jorge; Díaz-Marta, Juan Poveda; Gil, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Procedural learning can acquire or develop skills through performance and repetition of a task unconsciously or unintentionally. Procedural skills are considered as the cornerstone in the neuropsychological rehabilitation to promote the autonomy of patients with brain damage, as those with Alzheimer's disease. This review presents data about procedural skills in Alzheimer's disease. Over the past three decades, we have found 40 articles studying various procedural skills in the Alzheimer's disease: motor, perceptual-motor, cognitive, perceptual-cognitive and those developed through serial reaction-time paradigm. We analyzed every study evaluating a procedural skill, indicating the used task and preservation or no preservation of procedural learning. Overall, most of the papers published describe conservation of learning procedures or relatively conserved in Alzheimer's disease, which could be used to promote patient autonomy.

  17. Neuronutrition and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balenahalli N.; Rao, T.S. Sathyanarayana; Prakasam, Annamalai; Sambamurti, Kumar; Rao, K.S. Jagannatha

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurological disorder with several unequivocally identified genetic risk factors. Among the several environmental factors proposed for AD, dietary protective and risk factors have been most compelling. In particular, diets rich in saturated fatty acids and alcohol, and deficient in antioxidants and vitamins appear to promote the onset of the disease, while diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants, and wine likely suppress its onset. Evidence suggests that diets rich in polyphenols and some spices suppress the onset of AD by scavenging free radicals and preventing oxidative damage. Metal ions are known to catalyze the production of free radicals and induce mental retardation or dementia. Several studies have also identified metals such as Pb, Fe, Al, Cu and Zn in AD pathogenesis. While specific chelators have been tested for therapy, they have not been very successful probably due to late administration after brain damage has been triggered. Since several dietary polyphenols are known to chelate metals, their routine use may also be protective against the onset of AD. PMID:20308778

  18. [Biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    García-Ribas, G; López-Sendón Moreno, J L; García-Caldentey, J

    2014-04-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. Three CSF biomarkers, Aß42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau, reflect the core pathological features of AD. It is already known that these pathological processes of AD starts decades before the first symptoms, so these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. At least three stages of AD could be identified: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and dementia due to AD. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review the actual research on blood-based biomarkers. Recent studies on healthy elderly subjects and on carriers of dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes that allow separate groups in these preclinical stages. These studies may aid for segregate populations in clinical trials and objectively evaluate if there are changes over the pathological processes of AD. Limits to widespread use of CSF biomarkers, apart from the invasive nature of the process itself, is the higher coefficient of variation for the analyses between centres. It requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures that may make feasible multi-centre studies and global cut-off points for the different stages of AD.

  19. Neuroinhibitory molecules in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Larner, A J; Keynes, R J

    2006-09-01

    Aberrant neurite growth is one of the neuropathological signatures of the Alzheimer's disease brain, both around amyloid plaques and in the cortical neuropil. Disruption of neuroinhibitory or repulsive growth and guidance signals, as well as of neurotrophic or permissive signals, may contribute to this dystrophic growth. Hence, therapeutic efforts directed exclusively at restoring neurotrophic activity are unlikely to meet with success. The molecular species responsible for neuroinhibitory effects in the Alzheimer's disease brain are beginning to be elucidated.

  20. Cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, R; Tournoy, J

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive aging and clinically probable Alzheimer's disease can be discriminated by means of clinical and neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional imaging techniques. Research at the level of cognitive brain systems and at the molecular level provides exciting new insights into the relation between aging and neurodegeneration. The advances at the clinical and at the basic research levels are necessary if we wish to meet the formidable challenge that the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease poses to the medical community. PMID:15937198

  1. Relationship of aluminum to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perl, D P

    1985-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques in the brain. Aluminum salts may be used experimentally to produce lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle. Although some studies have reported increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, these bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate and remain controversial. Using scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry, we have investigated this question on the cellular level. We have identified abnormal accumulations of aluminum within neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients containing neurofibrillary tangles. Similar accumulations have been detected in the numerous neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons seen in the brains of the indigenous native population of the island of Guam who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism with dementia. Epidemiologic evidence strongly suggests a causal role for local environmental conditions relating to availability of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. In view of the fact that a major consequence of acid rain is the liberation of large amounts of aluminum in bioavailable forms, concerns are raised about possible human health risks of this environmental phenomenon.

  2. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as ...

  3. Autotoxicity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, P L; McGeer, E G

    2000-06-01

    I mmunological responses are considered to be either humoral, resulting from cloning of B lymphocytes, or cell mediated, resulting from cloning of T lymphocytes. Autoimmune diseases occur when the cloned products attack host tissue. Inflammation is considered a nonspecific response to injury, characterized by exudation of serum into damaged tissue, and identified by the cardinal signs of rubor, calor, dolor, and tumor. However, these classic mechanisms do not fit pathological observations of Alzheimer disease (AD)-affected brain tissue. Although many of the components prominently associated with peripheral immunological and inflammatory states are present in AD lesions, there are no identifiable B lymphocytes or antibodies, and T cells are sparse. Furthermore, the blood-brain barrier is intact, excluding exudation of exogenous serum proteins. Although "neuroinflammation" is the term commonly used to describe the pathological changes, it fails to define adequately the process that is taking place. The reaction is neither a nonspecific response to injury, as classically implied for inflammatory reactions, nor an autoimmune reaction, despite the directed attack against plaques and extracellular tangles. It is most appropriately defined as an innate immunoreaction. The fact that such a reaction can be mounted by brain, an organ frequently described as being immunologically privileged, suggests that a reevaluation is required of the dimensions of the innate immune system, including how it operates at the tissue level. The innate immune system is primitive, while the adaptive immune system, which is directed by peripheral immune organs, is an invention of vertebrates. Even in vertebrates, however, the innate immune system is the first line of defense. Much more needs to be learned about the operation of the innate immune system in health and disease. Arch Neurol. 2000.

  4. Leptin in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, C A; Carvalho, M G; Sousa, L P; Caramelli, P; Gomes, K B

    2015-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly population. AD is histologically characterized by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) on extracellular plaques and deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Several studies have shown that obesity may precede dementia and that lifestyle factors play a critical role in the onset of AD. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is an independent risk factor for developing AD. In this scenario, the understanding of the role of adipose tissue in brain health is essential to clarify the establishment of demential processes. The objective of this work was to review studies regarding leptin, an anorexigenic peptide hormone synthesized in adipocytes, in the context of dementia. Some authors proposed that leptin evaluation might be a better predictor of dementia than traditional anthropometric measures. Leptin, once established as a biomarker, could enhance the understanding of late-onset AD risk over the life course, as well as the clinical progression of prodromal state to manifested AD. Other studies have proposed that leptin presents neuroprotective activities, which could be explained by inhibiting the amyloidogenic process, reducing the levels of tau protein phosphorylation and improving the cognitive function.

  5. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease.

  6. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy. PMID:24908841

  7. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy.

  8. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Living with Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... delay or prevent the disease. Free Guide for Alzheimer's Caregivers Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease ...

  9. Pharmacogenomics in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, Ramón

    2002-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disorder associated with multiple genetic defects either mutational or of susceptibility. Information available on AD genetics does not explain in full the etiopathogenesis of AD, suggesting that environmental factors and/or epigenetic phenomena may also contribute to AD pathology and phenotypic expression of dementia. The genomics of AD is still in its infancy, but is helping to understand novel aspects of the disease including genetic epidemiology, multifactorial risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms associated with genetic networks and genetically-regulated metabolic cascades. AD genomics is also helping to develop new strategies in pharmacogenomic research and prevention. Functional genomics, proteomics, pharmacogenomics, high-throughput methods, combinatorial chemistry and modern bioinformatics will greatly contribute to accelerate drug development for AD and other complex disorders. Main genes involved in AD include mutational loci (APP, PS1, PS2, TAU) and multiple susceptibility loci (APOE, A2M, AACT, LRP1, IL1A, TNF, ACE, BACE, BCHE, CST3, MTHFR, GSK3B, NOS) distributed across the human genome. Genomic associations integrate bigenic, trigenic, tetragenic or polygenic matrix models to investigate the genomic organization of AD in comparison to the control population. Similar genetic models are used in pharmacogenomics to elucidate genotype-specific responses of AD patients to a particular drug or combination of drugs. Using APOE-related monogenic models it has been demonstrated that the therapeutic response to drugs in AD is genotype-specific. A multifactorial therapy combining 3 different drugs yielded positive results during the 6-12 months in approximately 60% of the patients. With this therapeutic strategy, APOE-4/4 carriers were the worst responders, and patients with the APOE-3/4 genotype were the best responders. In bigenic and trigenic models it was possible to differentiate the influencial effect of PS1 and PS2

  10. [Alzheimer's disease, supporting carers].

    PubMed

    Lottin, Arlette; Botter, René

    2016-03-01

    The association France Alzheimer provides carers with resources. It runs training programmes and organises "Memory Cafes". These initiatives give carers the opportunity to talk about their daily struggles, close to home, and to obtain advice on how to better manage their situation.

  11. Coping & Caring: Living with Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Charles

    This guide on Alzheimer's disease is for those who care for Alzheimer's patients, as well as those who want to learn more about the disease. It answers these questions: (1) what is Alzheimer's? (2) how does the disease progress and how long does it last? (3) how do families cope? and (4) who can provide assistance and information? The guide also…

  12. Posture Recognition in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozaz, Maria; Garaigordobil, Maite; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Anderson, Jeffrey; Crucian, Gregory P.; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is neurologically induced deficit in the ability perform purposeful skilled movements. One of the most common forms is ideomotor apraxia (IMA) where spatial and temporal production errors are most prevalent. IMA can be associated Alzheimer's disease (AD), even early in its course, but is often not identified possibly because…

  13. [Alzheimer's disease, caregiving and frailty].

    PubMed

    de Peretti, Eva; Villars, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease often sees the elderly carer at risk of succumbing to frailty. The chronic stress which comes with this caregiving can lead to physical and emotional exhaustion, for which the physiological reserves of the ageing person may be insufficient. The concept of frailty may help to improve the understanding of this vulnerability.

  14. Assessing outcomes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L S

    2001-08-01

    To gain a better overview of the effectiveness of treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), areas such as cognition, activities of daily living (ADL), behavior, caregiver burden, quality of life and economics need to be assessed. A number of instruments are available for assessing these domains, many of which are reviewed in this article. These include the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (the standard instrument for the measurement of efficacy in dementia trials), scales that assess AD patients' abilities to perform ADL (including the Disability Assessment for Dementia scale and the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living), scales to assess behavioral symptoms in dementia (including the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale), scales for assessing global clinical change, and methods for assessing caregiver time, quality of life and health economics. Each instrument has its own advantages and disadvantages. However, the instruments used need to be selected carefully to provide credible and informative outcome data. PMID:11669509

  15. Genetic heterogeneity and Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Bird, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    In some early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) families, inheritance is autosomal dominant. (Early-onset AD is arbitarily defined as onset at {le} 60 years.) Two loci have been identified which are causative for early-onset familial AD (FAD). One is the amyloid precursor protein gene in which specific mutation have been identified. The second is a locus at 14q24.3 (AD3) which has been localized by linkage analysis; the gene and specific mutations have not been identified. Linkage studies place this locus between D14S61 and D14S63. These 2 loci, however, do not account for all early-onset FAD. The Volga German (VG) kindreds are descendants of families which emigrated from Germany to the Volga river region of Russia and subsequently to the US; AD in these families is hypothesized to be the result of a common genetic founder. The average age-at-onset in these families is 57 years. Linkage analysis for this group has been negative for the APP gene and for chromosome 14 markers. Thus, there is at least 1 other early-onset FAD locus. Recently, the {epsilon}4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) was identified as a risk-factor for late-onset AD. In a series of 53 late-onset kindreds, a strong genetic association was observed between the ApoE {epsilon}4 allele and AD. However, when linkage analysis was performed using a highly polymorphic locus at the ApoCII gene, which is within 30 kb of ApoE, significant evidence for co-segregation was not observed. This and other data suggests that while ApoE is an age-at-onset modifying locus, another gene(s), located elsewhere, contribute(s) to late-onset AD. Thus, there is probably at least 1 other late-onset locus. Once the VG locus is identified, it will be possible to determine whether an allelic variant of this locus is responsible for late-onset FAD.

  16. Alzheimer's disease and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Alvargonzález, David

    2012-12-01

    Employing the tenets of philosophical materialism, this paper discusses the ethical debate surrounding assisted suicide for persons suffering end-stage Alzheimer's. It first presents a classification of the dissociative situations between "human individual" and "human person". It then moves on to discuss challenges to diagnosed persons and their caregivers in relation to the cardinal virtues of Spinozistic ethics--strength of character (fortitudo), firmness (animositas) and generosity (generositas). Finally, a number of ideas attached to the debate--"right of choice", "death with dignity", "quality of life" and "compassion in dying"--are discussed in order to clarify their foundations. PMID:22939533

  17. Immunotherapeutic Approaches to Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsonego, Alon; Weiner, Howard L.

    2003-10-01

    Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are not classically considered mediated by inflammation or the immune system, in some instances the immune system may play an important role in the degenerative process. Furthermore, it has become clear that the immune system itself may have beneficial effects in nervous system diseases considered neurodegenerative. Immunotherapeutic approaches designed to induce a humoral immune response have recently been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These studies have led to human trials that resulted in both beneficial and adverse effects. In animal models, it has also been shown that immunotherapy designed to induce a cellular immune response may be of benefit in central nervous system injury, although T cells may have either a beneficial or detrimental effect depending on the type of T cell response induced. These areas provide a new avenue for exploring immune system-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and will be discussed here with a primary focus on Alzheimer's disease. We will also discuss how these approaches affect microglia activation, which plays a key role in therapy of such diseases.

  18. Clinical Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhangyu; Liu, Changyun; Che, Chunhui; Huang, Huapin

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common form of dementia in the elderly. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of AD, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset AD are largely understood with mutations in three different genes leading to the disease. In contrast, while susceptibility loci and alleles associated with late-onset AD have been identified using genetic association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset AD, the clinical features of EOAD according to genotypes, and the clinical implications of the genetics of AD. PMID:24955352

  19. Cognitive rehabilitation in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cotelli, Maria; Calabria, Marco; Zanetti, Orazio

    2006-04-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment in Alzheimer's Disease has gained great attention in recent years. The limited efficacy of drug therapy and the plasticity of human central nervous system are the two main reasons that explain this growing interest in rehabilitation. Different approaches have been developed. Here we discuss the efficacy of non-pharmacological therapy in the frame of two main approaches: Multistrategy Approaches (Reality Orientation, Reminiscence Therapy and Validation Therapy) and Cognitive Methods.

  20. Midlife predictors of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bendlin, B. B.; Carlsson, C. M.; Gleason, C. E.; Johnson, S. C.; Sodhi, A.; Gallagher, C.L.; Puglielli, L.; Engelman, C. D.; Ries, M. L.; Xu, G.; Wharton, W.; Asthana, S.

    2010-01-01

    Factors contributing to increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include age, sex, genes, and family history of AD. Several risk factors for AD are endogenous; however accumulating evidence implicates modifiable risk factors in the pathogenesis of AD. Although the continued task of identifying new genes will be critical to learning more about the disease, several research findings suggest that potentially alterable environmental factors influence genetic contributions, providing targets for disease prevention and treatment. Here, we review midlife risk factors for AD, and address the potential for therapeutic intervention in midlife. PMID:20044221

  1. Progress Report on Alzheimer Disease: Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This report summarizes advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease, the major cause of mental disability among older Americans. The demography of the disease is discussed, noting that approximately 2.5 million American adults are afflicted with the disease and that the large increase in the number of Alzheimer's disease patients is due to…

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevented, cured or even slowed. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers In 2015, 15.9 ... Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  3. Imaging the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, William; Small, Scott A

    2006-12-01

    Historical progress in medicine can be charted along the lines of technical innovations that have visualized the invisible. One hundred years ago, Alois Alzheimer exploited newly developed histological stains to visualize his eponymonous disease in dead tissue under the microscope. Now, as we are entering the second century of Alzheimer's disease research, technical innovation has endowed us with a range of in vivo imaging techniques that promise to visualize Alzheimer' disease in living people. The earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease is characterized by cell-sickness, not cell-death, and can occur before the deposition of amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. In principle, 'functional' imaging techniques might be able to detect this early stage of the disease, a stage that was invisible to Alzheimer himself. Here, we will first define the neurobiological meaning of 'function' and then review the different approaches that measure brain dysfunction in Alzheimer' disease.

  4. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  5. Therapeutic perspectives in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tschäpe, Jakob-A; Hartmann, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    It is now almost a century ago that Alois Alzheimer first presented his results in public. Main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are massive cerebral accumulation of amyloid, composed of fibrillary aggregates of the Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) and intracellular accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein associated with widespread neurodegeneration. The clinical picture is characterized by progressive and irreversible dementia, which is eventually fatal. To date, there is no cure for this severe disease affecting more than of 30 million individuals worldwide. In the last decades, the treatment of Alzheimer patients was mainly focusing on symptomatical strategies. Based on the augmented knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the pathology of AD, particularly the molecular causes and consequences of AD, different therapeutic approaches arose and recently, treatment with Statins, NSAIDs and Abeta vaccines reached the level of clinical trials, showing some indication of efficacy already. According to actual evaluations, these approaches have realistic chances to become established as therapeutic routine in AD within the next 10 years. We will review here some of the most promising novel approaches to cure and prevent rather than to treat the symptoms of AD.

  6. [Clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tariska, P; Urbanics, K; Knolmayer, J; Mészáros, A

    1995-04-23

    Data of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and checked out in the special unit named Memory Clinic functioning from 1992 in the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology are summarized. Age average of the 60 patients was 63 years, the first symptoms of the disease had appeared in 57 p.c. before the age of 65, so the classical presenile form of the ailment is represented too in the material. Predominance of multifocal cortical function disturbances in the symptomatology is characteristic, association of the depression is outstandingly frequent. The atypical features, or those characteristic in diseases of cerebrovascular origin are not infrequently seen (headache, dizziness, slight symptoms of pyramidal lesions). The absence of epileptic seizures It was interesting even in considering the data of the literature too. The main points of clinical diagnostics and differential diagnostics are demonstrated with the aid of case reports. The author's material is the first Hungarian publication in the topics of clinical symptoms of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease that had been investigated with up-to-date methods. Occurrence of the disease of very great frequency could be supposed to occur at general practitioners, the importance of differential diagnostics and planning of the complex longlasting therapy is extremely great.

  7. Pharmacotherapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Yif'at; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I; Adlard, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by an increasing impairment in normal memory and cognitive processes that significantly diminishes a person's daily functioning. Despite decades of research and advances in our understanding of disease aetiology and pathogenesis, there are still no effective disease-modifying drugs available for the treatment of AD. However, numerous compounds are currently undergoing pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. These candidate pharma-cotherapeutics are aimed at various aspects of the disease, such as the microtubule-associated τ-protein, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and metal ion dyshomeostasis – all of which are involved in the development and progression of AD. We will review the way these pharmacological strategies target the biochemical and clinical features of the disease and the investigational drugs for each category. PMID:19040415

  8. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    Loss of memory is among the first symptoms reported by patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by their caretakers. Working memory and long-term declarative memory are affected early during the course of the disease. The individual pattern of impaired memory functions correlates with parameters of structural or functional brain integrity. AD pathology interferes with the formation of memories from the molecular level to the framework of neural networks. The investigation of AD memory loss helps to identify the involved neural structures, such as the default mode network, the influence of epigenetic and genetic factors, such as ApoE4 status, and evolutionary aspects of human cognition. Clinically, the analysis of memory assists the definition of AD subtypes, disease grading, and prognostic predictions. Despite new AD criteria that allow the earlier diagnosis of the disease by inclusion of biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid or hippocampal volume analysis, neuropsychological testing remains at the core of AD diagnosis.

  9. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  10. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  11. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  12. Context Memory in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    El Haj, Mohamad; Kessels, Roy P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function. Summary Context recall, an element of episodic memory, refers to remembering the context in which an event has occurred, such as from whom or to whom information has been transmitted. Key Messages Our review raises crucial questions. For example, (1) which context element is more prone to being forgotten in the disease? (2) How do AD patients fail to bind context features together? (3) May distinctiveness heuristic or decisions based on metacognitive expectations improve context retrieval in these patients? (4) How does cueing at retrieval enhance reinstating of encoding context in AD? By addressing these questions, our work contributes to the understanding of the memory deficits in AD. PMID:24403906

  13. Inflammation, immunity, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Town, Terrence

    2010-04-01

    Few topics in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) research have brought about the level of excitement and interest as the role of inflammation and immunity in the pathobiology and treatment of the disease. In this special issue of the journal, experts in the field give their views on how inflammatory processes and the immune system intersect- at both etiological and treatment levels- with disease biology. Collectively, nearly three decades of work are covered in this special issue, beginning with the first epidemiologic studies that showed an inverse risk relationship between AD and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and ending with "immunotherapy" approaches and recent studies examining the roles of innate immune cells including microglia and peripheral mononuclear phagocytes in AD. Despite considerable work in this area, many important questions remain concerning the nature and timing of immune/inflammatory responses in the context of AD, and at what point and how to therapeutically intervene.

  14. [Study methods of drugs in Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Dubois, B; Stehlé, B; Lehner, J P; Derouesné, C; Bourin, M; Lamour, Y; Blin, O; Jourdain, G; Alperovitch, A

    1996-01-01

    The availability of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease, with different pharmacological profiles, leads to a redefinition the relevant methodology for developing drugs in this indication, including the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the duration of the studies, and therefore, the relevant guidelines. This was the purpose of the Giens Round-table devoted to the new methodology for drug development in Alzheimer disease.

  15. A protective mutation against Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    To date, nearly 35.6 million people world wide live with dementia, and the situation is going to get worse by 2050 with 115.4 million cases.(1) In the western world, the prevalence for dementia in people over the age of 60 is greater than 5% and two thirds are due to Alzheimer disease,(2) (-) (5) the most common form of dementias.   Alzheimer disease (AD), first described as "presenile dementia" by the German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906,(6) is a devastating disease characterized by progressive cognitive deterioration, as well as impairments in behavior, language, and visuospatial skills.(7) Furthermore, Alzheimer discovered the presence of intraneuronal tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques in the diseased-damaged brain, the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  17. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. Because it is a complex disease, scientists believe ...

  18. [Vaccination therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi

    2009-11-01

    Since AN-1792 vaccine induced autoimmune encephalitis, several pharmaceutical companies are now concentrated in developing antibody therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Each antibody has own characteristics. Thus, it is unpredictable at present which antibody is the most beneficial until we see the result of clinical trials. If disease modifying antibodies were found, they will be widely used for treatment of AD in near future. As a candidate of such antibodies, we have developed TAPIR-like antibody with much higher affinity to Abeta42 than Abeta40, and it effectively deleted senile plaque amyloid and Abeta oligomers without increasing microhemorrhages. Although passive immunization can avoid autoimmune encephalitis, it is expensive and it is not suitable for prevention. Thus, safe vaccines by active immunization would be better. Vaccines that induce Th2 type immune responses such as oral vaccine or per-nasal vaccine would be promising. PMID:20030228

  19. MRI morphometry in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    MRI based evaluation of brain atrophy is regarded as a valid method to stage the disease and to assess progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Volumetric software programs have made it possible to quantify gray matter in the human brain in an automated fashion. At present, voxel based morphometry (VBM) is easily applicable to the routine clinical procedure with a short execution time. The importance of the VBM approach is that it is not biased to one particular structure and is able to assess anatomical differences throughout the brain. Stand-alone VBM software running on Windows, Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for AD (VSRAD), has been widely used in the clinical diagnosis of AD in Japan. On the other hand, recent application of graph theory to MRI has made it possible to analyze changes in structural connectivity in AD.

  20. Nicotinic receptors and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Ripoll, Nadège; Dailly, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors (NRs) belong to the group of polymeric receptors of the cell membrane and are key elements of cholinergic transmission. Numerous subtypes of NRs exist with the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 types being encountered most frequently. Deficiencies in NRs seem to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, which is characterised by accumulation of senile plaques, mainly composed of beta-amyloid peptide (beta A). Although the aetiology of this disease is unknown, different pathogenesis hypotheses implicating alpha 7 NRs have been proposed, with the receptors exerting a direct or indirect action on the mechanism of beta A toxicity. Allosteric modulators of NRs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor galantamine, that facilitate the action of acetylcholine on these receptors may provide therapeutic benefits in the areas of cognition, attention and antineurodegenerative activity.

  1. Alzheimer's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) German (Deutsch) Hindi (हिन्दी) Italian (italiano) ... English 探索大腦之旅: 點圖解密 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Alzheimer's Association French (français) Alzheimer's Disease Maladie d'Alzheimer - français (French) ...

  2. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents The ... Suncoast Gerontology Center, University of South Florida. How Alzheimer's Changes the Brain The only definite way to ...

  3. Mitochondrial Drugs for Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonda, David J; Wang, Xinglong; Gustaw-Rothenberg, Katarzyna A; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-12-23

    Therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer disease (AD) have yet to offer a disease-modifying effect to stop the debilitating progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Rather, treatments thus far are limited to agents that slow disease progression without halting it, and although much work towards a cure is underway, a greater understanding of disease etiology is certainly necessary for any such achievement. Mitochondria, as the centers of cellular metabolic activity and the primary generators of reactive oxidative species in the cell, received particular attention especially given that mitochondrial defects are known to contribute to cellular damage. Furthermore, as oxidative stress has come to the forefront of AD as a causal theory, and as mitochondrial damage is known to precede much of the hallmark pathologies of AD, it seems increasingly apparent that this metabolic organelle is ultimately responsible for much, if not all of disease pathogenesis. In this review, we review the role of neuronal mitochondria in the pathogenesis of AD and critically assess treatment strategies that utilize this upstream access point as a method for disease prevention. We suspect that, with a revived focus on mitochondrial repair and protection, an effective and realistic therapeutic agent can be successfully developed. PMID:20657666

  4. Mitochondrial Drugs for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonda, David J.; Wang, Xinglong; Gustaw-Rothenberg, Katarzyna A.; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer disease (AD) have yet to offer a disease-modifying effect to stop the debilitating progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Rather, treatments thus far are limited to agents that slow disease progression without halting it, and although much work towards a cure is underway, a greater understanding of disease etiology is certainly necessary for any such achievement. Mitochondria, as the centers of cellular metabolic activity and the primary generators of reactive oxidative species in the cell, received particular attention especially given that mitochondrial defects are known to contribute to cellular damage. Furthermore, as oxidative stress has come to the forefront of AD as a causal theory, and as mitochondrial damage is known to precede much of the hallmark pathologies of AD, it seems increasingly apparent that this metabolic organelle is ultimately responsible for much, if not all of disease pathogenesis. In this review, we review the role of neuronal mitochondria in the pathogenesis of AD and critically assess treatment strategies that utilize this upstream access point as a method for disease prevention. We suspect that, with a revived focus on mitochondrial repair and protection, an effective and realistic therapeutic agent can be successfully developed. PMID:20657666

  5. Exploring Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeti; Singh, Anshika Nikita

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia occurring in elderly population worldwide. Currently Aβ42, tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid is estimated for confirmation of AD. CSF which is being used as the potent source for biomarker screening is obtained by invasive lumbar punctures. Thus, there is an urgent need of minimal invasive methods for identification of diagnostic markers for early detection of AD. Blood serum and plasma serves as an appropriate source, due to minimal discomfort to the patients, promoting frequent testing, better follow-up and better consent to clinical trials. Hence, the need of the hour demands discovery of diagnostic and prognostic patient specific signature biomarkers by using emerging technologies of mass spectrometry, microarrays and peptidomics. In this review we summarize the present scenario of AD biomarkers such as circulatory biomarkers, blood based amyloid markers, inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers being investigated and also some of the potent biomarkers which might be able to predict early onset of Alzheimer's and delay cognitive impairment. PMID:27630867

  6. Alzheimer's disease: insights from epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McDowell, I

    2001-06-01

    While a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains elusive, many conclusions can be drawn from the numerous epidemiological studies undertaken to date. Prevalence and incidence estimates show consistency, following a roughly exponential pattern with a doubling of both parameters roughly every five years after age 65. Roughly 7% of the population aged 65 and over has AD. The clinical course of the disease is reasonably well established and mortality rates rise with increasing levels of cognitive deficit. Four risk factors for AD are firmly established: increasing age, the presence of the apolipoproteinE-epsilon4 allele, familial aggregation of cases, and Down's syndrome. Numerous other associations have been shown in some studies, but not in others. For example, women generally appear at higher risk than men, as do people with lower levels of education; depression is probably prodromal; head injury is an established risk factor, and may interact with the apoE gene; several occupational exposures appear hazardous, and exposure to aluminum in the water supply confers excess risk. Hypertension and other vascular symptoms appear to predispose to AD, which is now seen as nosologically closer to vascular dementia than was previously believed. Several apparently protective factors have been identified, although preventive trials based on these have so far shown minimal effectiveness. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to treat arthritis is associated with a reduced risk of AD, as is estrogen use by post-menopausal women. Physical activity appears beneficial, as does a diet with high levels of vitamins B6, B12 and folate. while red wine in moderate quantities appears protective. This review concludes with a discussion of the strengths and limitations of current epidemiological methods for studying Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Alzheimer's disease & metals: therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kenche, Vijaya B; Barnham, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age related neurodegenerative disease. Currently, there are no disease modifying drugs, existing therapies only offer short-term symptomatic relief. Two of the pathognomonic indicators of AD are the presence of extracellular protein aggregates consisting primarily of the Aβ peptide and oxidative stress. Both of these phenomena can potentially be explained by the interactions of Aβ with metal ions. In addition, metal ions play a pivotal role in synaptic function and their homeostasis is tightly regulated. A breakdown in this metal homeostasis and the generation of toxic Aβ oligomers are likely to be responsible for the synaptic dysfunction associated with AD. Therefore, approaches that are designed to prevent Aβ metal interactions, inhibiting the formation of toxic Aβ species as well as restoring metal homeostasis may have potential as disease modifying strategies for treating AD. This review summarizes the physiological and pathological interactions that metal ions play in synaptic function with particular emphasis placed on interactions with Aβ. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. The most advanced of these strategies is the so-called ‘metal protein attenuating compound’ approach, with the lead molecule PBT2 having successfully completed early phase clinical trials. The success of these various strategies suggests that manipulating metal ion interactions offers multiple opportunities to develop disease modifying therapies for AD. PMID:21232050

  8. Role of Methylglyoxal in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder. The major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are extracellular aggregation of amyloid β peptides and, the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles formed by precipitation/aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is multifactorial and a full understanding of its pathogenesis remains elusive. Some years ago, it has been suggested that glycation may contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Glycation is an endogenous process that leads to the production of a class of compounds known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Interestingly, increased levels of AGEs have been observed in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methylglyoxal, a reactive intermediate of cellular metabolism, is the most potent precursor of AGEs and is strictly correlated with an increase of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Many studies are showing that methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24734229

  9. Alzheimer's disease in one monozygotic twin

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Richard; Dayan, A. D.; Wilson, John

    1972-01-01

    A woman of 64 died after an illness lasting 15 years and characterized by a progressive amnesic syndrome followed by global dementia. The brain showed changes typical of Alzheimer's disease. Her monozygotic twin sister was clinically not affected and died two years later of carcinoma. This is the second report of monozygotic twin sisters apparently discordant for presenile dementia of Alzheimer type. PMID:5084139

  10. Biomarker Modeling of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R; Holtzman, David M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressing disorder in which pathophysiological abnormalities, detectable in vivo by biomarkers, precede overt clinical symptoms by many years to decades. Five AD biomarkers are sufficiently validated to have been incorporated into clinical diagnostic criteria and commonly used in therapeutic trials. Current AD biomarkers fall into 2 categories: biomarkers of amyloid-β plaques and of tau-related neurodegeneration. Three of the 5 are imaging measures and two are cerebrospinal fluid analytes. AD biomarkers do not evolve in an identical manner but rather in a sequential but temporally overlapping manner. Models of the temporal evolution of AD biomarkers can take the form of plots of biomarker severity (degree of abnormality) vs. time. In this review we discuss several time-dependent models of AD which take into consideration varying age of onset (early vs. late) and the influence of aging and co-occurring brain pathologies that commonly arise in the elderly. PMID:24360540

  11. The Genetics of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2012-01-01

    Family history is the second strongest risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) following advanced age. Twin and family studies indicate that genetic factors are estimated to play a role in at least 80% of AD cases. The inheritance of AD exhibits a dichotomous pattern. On one hand, rare mutations in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 virtually guarantee early-onset (<60 years) familial AD, which represents ∼5% of AD. On the other hand, common gene polymorphisms, such as the ε4 and ε2 variants of the APOE gene, can influence susceptibility for ∼50% of the common late-onset AD. These four genes account for 30%–50% of the inheritability of AD. Genome-wide association studies have recently led to the identification of 11 additional AD candidate genes. This paper reviews the past, present, and future attempts to elucidate the complex and heterogeneous genetic underpinnings of AD. PMID:23028126

  12. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  13. [Alzheimer's disease: the infectious hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Roubaud Baudron, Claire; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Salles, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Several hypotheses are proposed for understanding the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological mechanisms, mainly the amyloid theory, but the process inducing Aß peptide deposit, tau protein degeneration, and ultimately neuronal loss, is still to be elucidated. Alteration of the blood-brain barrier and activation of neuroinflammation seem to play an important role in AD neurodegeneration, especially in the decrease of Aß peptide clearance, therefore suggesting a role of infectious agents. Epidemiological and experimental studies on cellular or murine models related to herpes simplex virus (HSV), spirochetes, Chlamydia pneumoniae or Borrelia, and systemic inflammation are reviewed. Aß peptide or tau protein could also behave like a prion protein. Infectious agents could thus have an impact on AD by direct interaction with neurotropism or systemic inflammation. Although the results of these studies are not conclusive, they may contribute to the understanding of AD pathology. PMID:26707559

  14. Quantitative evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, S.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a single, quantitative metric called the disease evaluation factor (DEF) and assess its efficiency at estimating disease burden in normal, control subjects (CTRL) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The study group consisted in 75 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and 75 age-matched normal CTRL without neurological or neuropsychological deficit. We calculated a reference eigenspace of MRI appearance from reference data, in which our CTRL and probable AD subjects were projected. We then calculated the multi-dimensional hyperplane separating the CTRL and probable AD groups. The DEF was estimated via a multidimensional weighted distance of eigencoordinates for a given subject and the CTRL group mean, along salient principal components forming the separating hyperplane. We used quantile plots, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 tests to compare the DEF values and test that their distribution was normal. We used a linear discriminant test to separate CTRL from probable AD based on the DEF factor, and reached an accuracy of 87%. A quantitative biomarker in AD would act as an important surrogate marker of disease status and progression.

  15. Structural networks in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Andrew T; Evans, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) appears to be a uniquely human condition, which is possibly attributable to our expanded longevity and peculiar capacity for episodic memory. Due to a lack of naturally-occurring animal model for investigating AD pathogenesis, our knowledge about the disease must be derived from correlational observation of humans, or from animal models produced by genetic manipulation of known risk factors in humans. Advances in neuroimaging, cellular and molecular science, and computational methods have proven useful for the improvement of such techniques, but the general limitation persists; as a result we remain without clear answers to some of the fundamental questions posed by AD. On the other hand, much progress has been made in characterizing the longitudinal progression of AD pathology, which includes the formation of "plaques and tangles", a distinct topological pattern of atrophy of grey and white matter, and the concurrent decline of specific cognitive functions, beginning with mild memory impairments and ending with general debilitating dementia. In this review, we first discuss the existing literature which characterizes AD etiology, pathology, and pathogenesis, with the intention of framing the disease as primarily a "disconnection syndrome". We next describe methodologies for investigating the topological properties of human brain networks, using graph theoretical techniques and connectivity information derived from anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Finally, we discuss how these methodologies have been applied to systems-level analyses of AD, to help characterize the network changes underlying the disease process, and how these patterns relate to specific cognitive outcome measures. PMID:23294972

  16. 77 FR 11116 - Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease AGENCY: Office of the Assistant.... SUMMARY: HHS is soliciting public input on the draft National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease, which... Alzheimer's disease. Coordinate Alzheimer's disease research and services across all federal...

  17. Interrelations of Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease. ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweber, Miriam

    This fact sheet summarizes the interrelations of Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease in a question and answer format. The following questions are addressed: What is Alzheimer disease? Why is a relationship suggested between Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease? Is there a genetic link between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome? Why is a…

  18. Alzheimer and his disease: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Dolciotti, Cristina; Picchi, Lucia; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2011-04-01

    More than 100 years ago, Alois Alzheimer first described the clinical and pathological features of an unusual brain disease during the meeting of the Society of Southwest German Psychiatrists in Tübingen: the patient, Auguste Deter, suffered memory loss, disorientation, hallucinations and delusions and died at the age of 55. In 1910, Emil Kraepelin named the condition with the eponym of "Alzheimer's disease" (AD) that is, now, the most common neurodegenerative disease with more than 25 million cases worldwide and a major medical problem nearing catastrophic levels. The present article discusses Alzheimer's work in the context of his life and time.

  19. Alois Alzheimer and Alzheimer's disease: a centennial perspective.

    PubMed

    Small, David H; Cappai, Roberto

    2006-11-01

    The year 2006 is the centenary of the famous presentation of Alois Alzheimer which first described the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since this presentation, enormous progress has been made in understanding the biology of AD. The central role of the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) in the pathogenesis of AD and the relationship between plaque and tangle pathology is now much better understood. In this article, we review the current status of the amyloid hypothesis of AD and its role in the development of future therapy.

  20. The economic costs of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hay, J W; Ernst, R L

    1987-09-01

    This paper estimates the economic costs of Alzheimer's Disease to individuals and to society, based on review of published Alzheimer's Disease-related research. The analysis is derived from epidemiological projections and cost information for the United States population in 1983. Estimated costs include both direct medical care and social support costs, as well as indirect costs, such as support services provided by family or volunteers, and the value of lost economic productivity in Alzheimer's Disease patients. Mid-range estimates of net annual expected costs for an Alzheimer's Disease patient, excluding the value of lost productivity, are $18,517 in the first year and $17,643 in subsequent years, with direct medical and social services comprising about half of these costs. Under base case assumptions, the total cost of disease per patient in 1983, was $48,544 to $493,277, depending upon patient's age at disease onset. The estimated present value of total net costs to society for all persons first diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 1983 was $27.9-31.2 billion. Development of a public or private insurance market for the economic burdens of Alzheimer's Disease would fill some of the gaps in the current US system of financing long-term chronic disease care.

  1. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  2. Can Infections Cause Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mawanda, Francis; Wallace, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent cause of dementia among older adults, yet more than a century of research has not determined why this disease develops. One prevailing hypothesis is that late-onset AD is caused by infectious pathogens, an idea widely studied in both humans and experimental animal models. This review examines the infectious AD etiology hypothesis and summarizes existing evidence associating infectious agents with AD in humans. The various mechanisms through which different clinical and subclinical infections could cause or promote the progression of AD are considered, as is the concordance between putative infectious agents and the epidemiology of AD. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, and EBSCO databases for research articles pertaining to infections and AD and systematically reviewed the evidence linking specific infectious pathogens to AD. The evidence compiled from the literature linking AD to an infectious cause is inconclusive, but the amount of evidence suggestive of an association is too substantial to ignore. Epidemiologic, clinical, and basic science studies that could improve on current understanding of the associations between AD and infections and possibly uncover ways to control this highly prevalent and debilitating disease are suggested. PMID:23349428

  3. Perspectives on the etiology of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mozar, H.N.; Bal, D.G.; Howard, J.T.

    1987-03-20

    There is a lack of consensus among investigators concerning the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Clues are lacking, however, and the authors have assessed them in a broad biologic context. This inquiry has led us to regard Alzheimer's disease as a multifactorial disorder in which a putative infective agent is an essential element. Despite seeming competition among current hypotheses, there is overall unity. The concept that Down's syndrome is a congenital form of Alzheimer's disease and that both conditions are the result of a ubiquitous infective pathogen that affects genetically susceptible individuals offers the broadest unification. In both conditions slow infections develops against the background of aging. Indirect evidence involving immunologic and other biologic phenomena supports the postulated infectious origin. Overlapping pathologic and clinical features of Alzheimer's disease and the known transmissible encephalopathies suggest a similar pathogenesis.

  4. Dementia (Including Alzheimer Disease) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems are caused by early Alzheimer disease. Normal age-related changes usually cause minor difficulties in short term memory and a slowed ability to learn and process information. These changes are usually mild and do not ...

  5. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  6. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  7. Epigenetic Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Gräff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in Western societies. It progresses asymptomatically during decades before being belatedly diagnosed when therapeutic strategies have become unviable. Although several genetic alterations have been associated with AD, the vast majority of AD cases do not show strong genetic underpinnings and are thus considered a consequence of non-genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for the integration of long-lasting non-genetic inputs on specific genetic backgrounds, and recently, a growing number of epigenetic alterations in AD have been described. For instance, an accumulation of dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms in aging, the predominant risk factor of AD, might facilitate the onset of the disease. Likewise, mutations in several enzymes of the epigenetic machinery have been associated with neurodegenerative processes that are altered in AD such as impaired learning and memory formation. Genome-wide and locus-specific epigenetic alterations have also been reported, and several epigenetically dysregulated genes validated by independent groups. From these studies, a picture emerges of AD as being associated with DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting a general repressed chromatin state and epigenetically reduced plasticity in AD. Here we review these recent findings and discuss several technical and methodological considerations that are imperative for their correct interpretation. We also pay particular focus on potential implementations and theoretical frameworks that we expect will help to better direct future studies aimed to unravel the epigenetic participation in AD. PMID:26734709

  8. Alzheimer's Disease and the Eye☆

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), is a major disorder causing visual problems in the elderly population. The pathology of AD includes the deposition in the brain of abnormal aggregates of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the form of senile plaques (SP) and abnormally phosphorylated tau in the form of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). A variety of visual problems have been reported in patients with AD including loss of visual acuity (VA), colour vision and visual fields; changes in pupillary response to mydriatics, defects in fixation and in smooth and saccadic eye movements; changes in contrast sensitivity and in visual evoked potentials (VEP); and disturbances of complex visual functions such as reading, visuospatial function, and in the naming and identification of objects. Many of these changes are controversial with conflicting data in the literature and no ocular or visual feature can be regarded as particularly diagnostic of AD. In addition, some pathological changes have been observed to affect the eye, visual pathway, and visual cortex in AD. The optometrist has a role in helping a patient with AD, if it is believed that signs and symptoms of the disease are present, so as to optimize visual function and improve the quality of life.

  9. Regenerative medicine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Felsenstein, Kevin M; Candelario, Kate M; Steindler, Dennis A; Borchelt, David R

    2014-04-01

    Identifying novel, effective therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major unmet medical needs for the coming decade. Because the current paradigm for developing and testing disease-modifying AD therapies is protracted and likely to be even longer, with the shift toward earlier intervention in preclinical AD, it is an open issue whether we can develop, test, and widely deploy a novel therapy in time to help the current at-risk generation if we continue to follow the standard paradigms of discovery and drug development. There is an imperative need to find safe and effective preventive measures that can be distributed rapidly to stem the coming wave of AD that will potentially engulf the next generation. We can define regenerative medicine broadly as approaches that use stem cell-based therapies or approaches that seek to modulate inherent neurogenesis. Neurogenesis, although most active during prenatal development, has been shown to continue in several small parts of the brain, including the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, suggesting its potential to reverse cognitive deficits. If AD pathology affects neurogenesis, then it follows that conditions that stimulate endogenous neurogenesis (eg, environmental stimuli, physical activity, trophic factors, cytokines, and drugs) may help to promote the regenerative and recovery process. Herein, we review the complex logistics of potentially implementing neurogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:24286919

  10. Regenerative Medicine in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Candelario, Kate M.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying novel, effective therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major unmet medical needs for the coming decade. Because the current paradigm for developing and testing disease modifying AD therapies is protracted and likely to be even longer with the shift towards earlier intervention in pre-clinical AD, it is an open question whether we can develop, test, and widely deploy a novel therapy in time to help the current at-risk generation if we continue to follow the standard paradigms of discovery and drug development. There is an imperative need to find safe and effective preventative measures that can be rapidly deployed to stem the coming wave of AD that will potentially engulf the next generation. We can broadly define regenerative medicine as approaches that use stem-cell-based therapies or approaches that seek to modulate inherent neurogenesis. Neurogenesis, though most active during pre-natal development has been shown to continue in several small parts of the brain, which includes the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, suggesting its potential to reverse cognitive deficits. If AD pathology impacts neurogenesis then it follows that conditions that stimulate endogenous neurogenesis (e.g., environmental stimuli, physical activity, trophic factors, cytokines, and drugs) may help to promote the regenerative and recovery process. Herein, we review the complex logistics of potentially implementing neurogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:24286919

  11. Cognitive intervention in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Buschert, Verena; Bokde, Arun L W; Hampel, Harald

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent chronic medical conditions affecting the elderly population. The effectiveness of approved antidementia drugs, however, is limited-licensed AD medications provide only moderate relief of clinical symptoms. Cognitive intervention is a noninvasive therapy that could aid prevention and treatment of AD. Data suggest that specifically designed cognitive interventions could impart therapeutic benefits to patients with AD that are associated with substantial biological changes within the brain. Moreover, evidence indicates that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions could provide greater relief of clinical symptoms than either intervention given alone. Functional and structural MRI studies have increased our understanding of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of aging and neurodegeneration, but the use of neuroimaging to investigate the effect of cognitive intervention on the brain remains largely unexplored. This Review provides an overview of the use of cognitive intervention in the healthy elderly population and patients with AD, and summarizes emerging findings that provide evidence for the effectiveness of this approach. Finally, we present recommendations for future research on the use of cognitive interventions in AD and discuss potential effects of this therapy on disease modification.

  12. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  13. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. It also examines in detail the financial impact of Alzheimer's on families, including annual costs to families and the difficult decisions families must often make to pay those costs. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops Alzheimer's disease every 66 seconds. By 2050, one new case of Alzheimer's is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥ 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from stroke, heart disease, and prostate cancer decreased 23%, 14%, and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from Alzheimer's disease increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which Alzheimer's disease contributes is likely much larger than the number of deaths from Alzheimer's disease recorded on death certificates. In 2016, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥ 65 years will die with Alzheimer's disease, and many of them will die because of the complications caused by Alzheimer's disease. In 2015, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of care to people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $221 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥ 65 years with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all

  14. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. It also examines in detail the financial impact of Alzheimer's on families, including annual costs to families and the difficult decisions families must often make to pay those costs. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops Alzheimer's disease every 66 seconds. By 2050, one new case of Alzheimer's is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥ 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from stroke, heart disease, and prostate cancer decreased 23%, 14%, and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from Alzheimer's disease increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which Alzheimer's disease contributes is likely much larger than the number of deaths from Alzheimer's disease recorded on death certificates. In 2016, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥ 65 years will die with Alzheimer's disease, and many of them will die because of the complications caused by Alzheimer's disease. In 2015, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of care to people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $221 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥ 65 years with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all

  15. Multi-Family Psychoeducational Support Group Therapy for Families with a Member Afflicted with Irreversible Brain Syndrome (Alzheimer's Disease): Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paley, Evelyn S.; And Others

    Alzheimers Disease (AD), an incurable disability which afflicts older adults, can have devastating emotional consequences for the victim and the family. In an attempt to determine the effectiveness of multifamily psychoeducational support, group therapy (MFPSGT), 22 persons (13 families) from the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders…

  16. Deconstructing mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    García-Escudero, Vega; Martín-Maestro, Patricia; Perry, George; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence showing that mitochondrial damage plays an important role in Alzheimer disease. Increased oxygen species generation and deficient mitochondrial dynamic balance have been suggested to be the reason as well as the consequence of Alzheimer-related pathology. Mitochondrial damage has been related to amyloid-beta or tau pathology or to the presence of specific presenilin-1 mutations. The contribution of these factors to mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed in this paper. Due to the relevance of mitochondrial alterations in Alzheimer disease, recent works have suggested the therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant. On the other hand, autophagy has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in Alzheimer-related protein stress, and increasing data shows that this pathway is altered in the disease. Moreover, mitochondrial alterations have been related to an insufficient clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Consequently, different approaches for the removal of damaged mitochondria or to decrease the related oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease have been described. To understand the role of mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease it is necessary to generate human cellular models which involve living neurons. We have summarized the novel protocols for the generation of neurons by reprogramming or direct transdifferentiation, which offer useful tools to achieve this result.

  17. Anatomical heterogeneity of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Young; Jeon, Seun; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Geon Ha; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yoon, Cindy W.; Kim, Hee Jin; Chin, Juhee; Park, Kee Hyung; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Because the signs associated with dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) can be heterogeneous, the goal of this study was to use 3-dimensional MRI to examine the various patterns of cortical atrophy that can be associated with dementia of AD type, and to investigate whether AD dementia can be categorized into anatomical subtypes. Methods: High-resolution T1-weighted volumetric MRIs were taken of 152 patients in their earlier stages of AD dementia. The images were processed to measure cortical thickness, and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was performed using Ward's clustering linkage. The identified clusters of patients were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group using a general linear model. Results: There were several distinct patterns of cortical atrophy and the number of patterns varied according to the level of cluster analyses. At the 3-cluster level, patients were divided into (1) bilateral medial temporal–dominant atrophy subtype (n = 52, ∼34.2%), (2) parietal-dominant subtype (n = 28, ∼18.4%) in which the bilateral parietal lobes, the precuneus, along with bilateral dorsolateral frontal lobes, were atrophic, and (3) diffuse atrophy subtype (n = 72, ∼47.4%) in which nearly all association cortices revealed atrophy. These 3 subtypes also differed in their demographic and clinical features. Conclusions: This cluster analysis of cortical thickness of the entire brain showed that AD dementia in the earlier stages can be categorized into various anatomical subtypes, with distinct clinical features. PMID:25344382

  18. Adaptive Walking in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients. PMID:22991684

  19. Adaptive walking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients.

  20. REVIEW: Curcumin and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    Curcumin has a long history of use as a traditional remedy and food in Asia. Many studies have reported that curcumin has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antitumor. Because of the reported effects of curcumin on tumors, many clinical trials have been performed to elucidate curcumin's effects on cancers. Recent reports have suggested therapeutic potential of curcumin in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In in vitro studies, curcumin has been reported to inhibit amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) aggregation, and Aβ-induced inflammation, as well as the activities of β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase. In in vivo studies, oral administration of curcumin has resulted in the inhibition of Aβ deposition, Aβ oligomerization, and tau phosphorylation in the brains of AD animal models, and improvements in behavioral impairment in animal models. These findings suggest that curcumin might be one of the most promising compounds for the development of AD therapies. At present, four clinical trials concerning the effects of curcumin on AD has been conducted. Two of them that were performed in China and USA have been reported no significant differences in changes in cognitive function between placebo and curcumin groups, and no results have been reported from two other clinical studies. Additional trials are necessary to determine the clinical usefulness of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:20406252

  1. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  2. Inflammatory process in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco A.; Toral-Rios, Danira; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Histopathologically is characterized by the presence of two major hallmarks, the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and extracellular neuritic plaques (NPs) surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia. NFTs consist of paired helical filaments of truncated tau protein that is abnormally hyperphosphorylated. The main component in the NP is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a small fragment of 40–42 amino acids with a molecular weight of 4 kD. It has been proposed that the amyloid aggregates and microglia activation are able to favor the neurodegenerative process observed in AD patients. However, the role of inflammation in AD is controversial, because in early stages the inflammation could have a beneficial role in the pathology, since it has been thought that the microglia and astrocytes activated could be involved in Aβ clearance. Nevertheless the chronic activation of the microglia has been related with an increase of Aβ and possibly with tau phosphorylation. Studies in AD brains have shown an upregulation of complement molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase reactants and other inflammatory mediators that could contribute with the neurodegenerative process. Clinical trials and animal models with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indicate that these drugs may decrease the risk of developing AD and apparently reduce Aβ deposition. Finally, further studies are needed to determine whether treatment with anti-inflammatory strategies, may decrease the neurodegenerative process that affects these patients. PMID:23964211

  3. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  4. REVIEW: Curcumin and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    Curcumin has a long history of use as a traditional remedy and food in Asia. Many studies have reported that curcumin has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antitumor. Because of the reported effects of curcumin on tumors, many clinical trials have been performed to elucidate curcumin's effects on cancers. Recent reports have suggested therapeutic potential of curcumin in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In in vitro studies, curcumin has been reported to inhibit amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) aggregation, and Aβ-induced inflammation, as well as the activities of β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase. In in vivo studies, oral administration of curcumin has resulted in the inhibition of Aβ deposition, Aβ oligomerization, and tau phosphorylation in the brains of AD animal models, and improvements in behavioral impairment in animal models. These findings suggest that curcumin might be one of the most promising compounds for the development of AD therapies. At present, four clinical trials concerning the effects of curcumin on AD has been conducted. Two of them that were performed in China and USA have been reported no significant differences in changes in cognitive function between placebo and curcumin groups, and no results have been reported from two other clinical studies. Additional trials are necessary to determine the clinical usefulness of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  5. The burden of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alistair

    2000-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) imposes a severe burden upon patients and their carers. In particular, family carers of AD patients face extreme hardship and distress that represents a major but often hidden burden on healthcare systems. Carers often experience clinically significant alterations in physical and mental health, particularly depression. A number of individual features of the dementia syndrome that are known to be particularly burdensome to carers include the degree of cognitive impairment, amount of help required with activities of daily living, personality changes and the presence of psychiatric symptoms and behavioural disturbances. The neuropsychiatric features of AD patients can adversely impact the relationship between the patient and caregiver generating feelings of strain, burden and social isolation. Individual characteristics of the caregiver including personality, gender, degree of formal and informal support and physical and mental health, as well as attributional style ('coping style') and expressed emotion (critical or hostile attitudes), also dictate carer burden. As informal caregivers play such a crucial role in the care of AD patients, appropriate management strategies that incorporate interventions which address the specific burdens of the individual caregiver are essential. Reducing the burden of care can be achieved by the combination of a number of individual and general measures, including education, respite and emotion-focused interventions. These measures, accompanied by non-pharmacological strategies, are extremely important in the total care of the AD patient, with the emphasis on maintaining people in the community as long as possible.

  6. Alzheimer's Disease. Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report of the Health and Human Services Department Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease addresses nine main areas in a problem-oriented approach aimed at better defining research needs and options as well as training, service, and policy issues relevant to Alzheimer's disease. Individual chapters deal with research in the areas of epidemiology,…

  7. Stem cell treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and neurodegenerative disorder that induces dementia in older people. It was first reported in 1907 by Alois Alzheimer, who characterized the disease as causing memory loss and cognitive impairment. Pathologic characteristics of AD are β-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration. Current therapies only target the relief of symptoms using various drugs, and do not cure the disease. Recently, stem cell therapy has been shown to be a potential approach to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, and in this review, we focus on stem cell therapies for AD.

  8. Cerebrovascular disease in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Miners, J Scott

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have more in common than their association with ageing. They share risk factors and overlap neuropathologically. Most patients with AD have Aβ amyloid angiopathy and degenerative changes affecting capillaries, and many have ischaemic parenchymal abnormalities. Structural vascular disease contributes to the ischaemic abnormalities in some patients with AD. However, the stereotyped progression of hypoperfusion in this disease, affecting first the precuneus and cingulate gyrus, then the frontal and temporal cortex and lastly the occipital cortex, suggests that other factors are more important, particularly in early disease. Whilst demand for oxygen and glucose falls in late disease, functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopy to measure the saturation of haemoglobin by oxygen, and biochemical analysis of myelin proteins with differential susceptibility to reduced oxygenation have all shown that the reduction in blood flow in AD is primarily a problem of inadequate blood supply, not reduced metabolic demand. Increasing evidence points to non-structural vascular dysfunction rather than structural abnormalities of vessel walls as the main cause of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD. Several mediators are probably responsible. One that is emerging as a major contributor is the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (EDN1). Whilst there is clearly an additive component to the clinical and pathological effects of hypoperfusion and AD, experimental and clinical observations suggest that the disease processes also interact mechanistically at a cellular level in a manner that exacerbates both. The elucidation of some of the mechanisms responsible for hypoperfusion in AD and for the interactions between CVD and AD has led to the identification of several novel therapeutic approaches that have the potential to ameliorate ischaemic damage and slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26711459

  9. Aluminium and Alzheimer's disease: An epidemiological approach.

    PubMed

    Martyn, C N

    1990-03-01

    Epidemiological methods have an important role in the investigation of the postulated connection between exposure to aluminium and the development of Alzheimer's disease. We have examined the usefulness of existing data on prevalence and mortality as a resource for studying variations in the rate of the disease with time and geography. Unfortunately, methodological differences between prevalence surveys and errors and biases in mortality data are large. No reliable conclusions can be drawn from these data about geographical differences in rates of dementia in England and Wales nor about time trends in the disease.Aluminium salts are widely used in the UK for the treatment of drinking water. Residual aluminium concentrations vary more than ten fold between different parts of the country. We have estimated diagnostic rates of pre-senile Alzheimer's disease in seven geographical areas and examined the correlation between rates of Alzheimer's disease and water aluminium concentration. PMID:24202582

  10. Alzheimer's disease research in the context of the national plan to address Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Hendrix, James; Bain, Lisa J; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease in the United States (U.S.) was released, a component of the National Alzheimer's Project Act legislation. Since that time, there have been incremental increases in U.S. federal funding for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia research, particularly in the areas of biomarker discovery, genetic link and related biological underpinnings, and prevention studies for Alzheimer's. A central theme in each of these areas has been the emphasis of cross-sector collaboration and private-public partnerships between government, non-profit organizations and for-profit organizations. This paper will highlight multiple private-public partnerships supporting the advancement of Alzheimer's research in the context of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's.

  11. Biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    The existence of an effective biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer disease would facilitate improved diagnosis and stimulate therapeutic trials. Multidisciplinary clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is time consuming and expensive and relies on experts who are rarely available outside of specialty clinics. Thus, many patients do not receive proper diagnosis until the disease has progressed beyond stages in which treatments are maximally effective. In the clinical trial setting, rapid, cost-effective screening of patients for Alzheimer disease is of paramount importance for the development of new treatments. Neuroimaging of cortical amyloid burden and volumetric changes in the brain and assessment of protein concentrations (eg, β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, phosphorylated tau) in cerebrospinal fluid are diagnostic tools that are not widely available. Known genetic markers do not provide sufficient discriminatory power between different forms of dementia to be useful in isolation. Recent studies using panels of biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment have been promising, though no such studies have been cross-validated in independent samples of subjects. The ideal biomarker enabling early detection of Alzheimer disease has not yet been identified.

  12. Apraxia and Alzheimer's disease: review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lesourd, Mathieu; Le Gall, Didier; Baumard, Josselin; Croisile, Bernard; Jarry, Christophe; Osiurak, François

    2013-09-01

    Apraxia is one of the cognitive deficits that characterizes Alzheimer's disease. Despite its prevalence and relevance to diagnosing Alzheimer's disease, this topic has received little attention and is without comprehensive review. The review herein is aimed to fill this gap by first presenting an overview of the impairment caused in different clinical situations: pantomime of tool use, single tool use, real tool use, mechanical problem solving, function and manipulation knowledge tasks, and symbolic/meaningless gestures. On the basis of these results, we then propose alternative interpretations regarding the nature of the underlying mechanisms impaired by the disease. Also presented are principal methodological issues precluding firm conclusions from being drawn. PMID:23904110

  13. Progress Report on Alzheimer's Disease: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document provides an overview of the state of scientific study of Alzheimer's disease, a disease of catastrophic proportions whose symptoms include serious forgetfulness; changes in personality; confused, restless, and irritable behavior; and problems with judgment, concentration, writing, reading, speech, and naming of objects. It discusses…

  14. Looking for Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Lynne Gershenson; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the correlates of symptom-seeking behavior for Alzheimer's disease (AD) among middle-aged persons. Symptom seeking, the tendency to search for signs of disease, is one manifestation of an individual's concern about developing AD. The data were obtained from a survey of two subsamples of 40-60 year old adults: 1) 108 adult…

  15. Is Alzheimer's disease a homogeneous disease entity?

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-10-01

    The epidemic proportions of dementia in old age are a cause of great concern for the medical profession and the society at large. It is customary to consider Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, and vascular dementia (VaD) as being the second. This dichotomous view of a primary neurodegenerative disease as opposed to a disorder where extrinsic factors cause brain damage led to separate lines of research in these two entities. New biomarkers, particularly the introduction of modern neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid changes, have, in recent years, helped to identify anatomical and chemical changes of VaD and of AD. Nevertheless, there is a substantial difference between the two entities. While it is clear that VaD is a heterogeneous entity, AD is supposed to be a single disorder. Nobody attempts to use CADASIL as a template to develops treatment for sporadic VaD. On the other hand, early-onset AD is used to develop therapy for sporadic AD. This paper will discuss the problems relating to this false concept and its consequences. PMID:23933662

  16. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with mild Alzheimer's disease may be helped in day-to-day living by a list of daily plans notes ... help some people with mild Alzheimer's disease with day-to-day living. A big calendar, a list ...

  17. Brain histamine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A; Niigawa, H; Hariguchi, S; Tada, K; Nishimura, T; Wada, H; Brandeis, L; Pearson, J

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of histamine (HA) has been determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection in 21 different regions of brains from patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and subjects (CB) whose causes of death were not related to neuropsychiatric, neurological and/or neurodegenerative diseases. The highest levels of HA in the central nervous system (CNS) of both control (CB) and SDAT samples were found in the posterior hypothalamus (CB = 3.13 +/- 0.63 pmol/mg; SDAT = 7.75 +/- 1.43 pmol/mg, p less than 0.005), where the HA neurons are located, and in the anterior hypothalamus (CB = 1.77 +/- 0.33 pmol/mg; SDAT = 2.82 +/- 0.45 pmol/mg, p less than 0.005). The lowest HA levels were detected in the cerebellum (CB = 0.12 +/- 0.04 pmol/mg; SDAT = 0.24 +/- 0.09 pmol/mg, p less than 0.01) and medulla oblongata. HA levels were significantly higher in SDAT than in CB in the following areas: motor cortex (Brodmann's area 4) (A4), premotor cortex (A6), postcentral gyrus (A1,2), posterior parietal cortex (A5,7), superior temporal gyrus (A41,42), temporal pole (A38), primary and secondary visual cortices (A17,18), anterior and posterior regions of the hypothalamus, putamen, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, hippocampus, pons, medulla oblongata and cerebellum. No changes were seen in globus pallidus and corpus callosum. Since the origin of HA in the brain is dependent upon three main compartments (neuronal, mast cell, vascular smooth muscle), with approximately 60-80% of the total HA belonging to the neuronal pool, on the basis of neurochemical data we postulate that the increase in the levels of HA in SDAT might account for or be associated with alterations in neuroendocrine, cognitive, neurovascular and sleep-wakefulness functions. PMID:2755282

  18. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: The Government's Response. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (Cold Spring Harbor, NY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine questions surrounding Alzheimer's disease, its treatment, funding for research, legal aspects, and support for families of Alzheimer's victims. Opening statements are included from Congressmen Downey, Mrazek, and Manton. Testimonies…

  19. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  20. [Predementia Alzheimer's disease. Benefits of early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Viloria, Aurora

    2011-10-01

    Given population aging and the rise in the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, measures that aim not only to delay but also to prevent the development of this disease are increasingly required. Advances in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease support the need for a review of current clinical standards for mild cognitive impairment and provide new goals in the early treatment of this disease. The current diagnostic process should be refocussed toward the pathological substrate of this disease rather than symptoms in order to initiate therapeutic measures as soon as possible without waiting for clinical manifestations to appear. Such an approach is essential in patients with greater cognitive reserve, in whom the lesions are usually more severe at diagnosis and treatment is less effective. To identify disease-modifying therapies to delay the onset of the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in cognitively intact persons at high risk, biomarkers for this disease must be validated. A single biomarker is unlikely to provide the required diagnostic accuracy and therefore a multimodal approach, incorporating biochemical, neuropathological and anatomical and metabolic neuroimaging methods, should be employed. To optimize the results of drugs under investigation, a combination of biomarkers should be used to select appropriate participants in the earliest phases of the disease, and disease progression should be followed-up. Early diagnosis might clarify essential questions in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, such as the possibility of distinguishing among various subtypes, thus encouraging the development of optimal treatments for each. The ultimate goal is to develop disease-modifying treatments that could be initiated early, while patients are asymptomatic or only minimally symptomatic, to maintain their quality of life.

  1. Alzheimer's disease: analyzing the missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disorder influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Recent work has identified 11 AD markers in 10 loci. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to analyze >2 million SNPs for 10,922 individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium to assess the phenotypic variance explained first by known late-onset AD loci, and then by all SNPs in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium dataset. In all, 33% of total phenotypic variance is explained by all common SNPs. APOE alone explained 6% and other known markers 2%, meaning more than 25% of phenotypic variance remains unexplained by known markers, but is tagged by common SNPs included on genotyping arrays or imputed with HapMap genotypes. Novel AD markers that explain large amounts of phenotypic variance are likely to be rare and unidentifiable using genome-wide association studies. Based on our findings and the current direction of human genetics research, we suggest specific study designs for future studies to identify the remaining heritability of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Word Association in Early Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Salmon, David P.; Paxton, Jessica L.

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease (AD) degrades semantic representations predicts that AD qualitatively alters spontaneous thoughts. In two experiments contrasting free associations to words with strong (e.g., "bride-groom") versus weak (e.g., "body-leg") associates participants with AD produced less common responses (e.g., "bride-pretty")…

  3. Ideational Action Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chainay, H.; Louarn, C.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2006-01-01

    We report data from a group of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease on a range of tasks requiring either stored semantic knowledge about objects (e.g., naming object use) or the execution of action to objects (e.g., miming and using objects). We found that the patients were impaired at miming in response to objects, even when they could describe…

  4. Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.; Kirkland, Glenn I.

    This document contains two brief bibliographies of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the elderly, one written for the educator and the other for the consumer. They are two of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics…

  5. Metaphor Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease: Novelty Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of…

  6. Chromatin structure in scrapie and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, D R; Lukiw, W J; Cho, H J; Carp, R I; Wisniewski, H

    1986-11-01

    Scrapie affected brains exhibit a number of pathological features in common with the human neurodegenerative condition, Alzheimer's disease. The present report describes studies on chromatin structure seen in these two disease processes. Chromatin associated proteins influence transcriptional activity of DNA through an effect upon chromatin structure. We examined chromatin structure by: measuring the capacity of the enzyme micrococcal nuclease to release mono- and dinucleosomes from isolated nuclei and measuring DNA-histone interactions by examining the effect of ambient tonicity upon the release of chromatin proteins. In two strains of mice infected with two strains of scrapie agent there was reduced accessibility to micrococcal nuclease and an increased content on dinucleosomes of the histone H1 and H1(0) types. These changes precede clinical signs of scrapie and resemble those found in the human conditions of Alzheimer's and Pick's disease. Scrapie mouse brain differs from Alzheimer brain in that scrapie does not alter histone-DNA interactions as monitored by ionically induced histone release from chromatin. Despite similarities, the scrapie agent appears to operate upon different molecular mechanisms than those found in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Famous forgetters: notable people and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M; Jones, Joni L

    2010-03-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become much more prevalent and as yet there is no cure. This has given rise to the situation Tithonus faced in Greek mythology of living longer but not staying young. In this article, the authors explore this phenomenon while reviewing some notable people and AD. PMID:19949162

  8. Alzheimer's disease: diverse aspects of mitochondrial malfunctioning

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Renato X; Correia, Sónia C; Wang, Xinglong; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Moreira, Paula I; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, either assuming a sporadic, age-associated, late-onset form, or a familial form, with early onset, in a smaller fraction of the cases. Whereas in the familial cases several mutations have been identified in genes encoding proteins related with the pathogenesis of the disease, for the sporadic form several causes have been proposed and are currently under debate. Mitochondrial dysfunction has surfaced as one of the most discussed hypotheses acting as a trigger for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondria assume central functions in the cell, including ATP production, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species generation, and apoptotic signaling. Although their role as the cause of the disease may be controversial, there is no doubt that mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and degradation by mitophagy occur during the disease process, contributing to its onset and progression. PMID:20661404

  9. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  10. Why Do We Get Alzheimer's Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2006-01-02

    Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  11. Why do we get Alzheimer's disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2006-10-02

    Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  12. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. [Alzheimer's disease and diabetes - the common pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Halmos, Tamas; Suba, Ilona

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological studies presented evidence that Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes share common features in their pathophysiology and clinical patterns. Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of both diseases. According to the pathomechanism, inflammatory, metabolic, and an atypical form based on the deficiency of zinc ions can be distinguished. Glucose metabolic disorders, related to Alzheimer's disease, are type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes/metabolic syndrome. Based on the common pathophysiological patterns of these two diseases, Alzheimer's disease is customary called type 3 diabetes. In the research on dementias, insulin resistance stands in the highlight for its documented harmful effects on cognitive function and causes dementia. Insulin-like growth factor also influences cognitive functions. Reduced input of this hormone into the brain may also cause dementia, however literary data are controversial. In Alzheimer's disease, deposition of amyloid ß in the brain, hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins and dysruption of neurofibrilles are characteristic. Amyloid ß is co-secreted in the ß-cells of the pancreas with insulin. Amyloid ß and hyperphosphorylated tau protein were detected in the Langerhans islets by autopsy. Amyloid deposits, found in the pancreas and brain presented similarities. As a consequence of hyperglycemia, glycation endproducts cause the development of amyloid plaques, dysruption of neurofibrilles, and activated microglia, all are typical to Alzheimer's disease. Continuous hyperglycemia leads to oxidative stress, which used to play significant role in the development of both diseases. Low-grade inflammation is also a significant pathophysiological factor in both disorders. The sources of inflammation are proinflammatorical adipocytokines, dysbacteriosis, metabolic endotoxaemia, caused by lipopolysaccharides, and high fat diet which also lead to insulin resistance. Based on recent data, microbial amyloid, the main product of

  14. The presubicular region in Alzheimer's disease: topography of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary changes.

    PubMed

    Kalus, P; Braak, H; Braak, E; Bohl, J

    1989-08-01

    Specific silver impregnation techniques for extracellular amyloid and intraneuronal neurofibrillary changes were used to examine the presubiculum in Alzheimer victims. Extended amyloid clouds in the absence of neurofibrillary changes were noted in the parvopyramidal layer of the presubiculum proper. The corresponding layer in the parasubiculum, in contrast, showed many neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads in the absence of amyloid. The transsubicular parvopyramidal layer contained both amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary changes. This severe involvement of all subdivisions of the presubicular region in Alzheimer's disease is considered to impair functions of the Papez circuit.

  15. Socio-economic Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Marešová, Petra; Mohelská, Hana; Dolejš, Josef; Kuča, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Social development, better living conditions and medical advances lead to the fact that more people have the opportunity to live longer than in the past. The aging population is a characteristic feature of demographic trends in developed countries. This trend is closely linked with the issue of increasing number of diseases in old age and increasing government expenditure on health and social care. The most frequently mentioned diseases in old age include dementia. The cause may lie in all kinds of diseases, the most common are Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease. Now the care of current 35 million patients with dementia costs over $ 600 billion per year, it is approximately one percent of global Gross Domestic Product. This review discusses the recent issues and questions in the area of social and economic aspects of Alzheimer's disease. It focuses in detail on the national strategies in the approach to Alzheimer's disease, the anticipated problems concerning the insufficient number of social workers and necessary expenses of state budgets in the future. The situation in the area of health insurance companies' expenditures is illustrated in the context of the analysis of long-term care systems, in the chosen countries within the European Union. PMID:26510983

  16. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  17. Alzheimer disease: current concepts & future directions.

    PubMed

    Musiek, Erik S; Schindler, Suzanne E

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over age 65, and is expected to cause a major public health crisis as the number of older Americans rapidly expands in the next three decades. Herein, we review current strategies for diagnosis and management of AD, and discuss ongoing clinical research and future therapeutic directions in the battle against this devastating disease.

  18. [Truth telling of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Fuentes R, Paola; Prato, Juan Andrés

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is becoming an increasingly common problem due to population aging. Most of the research on truth telling in relation to diagnosis has been done in oncology. However, although growing, there has a lack of interest about attitudes held among physicians towards disclosing the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Physicians, family caregivers and patients have different views about it. The reasons most often given for communicating the diagnosis are the right to know, relief of anxiety to know the cause of memory problems, early access to treatment and ability to plan ahead. On the contrary, the reasons for concealing the diagnosis are based on the right not to know, the anxiety associated to knowing the diagnosis and the absence of curative therapies for the disease. The aim of this paper is to report the current state of literature on diagnostic truth telling in dementia, review the ethical principles involved, and finally give a strategy to address the issue.

  19. Alzheimer's disease: current knowledge, management and research

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, S; Panisset, M; Nalbantoglu, J; Poirier, J

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a common neurological condition, appearing as early as age 40 but increasing dramatically in incidence over age 85. Different genetic factors are at play, modified by events over a lifetime. Clinical diagnosis is possible through careful history taking with a reliable informant and a minimum number of laboratory tests. A relatively predictable natural history can be observed, with progression through stages of cognitive loss, functional impairment and behavioural disinhibition or apathy. New medications such as donepezil offer hope for improving or stabilizing symptoms. Such treatment can be administered by primary care physicians with experience in the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease. Disease stabilization, or even prevention, may be possible in the future. PMID:9347775

  20. Association between Periodontitis and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbayya, Keshava; Puthanakar, Nagraj Y; Naduwinmani, Sanjay; Chidambar, Y S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease which significantly increases with age. Its onset can be either early or late. AD is characterized by the salient inflammatory features, microglial activation, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the inflammatory status of the central nervous system (CNS). Whereas, periodontitis is a common oral infection associated with the gram negative anaerobic bacteria. Periodontitis can be marked as a “low-grade systemic disease” by release of proinflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation and elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP). Inflammation is known to play a pivotal role in both the disease process serving as a connecting link between periodontitis and AD. The present review throws a light on possible enigmatic link between AD and periodontitis. This review is designed by collecting data from PubMed database using key words like “Alzheimer's disease”, “inflammation”, “periodontitis”, and “proinflammatory cytokines”. PMID:26199919

  1. Losing one's memory in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parsons-Suhl, Karen; Johnson, Mary E; McCann, Judy J; Solberg, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    A Heideggerian hermeneutical phenomenological research method was used to investigate the experience of memory loss in twelve individuals with early Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment. Data analysis proceeded as described by Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner (1989), and incorporated the methods of Benner (1994), Thomas and Pollio (2002), and van Manen (1990). Three constitutive patterns with relational themes were identified. The first pattern, experiencing breakdown, consisted of two themes: awakening to breakdown and living with forgetting. The second pattern, temporality, consisted of three themes: being in the nothing, forgetting the past, and looking ahead. The third pattern, managing forgetting, consisted of the themes: remembering with cues, writing things down, recognizing what made remembering better or worse, and using laughter. The finding show that early Alzheimer's disease is more than an illness of cognitive losses and that forgetting is significant in light of the meaning that it has within everyday life. PMID:18174533

  2. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a “nucleoplasmic reticulum,” into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  3. [Genetic aspects of Alzheimer's disease (Review)].

    PubMed

    El Kadmiri, N; Hamzi, K; El Moutawakil, B; Slassi, I; Nadifi, S

    2013-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative brain disorder, which concerns memory, cognition and behavior pattern. Its etiology is unknown, it is characterized by typical histological lesions: senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial pathology, characterized by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Genetic factors concern first of all the exceptional monogenic forms, characterized by early onset (<60 years), autosomal dominant forms. Mutations of the genes coding for amyloid-ß precursor protein or preselinins 1 and 2 are involved. The much more frequent sporadic forms also have genetic factors, the best studied being the apolipoprotein E4 coding allele and some more recent genotypes which will be mentioned. No causal, only symptomatic treatments are available.

  4. Fusing Heterogeneous Data for Alzheimer's Disease Classification.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Parvathy Sudhir; Leong, Tze-Yun

    2015-01-01

    In multi-view learning, multimodal representations of a real world object or situation are integrated to learn its overall picture. Feature sets from distinct data sources carry different, yet complementary, information which, if analysed together, usually yield better insights and more accurate results. Neuro-degenerative disorders such as dementia are characterized by changes in multiple biomarkers. This work combines the features from neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid studies to distinguish Alzheimer's disease patients from healthy subjects. We apply statistical data fusion techniques on 101 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We examine whether fusion of biomarkers helps to improve diagnostic accuracy and how the methods compare against each other for this problem. Our results indicate that multimodal data fusion improves classification accuracy. PMID:26262148

  5. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination.

  6. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  7. Psychotherapy for individuals with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bonder, B R

    1994-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer disease often experience depression, anger, and other psychological symptoms. Various forms of psychotherapy have been attempted with these individuals, including insight oriented therapy and less verbal therapies such as music therapy and art therapy. Although there are few data-based outcome studies that support the effectiveness of these interventions, case studies and descriptive information suggest that they can be helpful in alleviating negative emotions and minimizing problematic behaviors.

  8. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  9. The superficial white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Piras, Fabrizio; Orfei, Maria Donata; Iorio, Mariangela; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in the large deep fibers of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the late myelinating superficial white matter comprised of intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received much attention. To investigate this area, we extracted a surface corresponding to the superficial white matter beneath the cortex and then applied a cortical pattern-matching approach which allowed us to register and subsequently sample diffusivity along thousands of points at the interface between the gray matter and white matter in 44 patients with Alzheimer's disease (Age: 71.02 ± 5.84, 16M/28F) and 47 healthy controls (Age 69.23 ± 4.45, 19M/28F). In patients we found an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across most of the superficial white matter (P < 0.001) with increases in diffusivity of more than 20% in the bilateral parahippocampal regions and the temporal and frontal lobes. Furthermore, diffusivity correlated with the cognitive deficits measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination scores (P < 0.001). The superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and is critical for the integration of multimodal information during brain maturation and aging. Here we show that there are major abnormalities in patients and the deterioration of these fibers relates to clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Association of Alzheimer's disease and Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Tiffany L

    2008-06-01

    This paper critically reviews the association of infection by Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aging population has increased interest in finding the cause of AD, but studies have yielded contradictory results that are likely due to varying diagnostic tools and different uses of diagnostic tests. Knowledge of AD's characteristics, risk factors, and hypothesized etiologies has expanded since Alois Alzheimer's initial description of AD. Epidemiologic and projection studies provide incidence estimates of AD through a two-stage method: (1) primary diagnosis of dementia by cognitive testing such as Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and (2) clinical diagnosis of AD through criteria such as National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA). Cross-sectional studies yield prevalence estimates of infection by C. pneumoniae by detecting immunoglobulins through laboratory tests such as microimmunofluorescence (MIF). Studies examining the association of C. pneumoniae and AD are limited, but brain autopsy provides information about presence, proximity to areas associated with AD, and bacterial load. Standardization of diagnostic techniques would allow for better comparability of studies, but uncertainty about the best method of diagnosis of infection by C. pneumoniae and AD may call for revised or novel diagnostic tools.

  11. Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Amos, Edwin C.; Canick, Jonathan; Ackerley, Mary; Raji, Cyrus; Fiala, Milan; Ahdidan, Jamila

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems nationally and globally. Recently, the first description of the reversal of cognitive decline in patients with early Alzheimer's disease or its precursors, MCI (mild cognitive impairment) and SCI (subjective cognitive impairment), was published [1]. The therapeutic approach used was programmatic and personalized rather than monotherapeutic and invariant, and was dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND). Patients who had had to discontinue work were able to return to work, and those struggling at work were able to improve their performance. The patients, their spouses, and their co-workers all reported clear improvements. Here we report the results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing in ten patients with cognitive decline, nine ApoE4+ (five homozygous and four heterozygous) and one ApoE4−, who were treated with the MEND protocol for 5-24 months. The magnitude of the improvement is unprecedented, providing additional objective evidence that this programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. These results have far-reaching implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, MCI, and SCI; for personalized programs that may enhance pharmaceutical efficacy; and for personal identification of ApoE genotype. PMID:27294343

  12. The superficial white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Piras, Fabrizio; Orfei, Maria Donata; Iorio, Mariangela; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in the large deep fibers of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the late myelinating superficial white matter comprised of intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received much attention. To investigate this area, we extracted a surface corresponding to the superficial white matter beneath the cortex and then applied a cortical pattern-matching approach which allowed us to register and subsequently sample diffusivity along thousands of points at the interface between the gray matter and white matter in 44 patients with Alzheimer's disease (Age: 71.02 ± 5.84, 16M/28F) and 47 healthy controls (Age 69.23 ± 4.45, 19M/28F). In patients we found an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across most of the superficial white matter (P < 0.001) with increases in diffusivity of more than 20% in the bilateral parahippocampal regions and the temporal and frontal lobes. Furthermore, diffusivity correlated with the cognitive deficits measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination scores (P < 0.001). The superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and is critical for the integration of multimodal information during brain maturation and aging. Here we show that there are major abnormalities in patients and the deterioration of these fibers relates to clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26801955

  13. Alzheimer's disease: a report from the 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka

    2015-10-01

    The 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium was held on 11-13 June, 2015, in Kuopio, Finland and attracted ~250 attendees from 14 different countries around the world. The theme for the symposium in its seventh year was 'From mechanisms to prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease'. The 3-day international scientific symposium composed of seven oral sessions and a poster session. The program, spanning from molecular mechanisms to prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, provided a forum for the attendees to share their research, network and to obtain a comprehensive overview of the current status and future directions of research into Alzheimer's disease.

  14. International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) aims to capture global Alzheimer's disease research funding.

    PubMed

    Liggins, Charlene; Snyder, Heather M; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Ryan, Laurie; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD research and research-related resources, major funding organizations are starting to utilize the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) to categorize their funding information. This information is captured in the International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) for further analysis. As of January, 2014, over fifteen organizations from the US, Canada, Europe and Australia have contributed their information. The goal of the IADRP project is to enable funding organizations to assess the changing landscape of AD research and coordinate strategies, leverage resources, and avoid duplication of effort. PMID:24780512

  15. International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) aims to capture global Alzheimer's disease research funding.

    PubMed

    Liggins, Charlene; Snyder, Heather M; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Ryan, Laurie; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD research and research-related resources, major funding organizations are starting to utilize the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) to categorize their funding information. This information is captured in the International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) for further analysis. As of January, 2014, over fifteen organizations from the US, Canada, Europe and Australia have contributed their information. The goal of the IADRP project is to enable funding organizations to assess the changing landscape of AD research and coordinate strategies, leverage resources, and avoid duplication of effort.

  16. Choosing Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trial populations.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Monsell, Sarah E

    2014-03-01

    To assist investigators in making design choices, we modeled Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. We used longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes data, retention rates, and the proportions of trial-eligible cognitively normal participants age 65 and older in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to model trial sample sizes, the numbers needed to enroll to account for drop out, and the numbers needed to screen to successfully complete enrollment. We examined how enrichment strategies affected each component of the model. Relative to trials enrolling 65-year-old individuals, trials enriching for older (minimum 70 or 75) age required reduced sample sizes, numbers needed to enroll, and numbers needed to screen. Enriching for subjective memory complaints reduced sample sizes and numbers needed to enroll more than age enrichment, but increased the number needed to screen. We conclude that Alzheimer's disease prevention trials can enroll elderly participants with minimal effect on trial retention and that enriching for older individuals with memory complaints might afford efficient trial designs.

  17. Pattern of extrapyramidal signs in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often develop extrapyramidal signs (EPS), which increase in frequency as the disease progresses. We aimed to investigate the patterns of presentation of EPS in AD and their correlation with clinical and neuropathological features. 4284 subjects diagnosed with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database with at least one abnormal Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment were included. Individuals were assigned to a discovery sample and a sensitivity analysis sample (moderate and mild dementia, respectively) and a subset of subjects provided neuropathological data (n = 284). Individuals from the Washington Heights and Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) served as validation sample. Patterns of presentation of EPS were identified employing categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). Six principal components were identified in both mild and moderate AD samples: (I) hand movements, alternating movements, finger tapping, leg agility ("limbs bradykinesia"); (II) posture, postural instability, arising from chair, gait and body bradykinesia/hypokinesia ("axial"); (III) limb rigidity ("rigidity"); (IV) postural tremor; (V) resting tremor; (VI) speech and facial expression. Similar results were obtained in the WHICAP cohort. Individuals with hallucinations, apathy, aberrant night behaviors and more severe dementia showed higher axial and limb bradykinesia scores. "Limb bradykinesia" component was associated with a neuropathological diagnosis of Lewy body disease and "axial" component with reduced AD-type pathology. Patterns of EPS in AD show distinct clinical and neuropathological correlates; they share a pattern of presentation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26338814

  18. Dantrolene, a treatment for Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Wei, Huafeng

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a fatal progressive disease and the most common form of dementia without effective treatments. Previous studies support that the disruption of endoplasmic reticulum Ca through overactivation of ryanodine receptors plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD. Normalization of intracellular Ca homeostasis could be an effective strategy for AD therapies. Dantrolene, an antagonist of ryanodine receptors and an FDA-approved drug for clinical treatment of malignant hyperthermia and muscle spasms, exhibits neuroprotective effects in multiple models of neurodegenerative disorders. Recent preclinical studies consistently support the therapeutic effects of dantrolene in various types of AD animal models and were summarized in the current review. PMID:25551862

  19. Alzheimer's Disease and Medicinal Plants: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, S; Essa, M Mohamed; Vinoth, A; Kowsalya, R; Manimaran, A; Selvasundaram, R

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is progressive neurodegenerative disorder and identified as a major health concern globally. Individuals with AD and their care givers are affected in personal, emotional, financial, and social levels. Due to its significant impact and heavy burden on the individual, the patients' families, and society, it is highly needed to search for cost effective, long-time retention therapeutic targets. In recent decades, there are lots of research conducted the possible benefit of natural products and their active components on AD and other neurodegenerative disease, which are discussed here. PMID:27651250

  20. Does ionizing radiation influence Alzheimer's disease risk?

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Nasrin; Wang, Bing; Mori, Masahiko; Vares, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a human neurodegenerative disease, and its global prevalence is predicted to increase dramatically in the following decades. There is mounting evidence describing the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on the brain, suggesting that exposure to IR might ultimately favor the development of AD. Therefore better understanding the possible connections between exposure to IR and AD pathogenesis is of utmost importance. In this review, recent developments in the research on the biological and cognitive effects of IR in the brain will be explored. Because AD is largely an age-related pathology, the effects of IR on ageing will be investigated. PMID:22872779

  1. Cognitive approaches to early Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John

    2013-05-01

    In this article, cognitive measures in the screening of individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) are reviewed. Use of cognitive tasks in identifying clinical cases of AD is considered, as well as methods for detecting those in the prodromal stages of the disease, including cognitive screening instruments. Traditional assessments, such as the mini-mental state examination, as well as contemporary computerized screening instruments, are examined. Areas of cognition for investigation in the detection of prodromal AD are recommended. The prospects for general cognitive screening are reviewed, and more engaging technologies to tests individuals at risk for developing AD are recommended.

  2. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  3. The immune system, amyloid-beta peptide, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Weksler, Marc E; Gouras, Gunnar; Relkin, Norman R; Szabo, Paul

    2005-06-01

    In this review, the case is made that amyloid-beta peptide in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease is a primary cause of the disease and that immunotherapy directed against this peptide has the potential to halt and/or reverse disease progression. This supposition is supported by the capacity of anti-beta-amyloid peptide antibodies to prevent or reverse the disease in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, preliminary results obtained in a small number of patients with Alzheimer's disease are consistent with the observations made in the mouse model of this disease. We review the relationship between the immune system, amyloid-beta peptide, and Alzheimer's disease and the progress made in applying immunotherapy to patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Caloric Intake, Dietary Lifestyles, Macronutrient Composition, and Alzheimer' Disease Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria; Wang, Jun; Porter, Shanee; Ho, Lap

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition currently affecting over 5 million elderly individuals in the United States. There is much evidence suggesting that certain dietary lifestyles can help to prevent and possibly treat Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we discuss how certain cardiovascular and diabetic conditions can induce an increased susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms through which this occurs. We further discuss how the consumption of certain foods or food components can help to reduce one's risk for Alzheimer's disease and may possibly be developed as a therapeutic agent. PMID:21808725

  5. The informatics core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative project has brought together geographically distributed investigators, each collecting data on the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The quantity and diversity of the imaging, clinical, cognitive, biochemical, and genetic data acquired and generated throughout the study necessitated sophisticated informatics systems to organize, manage, and disseminate data and results. We describe, here, a successful and comprehensive system that provides powerful mechanisms for processing, integrating, and disseminating these data not only to support the research needs of the investigators who make up the Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative cores, but also to provide widespread data access to the greater scientific community for the study of Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20451873

  6. Assessment of visual impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadun, A A; Borchert, M; DeVita, E; Hinton, D R; Bassi, C J

    1987-08-15

    We examined five patients with Alzheimer's disease who complained of poor vision. Two patients had mild Alzheimer's disease; they complained of problems with reading and of "bumping into things," yet both had normal visual acuities. One patient with moderate Alzheimer's disease had abnormal eye movements, visual-evoked potentials, and contrast sensitivity. The other two patients had severe Alzheimer's disease. Despite difficulties in performing the examination, we were able to see moderate impairments in visual acuity and visual fields, as well as marked dyschromatopsia, severe deficits in contrast sensitivity, and markedly abnormal eye movements and visual-evoked potentials.

  7. Alzheimer's disease: new diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

    PubMed

    Racchi, Marco; Uberti, Daniela; Govoni, Stefano; Memo, Maurizio; Lanni, Cristina; Vasto, Sonya; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero; Romeo, Loriana; Scapagnini, Giovanni

    2008-08-13

    On March 19, 2008 a Symposium on Pathophysiology of Ageing and Age-Related diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Here, the lectures of M. Racchi on History and future perspectives of Alzheimer Biomarkers and of G. Scapagnini on Cellular Stress Response and Brain Ageing are summarized. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and progressive neurodegenerative disease, which in Western society mainly accounts for clinica dementia. AD prevention is an important goal of ongoing research. Two objectives must be accomplished to make prevention feasible: i) individuals at high risk of AD need to be identified before the earliest symptoms become evident, by which time extensive neurodegeneration has already occurred and intervention to prevent the disease is likely to be less successful and ii) safe and effective interventions need to be developed that lead to a decrease in expression of this pathology. On the whole, data here reviewed strongly suggest that the measurement of conformationally altered p53 in blood cells has a high ability to discriminate AD cases from normal ageing, Parkinson's disease and other dementias. On the other hand, available data on the involvement of curcumin in restoring cellular homeostasis and rebalancing redox equilibrium, suggest that curcumin might be a useful adjunct in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses characterized by inflammation, such as AD.

  8. [Alzheimer and Alzheimer's disease: the present enlighted by the past. An historical approach].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2008-06-01

    The history of Alzheimer's disease cannot be dissociated from that of the concept of dementia, as well as from the life and work of Alois Alzheimer. In his seminal paper, in 1907, Alzheimer thought to have shown a specific disease distinct from senile dementia. However, following the work of Fischer, Perusini, Kraepelin and Alzheimer himself, in 1911, the specificity of the pathological process with regard to that of senile dementia was questioned. Therefore, Alzheimer's disease was for long considered as related to senium praecox. Neuropathological then genetic data, mainly the description of monogenic forms, have demonstrated the reality of a specific pathological process involving the amyloid protein metabolism. Then, senile dementia became the most frequent form of Alzheimer's disease. However, Alzheimer's disease could hardly be considered as a natural entity and, particularly in the common forms, many points remained to be clarified such as the relationship between the amyloid process and that of aging, the significance of histopathological lesions and their relationship with the clinical symptoms. Beyond the description of the disease termed by his name, Alzheimer's work played a major role in the individualization of arteriosclerotic dementia from general palsy, and in the distinction between vascular and degenerative dementia. Moreover, he first described the histopathological lesions of Pick's disease.

  9. 'Making the best you can of it': living with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Hazel

    2008-04-01

    Drawing upon data from a qualitative study of persons who are in the early stage of the condition, this paper examines the meaning of Alzheimer's disease. It contrasts the meaning of the disease as portrayed in popular culture with its meaning as interpreted by persons living with it. Findings show that persons with the illness do not necessarily accept the negative cultural meaning of the disease, nor the helpless 'victim' role in which they are generally cast. With a determination to 'make the best of it', strategies such as humour, normalisation, present-time orientation, and life review are employed to create a meaningful life. PMID:18298633

  10. 'Making the best you can of it': living with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Hazel

    2008-04-01

    Drawing upon data from a qualitative study of persons who are in the early stage of the condition, this paper examines the meaning of Alzheimer's disease. It contrasts the meaning of the disease as portrayed in popular culture with its meaning as interpreted by persons living with it. Findings show that persons with the illness do not necessarily accept the negative cultural meaning of the disease, nor the helpless 'victim' role in which they are generally cast. With a determination to 'make the best of it', strategies such as humour, normalisation, present-time orientation, and life review are employed to create a meaningful life.

  11. Alzheimer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Alzheimer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Alzheimer disease : Alzheimer's Association -- www.alz.org Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center -- www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers ...

  12. Is aging part of Alzheimer's disease, or is Alzheimer's disease part of aging?

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2007-10-01

    For 70 years after Alois Alzheimer described a disorder of tangle-and-plaque dementia, Alzheimer's disease was a condition of the relatively young. Definitions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have, however, changed over the past 30 years and under the revised view AD has truly become an age-related disease. Most now diagnosed with AD are elderly and would not have been diagnosed with AD as originally conceived. Accordingly, younger patients that qualify for a diagnosis of AD under both original and current Alzheimer's disease constructs now represent an exceptionally small percentage of the diagnosed population. The question of whether pathogenesis of the "early" and "late" onset cases is similar enough to qualify as a single disease was previously raised although not conclusively settled. Interestingly, debate on this issue has not kept pace with advancing knowledge about the molecular, biochemical and clinical underpinnings of tangle-and-plaque dementias. Since the question of whether both forms of AD share a common pathogenesis could profoundly impact diagnostic and treatment development efforts, it seems worthwhile to revisit this debate.

  13. Increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Janson, Juliette; Laedtke, Thomas; Parisi, Joseph E; O'Brien, Peter; Petersen, Ronald C; Butler, Peter C

    2004-02-01

    Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes are characterized by increased prevalence with aging, a genetic predisposition, and comparable pathological features in the islet and brain (amyloid derived from amyloid beta protein in the brain in Alzheimer disease and islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes). Evidence is growing to link precursors of amyloid deposition in the brain and pancreas with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Given these similarities, we questioned whether there may be a common underlying mechanism predisposing to islet and cerebral amyloid. To address this, we first examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in a community-based controlled study, the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Patient Registry (ADPR), which follows patients with Alzheimer disease versus control subjects without Alzheimer disease. In addition to this clinical study, we performed a pathological study of autopsy cases from this same community to determine whether there is an increased prevalence of islet amyloid in patients with Alzheimer disease and increased prevalence of cerebral amyloid in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients who were enrolled in the ADPR (Alzheimer disease n = 100, non-Alzheimer disease control subjects n = 138) were classified according to fasting glucose concentration (FPG) as nondiabetic (FPG <110 mg/dl), impaired fasting glucose (IFG, FPG 110-125 mg/dl), and type 2 diabetes (FPG >126 mg/dl). The mean slope of FPG over 10 years in each case was also compared between Alzheimer disease and non-Alzheimer disease control subjects. Pancreas and brain were examined from autopsy specimens obtained from 105 humans (first, 28 cases of Alzheimer disease disease vs. 21 non-Alzheimer disease control subjects and, second, 35 subjects with type 2 diabetes vs. 21 non-type 2 diabetes control subjects) for the presence of islet and brain amyloid. Both type 2 diabetes (35% vs. 18%; P < 0

  14. Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology: National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association collaborative project.

    PubMed

    Refolo, Lorenzo M; Snyder, Heather; Liggins, Charlene; Ryan, Laurie; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Carrillo, Maria C

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is recognized as a public health crisis worldwide. As public and private funding agencies around the world enhance and expand their support of Alzheimer's disease research, there is an urgent need to coordinate funding strategies and leverage resources to maximize the impact on public health and avoid duplication of effort and inefficiency. Such coordination requires a comprehensive assessment of the current landscape of Alzheimer's disease research in the United States and internationally. To this end, the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Association developed the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) as a dynamic portfolio analysis tool that can be used by funding agencies worldwide for strategic planning and coordination.

  15. How does diabetes accelerate Alzheimer disease pathology?

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Kim, Bhumsoo; Rosko, Andrew; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-10-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer disease (AD)-two age-related diseases-are both increasing in prevalence, and numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The underlying biological mechanisms that link the development of diabetes with AD are not fully understood. Abnormal protein processing, abnormalities in insulin signaling, dysregulated glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, the formation of advanced glycation end products, and the activation of inflammatory pathways are features common to both diseases. Hypercholesterolemia is another factor that has received attention, owing to its potential association with diabetes and AD. This Review summarizes the mechanistic pathways that might link diabetes and AD. An understanding of this complex interaction is necessary for the development of novel drug therapies and lifestyle guidelines aimed at the treatment and/or prevention of these diseases.

  16. Immunotherapy against amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Laura; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-10-15

    The first drugs developed for Alzheimer's disease (AD), anticholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI), increase acetylcholine levels, previously demonstrated to be reduced in AD. To date, four AchEI are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. A further therapeutic option available for moderate to severe AD is memantine. These treatments are symptomatic, whereas drugs under development are supposed to modify pathological steps leading to AD, thus acting on the evolution of the disease. For this reason they are currently termed "disease modifying" drugs. To block the progression of the disease, they have to interfere with pathogenic steps at the basis of clinical symptoms, including the deposition of extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The most innovative approach is represented by the vaccination and passive immunization against Aβ peptide. In this article, current knowledge about concluded and ongoing clinical trials with both vaccination with different antigens and passive immunization will be reviewed and discussed.

  17. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

  18. Treatment of Alzheimer Disease With CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eugene R.; Hosfeld, Victor D.; Nadolski, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) primarily affects older adults. This neurodegenerative disorder is the most common cause of dementia and is a leading source of their morbidity and mortality. Patient care costs in the United States are about 200 billion dollars and will more than double by 2040. This case report describes the remarkable improvement in a patient with advanced AD in hospice who received 5 computed tomography scans of the brain, about 40 mGy each, over a period of 3 months. The mechanism appears to be radiation-induced upregulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against AD, which partially restored cognition, memory, speech, movement, and appetite. PMID:27103883

  19. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  20. Atherosclerosis, biomarkers of atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fiolaki, Aidonio; Tsamis, Konstantinos I; Milionis, Haralampos J; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent type of dementia, involving progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. Although the pathophysiological mechanism of AD is not fully elucidated, apart from β-amyloid and tau protein, a diverse number of factors such as cardiovascular risk factors, inflammation, and lipids metabolism may play a significant role. Numerous epidemiological and laboratory studies support vascular injury and inflammation, as key pathological processes. The present review is focused on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids, and circulating biomarkers of inflammation, discussing them as independent mechanisms converging to the same final pathogenetic cascade of AD.

  1. [Neuropsychiatric and behavioral symptomatology in Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    García-Alberca, J M; Lara Muñoz, J P; Berthier Torres, M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show high incidence of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPS).The occurrence of BPS has a great impact on the patients and caregiver's quality of life, increases caregiver's burden, and in many cases precipitates admission of the patients to a geriatric center. On the other hand, the importance of the BPS is increasing because most of them are susceptible to being treated effectively, mainly thanks to the use of drug measures and behaviour modification techniques. This study describes the pathophysiological mechanisms of BPS in AD and its relationship with cognitive and functional impairment of patient and caregiver's burden and current therapies.

  2. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  3. Prevention of Alzheimer disease: The roles of nutrition and primary care.

    PubMed

    Bane, Tabitha J; Cole, Connie

    2015-05-15

    Risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. Due to lack of effective treatments for Alzheimer disease, nutrition and primary prevention becomes important.

  4. Alzheimer's disease: The role for neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Julio Leonardo Barbosa; Downes, Angela; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Patel, Vishal; Malkasian, Dennis; De Salles, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Dementia, most commonly caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), affects approximately 35 million people worldwide, with the incidence expected to increase as the population ages. After decades of investigation, AD is now understood to be a complex disease that affects behavior and cognition through several mechanisms: Disrupted neuronal communication, abnormal regional tissue metabolism, and impaired cellular repair. Existing therapies have demonstrated limited efficacy, which has spurred the search for specific disease markers and predictors as well as innovative therapeutic options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the memory circuits is one such option, with early studies suggesting that modulation of neural activity in these networks may improve cognitive function. Encapsulated cell biodelivery (ECB) is a device that delivers nerve growth factor to the cholinergic basal forebrain to potentially improve cognitive decline in AD patients. This review discusses the pathogenesis of AD, novel neuroimaging and biochemical markers, and the emerging role for neurosurgical applications such as DBS and ECB. PMID:25289167

  5. Alzheimer's disease: The role for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Julio Leonardo Barbosa; Downes, Angela; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Patel, Vishal; Malkasian, Dennis; De Salles, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Dementia, most commonly caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), affects approximately 35 million people worldwide, with the incidence expected to increase as the population ages. After decades of investigation, AD is now understood to be a complex disease that affects behavior and cognition through several mechanisms: Disrupted neuronal communication, abnormal regional tissue metabolism, and impaired cellular repair. Existing therapies have demonstrated limited efficacy, which has spurred the search for specific disease markers and predictors as well as innovative therapeutic options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the memory circuits is one such option, with early studies suggesting that modulation of neural activity in these networks may improve cognitive function. Encapsulated cell biodelivery (ECB) is a device that delivers nerve growth factor to the cholinergic basal forebrain to potentially improve cognitive decline in AD patients. This review discusses the pathogenesis of AD, novel neuroimaging and biochemical markers, and the emerging role for neurosurgical applications such as DBS and ECB.

  6. Epigenetic nutraceutical diets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davinelli, S; Calabrese, V; Zella, D; Scapagnini, G

    2014-11-01

    There is growing support that environmental influences and individual genetic susceptibility may increase the incidence and accelerate the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epigenetic mechanisms encompass a complex regulatory network of modifications with considerable impact on health and disease risk. Abnormal epigenetic regulation is a hallmark in many pathological conditions including AD. It is well recognized that numerous bioactive dietary components mediate epigenetic modifications associated with the pathophysiology of several diseases. Although the influences of dietary factors on epigenetic regulation have been extensively investigated, only few studies have explored the effects of specific food components in regulating epigenetic patterns during neurodegeneration and AD. Epigenetic nutritional research has substantial potential for AD and may represent a window of opportunity to complement other interventions. Here, we provide a brief overview of the main mechanisms involved in AD, some of which may be epigenetically modulated by bioactive food.

  7. Glucose Metabolism: A Sweet Relief of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-09-12

    Patients and individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease show reduced glucose metabolism in the brain. A new study takes advantage of a fly model of Alzheimer's disease to demonstrate that enhancing glucose uptake in neurons has strong neuroprotective effects involving improved proteostasis. PMID:27623263

  8. [Alzheimer's disease. Present and future role of genetics].

    PubMed

    Roks, Gerwin

    2003-02-01

    Research in the field of Alzheimer's disease has shown that genetic factors play an important role in the aetiology of the disease. Until now, four genes have been found to be implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) and the presenilin genes (PSEN1 en PSEN2) cause early onset Alzheimer's disease. These mutations segregate in an autosomal dominant pattern. The fourth gene involved in Alzheimer's disease is the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). Carriers of the E4 variant of APOE have an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. Being a carrier of this E4 variant increases the risk of both early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Of the four Alzheimer-genes, APOE plays the most important role in the general population. Mutations in APP and the presenilin genes account for less than 1% of the prevalence of the disease in the general population compared to 10-17% for the APOE variation. Up till now the impact of genetics in daily clinical practice is very limited. However, genetics has caused major progress in molecular-biological knowledge, especially of the amyloid metabolism, creating optimism about novel biological markers and eventually therapeutic strategies. In Alzheimer's genetics break-throughs are to be expected using classical methods such as the candidate-gene or linkage approach. Novel strategies such as genetic research in isolated populations are promising. PMID:12629906

  9. Factors associated with psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, N.; Mori, E.; Yasuda, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Imamura, T.; Shimomura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Yamashita, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Many clinical and biological factors have been reported to be associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease, although the associations were variable. The aim of this study was to clarify factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
METHODS—Psychiatric functioning was studied in 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease based on the results of the behavioural pathology in Alzheimer's disease rating scale or the neuropsychiatric inventory. The effects of sex, education level, age, duration of illness, cognitive function, and apolipoprotein E genotype were investigated for dichotomous psychotic status with a multiple logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS—Of the 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 118 (51.8%) showed evidence of delusions or hallucinations. Of these, 94 had delusions only, three had hallucinations only, and 21 had both. Older age, female sex, longer duration of illness, and more severe cognitive impairment were the factors independently associated with the presence of psychosis. The presence of psychosis was not significantly related to either educational level or apolipoprotein E genotype.
CONCLUSIONS—Age, sex, and severity of illness were independent factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The reason why some patients with Alzheimer's disease develop psychosis remains unclear. There may be distinctive subtypes of Alzheimer's disease or the presence of individual factors which affect the development of psychosis.

 PMID:9598682

  10. Are Judgments of Semantic Relatedness Systematically Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, M.; Bell, B.; Graham, K. S.; Rogers, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a triadic comparison task in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls to contrast (a) multidimensional scaling (MDS) and accuracy-based assessments of semantic memory, and (b) degraded-store versus degraded-access accounts of semantic impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Similar to other studies using triadic…

  11. 77 FR 66519 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-27196 Filed 11-5-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8897 of November 1, 2012 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2012... country confront the tragic realities of Alzheimer's disease--an irreversible, fatal illness that robs...

  12. 76 FR 68615 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-28840 Filed... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8745 of November 1, 2011 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011... heartbreak of watching a loved one struggle with Alzheimer's disease is a pain they know all too...

  13. 75 FR 67899 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-28062 Filed 11-3-10... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8591 of October 29, 2010 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Alzheimer's disease tragically...

  14. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  15. Distinct Mechanisms of Impairment in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapstone, Mark; Dickerson, Kathryn; Duffy, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Similar manifestations of functional decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease obscure differences in the underlying cognitive mechanisms of impairment. We sought to examine the contributions of top-down attentional and bottom-up perceptual factors to visual self-movement processing in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We administered a novel…

  16. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  17. Alzheimer's Disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an insidious neurological disorder that affects memory, one of the human brain's main cognitive functions. Around 5.2 million Americans currently have AD, and the number threatens to climb to 7 million by 2020. Our native country, Colombia, is no exception with an estimated 260,000 individuals to be affected by AD in 2020. A large, genetically-isolated community in Antioquia, Colombia, with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation is ideally suited for the study of molecular mechanisms of AD, and hence accelerate the discovery of new or alternative treatment approaches. In this regard, polyphenols--also known as polyhydroxyphenols--have shown antioxidant activity, gene regulation, metal chelator and anti-amyloidogenic aggregation effects. However, further in vitro and in vivo investigations are warranted to validate their use in clinical trials. Drosophila melanogaster is increasingly being used as a valid in vivo model of AD. Here, we summarise data published within the past 16 years (1998-2014) on the molecular biology of AD and the use of polyphenols in the fly to understand the molecular actions and feasibility of these compounds in the treatment of AD. PMID:26092625

  18. Diminished glucose transport and phosphorylation in Alzheimer`s disease determined by dynamic FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Piert, M.; Koeppe, R.A.; Giordani, B.; Berent, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Using dynamic [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and PET, kinetic rate constants that describe influx (K{sub 1}) and efflux (k{sub 2}) of FDG as well s phosphorylation (k{sub 3}) and dephosphorylation (k{sub 4}) were determined in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease and similarly aged normal controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMR{sub glu}) was calculated from individually fitted rate constants in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Dynamic PET scans were obtained in normal controls (n = 10, mean age = 67) and Alzheimer`s disease patients (n = 8, mean age = 67) for 60 min following injection of 10 mCi of FDG. The Alzheimer`s disease group was characterized by decreases of the CMR{sub glu} ranging from 13.3% in the frontal to 40.9% in the parietal cortex, which achieved significance in all regions except the thalamus. K{sub 1} was significantly reduced in the parietal (p < 0.01) and temporal cortices (p < 0.005), temporal and occipital cortex, and in the putamen and cerebellum (p < 0.05). The rate constants k{sub 2} and k{sub 4} were unchanged in the Alzheimer`s disease group. These data suggest that hypometabolism in Alzheimer`s disease is related to reduced glucose phosphorylation activity as well as diminished glucose transport, particularly in the most metabolically affected areas of the brain, the parietal and temporal cortex. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Fall ... 10 to 20 years before symptoms appear and Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed. Mild Alzheimer's dementia Memory problems ...

  20. When is category specific in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Laws, Keith R; Gale, Tim M; Leeson, Verity C; Crawford, John R

    2005-08-01

    Mixed findings have emerged concerning whether category-specific disorders occur in Alzheimer's disease. Factors that may contribute to these inconsistencies include: ceiling effects/skewed distributions for control data in some studies; differences in the severity of cognitive deficit in patients; and differences in the type of analysis (in particular, if and how controls are used to analyse single case data). We examined picture naming in Alzheimer's patients and matched elderly healthy normal controls in three experiments. These experiments used stimuli that did and did not produce ceiling effects/skewed data in controls. In Experiment 1, we examined for category effects in individual DAT patients using commonly used analyses for single cases (chi2 and z-scores). The different techniques produced quite different outcomes. In Experiment 2a, we used the same techniques on a different group of patients with similar outcomes. Finally, in Experiment 2b, we examined the same patients but (a) used stimuli that did not produce ceiling effects/skewed distributions in healthy controls, and (b) used statistical methods that did not treat the control sample as a population. We found that ceiling effects in controls may markedly inflate the incidence of dissociations in which living things are differentially impaired and seriously underestimate dissociations in the opposite direction. In addition, methods that treat the control sample as a population led to inflation in the overall number of dissociations detected. These findings have implications for the reliability of category effects previously reported both in Alzheimer patients and in other pathologies. In particular, they suggest that the greater proportion of living than nonliving deficits reported in the literature may be an artifact of the methods used. PMID:16042022

  1. Metabolic profiling of Alzheimer's disease brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Toyo'Oka, Toshimasa

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease and can be definitively diagnosed after death through an examination of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in several brain regions. It is to be expected that changes in the concentration and/or localization of low-molecular-weight molecules are linked to the pathological changes that occur in AD, and determining their identity would provide valuable information regarding AD processes. Here, we propose definitive brain metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. The acquired data were subjected to principal components analysis to differentiate the frontal and parietal lobes of the AD/Control groups. Significant differences in the levels of spermine and spermidine were identified using S-plot, mass spectra, databases and standards. Based on the investigation of the polyamine metabolite pathway, these data establish that the downstream metabolites of ornithine are increased, potentially implicating ornithine decarboxylase activity in AD pathology.

  2. Commentary: is Alzheimer's disease uniquely human?

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    That Alzheimer's disease (AD) might be a human-specific disease was hypothesized by Rapoport in 1989. Apes and humans share an identical amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide amino acid sequence and accumulate considerable Aβ deposits after age 40 years, an age when amyloid plaques are uncommon in humans. Despite their early Aβ buildup, ape brains have not shown evidence dystrophic neurites near plaques. Aging great ape brains also have few neurofibrillary tangles, with one exception of 1 obese chimpanzee euthanized after a stroke who displayed abundant neurofibrillary tangles, but without the typical AD distribution. We discuss the need for more exacting evaluation of neuron density with age, and note husbandry issues that may allow great apes to live to greater ages. We remain reserved about expectations for fully developed AD-like pathology in the great apes of advanced ages and cautiously support Rapoport's hypothesis. PMID:25533426

  3. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  4. FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updates FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... disease.” back to top New Paths for New Alzheimer’s Drugs FDA’s draft guidance aims to encourage research ...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Serý, Omar; Povová, Jana; Míšek, Ivan; Pešák, Lukáš; Janout, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    More than 100 years after description of Alzheimer's disease (AD), two major pathological processes observed already by Alois Alzheimer, remain as the main explanation of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Important molecular interactions leading to AD neuropathology were described in amyloid cascade and in tau protein function. No clinical trials with novel therapies based on amyloid cascade and tau protein hypotheses have been successful. The main aim of recent research is focused on the question what is primary mechanism leading to the molecular development of AD pathology. Promising explanation of triggering mechanism can be seen in vascular pathology that have direct influence on the development of pathological processes typical for Alzheimer disease. Novel insight into a number of cellular signaling mechanisms, as well as mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease could also bring explanations of initial processes leading to the development of this pathology.

  6. Challenges and opportunities: recruitment and retention of African Americans for Alzheimer disease research: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Edna L; Gwyther, Lisa P; Edmonds, Henry L

    2010-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the recruitment and retention of African Americans for research in Alzheimer disease have been regarded as difficult undertakings with poor results. The typical explanation for failure to respond to research participation options is a widespread mistrust of research and the biomedical community. Mistrust is a reasonable response; given the historic reality of malfeasance, victimization, and mistreatment over the course of the research participation history of African Americans. The challenges are real but there are opportunities for successful recruitment and retention of African Americans for research including research on Alzheimer disease. Participation, however, comes with specific terms and considerations. Two of the most prominent criteria for research recruitment and retention are the transparency and accountability of the investigator, which may determine how he or she proceeds from the start of the process throughout the steps of recruitment, retention, and subsequent follow-up with the community.

  7. Alzheimer disease and pre-emptive suicide.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dena S

    2014-08-01

    There is a flood of papers being published on new ways to diagnose Alzheimer disease (AD) before it is symptomatic, involving a combination of invasive tests (eg, spinal tap), and pen and paper tests. This changes the landscape with respect to genetic tests for risk of AD, making rational suicide a much more feasible option. Before the availability of these presymptomatic tests, even someone with a high risk of developing AD could not know if and when the disease was approaching. One could lose years of good life by committing suicide too soon, or risk waiting until it was too late and dementia had already sapped one of the ability to form and carry out a plan. One can now put together what one knows about one's risk, with continuing surveillance via these clinical tests, and have a good strategy for planning one's suicide before one becomes demented. This has implications for how these genetic and clinical tests are marketed and deployed, and the language one uses to speak about them. The phrase 'there is nothing one can do' is insulting and disrespectful of the planned suicide option, as is the language of the Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's Disease (REVEAL) studies and others that conclude that it is 'safe' to tell subjects their risk status for AD. Further, the argument put forward by some researchers that presymptomatic testing should remain within research protocols, and the results not shared with subjects until such time as treatments become available, disrespects the autonomy of people at high risk who consider suicide an option.

  8. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  9. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  10. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. The cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease: a review of progress

    PubMed Central

    Francis, P.; Palmer, A.; Snape, M.; Wilcock, G.

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common causes of mental deterioration in elderly people, accounting for around 50%-60% of the overall cases of dementia among persons over 65 years of age. The past two decades have witnessed a considerable research effort directed towards discovering the cause of Alzheimer's disease with the ultimate hope of developing safe and effective pharmacological treatments. This article examines the existing scientific applicability of the original cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease by describing the biochemical and histopathological changes of neurotransmitter markers that occur in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease both at postmortem and neurosurgical cerebral biopsy and the behavioural consequences of cholinomimetic drugs and cholinergic lesions. Such studies have resulted in the discovery of an association between a decline in learning and memory, and a deficit in excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmission, together with important roles for the cholinergic system in attentional processing and as a modulator of EAA neurotransmission. Accordingly, although there is presently no "cure" for Alzheimer's disease, a large number of potential therapeutic interventions have emerged that are designed to correct loss of presynaptic cholinergic function. A few of these compounds have confirmed efficacy in delaying the deterioration of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, a valuable treatment target considering the progressive nature of the disease. Indeed, three compounds have received European approval for the treatment of the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, first tacrine and more recently, donepezil and rivastigmine, all of which are cholinesterase inhibitors.

 PMID:10071091

  12. Sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders and exact a burden on our society greater than cardiovascular disease and cancer combined. While cognitive and motor symptoms are used to define AD and PD, respectively, patients with both disorders exhibit sleep disturbances including insomnia, hypersomnia and excessive daytime napping. The molecular basis of perturbed sleep in AD and PD may involve damage to hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei that control sleep-wake cycles. Perturbations in neurotransmitter and hormone signaling (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine and melatonin) and the neurotrophic factor BDNF likely contribute to the disease process. Abnormal accumulations of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide, tau and α-synuclein occur in brain regions involved in the regulation of sleep in AD and PD patients, and are sufficient to cause sleep disturbances in animal models of these neurodegenerative disorders. Disturbed regulation of sleep often occurs early in the course of AD and PD, and may contribute to the cognitive and motor symptoms. Treatments that target signaling pathways that control sleep have been shown to retard the disease process in animal models of AD and PD, suggesting a potential for such interventions in humans at risk for or in the early stages of these disorders. PMID:22552887

  13. Support Group Counseling for Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Describes Alzheimer's disease and the burdens that caregivers encounter in dealing with Alzheimer's patients. Presents information concerning support group counseling for caregivers, their particular needs, and special family issues. Emphasizes that relationships between caregivers and support group counselors are crucial to successful…

  14. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  15. Memory for music in Alzheimer's disease: unforgettable?

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2009-03-01

    The notion that memory for music can be preserved in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has been raised by a number of case studies. In this paper, we review the current research examining musical memory in patients with AD. In keeping with models of memory described in the non-musical domain, we propose that various forms of musical memory exist, and may be differentially impaired in AD, reflecting the pattern of neuropathological changes associated with the condition. Our synthesis of this literature reveals a dissociation between explicit and implicit musical memory functions. Implicit, specifically procedural musical memory, or the ability to play a musical instrument, can be spared in musicians with AD. In contrast, explicit musical memory, or the recognition of familiar or unfamiliar melodies, is typically impaired. Thus, the notion that music is unforgettable in AD is not wholly supported. Rather, it appears that the ability to play a musical instrument may be unforgettable in some musicians with AD. PMID:19214750

  16. Metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease: novelty matters.

    PubMed

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of non-conventional (novel) metaphor comprehension. This ability was not related to global cognitive deterioration or to deficits in the cognitive domains of attention, memory and language comprehension. On the other hand, the impairment in verbal reasoning appeared to be relevant for both novel and conventional metaphor comprehension. The relationship between novel metaphor comprehension and performance in the visual-spatial planning task of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) suggests that executive impairment, possibly related to prefrontal dysfunction, may be responsible for the pAD patients' poor performance in novel metaphor comprehension. The present findings suggest a role of the prefrontal cortex in novel metaphor comprehension.

  17. Mitochondria, Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, M.; Calsolaro, V.; Orsucci, D.; Carlesi, C.; Choub, A.; Piazza, S.; Siciliano, G.

    2009-01-01

    To date, the beta amyloid (Aβ) cascade hypothesis remains the main pathogenetic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its role in the majority of sporadic AD cases is unclear. The “mitochondrial cascade hypothesis” could explain many of the biochemical, genetic, and pathological features of sporadic AD. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could cause energy failure, increased oxidative stress, and accumulation of Aβ, which in a vicious cycle reinforce the mtDNA damage and the oxidative stress. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, no causative mutations in the mtDNA have been detected so far. Indeed, results of studies on the role of mtDNA haplogroups in AD are controversial. In this review we discuss the role of the mitochondria, and especially of the mtDNA, in the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, dementia, and AD. PMID:20798880

  18. Mitochondria, cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, M; Calsolaro, V; Orsucci, D; Carlesi, C; Choub, A; Piazza, S; Siciliano, G

    2009-01-01

    To date, the beta amyloid (Abeta) cascade hypothesis remains the main pathogenetic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its role in the majority of sporadic AD cases is unclear. The "mitochondrial cascade hypothesis" could explain many of the biochemical, genetic, and pathological features of sporadic AD. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could cause energy failure, increased oxidative stress, and accumulation of Abeta, which in a vicious cycle reinforce the mtDNA damage and the oxidative stress. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, no causative mutations in the mtDNA have been detected so far. Indeed, results of studies on the role of mtDNA haplogroups in AD are controversial. In this review we discuss the role of the mitochondria, and especially of the mtDNA, in the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, dementia, and AD. PMID:20798880

  19. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in Canada.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suzy L; Gilmour, Heather; Ramage-Morin, Pamela L

    2016-05-18

    This article provides information on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada. Among Canadians aged 45 or older, an estimated 0.8% in private households and 45% in long-term residential care facilities had a diagnosis of dementia. Prevalence rose with age. The vast majority of people with dementia in private households received assistance with medical care (81%), housework and home maintenance (83%), meal preparation (88%), emotional support (90%), transportation (92%), and managing care (92%). Among those receiving assistance, 85% relied, at least in part, on family, friends or neighbours. The primary caregiver tended to be a spouse (46%) or an adult child (44%), most of whom were daughters (71%). The majority of primary caregivers lived in the same household (83%) and provided daily care (86%). PMID:27192206

  20. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. D.; Crafford, A. M.; Markesbery, W. R.; Lovell, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented.

  1. Preserved conceptual priming in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla A R; Lloyd-Jones, Toby J

    2006-10-01

    We assessed Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy older adult control (HC) group performance on: (1) a conceptual priming task, in which participants had to make a semantic decision as to whether a degraded picture of an object encountered previously belonged to the category of living or non-living things; and (2) a recognition memory task. The AD group showed a dissociation between impaired performance on the recognition task and preserved priming for semantic decisions to degraded pictures. We argue that it is not whether priming is conceptual or perceptual that is important for the observation of priming in AD, rather it is the nature of the response that is required (c.f., Gabrieli et al., 1999). PMID:17172179

  2. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  3. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia.

  4. Hypothesis: microtubules, a key to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, S S; Jarvik, L F

    1989-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a clinicopathologic syndrome of unknown etiology with numerous abnormalities in neuronal and nonneuronal cells. A review of the literature suggests that a common basic intracellular defect may underlie many of the reported abnormalities. We hypothesize impairment of the microtubule (MT) system as one explanation for the pathogenesis of AD. Evidence in support of the hypothesis includes the following: MTs are ubiquitous and vital cell components, unequally distributed, with the highest concentration in the brain; various abnormalities, including the key neuropathologic lesions, can be explained by impairments of the MT system; and experiments utilizing pharmacologic agents known to disrupt MTs have reproduced certain abnormalities observed in AD. The hypothesis provides a framework for systematic investigations of MTs at the cellular and molecular levels as well as the basis for in vivo diagnostic tests for AD. PMID:2813384

  5. Sulfonamides as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bag, Seema; Tulsan, Rekha; Sood, Abha; Cho, Hyejin; Redjeb, Hana; Zhou, Weihong; LeVine, Harry; Török, Béla; Török, Marianna

    2015-02-01

    Sulfonamide linker-based inhibitors with extended linear structure were designed and synthesized with the aim of producing multifunctional agents against several processes involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The potency of the compounds were assessed in the inhibition of Aβ self-assembly (fibril and oligomer formation), in modulating cholinesterase (AChE, BuChE) activity, and scavenging free radicals. Several compounds exhibited promising Aβ self-assembly and cholinesterase inhibition and in parallel, showed good free radical scavenging properties. The investigation of the scaffold described in this study resulted in the identification of three compounds (14, 19 and 26) as promising leads for the further design of multifunctional drug candidates for AD.

  6. Implicit memory for music in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Halpern, A R; O'Connor, M G

    2000-07-01

    Short, unfamiliar melodies were presented to young and older adults and to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in an implicit and an explicit memory task. The explicit task was yes-no recognition, and the implicit task was pleasantness ratings, in which memory was shown by higher ratings for old versus new melodies (the mere exposure effect). Young adults showed retention of the melodies in both tasks. Older adults showed little explicit memory but did show the mere exposure effect. The AD patients showed neither. The authors considered and rejected several artifactual reasons for this null effect in the context of the many studies that have shown implicit memory among AD patients. As the previous studies have almost always used the visual modality for presentation, they speculate that auditory presentation, especially of nonverbal material, may be compromised in AD because of neural degeneration in auditory areas in the temporal lobes.

  7. Memory for music in Alzheimer's disease: unforgettable?

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2009-03-01

    The notion that memory for music can be preserved in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has been raised by a number of case studies. In this paper, we review the current research examining musical memory in patients with AD. In keeping with models of memory described in the non-musical domain, we propose that various forms of musical memory exist, and may be differentially impaired in AD, reflecting the pattern of neuropathological changes associated with the condition. Our synthesis of this literature reveals a dissociation between explicit and implicit musical memory functions. Implicit, specifically procedural musical memory, or the ability to play a musical instrument, can be spared in musicians with AD. In contrast, explicit musical memory, or the recognition of familiar or unfamiliar melodies, is typically impaired. Thus, the notion that music is unforgettable in AD is not wholly supported. Rather, it appears that the ability to play a musical instrument may be unforgettable in some musicians with AD.

  8. Understanding Family Interaction Patterns in Families With Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Schaber, Patricia; Blair, Kate; Jost, Ellen; Schaffer, Molly; Thurner, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the dynamic changes that occur in family interaction patterns when Alzheimer's disease is present. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 participants who have a family member with the disease. Using modified analytic induction, guided by the dimensions of the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) Model, participants shared how Alzheimer's disease affected family structure, control dynamics, and intimacy among family members. Findings demonstrate that (a) families reorganize and restructure based on geographic proximity and shifting roles, act out of filial responsibility, and strive to preserve shared meanings and rituals; (b) decision making increases around care of the person with Alzheimer's disease and shifts to the primary caregiver or other family members based on their abilities; and (c) expressions of intimacy intensify while personality is preserved in the person with the disease. The Family FIRO model can inform practitioners using family-centered care with families with Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Structural Neuroimaging Genetics Interactions in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok Woo; Dinov, Ivo D; Kim, Jaebum; Zamanyan, Alen; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates late-onset cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) participants. Eight-hundred and eight ADNI subjects were identified and divided into three groups: 200 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 383 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 225 asymptomatic normal controls (NC). Their structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were parcellated using BrainParser, and the 80 most important neuroimaging biomarkers were extracted using the global shape analysis Pipeline workflow. Using Plink via the Pipeline environment, we obtained 80 SNPs highly-associated with the imaging biomarkers. In the AD cohort, rs2137962 was significantly associated bilaterally with changes in the hippocampi and the parahippocampal gyri, and rs1498853, rs288503, and rs288496 were associated with the left and right hippocampi, the right parahippocampal gyrus, and the left inferior temporal gyrus. In the MCI cohort, rs17028008 and rs17027976 were significantly associated with the right caudate and right fusiform gyrus, rs2075650 (TOMM40) was associated with the right caudate, and rs1334496 and rs4829605 were significantly associated with the right inferior temporal gyrus. In the NC cohort, Chromosome 15 [rs734854 (STOML1), rs11072463 (PML), rs4886844 (PML), and rs1052242 (PML)] was significantly associated with both hippocampi and both insular cortices, and rs4899412 (RGS6) was significantly associated with the caudate. We observed significant correlations between genetic and neuroimaging phenotypes in the 808 ADNI subjects. These results suggest that differences between AD, MCI, and NC cohorts may be examined by using powerful joint models of morphometric, imaging and genotypic data. PMID:26444770

  10. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  11. The arsenic exposure hypothesis for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gordon; OʼBryant, Sid E

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has shown that arsenic exposure induces changes that coincide with most of the developmental, biochemical, pathologic, and clinical features of Alzheimer disease (AD) and associated disorders. On the basis of this literature, we propose the Arsenic Exposure Hypothesis for AD that is inclusive of and cooperative with the existing hypotheses. Arsenic toxicity induces hyperphosphorylation of protein tau and overtranscription of the amyloid precursor protein, which are involved in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and brain amyloid plaques, consistent with the amyloid hypothesis of AD. Arsenic exposure has been associated with cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors, which is in agreement with the vascular hypothesis of AD. Arsenic exposure invokes brain inflammatory responses, which resonates with the inflammatory hypotheses of AD. Arsenic exposure has been linked to reduced memory and intellectual abilities in children and adolescents, which provides a biologic basis for the developmental origin of health and disease hypothesis for AD. Arsenic and its metabolites generate free radicals causing oxidative stress and neuronal death, which fits the existing oxidative stress hypothesis. Taken together, the arsenic exposure hypothesis for AD provides a parsimonious testable hypothesis for the development and progression of this devastating disease at least for some subsets of individuals.

  12. Brain atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Pini, Lorenzo; Pievani, Michela; Bocchetta, Martina; Altomare, Daniele; Bosco, Paolo; Cavedo, Enrica; Galluzzi, Samantha; Marizzoni, Moira; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to its safety and accessibility, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensively used in clinical routine and research field, largely contributing to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the main findings in AD and normal aging over the past twenty years, focusing on the patterns of gray and white matter changes assessed in vivo using MRI. Major progresses in the field concern the segmentation of the hippocampus with novel manual and automatic segmentation approaches, which might soon enable to assess also hippocampal subfields. Advancements in quantification of hippocampal volumetry might pave the way to its broader use as outcome marker in AD clinical trials. Patterns of cortical atrophy have been shown to accurately track disease progression and seem promising in distinguishing among AD subtypes. Disease progression has also been associated with changes in white matter tracts. Recent studies have investigated two areas often overlooked in AD, such as the striatum and basal forebrain, reporting significant atrophy, although the impact of these changes on cognition is still unclear. Future integration of different MRI modalities may further advance the field by providing more powerful biomarkers of disease onset and progression. PMID:26827786

  13. Biomaterials for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Darya; Poot, André A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main barriers is the blood-brain barrier. The increasing prevalence of AD and the low efficacy of current therapies have increased the amount of research on unraveling of disease pathways and development of treatment strategies. One of the interesting areas for the latter subject is biomaterials and their applications. This interest originates from the fact that biomaterials are very useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents, such as drugs, proteins, and/or cells, in order to treat diseases and regenerate tissues. Recently, manufacturing of nano-sized delivery systems has increased the efficacy and delivery potential of biomaterials. In this article, we review the latest developments with regard to the use of biomaterials for the treatment of AD, including nanoparticles and liposomes for delivery of therapeutic compounds and scaffolds for cell delivery strategies. PMID:27379232

  14. Role of physical exercise in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEI-WEI; ZHANG, XIA; HUANG, WEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on the brain and general wellness are well recognised, but not particularly well known to the general public. Understanding the importance of integrating active behavior for overall health is crucial at any age and particularly for the elderly who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease mainly affecting individuals aged >65 years. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-β, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of the protein tau, brain atrophy and dementia. The beneficial effects of physical exercise have been observed on the maintenance of brain size and efficiency for the prevention of AD risks, such as obesity, hypertension and stroke. These effects are extended to individuals with, or at risk of dementia and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, although extensive studies are required to fully understand the mechanisms by which physical exercise procures beneficial effects, data suggest the relevance of integrating physical exercise in the prevention and/or cure of AD, disease whose incidence is predicted to increase in the future. Such an increase, may pose medical, social and economical challenges for populations and the health care system worldwide. In the present review we assess the positive aspects of physical exercise with regard to prevention and cure of AD. PMID:27073621

  15. Brain atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Pini, Lorenzo; Pievani, Michela; Bocchetta, Martina; Altomare, Daniele; Bosco, Paolo; Cavedo, Enrica; Galluzzi, Samantha; Marizzoni, Moira; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to its safety and accessibility, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensively used in clinical routine and research field, largely contributing to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the main findings in AD and normal aging over the past twenty years, focusing on the patterns of gray and white matter changes assessed in vivo using MRI. Major progresses in the field concern the segmentation of the hippocampus with novel manual and automatic segmentation approaches, which might soon enable to assess also hippocampal subfields. Advancements in quantification of hippocampal volumetry might pave the way to its broader use as outcome marker in AD clinical trials. Patterns of cortical atrophy have been shown to accurately track disease progression and seem promising in distinguishing among AD subtypes. Disease progression has also been associated with changes in white matter tracts. Recent studies have investigated two areas often overlooked in AD, such as the striatum and basal forebrain, reporting significant atrophy, although the impact of these changes on cognition is still unclear. Future integration of different MRI modalities may further advance the field by providing more powerful biomarkers of disease onset and progression.

  16. Role of Plant Polyphenols in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by notable memory loss, cognitive impairment, and personality disorders accompanied with structural abnormalities in the brain of aged population. Currently approved drugs for AD offer symptomatic relief without preventing the progression of the disease and having limited efficacy. Many experiments and clinical trials have shown that the traditional herbal medicine, which has multiple targets, could provide effective treatment of AD. Increasing evidence suggests that the plant derived polyphenols plays a key role in improving cognitive functions and preventing/delaying the onset of certain neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Although several biological effects based on experimental studies could be scientifically explained, the way to bring natural polyphenols into routine clinical application against neurodegeneration seems to be long, because of its low average daily intake, poor availability and few adverse effects. So the better knowledge about intestinal absorption, excretion, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, plasma kinetics, the nature of circulating metabolites, transport, cellular uptake, intracellular metabolism, and accumulation in tissues including brain will facilitate current scientific understanding and offer great hope for the prevention of AD. PMID:27651253

  17. Explorative and targeted neuroproteomics in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Portelius, Erik; Öhrfelt, Annika; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Andreasson, Ulf; Gobom, Johan; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain amyloidosis that injures brain regions involved in memory consolidation and other higher brain functions. Neuropathologically, the disease is characterized by accumulation of a 42 amino acid peptide called amyloid β (Aβ42) in extracellular senile plaques, intraneuronal inclusions of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal and axonal degeneration and loss. Biomarker assays capturing these pathologies have been developed for use on cerebrospinal fluid samples but there are additional molecular pathways that most likely contribute to the neurodegeneration and full clinical expression of AD. One way of learning more about AD pathogenesis is to identify novel biomarkers for these pathways and examine them in longitudinal studies of patients in different stages of the disease. Here, we discuss targeted proteomic approaches to study AD and AD-related pathologies in closer detail and explorative approaches to discover novel pathways that may contribute to the disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  18. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia. PMID:18580596

  19. Molecular links between Alzheimer's disease and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Song, W

    2013-10-10

    Substantial epidemiological evidence shows an increased risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in people with diabetes. Yet the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. This article reviews the current studies on common pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease and diabetes with particular focus on potential mechanisms through which diabetes affects the initiation and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Impairment of insulin signaling, inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, advanced glycation end products, APOEε4 and cholesterol appear to be important mediators and are likely to act synergistically in promoting AD pathology.

  20. Crowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Genevera I; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Bare, Christopher J; Beaton, Derek; Bellotti, Roberto; Bennett, David A; Boehme, Kevin L; Boutros, Paul C; Caberlotto, Laura; Caloian, Cristian; Campbell, Frederick; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Beibei; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chien, Ting-Ying; Clark, Tim; Das, Sudeshna; Davatzikos, Christos; Deng, Jieyao; Dillenberger, Donna; Dobson, Richard J B; Dong, Qilin; Doshi, Jimit; Duma, Denise; Errico, Rosangela; Erus, Guray; Everett, Evan; Fardo, David W; Friend, Stephen H; Fröhlich, Holger; Gan, Jessica; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glaab, Enrico; Green, Robert C; Guan, Yuanfang; Hong, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chao; Hwang, Jinseub; Ibrahim, Joseph; Inglese, Paolo; Iyappan, Anandhi; Jiang, Qijia; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Klein, Arno; Kong, Dehan; Krause, Roland; Lalonde, Emilie; Lauria, Mario; Lee, Eunjee; Lin, Xihui; Liu, Zhandong; Livingstone, Julie; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Lovestone, Simon; Ma, Tsung-Wei; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Mangravite, Lara M; Maxwell, Taylor J; Merrill, Emily; Nagorski, John; Namasivayam, Aishwarya; Narayan, Manjari; Naz, Mufassra; Newhouse, Stephen J; Norman, Thea C; Nurtdinov, Ramil N; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Pawitan, Yudi; Peng, Shengwen; Peters, Mette A; Piccolo, Stephen R; Praveen, Paurush; Priami, Corrado; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Senger, Philipp; Shen, Xia; Simmons, Andrew; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Tung, Yi-An; Tustison, Nicholas J; Varol, Erdem; Vradenburg, George; Weiner, Michael W; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Lei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Jia; Yang, Hojin; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yunyun; Zhu, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-06-01

    Identifying accurate biomarkers of cognitive decline is essential for advancing early diagnosis and prevention therapies in Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's disease DREAM Challenge was designed as a computational crowdsourced project to benchmark the current state-of-the-art in predicting cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer's disease based on high dimensional, publicly available genetic and structural imaging data. This meta-analysis failed to identify a meaningful predictor developed from either data modality, suggesting that alternate approaches should be considered for prediction of cognitive performance.

  1. Crowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Genevera I; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Bare, Christopher J; Beaton, Derek; Bellotti, Roberto; Bennett, David A; Boehme, Kevin L; Boutros, Paul C; Caberlotto, Laura; Caloian, Cristian; Campbell, Frederick; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Beibei; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chien, Ting-Ying; Clark, Tim; Das, Sudeshna; Davatzikos, Christos; Deng, Jieyao; Dillenberger, Donna; Dobson, Richard J B; Dong, Qilin; Doshi, Jimit; Duma, Denise; Errico, Rosangela; Erus, Guray; Everett, Evan; Fardo, David W; Friend, Stephen H; Fröhlich, Holger; Gan, Jessica; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glaab, Enrico; Green, Robert C; Guan, Yuanfang; Hong, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chao; Hwang, Jinseub; Ibrahim, Joseph; Inglese, Paolo; Iyappan, Anandhi; Jiang, Qijia; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Klein, Arno; Kong, Dehan; Krause, Roland; Lalonde, Emilie; Lauria, Mario; Lee, Eunjee; Lin, Xihui; Liu, Zhandong; Livingstone, Julie; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Lovestone, Simon; Ma, Tsung-Wei; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Mangravite, Lara M; Maxwell, Taylor J; Merrill, Emily; Nagorski, John; Namasivayam, Aishwarya; Narayan, Manjari; Naz, Mufassra; Newhouse, Stephen J; Norman, Thea C; Nurtdinov, Ramil N; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Pawitan, Yudi; Peng, Shengwen; Peters, Mette A; Piccolo, Stephen R; Praveen, Paurush; Priami, Corrado; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Senger, Philipp; Shen, Xia; Simmons, Andrew; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Tung, Yi-An; Tustison, Nicholas J; Varol, Erdem; Vradenburg, George; Weiner, Michael W; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Lei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Jia; Yang, Hojin; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yunyun; Zhu, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-06-01

    Identifying accurate biomarkers of cognitive decline is essential for advancing early diagnosis and prevention therapies in Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's disease DREAM Challenge was designed as a computational crowdsourced project to benchmark the current state-of-the-art in predicting cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer's disease based on high dimensional, publicly available genetic and structural imaging data. This meta-analysis failed to identify a meaningful predictor developed from either data modality, suggesting that alternate approaches should be considered for prediction of cognitive performance. PMID:27079753

  2. Neural stem cells and Alzheimer's disease: challenges and hope.

    PubMed

    Zhongling Feng; Gang Zhao; Lei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of synapses and neurons in brain regions critical for learning and memory functions. The endogenous generation of new neurons in certain regions of the mature brain, derived from primitive cells termed neural stem cells, has raised hope that neural stem cells may be recruited for structural brain repair. Stem cell therapy has been suggested as a possible strategy for replacing damaged circuitry and restoring learning and memory abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the promising investigations that are raising hope, and understanding the challenges behind translating underlying stem cell biology into novel clinical therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Acupuncture and moxibustion reduces neuronal edema in Alzheimer's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Guojie; Kong, Lihong; Du, Yanjun; Shen, Feng; Wang, Shuju; Chen, Bangguo; Zeng, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    To examine the possible correlation of aberrant Wnt signaling and pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease, we established a rat model of Alzheimer's disease and measured axin and β-catenin expression in the hippocampus. Rats were pretreated with moxibustion or electroacupuncture, or both, at Baihui (GV20) and Shenshu (BL23). Axin expression was lower, β-catenin expression was greater, and neuronal cytoplasmic edema was visibly prevented in the rats that had received the pretreatments. Our results suggest that the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of acupuncture and moxibustion in Alzheimer's disease is associated with axin and β-catenin expression in the Wnt signal transduction pathway. PMID:25206919

  4. Perception of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saifadini, Rostam; Tajadini, Haleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehrabani, Mitra; Kamalinegad, Mohamad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. In regards to the world’s aging population, control and treatment of AD will be one of the major concerns of global public health in the next century. Alzheimer disease was not mentioned with the same phrase or its equivalent in traditional medical texts. The main of present paper was to investigate symptoms and causes of alzheimer disease from the view point of Iranian traditional medicine. Evidence Acquisition: In this qualitative study, we searched reliable sources of Iranian traditional medicine such as Canon of Medicide by Avicenna (Al-Quanon fi- tibb), Aghili cure by Aghili’s (Molajat-E-aghili), Tib-E-Akbari, Exire -E-Aazam and Sharh-E-Asbab and some reliable resources of neurology were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlap in terms of symptoms with alzheimer disease. By taking from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Results: Findings showed that alzheimer disease has the most overlap with Nesyan (fisad-e-zekr, fisad-e-fekr and fisad-e-takhayol) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a perfect overlap and there are causes, including coldness and dryness of the brain or coldness and wetness that could also lead to alzheimer disease according to Iranian traditional medicine. Conclusions: According to Iranian traditional medicine, The brain dystemperement is considered the main causes of alzheimer disease. By correcting the brain dystemperement, alzheimer can be well managed. This study helps to suggest a better strategy for preventing and treating alzheimer in the future. PMID:27247784

  5. Cajal's contributions to the study of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    García-Marín, Virginia; García-López, Pablo; Freire, Miguel

    2007-09-01

    Last year 2006, we commemorated two important events in the history of Neuroscience. One hundred years ago, on November 3, Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) presented the first case of a patient with symptoms of a disease that later would be called Alzheimer's disease. One month later, on December 10, Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) and Camilo Golgi (1843-1926) received the Nobel Prize "in recognition of their work on the structure of the Nervous System". These facts seem not to be related, but working in the Museum Cajal we found 37 histological preparations of material from patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, revealing that Cajal also studied this disease. This paper deals with Cajal's contribution to the study of Alzheimer's disease and it is fully illustrated by original pictures of Cajal's slides preserved in the Cajal Museum, Madrid.

  6. [On the 100th anniversary of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Verhey, F R J

    2006-12-30

    In November 1906, the German neurologist Alois Alzheimer presented a lecture to his colleagues regarding a 55-year-old patient with dementia who was found to have aggregated protein deposits (senile plaques) and abnormal neurofibrils in the cerebral cortex. Alzheimer was born in 1864 in Bavaria. After he became financially independent through marriage, he could devote himself to neuropathological research. At the end of the 19th century, it was widely believed that dementia was the inevitable consequence of arteriosclerosis. Alzheimer questioned this belief after finding no postmortem evidence of arteriosclerotic vessel alterations in the brain of a young patient with dementia. After finding a second and third case, Alzheimer was convinced that he was on the verge of discovering a new disease. The eponym 'Alzheimer's disease' was introduced in 1910 by his mentor Kraepelin.

  7. [Angiotensin converting enzyme and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Kugaevskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an incurable degenerative disease of the central nervous system, leading to dementia. The basis of AD is neurodegenerative process that leads to death of neurons in the cerebral cortex. This neurodegenerative process is associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain and the deposition of senile plaques, the main component of which is a beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta). Risk factors for AD are age, as well as hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia in the pathogenesis of which involved angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)--key enzyme of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and kallikrein-kinin (KKS) systems. Recently it was discovered that ACE, along with other metallopeptidases, participates in the metabolism of Abeta, cleaving the bonds at the N-terminal and C-terminal region of the molecule Abeta. The role of the ACE in the degradation processes of Abeta takes an interest. It is associated with the fact that the using of ACE inhibitors is the main therapeutic approach used in the treatment of various forms of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. However, until now not been resolved, can be used antihypertensive drugs that inhibit RAS for the treatment or prevention of AD. Currently, there are numerous studies on finding the relationship between RAS and AD. PMID:23650720

  8. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  9. Neuroprotective strategies involving ROS in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Magali; Beal, M Flint

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which oxidative stress is a key hallmark. It occurs early in disease pathogenesis and can exacerbate its progression. Several causes of oxidative stress have been determined over the years. First, mitochondria play an important role in the generation and accumulation of free radicals. In addition to mitochondria, inflammation can also induce oxidative damage, especially via microglia, and microglia are also important for Aβ clearance. In AD, both mitochondrial function and inflammatory response are affected, leading to increased ROS formation and oxidative damage to lipid, proteins, and nucleic acids. Some other sources have also been identified. From these findings, various neuroprotective strategies against ROS-mediated damages have been elaborated in AD research. This review recapitulates some of the major strategies used to prevent oxidative stress and disease progression. Outcomes from in vitro and in vivo studies using models of AD are encouraging. However, only a few clinical trials have provided positive results in terms of slowing down cognitive decline. Nonetheless, there is still hope for improved compounds that would better target pathways implicated in ROS production. In fact, facilitating the endogenous antioxidant system by modulating transcription has great promise for AD therapy.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  11. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitsch, R. M.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Pittas, A. G.; Slack, B. E.; Growdon, J. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease.

  12. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N M; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-05-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non-Alzheimer

  14. Support for an hypothesis linking Alzheimer`s disease and Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, L.N.; Benjamin, M.B.; Dressler, D.

    1994-09-01

    A connection between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is indicated by the fact that Down syndrome individuals develop AD neuropathology by the third or fourth decade of life. One explanation for the connection between AD and Down syndrome would be that the overexpression of a gene or genes on chromosome 21 results in Alzheimer`s disease, the most likely candidate being the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. However, mutations in the APP gene have been found to be associated with only a very small percentage of familial AD cases. An alternative cause of some Alzheimer`s disease cases may be sporadic trisomy of chromosome 21, resulting from mutations or toxins that cause chromosome nondisjunction. Several predictions can be made based on this hypothesis. One prediction is that there should be more trisomy 21 in cells from AD individuals than from unaffected controls. Using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization to compare the number of trisomy chromosome 21 cells in cultured fibroblasts from AD and unaffected individuals, we have shown that there are a significantly larger number of trisomy 21 cells from AD individuals. Another prediction is that a defect in the mitotic spindle apparatus could be the underlying cause of the aneuploidy. Cultured lymphoblasts from AD and unaffected individuals were briefly exposed to the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine. As assayed by the subsequent appearance of metaphase chromosomes showing centromere separation, cells from AD patients were significantly more sensitive to colchicine treatment compared to cells from unaffected individuals, supporting the prediction of an altered spindle apparatus. Finally, we would predict that both types of patients should share some physical symptoms. We have also found that AD, like Down`s patients, are hypersensitive to the effect of the cholinergic antagonist, tropicamide, on pupil dilation, which may serve as a diagnostic test for Alzheimer`s disease.

  15. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Antigonadotropins: a novel strategy to halt Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher W; Atwood, Craig S; Smith, Mark A; Bowen, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    A significant amount of research has been focused on the relationship between hormones and Alzheimer's disease. However, the majority of this work has been on estrogen and more recently testosterone. A serendipitous patient encounter led one of us (RLB) to question whether other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis could be playing a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The age-related decline in reproductive function results in a dramatic decrease in serum estrogen and testosterone concentrations and an equally dramatic compensatory increase in serum luteinizing hormone concentrations. Indeed, there is growing evidence that the gonadotropin, luteinizing hormone, which regulates serum estrogen and testosterone concentrations, could be an important causative factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. This review provides information supporting the "gonadotropin hypothesis," puts forth a novel mechanism of how changes in serum luteinizing hormone concentrations could contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and discusses potential therapeutic anti-gonadotropin compounds.

  17. Gonadotropins: a cohesive gender-based etiology of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Webber, Kate M; Casadesus, Gemma; Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    While there is ample experimental evidence supporting the role of estrogen in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, recent inconclusive data regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT), specifically, the unexpected results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Memory Study has raised serious questions regarding the protective effects of estrogen. Because of this and other inconsistencies in the estrogen hypothesis, we propose that another hormone of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, luteinizing hormone, is a major factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Specifically, we suspect that the increase in gonadotropin concentrations, and not the decrease in steroid hormone (e.g., estrogen) production following menopause/andropause, is a primary causative factor for the development of Alzheimer disease. In this review, we examine how the gonadotropins may play a central and determining role in modulating the susceptibility to, and progression of, Alzheimer disease.

  18. Visual exploration behaviour during clock reading in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mosimann, U P; Felblinger, J; Ballinari, P; Hess, C W; Müri, R M

    2004-02-01

    Eye movement behaviour during visual exploration of 24 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 24 age-matched controls was compared in a clock reading task. Controls were found to focus exploration on distinct areas at the end of each clock hand. The sum of these two areas of highest fixation density was defined as the informative region of interest (ROI). In Alzheimer's disease patients, visual exploration was less focused, with fewer fixations inside the ROI, and the time until the first fixation was inside the ROI was significantly delayed. Changes of fixation distribution correlated significantly with the ability to read the clock correctly, but did not correlate with dementia severity. In Alzheimer's disease patients, fixations were longer and saccade amplitudes were smaller. The altered visual exploration in Alzheimer's disease might be related to parietal dysfunction or to an imbalance between a degraded occipito-parietal and relatively preserved occipito-temporal visual network. PMID:14691059

  19. Executive functions in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allain, P; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Verny, C

    2013-10-01

    Executive functions is an umbrella term describing a wide range of higher order processes that allow the flexible modification of thought and behaviour in response to changing cognitive or environmental contexts. Impairment of executive functions is common in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These deficits negatively affect everyday activities and hamper the ability to cope with other cognitive or behavioural disorders. In this paper, we propose a synthesis of the knowledge on executive impairments in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mostly leaning on the current studies made in this domain. We made some propositions for neuropsychological assessment of executive functions in preclinical and clinical phases of Alzheimer's disease. We hope that this overview will provide a useful insight into an area that is still insufficiently explored in the field of the neuropsychology of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Macrophage and polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J; Durst, G G; Majeski, J A

    1985-01-01

    Monocyte derived macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) isolated from the peripheral blood of thirteen patients with Alzheimer disease were studied for their cytotoxic effects on a sensitive allogenic tumor target. PMN cells from 11 of the 13 patients with Alzheimer disease were able to kill the tumor cells. In addition, the macrophages from 12 of the 13 Alzheimer disease patients were cytotoxic towards the tumor targets. Four of these patients possessed a plasma inhibitory factor which was capable of suppressing macrophage mediated cytotoxicity. When the lymphocytes from these patients were studied for their ability to be stimulated with the specific antigen, streptokinase, to produce macrophage activating factor (MAF), only 5 of the 13 patients studied possessed lymphocytes which were capable of producing MAF. Thus, the only immunological defect in Alzheimer disease patients which was observed in this study was in the ability of the lymphocytes to synthesize MAF. PMID:4084662

  1. Lentivirus-expressed siRNA vectors against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kevin A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and the accumulation of APP products ultimately leads to the familiar histopathological and clinical manifestations associated with this most common form of dementia. A protein that has been shown to promote APP accumulation is beta-secretase (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, or BACE1), which is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid in those affected with Alzheimer disease. Through in vivo studies using APP transgenic mice, we demonstrated that decreasing the expression of BACE1 via lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA has the potential for significantly reducing the cleavage of APP, accumulation of these products, and consequent neurodegeneration. As such, lentiviral-expressed siRNA against BACE1 is a therapeutic possibility in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. We detail the use of lentivirus-expressed siRNA as a method to ameliorate Alzheimer disease neuropathology in APP transgenic mice.

  2. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials.

  3. Ayurvedic medicinal plants for Alzheimer's disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-associated, irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, unusual behavior, personality changes, and a decline in cognitive function. No cure for Alzheimer's exists, and the drugs currently available to treat the disease have limited effectiveness. It is believed that therapeutic intervention that could postpone the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease would dramatically reduce the number of cases in the next 50 years. Ayurvedic medicinal plants have been the single most productive source of leads for the development of drugs, and over a hundred new products are already in clinical development. Indeed, several scientific studies have described the use of various Ayurvedic medicinal plants and their constituents for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact mechanism of their action is still not clear, phytochemical studies of the different parts of the plants have shown the presence of many valuable compounds, such as lignans, flavonoids, tannins, polyphenols, triterpenes, sterols, and alkaloids, that show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-cholinesterase, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects. This review gathers research on various medicinal plants that have shown promise in reversing the Alzheimer's disease pathology. The report summarizes information concerning the phytochemistry, biological, and cellular activities and clinical applications of these various plants in order to provide sufficient baseline information that could be used in drug discovery campaigns and development process, thereby providing new functional leads for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22747839

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Mario; Dominguez, Ligia J

    2014-12-15

    Epidemiological and biological evidences support a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Persons with diabetes have a higher incidence of cognitive decline and an increased risk of developing all types of dementia. Cognitive deficits in persons with diabetes mainly affect the areas of psychomotor efficiency, attention, learning and memory, mental flexibility and speed, and executive function. The strong epidemiological association has suggested the existence of a physiopathological link. The determinants of the accelerated cognitive decline in DM2, however, are less clear. Increased cortical and subcortical atrophy have been evidenced after controlling for diabetic vascular disease and inadequate cerebral circulation. Most recent studies have focused on the role of insulin and insulin resistance as possible links between diabetes and AD. Disturbances in brain insulin signaling mechanisms may contribute to the molecular, biochemical, and histopathological lesions in AD. Hyperglycemia itself is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Hypoglycemia may also have deleterious effects on cognitive function. Recurrent symptomatic and asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes have been suggested to cause sub-clinical brain damage, and permanent cognitive impairment. Future trials are required to clarify the mechanistic link, to address the question whether cognitive decline may be prevented by an adequate metabolic control, and to elucidate the role of drugs that may cause hypoglycemic episodes.

  5. Adverse Stress, Hippocampal Networks, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Sarah M.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent clinical data have implicated chronic adverse stress as a potential risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and data also suggest that normal, physiological stress responses may be impaired in AD. It is possible that pathology associated with AD causes aberrant responses to chronic stress, due to potential alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent work in rodent models of AD suggests that chronic adverse stress exacerbates the cognitive deficits and hippocampal pathology that are present in the AD brain. This review summarizes recent findings obtained in experimental AD models regarding the influence of chronic adverse stress on the underlying cellular and molecular disease processes including the potential role of glucocorticoids. Emerging findings suggest that both AD and chronic adverse stress affect hippocampal neural networks in a similar fashion. We describe alterations in hippocampal plasticity that occur in both chronic stress and AD including dendritic remodeling, neurogenesis and long-term potentiation. Finally, we outline potential roles for oxidative stress and neurotrophic factor signaling as key determinants of the impact of chronic stress on the plasticity of neural networks and AD pathogenesis. PMID:19943124

  6. Association between alcohol and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by dense deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein in the brain, failure of the memory and dementia. At present, there is no cure for AD and current treatments only provide a temporary reduction of symptoms. Thus, there is a need for effective preventive/curative strategic approaches. Accordingly, epidemiological studies have reported a reduction in the prevalence of AD in individuals ingesting low amounts of alcohol, while a moderate consumption of ethanol may protect against Aβ. These data are conflicting with other observations that assigned detrimental effects of heavy alcohol use on brain function, which are apparently similar to those observed in AD. These discrepancies questioned whether or not alcohol is a protective agent against the development of AD, whether the probable protective effects are influenced by the quantity and/or frequency of drinking. These issues are addressed in this review with the aim to suggest the real risk of alcohol for developing or preventing AD. PMID:27588045

  7. Deregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingxuan; Huang, Yu; Li, Bin; Gong, Cheng-Xing; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been previously reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To extend these findings, several sphingolipids and sphingolipid hydrolases were analyzed in brain samples from AD patients and age-matched normal individuals. We found a pattern of elevated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and acid ceramidase (AC) expression in AD, leading to a reduction in sphingomyelin and elevation of ceramide. More sphingosine also was found in the AD brains, although sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels were reduced. Notably, significant correlations were observed between the brain ASM and S1P levels and the levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau protein. Based on these findings, neuronal cell cultures were treated with Aβ oligomers, which were found to activate ASM, increase ceramide, and induce apoptosis. Pre-treatment of the neurons with purified, recombinant AC prevented the cells from undergoing Aβ-induced apoptosis. We propose that ASM activation is an important pathological event leading to AD, perhaps due to Aβ deposition. The downstream consequences of ASM activation are elevated ceramide, activation of ceramidases, and production of sphingosine. The reduced levels of S1P in the AD brain, together with elevated ceramide, likely contribute to the disease pathogenesis. PMID:18547682

  8. Integrated cortical structural marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jing; Harms, Michael P; Morris, John C; Beg, M Faisal; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we propose an approach to integrate cortical morphology measures for improving the discrimination of individuals with and without very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). FreeSurfer was applied to scans collected from 83 participants with very mild AD and 124 cognitively normal individuals. We generated cortex thickness, white matter convexity (aka "sulcal depth"), and white matter surface metric distortion measures on a normalized surface atlas in this first study to integrate high resolution gray matter thickness and white matter surface geometric measures in identifying very mild AD. Principal component analysis was applied to each individual structural measure to generate eigenvectors. Discrimination power based on individual and combined measures are compared, based on stepwise logistic regression and 10-fold cross-validation. Global AD likelihood index and surface-based likelihood maps were also generated. Our results show complementary patterns on the cortical surface between thickness, which reflects gray matter atrophy, convexity, which reflects white matter sulcal depth changes and metric distortion, which reflects white matter surface area changes. The classifier integrating all 3 types of surface measures significantly improved classification performance compared with classification based on single measures. The principal component analysis-based approach provides a framework for achieving high discrimination power by integrating high-dimensional data, and this method could be very powerful in future studies for early diagnosis of diseases that are known to be associated with abnormal gyral and sulcal patterns. PMID:25444604

  9. Alzheimer disease immunotherapeutics: then and now.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Sk, Shashikantha; Singh Malik, Jagbir

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a public health priority and one of the major contributors to morbidity and global non-communicable disease burden, thus necessitating the need for significant health-care interventions. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60-70% of cases. The cause and progression of AD are not well understood but have been thought to be due at least in part to protein misfolding (proteopathy) manifest as plaque accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau proteins in brain. There are about 8 million new cases per year. The total number of people with dementia is projected to almost double every 20 years, to 66 million in 2030 and 115 million in 2050. Immunotherapy in AD aimed at β-amyloid covers 2 types of vaccination: active vaccination against Aβ42 in which patients receive injections of the antigen itself, or passive vaccination in which patients receive injections of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against Aβ42. Three of the peptide vaccines for active immunizations, CAD106, ACC001, and Affitope, are in phase 2 clinical trials. Three of the mAbs solanezumab, gantenerumab, and crenezumab, are or were in phase 2 and 3 clinical studies. While the phase 3 trials failed, one of these may have shown a benefit at least in mild forms of AD. There is a need for a greater initiative in the development of immunotherapeutics. Several avenues have been explored and still to come.

  10. Brain injury, neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    With as many as 300,000 United States troops in Iraq and Afghanistan having suffered head injuries (Miller, 2012), traumatic brain injury (TBI) has garnered much recent attention. While the cause and severity of these injuries is variable, severe cases can lead to lifelong disability or even death. While aging is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is now becoming clear that a history of TBI predisposes the individual to AD later in life (Sivanandam and Thakur, 2012). In this review article, we begin by defining hallmark pathological features of AD and the various forms of TBI. Putative mechanisms underlying the risk relationship between these two neurological disorders are then critically considered. Such mechanisms include precipitation and ‘spreading’ of cerebral amyloid pathology and the role of neuroinflammation. The combined problems of TBI and AD represent significant burdens to public health. A thorough, mechanistic understanding of the precise relationship between TBI and AD is of utmost importance in order to illuminate new therapeutic targets. Mechanistic investigations and the development of preclinical therapeutics are reliant upon a clearer understanding of these human diseases and accurate modeling of pathological hallmarks in animal systems. PMID:23874297

  11. Impairment of homonymous processing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Massimo; D'Alessandro, Patrizia; Micheletti, Norma; Macone, Sara; Scarponi, Laura; Arcelli, Paola; Petrillo, Stefania Maria; Silvestrini, Mauro; Luzzi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    An important issue in research on language is how concepts are represented and associated with each other in the brain. Many investigations have focused on language ambiguity and the phenomenon of homonymy in which a single lexical item, presenting the same form, is related to different meanings. Our study aims to test the hypothesis that weak association of meaning characterizing homonyms may be especially prone to brain damage. To verify this hypothesis a test of attribution of the meaning of homonymous words, the Humpty Dumpty (HD) test, was applied to 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 50 healthy subjects. Results show that AD patients are impaired in the HD test in an early phase of disease and that performance correlates with naming ability and phonological fluency. The data are in keeping with a growing body of literature that supports dual impairment to the semantic system in AD, i.e., to semantic knowledge and active processing and access to the semantic field. The evaluation of the ability to resolve homonymous ambiguity, using the HD test, may provide a useful and quick clinical tool to detect the anomalies of the semantic network linked to either a loss of the core system where meaning of words is stored or an impairment of the access to an intact semantic representation.

  12. Ethical issues in Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Leuzy, Antoine; Gauthier, Serge

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for the majority of dementia cases and leaves clinicians, patients, family members, caregivers, and researchers faced with numerous ethical issues that vary and evolve as a function of disease stage and severity. While the disclosure of a diagnosis of AD dementia is difficult enough, advances in the neurobiology of AD--embodied in the recent revisions to the AD diagnostic guidelines--have translated into an increasing shift toward the diagnosis being made in its pre-dementia stages, when patients have full insight into their prognosis. Genetic issues in AD are significant in the case of rare families with an early onset (before age 65) form of the disease, owing to the presence of deterministic mutations. While genetic testing for the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene--a risk factor for sporadic AD--is widely debated, it may become necessary in the context of novel disease-modifying drugs. The current symptomatic drugs--cholinesterase inhibitors (CIs) and the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine--are relatively simple to use but their access is limited in many countries by economic considerations and therapeutic nihilism. Although their efficacy is modest, they influence the design of protocols for new drugs since placebo treatment in clinical trials involving patients with established dementia is rarely allowed beyond 3 months. Driving privileges are lost in the moderate stages of dementia, with this decision ideally reached using a standardized assessment algorithm. Physical restraints are still overused in moderate-to-severe stages, but the alternative non-pharmacological therapies and caregiver training programs are not yet fully validated using randomized studies. End-of-life care is slowly moving towards a palliative care approach similar to that for end-stage cancer. There will be new drugs in the near future, some of which will delay progression from prodromal stages to dementia, but their use will require careful stopping rules

  13. Circulating Biomarker Panels in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Sachli; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis of diseases frequently represents an important unmet clinical need supporting in-time treatment of pathologies. This also applies to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, estimated to affect millions of individuals worldwide. The respective diagnostic and prognostic markers, especially for the preclinical stages of AD, are expected to improve patients' outcome significantly. In the last decades, many approaches to detecting AD have been developed, including markers to discover changes in amyloid-β levels [from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or using positron emission tomography] or other brain imaging technologies such as structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional-connectivity MRI or task-related functional MRI. A major challenge is the detection of AD using minimally or even noninvasive biomarkers from body fluids such as plasma or serum. Circulating biomarker candidates based on mRNAs or proteins measured from blood cells, plasma or serum have been proposed for various pathologies including AD. As for other diseases, there is a tendency to use marker signatures obtained by high-throughput approaches, which allow the generation of profiles of hundreds to thousands of biomarkers simultaneously [microarrays, mass spectrometry or next-generation sequencing (NGS)]. Beyond mRNAs and proteins, recent approaches have measured small noncoding RNA (so-called microRNA) profiles in AD patients' blood samples using NGS or array-based technologies. Generally, the development of marker panels is in its early stages and requires further, substantial clinical validation. In this review, we provide an overview of different circulating AD biomarkers, starting with a brief summary of CSF markers and focusing on novel biomarker signatures such as small noncoding RNA profiles.

  14. Altered Superficial White Matter on Tractography MRI in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Superficial white matter provides extensive cortico-cortical connections. This tractography study aimed to assess the diffusion characteristics of superficial white matter tracts in Alzheimer's disease. Methods Diffusion tensor 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired in 24 controls and 16 participants with Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychological test scores were available in some participants. Tractography was performed by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking (FACT) method. The superficial white matter was manually segmented and divided into frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AxD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of these tracts were compared between controls and participants with Alzheimer's disease and correlated with available cognitive tests while adjusting for age and white matter hyperintensity volume. Results Alzheimer's disease was associated with increased MD (p = 0.0011), increased RD (p = 0.0019) and increased AxD (p = 0.0017) in temporal superficial white matter. In controls, superficial white matter was associated with the performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Stroop and Trail Making Test B tests, whereas in Alzheimer's disease patients, it was not associated with the performance on cognitive tests. Conclusion Temporal lobe superficial white matter appears to be disrupted in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27489557

  15. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27629855

  16. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  17. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  19. "Will I get Alzheimer disease?" when cognitively normal patients ask to be tested for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Snider, B Joy; Buckles, Virginia D

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the case of a cognitively normal patient who is requesting a procedure (amyloid imaging) recently approved for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with cognitive impairment. The predictive value of this test in unaffected people is not clearly established. Knowing the results of the test will have no effect on therapeutic options, although the patient may make lifestyle decisions based on the results. There is potential risk to the patient in terms of insurability, employability, and psychological consequences. Physicians will face this situation with increasing frequency as the AD biomarker field progresses.

  20. [Selegiline in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Obenberger, J; Roth, J

    1995-06-14

    Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60-70% of all dementias. Although its etiology has not been elucidated so far, its multiple transmitter effect has been proved reliably. Treatment with selegiline, 10 mg per day, which blocks irreversibly monoaminooxidase type B, when administered on a long-term basis, revealed improvement of cognitive functions and of general functional fitness during objective examinations by means of a battery of psychometric tests. The danger of a hypertensive crisis due to excessive supplies of exogenous monoamines ("cheese effect") can be ruled out when this dose is used. Selegiline has moreover a detoxicating potential and the ability to block the transformation of some protoxins into an effective toxin. The reduced formation of free radicals is of particular importance. The latter participate in a significant way in the destruction of cellular membranes, proteins and nucleic acids. In experiments on rats selegiline improves sexual functions, learning and its use significantly prolongs survival. As a symptomatic drug selegiline is the drug of choice in AD. Only future studies will show the justification of extensive preventive medication in advanced age groups.

  1. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  2. Early neuropsychological detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bastin, C; Salmon, E

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle modification offers a promising way of preventing or delaying Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, nutritional interventions can contribute to decrease the risk of dementia. The efficacy of such interventions should be assessed in individuals thought to be prone to AD. It is therefore necessary to identify markers that may help detecting AD as early as possible. This review will focus on subtle neuropsychological changes that may already exist in the predementia phase, and that could point to individuals at risk of dementia. Episodic memory decline appears consistently as the earliest sign of incipient typical AD. An episodic memory test that ensures deep encoding of information and assesses retrieval with free as well as cued recall appears as a useful tool to detect patients at an early stage of AD. Beyond the memory domain, category verbal fluency has been shown to decline early and to predict progression to AD. Moreover, in line with current diagnosis criteria for prodromal AD, combining neuropsychological scores and neuroimaging data allows a better discrimination of future AD patients than neuroimaging or neuropsychological data alone. Altogether, the detection of cognitive changes that are predictive of the typical form of probable AD already in the predementia stage points to at risk people who are the best target for therapeutic interventions, such as nutrition or physical exercise counseling or dietary interventions. PMID:25182019

  3. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  4. Spatial Navigation in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Samantha L.; Fagan, Anne M.; Morris, John C.; Head, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated navigational deficits in early-stage symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), navigational abilities in preclinical AD have not been examined. The present investigation examined the effects of preclinical AD and early-stage symptomatic AD on spatial navigation performance. Performance on tasks of wayfinding and route learning in a virtual reality environment were examined. Comparisons were made across the following three groups: Clinically normal without preclinical AD (n = 42), clinically normal with preclinical AD (n = 13), and early-stage symptomatic AD (n = 16) groups. Preclinical AD was defined based on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels below 500 pg/ml. Preclinical AD was associated with deficits in the use of a wayfinding strategy, but not a route learning strategy. Moreover, post-hoc analyses indicated that wayfinding performance had moderate sensitivity and specificity. Results also confirmed early-stage symptomatic AD-related deficits in the use of both wayfinding and route learning strategies. The results of this study suggest that aspects of spatial navigation may be particularly sensitive at detecting the earliest cognitive deficits of AD. PMID:26967209

  5. Frontotemporal Dementia: Implications for Understanding Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Michel; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) comprises a group of behavioral, language, and movement disorders. On the basis of the nature of the characteristic protein inclusions, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be subdivided into the common FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP as well as the less common FTLD-FUS and FTLD-UPS. Approximately 10% of cases of FTD are inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner. Mutations in seven genes cause FTD, with those in tau (MAPT), chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), and progranulin (GRN) being the most common. Mutations in MAPT give rise to FTLD-tau and mutations in C9ORF72 and GRN to FTLD-TDP. The other four genes are transactive response–DNA binding protein-43 (TARDBP), fused in sarcoma (FUS), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B). Mutations in TARDBP and VCP give rise to FTLD-TDP, mutations in FUS to FTLD-FUS, and mutations in CHMP2B to FTLD-UPS. The discovery that mutations in MAPT cause neurodegeneration and dementia has important implications for understanding Alzheimer disease. PMID:22355793

  6. [Car driving, cognitive aging and Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Fabrigoule, Colette; Lafont, Sylviane

    2015-10-01

    Older drivers are more numerous on the roads. They are expert drivers, but with increasing age certain physiological changes can interfere with driving, which is a complex activity of daily living. Older drivers are involved in fewer accidents than younger drivers, but they have a higher accident rate per kilometer driven. The elderly are heavily represented in the balance sheet of road deaths, being motorists or pedestrians. This high mortality is largely explained by their physical frailty. In the presence of deficits, self-regulation of driving habits, changes/reductions or stopping in driving activity occur in the elderly. But cognitive deficits are associated with an increased risk of accidents. Among drivers with Alzheimer's disease, there is a heterogeneity of driving ability, making difficult the advisory role of a physician for driving. A protocol for physicians was developed to assess cognitive impairments that may affect driving in an elderly patient. The car plays an important role in the autonomy of the elderly and patient advice on stopping driving should take into account the risk/benefit ratio. PMID:26009241

  7. Vascular and metabolic reserve in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Kondoh, Y; Atchison, R; Sato, M; Satoh, Y; Watahiki, Y; Hirata, Y; Yokoyama, E

    2000-01-01

    Vascular and metabolic reserve were analyzed in probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured quantitatively with positron emission tomography (PET). Vascular reactivity (VR) was also calculated by comparing the CBF during 5% CO(2) inhalation with the CBF during normal breathing. Vascular transit time (VTT) that was calculated as a ratio of CBV/CBF and VR reflect vasodilating capacity of the small resistance vessels, whereas OEF designates metabolic (oxygen-extraction) reserve in threatening brain ischemia. Significant increase in OEF was seen in the parieto-temporal cortex and both VTT and VR were preserved in AD patients. By constrast, there was no significant increase in OEF whereas VTT was prolonged and VR was markedly depressed in VaD patients. The increase of OEF and preserved VTT and VR seen in AD patients indicate the possible participation of vascular factors in the pathogenesis of AD perhaps at the capillary level.

  8. "Is dopamine involved in Alzheimer's disease?".

    PubMed

    Martorana, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Recent advances indicate that AD pathogenesis appears more complex than its mere neuropathology. Changes in synaptic plasticity, neuronal disarray and cell death are pathways commonly recognized as pathogenic mechanisms of AD. It is thought that the altered metabolism of certain membrane proteins may lead to the production of amyloid (Aβ) oligomers that are characterized by an highly toxic effect on neurotransmission pathways, such as those mediated by Acetylcholine. The interaction of Aβ oligomers with these neurotansmitters systems would in turn induce cell dysfunction, neurotransmitters signaling imbalance and finally lead to the appearance of neurological signs. In this perspective, it is still debated how and if these mechanisms may also engage the dopaminergic system in AD. Recent experimental work revealed that the dopaminergic system may well be involved in the occurrence of cognitive decline, often being predictive of rapidly progressive forms of AD. However, a clear idea on the role of the dopamine system in AD is still missing. Here we review the more recent evidences supporting the notion that the dopaminergic dysfunction has a pathogenic role in cognitive decline symptoms of AD. PMID:25309431

  9. Reduced hippocampal glutamate in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rupsingh, R; Borrie, M; Smith, M; Wells, J L; Bartha, R

    2011-05-01

    Altered neurometabolic profiles have been detected in Alzheimer disease (AD) using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), but no definitive biomarker of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD has been established. This study used MRS to compare hippocampal metabolite levels between normal elderly controls (NEC) and subjects with MCI and AD. Short echo-time (TE=46 ms) (1)H spectra were acquired at 4T from the right hippocampus of 23 subjects with AD, 12 subjects with MCI and 15 NEC. Absolute metabolite levels and metabolite ratios were compared between groups using a multivariate analysis of covariance (covariates: age, sex) followed by post hoc Tukey's test (p<0.05 significant). Subjects with AD had decreased glutamate (Glu) as well as decreased Glu/creatine (Cr), Glu/myo-inositol (mI), Glu/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and NAA/Cr ratios compared to NEC. Subjects with AD also had decreased Glu/mI ratio compared to MCI. There were no differences between subjects with MCI and NEC. Therefore, in addition to NAA/Cr, decreased hippocampal Glu may be an indicator of AD.

  10. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Amoroso, Salvatore; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  11. Cognitive Correlates of Metamemory in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Danielle; Farrell, Meagan; Huey, Edward; Metcalfe, Janet; Cines, Sarah; Karlawish, Jason; Sullo, Elisabeth; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Metamemory, or knowledge of one's memory abilities, is often impaired in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), although the basis of this metacognitive deficit has not been fully articulated. Behavioral and imaging studies have produced conflicting evidence regarding the extent to which specific cognitive domains (i.e., executive functioning (EF), memory) and brain regions contribute to memory awareness. The primary aim of this study was to disentangle the cognitive correlates of metamemory in AD by examining the relatedness of objective metamemory performance to cognitive tasks grouped by domain (EF or memory) as well as by preferential hemispheric reliance defined by task modality (verbal or nonverbal). Method 89 participants with mild AD recruited at Columbia University Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania underwent objective metamemory and cognitive testing. Partial correlations were used to assess the relationship between metamemory and four cognitive variables, adjusted for recruitment site. Results The significant correlates of metamemory included nonverbal fluency (r = .27 p = .02) and nonverbal memory (r = .24, p = .04). Conclusions Our findings suggest that objectively measured metamemory in a large sample of individuals with mild AD is selectively related to a set of inter-domain nonverbal tasks. The association between metamemory and the nonverbal tasks may implicate a shared reliance on a right-sided cognitive network that spans frontal and temporal regions. PMID:24819066

  12. 5-HT6 receptors and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Javier

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the 5-HT6 receptor has received increasing attention and become a promising target for improving cognition. Several studies with structurally different compounds have shown that not only antagonists but also 5-HT6 receptor agonists improve learning and memory in animal models. A large number of publications describing the development of ligands for this receptor have come to light, and it is now quite evident that 5-HT6 receptors have great pharmaceutical potential in terms of related patents. However, 5-HT6 receptor functionality is much more complex than initially defined. According to the existing data, different cellular pathways may be activated, depending on the drug being used. This article reviews preclinical and clinical evidence of the effects that 5-HT6 receptor compounds have on cognition. In addition, the biochemical and neurochemical mechanisms of action through which 5-HT6 receptor compounds can influence cognition will be described. Overall, several 5-HT6-targeted compounds can reasonably be regarded as powerful drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  14. Brainstem morphological changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Han; Ryan, John; Andreescu, Carmen; Aizenstein, Howard; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2015-05-01

    As brainstem nuclei are interconnected with several cortical structures and regulate several autonomic, cognitive, and behavioral functions, it might be important to place the brainstem within an important pathologic core in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although there have been several postmortem studies reporting neuropathological alterations of the brainstem in AD, there has been no in-vivo structural neuroimaging study of the brainstem in the patients with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the brainstem volume and shape between patients with AD and elderly normal controls. Fifty AD patients (the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale ≥ 1) and 50 normal controls were recruited, and the brainstem volumes and deformations were compared between the AD and the controls. Patients with AD showed significant total volume [(mean ± SD) 21007 ± 1640 mm] reduction in the brainstem compared with the controls [(mean ± SD) 22530 ± 1750 mm] (P<0.001). In addition, AD patients showed significant brainstem deformations in the upper posterior brainstem corresponding to the midbrain compared with the healthy individuals (false discovery rate corrected P<0.05). This study is the first to explore brainstem volume change and deformations in AD. These structural changes in the midbrain areas might be at the core of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of brainstem dysfunction with relevance to their various cognitive and behavioral symptoms such as memory impairment, sleep, and emotional disturbance in AD. However, further longitudinal studies might be needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25830491

  15. Copper Chelation in Alzheimer's Disease Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people in the U.S. AD is primarily characterized at the cellular level by densely tangled fibrils of amyloid- β protein. These protein clusters have been found in association with elevated levels of multiple transition metals, with copper being the most egregious. Interestingly, metal chelation has shown promise in attenuating the symptoms of AD in recent clinical studies. We investigate this process by constructing an atomistic model of the amyloid- β-copper complex and profile the energetic viability in each of its subsequent disassociation stages. Our results indicate that five energetic barriers must be overcome for full metal chelation. The energy barriers are biologically viable in the presence water mediated bond and proton transfer between the metal and the protein. We model the chelation reaction using a consecutive path nudged elastic band method implemented in our ab initio real-space multi-grid code to obtain a viable sequence. This reaction model details a physically consistent explanation of the chelation process that could lead to the discovery of more effective chelation agents in the treatment of AD.

  16. [Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease and Nutrients].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    The dietary recommendations for the prevention and management of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are the Mediterranean diet and the Japanese-style diet, both of which contain well-balanced nutrients from fish and vegetables. These diets are rich in vitamin E, carotenes, antioxidant flavonoids, vitamin B12, folate, and n-3PUFA. According to recent review supplementation of folate and vitamin E may protect against elderly people's cognitive decline when the serum folate is <12 nmol/L or the vitamin E intake is <6.1 mg/day. Another nutritional topic with regard to dementia and diet is the association of type-2 diabetes and hyperinsulinemia with AD. Expression array data of the brain tissue of AD patients in the Hisayama study strongly suggests a disturbance in insulin signaling in the AD brain. The dysfunction of insulin signaling could directly lead to disrupted glucose utilization in the AD brain. Instead of improperly utilized glucose, the medium chain triglyceride ketone bodies can be an alternative energy resource for the AD brain. In conclusion, the dietary recommendations for the prevention and management of AD are a high consumption of fish, vegetables, and low glycemic index fruits; a moderate amount of meat and dairy products; and a lower amount of carbohydrates and refined sugar. PMID:27395465

  17. Alzheimer's disease dietary supplements in websites.

    PubMed

    Palmour, Nicole; Vanderbyl, Brandy L; Zimmerman, Emma; Gauthier, Serge; Racine, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Consumer demand for health information and health services has rapidly evolved to capture and even propel the movement to online health information seeking. Seventeen percent (52 million) of health information internet users will look for information about memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Fox Pew Internet & American life project: Online health search. Report. Pew Research Center. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2006/Online-Health-Search-2006.aspx 2006, Pew Research Center. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/HealthTopics.aspx 2011). We examined the content of the 25 most frequently retrieved websites marketing AD dietary supplements. We found that the majority of websites and their products claimed AD-related benefits, including improvement and enhancement of function, treatment for AD, prevention of AD, maintenance of function, delayed progression of AD, and decreased symptoms. Supplements were described as effective, natural, powerful or strong, dependable and pure or of high quality. Peer reviewed references to proper scientific studies were infrequent on websites. Statements highlighting the risks of dietary supplements were as common as statements mitigating or minimizing these risks. Different strategies were used to promote supplements such as popular appeals and testimonials. Further enforcement of relevant policy is needed and preparation of clinicians to deal with requests of patients and caregivers is indicated. PMID:23765585

  18. Apathy in Alzheimer's Disease: Any Effective Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Fasanaro, Angiola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This review has evaluated the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment of apathy in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted on published clinical trials assessing the effects of pharmacological treatment on apathy in AD over the last 10 years. Results. Fourteen studies considered of good quality were included in the analysis (4 randomized controlled trials, 9 open-label studies, and 1 retrospective analysis). Cholinesterase inhibitors were investigated in 9 studies, monoaminergic compounds such as methylphenidate and modafinil in two trials and one trial, respectively, and Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761 extract) and citalopram in one study each. Cholinesterase inhibitors did not show statistical significant effect in 1 RCT study but were associated to improvement in 3 open-label studies. Methylphenidate elicited a small but significant activity accompanied by relevant side effects such as high blood pressure, cough, and osteoarticular pain. EGb 761 was well tolerated and countered apathy. Other treatments induced modest improvements or were ineffective. Conclusions. Apathy treatment remains a challenge and there is no evident advantage of any specific pharmacotherapy tested so far. The development of controlled studies according to updated guidelines for the diagnosis of apathy in patients with AD is desirable. PMID:24672318

  19. Tropisetron and its targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Despite this, there are no drugs for preventing the onset of AD. Preclinical studies suggest that the interaction between amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) plays a key role in AD pathology, and that α7 nAChR agonists could act as potential therapeutic drugs for AD. A recent study demonstrated that tropisetron, a potent α7 nAChR agonist and serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonist, also bound to the ectodomain of amyloid precursor protein. Furthermore, tropisetron promoted greater improvements in memory than current AD therapeutic drugs, such as memantine and donepezil. Positron emission tomography studies detected Aβ deposition and inflammation in the brains of subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) before the onset of AD. Given the role of α7 nAChR in Aβ deposition and inflammation, tropisetron represents an attractive potential therapeutic drug to delay or prevent MCI and AD. Additionally as this drug is used internationally to treat chemotherapy-induced emesis, its safety record is already known.

  20. Common polygenic variation enhances risk prediction for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Sims, Rebecca; Bannister, Christian; Harold, Denise; Vronskaya, Maria; Majounie, Elisa; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Morgan, Kevin; Passmore, Peter; Holmes, Clive; Powell, John; Brayne, Carol; Gill, Michael; Mead, Simon; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos; Lambert, Jean-Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia; Maier, Wolfgang; Ramirez, Alfredo; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Hardy, John; Seshadri, Sudha; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie

    2015-12-01

    The identification of subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease is important for prognosis and early intervention. We investigated the polygenic architecture of Alzheimer's disease and the accuracy of Alzheimer's disease prediction models, including and excluding the polygenic component in the model. This study used genotype data from the powerful dataset comprising 17 008 cases and 37 154 controls obtained from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP). Polygenic score analysis tested whether the alleles identified to associate with disease in one sample set were significantly enriched in the cases relative to the controls in an independent sample. The disease prediction accuracy was investigated in a subset of the IGAP data, a sample of 3049 cases and 1554 controls (for whom APOE genotype data were available) by means of sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and positive and negative predictive values. We observed significant evidence for a polygenic component enriched in Alzheimer's disease (P = 4.9 × 10(-26)). This enrichment remained significant after APOE and other genome-wide associated regions were excluded (P = 3.4 × 10(-19)). The best prediction accuracy AUC = 78.2% (95% confidence interval 77-80%) was achieved by a logistic regression model with APOE, the polygenic score, sex and age as predictors. In conclusion, Alzheimer's disease has a significant polygenic component, which has predictive utility for Alzheimer's disease risk and could be a valuable research tool complementing experimental designs, including preventative clinical trials, stem cell selection and high/low risk clinical studies. In modelling a range of sample disease prevalences, we found that polygenic scores almost doubles case prediction from chance with increased prediction at polygenic extremes.

  1. Homonymous Hemianopsia Associated with Probable Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Akiko; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that has cerebral atrophy in the parietal, occipital, or occipitotemporal cortices and is characterized by visuospatial and visuoperceptual impairments. The most cases are pathologically compatible with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We describe a case of PCA in which a combination of imaging methods, in conjunction with symptoms and neurological and neuropsychological examinations, led to its being diagnosed and to AD being identified as its probable cause. Treatment with donepezil for 6 months mildly improved alexia symptoms, but other symptoms remained unchanged. A 59-year-old Japanese woman with progressive alexia, visual deficit, and mild memory loss was referred to our neurologic clinic for the evaluation of right homonymous hemianopsia. Our neurological examination showed alexia, constructional apraxia, mild disorientation, short-term memory loss, and right homonymous hemianopsia. These findings resulted in a score of 23 (of 30) points on the Mini-Mental State Examination. Occipital atrophy was identified, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing left-side dominance. The MRI data were quantified with voxel-based morphometry, and PCA was diagnosed on the basis of these findings. Single photon emission computed tomography with (123)I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine showed hypoperfusion in the corresponding voxel-based morphometry occipital lobes. Additionally, the finding of hypoperfusion in the posterior associate cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, and precuneus was consistent with AD. Therefore, the PCA was considered to be a result of AD. We considered Lewy body dementia as a differential diagnosis because of the presence of hypoperfusion in the occipital lobes. However, the patient did not meet the criteria for Lewy body dementia during the course of the disease. We therefore consider including PCA in the differential diagnoses to be important for patients with visual deficit, cognitive

  2. The gonadotropin connection in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meethal, Sivan Vadakkadath; Smith, Mark A; Bowen, Richard L; Atwood, Craig S

    2005-04-01

    Although not traditionally thought of as regulators of neuronal function, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) hormones luteinizing hormone (LH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and activins possess neuronal receptors. These receptors are found throughout the limbic system on a number of different cell types, and, like reproductive tissues, the expression of these receptors is regulated by hormonal feedback loops. These hormones and their receptors regulate structure and a diverse range of functions in the brain. Therefore, it is not surprising that the dysregulation of the HPG axis with menopause and andropause (leading to elevated LH, GnRH, and activin signaling but decreased sex steroid signaling) might promote alterations in both the structure and function of neuronal cells. To date, most evidence has accumulated for a role of LH in promoting neurodegenerative changes. LH is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, receptors for LH are most concentrated in the hippocampus, that region of the brain most vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and LH is significantly elevated in both the serum and the pyramidal neurons of AD subjects. LH promotes the amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid-beta precursor protein in vitro, and the antigonadotropin leuprolide acetate decreases amyloid generation in mice. Moreover, leuprolide acetate improves the cognitive performance and decreases amyloid-beta deposition in aged transgenic mice carrying the Swedish AbetaPP mutation. Therefore, the elevation of LH with the dysregulation of the HPG axis at menopause and andropause is a physiologically relevant signal that could promote neurodegeneration. Epidemiological support for a role of LH/GnRH in AD is evidenced by a reduction in neurodegenerative disease among prostate cancer patients a group known to GnRH agonists. Clinical trials are underway for the treatment of AD using GnRH analogs and should provide further insights into the gonadotropin connection in AD.

  3. Chaperone signalling complexes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koren, John; Jinwal, Umesh K; Lee, Daniel C; Jones, Jeffrey R; Shults, Cody L; Johnson, Amelia G; Anderson, Laura J; Dickey, Chad A

    2009-04-01

    Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsp) have emerged as critical regulators of proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease pathologies. The very nature of the chaperone system, which is to maintain protein quality control, means that most nascent proteins come in contact with chaperone proteins. Thus, amyloid precursor protein (APP), members of the gamma-secretase complex (presenilin 1 [PS1] collectively), the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) as well as a number of neuroinflammatory components are all in contact with chaperones from the moment of their production. Chaperones are often grouped together as one machine presenting abnormal or mutant proteins to the proteasome for degradation, but this is not at all the case. In fact, the chaperone family consists of more than 100 proteins in mammalian cells, and the primary role for most of these proteins is to protect clients following synthesis and during stress; only as a last resort do they facilitate protein degradation. To the best of our current knowledge, the chaperone system in eukaryotic cells revolves around the ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsp90, the two primary chaperone scaffolds. Other chaperones and co-chaperones manipulate the ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsp90, facilitating either folding of the client or its degradation. In the case of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of studies have recently emerged describing the impact that these chaperones have on the proteotoxic effects of tau and amyloid- beta accumulation. Here, we present the current understandings of chaperone biology and examine the literature investigating these proteins in the context of AD.

  4. Alzheimer's disease is incurable but preventable.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic rising incidence and costs of Alzheimer's disease (AD) require that research efforts and funding be primarily directed on either finding a cure or applying preventive measures to curb this disorder. A cure for AD appears unlikely when significant cognitive loss has occurred because the neuronal networks that controlled the perturbed cognitive abilities are either dead or irreversibly damaged and replacing them, even if it were technically possible, would not reconstruct the intellectual identity of the host. Prevention of risk factors to sporadic AD is a more realistic stratagem and treatment, when indicated, ideally should begin in cognitively intact individuals as part of a mass screening effort. Prevention of modifiable risk factors to AD is cost-effective because it reduces hospice or hospital stay, repeated doctor visits, and long-term care. Presently, neurocognitive and neuroimaging tests are used with partial success in identifying persons at higher risk of AD but these tests can not pinpoint either a cause or a specific intervention that could attenuate disease progress. We previously proposed that carotid artery ultrasound +echocardiography together with ankle-brachail index (CAUSE+ABI) as mass screening tests in asymptomatic persons could detect not only cardio-cerebrovascular risk factors to AD, but also identify an indicated intervention. CAUSE+ABI are simple to perform, cost-effective, non-invasive, and reasonably accurate for the intended purpose. Additionally, detection of cardio-cerebrovasacular abnormalities long before expression of cognitive deterioration allows higher success rate with earlier treatment. Evidence-based medicine is recommended for optimizing clinical decision-making in evaluating AD risk factors and their treatment. PMID:20182017

  5. Feelings Without Memory in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Feinstein, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) typically have impaired declarative memory as a result of hippocampal damage early in the disease. Far less is understood about AD’s effect on emotion. Objective: We investigated whether feelings of emotion can persist in patients with AD, even after their declarative memory for what caused the feelings has faded. Methods: A sample of 17 patients with probable AD and 17 healthy comparison participants (case-matched for age, sex, and education) underwent 2 separate emotion induction procedures in which they watched film clips intended to induce feelings of sadness or happiness. We collected real-time emotion ratings at baseline and at 3 post-induction time points, and we administered a test of declarative memory shortly after each induction. Results: As expected, the patients with AD had severely impaired declarative memory for both the sad and happy films. Despite their memory impairment, the patients continued to report elevated levels of sadness and happiness that persisted well beyond their memory for the films. This outcome was especially prominent after the sadness induction, with sustained elevations in sadness lasting for more than 30 minutes, even in patients with no conscious recollection for the films. Conclusions: These findings indicate that patients with AD can experience prolonged states of emotion that persist well beyond the patients’ memory for the events that originally caused the emotion. The preserved emotional life evident in patients with AD has important implications for their management and care, and highlights the need for caretakers to foster positive emotional experiences. PMID:25237742

  6. Older adults with Alzheimer's disease in a faith community.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Catherine j; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2008-01-01

    In the first phase of this study, focus groups were conducted with 12 clergy to explore how to meet the needs of Alzheimer's disease patients and their families. The clergy reported that although they do reach out to these families, they have not received formal training, so they often do not know what families need. Members of their congregations who are trained in working with Alzheimer's patients need to partner with the clergy in reaching out to these families. Although this article mainly focuses on the clergy's perspective, in the second phase of the study, caregivers and early-stage Alzheimer's patients were asked to describe their experiences of spiritual connections related to Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Stereological quantification of the cerebellum in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kjeld; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Nonquantitative studies indicate that the cerebellum is neuropathologically affected in Alzheimer's disease; however, no quantitative studies on the subject have yet been conducted. Ten cerebella from elderly female subjects with severe Alzheimer's disease and 10 age- and gender-matched controls were examined. The cerebellum was divided into 5 regions and the Purkinje and granule cell number and density, cortical volume, molecular and granular layer volume and thickness, white matter volume, surface area, and the Purkinje cell gradient were stereologically estimated. There was no significant difference between the groups in Purkinje or granule cell number or density, and no overall difference in Purkinje cell gradient. However, there was a significant 12.7% reduction in total cerebellar volume in the Alzheimer's group and significant localized differences between the groups regarding other parameters. The relative lack of neuropathological changes in the cerebellum of severely demented Alzheimer's patients suggests that neuronal cell bodies on a global scale apparently still are intact. PMID:20728248

  8. Developmental Disabilities and Alzheimer's Disease...What You Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This booklet provides an overview of Alzheimer's disease along with a description of the disease, how to find out if someone has it, and how it affects adults with developmental disabilities. It also provides information on what to do and suggests where to seek help. Specific sections discuss: (1) the etiology of the disease; (2) symptoms of…

  9. [Pathological interaction between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko

    2012-11-01

    The incidence of dementia and diabetes mellitus is increasing at an alarming rate, and has become a major public health concern all over the world. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the risk of Alzheimer's disease is increased in individuals with diabetes mellitus, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. To analyze underlying mechanisms linking Alzheimer's disease and diabetes mellitus, we established unique animal models that show pathological manifestations of both diseases. Our findings suggest that impaired brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular changes could be potential underlying mechanisms for this relationship. On the other hand, interestingly, Alzheimer's amyloid pathology aggravated diabetes mellitus in these mouse models, suggesting the presence of mutual interaction between these diseases. In addition, we also found that plasma Abeta levels rapidly and strikingly increased after glucose loading in Alzheimer's disease mouse models, which could be a novel diagnostic marker of Alzheimer's disease. The current review summarizes the results of our recent studies on the pathological relationship between these diseases, which could provide novel insights into this intensely debated association.

  10. New cardiovascular targets to prevent late onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2015-09-15

    The prevalence of dementia rises to between 20% and 40% with advancing age. The dominant cause of dementia in approximately 70% of these patients is Alzheimer disease. There is no effective disease-modifying pharmaceutical treatment for this neurodegenerative disease. A wide range of Alzheimer drugs that appeared effective in animal models have recently failed to show clinical benefit in patients. However, hopeful news has emerged from recent studies that suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease may also reduce the prevalence of dementia due to Alzheimer disease. This review summarizes the evidence for this link between cardiovascular disease and late onset Alzheimer dementia. Only evidence from human research is considered here. Longitudinal studies show an association between high blood pressure and pathological accumulation of the protein amyloid-beta42, and an even stronger association between vascular stiffness and amyloid accumulation, in elderly subjects. Amyloid-beta42 accumulation is considered to be an early marker of Alzheimer disease, and increases the risk of subsequent cognitive decline and development of dementia. These observations could provide an explanation for recent observations of reduced dementia prevalence associated with improved cardiovascular care.

  11. Resting metabolic connectivity in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. A European Alzheimer Disease Consortium (EADC) project.

    PubMed

    Morbelli, Silvia; Drzezga, Alex; Perneczky, Robert; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Caroli, Anna; van Berckel, Bart N M; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Guedj, Eric; Didic, Mira; Brugnolo, Andrea; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Pagani, Marco; Salmon, Eric; Nobili, Flavio

    2012-11-01

    We explored resting-state metabolic connectivity in prodromal Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients and in healthy controls (CTR), through a voxel-wise interregional correlation analysis of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) by means of statistical parametric mapping. Baseline 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography of 36 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment who converted to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia after an average time of 2 years (pAD) and of 105 CTR were processed. The area of hypometabolism in pAD showed less metabolic connectivity in patients than in CTR (autocorrelation and correlation with large temporal and frontal areas, respectively). pAD patients showed limited correlation even in selected nonhypometabolic areas, including the hippocampi and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFC). On the contrary, in CTR group correlation was highlighted between hippocampi and precuneus/posterior cingulate and frontal cortex, and between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei and parietal cortex. The reduced metabolic connections both in hypometabolic and nonhypometabolic areas in pAD patients suggest that metabolic disconnection (reflecting early diaschisis) may antedate remote hypometabolism (early sign of synaptic degeneration).

  12. Early behavioural changes in familial Alzheimer's disease in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Liang, Li-Jung; Zhou, Yan; Vangala, Sitaram; Teng, Edmond; Kremen, Sarah; Wharton, David; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Farlow, Martin; Ghetti, Bernardino; McDade, Eric; Masters, Colin L; Mayeux, Richard P; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Buckles, Virginia; Bateman, Randall; Morris, John C

    2015-04-01

    Prior studies indicate psychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy and anxiety are risk factors for or prodromal symptoms of incipient Alzheimer's disease. The study of persons at 50% risk for inheriting autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations allows characterization of these symptoms before progressive decline in a population destined to develop illness. We sought to characterize early behavioural features in carriers of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations. Two hundred and sixty-one persons unaware of their mutation status enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, a study of persons with or at-risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Ninety-seven asymptomatic (CDR = 0), 25 mildly symptomatic (CDR = 0.5), and 33 overtly affected (CDR > 0.5) autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers were compared to 106 non-carriers with regard to frequency of behavioural symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire and severity of depressive symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale using generalized linear regression models with appropriate distributions and link functions. Results from the adjusted analyses indicated that depressive symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire were less common in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers than in non-carriers (5% versus 17%, P = 0.014) and the odds of experiencing at least one behavioural sign in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers was lower than in non-carriers (odds ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.98, P = 0.042). Depression (56% versus 17%, P = 0.0003), apathy (40% versus 4%, P < 0.0001), disinhibition (16% versus 2%, P = 0.009), irritability (48% versus 9%, P = 0.0001), sleep changes (28% versus 7%, P = 0.003), and agitation (24% versus 6%, P = 0.008) were more common and

  13. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  14. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  15. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  16. Genetic determinants of disease progression in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingbin; Lopez, Oscar L; Sweet, Robert A; Becker, James T; DeKosky, Steven T; Barmada, Mahmud M; Demirci, F Yesim; Kamboh, M Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong genetic basis for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD); thus far 22 genes/loci have been identified that affect the risk of LOAD. However, the relationships among the genetic variations at these loci and clinical progression of the disease have not been fully explored. In the present study, we examined the relationships of 22 known LOAD genes to the progression of AD in 680 AD patients recruited from the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Patients were classified as "rapid progressors" if the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) changed ≥3 points in 12 months and "slow progressors" if the MMSE changed ≤2 points. We also performed a genome-wide association study in this cohort in an effort to identify new loci for AD progression. Association analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the progression status of the AD cases was performed using logistic regression model controlled for age, gender, dementia medication use, psychosis, and hypertension. While no significant association was observed with either APOE*4 (p = 0.94) or APOE*2 (p = 0.33) with AD progression, we found multiple nominally significant associations (p < 0.05) either within or adjacent to seven known LOAD genes (INPP5D, MEF2C, TREM2, EPHA1, PTK2B, FERMT2, and CASS4) that harbor both risk and protective SNPs. Genome-wide association analyses identified four suggestive loci (PAX3, CCRN4L, PIGQ, and ADAM19) at p < 1E-05. Our data suggest that short-term clinical disease progression in AD has a genetic basis. Better understanding of these genetic factors could help to improve clinical trial design and potentially affect the development of disease modifying therapies.

  17. Absence of aluminium in neuritic plaque cores in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J P; McDonald, B; Watt, F

    1992-11-01

    Controversy exists over whether aluminium has a role in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is neuropathologically characterized by the occurrence of a minimum density of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the hippocampus and the association cortex of the brain. The purported association of aluminium with Alzheimer's disease is based on: (1) the experimental induction of fibrillary changes in the neurons of animals by the injection of aluminium salts into brain tissue; (2) reported detection of aluminium in neuritic plaques and tangle-bearing neurons; (3) epidemiological studies linking aluminium levels in the environment, notably water supplies, with an increased prevalence of dementia; and (4) a reported decrease in the rate of disease progression following the administration of desferroxamine, an aluminium chelator, to clinically diagnosed sufferers of Alzheimer's disease. Here we use nuclear microscopy, a new analytical technique involving million-volt nuclear particles, to identify and analyse plaques in postmortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease without using chemical staining techniques and fail to demonstrate the presence of aluminium in plaque cores in untreated tissue. PMID:1436075

  18. The micron stroke hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

    PubMed

    Orehek, Allen J

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease as currently described in the medical literature is often more a description of dementia rather than a specific disease. In over a century of scientific work there has been no proven theory as to the precise pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. As there is no efficient treatment for patients with Alzheimer's disease, prevention or attenuation of the disease is of substantial value. An intricate collection of hypotheses, studies, research, and experience has made it complicated for one to completely understand this disease. The purpose of this hypothesis is to illustrate new concepts and work to link those concepts to the present understanding of an obscure disease. The search for a single unifying hypothesis on the etiology of Alzheimer's disease has been elusive. Many hypotheses associated to Alzheimer's disease have not survived their testing to become theory. Suggested here is that the elusive nature of etiology of dementia is not from one cause, but rather the causes are numerous. Medical terminology used freely for decades is rarely evaluated in the light of a new hypothesis. At the foundation of this work is the suggestion of a new medical term: Micron Strokes. The Micron Stroke Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia include primary and secondary factors. The primary factors can be briefly described as baseline brain tissue, atrial fibrillation, hypercoaguable state, LDL, carotid artery stenosis, tobacco exposure, hypertension diabetes mellitus, and the presence of systemic inflammation. Dozens of secondary factors contribute to the development of dementia. Most dementia is caused by nine primary categories of factors as they interact to cause micron strokes to the brain.

  19. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Layered Worlds: A Metaphor of Time, Visualizing the Experience of Alzheimer's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Ann M.

    This paper describes an exhibit, "Layered Worlds: The Look of Alzheimer's," which uses photography as the medium to interpret Alzheimer's disease visually. The goal was not to photograph the victims of the disease, but to interpret the experience of Alzheimer's for the patient, family members, and caregivers. The metaphor of layers was used to…

  1. Hormone therapy and Alzheimer disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huibo; Breitner, John C.S.; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Wang, Junmin; Hayden, Kathleen; Wengreen, Heidi; Corcoran, Chris; Tschanz, JoAnn; Norton, Maria; Munger, Ron; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Observational studies suggest reduced risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) in users of hormone therapy (HT), but trials show higher risk. We examined whether the association of HT with AD varies with timing or type of HT use. Methods: Between 1995 and 2006, the population-based Cache County Study followed 1,768 women who had provided a detailed history on age at menopause and use of HT. During this interval, 176 women developed incident AD. Cox proportional hazard models evaluated the association of HT use with AD, overall and in relation to timing, duration of use, and type (opposed vs unopposed) of HT. Results: Women who used any type of HT within 5 years of menopause had 30% less risk of AD (95% confidence interval 0.49–0.99), especially if use was for 10 or more years. By contrast, AD risk was not reduced among those who had initiated HT 5 or more years after menopause. Instead, rates were increased among those who began “opposed” estrogen-progestin compounds within the 3 years preceding the Cache County Study baseline (adjusted hazard ratio 1.93; 95% confidence interval 0.94–3.96). This last hazard ratio was similar to the ratio of 2.05 reported in randomized trial participants assigned to opposed HT. Conclusions: Association of HT use and risk of AD may depend on timing of use. Although possibly beneficial if taken during a critical window near menopause, HT (especially opposed compounds) initiated in later life may be associated with increased risk. The relation of AD risk to timing and type of HT deserves further study. PMID:23100399

  2. Apolipoprotein E: Risk factor for Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.S.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Tangalos, E.G.; Petersen, R.C.; Kokmen, E.; Smith, G.E.; Schaid, D.J.; Ivnik, R.J. )

    1994-04-01

    The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) has three common alleles (E2, E3, and E4) that determine six genotypes in the general population. In this study, the authors examined 77 patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD), along with an equal number of age- and sex-matched controls, for an association with the APOE-E4 allele. They show that the frequency of this allele among AD patients was significantly higher than that among the control population (.351 vs. .130, P = .000006). The genotype frequencies also differed between the two groups (P = .0002), with the APOE-E4/E3 genotype being the most common in the AD group and the APOE-E3/E3 being the most common in the control group. In the AD group, homozygosity for E4 was found in nine individuals, whereas none was found in the control group. The odds ratio for AD, when associated with one or two E4 alleles, was 4.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-12.3), while the odds ratio for AD, when associated with heterozygosity for APOE-E4, was 3.6 (05% CI 1.5-9.8). Finally, the median age at onset among the AD patients decreased from 83 to 78 to 74 years as the number of APOE-E4 alleles increased from 0 to 1 to 2, respectively (test for trend, P = .001). The data, which are in agreement with recent reports, suggest that the APOE-E4 allele is associated with AD and that this allelic variant may be an important risk factor for susceptibility to AD in the general population. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Metabolome in progression to Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Orešič, M; Hyötyläinen, T; Herukka, S-K; Sysi-Aho, M; Mattila, I; Seppänan-Laakso, T; Julkunen, V; Gopalacharyulu, P V; Hallikainen, M; Koikkalainen, J; Kivipelto, M; Helisalmi, S; Lötjönen, J; Soininen, H

    2011-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered as a transition phase between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). MCI confers an increased risk of developing AD, although the state is heterogeneous with several possible outcomes, including even improvement back to normal cognition. We sought to determine the serum metabolomic profiles associated with progression to and diagnosis of AD in a prospective study. At the baseline assessment, the subjects enrolled in the study were classified into three diagnostic groups: healthy controls (n=46), MCI (n=143) and AD (n=47). Among the MCI subjects, 52 progressed to AD in the follow-up. Comprehensive metabolomics approach was applied to analyze baseline serum samples and to associate the metabolite profiles with the diagnosis at baseline and in the follow-up. At baseline, AD patients were characterized by diminished ether phospholipids, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and sterols. A molecular signature comprising three metabolites was identified, which was predictive of progression to AD in the follow-up. The major contributor to the predictive model was 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, which was upregulated in AD progressors (P=0.0048), indicating potential involvement of hypoxia in the early AD pathogenesis. This was supported by the pathway analysis of metabolomics data, which identified upregulation of pentose phosphate pathway in patients who later progressed to AD. Together, our findings primarily implicate hypoxia, oxidative stress, as well as membrane lipid remodeling in progression to AD. Establishment of pathogenic relevance of predictive biomarkers such as ours may not only facilitate early diagnosis, but may also help identify new therapeutic avenues. PMID:22832349

  4. Impact of apolipoprotein E on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Paul S; Ryan, Robert O

    2013-10-01

    A key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is deposition of extracellular amyloid plaque comprised chiefly of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Studies of Aβ have shown that it may be catabolized by proteolysis or cleared from brain via members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. Alternatively, Aβ can undergo a conformational transition from α-helix to β-sheet, a conformer that displays a propensity to self-associate, oligomerize and form fibrils. Furthermore, β- sheet conformers catalyze conversion of other α-helical Aβ peptides to β-sheet, feeding the oligomer and fibril assembly process. A factor that influences the fate of Aβ in the extracellular space is apolipoprotein (apo) E. Polymorphism at position 112 or 158 in apoE give rise to three major isoforms. One isoform in particular, apoE4 (Arg at 112 and 158), has generated considerable interest since the discovery that it is the major genetic risk factor for development of late onset AD. Despite this striking correlation, the molecular mechanism underlying apoE4's association with AD remains unclear. A tertiary structural feature distinguishing apoE4 from apoE2 and apoE3, termed domain interaction, is postulated to affect the conformation and orientation of its' two independently folded domains. This feature has the potential to influence apoE4's interaction with Aβ, its sensitivity to proteolysis or its lipid accrual and receptor binding activities. Thus, domain interaction may constitute the principal molecular feature of apoE4 that predisposes carriers to late onset AD. By understanding the contribution of apoE4 to AD at the molecular level new therapeutic or prevention strategies will emerge.

  5. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Perry, David C; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Scheltens, Nienke M E; Vogel, Jacob W; Kramer, Joel H; van der Vlies, Annelies E; La Joie, Renaud; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Grinberg, Lea T; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Huang, Eric J; van Berckel, Bart N M; Miller, Bruce L; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-09-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59

  6. Alzheimer's disease; taking the edge off with cannabinoids?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, V A; Gowran, A

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-related neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive decline. The pathological hallmarks of the disease are the deposition of β-amyloid protein and hyperphosphorylation of tau, which evoke neuronal cell death and impair inter-neuronal communication. The disease is also associated with neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In recent years the proclivity of cannabinoids to exert a neuroprotective influence has received substantial interest as a means to mitigate the symptoms of neurodegenerative conditions. In brains obtained from Alzheimer's patients alterations in components of the cannabinoid system have been reported, suggesting that the cannabinoid system either contributes to, or is altered by, the pathophysiology of the disease. Certain cannabinoids can protect neurons from the deleterious effects of β-amyloid and are capable of reducing tau phosphorylation. The propensity of cannabinoids to reduce β-amyloid-evoked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, whilst stimulating neurotrophin expression neurogenesis, are interesting properties that may be beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol can also inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity and limit amyloidogenesis which may improve cholinergic transmission and delay disease progression. Targeting cannabinoid receptors on microglia may reduce the neuroinflammation that is a feature of Alzheimer's disease, without causing psychoactive effects. Thus, cannabinoids offer a multi-faceted approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by providing neuroprotection and reducing neuroinflammation, whilst simultaneously supporting the brain's intrinsic repair mechanisms by augmenting neurotrophin expression and enhancing neurogenesis. The evidence supporting a potential role for the cannabinoid system as a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed herewith. PMID:17828287

  7. Disrupting beta-amyloid aggregation for Alzheimer disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Estrada, L D; Soto, C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating degenerative disorder for which there is no cure or effective treatment. Although the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is not fully understood, compelling evidence indicates that deposition of aggregates composed by a misfolded form of the amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is the central event in the disease pathogenesis. Therefore, an attractive therapeutic strategy is to prevent or reverse Abeta misfolding and aggregation. Diverse strategies have been described to identify inhibitors of this process, including screening of libraries of small molecules chemical compounds, rational design of synthetic peptides, assessment of natural Abeta-binding proteins and stimulation of the immune system by vaccination. In this article we describe these different approaches, their principles and their potential strengths and weaknesses. Overall the available data suggest that the development of drugs to interfere with Abeta misfolding and aggregation is a feasible target that hold great promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Potential Role of Aminoprocalcitonin in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eva; Antequera, Desiree; López-González, Irene; Ferrer, Isidro; Miñano, Francisco J; Carro, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory responses cause brain atrophy and play a prominent and early role in the progression of Alzheimer disease. Recent findings show that the neuroendocrine peptide aminoprocalcitonin (NPCT) plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammatory response; however, the presence, possible function, regulation, and mechanisms by which NPCT may be involved in Alzheimer disease neuropathology remain unknown. We explored the expression of NPCT and its interaction with amyloid-β (Aβ), and proinflammatory and neurogenic effects. By using brain samples of Alzheimer disease patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, we evaluated the potential role of NPCT on Aβ-related pathology. We found that NPCT is expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and Aβ-induced up-regulation of NPCT expression. Peripherally administered antibodies against NPCT decreased microglial activation, decreased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in experimental models of Alzheimer disease. Remarkably, anti-NPTC therapy resulted in a significant improvement in the behavioral status of APP/PS1 mice. Our results indicate a central role of NPCT in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and suggest NPCT as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27497681

  9. Aluminum and Alzheimer's disease, a personal perspective after 25 years.

    PubMed

    Perl, Daniel P; Moalem, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    It is now 25 years since the publication of our original paper investigating the association aluminum with Alzheimer's disease. This publication reported on the results of scanning electron microscopy coupled x-ray spectrometry microprobe elemental studies of both neurofibrillary tangle-bearing and tangle-free neurons in the hippocampus of cases of Alzheimer's disease and controls. Peaks related to the presence of aluminum were consistently detected within the tangle-bearing neurons. This paper supported the association of aluminum and Alzheimer's disease on the cellular level of resolution and caused considerable interest and discussion. Subsequent work demonstrated prominent evidence of aluminum accumulation in the tangle-bearing neurons of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam. This latter observation has now been replicated using five different forms of microanalysis. Finally, using laser microprobe mass analysis, we demonstrated that the abnormally high aluminum-related signal which we originally detected was actually located within the neurofibrillary tangle, itself, and was accompanied by excess concentrations of iron. Although it is unlikely that aluminum represents an etiologic cause of Alzheimer's disease, we believe that this highly reactive element, known to cross-link hyperphosphorylated proteins, may play an active role in the pathogenesis of critical neuropathologic lesion in Alzheimer's disease and other related disorders.

  10. Memantine Attenuates Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of protein phosphatase-2A is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase-2A, inhibitor-1, I1PP2A, which inhibits the phosphatase activity by interacting with its catalytic subunit protein phosphatase-2Ac, is known to be upregulated in Alzheimer's disease brain. In the present study, we overexpressed I1PP2A by intracerebroventricular injection with adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A in Wistar rats. The I1PP2A rats showed a decrease in brain protein phosphatase-2A activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, neurodegeneration, an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, enhanced expression of intraneuronal amyloid-beta and spatial reference memory deficit; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., adeno-associated virus vector-1-enhanced GFP, served as a control. Treatment with memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist which is an approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, rescued protein phosphatase-2A activity by decreasing its demethylation at Leu309 selectively and attenuated Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive impairment in adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A rats. These findings provide new clues into the possible mechanism of the beneficial therapeutic effect of memantine in Alzheimer's disease patients.

  11. Potential Role of Aminoprocalcitonin in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eva; Antequera, Desiree; López-González, Irene; Ferrer, Isidro; Miñano, Francisco J; Carro, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory responses cause brain atrophy and play a prominent and early role in the progression of Alzheimer disease. Recent findings show that the neuroendocrine peptide aminoprocalcitonin (NPCT) plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammatory response; however, the presence, possible function, regulation, and mechanisms by which NPCT may be involved in Alzheimer disease neuropathology remain unknown. We explored the expression of NPCT and its interaction with amyloid-β (Aβ), and proinflammatory and neurogenic effects. By using brain samples of Alzheimer disease patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, we evaluated the potential role of NPCT on Aβ-related pathology. We found that NPCT is expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and Aβ-induced up-regulation of NPCT expression. Peripherally administered antibodies against NPCT decreased microglial activation, decreased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in experimental models of Alzheimer disease. Remarkably, anti-NPTC therapy resulted in a significant improvement in the behavioral status of APP/PS1 mice. Our results indicate a central role of NPCT in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and suggest NPCT as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target.

  12. Apolipoprotein E receptors: linking brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herz, J; Beffert, U

    2000-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts an increasing part of our ageing population. An isoform of apolipoprotein E, a protein that mediates the transport of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system, predisposes carriers of this allele to the common late-onset form of the disease. How this protein is related to a neurodegenerative disorder is an enigma. Mounting evidence indicates that apolipoprotein E receptors, which are abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system, also fulfill critical functions during brain development and may profoundly influence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. 2012 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Topics addressed include incidence, prevalence, mortality rates, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society. The report also explores issues that arise when people with AD and other dementias live alone. The characteristics, risks, and unmet needs of this population are described. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have AD, including approximately 200,000 age <65 years who comprise the younger-onset AD population. Over the coming decades, the aging of the baby boom generation is projected to result in an additional 10 million people with AD. Today, someone in America develops AD every 68 seconds. By 2050, there is expected to be one new case of AD every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and AD prevalence is projected to be 11 million to 16 million. Dramatic increases in the number of "oldest-old" (those age ≥85 years) across all racial and ethnic groups are expected to contribute to the increased prevalence of AD. AD is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥65 years. Although the proportions of deaths due to other major causes of death have decreased in the last several years, the proportion due to AD has risen significantly. Between 2000 and 2008, the proportion of deaths due to heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased by 13%, 20%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion due to AD increased by 66%. In 2011, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $210 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are three times as great as payments for beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times

  14. 2011 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged ≥65 years. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2008 (preliminary data), heart disease deaths decreased by 13%, stroke deaths by 20%, and prostate cancer-related deaths by 8%, whereas deaths because of AD increased by 66%. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 people aged <65 years with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 69 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050, the time is expected to accelerate to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million people. Dramatic increases in the numbers of "oldest-old" (those aged ≥85 years) across all racial and ethnic groups will also significantly affect the numbers of people living with AD. In 2010, nearly 15 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $202 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are almost 3 times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments in 2011 for health care, long-term care, and hospice services for people aged ≥65years with AD and other dementias are expected to be $183 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health effect of AD, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. The report also examines the

  15. 2010 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is virtually tied with the sixth leading cause of death-diabetes. AD is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 and older. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2006, heart disease deaths decreased 11.1%, stroke deaths decreased 18.2%, and prostate cancer-related deaths decreased 8.7%, whereas deaths because of AD increased 46.1%. Older African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely than older white Americans to have AD or other dementia. Current estimates are that African-Americans are about 2 times more likely, and Hispanics about 1.5 times more likely, than their white counterparts to have these conditions. However, the relationship of race and ethnicity to the development of AD and other dementias is complex and not fully understood. In 2009, nearly 11 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 12.5 billion hours of care to persons with AD and other dementias; this care is valued at nearly $144 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments for 2010 for health care and long-term care services for people aged 65 and older with AD and other dementias are expected to be $172 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 persons under age 65 with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 70 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050 the time of every 70 seconds is expected to decrease to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a

  16. Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which impairs the memory and intellectual abilities of the affected individuals. Loss of episodic as well as semantic memory is an early and principal feature. The basal forebrain cholinergic system is the population of neurons most affected by the neurodegenerative process. Extracellular as well as intracellular deposition of beta-amyloid or Abeta (Abeta) protein, intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss are the neuropathological hallmarks of AD. In the last few years, hopes were raised that cell replacement therapy would provide cure by compensating the lost neuronal systems. Stem cells obtained from embryonic as well as adult tissue and grafted into the intact brain of mice or rats were mostly followed by their incorporation into the host parenchyma and differentiation into functional neural lineages. In the lesioned brain, stem cells exhibited targeted migration towards the damaged regions of the brain, where they engrafted, proliferated and matured into functional neurones. Neural precursor cells can be intravenously administered and yet migrate into brain damaged areas and induce functional recovery. Observations in animal models of AD have provided evidence that transplanted stem cells or neural precursor cells (NPCs) survive, migrate, and differentiate into cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes with amelioration of the learning/memory deficits. Besides replacement of lost or damaged cells, stem cells stimulate endogenous neural precursors, enhance structural neuroplasticity, and down regulate proinflammatory cytokines and neuronal apoptotic death. Stem cells could also be genetically modified to express growth factors into the brain. In the last years, evidence indicated that the adult brain of mammals preserves the capacity to generate new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells. Inefficient adult neurogenesis may contribute to the

  17. Alzheimer's Disease. LC Science Tracer Bullet 87-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Vivian O., Comp.

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a degeneration and shrinkage of brain tissue; the symptoms include progressive memory loss, bizarre behavior, difficulty in speaking and walking, incontinence, and confusion. Positive diagnosis is possible only upon examination of brain tissue at autopsy. The disease affects not only the patient but also the…

  18. Survival of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiver Coping Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, McKee J.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Neundorfer, Marcia M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Although persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) require increasingly more assistance with activities of daily living as their disease progresses, the caregiving environment has received little attention as a source of predictors of their survival time. We report here on a study to determine whether variation in survival time of persons…

  19. Pituitary gland levels of mercury, selenium, iron, and zinc in an Alzheimer`s disease study

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, C.R.; Markesbery, W.R.; Wekstein, D.R.; Ehmann, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Mercury, iron, selenium, and zinc imbalances have been observed in comparisons between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and control subject brains. Analyses of the pituitary gland have demonstrated that this organ retains relatively high concentrations of trace elements, including mercury, iron, and zinc. Our previous work has shown that the pituitary glands of AD and control subjects are typically higher in these trace elements than brain samples from the same subject. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to compare the pituitary trace element levels of AD and control subjects. This study also describes the intrasubject relationships of brain trace element levels to those in the pituitary gland of AD and control subjects.

  20. Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized—and treatable—epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems today, with a dire need for effective treatment. Identifying subtypes of Alzheimer's disease may aid in the development of therapeutics, and recently three different subtypes have been described: type 1 (inflammatory), type 2 (non-inflammatory or atrophic), and type 3 (cortical). Here I report that type 3 Alzheimer's disease is the result of exposure to specific toxins, and is most commonly inhalational (IAD), a phenotypic manifestation of chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS), due to biotoxins such as mycotoxins. The appropriate recognition of IAD as a potentially important pathogenetic condition in patients with cognitive decline offers the opportunity for successful treatment of a large number of patients whose current prognoses, in the absence of accurate diagnosis, are grave. PMID:26870879

  1. Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized - and treatable - epidemic.

    PubMed

    Bredesen, Dale E

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems today, with a dire need for effective treatment. Identifying subtypes of Alzheimer's disease may aid in the development of therapeutics, and recently three different subtypes have been described: type 1 (inflammatory), type 2 (non-inflammatory or atrophic), and type 3 (cortical). Here I report that type 3 Alzheimer's disease is the result of exposure to specific toxins, and is most commonly inhalational (IAD), a phenotypic manifestation of chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS), due to biotoxins such as mycotoxins. The appropriate recognition of IAD as a potentially important pathogenetic condition in patients with cognitive decline offers the opportunity for successful treatment of a large number of patients whose current prognoses, in the absence of accurate diagnosis, are grave. PMID:26870879

  2. Alzheimer's disease care and management: role of information technology.

    PubMed

    Thota, Hanuman; Rao, Allam Appa; Reddi, Kiran Kumar; Akula, Sivaprasad; Changalasetty, Suresh Babu; Srinubabu, Gedela

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) an ailment that is supposed to affect people in old age. There are evidences that it might affect others also. The number of elders is increasing as the average life expectancy is increasing. AD afflicts its patients with the dementia and AD might increase in malignance over time. People with cognitive disabilities can be overwhelmed through cognitive prosthetics. With the help of information technology we can enhance the quality of life. Significant achievements are possible with an interdisciplinary approach that includes genomic, genetic, technological and therapeutic measures. The combination and coordination of Bioinformatics facilitates generation of various diagnostic tools for the people who are suffering from Alzheimer's disease. These tools help the care providers also. In this article, we emphasize the literature regarding the use of technology and its methodologies to improve the quality of care for the people with Alzheimer's disease.

  3. When Memories Disappear | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... AD. For copies of this book, contact the Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, a service of the ... the following resources: National Institute on Aging's (NIA) Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center for answers to your ...

  4. Statistical physics approaches to Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shouyong

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of late life dementia. In the brain of an AD patient, neurons are lost and spatial neuronal organizations (microcolumns) are disrupted. An adequate quantitative analysis of microcolumns requires that we automate the neuron recognition stage in the analysis of microscopic images of human brain tissue. We propose a recognition method based on statistical physics. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulations of an inhomogeneous Potts model are applied for image segmentation. Unlike most traditional methods, this method improves the recognition of overlapped neurons, and thus improves the overall recognition percentage. Although the exact causes of AD are unknown, as experimental advances have revealed the molecular origin of AD, they have continued to support the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which states that early stages of aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides lead to neurodegeneration and death. X-ray diffraction studies reveal the common cross-beta structural features of the final stable aggregates-amyloid fibrils. Solid-state NMR studies also reveal structural features for some well-ordered fibrils. But currently there is no feasible experimental technique that can reveal the exact structure or the precise dynamics of assembly and thus help us understand the aggregation mechanism. Computer simulation offers a way to understand the aggregation mechanism on the molecular level. Because traditional all-atom continuous molecular dynamics simulations are not fast enough to investigate the whole aggregation process, we apply coarse-grained models and discrete molecular dynamics methods to increase the simulation speed. First we use a coarse-grained two-bead (two beads per amino acid) model. Simulations show that peptides can aggregate into multilayer beta-sheet structures, which agree with X-ray diffraction experiments. To better represent the secondary structure transition happening during aggregation, we refine the

  5. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  6. Globalization of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies are increasingly being tested in global clinical trials. A search of ClincalTrials.gov revealed that of 269 currently active trials, 28% are currently being conducted in the United States; the majority of trials and the majority of trial sites are ex-US. The US has the largest number of trial sites of any single country; cumulatively, nearly half of all sites are outside the US. The US conducts more trials in all phases of drug development but has a greater proportion of phase 3 trials. The increasing importance of global participants in clinical trials emphasizes the importance of considering the ethnic and international factors that may influence trial outcome. The International Conference on Harmonization guidelines divide ethnic factors that may affect drug development into intrinsic and extrinsic influences. These include language, cultural factors, educational levels, the general level of health and standard of care, as well as nutrition and diet. Ethnic influences on pharmacokinetics are known for some metabolic pathways. The biology of AD may also differ among the world's populations. The frequency of the apolipoprotein e4 allele, a major risk factor for AD, differs internationally. Genetic variations might also affect inflammatory, excitotoxic, and oxidative components of AD. Diagnostic standards and experience vary from country to country. Levels of practitioner training and experience, diagnostic approaches to AD, and attitudes regarding aging and AD may differ. Experience and sophistication with regard to clinical trial conduct also vary within and between countries. Experience with conducting the necessary examinations, as well as the linguistic and cultural validity of instrument translations, may affect trial outcomes. Operational and regulatory aspects of clinical trials vary and provide important barriers to seamless conduct of multiregional clinical trials. Collection and testing of biological samples, continuous

  7. Cerebral microbleeds in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Poliakova, T; Levin, O; Arablinskiy, A; Vasenina, E; Zerr, I

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesize that cerebral microbleeds (CMB) in patients with different neuropsychological profiles (amnestic or non-amnestic) and MRI features of vascular damage could provide important information on the underlying pathological process in early Alzheimer's disease. The study was performed at two trial sites. We studied 136 outpatients with cognitive decline. MRI was performed using a magnetic field of 1.5 and 3 T. Neuropsychological assessment included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale (MoCA), Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), Cambridge Cognitive Examination battery (CAMCOG) (Part 3), Clock Drawing Test, fluency test and the visual memory test (SCT). CSF was examined for standard parameters such as tau, phosphorylated tau, amyloid-β 1-40 and 42 and Qalbumin, in accordance with established protocols and genotype. In 61 patients (45 %), at least 1 CMB was found. Most of the CMBs were described in the amnestic profile (67 %). In 86 % of the cases, multiple CMB were observed. The ratio of Aβ1-40/42 in non-amnestic patients with CMB was significantly lower (mean 0.6) than in patients without CMB (mean 1.2). A notable difference in the albumin ratio as an indicator of the BBB was observed between groups with and without CMB. In the CMP-positive group, the E2 genotype was observed more frequently, and the E4 genotype less frequently, than in the CMB-negative group. Based on the cerebrospinal fluid-serum albumin ratio, we were able to show that patients with CMB present several features of BBB dysfunction. According to logistic regression, the predictive factors for CMB in patients with cognitive decline were age, WMHs score and albumin ratio. We found a significant reduction in the Aβ-amyloid ratio in the non-amnestic profile group with CMB (particularly in the cortical region) in comparison to those without CMB. While this is an interesting finding, its significance needs to be assessed in a prospective follow

  8. Cerebral microbleeds in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Poliakova, T; Levin, O; Arablinskiy, A; Vasenina, E; Zerr, I

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesize that cerebral microbleeds (CMB) in patients with different neuropsychological profiles (amnestic or non-amnestic) and MRI features of vascular damage could provide important information on the underlying pathological process in early Alzheimer's disease. The study was performed at two trial sites. We studied 136 outpatients with cognitive decline. MRI was performed using a magnetic field of 1.5 and 3 T. Neuropsychological assessment included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale (MoCA), Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), Cambridge Cognitive Examination battery (CAMCOG) (Part 3), Clock Drawing Test, fluency test and the visual memory test (SCT). CSF was examined for standard parameters such as tau, phosphorylated tau, amyloid-β 1-40 and 42 and Qalbumin, in accordance with established protocols and genotype. In 61 patients (45 %), at least 1 CMB was found. Most of the CMBs were described in the amnestic profile (67 %). In 86 % of the cases, multiple CMB were observed. The ratio of Aβ1-40/42 in non-amnestic patients with CMB was significantly lower (mean 0.6) than in patients without CMB (mean 1.2). A notable difference in the albumin ratio as an indicator of the BBB was observed between groups with and without CMB. In the CMP-positive group, the E2 genotype was observed more frequently, and the E4 genotype less frequently, than in the CMB-negative group. Based on the cerebrospinal fluid-serum albumin ratio, we were able to show that patients with CMB present several features of BBB dysfunction. According to logistic regression, the predictive factors for CMB in patients with cognitive decline were age, WMHs score and albumin ratio. We found a significant reduction in the Aβ-amyloid ratio in the non-amnestic profile group with CMB (particularly in the cortical region) in comparison to those without CMB. While this is an interesting finding, its significance needs to be assessed in a prospective follow-up.

  9. The Zinc Dyshomeostasis Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Chopra, Deepak; Casey, Noel; Goldstein, Lee E.; Hameroff, Stuart R.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Hallmark AD neuropathology includes extracellular amyloid plaques composed largely of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ), intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP-tau), and microtubule destabilization. Early-onset autosomal dominant AD genes are associated with excessive Aβ accumulation, however cognitive impairment best correlates with NFTs and disrupted microtubules. The mechanisms linking Aβ and NFT pathologies in AD are unknown. Here, we propose that sequestration of zinc by Aβ-amyloid deposits (Aβ oligomers and plaques) not only drives Aβ aggregation, but also disrupts zinc homeostasis in zinc-enriched brain regions important for memory and vulnerable to AD pathology, resulting in intra-neuronal zinc levels, which are either too low, or excessively high. To evaluate this hypothesis, we 1) used molecular modeling of zinc binding to the microtubule component protein tubulin, identifying specific, high-affinity zinc binding sites that influence side-to-side tubulin interaction, the sensitive link in microtubule polymerization and stability. We also 2) performed kinetic modeling showing zinc distribution in extra-neuronal Aβ deposits can reduce intra-neuronal zinc binding to microtubules, destabilizing microtubules. Finally, we 3) used metallomic imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to show anatomically-localized and age-dependent zinc dyshomeostasis in specific brain regions of Tg2576 transgenic, mice, a model for AD. We found excess zinc in brain regions associated with memory processing and NFT pathology. Overall, we present a theoretical framework and support for a new theory of AD linking extra-neuronal Aβ amyloid to intra-neuronal NFTs and cognitive dysfunction. The connection, we propose, is based on β-amyloid-induced alterations in zinc ion concentration inside neurons affecting stability of polymerized

  10. Changes in chromatin structure associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P N; Lukiw, W J; De Boni, U; McLachlan, D R

    1981-11-01

    The enzyme micrococcal nuclease was used to examine the accessibility of chromatin extracted from brains of 13 patients with senile and presenile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Compared with chromatin extracted from brains of 8 patients without neurological signs or brain pathology and brains of 7 patients with nonAlzheimer dementia, Alzheimer chromatin was less accessible to this enzyme. Reduced accessibility was reflected by a reduced yield of mononucleosomes in comparison with dinucleosomes and larger oligomers. Both neuronal and glial chromatin were found to be similarly affected. The reduced yield of mononucleosomes from Alzheimer chromatin is not due to their increased breakdown, but is probably related to protein associated with the internucleosomal linker region that retards nuclease action. Dinucleosomes isolated from control and Alzheimer nuclease digests were examined for their protein complement. Three perchloric acid-soluble proteins situated in the histone H1 region of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels were present in elevated levels in Alzheimer dinucleosomes. These results represent the first example of altered chromosomal proteins associated with a diseased state of the brain.

  11. Amyloid imaging with PET in early Alzheimer disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L

    2013-05-01

    In vivo imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) with positron emission tomography has moved from the research arena into clinical practice. Clinicians working with cognitive decline and dementia must become familiar with its benefits and limitations. Amyloid imaging allows earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and better differential diagnosis of dementia and provides prognostic information for mild cognitive impairment. It also has an increasingly important role in therapeutic trial recruitment and for evaluation of anti-Aβ treatments. Longitudinal observations are required to elucidate the role of Aβ deposition in the course of Alzheimer disease and provide information needed to fully use the prognostic power of this investigation.

  12. Effectiveness of exercise on cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Sandor; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Frederico, Santos de Santana; Prestes, Jonato; Balsamo, Denise Coscrato; Dahan, da Cunha Nascimento; Dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo; Nobrega, Otávio T

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity has a protective effect on brain function in older people. Here, we briefly reviewed the studies and results related to the effects of exercise on cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The main findings from the current body of literature indicate positive evidence for structured physical activity (cardiorespiratory and resistance exercise) as a promising non-pharmacological intervention for preventing cognitive decline. More studies are needed to determine the mechanisms involved in this preventative effect, including on strength, cardiorespiratory, and other types of exercise. Thus, the prevention of Alzheimer's disease may depend on healthy lifestyle habits, such as a structured physical fitness program.

  13. In search of meaning: reading and writing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Harnish, Stacy M; Neils-Strunjas, Jean

    2008-02-01

    Decline in semantic memory is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease, and reading and writing performance reflects this loss. The article presents an overview of theoretical reading and spelling models, including definitions of key terminology and controversies surrounding the interaction of semantics and the orthographic lexicon. We review literature supporting a direct lexical nonsemantic route in reading and writing. The reading and writing deficits of Alzheimer's disease are contrasted with those of semantic dementia. Methods of assessing semantic memory in reading and writing are outlined, including administering published tests, word lists, homophones, written confrontation naming, verbal fluency, and written narrative analysis.

  14. Gene therapy in Alzheimer's disease - potential for disease modification.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Per; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tjernberg, Lars O; Winblad, Bengt; Saido, Takaomi C

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the elderly, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline. The mechanism underlying onset of the disease has not been fully elucidated. However, characteristic pathological manifestations include extracellular accumulation and aggregation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) into plaques and intracellular accumulation and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, forming neurofibrillary tangles. Despite extensive research worldwide, no disease modifying treatment is yet available. In this review, we focus on gene therapy as a potential treatment for AD, and summarize recent work in the field, ranging from proof-of-concept studies in animal models to clinical trials. The multifactorial causes of AD offer a variety of possible targets for gene therapy, including two neurotrophic growth factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Abeta-degrading enzymes, such as neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme and cathepsin B, and AD associated apolipoprotein E. This review also discusses advantages and drawbacks of various rapidly developing virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for gene therapy. Finally, approaches aiming at down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 levels by means of siRNA-mediated knockdown are briefly summarized. Overall, the prospects appear hopeful that gene therapy has the potential to be a disease modifying treatment for AD.

  15. 2014 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    This report discusses the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and overall effect on caregivers and society. It also examines the impact of AD on women compared with men. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have AD. Approximately 200,000 people younger than 65 years with AD comprise the younger onset AD population; 5 million are age 65 years or older. By mid-century, fueled in large part by the baby boom generation, the number of people living with AD in the United States is projected to grow by about 9 million. Today, someone in the country develops AD every 67 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and the total estimated prevalence is expected to be 13.8 million. In 2010, official death certificates recorded 83,494 deaths from AD, making AD the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 years or older. Between 2000 and 2010, the proportion of deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased 16%, 23%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion resulting from AD increased 68%. The actual number of deaths to which AD contributes (or deaths with AD) is likely much larger than the number of deaths from AD recorded on death certificates. In 2014, an estimated 700,000 older Americans will die with AD, and many of them will die from complications caused by AD. In 2013, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $220 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as

  16. [Alzheimer's disease: a public health problem: yes, but a priority?].

    PubMed

    Dartigues, J F; Helmer, C; Dubois, B; Duyckaerts, C; Laurent, B; Pasquier, F; Touchon, J

    2002-03-01

    Alzheimer's Disease is a major Public Health problem for many reasons. First, it is a frequent disease since, in France, the prevalence was estimated at about 400.000 cases, and the annual incidence at 100.000 cases. The frequency of the disease increases, in particular due to the ageing of the population. This disease has major consequences on the life of the patient and his/her caretaker. The cost of the disease is important, estimated at about 50 milliards of French francs. Pharmaceutical treatment and other interventions are possible in particular to delay the nursing home placement. On the other hand, this disease is often ignored, under-diagnosed, underestimated and exposed to inequality in resorting to care. In summary, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has all the criteria required for a major public health problem. In spite of this observation, AD is not yet considered as a priority for health authorities, although attitudes are changing.

  17. Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease: Common pathways, common goals.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Dean; Blumenthal, Thomas; Carrillo, Maria; DiPaolo, Gilbert; Esralew, Lucille; Gardiner, Katheleen; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Iqbal, Khalid; Krams, Michael; Lemere, Cynthia; Lott, Ira; Mobley, William; Ness, Seth; Nixon, Ralph; Potter, Huntington; Reeves, Roger; Sabbagh, Marwan; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Whitten, Michelle; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, estimates indicate there are between 250,000 and 400,000 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and nearly all will develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology starting in their 30s. With the current lifespan being 55 to 60 years, approximately 70% will develop dementia, and if their life expectancy continues to increase, the number of individuals developing AD will concomitantly increase. Pathogenic and mechanistic links between DS and Alzheimer's prompted the Alzheimer's Association to partner with the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation at a workshop of AD and DS experts to discuss similarities and differences, challenges, and future directions for this field. The workshop articulated a set of research priorities: (1) target identification and drug development, (2) clinical and pathological staging, (3) cognitive assessment and clinical trials, and (4) partnerships and collaborations with the ultimate goal to deliver effective disease-modifying treatments.

  18. Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease: Common pathways, common goals

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Dean; Blumenthal, Thomas; Carrillo, Maria; DiPaolo, Gilbert; Esralew, Lucille; Gardiner, Katheleen; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Iqbal, Khalid; Krams, Michael; Lemere, Cynthia; Lott, Ira; Mobley, William; Ness, Seth; Nixon, Ralph; Potter, Huntington; Reeves, Roger; Sabbagh, Marwan; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Whitten, Michelle; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, estimates indicate there are between 250,000 and 400,000 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and nearly all will develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology starting in their 30s. With the current lifespan being 55 to 60 years, approximately 70% will develop dementia, and if their life expectancy continues to increase, the number of individuals developing AD will concomitantly increase. Pathogenic and mechanistic links between DS and Alzheimer's prompted the Alzheimer's Association to partner with the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation at a workshop of AD and DS experts to discuss similarities and differences, challenges, and future directions for this field. The workshop articulated a set of research priorities: (1) target identification and drug development, (2) clinical and pathological staging, (3) cognitive assessment and clinical trials, and (4) partnerships and collaborations with the ultimate goal to deliver effective disease-modifying treatments. PMID:25510383

  19. 3 CFR 9050 - Proclamation 9050 of October 31, 2013. National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013 9050 Proclamation 9050 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 9050 of October 31, 2013 Proc. 9050 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible...

  20. 2013 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. It also explores the roles and unique challenges of long-distance caregivers, as well as interventions that target those challenges. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have AD. Approximately 200,000 people younger than 65 years with AD comprise the younger onset AD population; 5 million comprise the older onset AD population. Throughout the coming decades, the baby boom generation is projected to add about 10 million to the total number of people in the United States with AD. Today, someone in America develops AD every 68 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and the total estimated prevalence is expected to be 13.8 million. AD is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age 65 years or older. Between 2000 and 2010, the proportion of deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased 16%, 23%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion resulting from AD increased 68%. The number of deaths from AD as determined by official death certificates (83,494 in 2010) likely underrepresents the number of AD-related deaths in the United States. A projected 450,000 older Americans with AD will die in 2013, and a large proportion will die as a result of complications of AD. In 2012, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.5 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $216 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times as great as payments for beneficiaries without these conditions, and

  1. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C.

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Recommended minimum data to be collected in research studies on Alzheimer's disease. The MRC (UK) Alzheimer's Disease Workshop Steering Committee.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, G K; Hope, R A; Brooks, D N; Lantos, P L; Oppenheimer, C; Reynolds, G P; Rossor, M N; Davies, M B

    1989-01-01

    In order to be able to compare the results of research work carried out in different centres on Alzheimer's disease and dementia, it is necessary for there to be standardised assessment methods. The Medical Research Council organised a workshop in order to see whether workers in Britain in the field of dementia research could agree on such standardised assessment methods. The workshop agreed guidelines for the minimum data which should be collected, in clinical and pathological studies, on patients with presumed Alzheimer's disease and dementia. These recommendations are compared with other approaches based on research diagnostic criteria. PMID:2664087

  3. Aroma and taste perceptions with Alzheimer disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Aliani, Michel; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Girgih, Abraham T; Pownall, Trisha L; Bugera, Jacqeline L; Eskin, Michael N A

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory disorders of smell or taste in humans have been attributed to various physiological and environmental factors including aging and disease conditions. Aroma and taste greatly condition our food preference, selection and, consumption; the decreased appetite in patients with known neurodegenerative diseases may lead to dietary restrictions that could negatively impact nutritional and health status. The decline in olfactory and gustatory systems in patients with Alzheimer disease and various types of stroke are described.

  4. Variations in the transcriptome of Alzheimer's disease reveal molecular networks involved in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Monika; Ruan, Jianhua; Zhang, Weixiong

    2008-01-01

    Background Because of its polygenic nature, Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused not by defects in single genes, but rather by variations in a large number of genes and their complex interactions. A systems biology approach, such as the generation of a network of co-expressed genes and the identification of functional modules and cis-regulatory elements, to extract insights and knowledge from microarray data will lead to a better understanding of complex diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we perform a series of analyses using co-expression networks, cis-regulatory elements, and functions of co-expressed gene modules to analyze single-cell gene expression data from normal and Alzheimer's disease-affected subjects. Results We identified six co-expressed gene modules, each of which represented a biological process perturbed in Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease-related genes, such as APOE, A2M, PON2 and MAP4, and cardiovascular disease-associated genes, including COMT, CBS and WNK1, all congregated in a single module. Some of the disease-related genes were hub genes while many of them were directly connected to one or more hub genes. Further investigation of this disease-associated module revealed cis-regulatory elements that match to the binding sites of transcription factors involved in Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease. Conclusion Our results show the extensive links between Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease at the co-expression and co-regulation levels, providing further evidence for the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease are linked. Our results support the notion that diseases in which the same set of biochemical pathways are affected may tend to co-occur with each other. PMID:18842138

  5. Knowledge of Natural Kinds in Semantic Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Katy; Smith, Edward E.; Grossman, Murray

    2008-01-01

    We examined the semantic impairment for natural kinds in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and semantic dementia (SD) using an inductive reasoning paradigm. To learn about the relationships between natural kind exemplars and how these are distinguished from manufactured artifacts, subjects judged the strength of arguments such as…

  6. Comprehension of Long Distance Number Agreement in Probable Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almor, Amit; MacDonald, Maryellen C.; Kempler, Daniel; Andersen, Elaine S.; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2001-01-01

    Two studies are discussed. The first tested the effect of intervening material on the processing of subject-verb number agreement in Alzheimer's Disease patients and in normal elderly adults. The second examined the effect of intervening material on the processing of pronoun-antecedent number agreement in the same patients. (Author/VWL)

  7. Joint Storytelling by Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Spouses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses personal narratives of subjects with Alzheimer's disease and their spouses. Notes that solo narratives were gathered from patients and spouses separately, and then joint narratives were gathered. Compares patients' ability to provide settings in their solo narrative to their ability to supply information when prompted by spouses. Finds…

  8. Cortical metabolism, acetylcholinesterase staining and pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, E G; McGeer, P L; Kamo, H; Tago, H; Harrop, R

    1986-11-01

    The local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRgl) was determined by positron emission tomography (PET) using the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose method in a series of Alzheimer patients and normal controls. The LCMRgl declined in the cerebral cortex with age, but the decrement was significantly greater in the clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's cases. Comparison of PET and psychological data indicated that, as the disease progressed clinically, the reduction in cortical LCMRgl and the number of cortical regions involved also increased. Variable regions of cortex were involved in the early stages but the temporal, parietal and frontal regions were most typically affected. One case coming to autopsy showed that the severity of the LCMRgl decline paralleled loss of neurons in the cortex and their replacement with astroglia. A case of Pick's disease coming to autopsy had shown a different and highly characteristic pattern of cortical metabolic defect. In this case also a poor metabolic rate was associated with extensive gliosis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) staining of the cerebral cortex in elderly normals and Alzheimer's disease cases with a new, highly sensitive method showed that in Alzheimer's disease there was an extensive loss of AChE-positive fibers with senile plaques frequently incorporating AChE-positive fiber debris. AChE staining of the substantia innominata area, where the cells giving rise to these neocortical fibers are presumably located, also showed evidence of degenerating cells and fibers.

  9. Financial Conflicts Facing Late-Life Remarried Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Carey Wexler; Bauer, Jean W.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores financial conflicts faced by late-life remarried wives providing care for their husbands with Alzheimer's disease. Interviews with 9 women identified intergenerational secrets and tensions regarding financial and inheritance decisions. Participants' remarried spouse status, underlying family boundary ambiguities,…

  10. Voice Onset Time Production in Speakers with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Julie; Ryalls, Jack; Brice, Alejandro; Whiteside, Janet

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, voice onset time (VOT) measurements were compared between a group of individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a group of healthy age- and gender-matched peers. Participants read a list of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, which included the six stop consonants. The VOT measurements were made from…

  11. Semantic Priming for Coordinate Distant Concepts in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, R.; Zannino, G. D.; Caltagirone, C.; Carlesimo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Semantic priming paradigms have been used to investigate semantic knowledge in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). While priming effects produced by prime-target pairs with associative relatedness reflect processes at both lexical and semantic levels, priming effects produced by words that are semantically related but not associated should…

  12. The Effect of Alzheimer's Disease and Aging on Conceptual Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taler, Vanessa; Chertkow, Howard; Saumier, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects, healthy elderly, and young adults interpreted a series of novel noun-noun expressions composed of familiar object words. Subjects interpreted each item by selecting one of three possible definitions: a definition in which the referents of each noun were associated together in a particular context (e.g., rabbit…

  13. Music Enhances Autobiographical Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Haj, Mohamad; Postal, Virginie; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that the "Four Seasons" music may enhance the autobiographical performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We used a repeated measures design in which autobiographical recall of 12 mild AD patients was assessed using a free narrative method under three conditions: (a) in "Silence," (b) after being exposed to the opus "Four…

  14. Assessing Impact on Family Caregivers to Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talkington-Boyer, Shannon; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1994-01-01

    Examined impact of caregiving among 110 caregivers to aging family member with Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' appraisals along dimensions of subjective burden, negative impact, caregiving satisfaction, and caregiver mastery were correlated with extent of memory and behavior problems of patient and caregivers' coping style, locus of…

  15. Taking Control of Alzheimer's Disease: A Training Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Nina M.; Sherman, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a training program for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their care partners. Care partners were mailed two surveys, one for themselves and one for the person with dementia. Domains covered in the training included an overview of cognitive disorders, treatment of symptoms including…

  16. Qualitative neuropsychological performance characteristics in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Stopford, C; Snowden, J; Neary, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease are clinically distinct disorders, yet neuropsychological studies have had variable success in distinguishing them. A possible reason is that studies typically rely on overall accuracy scores, which may obscure differences in reasons for failure. Objectives: To explore the hypothesis that analysis of qualitative performance characteristics and error types, in addition to overall numerical scores, would enhance the neuropsychological distinction between FTD and Alzheimer's disease. Methods: 38 patients with FTD and 73 with Alzheimer's disease underwent assessment of language, visuospatial abilities, memory, and executive function, using a neuropsychological screening instrument and standard neuropsychological tests. In each of these cognitive domains, performance characteristics and error types were documented, in addition to numerical scores on tests. Results: Whereas comparison of neuropsychological test scores revealed some group differences, these did not occur consistently across tests within cognitive domains. However, analysis of performance characteristics and error types revealed qualitative differences between the two groups. In particular, FTD patients displayed features associated with frontal lobe dysfunction, such as concrete thought, perseveration, confabulation, and poor organisation, which disrupted performance across the range of neuropsychological tests. Conclusions: Numerical scores on neuropsychological tests alone are of limited value in differentiating FTD and Alzheimer's disease, but performance characteristics and error types enhance the distinction between the two disorders. FTD is associated with a profound behavioural syndrome that affects performance on cognitive assessment, obscuring group differences. Qualitative information should be included in neuropsychological research and clinical assessments. PMID:15965196

  17. Alzheimer's Disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Carolyn; Bartolotti, Nancy; Lazarov, Orly

    2016-01-01

    New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus, and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer's disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27199641

  18. Beyond amyloid: getting real about nonamyloid targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herrup, Karl; Carrillo, Maria C; Schenk, Dale; Cacace, Angela; Desanti, Susan; Fremeau, Robert; Bhat, Ratan; Glicksman, Marcie; May, Patrick; Swerdlow, Russell; Van Eldik, Linda J; Bain, Lisa J; Budd, Samantha

    2013-07-01

    For decades, researchers have focused primarily on a pathway initiated by amyloid beta aggregation, amyloid deposition, and accumulation in the brain as the key mechanism underlying the disease and the most important treatment target. However, evidence increasingly suggests that amyloid is deposited early during the course of disease, even prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Thus, targeting amyloid in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), as past failed clinical trials have done, may be insufficient to halt further disease progression. Scientists are investigating other molecular and cellular pathways and processes that contribute to AD pathogenesis. Thus, the Alzheimer's Association's Research Roundtable convened a meeting in April 2012 to move beyond amyloid and explore AD as a complex multifactorial disease, with the goal of using a more inclusive perspective to identify novel treatment strategies. PMID:23809366

  19. Alzheimer's disease: the silver tsunami of the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ankita; Irwin, Madison; Singh, Aditi; Riccetti, Matthew; Singh, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder, has no cure to date. One of the causes of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) plaques, which result in the onset of neurodegeneration. It is not known how these plaques trigger the onset of neurodegeneration. There are several animal models developed to (i) study etiology of disease, (ii) look for genetic modifiers, and (iii) identify chemical inhibitors that can block neurodegeneration and help to find cure for this disease. An insect model of Drosophila melanogaster has also provided new insights into the disease. Here we will discuss the utility of the Drosophila eye model to study Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27335537

  20. Alzheimer's disease: the silver tsunami of the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ankita; Irwin, Madison; Singh, Aditi; Riccetti, Matthew; Singh, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder, has no cure to date. One of the causes of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) plaques, which result in the onset of neurodegeneration. It is not known how these plaques trigger the onset of neurodegeneration. There are several animal models developed to (i) study etiology of disease, (ii) look for genetic modifiers, and (iii) identify chemical inhibitors that can block neurodegeneration and help to find cure for this disease. An insect model of Drosophila melanogaster has also provided new insights into the disease. Here we will discuss the utility of the Drosophila eye model to study Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27335537

  1. [Development of Disease-modifying Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that can arrest the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as one of the highest priorities of medical research. Two pathological hallmarks, amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein deposition and tau accumulation, are the major targets of DMT. Immunotherapy for Abeta removal and secretase inhibitors/modulators that reduce total or accumulation-prone Abeta are candidate DMTs against Abeta. Compounds that prevent tau aggregation are also under development. Clinical trials that test the efficacy of these DMT candidates are in preparation or ongoing. Recent studies of biomarkers of AD brain lesions have indicated that Abeta and tau accumulation appears 10 to 30 years before the occurrence of dementia and gradually propagate to reach the level that causes symptoms. Therefore, efficacy of DMT has to be evaluated in the preclinical stage of AD. The incidence of preclinical AD in the cognitively normal, aged population are estimated to be around 19%. Thus, currently available biomarkers, amyloid/tau PET imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of Abeta and tau, are, perhaps, too invasive and costly. An international collaborative effort is needed to overcome this issue. PMID:27056864

  2. Alzheimer disease: current concepts and emerging diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher M; Karlawish, Jason H T

    2003-03-01

    Alzheimer disease is a complex neurodegenerative dementing illness. It has become a major public health problem because of its increasing prevalence, long duration, high cost of care, and lack of disease-modifying therapy. Over the past few years, however, remarkable advances have taken place in understanding both the genetic and molecular biology associated with the intracellular processing of amyloid and tau and the changes leading to the pathologic formation of extracellular amyloid plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau into neurofibrillary tangles. The identification of disease-causing autosomal dominant mutations as well as gene polymorphisms that alter the risk for pathology indicate that Alzheimer disease is a genetically complex disorder. This progress in our understanding of the molecular pathology has set the stage for clinically meaningful advances in diagnosis and treatment. Emerging diagnostic methods that are based on biochemical and imaging biomarkers of disease-specific pathology hold the potential for accurately diagnosing Alzheimer disease at the earliest stage of the illness--the time when disease-modifying treatment will be most effective. Currently available cholinesterase inhibition therapy targets the cognitive symptoms. However, the goal of new therapies under development is halting the pathologic cascade and potentially reversing the course of the disease. If these new therapies are successful, they will represent a remarkable medical advance for patients and the families who care for them.

  3. Prion Disease Induces Alzheimer Disease-Like Neuropathologic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Tousseyn, Thomas; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sánchez, Henry; Gheyara, Ania; Oehler, Abby; Geschwind, Michael; DeArmond, Bernadette; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the brains of 266 patients with prion diseases (PrionD) and found that 46 (17%) had Alzheimer disease (AD)-like changes. To explore potential mechanistic links between PrionD and AD, we exposed human brain aggregates (Hu BrnAggs) to brain homogenate from a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and found that the neurons in the Hu BrnAggs produced many β-amyloid (β42) inclusions, whereas uninfected, control-exposed Hu BrnAggs did not. Western blots of 20-pooled CJD-infected BrnAggs verified higher Aβ42 levels than controls. We next examined the CA1 region of the hippocampus from 14 patients with PrionD and found that 5 patients had low levels of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc), many Aβ42 intraneuronal inclusions, low APOE-4, and no significant nerve cell loss. Seven patients had high levels of PrPSc, low Aβ42, high APOE-4 and 40% nerve cell loss, suggesting that APOE-4 and PrPSc together cause neuron loss in PrionD. There were also increased levels of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (Hτ) and Hτ-positive neuropil threads and neuron bodies in both PrionD and AD groups. The brains of 6 age-matched control patients without dementia did not contain Aβ42 deposits; however, there were rare Hτ-positive threads in 5 controls and 2 controls had a few Hτ-positive nerve cell bodies. We conclude that PrionD may trigger biochemical changes similar to AD and suggest that PrionD are diseases of PrPSc, Aβ42, APOE-4 and abnormal tau. PMID:26226132

  4. Early behavioural changes in familial Alzheimer's disease in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Liang, Li-Jung; Zhou, Yan; Vangala, Sitaram; Teng, Edmond; Kremen, Sarah; Wharton, David; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Farlow, Martin; Ghetti, Bernardino; McDade, Eric; Masters, Colin L; Mayeux, Richard P; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Buckles, Virginia; Bateman, Randall; Morris, John C

    2015-04-01

    Prior studies indicate psychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy and anxiety are risk factors for or prodromal symptoms of incipient Alzheimer's disease. The study of persons at 50% risk for inheriting autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations allows characterization of these symptoms before progressive decline in a population destined to develop illness. We sought to characterize early behavioural features in carriers of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations. Two hundred and sixty-one persons unaware of their mutation status enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, a study of persons with or at-risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Ninety-seven asymptomatic (CDR = 0), 25 mildly symptomatic (CDR = 0.5), and 33 overtly affected (CDR > 0.5) autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers were compared to 106 non-carriers with regard to frequency of behavioural symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire and severity of depressive symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale using generalized linear regression models with appropriate distributions and link functions. Results from the adjusted analyses indicated that depressive symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire were less common in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers than in non-carriers (5% versus 17%, P = 0.014) and the odds of experiencing at least one behavioural sign in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers was lower than in non-carriers (odds ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.98, P = 0.042). Depression (56% versus 17%, P = 0.0003), apathy (40% versus 4%, P < 0.0001), disinhibition (16% versus 2%, P = 0.009), irritability (48% versus 9%, P = 0.0001), sleep changes (28% versus 7%, P = 0.003), and agitation (24% versus 6%, P = 0.008) were more common and

  5. Alzheimer's disease: rhythm, timing and music as therapy.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, D

    1994-01-01

    Active music-making provides a form of therapy for the Alzheimer's patient which may stimulate cognitive activities such that areas subject to progressive failure are maintained. Anecdotal evidence suggests that quality of life of Alzheimer's patients is significantly improved with music therapy, accompanied by the overall social benefits of acceptance and sense of belonging gained by communicating with others. Music therapy, when based on clear treatment objectives can reduce the individual prescription of tranquilizing medication, reduce the use of hypnotics and help overall goals of rehabilitation. Mood improvement and self-expression, the stimulation of speech and organisation of mental processes; and sensory stimulation and motor integration are promoted. Given that the rate of deterioration in Alzheimer's disease is not predictable, a series of single case experimental designs would generate valuable empirical data concerning treatment outcome and promote basic research into the timing functions required for the co-ordination of cognition, physiology, motor ability and the integrity of behaviour.

  6. Translocator protein (TSPO) role in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Repalli, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Cellular damage and deregulated apoptotic cell death lead to functional impairment, and a main consequence of these events is aging. Cellular damage is initiated by different stress/risk factors such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and heavy metals. These stress/risk factors affect the cellular homeostasis by altering methylation status of several aging and Alzheimer's disease associated genes; these effects can be manifested immediately after exposure to stress and at later stages of life. However, when cellular damage exceeds certain threshold levels apoptosis is initiated. This review discusses the stress factors involved in cellular damage and the role and potential of TSPO-mediated cell death in aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease, which is also characterized by extensive cell death. Mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic death through the release of cytochrome c is regulated by TSPO, and increased expression of this protein is observed in both elderly people and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. TSPO forms and mediates opening of the mitochondrial membrane pore, mPTP and oxidizes cardiolipin, and these events lead to the leakage of apoptotic death mediators, such as cytochrome c, resulting in cell death. However, TSPO has many proposed functions and can also increase steroid synthesis, which leads to inhibition of inflammation and inhibition of the release of apoptotic factors, thereby decreasing cell damage and promoting cell survival. Thus, TSPO mediates apoptosis and decreases the cell damage, which in turn dictates the process of aging as well as the functionality of organs such as the brain. TSPO modulation with ligands in the Alzheimer's disease mouse model showed improvement in behavioral symptoms, and studies in Drosophila species showed increased cell survival and prolonged lifespan in flies after TSPO inhibition. These data suggest that since effects/signs of stress can manifest at any time, prevention through change in lifestyle and TSPO

  7. Mitochondria-Targeted Protective Compounds in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; González-Burgos, Elena; Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles that regulate both metabolic and apoptotic signaling pathways; their most highlighted functions include cellular energy generation in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis, balance between ROS production and detoxification, mediation of apoptosis cell death, and synthesis and metabolism of various key molecules. Consistent evidence suggests that mitochondrial failure is associated with early events in the pathogenesis of ageing-related neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondria-targeted protective compounds that prevent or minimize mitochondrial dysfunction constitute potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of these central nervous system diseases. This paper provides an overview of the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, with particular attention to in vitro and in vivo studies on promising endogenous and exogenous mitochondria-targeted protective compounds. PMID:26064418

  8. Modulating metals as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Lin W; Barnham, Kevin J

    2012-05-01

    In 1906, Alois Alzheimer first characterized the disease that bears his name. Despite intensive research, which has led to a better understanding of the pathology, there is no effective treatment for this disease. Of the drugs approved by the US FDA, none are disease modifying, only symptomatic. Unfortunately, there have been a number of failed clinical trials in the past 10 years where studies show either no cognitive improvement or, worse, serious side effects associated with treatment. Hence, there is a need for the field to look at alternative approaches to therapy. In this review, we will discuss how metal dyshomeostasis occurs in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Concomitantly, we will discuss how targeting this dyshomeostasis offers an effective and novel therapeutic approach. Thus far, compounds that mediate these effects have shown great potential in both preclinical animal studies as well as in early-stage clinical trials.

  9. Twenty years of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid hypothesis: a genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Rudolph E; Bertram, Lars

    2005-02-25

    From Alois Alzheimer's description of Auguste D.'s brain in 1907 to George Glenner's biochemical dissection of beta-amyloid in 1984, the "amyloid hypothesis" of Alzheimer's disease has continued to gain support over the past two decades, particularly from genetic studies. Here we assess the amyloid hypothesis based on both known and putative Alzheimer's disease genes.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas R; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hyman, Bradley T; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ-, and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level versus those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. Cerebrospinal fluid apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients versus age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring.

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C. Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M.; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S.; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ- and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level vs. those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. CSF apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients vs. age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring. PMID:26083568

  12. Revisiting rodent models: Octodon degus as Alzheimer's disease model?

    PubMed

    Steffen, Johannes; Krohn, Markus; Paarmann, Kristin; Schwitlick, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Korth, Carsten; Braun, Katharina; Pahnke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease primarily occurs as sporadic disease and is accompanied with vast socio-economic problems. The mandatory basic research relies on robust and reliable disease models to overcome increasing incidence and emerging social challenges. Rodent models are most efficient, versatile, and predominantly used in research. However, only highly artificial and mostly genetically modified models are available. As these 'engineered' models reproduce only isolated features, researchers demand more suitable models of sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. One very promising animal model was the South American rodent Octodon degus, which was repeatedly described as natural 'sporadic Alzheimer's disease model' with 'Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology'. To unveil advantages over the 'artificial' mouse models, we re-evaluated the age-dependent, neurohistological changes in young and aged Octodon degus (1 to 5-years-old) bred in a wild-type colony in Germany. In our hands, extensive neuropathological analyses of young and aged animals revealed normal age-related cortical changes without obvious signs for extensive degeneration as seen in patients with dementia. Neither significant neuronal loss nor enhanced microglial activation were observed in aged animals. Silver impregnation methods, conventional, and immunohistological stains as well as biochemical fractionations revealed neither amyloid accumulation nor tangle formation. Phosphoepitope-specific antibodies against tau species displayed similar intraneuronal reactivity in both, young and aged Octodon degus.In contrast to previous results, our study suggests that Octodon degus born and bred in captivity do not inevitably develop cortical amyloidosis, tangle formation or neuronal loss as seen in Alzheimer's disease patients or transgenic disease models. PMID:27566602

  13. [Alzheimer's disease and the organization of visits to cultural sites].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Valérie; Brinck-Jensen, Signe; Filleau, Christelle; Greenblat, Cathy; David, Renaud; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of a policy to open up cultural sites within the city to the specific disability of Alzheimer's disease, the Resource and Research Memory Centre at Nice general hospital in partnership with Nice's city hall, has developed a cultural programme. The aim of this project is to assess the therapeutic aspects of this programme and notably the perception of the disease by the family carers.

  14. Friend or foe? Targeting microglia in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation is believed to be a component of a number of degenerative brain diseases including Alzheimer's disease. A recent article by Fu and colleagues (2016) demonstrated that the cytokine IL-33 can modulate microglia in an animal model of AD to become better scavengers of beta-amyloid and less pro-inflammatory. The findings have potential therapeutic implications for a number of brain conditions. PMID:27442003

  15. Vascular and Alzheimer's disease markers independently predict brain atrophy rate in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative controls.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Josephine; Carmichael, Owen T; Leung, Kelvin K; Schwarz, Christopher; Ridgway, Gerard R; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Malone, Ian B; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeCarli, Charlie; Fox, Nick C

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed relationships among white matter hyperintensities (WMH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain volume loss. Subjects included 197 controls, 331 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 146 individuals with AD with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ1-42 (n = 351) and tau (n = 346) were measured. Brain volume change was quantified using the boundary shift integral (BSI). We assessed the association between baseline WMH volume and annualized BSI, adjusting for intracranial volume. We also performed multiple regression analyses in the CSF subset, assessing the relationships of WMH and Aβ1-42 and/or tau with BSI. WMH burden was positively associated with BSI in controls (p = 0.02) but not MCI or AD. In multivariable models, WMH (p = 0.003) and Aβ1-42 (p = 0.001) were independently associated with BSI in controls; in MCI Aβ1-42 (p < 0.001) and tau (p = 0.04) were associated with BSI. There was no evidence of independent effects of WMH or CSF measures on BSI in AD. These data support findings that vascular damage is associated with increased brain atrophy in the context of AD pathology in pre-dementia stages.

  16. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  17. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  18. Insight into the Molecular Imaging of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Earlier it was diagnosed only via clinical assessments and confirmed by postmortem brain histopathology. The development of validated biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease has given impetus to improve diagnostics and accelerate the development of new therapies. Functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides a means of detecting and characterising the regional changes in brain blood flow, metabolism, and receptor binding sites that are associated with Alzheimer's disease. Multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical variations that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Radiotracer-based PET and SPECT potentially provide sensitive, accurate methods for the early detection of disease. This paper presents a review of neuroimaging modalities like PET, SPECT, and selected imaging biomarkers/tracers used for the early diagnosis of AD. Neuroimaging with such biomarkers and tracers could achieve a much higher diagnostic accuracy for AD and related disorders in the future. PMID:26880871

  19. Disturbed Copper Bioavailability in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaden, Daniela; Bush, Ashley I.; Danzeisen, Ruth; Bayer, Thomas A.; Multhaup, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Recent data from in vitro, animal, and human studies have shed new light on the positive roles of copper in many aspects of AD. Copper promotes the non-amyloidogenic processing of APP and thereby lowers the Aβ production in cell culture systems, and it increases lifetime and decreases soluble amyloid production in APP transgenic mice. In a clinical trial with Alzheimer patients, the decline of Aβ levels in CSF, which is a diagnostic marker, is diminished in the verum group (8 mg copper/day), indicating a beneficial effect of the copper treatment. These observations are in line with the benefit of treatment with compounds aimed at normalizing metal levels in the brain, such as PBT2. The data reviewed here demonstrate that there is an apparent disturbance in metal homeostasis in AD. More research is urgently needed to understand how this disturbance can be addressed therapeutically. PMID:22145082

  20. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  1. 100 Years of Alzheimer's disease (1906-2006).

    PubMed

    Lage, José Manuel Martínez

    2006-01-01

    As we commemorate the first centennial since Alzheimer's disease (AD) was first diagnosed, this article casts back into the past while also looking to the future. It reflects on the life of Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) and the scientific work he undertook in describing the disorder suffered by Auguste D. from age 51 to 56 and the neuropathological findings revealed by her brain, reminding us of the origin of the eponym. It highlights how, throughout the 1960's, the true importance of AD as the major cause of late life dementia ultimately came to light and narrates the evolution of the concepts related to AD throughout the years and its recognition as a major public health problem. Finally, the article pays homage to the work done by the Alzheimer's Association and the research undertaken at the Alzheimer's Disease Centres within the framework of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Program, briefly discussing the long road travelled in the fight against AD in the past 25 years and the scientific odyssey that we trust will result in finding a cure.

  2. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships.

  3. Cascading network failure across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Jones, David T; Knopman, David S; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Boeve, Bradley F; Petersen, Ronald C; Weiner, Michael W; Jack, Clifford R

    2016-02-01

    Complex biological systems are organized across various spatiotemporal scales with particular scientific disciplines dedicated to the study of each scale (e.g. genetics, molecular biology and cognitive neuroscience). When considering disease pathophysiology, one must contemplate the scale at which the disease process is being observed and how these processes impact other levels of organization. Historically Alzheimer's disease has been viewed as a disease of abnormally aggregated proteins by pathologists and molecular biologists and a disease of clinical symptoms by neurologists and psychologists. Bridging the divide between these scales has been elusive, but the study of brain networks appears to be a pivotal inroad to accomplish this task. In this study, we were guided by an emerging systems-based conceptualization of Alzheimer's disease and investigated changes in brain networks across the disease spectrum. The default mode network has distinct subsystems with unique functional-anatomic connectivity, cognitive associations, and responses to Alzheimer's pathophysiology. These distinctions provide a window into the systems-level pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Using clinical phenotyping, metadata, and multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, we characterized the pattern of default mode network subsystem connectivity changes across the entire disease spectrum (n = 128). The two main findings of this paper are (i) the posterior default mode network fails before measurable amyloid plaques and appears to initiate a connectivity cascade that continues throughout the disease spectrum; and (ii) high connectivity between the posterior default mode network and hubs of high connectivity (many located in the frontal lobe) is associated with amyloid accumulation. These findings support a system model best characterized by a cascading network failure--analogous to cascading failures seen in power grids triggered by local

  4. Cascading network failure across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Jones, David T; Knopman, David S; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Boeve, Bradley F; Petersen, Ronald C; Weiner, Michael W; Jack, Clifford R

    2016-02-01

    Complex biological systems are organized across various spatiotemporal scales with particular scientific disciplines dedicated to the study of each scale (e.g. genetics, molecular biology and cognitive neuroscience). When considering disease pathophysiology, one must contemplate the scale at which the disease process is being observed and how these processes impact other levels of organization. Historically Alzheimer's disease has been viewed as a disease of abnormally aggregated proteins by pathologists and molecular biologists and a disease of clinical symptoms by neurologists and psychologists. Bridging the divide between these scales has been elusive, but the study of brain networks appears to be a pivotal inroad to accomplish this task. In this study, we were guided by an emerging systems-based conceptualization of Alzheimer's disease and investigated changes in brain networks across the disease spectrum. The default mode network has distinct subsystems with unique functional-anatomic connectivity, cognitive associations, and responses to Alzheimer's pathophysiology. These distinctions provide a window into the systems-level pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Using clinical phenotyping, metadata, and multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, we characterized the pattern of default mode network subsystem connectivity changes across the entire disease spectrum (n = 128). The two main findings of this paper are (i) the posterior default mode network fails before measurable amyloid plaques and appears to initiate a connectivity cascade that continues throughout the disease spectrum; and (ii) high connectivity between the posterior default mode network and hubs of high connectivity (many located in the frontal lobe) is associated with amyloid accumulation. These findings support a system model best characterized by a cascading network failure--analogous to cascading failures seen in power grids triggered by local

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Mechanisms and Emerging Roads to Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sala Frigerio, Carlo; De Strooper, Bart

    2016-07-01

    Ten years of remarkable progress in understanding the fundamental biochemistry of Alzheimer's disease have been followed by ten years of remarkable and increasing clinical insight into the natural progression of the disorder. The concept of a long, intermediary, prodromal phase between the first appearance of amyloid plaques and tangles and the manifestation of dementia is now well established. The major challenge for the next decade is to chart the many cellular processes that underlie this phase and link the biochemical alterations to the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease. We discuss here how genetics, new cell culture systems, and improved animal models will fuel this work. We anticipate that the resulting novel insights will provide a basis for further drug development for this terrible disease. PMID:27050320

  6. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease: academic, industry and regulatory perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Frank, Richard; Broich, Karl; Teipel, Stefan J; Katz, Russell G; Hardy, John; Herholz, Karl; Bokde, Arun L W; Jessen, Frank; Hoessler, Yvonne C; Sanhai, Wendy R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Woodcock, Janet; Blennow, Kaj

    2010-07-01

    Advances in therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease that lead to even small delays in onset and progression of the condition would significantly reduce the global burden of the disease. To effectively test compounds for Alzheimer's disease and bring therapy to individuals as early as possible there is an urgent need for collaboration between academic institutions, industry and regulatory organizations for the establishment of standards and networks for the identification and qualification of biological marker candidates. Biomarkers are needed to monitor drug safety, to identify individuals who are most likely to respond to specific treatments, to stratify presymptomatic patients and to quantify the benefits of treatments. Biomarkers that achieve these characteristics should enable objective business decisions in portfolio management and facilitate regulatory approval of new therapies.

  7. The fine-tuning of proteolytic pathways in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cecarini, Valentina; Bonfili, Laura; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Angeletti, Mauro; Keller, Jeffrey N; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2016-09-01

    Several integrated proteolytic systems contribute to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the continuous removal of misfolded, aggregated or oxidized proteins and damaged organelles. Among these systems, the proteasome and autophagy play the major role in protein quality control, which is a fundamental issue in non-proliferative cells such as neurons. Disturbances in the functionality of these two pathways are frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, and reflect the accumulation of protease-resistant, deleterious protein aggregates. In this review, we explored the sophisticated crosstalk between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy in the removal of the harmful structures that characterize Alzheimer's disease neurons. We also dissected the role of the numerous shuttle factors and chaperones that, directly or indirectly interacting with ubiquitin and LC3, are used for cargo selection and delivery to one pathway or the other. PMID:27120560

  8. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties. PMID:26579421

  9. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

    2016-04-21

    Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing. PMID:27104898

  11. Apolipoprotein E in the genetics and epidemiology of Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.

    1995-10-09

    The role of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) alleles and isoforms in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer`s disease is discussed. The possibility that ApoE itself is not involved in the disease pathogenesis but is merely in genetic disequilibrium with the real locus is discussed and dismissed. The data showing that the {epsilon}4 allele is associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and with an earlier onset age are reviewed. The data showing that, at least in some circumstances, the {epsilon}2 allele is associated with a decrease in the risk of developing the disease, and with a later onset age are also reviewed. Data from the genetic analysis of other disorders are reviewed and presented, and it is suggested that the genetic data support the notion that the role of ApoE in the etiology of the disease directly relates to {beta}-amyloid deposition and plaque formation. This suggestion is in concordance with the most likely mechanism for the role of P-amyloid precursor protein gene mutations as other risk factors for the disease. 68 refs.

  12. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-01-01

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans. PMID:26919851

  13. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.; Bonnycastle, L.; Poorkai, P.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of chromosome 14q24.3 which encompasses the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus (AD3). Determined by linkage analysis of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease kindreds, this interval is bounded by the genetic markers D14S61-D14S63 and spans approximately 15 centimorgans. The contig consists of 29 markers and 74 YACs of which 57 are defined by one or more sequence tagged sites (STSs). The STS markers comprise 5 genes, 16 short tandem repeat polymorphisms and 8 cDNA clones. An additional number of genes, expressed sequence tags and cDNA fragments have been identified and localized to the contig by hybridization and sequence analysis of anonymous clones isolated by cDNA direct selection techniques. A minimal contig of about 15 YACs averaging 0.5-1.5 megabase in length will span this interval and is, at first approximation, in rough agreement with the genetic map. For two regions of the contig, our coverage has relied on L1/THE fingerprint and Alu-PCR hybridization data of YACs provided by CEPH/Genethon. We are currently developing sequence tagged sites from these to confirm the overlaps revealed by the fingerprint data. Among the genes which map to the contig are transforming growth factor beta 3, c-fos, and heat shock protein 2A (HSPA2). C-fos is not a candidate gene for AD3 based on the sequence analysis of affected and unaffected individuals. HSPA2 maps to the proximal edge of the contig and Calmodulin 1, a candidate gene from 4q24.3, maps outside of the region. The YAC contig is a framework physical map from which cosmid or P1 clone contigs can be constructed. As more genes and cDNAs are mapped, a highly resolved transcription map will emerge, a necessary step towards positionally cloning the AD3 gene.

  14. Animal models in the drug discovery pipeline for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2011-01-01

    With increasing feasibility of predicting conversion of mild cognitive impairment to dementia based on biomarker profiling, the urgent need for efficacious disease-modifying compounds has become even more critical. Despite intensive research, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain insufficiently documented for purposeful target discovery. Translational research based on valid animal models may aid in alleviating some of the unmet needs in the current Alzheimer's disease pharmaceutical market, which includes disease-modification, increased efficacy and safety, reduction of the number of treatment unresponsive patients and patient compliance. The development and phenotyping of animal models is indeed essential in Alzheimer's disease-related research as valid models enable the appraisal of early pathological processes – which are often not accessible in patients, and subsequent target discovery and evaluation. This review paper summarizes and critically evaluates currently available animal models, and discusses their value to the Alzheimer drug discovery pipeline. Models dealt with include spontaneous models in various species, including senescence-accelerated mice, chemical and lesion-induced rodent models, and genetically modified models developed in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Danio rerio and rodents. Although highly valid animal models exist, none of the currently available models recapitulates all aspects of human Alzheimer's disease, and one should always be aware of the potential dangers of uncritical extrapolating from model organisms to a human condition that takes decades to develop and mainly involves higher cognitive functions. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21371009

  15. Olive Oil and its Potential Effects on Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Shan; Zhang, G. P.

    Alzheimer's disease is a neuro-degenerative brain disease that is responsible for affecting the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. There has been no evidence to suggest a cure for the disease and the only existing treatments have very low rates of success in trial patients. This is largely due to the fact that the brain is one of the most undiscovered parts of the human body. Brain chemistry is highly complex and responds to its environment in random and radical ways. My research includes testing the reactionary outcomes of combining compounds of olive oil with the 20 basic amino acids. Regions around the world with olive oil based diets show a direct correlation to lower rates of Alzheimer's. Testing few compounds of olive oil with chemicals already found in the brain may yield to a better understanding as to why that is. I took the compounds tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and oleocanthal, and combined them with the 20 basic amino acids and calculated the total energy of the new molecule. The molecules produced with acceptably low energy values will be the center of further research. These molecules could lead to truly understanding olive oil's effect on the brain, and ultimately, the cure or prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Regional variability of imaging biomarkers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Benzinger, Tammie L S; Blazey, Tyler; Jack, Clifford R; Koeppe, Robert A; Su, Yi; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ances, Beau M; Bateman, Randall J; Cairns, Nigel J; Fagan, Anne M; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Aisen, Paul S; Christensen, Jon J; Ercole, Lindsay; Hornbeck, Russ C; Farrar, Angela M; Aldea, Patricia; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Owen, Christopher J; Xie, Xianyun; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam; McDade, Eric; Klunk, William; Mathis, Chester A; Ringman, John; Thompson, Paul M; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L; Martins, Ralph; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Cash, David M; Weiner, Michael W; Holtzman, David M; Buckles, Virginia D; Moulder, Krista; Morris, John C

    2013-11-19

    Major imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease include amyloid deposition [imaged with [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET], altered glucose metabolism (imaged with [(18)F]fluro-deoxyglucose PET), and structural atrophy (imaged by MRI). Recently we published the initial subset of imaging findings for specific regions in a cohort of individuals with autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We now extend this work to include a larger cohort, whole-brain analyses integrating all three imaging modalities, and longitudinal data to examine regional differences in imaging biomarker dynamics. The anatomical distribution of imaging biomarkers is described in relation to estimated years from symptom onset. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carrier individuals have elevated PiB levels in nearly every cortical region 15 y before the estimated age of onset. Reduced cortical glucose metabolism and cortical thinning in the medial and lateral parietal lobe appeared 10 and 5 y, respectively, before estimated age of onset. Importantly, however, a divergent pattern was observed subcortically. All subcortical gray-matter regions exhibited elevated PiB uptake, but despite this, only the hippocampus showed reduced glucose metabolism. Similarly, atrophy was not observed in the caudate and pallidum despite marked amyloid accumulation. Finally, before hypometabolism, a hypermetabolic phase was identified for some cortical regions, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate. Additional analyses of individuals in which longitudinal data were available suggested that an accelerated appearance of volumetric declines approximately coincides with the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease. PMID:24194552

  17. Spotlight on memantine in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2010-02-01

    Memantine (Axura, Ebixa, Namenda) is an uncompetitive, moderate-affinity NMDA receptor antagonist that is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. In well designed trials in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, oral memantine monotherapy improved outcomes in the area of functional ability more than placebo in one trial, but in a second trial, treatment differences did not reach significance. Memantine has a distinct mode of action compared with that of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, and in a well designed study, combination therapy with memantine plus donepezil improved outcomes more than donepezil plus placebo in all four domains (function, cognition, behaviour and global change). Memantine is generally well tolerated, with adverse events occurring with a similar incidence to that reported with placebo. In modelled cost-effectiveness analyses, memantine was dominant to no therapy in regard to cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, and the combination of memantine plus donepezil was dominant to donepezil therapy alone in regard to QALYs gained when treatment periods exceeded 1 year in patients with moderate to severe disease. Thus, in the management of patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, memantine provides an effective treatment option. To date, clinical trial support is greater for memantine use in combination with an AChE inhibitor, while more data are needed to confirm its efficacy as monotherapy.

  18. Environment, epigenetics and neurodegeneration: Focus on nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolia, Vincenzina; Lucarelli, Marco; Fuso, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Many different environmental factors (nutrients, pollutants, chemicals, physical activity, lifestyle, physical and mental stress) can modulate epigenetic markers in the developing and adult organism. Epigenetics, in turn, can cause and is associated with several neurodegenerative and aging-dependent human diseases. Alzheimer's disease certainly represents one of the most relevant neurodegenerative disorders due to its incidence and its huge socio-economic impact. Therefore, it is easy to understand why recent literature focuses on the epigenetic modifications associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. One of the most intriguing and, at the same time, worrying evidence is that even "mild" environmental factors (such as behavioral or physical stress) as well as the under-threshold exposure to pollutants and chemicals, can be effective. Finally, even mild nutrients disequilibria can result in long-lasting and functional alterations of many epigenetic markers, although they don't have an immediate acute effect. Therefore, we will probably have to re-define the current risk threshold for many factors, molecules and stresses. Among the many different environmental factors affecting the epigenome, nutrition represents one of the most investigated fields; the reasons are probably that each person interacts with nutrients and that, in turn, nutrients can modulate at molecular level the epigenetic biochemical pathways. The role that nutrition can exert in modulating epigenetic modifications in Alzheimer's disease will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role of B vitamins and DNA methylation.

  19. Challenges, solutions, and recommendations for Alzheimer's disease combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, James A; Bateman, Randall J; Brashear, H Robert; Duggan, Cynthia; Carrillo, Maria C; Bain, Lisa J; DeMattos, Ronald; Katz, Russell G; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Siemers, Eric; Sperling, Reisa; Vitolo, Ottavio V

    2016-05-01

    Given the complex neuropathology Alzheimer's disease (AD), combination therapy may be necessary for effective treatment. However, scientific, pragmatic, regulatory, and business challenges need to be addressed before combination therapy for AD can become a reality. Leaders from academia and industry, along with a former member of the Food and Drug Administration and the Alzheimer's Association, have explored these challenges and here propose a strategy to facilitate proof-of-concept combination therapy trials in the near future. First, a more integrated understanding of the complex pathophysiology and progression of AD is needed to identify the appropriate pathways and the disease stage to target. Once drug candidates are identified, novel clinical trial designs and selection of appropriate outcome assessments will be needed to enable definition and evaluation of the appropriate dose and dosing regimen and determination of efficacy. Success in addressing this urgent problem will only be achieved through collaboration among multiple stakeholders.

  20. My own experience in early research on Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Terry, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    This brief paper reviews the work on dementia by the Neuropathology group at the Einstein College of Medicine and later at the University of California, San Diego, from the time of our first approaches to Alzheimer Disease in 1959. The electron microscope studies concerned the tangle (got it wrong) and then the plaque (got it right). Lysosomes and active mitochondria were noted in the plaques. Axoplasmic transport was suggested to be abnormal. We studied the plaques in old dogs and old monkeys, and then went on to use image analysis to count neurons in the neocortex of Alzheimer cases and in examples of normal aging. Later in San Diego we quantified presynaptic boutons and recognized their loss as the major direct cause of dementia. Many collaborators including Henry Wisniewski participated in these early attempts to understand the disease.

  1. Differentiating Alzheimer disease-associated aggregates with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Honson, Nicolette S; Johnson, Ronald L; Huang, Wenwei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer disease is diagnosed postmortem by the density and spatial distribution of beta-amyloid plaques and tau-bearing neurofibrillary tangles. The major protein component of each lesion adopts cross-beta-sheet conformation capable of binding small molecules with submicromolar affinity. In many cases, however, Alzheimer pathology overlaps with Lewy body disease, characterized by the accumulation of a third cross-beta-sheet forming protein, alpha-synuclein. To determine the feasibility of distinguishing tau aggregates from beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein aggregates with small molecule probes, a library containing 72,455 small molecules was screened for antagonists of tau-aggregate-mediated changes in Thioflavin S fluorescence, followed by secondary screens to distinguish the relative affinity for each substrate protein. Results showed that >10-fold binding selectivity among substrates could be achieved, with molecules selective for tau aggregates containing at least three aromatic or rigid moieties connected by two rotatable bonds.

  2. Differentiating Alzheimer Disease-Associated Aggregates with Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Johnson, Ronald L.; Huang, Wenwei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Kuret, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is diagnosed postmortem by the density and spatial distribution of β-amyloid plaques and tau-bearing neurofibrillary tangles. The major protein component of each lesion adopts cross-β-sheet conformation capable of binding small molecules with submicromolar affinity. In many cases, however, Alzheimer pathology overlaps with Lewy body disease, characterized by the accumulation of a third cross-β-sheet forming protein, α-synuclein. To determine the feasibility of distinguishing tau aggregates from β-amyloid and α-synuclein aggregates with small molecule probes, a library containing 71,975 small molecules was screened for antagonists of tau-aggregate mediated changes in Thioflavin S fluorescence, followed by secondary screens to distinguish the relative affinity for each substrate protein. Results showed that >10-fold binding selectivity among substrates could be achieved, with molecules selective for tau aggregates containing at least three aromatic or rigid moieties connected by two rotatable bonds. PMID:17761424

  3. Implication of alpha1-antichymotrypsin polymorphism in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nacmias, B; Marcon, G; Tedde, A; Forleo, P; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Amaducci, L; Sorbi, S

    1998-03-13

    A common polymorphism in the alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene has been shown to modify the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4-associated Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk identifying the combination of the ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes as a potential susceptibility marker for AD. Using the polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed the segregation of the ACT and ApoE polymorphisms in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) patients carrying mutations in Presenilin (PS) and APP genes and in both early onset (EO) and late onset (LO) FAD patients without known mutations. Our data suggest that ACT does not represent an additional risk factor for PS and APP mutated families. However, in LOFAD patients a high frequency of the combined ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes suggest that ACT may interact with ApoE and play a role in LOFAD. PMID:9572591

  4. Systemic and central immunity in Alzheimer's disease: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Butchart, Joseph; Holmes, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Clinical pharmaceutical trials aimed at modulating the immune system in Alzheimer's Disease have largely focused on either dampening down central proinflammatory innate immunity or have manipulated adaptive immunity to facilitate the removal of centrally deposited beta amyloid. To date, these trials have had mixed clinical therapeutic effects. However, a number of clinical studies have demonstrated disturbances of both systemic and central innate immunity in Alzheimer's Disease and attention has been drawn to the close communication pathways between central and systemic immunity. This paper highlights the need to take into account the potential systemic effects of drugs aimed at modulating central immunity and the possibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches based on the manipulation of systemic immunity and its communication with the central nervous system.

  5. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    El Kadmiri, N; Slassi, I; El Moutawakil, B; Nadifi, S; Tadevosyan, A; Hachem, A; Soukri, A

    2014-12-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the sixth step of glycolysis and thus, serves to break down glucose for energy production. Beyond the traditional aerobic metabolism of glucose, recent studies have highlighted additional roles played by GAPDH in non-metabolic processes, such as control of gene expression and redox post-translational modifications. Neuroproteomics have revealed high affinity interactions between GAPDH and Alzheimer's disease-associated proteins, including the β-amyloid, β-amyloid precursor protein and tau. This neuronal protein interaction may lead to impairment of the GAPDH glycolytic function in Alzheimer's disease and may be a forerunner of its participation in apoptosis. The present review examines the crucial implication of GAPDH in neurodegenerative processes and clarifies its role in apoptotic cell death.

  6. Alzheimer's Disease: Mechanism and Approach to Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Amemori, Takashi; Jendelova, Pavla; Ruzicka, Jiri; Urdzikova, Lucia Machova; Sykova, Eva

    2015-11-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The risk of AD increases with age. Although two of the main pathological features of AD, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, were already recognized by Alois Alzheimer at the beginning of the 20th century, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unsettled. Therapeutic approaches targeting plaques or tangles have not yet resulted in satisfactory improvements in AD treatment. This may, in part, be due to early-onset and late-onset AD pathogenesis being underpinned by different mechanisms. Most animal models of AD are generated from gene mutations involved in early onset familial AD, accounting for only 1% of all cases, which may consequently complicate our understanding of AD mechanisms. In this article, the authors discuss the pathogenesis of AD according to the two main neuropathologies, including senescence-related mechanisms and possible treatments using stem cells, namely mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

  7. [One hundred years of Alzheimer's disease: immunotherapy a hope?].

    PubMed

    Behrens P, María Isabel; Vergara E, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    In 1906 Alois Alzheimer, described the cerebral lesions characteristic of the disorder that received his name: senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now, 100 years after, the most prevalent form of dementia in the world. The longer life expectancy and aging of the population renders it as a serious public health problem of the future. Urgent methods of diagnosis and treatment are required, since the definitive diagnosis of AD continues to be neuropathologic. In the last 30 years several drugs have been approved to retard the progression of the disease; however, there are still no curative or preventive treatments. Although still in experimentation, the visualization of amyloid deposition by positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging will allow in vivo diagnosis of AD. In addition, experiments with the amyloid vaccine are still ongoing, and very recent data suggest that intravenous gammaglobulins may be beneficial and safe for the treatment of AD.

  8. Tibetan medicine “RNSP” in treatment of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing-Ming; He, Xue; Lian, Hui-Juan; Yuan, Dong-Ya; Hu, Qun-Ying; Sun, Zheng-Qi; Li, Yan-Song; Zeng, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (Alzheimer Disease, AD) is one of the most common type in senile dementia. Its main pathological features were that a large number of senile plaques gathered in brain extracellular and tangles fibrosis appeared in nerve cells. Currently, the pathogenesis of AD is still uncertain, and scale investigation and combined brain CT, MRI data were analyzed mainly for clinical diagnosis. Mitigation and improvement of the nervous system activity to interfere with the subsequent behavior of the patients are the main methods for treatment. In clinical no drug can really prevent and cure AD. From the view point of Tibetan medicine studies, Tibetan medicine RNSP has effect on improving memory and repairing the neurons in the brain. In this study, we combined the characteristics of AD pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment methods to explore the feasibility of Tibetan medicine RNSP for the treatment of AD to provide new ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. PMID:26884898

  9. [Advances in the researches of lutein and alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianrong; Lin, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Lutein, a kind of oxycarotenoid, can pass the blood brain barrier and preferentially accumulate in the human brain, which is the most abundant carotenoid in human brain. Evidence from multiple studies suggested that lutein was closely related to age-related cognitive decline and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human. Dietary, plasma and brain concentrations of lutein were negatively associated with age-related cognitive decline. Lutein concentrations in plasma and brain were significantly lower in AD patients than those of health control. In human brain, lutein was the sole carotenoid which consistently associated with a range of cognitive function measures. In elderly women, lutein supplement can improve the cognitive function. In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature on the role of lutein in age-related cognitive decline and alzheimer's disease and its possible mechanisms. It may prove some benefit information for the advanced research and prevention of AD.

  10. Challenges, solutions, and recommendations for Alzheimer's disease combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, James A; Bateman, Randall J; Brashear, H Robert; Duggan, Cynthia; Carrillo, Maria C; Bain, Lisa J; DeMattos, Ronald; Katz, Russell G; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Siemers, Eric; Sperling, Reisa; Vitolo, Ottavio V

    2016-05-01

    Given the complex neuropathology Alzheimer's disease (AD), combination therapy may be necessary for effective treatment. However, scientific, pragmatic, regulatory, and business challenges need to be addressed before combination therapy for AD can become a reality. Leaders from academia and industry, along with a former member of the Food and Drug Administration and the Alzheimer's Association, have explored these challenges and here propose a strategy to facilitate proof-of-concept combination therapy trials in the near future. First, a more integrated understanding of the complex pathophysiology and progression of AD is needed to identify the appropriate pathways and the disease stage to target. Once drug candidates are identified, novel clinical trial designs and selection of appropriate outcome assessments will be needed to enable definition and evaluation of the appropriate dose and dosing regimen and determination of efficacy. Success in addressing this urgent problem will only be achieved through collaboration among multiple stakeholders. PMID:27017906

  11. High-resolution PET studies in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.; Haxby, J.V.; Wagner, E.; Salerno, J.A.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1991-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with probable dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 30 healthy age-matched controls were scanned using (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose on a Scanditronix PC 1024-7B tomograph (inplane resolution = 6 mm, axial resolution = 10 mm). Patients and controls were scanned in the resting state with their eyes patched and ears occluded. The regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) in most major neocortical and subcortical gray matter regions, and certain metabolic ratios (rCMRglc/ calcarine rCMRglc), quantitatively discriminated even the mildly demented patients from healthy controls. The association neocortices showed metabolic abnormalities that were more severe than those in the sensorimotor and calcarine regions. All demented groups showed significant neuropsychological disturbances when compared to healthy controls. These data demonstrated widespread metabolic disturbances, particularly in the association areas, relatively early in Alzheimer's disease, and more profound involvement with disease progression.

  12. Issues affecting minority participation in research studies of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kathleen A; Ballard, Edna; Nash, Florence; Raiford, Kate; Harrell, Lindy

    1994-01-01

    Despite the need for minority subjects in research studies of Alzheimer disease (AD), the successful involvement of minority patients in such studies has been difficult. This report discusses the many societal, economic, logistical, and attitudinal barriers that have inhibited the participation of minority patients and their families in medical research programs of AD. Special consideration is given to the unique cultural issues that arise when conducting studies involving African-American elderly subjects. Methods are considered for overcoming the barriers to participation gleaned from the national study CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry of Alzheimer Disease) and other investigations of AD. Recommendations are made for future research programs targeted on the specific health care needs and concerns of the minority segments of our population.

  13. Memantine-associated hyperkalaemia in a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Yamada, Hidetaka; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2013-09-01

    Memantine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist that may improve cognitive functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is predominantly excreted unchanged via the kidneys, and patients with decreased creatinine clearance must be treated with lower doses of memantine. However, it is unclear whether memantine itself can lead to renal dysfunction and/or hyperkalaemia. We report a patient with renal impairment and hyperkalaemia possibly associated with memantine administration.

  14. Cohort profile: the Finnish Medication and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study

    PubMed Central

    Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Taipale, Heidi; Koponen, Marjaana; Lavikainen, Piia; Tanskanen, Antti; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the Medicine use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study is to investigate the changes in medication and healthcare service use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medications in this group. This is important, because the number of persons with AD is rapidly growing and even though they are a particularly vulnerable patient group, the number of representative, large-scale studies with adequate follow-up time is limited. Participants MEDALZ contains all residents of Finland who received a clinically verified diagnosis of AD between 2005 and 2011 and were community-dwelling at the time of diagnosis (N=70 719). The diagnosis is based on the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCS-ADRDA) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for Alzheimer's disease. The cohort contains socioeconomic data (education, occupational status and taxable income, 1972–2012) and causes of death (2005–2012), data from the prescription register (1995–2012), the special reimbursement register (1972–2012) and the hospital discharge register (1972–2012). Future updates are planned. The average age was 80.1 years (range 34.5–104.6 years). The majority of cohort (65.2%) was women. Currently, the average length of follow-up after AD diagnosis is 3.1 years and altogether 26 045 (36.8%) persons have died during the follow-up. Findings Altogether 53% of the cohort had used psychotropic drugs within 1 year after AD diagnoses. The initiation rate of for example, benzodiazepines and related drugs and antidepressants began to increase already before AD diagnosis. Future plans We are currently assessing if these, and other commonly used medications are related to adverse events such as death, hip fractures, head injuries and pneumonia. PMID:27412109

  15. Disturbed calcium signaling in spinocerebellar ataxias and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Polina; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent a huge scientific and medical question, but the molecular mechanisms of these diseases are still not clear. There is increasing evidence that neuronal calcium signaling is abnormal in many neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal neuronal calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum may result in disturbances of cell homeostasis, synaptic dysfunction, and eventual cell death. Neuronal loss is observed in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent experimental evidence supporting the role of neuronal calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of SCAs and AD is discussed in this review.

  16. Regulation of gamma-Secretase in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing

    2007-02-07

    The {gamma}-secretase complex is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves its substrates along their transmembrane regions. Sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by {beta}- and {gamma}-secretase produces amyloid {beta}-peptides, which are the major components of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. The {gamma}-secretase complex is therefore believed to be critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Here we review the range of factors found to affect the nature and degree of {gamma}-secretase complex activity; these include {gamma}-secretase complex assembly and activation, the integral regulatory subunit CD147, transient or weak binding partners, the levels of cholesterol and sphingolipids in cell membranes, and inflammatory cytokines. Integrated knowledge of the molecular mechanisms supporting the actions of these factors is expected to lead to a comprehensive understanding of the functional regulation of the {gamma}-secretase complex, and this, in turn, should facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. REST and stress resistance in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Aron, Liviu; Zullo, Joseph; Pan, Ying; Kim, Haeyoung; Chen, Yiwen; Yang, Tun-Hsiang; Kim, Hyun-Min; Drake, Derek; Liu, X Shirley; Bennett, David A; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Yankner, Bruce A

    2014-03-27

    Human neurons are functional over an entire lifetime, yet the mechanisms that preserve function and protect against neurodegeneration during ageing are unknown. Here we show that induction of the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron-restrictive silencer factor, NRSF) is a universal feature of normal ageing in human cortical and hippocampal neurons. REST is lost, however, in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing and expression analysis show that REST represses genes that promote cell death and Alzheimer's disease pathology, and induces the expression of stress response genes. Moreover, REST potently protects neurons from oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity, and conditional deletion of REST in the mouse brain leads to age-related neurodegeneration. A functional orthologue of REST, Caenorhabditis elegans SPR-4, also protects against oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity. During normal ageing, REST is induced in part by cell non-autonomous Wnt signalling. However, in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, REST is lost from the nucleus and appears in autophagosomes together with pathological misfolded proteins. Finally, REST levels during ageing are closely correlated with cognitive preservation and longevity. Thus, the activation state of REST may distinguish neuroprotection from neurodegeneration in the ageing brain. PMID:24670762

  18. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  19. Imaging proteomics for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Arash; Ganjgahi, Habib; Roostaei, Tina; Nichols, Thomas; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2014-11-15

    Proteomic and imaging markers have been widely studied as potential biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset and performed parallel independent component analysis on cross sectional and longitudinal proteomic and imaging data in order to identify the best proteomic model for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer disease (AD). We used plasma proteins measurement and imaging data from AD and healthy controls (HC) at the baseline and 1 year follow-up. Group comparisons at baseline and changes over 1 year were calculated for proteomic and imaging data. The results were fed into parallel independent component analysis in order to identify proteins that were associated with structural brain changes cross sectionally and longitudinally. Regression model was used to find the best model that can discriminate AD from HC, monitor AD and to predict MCI converters from non-converters. We showed that five proteins are associated with structural brain changes in the brain. These proteins could discriminate AD from HC with 57% specificity and 89% sensitivity. Four proteins whose change over 1 year were associated with brain structural changes could discriminate AD from HC with sensitivity of 93%, and specificity of 92%. This model predicted MCI conversion to AD in 2 years with 94% accuracy. This model has the highest accuracy in prediction of MCI conversion to AD within the ADNI-1 dataset. This study shows that combination of selected plasma protein levels and MR imaging is a useful method in identifying potential biomarker.

  20. Cerebral correlates of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mega, M.; Lee, L.; Dinov, I.; Mishkin, F.; Toga, A.; Cummings, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Psychotic symptoms are produced by distributed neuronal dysfunction. Abnormalities of reality testing and false inference implicate frontal lobe abnormalities.
OBJECTIVES—To identify the functional imaging profile of patients with Alzheimer's disease manifesting psychotic symptoms as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Twenty patients with Alzheimer's disease who had SPECT and clinical evaluations were divided into two equal groups with similar mini mental status examination (MMSE), age, sex, and the range of behaviours documented by the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI), except delusions and hallucinations. SPECT studies, registered to a probabilistic anatomical atlas, were normalised across the combined group mean intensity level, and subjected to a voxel by voxel subtraction of the non-psychotic minus psychotic groups. Subvolume thresholding (SVT) corrected random lobar noise to produce a three dimensional functional significance map.
RESULTS—The significance map showed lower regional perfusion in the right and left dorsolateral frontal, left anterior cingulate, and left ventral striatal regions along with the left pulvinar and dorsolateral parietal cortex, in the psychotic versus non-psychotic group.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest psychosis may have disproportionate dysfunction of frontal lobes and related subcortical and parietal structures.

 PMID:10896687

  1. Dynamic self-guiding analysis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurakin, Alexei; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    We applied a self-guiding evolutionary algorithm to initiate the synthesis of the Alzheimer's disease-related data and literature. A protein interaction network associated with amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and a seed model that treats Alzheimer's disease as progressive dysregulation of APP-associated signaling were used as dynamic “guides” and structural “filters” in the recursive search, analysis, and assimilation of data to drive the evolution of the seed model in size, detail, and complexity. Analysis of data and literature across sub-disciplines and system-scale discovery platforms suggests a key role of dynamic cytoskeletal connectivity in the stability, plasticity, and performance of multicellular networks and architectures. Chronic impairment and/or dysregulation of cell adhesions/synapses, cytoskeletal networks, and/or reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transitions, which enable and mediate the stable and coherent yet dynamic and reconfigurable multicellular architectures, may lead to the emergence and persistence of the disordered, wound-like pockets/microenvironments of chronically disconnected cells. Such wound-like microenvironments support and are supported by pro-inflammatory, pro-secretion, de-differentiated cellular phenotypes with altered metabolism and signaling. The co-evolution of wound-like microenvironments and their inhabitants may lead to the selection and stabilization of degenerated cellular phenotypes, via acquisition of epigenetic modifications and mutations, which eventually result in degenerative disorders such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26041885

  2. Ca2+ dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fedrizzi, Laura; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    More than one century ago "a peculiar disorder of the cerebral cortex" was noticed in a middle-aged patient who had been affected by dementia in the last years of his life. The postmortem hallmarks of his brain were protein plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and atherosclerotic changes: the neuropathologist who found these alterations and gave his name to the disease that underlied them was Alois Alzheimer (Alzheimer et al., Clin Anat 1995;8:429-431). Following its discovery, the disease has been studied with a vigor that went parallel to the increase of its social importance. The amount of information amassed in the literature is impressive, but knowledge on the mechanism underlying its onset and its progression is still very limited. Numerous hypotheses on the molecular pathogenesis of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been proposed and two have gradually gained wide consensus: (i) the amyloid cascade hypothesis, first proposed on the basis of the toxicity evoked by the deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates; (ii) the Ca(2+) hypothesis, which focuses on the correlation between the dysfunction of Ca(2+) homeostasis and the neurodegeneration process. This succinct review will discuss the essential aspects of the role of Ca(2+) homeostasis dysregulation in the onset and development of AD.

  3. REST and stress resistance in ageing and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Aron, Liviu; Zullo, Joseph; Pan, Ying; Kim, Haeyoung; Chen, Yiwen; Yang, Tun-Hsiang; Kim, Hyun-Min; Drake, Derek; Liu, X. Shirley; Bennett, David A.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2014-03-01

    Human neurons are functional over an entire lifetime, yet the mechanisms that preserve function and protect against neurodegeneration during ageing are unknown. Here we show that induction of the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron-restrictive silencer factor, NRSF) is a universal feature of normal ageing in human cortical and hippocampal neurons. REST is lost, however, in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing and expression analysis show that REST represses genes that promote cell death and Alzheimer's disease pathology, and induces the expression of stress response genes. Moreover, REST potently protects neurons from oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity, and conditional deletion of REST in the mouse brain leads to age-related neurodegeneration. A functional orthologue of REST, Caenorhabditis elegans SPR-4, also protects against oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity. During normal ageing, REST is induced in part by cell non-autonomous Wnt signalling. However, in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, REST is lost from the nucleus and appears in autophagosomes together with pathological misfolded proteins. Finally, REST levels during ageing are closely correlated with cognitive preservation and longevity. Thus, the activation state of REST may distinguish neuroprotection from neurodegeneration in the ageing brain.

  4. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning. PMID:18674439

  5. [Pharmacology of Alzheimer's disease: where do we go from here?].

    PubMed

    Sellal, François; Nieoullon, André; Michel, Géraldine; Michel, Bernard-François; Lacomblez, Lucette; Geerts, Hugo; Delini-Stula, Alexandra; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Bordet, Régis; Allain, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    Ten years after the introduction of the first drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, tacrine, it seems appropriate to reappraise the pharmacological processes of innovation in the field of research in dementia. The aim of this review is to pinpoint concrete improvements achieved in this field, in terms of experimental methods and clinical evaluation of the compounds, as well as the neurochemistry of the disease and cellular targets deserving of initial consideration. * The article first considers the use of animal models of Alzheimer's disease, which are classified according to two categories: animals with lesions of some neuronal pathways specifically implicated in clinical symptoms (i.e. lesions of the nucleus basalis of Meynert, the origin of cholinergic projections to the cortex underlying memory processes); and transgenic models, which are intended to reproduce some of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Drugs can be tested in animals with such alterations for their effect on neuropathology, neurochemistry and behavioural disturbances. More recently, in silico models have been developed, which offer the possibility of simulating the pharmacodynamic effects of drugs in specific areas of the brain. These experiments are helpful in distinguishing purely symptomatic effects from disease-modifying effects, the latter being the ultimate goal of the modern pharmacology of dementia. * The second breakthrough considered in this article is the codification and standardisation of clinical methods for obtaining a more accurate and earlier diagnosis (the recent introduction of the concept of "Mild Cognitive Impairment", which includes patients who will later develop a true clinical dementia syndrome). In that respect, the determination of the biological markers of Alzheimer's disease (apolipoprotein E, amyloid substance, protein-tau, isoprostane) as well as progress in neuroimaging (functional positron emission tomography [fPET]-scan, single

  6. Liposomes for Targeted Delivery of Active Agents against Neurodegenerative Diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Navarro, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease represent a huge unmet medical need. The prevalence of both diseases is increasing, but the efficacy of treatment is still very limited due to various factors including the blood brain barrier (BBB). Drug delivery to the brain remains the major challenge for the treatment of all neurodegenerative diseases because of the numerous protective barriers surrounding the central nervous system. New therapeutic drugs that cross the BBB are critically needed for treatment of many brain diseases. One of the significant factors on neurotherapeutics is the constraint of the blood brain barrier and the drug release kinetics that cause peripheral serious side effects. Contrary to common belief, neurodegenerative and neurological diseases may be multisystemic in nature, and this presents numerous difficulties for their potential treatment. Overall, the aim of this paper is to summarize the last findings and news related to liposome technology in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of novel therapeutics and the possible applications of liposomes in the two most widespread neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. PMID:22203906

  7. A diagnostic approach in Alzheimer`s disease using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections of Fluorine-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Frey, K.A.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    To improve the diagnostic performance of PET as an aid in evaluating patients suspected of having Alzheimer`s disease, the authors developed a fully automated method which generates comprehensive image presentations and objective diagnostic indices. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET image sets were collected from 37 patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease (including questionable and mild dementia), 22 normal subjects and 5 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Following stereotactic anatomic standardization, metabolic activity on an individual`s PET image set was extracted to a set of predefined surface pixels (three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection, 3D-SSP), which was used in the subsequent analysis. A normal database was created by averaging extracted datasets of the normal subjects. Patients` datasets were compared individually with the normal database by calculating a Z-score on a pixel-by-pixel basis and were displayed in 3D-SSP views for visual inspections. Diagnostic indices were then generated based on averaged Z-scores for the association cortices. Patterns and severities of metabolic reduction in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease were seen in the standard 3D-SSP views of extracted raw data and statistical Z-scores. When discriminating patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease from normal subjects, diagnostic indices of the parietal association cortex and unilaterally averaged parietal-temporal-frontal cortex showed sensitivities of 95% and 97%, respectively, with a specificity of 100%. Neither index yielded false-positive results for cerebrovascular disease. 3D-SSP enables quantitative data extraction and reliable localization of metabolic abnormalities by means of stereotactic coordinates. The proposed method is a promising approach for interpreting functional brain PET scans. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of four Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Shoffner, J.M.; Wallace, D.C.

    1996-01-22

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence was determined on 3 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD) exhibiting AD plus Parkinson`s disease (PD) neuropathologic changes and one patient with PD. Patient mtDNA sequences were compared to the standard Cambridge sequence to identify base changes. In the first AD + PD patient, 2 of the 15 nucleotide substitutions may contribute to the neuropathology, a nucleotide pair (np) 4336 transition in the tRNA{sup Gln} gene found 7.4 times more frequently in patients than in controls, and a unique np 721 transition in the 12S rRNA gene which was not found in 70 other patients or 905 controls. In the second AD + PD patient, 27 nucleotide substitutions were detected, including an np 3397 transition in the ND1 gene which converts a conserved methionine to a valine. In the third AD + PD patient, 2 polymorphic base substitutions frequently found at increased frequency in Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients were observed, an np 4216 transition in ND1 and an np 13708 transition in the ND5 gene. For the PD patient, 2 novel variants were observed among 25 base substitutions, an np 1709 substitution in the 16S rRNA gene and an np 15851 missense mutation in the cytb gene. Further studies will be required to demonstrate a casual role for these base substitutions in neurodegenerative disease. 68 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Alternative splicing of the beta A4 amyloid gene of Alzheimer's disease in cortex of control and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    König, G; Salbaum, J M; Wiestler, O; Lang, W; Schmitt, H P; Masters, C L; Beyreuther, K

    1991-02-01

    An S1 nuclease protection assay was designed to study the splicing pattern of the alternatively spliced beta A4 amyloid gene (APP gene) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We determined the splicing pattern of the APP gene in fetal, adult, aged adult and AD human cortex. The results suggest that alternative splicing of the APP gene in AD is not significantly different from age-matched controls, but distinct from the developing fetal brain.

  10. No effect of the α1-antichymotrypsin A allele in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Didierjean, O; Martinez, M; Campion, D; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Martin, C; Puel, M; Anterion, C; Pasquier, F; Moreau, O; Babron, M; Penet, C; Agid, Y; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Frebourg, T; Brice, A

    1997-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-ε4 allele is associated in a dose dependent manner to an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, the ApoE-ε4 allele effect does not account for all patients with Alzheimer's disease, and the existence of other genetic risk factors has been postulated. Kamboh et al reported an association between Alzheimer's disease and the A allele of α1-antichymotrypsin (Aact) gene, which was not confirmed in a larger series more recently analysed. The ApoE and Aact genotypes were analysed in 314 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 173 healthy controls, confirming the dose dependent effect of the ApoE-ε4 allele. Nevertheless, even using odds ratios adjusted for age and sex, there was no significant effect of the Aact genotype on Alzheimer's disease or on the ApoE-ε4 allele associated risk for Alzheimer's disease.

 PMID:9221977

  11. New Genes Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, including the immune response, inflammation, cellular protein trafficking, and lipid transport. They also add to evidence ... Loss in Cancer Epigenetic Clock Marks Age of Human Tissues and Cells Connect with Us Subscribe to ...

  12. Mitochondrial control of autophagic lysosomal pathway in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, S M; Pereira, C F; Moreira, P I; Arduino, D M; Esteves, A R; Oliveira, C R

    2010-06-01

    When first described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907, AD was seen as a disorder that causes dementia and characterized by two defining neuropathological lesions, later associated with all forms of AD. While the etiology of AD remains largely unclear, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs prior to the onset of symptoms in AD. Mitochondria are exceptionally poised to play a crucial role in neuronal cell survival or death because they are regulators of both energy metabolism and apoptotic pathways. This review is mainly focused in the discussion of evidence suggesting a clear association between mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy impairment and amyloid-beta accumulation in Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. The knowledge that autophagic insufficiency may compromise the cellular degradation mechanisms that may culminate in the progressive accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, aberrant protein aggregates buildup and lysossomal burden shield new insights to the way we address Alzheimer's disease. In line with this knowledge an innovative window for new therapeutic strategies aimed to activate or ameliorate macroautophagy may be opened.

  13. The importance of being apt: metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; de Almeida, Roberto G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of aptness in the comprehension of copular metaphors (e.g., Lawyers are sharks) by Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Aptness is the extent to which the vehicle (e.g., shark) captures salient properties of the topic (e.g., lawyers). A group of AD patients provided interpretations for metaphors that varied both in aptness and familiarity. Compared to healthy controls, AD patients produced worse interpretations, but interpretation ability was related to a metaphor's aptness rather than to its familiarity level, and patients with superior abstraction ability produced better interpretations. Therefore, the ability to construct figurative interpretations for metaphors is not always diminished in AD patients nor is it dependent only on the novelty level of the expression. We show that Alzheimer's patients' capacity to build figurative interpretations for metaphors is related to both item variables, such as aptness, and participant variables, such as abstraction ability. PMID:25520642

  14. Aluminosilicates and senile plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Candy, J M; Oakley, A E; Klinowski, J; Carpenter, T A; Perry, R H; Atack, J R; Perry, E K; Blessed, G; Fairbairn, A; Edwardson, J A

    1986-02-15

    Aluminium and silicon were found to be colocalised in the central region of senile plaque cores in studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The distribution of these elements was similar in cores isolated from the cerebral cortex of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type and in cores studied in situ from tissue sections from the cerebral cortex of presenile and senile patients with Alzheimer's disease, and elderly, mentally normal patients. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques showed aluminium and silicon to be present as aluminosilicates. The presence of aluminosilicates at the centre of senile plaque cores contrasts with the distribution of other inorganic constituents and suggests that they may be involved in the initiation or early stages of senile plaque formation.

  15. CAP--advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Eric M; Langbaum, Jessica B; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Sperling, Reisa A; Aisen, Paul S; Roses, Allen D; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Carrillo, Maria C; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention (CAP)-a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact-and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials.

  16. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; González de San Román, Estíbaliz; Giralt, M Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The activity of CB1 cannabinoid receptors was studied in postmortem brain samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during clinical deterioration. CB1 activity was higher at earlier AD stages in limited hippocampal areas and internal layers of frontal cortex, but a decrease was observed at the advanced stages. The pattern of modification appears to indicate initial hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system in brain areas that lack classical histopathological markers at earlier stages of AD, indicating an attempt to compensate for the initial synaptic impairment, which is then surpassed by disease progression. These results suggest that initial CB1 stimulation might have therapeutic relevance.

  17. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    PubMed

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  18. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  19. Posterior cortical atrophy: an atypical variant of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Aida; Henley, Susie M; Walton, Jill; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-06-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by striking progressive visual impairment and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving posterior cortices. PCA is the most frequent atypical presentation of Alzheimer disease. The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of PCA's neuropsychiatric manifestations. Emotional and psychotic symptoms are discussed in the context of signal characteristic features of the PCA syndrome (the early onset, focal loss of visual perception, focal posterior brain atrophy) and the underlying cause of the disease. The authors' experience with psychotherapeutic intervention and PCA support groups is shared in detail.

  20. GSK-3β, a pivotal kinase in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Llorens-Marítin, María; Jurado, Jerónimo; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia. The etiology of AD is considered to be multifactorial as only a negligible percentage of cases have a familial or genetic origin. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is regarded as a critical molecular link between the two histopathological hallmarks of the disease, namely senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this review, we summarize current data regarding the involvement of this kinase in several aspects of AD development and progression, as well as key observations highlighting GSK-3 as one of the most relevant targets for AD treatment. PMID:24904272

  1. Ethical issues in genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kahn, J

    1997-09-01

    The discovery of genetic mutations that increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) brings new promise of predictive testing for the disease. But the quality of information yielded by genetic tests for AD and the implications of this information raise serious questions about the use of such tests. This article examines some of the ethical issues related to predictive genetic testing for AD by examining the interpretation and potential misuses of such data, as well as the factors affecting the development and use of such testing technology. Finally, it poses some recommendations for how genetic testing for AD and the information it yields should be used.

  2. Alzheimer's disease: Unique markers for diagnosis & new treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Shah, Raj C.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease. In humans, AD becomes symptomatic only after brain changes occur over years or decades. Three contiguous phases of AD have been proposed: (i) the AD pathophysiologic process, (ii) mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and (iii) AD dementia. Intensive research continues around the world on unique diagnostic markers and interventions associated with each phase of AD. In this review, we summarize the available evidence and new therapeutic approaches that target both amyloid and tau pathology in AD and discuss the biomarkers and pharmaceutical interventions available and in development for each AD phase. PMID:26609028

  3. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N.

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. [Nutritional factors in prevention of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Wyka, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional patterns affect significantly man's body at each age. The elderly--with their eating habits and diseases they have overcome--often require specific dietary intervention. A proper and well-balanced diet is an important element of lifestyle that may become a factor facilitating the so-called healthy, successful ageing and delay the development of noninfectious, chronic metabolic diseases that are in majority of cases diagnosed in elder people. Neurodegenerative diseases have been classified amongst chronic diseases yet with still controversial etiology. Nevertheless, it is speculated that some nutritional factors, including the appropriate intake of B-group vitamins, antioxidative vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids, are likely to play a significant role in their prevention and therapy. A diet rich in vegetables and fruits, whole-meal bread, milk and dairy products as well as containing fish, plant oils and nuts provides all indispensable nutrients. The appropriate merging of these food products into dishes--widely described in literature as the Mediterranean diet--facilitates leading a long life in health.

  5. Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome: sharing of a unique cerebrovascular amyloid fibril protein.

    PubMed

    Glenner, G G; Wong, C W

    1984-08-16

    The cerebrovascular amyloid protein from a case of adult Down's syndrome was isolated and purified. Amino acid sequence analysis showed it to be homologous to that of the beta protein of Alzheimer's disease. This is the first chemical evidence of a relationship between Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. It suggests that Down's syndrome may be a predictable model for Alzheimer's disease. Assuming the beta protein is a human gene product, it also suggests that the genetic defect in Alzheimer's disease is localized on chromosome 21.

  6. Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Daniel; Dietz, Nicole; Duda, John E; Wolk, David A; Doshi, Jimit; Xie, Sharon X; Davatzikos, Christos; Clark, Christopher M; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests overlap in brain regions undergoing neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. To assess the clinical significance of this, we applied a validated Alzheimer's disease-spatial pattern of brain atrophy to patients with Parkinson's disease with a range of cognitive abilities to determine its association with cognitive performance and decline. At baseline, 84 subjects received structural magnetic resonance imaging brain scans and completed the Dementia Rating Scale-2, and new robust and expanded Dementia Rating Scale-2 norms were applied to cognitively classify participants. Fifty-nine non-demented subjects were assessed annually with the Dementia Rating Scale-2 for two additional years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were quantified using both a region of interest approach and voxel-based morphometry analysis, and a method for quantifying the presence of an Alzheimer's disease spatial pattern of brain atrophy was applied to each scan. In multivariate models, higher Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score was associated with worse global cognitive performance (β = -0.31, P = 0.007), including in non-demented patients (β = -0.28, P = 0.05). In linear mixed model analyses, higher baseline Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score predicted long-term global cognitive decline in non-demented patients [F(1, 110) = 9.72, P = 0.002], remarkably even in those with normal cognition at baseline [F(1, 80) = 4.71, P = 0.03]. In contrast, in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses there was no association between region of interest brain volumes and cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease with normal cognition. These findings support involvement of the hippocampus and parietal-temporal cortex with cognitive impairment and long-term decline in Parkinson's disease. In addition, an Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy may be a preclinical biomarker of cognitive decline in

  7. Type 3 diabetes is sporadic Alzheimer׳s disease: mini-review.

    PubMed

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in North America. Growing evidence supports the concept that AD is a metabolic disease mediated by impairments in brain insulin responsiveness, glucose utilization, and energy metabolism, which lead to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and worsening of insulin resistance. In addition, metabolic derangements directly contribute to the structural, functional, molecular, and biochemical abnormalities that characterize AD, including neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, and amyloid-beta accumulation. Because the fundamental abnormalities in AD represent effects of brain insulin resistance and deficiency, and the molecular and biochemical consequences overlap with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, we suggest the term "Type 3 diabetes" to account for the underlying abnormalities associated with AD-type neurodegeneration. In light of the rapid increases in sporadic AD prevalence rates and vastly expanded use of nitrites and nitrates in foods and agricultural products over the past 30-40 years, the potential role of nitrosamine exposures as mediators of Type 3 diabetes is discussed.

  8. Pharmacoeconomics of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Linus

    2003-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors constitute one of few treatment options available for Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. The modest effects and relatively high acquisition costs of these drugs make the health economics of dementia an important subject of study. Simulation models can be used to bring together existing data and make predictions of the long-term cost effectiveness of treatment. Most models have been built around cognitive function as a key parameter based on the observed relationship between cognitive function and costs of care. Patients with more severe disease attain higher total costs of care. Also, these patients have a higher share of formal care costs than do patients with mild disease, who are usually looked after by informal caregivers. The valuation of unpaid care is controversial, and the choice of method may affect results considerably. Another important issue is the measurement of health-related QOL in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The few existing studies have used proxy respondents to elicit utility weights in different disease states; however, this methodology has not been validated. It is likely that the increased drug costs incurred by the use of cholinesterase inhibitors will be offset (at least partly) by savings in other healthcare costs. However, these results should be viewed as preliminary, since we are still awaiting data from long-term follow-up studies. Also, the value of treatment for patients and caregivers in terms of QOL improvements has yet to be established. PMID:13129415

  9. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Hampel, Harald; Feldman, Howard H; Scheltens, Philip; Aisen, Paul; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Benali, Habib; Bertram, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, Karl; Cavedo, Enrica; Crutch, Sebastian; Dartigues, Jean-François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gauthier, Serge; Genthon, Remy; Gouw, Alida A; Habert, Marie-Odile; Holtzman, David M; Kivipelto, Miia; Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, José-Luis; O'Bryant, Sid E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Schneider, Lon S; Sperling, Reisa; Teichmann, Marc; Carrillo, Maria C; Cummings, Jeffrey; Jack, Cliff R

    2016-03-01

    During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and the ethical consequence of detecting the disease at this asymptomatic stage. This article is aimed at addressing all the different issues by providing for each of them an updated review of the literature and evidence, with practical recommendations.

  10. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Hampel, Harald; Feldman, Howard H; Scheltens, Philip; Aisen, Paul; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Benali, Habib; Bertram, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, Karl; Cavedo, Enrica; Crutch, Sebastian; Dartigues, Jean-François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gauthier, Serge; Genthon, Remy; Gouw, Alida A; Habert, Marie-Odile; Holtzman, David M; Kivipelto, Miia; Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, José-Luis; O'Bryant, Sid E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Schneider, Lon S; Sperling, Reisa; Teichmann, Marc; Carrillo, Maria C; Cummings, Jeffrey; Jack, Cliff R

    2016-03-01

    During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and the ethical consequence of detecting the disease at this asymptomatic stage. This article is aimed at addressing all the different issues by providing for each of them an updated review of the literature and evidence, with practical recommendations. PMID:27012484

  11. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F.

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. What can we learn from study of Alzheimer's disease in patients with Down syndrome for early-onset Alzheimer's disease in the general population?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The clinical and scientific study of dementia in adults with Down syndrome led to the development of the amyloid hypothesis as a fundamental concept in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The journey started with the discovery of the structure and metabolic processing of β-amyloid brain deposits associated with Alzheimer's dementia in adults with Down syndrome, and then the prediction and confirmation of the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21. The processes and genes responsible for tau hyperphosphorylation contributing to toxic brain deposits were additionally identified. With increasing sophistication in genetic experimental techniques, additional mechanisms associated with excessive amyloid deposits were postulated and tested in brains of people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease and in those with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. This in turn led to the proposal and testing for particular genetic defects associated with familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Nearly 200 genetic causes of early-onset types of Alzheimer's disease have since been identified. Only a minority of these causes are on chromosome 21, although the aetiology of excess amyloid production remains fundamental to their pathogenesis. Knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in predisposed families and in people with Down syndrome is a step closer to prevention or cure of this devastating disease. PMID:21542885

  13. Alzheimer's Disease: Targeting the Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Guimaraes, Isabella M.; Silva, Flavia R.; Ribeiro, Fabiola M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a crucial role in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is responsible for synthesizing ACh from acetyl-CoA and choline in the cytoplasm and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) uptakes the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles. Following depolarization, ACh undergoes exocytosis reaching the synaptic cleft, where it can bind its receptors, including muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. ACh present at the synaptic cleft is promptly hydrolyzed by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), forming acetate and choline, which is recycled into the presynaptic nerve terminal by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). Cholinergic neurons located in the basal forebrain, including the neurons that form the nucleus basalis of Meynert, are severely lost in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the most ordinary cause of dementia affecting 25 million people worldwide. The hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, there is no real correlation between levels of cortical plaques and AD-related cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, synaptic loss is the principal correlate of disease progression and loss of cholinergic neurons contributes to memory and attention deficits. Thus, drugs that act on the cholinergic system represent a promising option to treat AD patients. PMID:26813123

  14. 3 CFR 8591 - Proclamation 8591 of October 29, 2010. National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010 8591 Proclamation 8591 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8591 of October 29, 2010 Proc. 8591 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Alzheimer’s disease tragically robs individuals...

  15. In vivo target bio-imaging of Alzheimer's disease by fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lanmei; Zhao, Chunqiu; Su, Meina; Li, Xiaoqi; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-07-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease which is difficult to cure. When Alzheimer's disease occurs, the level of zinc ions in the brain changes, and the relevant amount of zinc ions continue decreasing in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of Alzheimer's patients with disease exacerbation. In view of these considerations, we have explored a new strategy for the in vivo rapid fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease through target bio-labeling of zinc oxide nanoclusters which were biosynthesized in vivo in the Alzheimer's brain via intravenous injection of zinc gluconate solution. By using three-month-old and six-month-old Alzheimer's model mice as models, our observations demonstrate that biocompatible zinc ions could pass through the blood-brain barrier of the Alzheimer's disease mice and generate fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters (ZnO NCs) through biosynthesis, and then the bio-synthesized ZnO NCs could readily accumulate in situ on the hippocampus specific region for the in vivo fluorescent labeling of the affected sites. This study provides a new way for the rapid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and may have promising prospects in the effective diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Updated TDP-43 in Alzheimer's disease staging scheme.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Keith A; Murray, Melissa E; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D; Petrucelli, Leonard; Liesinger, Amanda M; Petersen, Ronald C; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we update the TDP-43 in Alzheimer's disease staging scheme by assessing the topography of TDP-43 in 193 cases of Alzheimer's disease, in 14 different brain regions (eight previously described plus six newly reported) and use conditional probability to model the spread of TDP-43 across the 14 brain regions. We show that in addition to the eight original regions we previously reported [amygdala, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, occipitotemporal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, middle frontal cortex and basal ganglia (putamen/globus pallidum)] that TDP-43 is also deposited in the insular cortex, ventral striatum, basal forebrain, substantia nigra, midbrain tectum, and the inferior olive of the medulla oblongata, in Alzheimer's disease. The conditional probability analysis produced six significantly different stages (P < 0.01), and suggests that TDP-43 deposition begins in the amygdala (stage 1), then moves to entorhinal cortex and subiculum (stage 2); to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and occipitotemporal cortex (stage 3); insular cortex, ventral striatum, basal forebrain and inferior temporal cortex (stage 4); substantia nigra, inferior olive and midbrain tectum (stage 5); and finally to basal ganglia and middle frontal cortex (stage 6). This updated staging scheme is superior to our previous staging scheme, classifying 100% of the cases (versus 94% in the old scheme), based on criteria provided, and shows clinical significance with some regions and with increasing stage. We discuss the relevance of the updated staging scheme, as well as its impact on the prion-like hypothesis of protein spread in neurodegenerative disease. We also address the issue of whether frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 could be the primary pathology in stage 6.

  17. African ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D; Grinberg, L T; Alba, J G; Naslavsky, M S; Licinio, L; Farfel, J M; Suemoto, C K; de Lucena Ferretti, R E; Leite, R E P; de Andrade, M P; dos Santos, A C F; Brentani, H; Pasqualucci, C A; Nitrini, R; Jacob-Filho, W; Zatz, M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in dementia epidemiology have reported higher Alzheimer's disease rates in African-Americans when compared with White Americans. To determine whether genetically determined African ancestry is associated with neuropathological changes commonly associated with dementia, we analyzed a population-based brain bank in the highly admixed city of São Paulo, Brazil. African ancestry was estimated through the use of previously described ancestry-informative markers. Risk of presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, small vessel disease, brain infarcts and Lewy bodies in subjects with significant African ancestry versus those without was determined. Results were adjusted for multiple environmental risk factors, demographic variables and apolipoprotein E genotype. African ancestry was inversely correlated with neuritic plaques (P=0.03). Subjects with significant African ancestry (n=112, 55.4%) showed lower prevalence of neuritic plaques in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.95, P=0.01) and when adjusted for age, sex, APOE genotype and environmental risk factors (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.89, P=0.02). There were no significant differences for the presence of other neuropathological alterations. We show for the first time, using genetically determined ancestry, that African ancestry may be highly protective of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, functioning through either genetic variants or unknown environmental factors. Epidemiological studies correlating African-American race/ethnicity with increased Alzheimer's disease rates should not be interpreted as surrogates of genetic ancestry or considered to represent African-derived populations from the developing nations such as Brazil.

  18. Alterations in metabolic properties in fibroblasts in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Sorbi, S; Piacentini, S; Latorraca, S; Piersanti, P; Amaducci, L

    1995-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) leads to alterations in several biochemical properties in cultured skin fibroblasts. Because abnormal glucose metabolism has been reported in both in vivo and in vitro studies of the brain, we examined glucose and glutamine oxidation and lactate production in cultured skin fibroblasts from nine patients with familial AD, 19 with sporadic AD, and 20 age-matched controls. The production of CO2 from glucose and glutamine was significantly lower in both groups of Alzheimer fibroblasts compared to controls after 10 min or 1, 2, and 4 h of incubation. The reduction in CO2 production was most evident after 1 h of incubation with either (U-14C)-glucose or (U-14C)-glutamine. Lactate concentration was comparable in all groups at any time of incubation. These findings suggest that processes that require mitochondrial function as glucose or glutamine oxidation are altered in AD and provide evidence that complex metabolic differences are expressed in cultured nonneuronal cells from Alzheimer patients. PMID:7662326

  19. Iron and aluminum in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Di Lorenzo, Berardino

    2013-01-01

    In this case presentation, a woman with high serum levels of aluminum was treated with chelation therapy with deferoxamine and ascorbic acid. This patient was initially bedridden and the clinical situation was complicated by epileptic seizures. After the chelation therapy, the clinical condition was ameliorated and the therapy continued without the correlation to aluminum serum levels. The role of metals in neurodegenerative disorders and the correlation between iron metabolism and amyloid beta peptide are described. This case suggests chelation therapy could represent a promising therapeutic option for this dramatic disease.

  20. Metabolomic changes in autopsy confirmed Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Rozen, Steve; Matson, Wayne; Han, Xianlin; Hulette, Christine M.; Burke, James R.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics, the global science of biochemistry, provides powerful tools to map perturbations in the metabolic network and enables simultaneous quantification of a large number of metabolites to identify metabolic perturbances that might provide insights into disease. In this pilot study we take a targeted electrochemistry based metabolomics approach where liquid chromatography followed by coulometric array detection enables quantification of over thirty metabolites within key neurotransmitter pathways (dopamine and serotonin) and pathways involved in oxidative stress. Using samples from post-mortem ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (15 AD and 15 non-demented subjects with autopsy confirmed diagnoses) and using regression models, correlations, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and t-tests we identified alterations in tyrosine, tryptophan, purine, and tocopherol pathways in patients with AD. Reductions in norepinephrine and its related metabolites were also seen, consistent with prior literature. These data support further investigation of metabolomics in larger samples of clinical AD as well as in those with preclinical disease for utility as biomarkers. PMID:21075060