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  1. Distress and Coping among Caregivers of Victims of Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundon, Margaret M.; And Others

    Alzheimer's disease is an insidious, progressively destructive brain disease which leads to the loss of judgment, communication skills, and psychomotor control preventing the victim from living independently. The consequences of caring for victims include emotional, physical, and familial strain as the caregiver is faced with the progressive…

  2. Alzheimer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Alzheimer Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Alzheimer Disease Print A ... slow it down. When Someone You Love Has Alzheimer Disease You might feel sad or angry — or ...

  3. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000760.htm Alzheimer disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease is one form of dementia. It affects memory, ...

  4. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  5. Natural distribution of environmental radon daughters in the different brain areas of an Alzheimer Disease victim

    PubMed Central

    Momčilović, Berislav; Lykken, Glenn I; Cooley, Marvin

    2006-01-01

    Background Radon is a ubiquitous noble gas in the environment and a primary source of harmful radiation exposure for humans; it decays in a cascade of daughters (RAD) by releasing the cell damaging high energy alpha particles. Results We studied natural distribution of RAD 210Po and 210Bi in the different parts of the postmortem brain of 86-year-old woman who had suffered from Alzheimer's disease (AD). A distinct brain map emerged, since RAD distribution was different among the analyzed brain areas. The highest RAD irradiation (mSv·year-1) occurred in the decreasing order of magnitude: amygdale (Amy) >> hippocampus (Hip) > temporal lobe (Tem) ~ frontal lobe (Fro) > occipital lobe (Occ) ~ parietal lobe (Par) > substantia nigra (SN) >> locus ceruleus (LC) ~ nucleus basalis (NB); generally more RAD accumulated in the proteins than lipids of gray and white (gray > white) brain matter. Amy and Hip are particularly vulnerable brain structure targets to significant RAD internal radiation damage in AD (5.98 and 1.82 mSv·year-1, respectively). Next, naturally occurring RAD radiation for Tem and Fro, then Occ and Par, and SN was an order of magnitude higher than that in LC and NB; the later was within RAD we observed previously in the healthy control brains. Conclusion Naturally occurring environmental RAD exposure may dramatically enhance AD deterioration by selectively targeting brain areas of emotions (Amy) and memory (Hip). PMID:16965619

  6. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  7. Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Apostolova, Liana G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose of Review: This article discusses the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent Findings: In recent years, significant advances have been made in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging, clinical diagnosis, and staging of AD. One of the most important recent advances in AD is our ability to visualize amyloid pathology in the living human brain. The newly revised criteria for diagnosis of AD dementia embrace the use for biomarkers as supportive evidence for the underlying pathology. Guidelines for the responsible use of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed, and the clinical and economic implications of amyloid PET imaging are actively being explored. Summary: Our improved understanding of the clinical onset, progression, neuroimaging, pathologic features, genetics, and other risk factors for AD impacts the approaches to clinical diagnosis and future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27042902

  8. Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Liana G

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). In recent years, significant advances have been made in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging, clinical diagnosis, and staging of AD. One of the most important recent advances in AD is our ability to visualize amyloid pathology in the living human brain. The newly revised criteria for diagnosis of AD dementia embrace the use for biomarkers as supportive evidence for the underlying pathology. Guidelines for the responsible use of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed, and the clinical and economic implications of amyloid PET imaging are actively being explored. Our improved understanding of the clinical onset, progression, neuroimaging, pathologic features, genetics, and other risk factors for AD impacts the approaches to clinical diagnosis and future therapeutic interventions.

  9. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    De-Paula, Vanessa J; Radanovic, Marcia; Diniz, Breno S; Forlenza, Orestes V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with well-defined pathophysiological mechanisms, mostly affecting medial temporal lobe and associative neocortical structures. Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles represent the pathological hallmarks of AD, and are respectively related to the accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in brain tissues, and to cytoskeletal changes that arise from the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated Tau protein in neurons. According to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, the overproduction of Aβ is a consequence of the disruption of homeostatic processes that regulate the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Genetic, age-related and environmental factors contribute to a metabolic shift favoring the amyloidogenic processing of APP in detriment of the physiological, secretory pathway. Aβ peptides are generated by the successive cleavage of APP by beta-secretase (BACE-1) and gamma-secretase, which has been recently characterized as part of the presenilin complex. Among several beta-amyloid isoforms that bear subtle differences depending on the number of C-terminal amino acids, Aβ (1-42) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. The neurotoxic potential of the Aβ peptide results from its biochemical properties that favor aggregation into insoluble oligomers and protofibrils. These further originate fibrillary Aβ species that accumulate into senile and neuritic plaques. These processes, along with a reduction of Aβ clearance from the brain, leads to the extracellular accumulation of Aβ, and the subsequent activation of neurotoxic cascades that ultimately lead to cytoskeletal changes, neuronal dysfunction and cellular death. Intracerebral amyloidosis develops in AD patients in an age-dependent manner, but recent evidence indicate that it may be observed in some subjects as early as in the third or fourth decades of life, with increasing magnitude in late middle age

  10. Dysphagia in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Seçil, Yaprak; Arıcı, Şehnaz; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Gürgör, Nevin; Beckmann, Yeşim; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2016-06-01

    To investigate electrophysiological parameters of swallowing in all stages of Alzheimer's disease. Forty Alzheimer's disease patients, 20 age-matched normal controls and 20 young normal controls were included. Dysphagia limit (DL) and sequential water swallowing (SWS) tests were performed. Cardiac rhythm, respiration and sympathetic skin responses were concomitantly recorded. Dysphagia was found in 30/40 (75%) of Alzheimer's disease patients. Mean volume at the DL test was significantly reduced (16.5±1.0mL) in the Alzheimer's disease group. Swallowing and apnea times in the SWS test were significantly prolonged in elderly controls, but even longer in Alzheimer's disease patients. Alzheimer's disease patients had electrophysiological features of dysphagia, even in the early period of disease. The cortical involvement and severity of cognitive disorder can increase swallowing problems, but subclinical signs of dysphagia may be observed even in patients with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  13. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  14. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gouras, Gunnar K

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy approaches for Alzheimer disease currently are among the leading therapeutic directions for the disease. Active and passive immunotherapy against the beta-amyloid peptides that aggregate and accumulate in the brain of those afflicted by the disease have been shown by numerous groups to reduce plaque pathology and improve behavior in transgenic mouse models of the disease. Several ongoing immunotherapy clinical trials for Alzheimer disease are in progress. The background and ongoing challenges for these immunological approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer disease are discussed.

  15. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition.

  16. Deciphering Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Selkoe, Dennis; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Holtzman, David

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease represents an insidious impairment of intellect and emotional well-being. However, recent advances in biochemical pathology and human genetics offer promise that effective therapeutic agents may soon be developed.

  17. Alzheimer's Disease - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Alzheimer's Disease URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/alzheimersdisease.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  18. Treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Bradford T; Onysko, Mary K; Stob, Christian M; Hazlewood, Kathleen A

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly one-half [corrected] of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among the pathologic manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Although there are no proven modalities for preventing Alzheimer disease, hypertension treatment, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, physical activity, and cognitive engagement demonstrate modest potential. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are first-line medications for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, and are associated with mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living; however, the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. The most common adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. Short-term use of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine can modestly improve measures of cognition, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer disease. Memantine can also be used in combination with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Memantine is generally well tolerated, but whether its benefits produce clinically meaningful improvement is controversial. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can slow the progression of Alzheimer disease, no pharmacologic agents can reverse the progression. Atypical antipsychotics can improve some behavioral symptoms, but have been associated with increased mortality rates in older patients with dementia. There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of selegiline, testosterone, and ginkgo for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. There is no evidence supporting the beneficial effects of vitamin E, estrogen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

  19. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Epidemiology of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-08-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease.

  1. Epidemiology of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease. PMID:22908189

  2. [Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Rachel, Wojciech; Grela, Agatha; Zyss, Tomasz; Zieba, Andrzej; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most abundant age-related psychiatric disorders. The outcome of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease has both individual (the patients and their families) and socio-economic effects. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease doubles after the age of 65 years, every 4.5 years. An etiologically heterogenic group of disorders related to aging as well as genetic and environmental interactions probably underlie the impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Those factors cause the degeneration of brain tissue which leads to significant cognitive dysfunction. There are two main hypotheses that are linked to the process of neurodegeneration: (i) amyloid cascade and (ii) the role of secretases and dysfunction of mitochondria. From the therapeutic standpoint it is crucial to get an early diagnosis and start with an adequate treatment. The undeniable progress in the field of biomarker research should lead to a better understanding of the early stages of the disorder. So far, the best recognised and described biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease, which can be detected in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood, are: beta-amyloid, tau-protein and phosphorylated tau-protein (phospho-tau). The article discusses the usefulness of the known biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in early diagnosis.

  3. Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Antón Álvarez, X; Fuentes, Patricio

    2011-07-01

    Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation mimicking the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors. Positive effects of Cerebrolysin on β-amyloid- and tau-related pathologies, neuroinflammation, neurotrophic factors, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neurotransmission, brain metabolism, neuroplasticity, neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, neurogenesis and cognition were demonstrated in experimental conditions. These pleiotropic effects of Cerebrolysin on Alzheimer's disease-related pathogenic events are consistent with a neurotrophic-like mode of action, and seems to involve the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 β intracellular signaling pathway. The clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease was evaluated in several randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, showing consistent benefits on global clinical function and cognition, improvements in behavior at high doses, and minor effects on daily living activities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, as well as in subgroups of moderate to moderately severe patients. In addition, the clinical benefits of Cerebrolysin were largely maintained for several months after ending treatment, a finding that supports its discontinuous administration. Cerebrolysin was generally well tolerated and did not induce significant adverse events in Alzheimer's patients. Although long-term studies are needed, the data available suggest that Cerebrolysin is effective as monotherapy and constitutes a promising option for combined therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Forecasting Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fackelmann, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that doctors may one day be able to identify healthy people who will develop Alzheimer's disease. Discusses recent studies in which characteristics of a person's writing early in life appear to predict the disease, and brain scans can highlight changes that may precede dementia. (CCM)

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Information Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat moderate to severe AD symptoms. View Full Treatment Information Definition Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, non-reversible ... that are developing and testing new and novel therapies that can relieve the symptoms of ... Alzheimer’s Plan . U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teri, Linda; Wagner, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Reviews research on depression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discusses evidence suggesting that depression affects many AD patients and can have profound effects on patient long-term functioning and caregiver well-being. Notes that field is dominated by studies of prevalence, as opposed to studies of etiology, association with other aspects of…

  7. Alzheimer's Disease and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teri, Linda; Wagner, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Reviews research on depression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discusses evidence suggesting that depression affects many AD patients and can have profound effects on patient long-term functioning and caregiver well-being. Notes that field is dominated by studies of prevalence, as opposed to studies of etiology, association with other aspects of…

  8. Reflections on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, S L

    1982-02-01

    As longevity increases, society will face a silent epidemic of idiopathic dementias. The concept, Alzheimer's disease, reflects a cumbersome and vaguely-defined cluster of signs, symptoms and other variables which might more appropriately be labelled as the idiopathic dementias, Alzheimer-type or IDAT. Diagnosis, which is made by exclusion and treatment, primarily custodial, demonstrates the complex nature and unfortunate prognosis of the problem. Dramatic progress, nevertheless, has been made in various scientific aspects of the issue, namely, in histology, genetics and neurochemistry. The resulting evidence warrants further speculation on the role of central cholinergic neurotransmission in cognitive functioning.

  9. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  10. Genetics of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso Vilatela, María Elisa; López-López, Marisol; Yescas-Gómez, Petra

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly and represents an important and increasing clinical challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment. This review highlights the role of genetics in understanding the pieces of the complex AD puzzle and summarizes the genes known to be involved in Alzheimer's disease. The amount of risk of Alzheimer's disease that is attributable to genetics is estimated to be ∼70%. Mutations in the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) are responsible for early-onset autosomal dominant AD. Although mutations in these genes account for ∼1% of AD cases, their identification has been crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of AD. For the more common complex late-onset AD, the ɛ-4 allele of the gene encoding apolipoprotein E (APOE) has been recognized as a major genetic risk factor. More recently, several potential disease risk genes have been identified with the use of advanced genomic methods like genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In the end, the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to AD will enable the development of more accurate diagnostic tests and new disease-treating strategies. Copyright © 2012 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Driving and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Roche, Jean

    2005-09-01

    Although most aged people remain safe drivers, a greater risk for crashes due to medical conditions is observed in the elderly. Impairment of important functions for safe driving such as visuospatial skills, attention, memory and judgement are observed in dementia, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. The accident rate increases from 9.4 accidents per million vehicle kilometers traveled for 80 to 85 year-old drivers, but raises to 163.6 for drivers with moderate AD. Patients and their families should be informed that patients with mild dementia related to Alzheimer's disease (stage 1 on the Clinical Dementia Rating, CDR), have a substantially increased rate of traffic accidents and therefore should not drive. But subjects in the pre-dementia phase (stage 0.5 at the CDR, mild cognitive impairment) also pose significant driving safety problems. In most States of the USA, and many European countries, but not in France, law requires regular investigating of driving performance in the elderly.

  12. [Calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, M A; Mozhaeva, G N; Kaznacheeva, E V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory and cognitive abilities loss. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. In this regard, there is no effective treatment for the disease. Various hypotheses to explain the nature of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease led to the development of appropriate therapeutics. Despite of decades of research and clinical trials available therapeutics, at best, can only slow down the progression of the disease, but cannot cure it. This review dedicated to the one of modern hypotheses of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis implied the impairment of calcium homeostasis as a key event for the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  13. Nicotine for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    López-Arrieta, J M; Rodríguez, J L; Sanz, F

    2000-01-01

    Nicotine is a cholinergic agonist that acts, not only post-synaptically, but also releases pre-synaptic acetylcholine, and in animal models has been shown to reverse spatial memory decline in rats with lesion in the medial septal nucleus and to show recovery on memory in aged monkeys. Nicotine also has effects on other transmitters like serotonin (5HT), dopamine, or GABA. On the other hand, because nicotine has serious adverse effects, especially concerning cardiovascular risks in elderly people, and also on sleep and behavior, there are several important reasons to conduct a systematic review to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of nicotine in patients with AD. The aim of this review is to determine whether there is evidence of beneficial effect, and to assess its safety profile, when nicotine is used for Alzheimer's disease. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 2, 99) was searched using the terms nicotin* and alzheimer*. Three references to trials were deemed suitable for inclusion but are awaiting consideration while the investigators are contacted. All unconfounded, double-blind, randomized trials in which treatment with nicotine patches or administration of nicotine intravenously was administered for more than a day and compared to placebo in people with Alzheimer's disease. As no trials were suitable for inclusion, no data have been extracted or pooled in a meta-analysis. One trial is awaiting consideration, and if included in an update of this review, any available data will be incorporated. The poor quality of the trials did not allow any synthesis of results across studies. However, the data available in trials considered are compatible with nicotine producing harm, no change or improvement. This review is not able to provide reliable evidence that nicotine is a useful treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Alzheimer disease in 2020.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, David M; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2012-11-01

    Remarkable advances in unraveling the biological underpinnings of Alzheimer disease (AD) have occurred during the last 25 years. Despite this, we have made only the smallest of dents in the development of truly disease-modifying treatments. What will change over the next 10 years? While the answer is not clear, we make several predictions on the state of the field in 2020, based on the rich knowledge described in the other contributions in this collection. As such, our predictions represent some of the principal unresolved questions that we believe deserve special investigative attention in the coming decade.

  15. Alzheimer disease update.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting more than 37 million people worldwide and increasing in incidence based on its primary risk factor, advancing age. A growing body of knowledge regarding amyloid and tau neuropathology, genetic and environmental risk modifiers, early and atypical clinical presentations, and the use of symptom-modifying medical and psychosocial therapies is available to aid in the diagnosis and management of patients with AD. Exciting recent advances in neurobiology render the areas of genetic susceptibility, biomarkers for early disease detection and assessment of disease progression, and novel therapeutic strategies to modify the natural history of the disease compelling, but in need of further study before implementation into routine clinical practice is feasible.

  16. Antioxidant therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Wang, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease featuring progressive impairments in memory, cognition, and behavior and ultimately leads to death. The histopathological changes of Alzheimer's disease include neuronal and synaptic loss, formation of extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in brain. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress not only strongly participates in an early stage of Alzheimer's disease prior to cytopathology, but plays an important role in inducing and activating multiple cell signaling pathways that contribute to the lesion formations of toxic substances and then promotes the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many years of studies show that antioxidant therapies have enjoyed general success in preclinical studies. Therefore, this paper mainly focuses on the recent developments of common used antioxidant therapies for Alzheimer's disease and thus provides indications for future potential antioxidant therapeutic strategies of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Genetics of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bekris, Lynn M.; Yu, Chang-En; Bird, Thomas D.; Tsuang, Debby W.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common causes of neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly individuals. Clinically, patients initially present with short-term memory loss, subsequently followed by executive dysfunction, confusion, agitation, and behavioral disturbances. Three causative genes have been associated with autosomal dominant familial AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) and 1 genetic risk factor (APOEε4 allele). Identification of these genes has led to a number of animal models that have been useful to study the pathogenesis underlying AD. In this article, we provide an overview of the clinical and genetic features of AD. PMID:21045163

  18. Genetic aspects of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bird, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia and represents a major public health problem. The neuropathologic findings of amyloid-beta plaques and tau containing neurofibrillary tangles represent important molecular clues to the underlying pathogenesis. Genetic factors are well recognized, but complicated. Three rare forms of autosomal-dominant early-onset familial Alzheimer disease have been identified and are associated with mutations in amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, and presenilin 2 genes. The more common late-onset form of Alzheimer disease is assumed to be polygenic/multifactorial. However, thus far the only clearly identified genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease is Apo lipoprotein E. The epsilon4 allele of Apo lipoprotein E influences age at onset of Alzheimer disease, but is neither necessary nor sufficient for the disease. The search continues for the discovery of additional genetic influences.

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta.

    PubMed

    Town, Terrence

    2010-05-01

    Many of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials have made it far enough down the pipeline to allow conclusions about targeting the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) as a therapeutic approach. Based on these results, it is becoming clear that a multifocal approach to AD treatment is probably necessary. However, critical discussion beyond Abeta is necessary to enable the next wave of AD therapeutic targets. For this reason, the 2010 Keystone Symposium, 'Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta', was organized by JoAnne McLaurin and Tony Wyss-Coray to spark topical discussion and debate. While researchers struggled to get beyond that ever-present pathognomonic feature of AD, new and exciting evidence was presented that raised our awareness of what is around the corner for next-generation AD therapeutics beyond Abeta. This report will describe some of the highlights from Copper Mountain Resort throughout the meeting period of 10-15 January 2010 in Colorado (USA). Despite illuminating scientific presentations and intense discussions, a number of important questions remain concerning the best biomarkers and targets to focus on, and when and how to therapeutically intervene.

  20. Causes of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, D G; Feldman, H

    2000-01-01

    It is now understood that genetic factors play a crucial role in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare mutations in at least 3 genes are responsible for early-onset familial AD. A common polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene is the major determinant of risk in families with late-onset AD, as well as in the general population. Advanced age, however, remains the major established risk factor for AD, although environmental variables may also have some role in disease expression. Some pathogenic factors directly associated with aging include oxidative damage and mutations in messenger RNA. Other factors unrelated to the aging process may, in the future, be amenable to therapeutic intervention by way of estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, anti-inflammatory drug therapy and reducing vascular risk factors. Older theories, such as aluminum playing a role in the pathogenesis of AD, have been mostly discarded as our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of AD has advanced. PMID:11216203

  1. [Management of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Belmin, Joël; Péquignot, Renaud; Konrat, Cécile; Pariel-Madjlessi, Sylvie

    2007-10-01

    Management of Alzheimer disease is based on drug and nondrug treatments. Specific drug treatment includes acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine. They show moderate efficacy superior to that of placebo for global condition, cognitive disorders, need for care, and behavioral problems, but do not prevent further decline. These treatments remain underused. The efficacy of psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, neuroleptics, and antipsychotic agents) in treating behavioral problems is not well documented. Nondrug activities and interventions have not been sufficiently evaluated scientifically. These involve interventions against the consequences of the disease (loss of autonomy, malnutrition) and helping patients' family caregivers. Among these activities, the best evaluated and most interesting are: educational programs for caregivers, occupational therapy at home, and interventions at home by nurses specially trained as case managers.

  2. Melatonin in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Huang, Qiong-Xia; Yang, Shu-Sheng; Chu, Jiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Tian, Qing

    2013-07-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive cognition deficit, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques (SP) of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, mainly containing the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. Multiple factors contribute to the etiology of AD in terms of initiation and progression. Melatonin is an endogenously produced hormone in the brain and decreases during aging and in patients with AD. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from Aβ-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties. It not only inhibits Aβ generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with Aβ. Our studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood, a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting the cholinergic system and in anti-inflammation. The aim of this review is to stimulate interest in melatonin as a potentially useful agent in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  3. Antioxidants for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, Douglas R.; Peskind, Elaine; Clark, Christopher M.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Ringman, John M.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Cotman, Carl; Cottrell, Barbara; Montine, Thomas J.; Thomas, Ronald G.; Aisen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether antioxidant supplements presumed to target specific cellular compartments affected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Design Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting Academic medical centers. Participants Subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. Intervention Random assignment to treatment for 16 weeks with 800 IU/d of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) plus 500 mg/d of vitamin C plus 900 mg/d of α-lipoic acid (E/C/ALA); 400 mg of coenzyme Q 3 times/d; or placebo. Main Outcome Measures Changes from baseline to 16 weeks in CSF biomarkers related to Alzheimer disease and oxidative stress, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), and function (Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale). Results Seventy-eight subjects were randomized; 66 provided serial CSF specimens adequate for biochemical analyses. Study drugs were well tolerated, but accelerated decline in Mini-Mental State Examination scores occurred in the E/C/ALA group, a potential safety concern. Changes in CSF Aβ42, tau, and P-tau181 levels did not differ between the 3 groups. Cerebrospinal fluid F2-isoprostane levels, an oxidative stress biomarker, decreased on average by 19% from baseline to week 16 in the E/C/ALA group but were unchanged in the other groups. Conclusions Antioxidants did not influence CSF biomarkers related to amyloid or tau pathology. Lowering of CSF F2-isoprostane levels in the E/C/ALA group suggests reduction of oxidative stress in the brain. However, this treatment raised the caution of faster cognitive decline, which would need careful assessment if longer-term clinical trials are conducted. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00117403 PMID:22431837

  4. [Molecular basics of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, A P; Rogaev, E I

    2007-01-01

    Studies of molecular mechanisms for Alzheimer's Disease have led to the two major achievements. First, genes with mutations causing Alzheimer's Disease (presenilin genes PSI, PS2 and APP) or bearing a risk factor polymorphism (ApoE) for Alzheimer's Disease were described. Second, the new type of proteases and mechanisms of regulation of cellular differentiation and development by processes of intramembrane proteolysis were identified. These mechanisms, apparently, are universal for various cell types and organisms. Presenilin is a catalytic component of tetra-protein complex (epsilon-/gamma-secretase) cleaving type I transmembrane proteins. Other recently discovered aspartate proteases, IMPAS/SPP, cleave type II transmembrane proteins. Processing of transmembrane proteins by cellular intramembrane proteases results in production of signal peptides, transcriptional factors and short hydrophobic proteins (fragments of transmembrane domains), which may have a physiological function or play a key role in patogenic events associated with ageing (e.g., beta-amyloid formation in Alzheimer's Disease). To date approximately 160 mutations in PSI gene, more than 10 mutations in PS2 gene and 21 mutations in APP gene were described. Early preclinical diagnostics of some early forms of Alzheimer's Disease became possible. Since patogeneses of early and late onset forms of Alzheimer's Disease are similar, identification of molecular or epigenetic factors affecting primary molecular mechanisms (intramembrane or membrane associated proteolysis) underlying the disease may ultimately contribute to development of rational therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease: The Death of the Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Lynn W.

    1987-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a form of dementia in middle-age and older adults is becoming more evident because of growing numbers of older people and better diagnosis and detection methods. Describes the behavioral and physical symptoms of the disease as well as specific suggestions for care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, including dealing with…

  6. Anxiety and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, L; McCurry, S M; Logsdon, R; Gibbons, L; Teri, L

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated symptoms of anxiety in two samples of clinic outpatients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinician and caregiver reports were obtained using standardized measures to characterize a broad array of anxiety symptoms. Anxiety symptoms were reported for a substantial proportion of subjects, regardless of whether clinician or caregiver ratings were used. Anxious or worried appearance was most common (68% to 71%), followed by fearfulness, tension, restlessness, and fidgeting (37% to 57%). Sleep disturbance and various somatic symptoms were less common (8% to 34%). Although anxiety symptoms were prevalent, only 5% to 6% of subjects met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for the diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder. In both samples, anxiety symptoms were associated with depression, behavioral disturbances, and increased cognitive impairment. Study findings support a high occurrence of anxiety in patients with dementia, and treatments for anxiety might therefore be helpful in reducing the psychiatric burden of AD.

  7. Metals and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Adlard, Paul A; Bush, Ashley I

    2006-11-01

    There is increasing evidence to support a role for both the amyloid beta-protein precursor (AbetaPP) and its proteolytic fragment, amyloid beta (Abeta), in metal ion homeostasis. Furthermore, metal ions such as zinc and copper can interact with both AbetaPP and Abeta to potentiate Alzheimer's disease by participating in the aggregation of these normal cellular proteins and in the generation of reactive oxygen species. In addition, metal ions may interact on several other AD-related pathways, including those involved in neurofibrillary tangle formation, secretase cleavage of AbetaPP and proteolytic degradation of Abeta. As such, a dysregulation of metal ion homeostasis, as occurs with both aging and in AD, may foster an environment that can both precipitate and accelerate degenerative conditions such as AD. This offers a broad biochemical front for novel therapeutic interventions.

  8. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  9. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  10. Early Alzheimer's disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-01-01

    The genetics community working on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has made remarkable progress in the past 20 years. The cumulative efforts by multiple groups have lead to the identification of three autosomal dominant genes for early onset AD. These are the amyloid-beta protein precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin1 and 2. The knowledge derived from this work has firmly established Abeta as a critical disease molecule and lead to candidate drugs currently in treatment trials. Work on a related disease, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism - chromosome 17 type has also added to our understanding of pathogenesis by revealing that tau, the protein component of neurofibrillary tangles, is also a critical molecule in neurodegeneration. Lessons learned that still influence work on human genetics include the need to recognize and deal with genetic heterogeneity, a feature common to many genetic disorders. Genetic heterogeneity, if recognized, can be source of information. Another critical lesson is that clinical, molecular, and statistical scientists need to work closely on disease projects to succeed in solving the complex problems of common genetic disorders.

  11. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review. PMID:27698682

  12. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review.

  13. Epidemiology of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Brayne, Carol; Mayeux, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The global prevalence of dementia is estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years through to 2040, leading to a costly burden of disease. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function, which typically begins with deterioration in memory. Before death, individuals with this disorder have usually become dependent on caregivers. The neuropathological hallmarks of the AD brain are diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques—which are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites—and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These hallmark pathologies are often accompanied by the presence of reactive microgliosis and the loss of neurons, white matter and synapses. The etiological mechanisms underlying the neuropathological changes in AD remain unclear, but are probably affected by both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we provide an overview of the criteria used in the diagnosis of AD, highlighting how this disease is related to, but distinct from, normal aging. We also summarize current information relating to AD prevalence, incidence and risk factors, and review the biomarkers that may be used for risk assessment and in diagnosis. PMID:21304480

  14. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  15. Seizures in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, H A

    2015-02-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases the risk for late-onset seizures and neuronal network abnormalities. An elevated co-occurrence of AD and seizures has been established in the more prevalent sporadic form of AD. Recent evidence suggests that nonconvulsive network abnormalities, including seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities, may be more commonly found in patients than previously thought. Patients with familial AD are at an even greater risk for seizures, which have been found in patients with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP, as well as with APP duplication. This review also provides an overview of seizure and electroencephalography studies in AD mouse models. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been identified as a possible link between AD and seizures, and while Aβ is known to affect neuronal activity, the full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and other APP cleavage products may be important for the development and maintenance of cortical network hyperexcitability. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity, such as seizures or network abnormalities that are shorter in duration but may occur with higher frequency, may contribute to cognitive impairments characteristic of AD, such as amnestic wandering. Finally, the review discusses recent studies using antiepileptic drugs to rescue cognitive deficits in AD mouse models and human patients. Understanding the mechanistic link between epileptiform activity and AD is a research area of growing interest. Further understanding of the connection between neuronal hyperexcitability and Alzheimer's as well as the potential role of epileptiform activity in the progression of AD will be beneficial for improving treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibitory functioning in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Hélène; Phillips, Louise H; Della Sala, Sergio; Henry, Julie D

    2004-05-01

    We present a comprehensive review of studies assessing inhibitory functioning in Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this review are: (i) to establish whether Alzheimer's disease affects all inhibitory mechanisms equally, and (ii) where possible, to assess whether any effects of Alzheimer's disease on inhibition tasks might be caused by other cognitive deficits, such as slowed processing. We review inhibitory mechanisms considered to play a crucial role in various domains of cognition, such as inhibition involved in working memory, selective attention and shifting abilities, and the inhibition of motor and verbal responses. It was found that whilst most inhibitory mechanisms are affected by the disorder, some are relatively preserved, suggesting that inhibitory deficits in Alzheimer's disease may not be the result of a general inhibitory breakdown. In particular, the experimental results reviewed showed that Alzheimer's disease has a strong effect on tasks requiring controlled inhibition processes, such as the Stroop task. However, the presence of the disease appears to have relatively little effect on tasks requiring more automatic inhibition, such as the inhibition of return task. Thus, the distinction between automatic, reflexive inhibitory mechanisms and controlled inhibitory mechanisms may be critical when predicting the integrity of inhibitory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease. Substantial effects of Alzheimer's disease on tasks such as negative priming, which are not cognitively complex but do require some degree of controlled inhibition, support this hypothesis. A meta-analytic review of seven studies on the Stroop paradigm revealed substantially larger effects of Alzheimer's disease on the inhibition condition relative to the baseline condition, suggesting that these deficits do not simply reflect general slowing.

  17. Relationship of aluminum to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Perl, D P

    1985-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the development of large numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques in the brain. Aluminum salts may be used experimentally to produce lesions which are similar, but not identical, to the neurofibrillary tangle. Although some studies have reported increased amounts of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's disease victims, these bulk analysis studies have been difficult to replicate and remain controversial. Using scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry, we have investigated this question on the cellular level. We have identified abnormal accumulations of aluminum within neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients containing neurofibrillary tangles. Similar accumulations have been detected in the numerous neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons seen in the brains of the indigenous native population of the island of Guam who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism with dementia. Epidemiologic evidence strongly suggests a causal role for local environmental conditions relating to availability of aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. In view of the fact that a major consequence of acid rain is the liberation of large amounts of aluminum in bioavailable forms, concerns are raised about possible human health risks of this environmental phenomenon. PMID:4076080

  18. [Proceeding memory in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Anlló, Eva Ma; Chamorro-Sánchez, Jorge; Díaz-Marta, Juan Poveda; Gil, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Procedural learning can acquire or develop skills through performance and repetition of a task unconsciously or unintentionally. Procedural skills are considered as the cornerstone in the neuropsychological rehabilitation to promote the autonomy of patients with brain damage, as those with Alzheimer's disease. This review presents data about procedural skills in Alzheimer's disease. Over the past three decades, we have found 40 articles studying various procedural skills in the Alzheimer's disease: motor, perceptual-motor, cognitive, perceptual-cognitive and those developed through serial reaction-time paradigm. We analyzed every study evaluating a procedural skill, indicating the used task and preservation or no preservation of procedural learning. Overall, most of the papers published describe conservation of learning procedures or relatively conserved in Alzheimer's disease, which could be used to promote patient autonomy.

  19. Ibuprofen and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dokmeci, Dikmen

    2004-01-01

    There is epidemiological observation that long-term treatment of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis with ibuprofen results in reduced risk and delayed onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic central nervous system inflammation in AD brain is implicated in the pathology, but how ibuprofen impacts the pathogenic AD pathways is unclear. Ibuprofen, a commonly used over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is a cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibitor as well as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, decreases the production of nitric oxide (NO), protects neurons against glutamate toxicity and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Ibuprofen crosses the blood brain barrier and suppresses neuritic plaque pathology and inflammation in AD brain. Furthermore, ibuprofen is a potent free radical scavenger, and it could reduce lipid peroxidation and free radical generation. Because of neuroprotective activity, relative safety, and its long history of use, ibuprofen is currently being developed for clinical use in AD. Ibuprofen may be a promising new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  20. Epigenomics of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David A; Yu, Lei; Yang, Jingyun; Srivastava, Gyan P; Aubin, Cristin; De Jager, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a large and growing public health problem. It is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid β peptides and abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins that are associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Much has been learned about the genomics of AD from linkage analyses and, more recently, genome-wide association studies. Several but not all aspects of the genomic landscape are involved in amyloid β metabolism. The moderate concordance of disease among twins suggests other factors, potentially epigenomic factors, are related to AD. We are at the earliest stages of examining the relation of the epigenome to the clinical and pathologic phenotypes that characterize AD. Our literature review suggests that there is some evidence of age-related changes in human brain methylation. Unfortunately, studies of AD have been relatively small with limited coverage of methylation sites and microRNA, let alone other epigenomic marks. We are in the midst of 2 large studies of human brains including coverage of more than 420,000 autosomal cytosine-guanine dinucleotides with the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadArray, and histone acetylation with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing. We present descriptive data to help inform other researchers what to expect from these approaches to better design and power their studies. We then discuss future directions to inform on the epigenomic architecture of AD.

  1. [Biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    García-Ribas, G; López-Sendón Moreno, J L; García-Caldentey, J

    2014-04-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. Three CSF biomarkers, Aß42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau, reflect the core pathological features of AD. It is already known that these pathological processes of AD starts decades before the first symptoms, so these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. At least three stages of AD could be identified: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and dementia due to AD. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review the actual research on blood-based biomarkers. Recent studies on healthy elderly subjects and on carriers of dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes that allow separate groups in these preclinical stages. These studies may aid for segregate populations in clinical trials and objectively evaluate if there are changes over the pathological processes of AD. Limits to widespread use of CSF biomarkers, apart from the invasive nature of the process itself, is the higher coefficient of variation for the analyses between centres. It requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures that may make feasible multi-centre studies and global cut-off points for the different stages of AD.

  2. Neuronutrition and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balenahalli N.; Rao, T.S. Sathyanarayana; Prakasam, Annamalai; Sambamurti, Kumar; Rao, K.S. Jagannatha

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurological disorder with several unequivocally identified genetic risk factors. Among the several environmental factors proposed for AD, dietary protective and risk factors have been most compelling. In particular, diets rich in saturated fatty acids and alcohol, and deficient in antioxidants and vitamins appear to promote the onset of the disease, while diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants, and wine likely suppress its onset. Evidence suggests that diets rich in polyphenols and some spices suppress the onset of AD by scavenging free radicals and preventing oxidative damage. Metal ions are known to catalyze the production of free radicals and induce mental retardation or dementia. Several studies have also identified metals such as Pb, Fe, Al, Cu and Zn in AD pathogenesis. While specific chelators have been tested for therapy, they have not been very successful probably due to late administration after brain damage has been triggered. Since several dietary polyphenols are known to chelate metals, their routine use may also be protective against the onset of AD. PMID:20308778

  3. What causes alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R A

    2013-01-01

    Since the earliest descriptions of Alzheimer's disease (AD), many theories have been advanced as to its cause. These include: (1) exacerbation of aging, (2) degeneration of anatomical pathways, including the cholinergic and cortico-cortical pathways, (3) an environmental factor such as exposure to aluminium, head injury, or malnutrition, (4) genetic factors including mutations of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin (PSEN) genes and allelic variation in apolipoprotein E (Apo E), (5) mitochondrial dysfunction, (6) a compromised blood brain barrier, (7) immune system dysfunction, and (8) infectious agents. This review discusses the evidence for and against each of these theories and concludes that AD is a multifactorial disorder in which genetic and environmental risk factors interact to increase the rate of normal aging ('allostatic load'). The consequent degeneration of neurons and blood vessels results in the formation of abnormally aggregated 'reactive' proteins such as β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. Gene mutations influence the outcome of age-related neuronal degeneration to cause early onset familial AD (EO-FAD). Where gene mutations are absent and a combination of risk factors present, Aβ and tau only slowly accumulate not overwhelming cellular protection systems until later in life causing late-onset sporadic AD (LO-SAD). Aβ and tau spread through the brain via cell to cell transfer along anatomical pathways, variation in the pathways of spread leading to the disease heterogeneity characteristic of AD.

  4. Neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José J; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that neural stem cells generate new neurons through the process of neurogenesis in the adult brain. In mammals, adult neurogenesis occurs in two areas of the CNS: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, their properties being equivalent to those of mature neurons. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the widespread cause of dementia, and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that results in massive neuronal death and deterioration of cognitive functions. Here, we overview the relations between adult neurogenesis and AD, and try to analyse the controversies in the field. We also summarise recent data obtained in the triple transgenic model of AD that show time- and region-specific impairment of neurogenesis, which may account for the early changes in synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairments that develop prior to gross neurodegenerative alterations and that could underlie new rescue therapies. PMID:21323664

  5. Nanotechnology for Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Leszek, Jerzy; Tse, Wai Hei; Zhang, Jin; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco Fidel; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Bachurin, Sergey O; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-02-03

    Dementia of Alzheimer disease (AD) type affects memory, thinking and behavior. Researchers believe that changes in the brain may begin 10-20 years before symptoms appear and AD is diagnosed. The need to diagnose and treat the devastating disease at an early stage is critical to manage and treat AD. Unfortunately, the lack of validated biomarkers limits the possibility of the earlier stages of AD. The advance of nanotechnology could offer huge opportunities in early-stage diagnosis and well treatment of AD. Biocompatible nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 1-100 nm could be used as targeted delivery system for drugs (e.g. Rivastigmine) to overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and to minimize the side effects caused by over-dosage. In addition, biocompatible nanomaterials with enhanced optical and magnetic properties may allow them being excellent alternative contrast agents for early-stage diagnosis. With more studies on using nanomaterials and nanotechnology in complex biochemical environment of the central nervous system, it is most likely that nanomaterials and nanotechnology can be give significant impact on the early-stage diagnosis and treatment of AD. In this review we discuss the challenges of current treatment and diagnosis of AD and the development on biocompatible nanoparticles, and provide the rational and potentials of using nanoparticles for both drug carrier and imaging contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment of AD. . Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Head trauma and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nandoe, Rishi D S; Scheltens, Philip; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2002-08-01

    The authors describe a case of a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease 1.5 years after a car accident in which she experienced a mild concussion. Extensive history taking disclosed no cognitive changes prior to the car accident. The case is discussed in view of the inflammation hypothesis regarding Alzheimer's disease and the role of the apolipoprotein E4 genotype of the patient.

  7. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as many ...

  8. Inflammatory signaling in Alzheimer disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To help define the relationships among inflammation, Alzheimer disease, and depression, the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium analyzed an array of inflammatory biomarkers in a cohort of patients with Alzheimer disease and in controls. Inflammation severity was highly correlated with earlier age at onset of Alzheimer disease and was also associated with cognitive decline. The relationship between inflammation and depression was not as clear, and it varied with aspects of depression, gender, and the presence of Alzheimer disease.

  9. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Goni, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. In AD the normal soluble amyloid β (sAβ) peptide is converted into oligomeric/fibrillar Aβ. The oligomeric forms of Aβ are thought to be the most toxic, while fibrillar Aβ becomes deposited as amyloid plaques and congophilic angiopathy, which serve as neuropathological markers of the disease. In addition the accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau as soluble toxic oligomers and as neurofibrillary tangles is a critical part of the pathology. Numerous therapeutic interventions are under investigation to prevent and treat AD. Among the more exciting and advanced of these approaches is vaccination. Active and passive Immunotherapy targeting only Aβ has been successful in many AD model animal trials; however, the more limited human data has shown much less benefit so far, with encephalitis occurring in a minority of patients treated with active immunization and vasogenic edema or amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) being a complication in some passive immunization trials. Therapeutic intervention targeting only tau has been tested only in mouse models; and no approaches targeting both pathologies concurrently has been attempted, until very recently. The immune approaches tried so far were targeting a self-protein, albeit in an abnormal conformation; however, effective enhanced clearance of the disease associated conformer has to be balanced with the potential risk of stimulating excessive toxic inflammation. The design of future more effective immunomodulatory approaches will need to target all aspects of AD pathology, as well as specifically targeting pathological oligomeric conformers, without the use of any self-antigen. PMID:24412277

  10. Autotoxicity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, P L; McGeer, E G

    2000-06-01

    I mmunological responses are considered to be either humoral, resulting from cloning of B lymphocytes, or cell mediated, resulting from cloning of T lymphocytes. Autoimmune diseases occur when the cloned products attack host tissue. Inflammation is considered a nonspecific response to injury, characterized by exudation of serum into damaged tissue, and identified by the cardinal signs of rubor, calor, dolor, and tumor. However, these classic mechanisms do not fit pathological observations of Alzheimer disease (AD)-affected brain tissue. Although many of the components prominently associated with peripheral immunological and inflammatory states are present in AD lesions, there are no identifiable B lymphocytes or antibodies, and T cells are sparse. Furthermore, the blood-brain barrier is intact, excluding exudation of exogenous serum proteins. Although "neuroinflammation" is the term commonly used to describe the pathological changes, it fails to define adequately the process that is taking place. The reaction is neither a nonspecific response to injury, as classically implied for inflammatory reactions, nor an autoimmune reaction, despite the directed attack against plaques and extracellular tangles. It is most appropriately defined as an innate immunoreaction. The fact that such a reaction can be mounted by brain, an organ frequently described as being immunologically privileged, suggests that a reevaluation is required of the dimensions of the innate immune system, including how it operates at the tissue level. The innate immune system is primitive, while the adaptive immune system, which is directed by peripheral immune organs, is an invention of vertebrates. Even in vertebrates, however, the innate immune system is the first line of defense. Much more needs to be learned about the operation of the innate immune system in health and disease. Arch Neurol. 2000.

  11. Prevention of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Monica Zavaloni; van Reekum, Robert

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence regarding prevention of Alzheimer disease (AD) in order to highlight the role of family medicine. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Most of the evidence relating to prevention of AD is derived from observational (cross-sectional, case-control, or longitudinal) studies. Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is available only for blood pressure control and for hormone replacement therapy for menopausal women. MAIN MESSAGE Many preventive approaches to AD have been identified, but no RCTs support their efficacy. Evidence from RCTs supports the effectiveness of blood pressure control in reducing incidence of AD, but demonstrates that postmenopausal women’s use of estrogen is ineffective in reducing it. Observational studies suggest that some preventive approaches, such as healthy lifestyle, ongoing education, regular physical activity, and cholesterol control, play a role in prevention of AD. These approaches can and should be used for every patient because they carry no significant risk. Currently, no effective pharmacologic interventions have been researched enough to support their use in prevention of AD. CONCLUSION Health professionals should educate patients, especially patients at higher risk of AD, about preventive strategies and potentially modifiable risk factors. PMID:16529393

  12. Alzheimer's disease and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Yeo, R A; Arden, R; Jung, R E

    2011-06-01

    A significant body of evidence has accumulated suggesting that individual variation in intellectual ability, whether assessed directly by intelligence tests or indirectly through proxy measures, is related to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in later life. Important questions remain unanswered, however, such as the specificity of risk for AD vs. other forms of dementia, and the specific links between premorbid intelligence and development of the neuropathology characteristic of AD. Lower premorbid intelligence has also emerged as a risk factor for greater mortality across myriad health and mental health diagnoses. Genetic covariance contributes importantly to these associations, and pleiotropic genetic effects may impact diverse organ systems through similar processes, including inefficient design and oxidative stress. Through such processes, the genetic underpinnings of intelligence, specifically, mutation load, may also increase the risk of developing AD. We discuss how specific neurobiologic features of relatively lower premorbid intelligence, including reduced metabolic efficiency, may facilitate the development of AD neuropathology. The cognitive reserve hypothesis, the most widely accepted account of the intelligence-AD association, is reviewed in the context of this larger literature.

  13. National Alzheimer's disease program.

    PubMed

    Sotton, J; Boursaly, J; Rapin, J R; Xuong, N G; Starton, P; Rancurel, G; Bouillon, D; Leponcin, M

    1989-01-01

    The psycho-behavioral troubles of patients with an Alzheimer's Disease (AD) are such that it is very difficult to keep those patients within the normal family environment, and that it therefore proves necessary to have them placed in a specially adapted residence manned by a highly specialised medical and para-medical staff. Within the frame of such an approach, a new type of residence has been devised "Asclepios Gardens", a one-level ranch-type residence, including 44 individual apartments, each opening, on the one hand, on a little private garden opening itself on a large, strictly enclosed and protected, 5-acre park, and, on the other hand, on a collective living structure conceived for social activities under attentive medical care, to help the patients restore their social structures. In a such residences, besides the special training given to the staff (medical, para-medical), aimed at developing as much as possible the patients' autonomy and self-reliance in every aspect of everyday life, you find a psychometric computerized "activation" program, devised both on a collective basis with differentiated subprograms, for groups of patients that have been classified according to the degree of seriousness of their problem, and-whenever possible, with individual attention programs; the whole of this "activation" method has thus clearly a double target; first to develop what is left of the patients' autonomy, for instance by psychometric exercises, and moreover, to have them start new activities, which they had never practised before--this latter action with a view to developing their neuroplasticity resources. And finally, a new chemical therapy is proposed. This substance induced a significant improvement in 40% of cases and a slight improvement in 20%. These results were observed through a series of specific psychometric tests (Visuo Retention Test of Benton, Mnesic profile of Rey), a global scale (Mini Mental State), and a general evaluation of the patients

  14. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease.

  15. Galantamine for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Olin, J; Schneider, L

    2001-01-01

    Galantamine (also called galanthamine, marketed as Reminyl (Janssen)) was isolated from several plants, including daffodil bulbs, but is now synthesized. Galantamine is a specific, competitive, and reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It is also an allosteric modulator at nicotinic cholinergic receptor sites potentiating cholinergic nicotinic neurotransmission. A small number of early studies showed mild cognitive and global benefits for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and recently several multicenter clinical trials have been published with positive findings. Galantamine has received regulatory approval in 29 counties: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Czechia, the European Union (except for The Netherlands), Iceland, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Thailand, and the United States. The objective of this overview is to assess the clinical effects of galantamine in patients with probable AD, and to investigate potential moderators of an effect. The trials were identified from a search of the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group on 4 July 2001 using the terms galantamine and Reminyl. The Specialized Register at that time contained records from the following databases: CCTR/Central:April 2001 (issue 2); Medline: 1966 to June 2001; Embase: 1980 to April 2001; PsycLit: 1887 to April 2001; Cinahl: 1982 to March 2001; SIGLE (Grey Literature in Europe): 1980 to December 2000; ISTP (Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings): to May 2000; INSIDE (BL database of Conference Proceedings and Journals): to June 2000; Aslib Index to Theses (UK and Ireland theses): 1970 to June 2001; Dissertation Abstract (USA): 1861 to June 2001; ADEAR (Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials Database): to June 2001; National Research Register (including the MRC Clinical Trials Directory): April 2001 (issue 2) Alzheimers Society Trials Database: to June 2001; Glaxo-Wellcome Trials Database: to June 2001

  16. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy.

  17. Genetics of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chouraki, Vincent; Seshadri, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the main form of dementia, and is a major public health problem. Despite intensive research efforts, current treatments have only marginal symptomatic benefits and there are no effective disease-modifying or preventive interventions. AD has a strong genetic component, so much research in AD has focused on identifying genetic causes and risk factors. This chapter will cover genetic discoveries in AD and their consequences in terms of improved knowledge regarding the disease and the identification of biomarkers and drug targets. First, we will discuss the study of the rare early-onset, autosomal dominant forms of AD that led to the discovery of mutations in three major genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2. These discoveries have shaped our current understanding of the pathophysiology and natural history of AD as well as the development of therapeutic targets and the design of clinical trials. Then, we will explore linkage analysis and candidate gene approaches, which identified variants in Apolipoprotein E (APOE) as the major genetic risk factor for late-onset, "sporadic" forms of AD (LOAD), but failed to robustly identify other genetic risk factors, with the exception of variants in SORL1. The main focus of this chapter will be on recent genome-wide association studies that have successfully identified common genetic variations at over 20 loci associated with LOAD outside of the APOE locus. These loci are in or near-novel AD genes including BIN1, CR1, CLU, phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM), CD33, EPHA1, MS4A4/MS4A6, ABCA7, CD2AP, SORL1, HLA-DRB5/DRB1, PTK2B, SLC24A4-RIN3, INPP5D, MEF2C, NME8, ZCWPW1, CELF1, FERMT2, CASS4, and TRIP4 and each has small effects on risk of AD (relative risks of 1.1-1.3). Finally, we will touch upon the ongoing effort to identify less frequent and rare variants through whole exome and whole genome sequencing. This effort has identified two novel genes, TREM2 and PLD3, and shown a

  18. [Therapy of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Tibor

    2009-03-01

    Dementia is one of the most important health problems in the aging populations. The most frequent cause of it is Alzheimer's disease (AD) which is characterized by intracellular neuro-fibrillary tangles (NFT) and the extracellular senile plaques. The NFTs are mainly formed by the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-binding protein, the tau, while the senile plaques are composed of beta-amyloid protein cleaved from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the beta- and gamma-secretases. The pharmacotherapy of AD consists of symptomatic and disease-modifying therapies. The most frequently used therapeutic agents are the nootropic drugs supported by personal rather evidence based experiences. The leading-edge therapy of AD at present is the inhibition of the acetylcholine-esterase enzyme (AChEI) with mainly cognitive symptomatic and weak disease-modifying effects; they are licensed in the mild and middle stages of AD (MMSE 26-10), but their effect is proved in the severe stage of the disease and they are effective in the management of the neuropsychiatric symptoms too. Memantine (which is an inhibitor of the N-metil-D-aspartate receptor) is used in the middle and severe stages of AD and it can be effectively combined with AChEIs. The future therapy of AD will possibly be a "causative" therapy. The most frequent directions are therapies aiming to decrease the production or the deposition of beta-amyloid peptide. The active vaccination study of AN-1792 was terminated because of immunological side-effects, but several active and passive immunisation therapies are in development nowadays. It is also possible to inhibit the aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptide with peptide fragments or with Cu2+ and Zn2+ ion chelators. A promising direction is the inhibition of the enzymes responsible for the production of the beta-amyloid peptide: beta-secretase inhibitors with low molecular weight and penetrability through the blood-brain barrier are developed while the inhibitors of the

  19. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mantzavinosa, Vasileios; Alexiou, Athanasios; Greig, Nigel H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2017-02-03

    The dramatic increase in the population with dementia expected in the next decades is accompanied by the establishment of novel and innovated methods that will offer accurate and efficient detection of the disease in its early stages. While Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, by the time is typically diagnosed substantial neuronal loss and neuropathological lesions can damaged many brain regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the main risk factors that affect and increase Alzheimer's disease progression over time even in cases with no significant memory impairment present. Several potential markers are discussed such as oxidative stress, metal ions, vascular disorders, protein dysfunctions and alterations in the mitochondrial populations. A multiparametric model of Alzheimer's biomarkers is presented according to the latest classification of the disease.

  20. [Hearing loss and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Bakhos, David; Villeuneuve, Alexandre; Kim, Soo; Hammoudi, Karim; Hommet, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that subjects with hearing loss are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. Hearing loss can be consecutive to presbycusis and/or to central auditory dysfunction. Standard audiometric measures (pure tone and speech intelligibility) allow the diagnosis of presbycusis. However, to demonstrate central auditory dysfunction, specific audiometric tests are needed such as noisy and/or dichotic tests. Actually, no consensus exists to investigate hearing loss in people with Alzheimer's disease though hearing loss may be an early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease. Until now, investigations and clinical procedure related to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease ignored the hearing ability of the patient. However, the major part of care management and investigations implies the patient's communication ability with the caregivers. Hearing loss may be one of the most unrecognized deficit in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. Auditory rehabilitation could benefit to the patient in order to lessen cognitive decline, but this must be investigated during longitudinal studies in order to clearly demonstrate their efficiency.

  1. Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas B; Remington, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies. We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance. Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted.

  2. [Language Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive memory disturbance. Language symptoms are considered to be less disease specific and therefore did not attract many researchers, interest until recently. Typical patients with AD present amnesic aphasia in the early disease stage followed by transcortical sensory aphasia; however, their language symptoms are varied. Recently, the concept of logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) has been developed, which is reported to have Alzheimer's neuropathology. Clinicians should verify patients' language abilities, as language can be the key to reveal their true cognitive functions.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Living with Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... delay or prevent the disease. Free Guide for Alzheimer's Caregivers Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease ...

  4. Depth perception in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mendez, M F; Cherrier, M M; Meadows, R S

    1996-12-01

    Abnormal depth perception contributes to visuospatial deficits in Alzheimer's disease. Disturbances in stereopsis, motion parallax, and the interpretation of static monocular depth cues may result from neuropathology in the visual cortex. We evaluated 15 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 15 controls matched for age, sex, and education on measures of local stereopsis (stereoscopic testing), global stereopsis (random dots), motion parallax (Howard-Dolman apparatus), and monocular depth perception by relative size, interposition, and perspective. Compared to controls, the patients were significantly impaired in over-all depth perception. This impairment was largely due to disturbances in local stereopsis and in the interpretation of depth from perspective, independent of other visuospatial functions. Patients with Alzheimer's disease have disturbed interpretation of monocular as well as binocular depth cues. This information could lead to optic interventions to improve their visual depth perception.

  5. Pharmacogenomics in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for 10-20% of direct costs, and fewer than 20% of AD patients are moderate responders to conventional drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, memantine), with doubtful cost-effectiveness. Both AD pathogenesis and drug metabolism are genetically regulated complex traits in which hundreds of genes cooperatively participate. Structural genomics studies demonstrated that more than 200 genes might be involved in AD pathogenesis regulating dysfunctional genetic networks leading to premature neuronal death. The AD population exhibits a higher genetic variation rate than the control population, with absolute and relative genetic variations of 40-60% and 0.85-1.89%, respectively. AD patients also differ in their genomic architecture from patients with other forms of dementia. Functional genomics studies in AD revealed that age of onset, brain atrophy, cerebrovascular hemodynamics, brain bioelectrical activity, cognitive decline, apoptosis, immune function, lipid metabolism dyshomeostasis, and amyloid deposition are associated with AD-related genes. Pioneering pharmacogenomics studies also demonstrated that the therapeutic response in AD is genotype-specific, with apolipoprotein E (APOE) 4/4 carriers the worst responders to conventional treatments. About 10-20% of Caucasians are carriers of defective cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 polymorphic variants that alter the metabolism and effects of AD drugs and many psychotropic agents currently administered to patients with dementia. There is a moderate accumulation of AD-related genetic variants of risk in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PMs) and ultrarapid metabolizers (UMs), who are the worst responders to conventional drugs. The association of the APOE-4 allele with specific genetic variants of other genes (e.g., CYP2D6, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]) negatively modulates the therapeutic response to multifactorial treatments affecting cognition, mood, and behavior

  6. Coping & Caring: Living with Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Charles

    This guide on Alzheimer's disease is for those who care for Alzheimer's patients, as well as those who want to learn more about the disease. It answers these questions: (1) what is Alzheimer's? (2) how does the disease progress and how long does it last? (3) how do families cope? and (4) who can provide assistance and information? The guide also…

  7. [Aluminum, hypothetic cause of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Pailler, F M; Bequet, D; Corbé, H; Giudicelli, C P

    1995-03-11

    A great deal of research has focused on aluminium as a putative causative factor in Alzheimer's disease. We measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry aluminium levels in blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid from 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease, compared with 20 control individuals. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. This suggests that aluminium is not a causative factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Coping & Caring: Living with Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Charles

    This guide on Alzheimer's disease is for those who care for Alzheimer's patients, as well as those who want to learn more about the disease. It answers these questions: (1) what is Alzheimer's? (2) how does the disease progress and how long does it last? (3) how do families cope? and (4) who can provide assistance and information? The guide also…

  9. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  10. Posture Recognition in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozaz, Maria; Garaigordobil, Maite; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Anderson, Jeffrey; Crucian, Gregory P.; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is neurologically induced deficit in the ability perform purposeful skilled movements. One of the most common forms is ideomotor apraxia (IMA) where spatial and temporal production errors are most prevalent. IMA can be associated Alzheimer's disease (AD), even early in its course, but is often not identified possibly because…

  11. Caregiver Response to Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Mark; Guest, Carol

    1989-01-01

    Examined correlates of caregiver burden among 30 caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients. Results revealed no significant correlation between length of time a caregiver had given care to a particular patient and the caregiver's subjective feelings of caregiver burden. Found significant, moderate correlation between caregiver burden and patient…

  12. Posture Recognition in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozaz, Maria; Garaigordobil, Maite; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Anderson, Jeffrey; Crucian, Gregory P.; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is neurologically induced deficit in the ability perform purposeful skilled movements. One of the most common forms is ideomotor apraxia (IMA) where spatial and temporal production errors are most prevalent. IMA can be associated Alzheimer's disease (AD), even early in its course, but is often not identified possibly because…

  13. Genetic heterogeneity and Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Bird, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    In some early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) families, inheritance is autosomal dominant. (Early-onset AD is arbitarily defined as onset at {le} 60 years.) Two loci have been identified which are causative for early-onset familial AD (FAD). One is the amyloid precursor protein gene in which specific mutation have been identified. The second is a locus at 14q24.3 (AD3) which has been localized by linkage analysis; the gene and specific mutations have not been identified. Linkage studies place this locus between D14S61 and D14S63. These 2 loci, however, do not account for all early-onset FAD. The Volga German (VG) kindreds are descendants of families which emigrated from Germany to the Volga river region of Russia and subsequently to the US; AD in these families is hypothesized to be the result of a common genetic founder. The average age-at-onset in these families is 57 years. Linkage analysis for this group has been negative for the APP gene and for chromosome 14 markers. Thus, there is at least 1 other early-onset FAD locus. Recently, the {epsilon}4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) was identified as a risk-factor for late-onset AD. In a series of 53 late-onset kindreds, a strong genetic association was observed between the ApoE {epsilon}4 allele and AD. However, when linkage analysis was performed using a highly polymorphic locus at the ApoCII gene, which is within 30 kb of ApoE, significant evidence for co-segregation was not observed. This and other data suggests that while ApoE is an age-at-onset modifying locus, another gene(s), located elsewhere, contribute(s) to late-onset AD. Thus, there is probably at least 1 other late-onset locus. Once the VG locus is identified, it will be possible to determine whether an allelic variant of this locus is responsible for late-onset FAD.

  14. Alzheimer's disease and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Alvargonzález, David

    2012-12-01

    Employing the tenets of philosophical materialism, this paper discusses the ethical debate surrounding assisted suicide for persons suffering end-stage Alzheimer's. It first presents a classification of the dissociative situations between "human individual" and "human person". It then moves on to discuss challenges to diagnosed persons and their caregivers in relation to the cardinal virtues of Spinozistic ethics--strength of character (fortitudo), firmness (animositas) and generosity (generositas). Finally, a number of ideas attached to the debate--"right of choice", "death with dignity", "quality of life" and "compassion in dying"--are discussed in order to clarify their foundations.

  15. [Nutritional status in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Machado, Jacqueline; Caram, Carmen Lucia Barreto; Frank, Andrea Abdala; Soares, Eliane de Abreu; Laks, Jerson

    2009-01-01

    To describe the nutritional status of elderly subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Subjects of both genders (n=40) diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, participated in the study. Socioeconomic status, activities of daily life, anthropometric, clinical and dietary profiles were surveyed. Of the total, 65% were female. More than 70% were capable of accomplishing daily activities by themselves. Subjects were eutrophic with a statistically significant difference of the arm circumference between the mild and moderate groups. As for illnesses secondary to Alzheimer's, 52% of the elderly presented hypertension, followed by arthrosis type alterations (17%). The mean consumption of energy and macronutrients in the elderly classified as mild dementia was of 1645 kcal, distributed in 53.7% of carbohydrate, 17.5% of proteins or 0.9 g/kg and 28.8% of lipids. For those classified as moderate dementia it was of 1482 kcal, distributed in 59.3% of carbohydrate, 16.1% of proteins and 24.6% of lipids. In this descriptive study of elderly outpatients with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease, most presented a nutritional status of eutrophy, with adequate dietary intake of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and vitamin C, but with low dietary intake of vitamin E.

  16. Immunotherapeutic Approaches to Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsonego, Alon; Weiner, Howard L.

    2003-10-01

    Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are not classically considered mediated by inflammation or the immune system, in some instances the immune system may play an important role in the degenerative process. Furthermore, it has become clear that the immune system itself may have beneficial effects in nervous system diseases considered neurodegenerative. Immunotherapeutic approaches designed to induce a humoral immune response have recently been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These studies have led to human trials that resulted in both beneficial and adverse effects. In animal models, it has also been shown that immunotherapy designed to induce a cellular immune response may be of benefit in central nervous system injury, although T cells may have either a beneficial or detrimental effect depending on the type of T cell response induced. These areas provide a new avenue for exploring immune system-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and will be discussed here with a primary focus on Alzheimer's disease. We will also discuss how these approaches affect microglia activation, which plays a key role in therapy of such diseases.

  17. Molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Christopher

    2005-11-01

    Molecular imaging represents a new term for a long-standing quest to image cellular and molecular processes in vivo. The development of a successful molecular imaging approach starts with a well-defined diagnostic question best answered using in vivo imaging. A selective target for a particular disease state is then identified and a biocompatible probe selective for that target is developed. Many of the challenges of finding selective disease targets and probes that bind selectively to those targets in vivo are evident in the 25-year history of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease. This article provides a brief overview of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease and its potential for early diagnosis and treatment development.

  18. Animal models of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    LaFerla, Frank M; Green, Kim N

    2012-11-01

    Significant insights into the function of genes associated with Alzheimer disease and related dementias have occurred through studying genetically modified animals. Although none of the existing models fully reproduces the complete spectrum of this insidious human disease, critical aspects of Alzheimer pathology and disease processes can be experimentally recapitulated. Genetically modified animal models have helped advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease and have proven to be invaluable in the preclinical evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. Continuing refinement and evolution to yield the next generation of animal models will facilitate successes in producing greater translational concordance between preclinical studies and human clinical trials and eventually lead to the introduction of novel therapies into clinical practice.

  19. Role of methylglyoxal in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Zambonin, Laura; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder. The major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are extracellular aggregation of amyloid β peptides and, the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles formed by precipitation/aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is multifactorial and a full understanding of its pathogenesis remains elusive. Some years ago, it has been suggested that glycation may contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Glycation is an endogenous process that leads to the production of a class of compounds known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Interestingly, increased levels of AGEs have been observed in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methylglyoxal, a reactive intermediate of cellular metabolism, is the most potent precursor of AGEs and is strictly correlated with an increase of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Many studies are showing that methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Lyme disease associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meer-Scherrer, Laurence; Chang Loa, Chien; Adelson, Martin E; Mordechai, Eli; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Fallon, Brian A; Tilton, Richard C

    2006-04-01

    This case report discusses a patient with co-occurring neuroborreliosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although no claim is made for causality nor is there objective evidence that spirochetes are involved in AD, co-infection may exacerbate the symptoms of either neuroborreliosis or AD. Much is to be learned about the role of spirochetes in degenerative central nervous system disease.

  1. Genetic insights in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Karolien; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new genes in Alzheimer's disease, classic linkage-based and candidate-gene-based association studies have been supplanted by exome sequencing, genome-wide sequencing (for mendelian forms of Alzheimer's disease), and genome-wide association studies (for non-mendelian forms). The identification of new susceptibility genes has opened new avenues for exploration of the underlying disease mechanisms. In addition to detecting novel risk factors in large samples, next-generation sequencing approaches can deliver novel insights with even small numbers of patients. The shift in focus towards translational studies and sequencing of individual patients places each patient's biomaterials as the central unit of genetic studies. The notional shift needed to make the patient central to genetic studies will necessitate strong collaboration and input from clinical neurologists.

  2. Alzheimer's Disease: Burdens and Problems for Victims and Their Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session (October 28, 1985, Elizabeth, NJ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witness testimonies from the Congressional hearing called to examine the problem of Alzheimer's disease. Opening statements are included from Congressmen Rinaldo, Courter, and Saxton, and from Tom Dunn, the mayor of Elizabeth, New Jersey where the hearing was held. J. Richard Goldstein, New Jersey State Commissioner of…

  3. Physical Mistreatment in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    VandeWeerd, Carla; Paveza, Gregory J.; Walsh, Margaret; Corvin, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Physical mistreatment has been estimated to affect 2 million older persons each year and dramatically affects health outcomes. While researchers have attempted to examine risk factors for specific forms of abuse, many have been able to focus on only victim or perpetrator characteristics, or a limited number of psychosocial variables at any one time. Additionally, data on risk factors for subgroups such as persons with Alzheimer's disease who may have heightened and/or unique risk profiles has also been limited. This paper examines risk for physical violence in caregiver/patient dyads who participated in the Aggression and Violence in Community-Based Alzheimer's Families Grant. Data were collected via in-person interview and mailed survey and included demographics as well as measures of violence, physical and emotional health, and health behaviors. Logistic regression analysis indicated that caregivers providing care to elders with high levels of functional impairment or dementia symptoms, or who had alcohol problems, were more likely to use violence as a conflict resolution strategy, as were caregivers who were providing care to elders who used violence against them. By contrast, caregivers with high self-esteem were less likely to use violence as a conflict resolution strategy. Significant interaction effects were also noted. PMID:23577255

  4. Ocular biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heaton, George R; Davis, Benjamin M; Turner, Lisa A; Cordeiro, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterised clinically by a progressive decline in executive functions, memory and cognition. Classic neuropathological hallmarks of AD include intracellular hyper-phosphorylated tau protein which forms neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), and extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) protein, the primary constituent of senile plaques (SP). The gradual process of pathogenic amyloid accumulation is thought to occur 10-20 years prior to symptomatic manifestation. Advance detection of these deposits therefore offers a highly promising avenue for prodromal AD diagnosis. Currently, the most sophisticated method of 'probable AD' diagnosis is via neuroimaging or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analysis. Whilst these methods have reported a high degree of diagnostic specificity and accuracy, they fall significantly short in terms of practicality; they are often highly invasive, expensive or unsuitable for large-scale population screening. In recent years, ocular screening has received substantial attention from the scientific community due to its potential for non-invasive and inexpensive central nervous system (CNS) imaging. In this appraisal we build upon our previous reviews detailing ocular structural and functional changes in AD (Retinal manifestations of Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Retinal Neurodegeneration) and consider their use as biomarkers. In addition, we present an overview of current advances in the use of fluorescent reporters to detect AD pathology through non-invasive retinal imaging.

  5. Alternative Medicine and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Knopman, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine has an extensive worldwide history and is commonly used by older patients. A number of different alternative medicines are used by patients having Alzheimer's disease. It is both desirable and expected for clinicians to be acquainted with these medications. Review Summary This paper discusses the available clinical trial evidence regarding eight agents commonly used by people having Alzheimer's disease. We provide an overview of the history and basic scientific evidence available for each agent, followed by a critical analysis of the evidence available from clinical trials, including the number of participants, trial duration and specific outcomes evaluated. Conclusion While many of these compounds have been associated with interesting basic science, none has shown clear clinical benefit to date. Data available for some, such as ginkgo biloba, curcumin and huperzine A, suggest that further evaluation is warranted. Familiarity with this literature will allow clinicians to provide meaningful recommendations to patients who wish to use these agents. PMID:18784599

  6. Alzheimer's as a metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd A; Driver, Jane

    2013-12-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of almost all cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence is reviewed supporting the general hypothesis that the up-regulation of OxPhos activity, a metabolic response to mitochondrial dysregulation, drives the cascade of events leading to AD. This mode of metabolic alteration, called the Inverse Warburg effect, is postulated as an essential compensatory mechanism of energy production to maintain the viability of impaired neuronal cells. This article appeals to the inverse comorbidity of cancer and AD to show that the amyloid hypothesis, a genetic and neuron-centric model of the origin of sporadic forms of AD, is not consistent with epidemiological data concerning the age-incidence rates of AD. A view of Alzheimer's as a metabolic disease-a condition consistent with mitochondrial dysregulation and the Inverse Warburg effect, will entail a radically new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Alzheimer disease: focus on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately 5.3 million Americans. This debilitating disease is marked by memory loss, confusion, and loss of cognitive ability. The exact cause of Alzheimer disease is unknown although research suggests that it might result from a combination of factors. The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Radiologic imaging can help physicians detect these structural characteristics and monitor disease progression and brain function. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered first-line imaging modalities for the routine evaluation of Alzheimer disease.

  8. Alzheimer's disease: risk and protection.

    PubMed

    Jorm, A F

    1997-10-20

    Only four risk factors for Alzheimer's disease can be regarded as confirmed--old age, family history of dementia, apo-E genotype and Down syndrome. Other disputed risk factors with some supporting evidence include ethnic group, head trauma and aluminium in drinking water. Possible protection factors, such as anti-inflammatory drugs, oestrogen replacement therapy and a high education level, are of great interest because they suggest possible preventive action.

  9. Cellular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD.

  10. Rodent models of neuroinflammation for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazem, Amir; Sankowski, Roman; Bacher, Michael; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease remains incurable, and the failures of current disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's disease could be attributed to a lack of in vivo models that recapitulate the underlying etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease is not based on mutations related to amyloid-β (Aβ) or tau production which are currently the basis of in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease. It has recently been suggested that mechanisms like chronic neuroinflammation may occur prior to amyloid-β and tau pathologies in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of rodent models of neuroinflammation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Our search criteria were based on characteristics of an idealistic disease model that should recapitulate causes, symptoms, and lesions in a chronological order similar to the actual disease. Therefore, a model based on the inflammation hypothesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease should include the following features: (i) primary chronic neuroinflammation, (ii) manifestations of memory and cognitive impairment, and (iii) late development of tau and Aβ pathologies. The following models fit the pre-defined criteria: lipopolysaccharide- and PolyI:C-induced models of immune challenge; streptozotocin-, okadaic acid-, and colchicine neurotoxin-induced neuroinflammation models, as well as interleukin-1β, anti-nerve growth factor and p25 transgenic models. Among these models, streptozotocin, PolyI:C-induced, and p25 neuroinflammation models are compatible with the inflammation hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Progress Report on Alzheimer Disease: Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This report summarizes advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease, the major cause of mental disability among older Americans. The demography of the disease is discussed, noting that approximately 2.5 million American adults are afflicted with the disease and that the large increase in the number of Alzheimer's disease patients is due to…

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    MedlinePlus

    ... date on the latest news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with ... is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272- ...

  13. Alzheimer disease: update on basic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaoning

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia in the aged population. Pathologically, Alzheimer disease is characterized by progressive synaptic and neuronal loss and the presence of diagnostic amyloid plaques, consisting of fibril b-amyloid peptide aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau protein filaments. Although plaques and tangles were originally considered the mediators of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer disease, recent research has underscored the roles of soluble β-amyloid oligomers and tau molecules. Furthermore, new evidence has re-emphasized the important roles of endocytic, autophagic, and lysosomal pathways in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis-including the finding that deficiency or mutations in the gene that encodes presenilin 1 (the most common cause for early-onset familial Alzheimer disease) impairs the maturation of the lysosomal proton pump. The author discusses recent developments in the perspective of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic interventions.

  14. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Tau immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2015-06-01

    Targeting pathological tau protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies has shown great potential in animal models. Given that tau lesions correlate better with the degree of dementia than do amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, their clearance may be clinically more efficacious than removing Aβ when cognitive deficits become evident in AD. Several complementary mechanisms of antibody-mediated removal of tau aggregates are likely to act in concert and the importance of each one may depend on antibody properties, the disease, and its stage. Clinical trials of tau immunotherapy are already underway and several more are likely to be initiated in the near future.

  16. Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Aimee L; Bullain, Szofia S; Kawas, Claudia H

    2017-05-01

    The oldest-old represent the fastest growing segment of society, and the risk of developing dementia continues to increase with advancing age into the 9th and 10th decades of life. The most common form of dementia in the oldest-old is Alzheimer disease (AD), although there are often mixed pathologies contributing to dementia in addition to amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Diagnosing AD in the oldest-old is challenging due to cognitive and physical changes associated with aging. Treatment remains supportive, with current approved medications able to provide modest symptomatic benefit but unable to slow the progression of disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacotherapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Yif'at; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I; Adlard, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by an increasing impairment in normal memory and cognitive processes that significantly diminishes a person's daily functioning. Despite decades of research and advances in our understanding of disease aetiology and pathogenesis, there are still no effective disease-modifying drugs available for the treatment of AD. However, numerous compounds are currently undergoing pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. These candidate pharma-cotherapeutics are aimed at various aspects of the disease, such as the microtubule-associated τ-protein, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and metal ion dyshomeostasis – all of which are involved in the development and progression of AD. We will review the way these pharmacological strategies target the biochemical and clinical features of the disease and the investigational drugs for each category. PMID:19040415

  18. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall ... the public to the early warning signs of Alzheimer's disease. If someone has several or even most of ...

  19. Alzheimer disease and its management: a review.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Malay K; Wilson, B; Santhi, K; Kumar, K P Sampath; Suresh, B

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a progressive degenerative disorder of the brain characterized by a slow, progressive decline in cognitive function and behavior. As the disease advances, persons with Alzheimer disease have tough time with daily usage of things like using the phone, cooking, handling money, or driving the car. The disease is more common in elder population. It is estimated that Alzheimer disease affects 15 million people worldwide and approximately 4 million Americans. The clinical features of Alzheimer disease overlaps with common signs of aging, and other types of dementia, hence the diagnosis remains difficult. The neuropathologic hallmarks of the disorder are amyloid-rich senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal degeneration. Drugs approved for treating Alzheimer disease include acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. Caregivers not getting adequate information about Alzheimer disease may believe that nothing can be done to manage its symptoms. Understanding the extent of Alzheimer disease related knowledge can assist disease management that result in improved disease management and reduced care costs. This article attempts to focus on some of the important recent developments in understanding and management of Alzheimer disease.

  20. Preventing schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease: comparative ethics.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    2001-08-01

    Schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease are both diseases of the brain that involve genetic susceptibility factors and for which the prevention or delay of symptom onset are important research goals. This paper provides some comparisons between current preventive efforts in schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease, focusing on certain ethical features of these endeavors such as potential discrimination, misdiagnosis, and stigma.

  1. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    Loss of memory is among the first symptoms reported by patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by their caretakers. Working memory and long-term declarative memory are affected early during the course of the disease. The individual pattern of impaired memory functions correlates with parameters of structural or functional brain integrity. AD pathology interferes with the formation of memories from the molecular level to the framework of neural networks. The investigation of AD memory loss helps to identify the involved neural structures, such as the default mode network, the influence of epigenetic and genetic factors, such as ApoE4 status, and evolutionary aspects of human cognition. Clinically, the analysis of memory assists the definition of AD subtypes, disease grading, and prognostic predictions. Despite new AD criteria that allow the earlier diagnosis of the disease by inclusion of biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid or hippocampal volume analysis, neuropsychological testing remains at the core of AD diagnosis.

  2. Genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Yann S; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally.

  3. Genetic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mineur, Yann S.; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E.; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally. PMID:16444901

  4. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form ...

  5. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  6. Molecular neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Masters, C L; Beyreuther, K

    1995-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by the aberrant metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and is consequently associated with the accumulation of one of its degradation products, the beta A4 amyloid protein. The proteases (secretases) which generate beta A4 from APP are now being defined, as is the normal function of APP. How neurons degenerate in AD remains unexplained, but is of central importance in developing new therapeutic approaches. While the genetic factors which contribute to the aberrant metabolism of APP are now being elucidated, the environmental factors which exacerbate this process are unknown.

  7. Physiology of the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hahr, Jung Y

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a disease that is resulted from increased plasma osmolality both the excessive consumption of animal-based proteins and reduction of sodium intake, that resulted to increase plasma osmolality. When we are exposed to high animal-based protein diets throughout life, we gradually lose extracellular sodium and the body cannot retain water, resulting in a gradual rise of plasma osmolality. When the neuronal cells of the central nervous system are exposed to high osmolality stress, they produce of phosphorylated tau, APP, and pathologic beta amyloid protein peptides. The BACE 1 protein which influences the cleavage of amyloid precursor proteins (APP) and affects the production of beta amyloid protein peptides, is also increased in a hyperosmotic stress. When pathologic beta amyloid protein peptides are produced, they are degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome proteolytic pathway, and only then are the neurotoxic effects on the central nervous system manifested, leading to Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging concepts in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vinters, Harry V

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease/senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD/SDAT) is the most common neuropathologic substrate of dementia. It is characterized by synapse loss (predominantly within neocortex) as well as deposition of certain distinctive lesions (the result of protein misfolding) throughout the brain. The latter include senile plaques, composed mainly of an amyloid (Aβ) core and a neuritic component; neurofibrillary tangles, composed predominantly of hyperphosphorylated tau; and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a microangiopathy affecting both cerebral cortical capillaries and arterioles and resulting from Aβ deposition within their walls or (in the case of capillaries) immediately adjacent brain parenchyma. In this article, I discuss the hypothesized role these lesions play in causing cerebral dysfunction, as well as CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers (for dementia) that are especially relevant as immunotherapeutic approaches are being developed to remove Aβ from the brain parenchyma. In addition, I address the role of neuropathology in characterizing the sequelae of new AD/SDAT therapies and helping to validate CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers of disease. Comorbidity of AD/SDAT and various types of cerebrovascular disease is a major theme in dementia research, especially as cognitive impairment develops in the oldest old, who are especially vulnerable to ischemic and hemorrhagic brain lesions.

  9. Context Memory in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    El Haj, Mohamad; Kessels, Roy P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function. Summary Context recall, an element of episodic memory, refers to remembering the context in which an event has occurred, such as from whom or to whom information has been transmitted. Key Messages Our review raises crucial questions. For example, (1) which context element is more prone to being forgotten in the disease? (2) How do AD patients fail to bind context features together? (3) May distinctiveness heuristic or decisions based on metacognitive expectations improve context retrieval in these patients? (4) How does cueing at retrieval enhance reinstating of encoding context in AD? By addressing these questions, our work contributes to the understanding of the memory deficits in AD. PMID:24403906

  10. Golgi fragmentation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gunjan; Bekier, Michael E.; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is an essential cellular organelle for post-translational modifications, sorting, and trafficking of membrane and secretory proteins. Proper functionality of the Golgi requires the formation of its unique cisternal-stacking morphology. The Golgi structure is disrupted in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting a common mechanism and contribution of Golgi defects in neurodegenerative disorders. A recent study on Alzheimer's disease (AD) revealed that phosphorylation of the Golgi stacking protein GRASP65 disrupts its function in Golgi structure formation, resulting in Golgi fragmentation. Inhibiting GRASP65 phosphorylation restores the Golgi morphology from Aβ-induced fragmentation and reduces Aβ production. Perturbing Golgi structure and function in neurons may directly impact trafficking, processing, and sorting of a variety of proteins essential for synaptic and dendritic integrity. Therefore, Golgi defects may ultimately promote the development of AD. In the current review, we focus on the cellular impact of impaired Golgi morphology and its potential relationship to AD disease development. PMID:26441511

  11. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  12. Brain imaging in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keith A; Fox, Nick C; Sperling, Reisa A; Klunk, William E

    2012-04-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies.

  13. Emerging ocular biomarkers of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Peter; Hadoux, Xavier; Alwan, Mostafa; Keel, Stuart; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Interest in reliable biomarkers of Alzheimer disease, the leading cause of dementia, has been fuelled by challenges in diagnosing the disease and monitoring disease progression as well as the response to therapy. A range of ocular manifestations of Alzheimer disease, including retinal and lens amyloid-beta accumulation, retinal nerve fiber layer loss, and retinal vascular changes, have been proposed as potential biomarkers of the disease. Herein, we examine the evidence regarding the potential value of these ocular biomarkers of Alzheimer disease. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  14. Sundowning and circadian rhythms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Volicer, L; Harper, D G; Manning, B C; Goldstein, R; Satlin, A

    2001-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine changes of circadian rhythms induced by Alzheimer's disease and to explore relationships among rhythm disturbances, sundowning, and sleep disturbances in patients with Alzheimer's disease. "Sundowning" is the occurrence or exacerbation of behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in the afternoon and evening. Circadian rhythms of core body temperature and motor activity were measured in 25 patients with diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease and in nine healthy individuals. The subjects with Alzheimer's disease were divided according to the occurrence of sundowning as determined by staff reports. The subjects with Alzheimer's disease had less diurnal motor activity, a higher percentage of nocturnal activity, lower interdaily stability of motor activity, and a later activity acrophase (time of peak) than did the healthy individuals. They also had a higher mesor (fitted mean) temperature, higher amplitude of the fitted cosine temperature curve, and later temperature acrophase than did the healthy subjects. The severity of sundowning was associated with later acrophase of temperature, less correlation of circadian temperature rhythm with a 24-hour cycle, and lower amplitude of temperature curve. These data indicate that Alzheimer's disease causes disturbances of circadian rhythms and that sundowning is related to a phase delay of body temperature caused by Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Plasma tau in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Janelidze, Shorena; Insel, Philip S; Andreasson, Ulf; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Baker, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A; Jeromin, Andreas; Hanlon, David; Song, Linan; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-10-25

    To test whether plasma tau is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) and whether it is related to changes in cognition, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (including β-amyloid [Aβ] and tau), brain atrophy, and brain metabolism. This was a study of plasma tau in prospectively followed patients with AD (n = 179), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 195), and cognitive healthy controls (n = 189) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and cross-sectionally studied patients with AD (n = 61), mild cognitive impairment (n = 212), and subjective cognitive decline (n = 174) and controls (n = 274) from the Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably (BioFINDER) study at Lund University, Sweden. A total of 1284 participants were studied. Associations were tested between plasma tau and diagnosis, CSF biomarkers, MRI measures, (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and cognition. Higher plasma tau was associated with AD dementia, higher CSF tau, and lower CSF Aβ42, but the correlations were weak and differed between ADNI and BioFINDER. Longitudinal analysis in ADNI showed significant associations between plasma tau and worse cognition, more atrophy, and more hypometabolism during follow-up. Plasma tau partly reflects AD pathology, but the overlap between normal aging and AD is large, especially in patients without dementia. Despite group-level differences, these results do not support plasma tau as an AD biomarker in individual people. Future studies may test longitudinal plasma tau measurements in AD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Plasma tau in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Janelidze, Shorena; Insel, Philip S.; Andreasson, Ulf; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Baker, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Jeromin, Andreas; Hanlon, David; Song, Linan; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test whether plasma tau is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) and whether it is related to changes in cognition, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (including β-amyloid [Aβ] and tau), brain atrophy, and brain metabolism. Methods: This was a study of plasma tau in prospectively followed patients with AD (n = 179), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 195), and cognitive healthy controls (n = 189) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and cross-sectionally studied patients with AD (n = 61), mild cognitive impairment (n = 212), and subjective cognitive decline (n = 174) and controls (n = 274) from the Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably (BioFINDER) study at Lund University, Sweden. A total of 1284 participants were studied. Associations were tested between plasma tau and diagnosis, CSF biomarkers, MRI measures, 18fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and cognition. Results: Higher plasma tau was associated with AD dementia, higher CSF tau, and lower CSF Aβ42, but the correlations were weak and differed between ADNI and BioFINDER. Longitudinal analysis in ADNI showed significant associations between plasma tau and worse cognition, more atrophy, and more hypometabolism during follow-up. Conclusions: Plasma tau partly reflects AD pathology, but the overlap between normal aging and AD is large, especially in patients without dementia. Despite group-level differences, these results do not support plasma tau as an AD biomarker in individual people. Future studies may test longitudinal plasma tau measurements in AD. PMID:27694257

  17. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  18. [Alzheimer's disease: New therapeutic strategies].

    PubMed

    Villegas, Sandra

    2015-07-20

    The rapid increase in prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease means that treatments to prevent, stop or reverse this devastating disease are urgently needed. Despite advances in understanding its molecular pathology, there are no drugs that can halt its progression. This review takes a tour through phase 2, or higher studies, probing receptor agonist agents interfering with aggregation, inhibitors/modulators of secretases, lipid-lowering agents, and, finally and most extensively, immunotherapy. The fact that phase 3 studies with bapineuzumab and solaneuzumab have recently failed does not invalidate the potential of immunotherapy, as more information is available and new clinical trials are being initiated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomarkers for preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen-Chen; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a pressing need to shift the focus to accurate detection of the earliest phase of increasingly preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Meanwhile, the growing recognition that the pathophysiological process of AD begins many years prior to clinically obvious symptoms and the concept of a presymptomatic or preclinical stage of AD are becoming more widely accepted. Advances in clinical identification of new measurements will be critical not only in the discovery of sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers of preclinical AD but also in the development of tests that will aid in the early detection and differential diagnosis of dementia and in monitoring disease progression. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of biomarkers for preclinical AD, with emphasis on neuroimaging and neurochemical biomarkers. We conclude with a discussion of emergent directions for AD biomarker research.

  20. [Gene therapy and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Zhou, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid in the senile plaques, intracellular aggregates of abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein in the neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. The manifestations of clinical symptoms include memory impairment, cognitive decline, altered behavior and language deficit. Currently available drugs in AD therapy consist of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, NMDA receptor antagonists, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, etc. These drugs can only alleviate the symptoms of AD. Gene therapy is achieved by vector-mediated gene transfer technology, which can delivery DNA or RNA into target cells to promote the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein and silence certain virulence genes.

  1. Facilitating Alzheimer disease research recruitment.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Galvin, James E

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) research faces challenges to successful enrollment, especially to clinical trials and biomarker studies. Failure to recruit the planned number of participants in a timely manner threatens the internal validity and success of clinical research, raising concerns about external validity and generalizability of results, and possibly leading to disparities in disease treatment. Methods to improve recruitment exist, but require varying levels of staff effort and financial resources, and evidence of effectiveness is often lacking or inconsistent. In this review, we summarize some of the available methods to improve AD research recruitment, the available literature to support or refute these strategies, and some of the experiences at the authors' AD Research Centers. We discuss the use of community-based participatory research principles and participant registries as a means to enhance research enrollment and increase diversity of research samples.

  2. Emerging therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Karen; Koo, Edward H

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of intense research, therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still limited to symptomatic treatments that possess only short-term efficacy. Recently, several large-scale Phase III trials targeting amyloid-β production or clearance have failed to show efficacy, leading to a reexamination of the amyloid hypothesis as well as highlighting the need to explore alternatives in both clinical testing strategies and drug discovery targets. In this review, we discuss therapeutics currently being tested in clinical trials and up-and-coming interventions that have shown promise in animal models, devoting attention to the mechanisms that may underlie their ability to influence disease progression and placing particular emphasis on tau therapeutics.

  3. Neuropathological Alterations in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) include “positive” lesions such as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neurofibrillary tangles, and glial responses, and “negative” lesions such as neuronal and synaptic loss. Despite their inherently cross-sectional nature, postmortem studies have enabled the staging of the progression of both amyloid and tangle pathologies, and, consequently, the development of diagnostic criteria that are now used worldwide. In addition, clinicopathological correlation studies have been crucial to generate hypotheses about the pathophysiology of the disease, by establishing that there is a continuum between “normal” aging and AD dementia, and that the amyloid plaque build-up occurs primarily before the onset of cognitive deficits, while neurofibrillary tangles, neuron loss, and particularly synaptic loss, parallel the progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, these cross-sectional neuropathological data have been largely validated by longitudinal in vivo studies using modern imaging biomarkers such as amyloid PET and volumetric MRI. PMID:22229116

  4. Fluid Biomarkers in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fagan, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Research progress has provided detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This knowledge has been translated into new drug candidates with putative disease-modifying effects, which are now being tested in clinical trials. The promise of effective therapy has created a great need for biomarkers able to detect AD in the predementia phase, because drugs will probably be effective only if neurodegeneration is not too advanced. In this chapter, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma biomarkers are reviewed. The core CSF biomarkers total tau (T-tau), phosphorylated tau (P-tau) and the 42 amino acid form of β-amyloid (Aβ42) reflect AD pathology, and have high diagnostic accuracy to diagnose AD with dementia and prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment cases. The rationale for the use of CSF biomarkers to identify and monitor the mechanism of action of new drug candidates is also outlined in this chapter. PMID:22951438

  5. Fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fagan, Anne M

    2012-09-01

    Research progress has provided detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This knowledge has been translated into new drug candidates with putative disease-modifying effects, which are now being tested in clinical trials. The promise of effective therapy has created a great need for biomarkers able to detect AD in the predementia phase, because drugs will probably be effective only if neurodegeneration is not too advanced. In this chapter, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma biomarkers are reviewed. The core CSF biomarkers total tau (T-tau), phosphorylated tau (P-tau) and the 42 amino acid form of β-amyloid (Aβ42) reflect AD pathology, and have high diagnostic accuracy to diagnose AD with dementia and prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment cases. The rationale for the use of CSF biomarkers to identify and monitor the mechanism of action of new drug candidates is also outlined in this chapter.

  6. Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Shi, Jessica; Yaeger, Devin M; Ager, Rahasson; LaFerla, Frank M

    2016-05-01

    Despite intensive research efforts over the past few decades, the mechanisms underlying the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unknown. This fact is of major concern because the number of patients affected by this medical condition is increasing exponentially and the existing treatments are only palliative in nature and offer no disease modifying affects. Interestingly, recent epidemiological studies indicate that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing AD, suggesting that diabetes may play a causative role in the development of AD pathogenesis. Therefore, elucidating the molecular interactions between diabetes and AD is of critical significance because it might offer a novel approach to identifying mechanisms that may modulate the onset and progression of sporadic AD cases. This review highlights the involvement of several novels pathological molecular mechanisms induced by diabetes that increase AD pathogenesis. Furthermore, we discuss novel findings in animal model and clinical studies involving the use of anti-diabetic compounds as promising therapeutics for AD.

  7. What Are the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents It's important to know the signs of Alzheimer's disease. If you know the signs, you can get help right away. Some signs of the disease are listed here: Diagnosis Doctors now have several methods and tools to ...

  8. Genetic Aspects of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Jennifer; Goldman, Jill; Marder, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a genetically complex disorder. Mutations in 3 genes, presenilin 1, amyloid precursor protein, and presenilin 2, lead to early-onset familial AD in rare families with onset of disease occurring prior to age 65. Specific polymorphisms in apolipoprotein E are associated with the more common, late-onset AD occurring after age 65. In this review, we discuss current advances in AD genetics, the implications of the known AD genes, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, amyloid precursor protein, and apolipoprotein E, and other possible genes on the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling of patients and families with early- and late-onset AD. Review Summary In addition to the mutations in 4 known genes associated with AD, mutations in other genes may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Most recently, 2 different research groups have reported genetic association between 2 genes, sortilin-related receptor and GAB2, and AD. These associations have not changed the diagnostic and medical management of AD. Conclusions New research in the genetics of AD have implicated novel genes as having a role in the disease, but these findings have not been replicated nor have specific disease causing mutations been identified. To date, clinical genetic testing is limited to familial early-onset disease for symptomatic individuals and asymptomatic relatives and, although not recommended, amyloid precursor protein apolipoprotein E testing as an adjunct to diagnosis of symptomatic individuals. PMID:19276785

  9. Alzheimer's disease: insights from epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McDowell, I

    2001-06-01

    While a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains elusive, many conclusions can be drawn from the numerous epidemiological studies undertaken to date. Prevalence and incidence estimates show consistency, following a roughly exponential pattern with a doubling of both parameters roughly every five years after age 65. Roughly 7% of the population aged 65 and over has AD. The clinical course of the disease is reasonably well established and mortality rates rise with increasing levels of cognitive deficit. Four risk factors for AD are firmly established: increasing age, the presence of the apolipoproteinE-epsilon4 allele, familial aggregation of cases, and Down's syndrome. Numerous other associations have been shown in some studies, but not in others. For example, women generally appear at higher risk than men, as do people with lower levels of education; depression is probably prodromal; head injury is an established risk factor, and may interact with the apoE gene; several occupational exposures appear hazardous, and exposure to aluminum in the water supply confers excess risk. Hypertension and other vascular symptoms appear to predispose to AD, which is now seen as nosologically closer to vascular dementia than was previously believed. Several apparently protective factors have been identified, although preventive trials based on these have so far shown minimal effectiveness. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to treat arthritis is associated with a reduced risk of AD, as is estrogen use by post-menopausal women. Physical activity appears beneficial, as does a diet with high levels of vitamins B6, B12 and folate. while red wine in moderate quantities appears protective. This review concludes with a discussion of the strengths and limitations of current epidemiological methods for studying Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Current and future treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salloway, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    There are currently >5 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. That prevalence rate is expected to triple as the population ages. The health and economic burden due to Alzheimer's disease is a worldwide problem, with some of the greatest burden coming from the developing world as people live longer in those societies. Throughout the world, the projected growth of Alzheimer's disease is dramatic. This is a worldwide public health problem of the highest order, and there is a compelling need to develop new treatments and methods of earlier diagnosis need to slow the progression of the disease and lessen its impact.

  11. Role of Methylglyoxal in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder. The major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are extracellular aggregation of amyloid β peptides and, the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles formed by precipitation/aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is multifactorial and a full understanding of its pathogenesis remains elusive. Some years ago, it has been suggested that glycation may contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Glycation is an endogenous process that leads to the production of a class of compounds known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Interestingly, increased levels of AGEs have been observed in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methylglyoxal, a reactive intermediate of cellular metabolism, is the most potent precursor of AGEs and is strictly correlated with an increase of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Many studies are showing that methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24734229

  12. Lipofuscin Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giaccone, Giorgio; Orsi, Laura; Cupidi, Chiara; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The primary culprit responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unknown. Aβ protein has been identified as the main component of amyloid of senile plaques, the hallmark lesion of AD, but it is not definitively established whether the formation of extracellular Aβ deposits is the absolute harbinger of the series of pathological events that hit the brain in the course of sporadic AD. The aim of this paper is to draw attention to a relatively overlooked age-related product, lipofuscin, and advance the hypothesis that its release into the extracellular space following the death of neurons may substantially contribute to the formation of senile plaques. The presence of intraneuronal Aβ, similarities between AD and age-related macular degeneration, and the possible explanation of some of the unknown issues in AD suggest that this hypothesis should not be discarded out of hand. PMID:22545040

  13. [Alzheimer's disease as neurodegenerative disorder].

    PubMed

    Zabłocka, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very common progressive neurodegenerative disorder. AD patients are affected by cognitive and memory deterioration. Cerebral degeneration, with selective neuronal death induced by extracellular amyloid deposits in the form of senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of helical paired tau protein, is the best-studied pathological event related to AD. Presenilins and apolipoprotein E are other neurotoxic agents involved in the pathogenesis of AD. A large body evidence has shown that permanent activation of glial cells in the brains of AD patients promotes the production of excessive quantities of free radicals, nitric oxide, and cytokines which could be detrimental to neuronal cells. Damage to the blood-brain barrier by inflammatory processes result in the influx of peripheral immune system cells and local immune reactions. Inhibition of ROS and NO overproduction as well as endogenic regulation of cytokine induction could be of therapeutic importance and delay neurodegeneration in AD.

  14. Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Wang, Tao; Jin, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common neurodegenerative disorder, which associates with impaired cognition. Gut microbiota can modulate host brain function and behavior via microbiota-gut-brain axis, including cognitive behavior. Germ-free animals, antibiotics, probiotics intervention and diet can induce alterations of gut microbiota and gut physiology and also host cognitive behavior, increasing or decreasing risks of AD. The increased permeability of intestine and blood-brain barrier induced by gut microbiota disturbance will increase the incidence of neurodegeneration disorders. Gut microbial metabolites and their effects on host neurochemical changes may increase or decrease the risk of AD. Pathogenic microbes infection will also increase the risk of AD, and meanwhile, the onset of AD support the "hygiene hypothesis". All the results suggest that AD may begin in the gut, and is closely related to the imbalance of gut microbiota. Modulation of gut microbiota through personalized diet or beneficial microbiota intervention will probably become a new treatment for AD.

  15. APP processing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-wu; Thompson, Robert; Zhang, Han; Xu, Huaxi

    2011-01-07

    An important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the presence of extracellular senile plaques in the brain. Senile plaques are composed of aggregations of small peptides called β-amyloid (Aβ). Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that overproduction/aggregation of Aβ in the brain is a primary cause of AD and inhibition of Aβ generation has become a hot topic in AD research. Aβ is generated from β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavages first by β-secretase and then by γ-secretase complex. Alternatively, APP can be cleaved by α-secretase within the Aβ domain to release soluble APPα and preclude Aβ generation. Cleavage of APP by caspases may also contribute to AD pathologies. Therefore, understanding the metabolism/processing of APP is crucial for AD therapeutics. Here we review current knowledge of APP processing regulation as well as the patho/physiological functions of APP and its metabolites.

  16. Alzheimer's Disease: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Watson, W. J.; Seiden, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function from a previously established level, and is the most common cause of all the dementias. While the exact etiology remains to be determined, there are several theories about possible genetic, immunological, biochemical and viral causes. Clinical diagnosis is by exclusion of other established causes of dementia and requires a careful history, physical examination and, often, psychological testing. Definitive diagnosis is made at post-mortem, although some cases show none of the histological hallmarks such as neurofibrillary tangles or senile plaques. There is no effective preventive or therapeutic treatment. Symptomatic management includes pharmacotherapy, socialization, support for the patient and his family and, ultimately, institutionalization. Patients are best managed by an interdisciplinary team using community resources. PMID:21279077

  17. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F

    2017-05-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD), with onset in individuals younger than 65 years, although overshadowed by the more common late-onset AD (LOAD), differs significantly from LOAD. EOAD comprises approximately 5% of AD and is associated with delays in diagnosis, aggressive course, and age-related psychosocial needs. One source of confusion is that a substantial percentage of EOAD are phenotypic variants that differ from the usual memory-disordered presentation of typical AD. The management of EOAD is similar to that for LOAD, but special emphasis should be placed on targeting the specific cognitive areas involved and more age-appropriate psychosocial support and education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Finger agnosia in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shenal, Brian V; Jackson, Melissa D; Crucian, Gregory P; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if a deficit of finger naming (finger agnosia or anomia) is a sensitive test for Alzheimer disease (AD) and the best means of testing for finger agnosia. The subjects were 38 patients with AD and 10 matched normal controls. All subjects were asked to name the thumb, index, and pinky fingers. No control subject had trouble naming any of these fingers, but 37% of the AD subjects did. When AD patients had difficulty with finger naming, they always had trouble naming the index finger. In the absence of stroke, the inability to name the index finger seems as an indicator of dementia. Although brief, this test is not extremely sensitive test for AD.

  19. Immunotherapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Goñi, Fernando

    2015-03-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide and is an emerging global epidemic. It is characterized by an imbalance between production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. Oligomeric forms of Aβ and tau are believed to be the most toxic. Dramatic results from AD animal models showed great promise for active and passive immune therapies targeting Aβ. However, there is very limited evidence in human studies of the clinical benefits from these approaches. Immunotherapies targeting only tau pathology have had some success but are limited so far to mouse models. The majority of current methods is based on immunological targeting of a self-protein; hence, benefits need to be balanced against risks of stimulating excessive autoimmune toxic inflammation. For greater efficacy the next generation of vaccines needs to focus more on concurrently targeting all the intermediate toxic conformers of oligomeric Aβ and tau species.

  20. Asymptomatic Alzheimer disease: Defining resilience.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Timothy J; McLaren, Donald G; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Gifford, Katherine A; Libon, David J; Jefferson, Angela L

    2016-12-06

    To define robust resilience metrics by leveraging CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology within a latent variable framework and to demonstrate the ability of such metrics to predict slower rates of cognitive decline and protection against diagnostic conversion. Participants with normal cognition (n = 297) and mild cognitive impairment (n = 432) were drawn from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Resilience metrics were defined at baseline by examining the residuals when regressing brain aging outcomes (hippocampal volume and cognition) on CSF biomarkers. A positive residual reflected better outcomes than expected for a given level of pathology (high resilience). Residuals were integrated into a latent variable model of resilience and validated by testing their ability to independently predict diagnostic conversion, cognitive decline, and the rate of ventricular dilation. Latent variables of resilience predicted a decreased risk of conversion (hazard ratio < 0.54, p < 0.0001), slower cognitive decline (β > 0.02, p < 0.001), and slower rates of ventricular dilation (β < -4.7, p < 2 × 10(-15)). These results were significant even when analyses were restricted to clinically normal individuals. Furthermore, resilience metrics interacted with biomarker status such that biomarker-positive individuals with low resilience showed the greatest risk of subsequent decline. Robust phenotypes of resilience calculated by leveraging AD biomarkers and baseline brain aging outcomes provide insight into which individuals are at greatest risk of short-term decline. Such comprehensive definitions of resilience are needed to further our understanding of the mechanisms that protect individuals from the clinical manifestation of AD dementia, especially among biomarker-positive individuals. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Interrelations of Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease. ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweber, Miriam

    This fact sheet summarizes the interrelations of Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease in a question and answer format. The following questions are addressed: What is Alzheimer disease? Why is a relationship suggested between Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease? Is there a genetic link between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome? Why is a…

  2. Interrelations of Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease. ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweber, Miriam

    This fact sheet summarizes the interrelations of Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease in a question and answer format. The following questions are addressed: What is Alzheimer disease? Why is a relationship suggested between Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease? Is there a genetic link between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome? Why is a…

  3. DNA Modifications and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca G; Lunnon, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. While a number of studies have focused on identifying genetic variants that contribute to the development and progression of late-onset AD, the majority of these only have a relatively small effect size. There are also a number of other risk factors, for example, age, gender, and other comorbidities; however, how these influence disease risk is not known. Therefore, in recent years, research has begun to investigate epigenetic mechanisms for a potential role in disease etiology. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of play for research into DNA modifications in AD, the most well studied being 5-methylcytosine (5-mC). We describe the earlier studies of candidate genes and global measures of DNA modifications in human AD samples, in addition to studies in mouse models of AD. We focus on recent epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) in human AD, using microarray technology, examining a number of key study design issues pertinent to such studies. Finally, we discuss how new technological advances could further progress the research field.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, S.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a single, quantitative metric called the disease evaluation factor (DEF) and assess its efficiency at estimating disease burden in normal, control subjects (CTRL) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The study group consisted in 75 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and 75 age-matched normal CTRL without neurological or neuropsychological deficit. We calculated a reference eigenspace of MRI appearance from reference data, in which our CTRL and probable AD subjects were projected. We then calculated the multi-dimensional hyperplane separating the CTRL and probable AD groups. The DEF was estimated via a multidimensional weighted distance of eigencoordinates for a given subject and the CTRL group mean, along salient principal components forming the separating hyperplane. We used quantile plots, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 tests to compare the DEF values and test that their distribution was normal. We used a linear discriminant test to separate CTRL from probable AD based on the DEF factor, and reached an accuracy of 87%. A quantitative biomarker in AD would act as an important surrogate marker of disease status and progression.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, George T

    2003-01-01

    The defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease is cognitive impairment, but commonly this impairment is accompanied by mood and behavioral symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, inappropriate behavior, sleep disturbance, psychosis, and agitation. The symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are not normative to the aging process. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in the majority of cases can be made with confidence through office-based clinical assessment and informant interview. Alzheimer's disease is the most common of the dementing disorders and is exponentially increasing in incidence, projected to affect 8.64 million people in the United States by the year 2047. At present, no treatment can prevent or cure Alzheimer's disease, and the fact that Alzheimer's affects a geriatric population makes treatment all the more challenging. Therapies that could delay onset of symptoms even briefly would have a major impact on public health. As the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease increases, researchers are examining the efficacy of treatment options beyond the realm of the established cholinesterase inhibitors.

  6. Targeting the Endocannabinoid System in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koppel, Jeremy; Davies, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is rapidly emerging as a potential drug target for a variety of immune-mediated central nervous system diseases. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that endocannabinoid interventions may have particular relevance to Alzheimer's disease. Here we present a review of endocannabinoid physiology, the evidence that underscores its utility as a potential target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease, and suggest future pathways of research. PMID:18997302

  7. Treatment of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Alistair

    2003-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, cognition now responds to several drugs. Anticholinesterases target the acetylcholine deficit. In mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease, they all provide significant benefit versus placebo on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment ScheduleCognitive Section (ADAS-Cog), Side effects, in 5% to 15% of cases, include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and dizziness. Tacrine, the leading anticholinesterase, caused frequent hepatic enzyme elevation and was withdrawn; once-daily donepezil spares the liver and improves global measures of change in severe dementia; rivasiigmine is indicated in comorbid vascular disease; while galaniamine modulates the cerebral nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that potentiate the response to acetylcholine. Alternative agents include the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, memaniine, licensed in Europe for moderately severe to severe Alzheimer's disease; it acts on a different neurotransmitter system present in 70% of neurons, protecting against pathologic glutamergic activation while preserving or even restoring physiologic glutamergic activation. The clinician's armamentarium in AD has never been greater. PMID:22034058

  8. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  9. Alzheimer's disease and epigenetic diet.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Zeynep; Dincer, Yildiz

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease. Many efforts have been directed to prevent AD due to its rising prevalence and the lack of an effective curative treatment. Various epigenetic mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis of AD. Epigenetic alterations may occur through external factors and are known for their reversibility. Dietary factors can influence epigenetic mechanisms. Several neuroprotective nutrients have been shown to enhance cognition, memory and other impaired functions seen in AD. Within recent years neuroprotective nutrients have gained more attention in the field of epigenetic. A growing body of evidence suggest that epigenetic changes triggered by dietary nutrients have an important role in health and in prevention of some diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. Several studies have shown that folic acid, vitamin B12, choline, zinc, selenium, dietary polyphenols are capable of interacting with epigenetic mechanisms and ultimately gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms resulting in neuronal dysfunction may be modified by diet. Therefore manipulation of epigenetic mechanisms via dietary nutrients may affect influence the vulnerability of neurons to degeneration which is seen in AD. The aim of this article is to provide a brief overview about the recent findings related to epigenetic alterations that are linked to AD pathogenesis, and to discuss the bioactive nutrients which can affect these epigenetic mechanisms.

  10. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  11. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L; Akbari, Mansour; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis of sporadic AD (sAD) is more complex and variants of several genes are associated with an increased lifetime risk of AD. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA integrity is pivotal during neuronal development, maintenance and function. DNA damage and alterations in cellular DNA repair capacity have been implicated in the aging process and in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. These findings are supported by research using animal models of AD and in DNA repair deficient animal models. In recent years, novel mechanisms linking DNA damage to neuronal dysfunction have been identified and have led to the development of noninvasive treatment strategies. Further investigations into the molecular mechanisms connecting DNA damage to AD pathology may help to develop novel treatment strategies for this debilitating disease. Here we provide an overview of the role of genome instability and DNA repair deficiency in AD pathology and discuss research strategies that include genome instability as a component. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Active Vaccines for Alzheimer Disease Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sterner, Rosalie M; Takahashi, Paul Y; Yu Ballard, Aimee C

    2016-09-01

    Vaccination against peptides specific to Alzheimer disease may generate an immune response that could help inhibit disease and symptom progression. PubMed and Scopus were searched for clinical trial articles, review articles, and preclinical studies relevant to the field of active Alzheimer disease vaccines and raw searches yielded articles ranging from 2016 to 1973. ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for active Alzheimer disease vaccine trials. Manual research and cross-referencing from reviews and original articles was performed. First generation Aβ42 phase 2a trial in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease resulted in cases of meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients, so next generation vaccines are working to target more specific epitopes to induce a more controlled immune response. Difficulty in developing these vaccines resides in striking a balance between providing a vaccine that induces enough of an immune response to actually clear protein sustainably but not so much of a response that results in excess immune activation and possibly adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis. Although much work still needs to be done in the field to make this a practical possibility, the enticing allure of being able to treat or even prevent the extraordinarily impactful disease that is Alzheimer disease makes the idea of active vaccination for Alzheimer disease very appealing and something worth striving toward. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future.

  15. Global data sharing in Alzheimer's disease research

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Bhatt, Priya; Ashish, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Many investigators recognize the importance of data sharing, however they lack the capability to share data. Research efforts could be vastly expanded if Alzheimer's disease data from around the world was linked by a global infrastructure that would enable scientists to access and utilize a secure network of data with thousands of study participants at risk for or already suffering from the disease. We discuss the benefits of data sharing, impediments today and solutions to achieving this on a global scale. We introduce the Global Alzheimer's Association Interactive Network (GAAIN), a novel approach to create a global network of Alzheimer's disease data, researchers, analytical tools and computational resources to better our understanding of this debilitating condition. GAAIN has addressed the key impediments to Alzheimer's disease data sharing with its model and approach. It presents practical, promising, yet data owner sensitive data sharing solutions. PMID:26523713

  16. Perspectives on the etiology of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mozar, H.N.; Bal, D.G.; Howard, J.T.

    1987-03-20

    There is a lack of consensus among investigators concerning the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Clues are lacking, however, and the authors have assessed them in a broad biologic context. This inquiry has led us to regard Alzheimer's disease as a multifactorial disorder in which a putative infective agent is an essential element. Despite seeming competition among current hypotheses, there is overall unity. The concept that Down's syndrome is a congenital form of Alzheimer's disease and that both conditions are the result of a ubiquitous infective pathogen that affects genetically susceptible individuals offers the broadest unification. In both conditions slow infections develops against the background of aging. Indirect evidence involving immunologic and other biologic phenomena supports the postulated infectious origin. Overlapping pathologic and clinical features of Alzheimer's disease and the known transmissible encephalopathies suggest a similar pathogenesis.

  17. Cell Therapy Products in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Jun-Mo; Park, Yoo Jin; Lee, Arum; Kim, Soo Ah; Choi, Hye Ji

    2017-04-01

    We are rapidly becoming an aging society, with the ongoing increase in challenges of the elderly. The age-related cognitive decline in accordance with aging society is of major importance in public health. Recent studies have proved the impacts of sex-steroid hormone on the brain; compliant with aging, menopause and decrease in estrogen have an effect on the occurrence and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. A new hypothesis states that Alzheimer's disease is a postmenopausal dementia, and is a negative form of estrogen deficiency. In this review article, we reckoned the cause of postmenopausal Alzheimer's disease. We further investigated new cell therapies for postmenopausal Alzheimer's disease, which are under development in some pharmaceutical companies. One remedy is cell therapy that inhibits the amyloid beta formation, and the other is the umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

  18. Alzheimer's disease: research advances and medical reality.

    PubMed

    Seiguer, Erica

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy-makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of federally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes, particularly the aging of baby boomers, take hold. Better prevention of Alzheimer's, advances in therapy, and appropriate care modalities will likely require significant investment.

  19. Alzheimer disease and genetics: anticipating the questions.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Debra L

    2006-12-01

    Three genes with autosomal dominant mutations have been identified that may lead to Alzheimer symptoms in carriers before they reach age 60. Genetic tests exist for Alzheimer disease, but they are considered useful only for the small number of families with a history of early-onset illness. As researchers continue to uncover evidence of genetic links to Alzheimer disease, nurses can expect to field questions from family members about genetic testing. The article presents a variety of questions nurses may be asked, as well as possible answers.

  20. Fungal infection in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia mainly among the elderly. This disease is characterized by the presence in the brain of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that provoke neuronal cell death, vascular dysfunction, and inflammatory processes. In the present work, we have analyzed the existence of fungal infection in Alzheimer's disease patients. A proteomic analysis provides compelling evidence for the existence of fungal proteins in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. Furthermore, PCR analysis reveals a variety of fungal species in these samples, dependent on the patient and the tissue tested. DNA sequencing demonstrated that several fungal species can be found in brain samples. Together, these results show that fungal macromolecules can be detected in brain from Alzheimer's disease patients. To our knowledge these findings represent the first evidence that fungal infection is detectable in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients. The possibility that this may represent a risk factor or may contribute to the etiological cause of Alzheimer's disease is discussed.

  1. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  2. Quantitative MRI to understand Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bozzali, Marco; Serra, Laura; Cercignani, Mara

    2016-08-01

    The role of white matter damage in the progression of Alzheimer's disease and the associated cognitive symptoms is becoming increasingly clearer. This is partly because of the advent of diffusion tensor imaging, which, in combination with other quantitative MRI techniques, offers unique insights into the patholophysiology of Alzheimer's disease in vivo. The purpose of this review is to integrate the most recent imaging findings, with respect to understanding Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology, and identifying potential biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic value. Consistent with patterns of gray matter atrophy, white matter damage in Alzheimer's disease is localized within white matter tracts connecting the temporal lobe with the rest of the brain, including the cingulum, the uncinate fasciculus and the fornix. These abnormalities are often correlated with adjacent gray matter tissue loss, and with cognitive performance. The relationship between these findings and loss of functional connectivity supports the hypothesis of disconnection as a mechanism for the spread of Alzheimer's disease. White matter abnormalities occur early in Alzheimer's disease, and might actively contribute to the progression of the disease. Functional and structural gray matter abnormalities parallel the white matter changes, and successful biomarkers are likely to be multiparametric.

  3. Ayurvedic Profiling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bredesen, Dale E; Rao, Rammohan V

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, personality changes, and an overall decline in cognitive function. The cause of AD is not yet completely defined and efforts to find a cure for it have so far been disappointing. AD is one of the most significant health care problems nationally and globally. Recently, we described a personalized therapeutic approach called metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND) that successfully reversed the cognitive decline in patients with early AD. The magnitude of the improvement was exceptional, providing testimony to the fact that a personalized and programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. Ayurveda is a personalized system of traditional medicine native to India and the Indian subcontinent. Although a direct reference to AD in the ancient Ayurvedic literature is missing, concepts including forgetfulness, memory loss, and brain cell loss have been described. Using the clinical information and the metabolic profiling of AD individuals we recently reported using the MEND program, we now describe in this commentary, 3 subtypes of AD based on the Ayurvedic interpretation. Ayurvedic profiling of patients with AD reveals 3 readily distinguishable subtypes, namely Vata, Pitta, and Krimi, which will prove useful in patients with cognitive decline and those at risk for such decline from the standpoint of specific subtype-based Ayurvedic intervention.

  4. Regenerative Medicine in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Candelario, Kate M.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying novel, effective therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major unmet medical needs for the coming decade. Because the current paradigm for developing and testing disease modifying AD therapies is protracted and likely to be even longer with the shift towards earlier intervention in pre-clinical AD, it is an open question whether we can develop, test, and widely deploy a novel therapy in time to help the current at-risk generation if we continue to follow the standard paradigms of discovery and drug development. There is an imperative need to find safe and effective preventative measures that can be rapidly deployed to stem the coming wave of AD that will potentially engulf the next generation. We can broadly define regenerative medicine as approaches that use stem-cell-based therapies or approaches that seek to modulate inherent neurogenesis. Neurogenesis, though most active during pre-natal development has been shown to continue in several small parts of the brain, which includes the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, suggesting its potential to reverse cognitive deficits. If AD pathology impacts neurogenesis then it follows that conditions that stimulate endogenous neurogenesis (e.g., environmental stimuli, physical activity, trophic factors, cytokines, and drugs) may help to promote the regenerative and recovery process. Herein, we review the complex logistics of potentially implementing neurogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:24286919

  5. Alzheimer's Disease and Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayi; Liu, Bingqian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with progressive loss of memory and cognitive function, pathologically hallmarked by aggregates of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. Aggregation of Aβ under the form of amyloid fibrils has long been considered central to the pathogenesis of AD. However, recent evidence has indicated that soluble Aβ oligomers, rather than insoluble fibrils, are the main neurotoxic species in AD. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has newly been identified as a cell surface receptor for Aβ oligomers. PrPC is a cell surface glycoprotein that plays a key role in the propagation of prions, proteinaceous infectious agents that replicate by imposing their abnormal conformation to PrPC molecules. In AD, PrPC acts to transduce the neurotoxic signals arising from Aβ oligomers, leading to synaptic failure and cognitive impairment. Interestingly, accumulating evidence has also shown that aggregated Aβ or tau possesses prion-like activity, a property that would allow them to spread throughout the brain. In this article, we review recent findings regarding the function of PrPC and its role in AD, and discuss potential therapeutic implications of PrPC-based approaches in the treatment of AD. PMID:25343100

  6. Cognitive intervention in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Buschert, Verena; Bokde, Arun L W; Hampel, Harald

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent chronic medical conditions affecting the elderly population. The effectiveness of approved antidementia drugs, however, is limited-licensed AD medications provide only moderate relief of clinical symptoms. Cognitive intervention is a noninvasive therapy that could aid prevention and treatment of AD. Data suggest that specifically designed cognitive interventions could impart therapeutic benefits to patients with AD that are associated with substantial biological changes within the brain. Moreover, evidence indicates that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions could provide greater relief of clinical symptoms than either intervention given alone. Functional and structural MRI studies have increased our understanding of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of aging and neurodegeneration, but the use of neuroimaging to investigate the effect of cognitive intervention on the brain remains largely unexplored. This Review provides an overview of the use of cognitive intervention in the healthy elderly population and patients with AD, and summarizes emerging findings that provide evidence for the effectiveness of this approach. Finally, we present recommendations for future research on the use of cognitive interventions in AD and discuss potential effects of this therapy on disease modification.

  7. Brain Stimulation in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fried, Itzhak

    2016-09-06

    Deep brain stimulation has been successfully used in treatment of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. In a recent multi-center prospectively randomized study, deep brain stimulation of the fornix was administered in order to ameliorate the cognitive symptoms and clinical course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study points to the possibility of modest slowing of the cognitive decline in AD in a subset of patients older than 65, while at the same time highlights the risk of stimulation in exacerbation of this decline in younger patients. The logic of conducting large clinical trials in the face of limited scientific understanding of the pathophysiology of AD and response of affected brain regions to electrical stimulation, is discussed with emphasis on the need to conduct: (i) animal studies in AD models, using precise focused stimulation; (ii) studies in patients who are implanted with depth electrodes for established clinical reasons (i.e., patients with epilepsy or movement disorders); and (iii) smaller adaptive studies in AD patients with systematic alterations of therapeutic parameters such as stimulation protocol.

  8. Protein phosphatases and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Steven P; Stock, Jeffry B; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, linked to marked neuronal loss. Pathological hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the form of amyloid plaques and the intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Accumulating evidence supports a key role for protein phosphorylation in both the normal and pathological actions of Aβ as well as the formation of NFTs. NFTs contain hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule-binding protein tau, and phosphorylation of tau by several different kinases leads to its aggregation. The protein kinases involved in the generation and/or actions of tau or Aβ are viable drug targets to prevent or alleviate AD pathology. However, it has also been recognized that the protein phosphatases that reverse the actions of these protein kinases are equally important. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases in the pathology of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Raj C

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65

  10. Amyloid imaging in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment are at an increased risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease. However, not all patients with mild cognitive impairment progress, and it is difficult to accurately identify those patients who are in the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease. In a recent paper, Koivunen and colleagues report that Pittsburgh compound-B, an amyloid-beta positron emission tomography ligand, predicts the progression of patients with mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease. Of 29 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, 21 (72%) had a positive Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography baseline scan. In their study, 15 of these 21 (71%) patients progressed to Alzheimer's disease, whilst only 1 out of 8 (12.5%) Pittsburgh compound-B-negative patients with mild cognitive impairment did so. Moreover, in these mild cognitive impairment patients, the overall amyloid burden increased approximately 2.5% during the follow-up period. This is consistent with other longitudinal amyloid imaging studies that found a similar increase in amyloid deposition over time in patients with mild cognitive impairment. These studies together challenge current theories that propose a flattening of the increase of brain amyloid deposition already in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. These findings may have important implications for the design of future clinical trials aimed at preventing progression to Alzheimer's disease by lowering the brain amyloid-beta burden in patients with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21936965

  11. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  12. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. It also examines in detail the financial impact of Alzheimer's on families, including annual costs to families and the difficult decisions families must often make to pay those costs. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops Alzheimer's disease every 66 seconds. By 2050, one new case of Alzheimer's is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥ 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from stroke, heart disease, and prostate cancer decreased 23%, 14%, and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from Alzheimer's disease increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which Alzheimer's disease contributes is likely much larger than the number of deaths from Alzheimer's disease recorded on death certificates. In 2016, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥ 65 years will die with Alzheimer's disease, and many of them will die because of the complications caused by Alzheimer's disease. In 2015, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of care to people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $221 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥ 65 years with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all

  13. Deconstructing mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    García-Escudero, Vega; Martín-Maestro, Patricia; Perry, George; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence showing that mitochondrial damage plays an important role in Alzheimer disease. Increased oxygen species generation and deficient mitochondrial dynamic balance have been suggested to be the reason as well as the consequence of Alzheimer-related pathology. Mitochondrial damage has been related to amyloid-beta or tau pathology or to the presence of specific presenilin-1 mutations. The contribution of these factors to mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed in this paper. Due to the relevance of mitochondrial alterations in Alzheimer disease, recent works have suggested the therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant. On the other hand, autophagy has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in Alzheimer-related protein stress, and increasing data shows that this pathway is altered in the disease. Moreover, mitochondrial alterations have been related to an insufficient clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Consequently, different approaches for the removal of damaged mitochondria or to decrease the related oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease have been described. To understand the role of mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease it is necessary to generate human cellular models which involve living neurons. We have summarized the novel protocols for the generation of neurons by reprogramming or direct transdifferentiation, which offer useful tools to achieve this result.

  14. The economics of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Leung, G M; Yeung, R Y T; Chi, I; Chu, L W

    2003-01-01

    Economic assessments of health and healthcare have become an integral part of policy decisions in the last decade. Increasingly, this trend is extending to medical decision-making in day-to-day patient-provider interactions. Alzheimer disease (AD) offers a potent example of the clinical and economic issues at stake with its diagnostic techniques, pharmacotherapies, and public health and policy implications. This review introduces basic economic concepts in examining the impact of AD and related care. It presents a summary of the latest economics research on cost estimates of AD and on economic evaluations of diagnostic and management interventions in terms of cost-of-illness and cost-effectiveness studies respectively. Empirical and conceptual issues about the interpretation of costs and the uses of evaluative methods are also discussed. We found that the economic costs attributable to AD care is highly variable mostly due to non-standardised methodologies and geographical variations in care patterns. There is, however, little doubt that the impact is substantial and is expected to worsen with the demographic, epidemiologic, technologic and economic transitions worldwide. There are comparatively fewer studies on the cost-effectiveness of interventions in AD. Most of the published work revolves around pharmacotherapeutics while relatively little has been done on diagnostics, patient care programmes and programmes for caregivers. We conclude that there are significant opportunities to strengthen research on standardised cost-of-illness analyses and new cost-effectiveness studies on a broader range of AD interventions. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Electroencephalographic Rhythms in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lizio, Roberta; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Ferri, Raffaele; Rodriguez, Guido; Babiloni, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Physiological brain aging is characterized by synapses loss and neurodegeneration that slowly lead to an age-related decline of cognition. Neural/synaptic redundancy and plastic remodelling of brain networking, also due to mental and physical training, promotes maintenance of brain activity in healthy elderly subjects for everyday life and good social behaviour and intellectual capabilities. However, age is the major risk factor for most common neurodegenerative disorders that impact on cognition, like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain electromagnetic activity is a feature of neuronal network function in various brain regions. Modern neurophysiological techniques, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs), are useful tools in the investigation of brain cognitive function in normal and pathological aging with an excellent time resolution. These techniques can index normal and abnormal brain aging analysis of corticocortical connectivity and neuronal synchronization of rhythmic oscillations at various frequencies. The present review suggests that discrimination between physiological and pathological brain aging clearly emerges at the group level, with suggested applications also at the level of single individual. The possibility of combining the use of EEG together with biological/neuropsychological markers and structural/functional imaging is promising for a low-cost, non-invasive, and widely available assessment of groups of individuals at-risk. PMID:21629714

  16. Electroencephalographic rhythms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lizio, Roberta; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Ferri, Raffaele; Rodriguez, Guido; Babiloni, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Physiological brain aging is characterized by synapses loss and neurodegeneration that slowly lead to an age-related decline of cognition. Neural/synaptic redundancy and plastic remodelling of brain networking, also due to mental and physical training, promotes maintenance of brain activity in healthy elderly subjects for everyday life and good social behaviour and intellectual capabilities. However, age is the major risk factor for most common neurodegenerative disorders that impact on cognition, like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain electromagnetic activity is a feature of neuronal network function in various brain regions. Modern neurophysiological techniques, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs), are useful tools in the investigation of brain cognitive function in normal and pathological aging with an excellent time resolution. These techniques can index normal and abnormal brain aging analysis of corticocortical connectivity and neuronal synchronization of rhythmic oscillations at various frequencies. The present review suggests that discrimination between physiological and pathological brain aging clearly emerges at the group level, with suggested applications also at the level of single individual. The possibility of combining the use of EEG together with biological/neuropsychological markers and structural/functional imaging is promising for a low-cost, non-invasive, and widely available assessment of groups of individuals at-risk.

  17. Adaptive walking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients.

  18. Adaptive Walking in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients. PMID:22991684

  19. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  20. Inductive reasoning in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, E E; Rhee, J; Dennis, K; Grossman, M

    2001-12-01

    We evaluated knowledge of basic level and superordinate semantic relations and the role of cognitive resources during inductive reasoning in probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nineteen mildly demented AD patients and 17 healthy control subjects judged the truthfulness of arguments with a premise and a conclusion that contain familiar concepts coupled with "blank" predicates, such as "Spiders contain phosphatidylcholine; therefore all insects contain phosphatidylcholine." Like healthy control subjects, AD patients were relatively insensitive to the typicality of the premise category when judging the strength of arguments with a conclusion containing a basic-level concept, but were relatively sensitive to typicality during judgments of arguments containing a superordinate in the conclusion. Moreover, AD patients resembled control subjects in judging arguments with an immediate superordinate in the conclusion compared to arguments with a distant superordinate. AD patients differed from control subjects because they could not take advantage of two premises in an argument containing basic-level concepts. We conclude that semantic knowledge is sufficiently preserved in AD to support inductive reasoning, but that limited cognitive resources may interfere with AD patients' ability to consider the entire spectrum of information available during semantic challenges.

  1. REVIEW: Curcumin and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    Curcumin has a long history of use as a traditional remedy and food in Asia. Many studies have reported that curcumin has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antitumor. Because of the reported effects of curcumin on tumors, many clinical trials have been performed to elucidate curcumin's effects on cancers. Recent reports have suggested therapeutic potential of curcumin in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In in vitro studies, curcumin has been reported to inhibit amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) aggregation, and Aβ-induced inflammation, as well as the activities of β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase. In in vivo studies, oral administration of curcumin has resulted in the inhibition of Aβ deposition, Aβ oligomerization, and tau phosphorylation in the brains of AD animal models, and improvements in behavioral impairment in animal models. These findings suggest that curcumin might be one of the most promising compounds for the development of AD therapies. At present, four clinical trials concerning the effects of curcumin on AD has been conducted. Two of them that were performed in China and USA have been reported no significant differences in changes in cognitive function between placebo and curcumin groups, and no results have been reported from two other clinical studies. Additional trials are necessary to determine the clinical usefulness of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  2. Chronobiological approaches to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Alexis M

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic circadian rhythms contribute to memory formation, and the hormonal and neurochemical changes that follow circadian patterns are frequently dysregulated with aging. The effect of aging on circadian rhythms is a double-edged sword; on one hand, poor sleep quality compromises neuronal structure and function in regions that support cognition, and on the other hand, perturbation of central and peripheral oscillators changes the hormonal milieu, with consequences for neuroplasticity. In the current review, recent developments surrounding the circadian regulation of memory formation are described, with reference to how mechanisms that support temporal coding might change with advancing age. The cognitive consequences of changes in sleep patterns are also discussed. New roles for the circadian clock genes period-1, period-2, and bmal1 in memory formation are discussed in the context of age-related cognitive decline. The potential for chronobiological approaches to the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease merits further exploration from a pharmacotherapeutic perspective, as the timing of drug delivery could potentiate or diminish treatment efficacy.

  3. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  4. [Advances in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, U; Wiltfang, J; Peters, N; Benninghoff, J

    2012-05-01

    Due to the demographic developments, diagnosis and treatment, dementia constitutes an increasing medical challenge and is likely to have an increasing socioeconomic impact. Dementia does not reflect a single disease but encompasses a variety of underlying conditions, heterogeneous clinical courses and therapeutic approaches, among which Alzheimer's disease represents the most common cause. Therefore, a thorough differential diagnosis of dementia is of major importance. To date the current diagnosis of dementia according to ICD-10/DMS-IV is based on clinical criteria. In addition, the concept of mild cognitive impairment comprises early cognitive dysfunction without clinically apparent dementia. Alzheimer's disease is more and more conceptualized as a disease continuum with mild cognitive impairment as an early and manifest dementia as the later stage of the disease. This review gives an overview on the current diagnostic approaches and the proposed revisions of diagnostic and research criteria for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease. Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report of the Health and Human Services Department Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease addresses nine main areas in a problem-oriented approach aimed at better defining research needs and options as well as training, service, and policy issues relevant to Alzheimer's disease. Individual chapters deal with research in the areas of epidemiology,…

  6. Alzheimer's disease, oral function and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Nordenram, G; Ryd-Kjellen, E; Johansson, G; Nordstrom, G; Winblad, B

    1996-07-01

    To study differences in nutritional, dental status and oral function between institutionalised patients with Alzheimer's disease and cognitively healthy elderly people living in the community. Comparison was made between two groups. Alzheimer's disease sufferers and healthy controls, using established criteria for anthropometric, mental and dental state. An institution and residential area in Stockholm, Sweden. Forty patients with Alzheimer's disease living in a nursing home and 40 age- and gender-matched control subjects living independently. Dental status and anthropometric variables. Overnutrition was less frequent among the demented than the controls and more demented were undernourished. Dental status was similar in the two groups with few edentulous subjects but only 2 of 7 edentulous subjects with Alzheimer's disease wore dentures. Having natural teeth and many functional oral zones is important for food consistency choice, but not for nutritional status. In the Alzheimer group, the stage of dementia has a strong association to the ability to eat unaided and an association with dental status. There are differences in nutritional status between Alzheimer's patients in institutions and cognitively healthy elderly living at home. The choice of food consistency is correlated to dental status but nutritional status is not shown to be influenced by dental status. However, the ability to eat unaided is strongly correlated to cognitive status.

  7. [Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Thomas-Antérion, C; Laurent, B

    1998-11-01

    The diagnosis of dementia of Alzheimer type (DTA) in the early stage of the disease may be possible with the development of specialized memory consultations. After this diagnosis, we can inform family and even the patient in some cases, monitor the progression of disease, give or not treatment, and help family for daily life management (money, car driving, administration papers, etc.). The first step is to analyse the memory complaints of the patient and if possible of his family. The difficulties in everyday life are more informative than an anxious complaint of memory and some IADL deficiency appear early: difficulty to use phone, drugs, transports or checks. The patient examination by a practitioner or a neurologist has to be complete, even if normal in most of the cases. The practitioner has to explore without specific material, the main cognitive domain: the "5 words test" illustrates a useful memory tool, analysing two types of recall. We also must observe writing, digit span, naming and verbal fluency. The examination by a psychologist using standardized batteries of tests must always be driven by this clinical exploration using common scales like MMS or ADAS. In very early DTA, we may observe a cognitive decline limited to some aspects of memory (free long term recall, cued recall, working memory...) with a decline of the most controlled attentional tasks. An isolated memory disorder has to be identified either as onset of DTA or as an aging related cognitive decline (ARCD): the difference is qualitative and may appear only on repeated exams by experimented psychologist.

  8. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Christen, Y

    2000-02-01

    Research in the field of molecular biology has helped to provide a better understanding of both the cascade of biochemical events that occurs with Alzheimer disease (AD) and the heterogeneous nature of the disease. One hypothesis that accounts for both the heterogeneous nature of AD and the fact that aging is the most obvious risk factor is that free radicals are involved. The probability of this involvement is supported by the fact that neurons are extremely sensitive to attacks by destructive free radicals. Furthermore, lesions are present in the brains of AD patients that are typically associated with attacks by free radicals (eg, damage to DNA, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and advanced glycosylation end products), and metals (eg, iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum) are present that have catalytic activity that produce free radicals. beta-Amyloid is aggregated and produces more free radicals in the presence of free radicals; beta-amyloid toxicity is eliminated by free radical scavengers. Apolipoprotein E is subject to attacks by free radicals, and apolipoprotein E peroxidation has been correlated with AD. In contrast, apolipoprotein E can act as a free radical scavenger and this behavior is isoform dependent. AD has been linked to mitochondrial anomalies affecting cytochrome-c oxidase, and these anomalies may contribute to the abnormal production of free radicals. Finally, many free radical scavengers (eg, vitamin E, selegeline, and Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761) have produced promising results in relation to AD, as has desferrioxamine-an iron-chelating agent-and antiinflammatory drugs and estrogens, which also have an antioxidant effect.

  9. Stem cell treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and neurodegenerative disorder that induces dementia in older people. It was first reported in 1907 by Alois Alzheimer, who characterized the disease as causing memory loss and cognitive impairment. Pathologic characteristics of AD are β-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration. Current therapies only target the relief of symptoms using various drugs, and do not cure the disease. Recently, stem cell therapy has been shown to be a potential approach to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, and in this review, we focus on stem cell therapies for AD.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease therapeutics: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Ben; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Pathologically, Alzheimer's Disease is characterized by amyloidal protein plaques that lead to dementia in the elderly population. While advances have been made in therapeutics over the course of the last 20 years, the drugs generally target the symptoms rather than the underlying pathology. Unfortunately, despite the advances, the mechanisms behind Alzheimer's Disease have still not been clearly identified. Some of these current treatments include acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonists. Recently, the pathophysiology behind this disease is becoming more clearly understood and this has led to some novel therapeutic targets that may be able to break the barrier and target the underlying disease. In this review, we will discuss Alzheimer's Disease pathology and the pharmacological therapy that has been in use for a long time as well as novel therapies.

  11. [Anti-ageing therapies in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Alonso Abreu, Gara S; Brito Armas, José M; Castro Fuentes, Rafael

    2017-05-23

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly population. Currently, there are no effective treatments to prevent or delay the natural course of the disease. Numerous studies have provided information about the molecular processes underlying biological ageing and, perhaps more importantly, potential interventions to slow ageing and promote healthy longevity in laboratory model systems. The main issue addressed in this review is whether an intervention that has anti-ageing properties can alter the appearance and/or progression of Alzheimer's disease, a disease in which age is the biggest risk factor. Different anti-ageing interventions have been shown to prevent (and in some cases possibly restore) several parameters recognised as central symptoms to the development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, they are taking the first steps towards translating these laboratory discoveries into clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Alzheimer's disease research in the context of the national plan to address Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Hendrix, James; Bain, Lisa J; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease in the United States (U.S.) was released, a component of the National Alzheimer's Project Act legislation. Since that time, there have been incremental increases in U.S. federal funding for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia research, particularly in the areas of biomarker discovery, genetic link and related biological underpinnings, and prevention studies for Alzheimer's. A central theme in each of these areas has been the emphasis of cross-sector collaboration and private-public partnerships between government, non-profit organizations and for-profit organizations. This paper will highlight multiple private-public partnerships supporting the advancement of Alzheimer's research in the context of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's.

  13. Cerebrovascular disease in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Miners, J Scott

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have more in common than their association with ageing. They share risk factors and overlap neuropathologically. Most patients with AD have Aβ amyloid angiopathy and degenerative changes affecting capillaries, and many have ischaemic parenchymal abnormalities. Structural vascular disease contributes to the ischaemic abnormalities in some patients with AD. However, the stereotyped progression of hypoperfusion in this disease, affecting first the precuneus and cingulate gyrus, then the frontal and temporal cortex and lastly the occipital cortex, suggests that other factors are more important, particularly in early disease. Whilst demand for oxygen and glucose falls in late disease, functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopy to measure the saturation of haemoglobin by oxygen, and biochemical analysis of myelin proteins with differential susceptibility to reduced oxygenation have all shown that the reduction in blood flow in AD is primarily a problem of inadequate blood supply, not reduced metabolic demand. Increasing evidence points to non-structural vascular dysfunction rather than structural abnormalities of vessel walls as the main cause of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD. Several mediators are probably responsible. One that is emerging as a major contributor is the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (EDN1). Whilst there is clearly an additive component to the clinical and pathological effects of hypoperfusion and AD, experimental and clinical observations suggest that the disease processes also interact mechanistically at a cellular level in a manner that exacerbates both. The elucidation of some of the mechanisms responsible for hypoperfusion in AD and for the interactions between CVD and AD has led to the identification of several novel therapeutic approaches that have the potential to ameliorate ischaemic damage and slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Interaction between cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer pathology.

    PubMed

    Saito, Satoshi; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological investigations have proposed strict control of vascular risk factors as a strategy to overcome dementia, because of the close interaction between cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease. In light of recent advances in basic, translational, and clinical research in the area, this review focuses on the significance of CVD in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Alzheimer's disease and CVD share several risk factors, and the coexistence of both pathologies is frequently noted. CVD and subsequent cerebral blood flow reduction would increase amyloid β (Aβ) production by modulating β and γ-secretase. Furthermore, CVD impairs Aβ clearance, which is mainly driven by vascular mediated systems, including active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and perivascular lymphatic/paravascular glymphatic drainage systems. Thus, CVD may disturb homeostasis between Aβ production and clearance, thereby aggravating Alzheimer's disease. Recent translational researches in this field aim to facilitate Aβ clearance. Several candidate drugs are being tested in clinical trials. Compared with Aβ pathology, little is known about the relationship between tau pathology and CVD, although some studies have shown that CVD has an influence on tau pathology. The close interrelationship between Alzheimer's disease and CVD suggests the necessity of the maintenance of cerebrovascular integrity, which may herald a new generation of dementia treatment strategies.

  15. 'Clinical trials in Alzheimer's disease': immunotherapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, Julien; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Caillaud, Céline; Vellas, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. Several types of Aβ peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, direct immunization with synthetic intact Aβ(42) , active immunization involving the administration of synthetic fragments of Aβ peptide conjugated to a carrier protein and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against Aβ peptide. Pre-clinical studies showed that immunization against Aβ peptide can provide protection and reversal of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease in animal models. Indeed, several adverse events have been described like meningoencephalitis with AN1792, vasogenic edema and microhemorrhages with bapineuzumab. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several Aβ peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    The existence of an effective biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer disease would facilitate improved diagnosis and stimulate therapeutic trials. Multidisciplinary clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is time consuming and expensive and relies on experts who are rarely available outside of specialty clinics. Thus, many patients do not receive proper diagnosis until the disease has progressed beyond stages in which treatments are maximally effective. In the clinical trial setting, rapid, cost-effective screening of patients for Alzheimer disease is of paramount importance for the development of new treatments. Neuroimaging of cortical amyloid burden and volumetric changes in the brain and assessment of protein concentrations (eg, β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, phosphorylated tau) in cerebrospinal fluid are diagnostic tools that are not widely available. Known genetic markers do not provide sufficient discriminatory power between different forms of dementia to be useful in isolation. Recent studies using panels of biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment have been promising, though no such studies have been cross-validated in independent samples of subjects. The ideal biomarker enabling early detection of Alzheimer disease has not yet been identified.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Krasner, Neville

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, and causes steady memory loss and mental regression. It is also accompanied by severe atrophy of the brain. However, the pathological biomarkers of the disease can only be confirmed and examined upon the death of the patient. A commercial (Renishaw PLC, UK) Raman system with an 830 nm NIR diode laser was used to analyse brain samples, which were flash frozen at post-mortem. Ethical approval was sought for these samples. The Alzheimer's diseased samples contained a number of biomarkers, including neuritic plaques and tangles. The Raman spectra were examined by order to differentiate between normal and Alzheimer's diseased brain tissues. Preliminary results indicate that Alzheimer's diseased tissues can be differentiated from control tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra differ in terms of peak intensity, and the presence of a stronger amide I band in the 1667 cm-1 region which occurs more prominently in the Alzheimer's diseased tissue. These preliminary results indicate that the beta-amyloid protein originating from neuritic plaques can be identified with Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Chételat, Gael; Rabinovici, Gil D.; de Leon, Mony J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Reiman, Eric M.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Black, Sandra E.; Brooks, David J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Fox, Nick C.; Herholz, Karl; Nordberg, Agneta; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Thies, William; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Weiner, Michael W.; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; DeCarli, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials. PMID:23897875

  19. [Verbal fluency and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Alberca, R; Salas, D; Pérez-Gil, J A; Lozano, P; Gil-Néciga, E

    1999-01-01

    BASIC: The loss of verbal fluency in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been related to the cognitive and functional impairment caused by the disorder. To determine the value of the different types of verbal fluency examination for the detection of AD. We have compared the results obtained in the study of verbal fluency in 74 patients with probable AD (NINCDS-ARDRA criteria) to a control group of 64 persons of similar age, gender and educational level. Patients were divided in three categories according to the intensity of dementia: very mild (MMSE > 23), mild (MMSE 18-23) and moderate (MMSE 10-17). Semantic and literal verbal fluencies were studied by means of the "set-test", including in the analysis the results in every of four categories and total, the time consumed per category and the sum of all, the number of animal's names and words given in a minute. We also determined the number of animals in every fifteen seconds up to one minute in 66 controls y 97 patients. Results in the different groups were compared using the ANOVA variance and the contrast of means for alpha < or = 0.05. The time consumed in saying the names has a great value in detecting AD, with the same or even better significance than the number of words. It is feasible to shorten the examination and use only one category of names. Our results suggest that counting the names of animals given in the first fifteen seconds does not lower the value of the exam and can also suppress a "roof effect" of the test. A short version of semantic verbal fluency examination could be of potential use in general practice where time consuming exams are difficult to implement.

  20. Monoaminergic neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles R; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude M; Hof, Patrick R

    2017-04-01

    None of the proposed mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) fully explains the distribution patterns of the neuropathological changes at the cellular and regional levels, and their clinical correlates. One aspect of this problem lies in the complex genetic, epigenetic, and environmental landscape of AD: early-onset AD is often familial with autosomal dominant inheritance, while the vast majority of AD cases are late-onset, with the ε4 variant of the gene encoding apolipoprotein E (APOE) known to confer a 5-20 fold increased risk with partial penetrance. Mechanisms by which genetic variants and environmental factors influence the development of AD pathological changes, especially neurofibrillary degeneration, are not yet known. Here we review current knowledge of the involvement of the monoaminergic systems in AD. The changes in the serotonergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, and melatonergic systems in AD are briefly described. We also summarize the possibilities for monoamine-based treatment in AD. Besides neuropathologic AD criteria that include the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), special emphasis is given to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Both of these brainstem nuclei are among the first to be affected by tau protein abnormalities in the course of sporadic AD, causing behavioral and cognitive symptoms of variable severity. The possibility that most of the tangle-bearing neurons of the LC and DRN may release amyloid β as well as soluble monomeric or oligomeric tau protein trans-synaptically by their diffuse projections to the cerebral cortex emphasizes their selective vulnerability and warrants further investigations of the monoaminergic systems in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Astrocytic face of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zorec, Robert; Parpura, Vladimir; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexej

    2017-03-30

    Ageing of the central nervous system (CNS) is the major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a type of neurodegeneration that is associated with deficits in cognition and memory and clinically manifested as severe senile dementia. Numerous mental processes underline cognition, including attention, producing and understanding language, learning, reasoning, problem solving, decision making and memory formation. In the past, neurones or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of memory and cognitive processes. However, it has become evident that astrocytes, the major homeostatic glial cell of the CNS, provide an essential contribution to memory formation, and astroglial failure may promote cognitive decline in AD. In response to the network reset mechanisms mediated by the noradrenergic projections of neurones located in the locus coeruleus, astrocytes get excited and participate in the morphological remodelling associated with synaptic plasticity, otherwise thought to represent a cellular mechanism of learning and memory. Astroglial morphological plasticity is an energy-demanding process requiring mobilisation of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages ions (such as Ca(2+) and Na(+)) and second messengers (such as cAMP). These ions/molecules contribute to the reception of extracellular signals and coordinate the secretion of glio-signalling molecules, including peptides such as apolipoporotein E, which participates in lipid transport between glia and neurones. In this setting, astrocytes are positioned as spatio-temporal integrators of neural network coordination, which disintegrates during progression of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Creative work of painters with Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Marcus, Esther-Lee; Kaufman, Yakir; Cohen-Shalev, Amir

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive cognitive and functional decline. Recently, there have been reports in the medical literature on artists who continued to paint while suffering from Alzheimer's. This article describes the changes that occurred in the work of three artists who suffered from Alzheimer's: William Utermohlen, Carolus Horn and Willem de Kooning. In the case of William Utermohlen (1935-2007), Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed at the age of 61. A series of 15 self-portraits that he painted during the years he suffered from Alzheimer's disease provide a rare opportunity to look into the world of an Alzheimer's patient, and testifies to sustained motivation to create, despite severe cognitive impairment. Although Utermohlen's portraits show distortions in proportion and defects in spatial organization that became more evident as the disease progressed, the portraits are characterized by an extraordinary ability to express emotion, as well as by originality: each is a new piece of work, not an attempt to copy a previous painting. Carolus Horn (1921-1992) was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease at the age of 58. In Horn's paintings, from the time he was diagnosed, there is evidence of distortion in perspective, "primitive" style, lack of individual characteristics in depicting his subjects, more schematic drawing, and a preference for using reds and yellows. In the most advanced stage of the disease Horn was only able to scribble. Despite his cognitive and functional limitations, Horn continued to draw daily, even in the advanced stages of his illness, until shortly before his death. Willem de Kooning's (1904-1997) Alzheimer's was diagnosed in his late eighties. During the following years, he painted more than 300 abstract paintings, which art critics assess as among the finest and most sensitive artistic achievements in contemporary painting. Despite cognitive limitations, de Kooning was able to muster the concentration to continue painting

  3. Therapeutic potential of resveratrol in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Zhao, Haitian; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2008-12-03

    Several epidemiological studies indicate that moderate consumption of red wine is associated with a lower incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Red wine is enriched in antioxidant polyphenols with potential neuroprotective activities. Despite scepticism concerning the bioavailability of these polyphenols, in vivo data have clearly demonstrated the neuroprotective properties of the naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol in rodent models for stress and diseases. Furthermore, recent work in cell cultures and animal models has shed light on the molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the beneficial effects of resveratrol intake against the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: The Government's Response. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (Cold Spring Harbor, NY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine questions surrounding Alzheimer's disease, its treatment, funding for research, legal aspects, and support for families of Alzheimer's victims. Opening statements are included from Congressmen Downey, Mrazek, and Manton. Testimonies…

  5. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: The Government's Response. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (Cold Spring Harbor, NY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine questions surrounding Alzheimer's disease, its treatment, funding for research, legal aspects, and support for families of Alzheimer's victims. Opening statements are included from Congressmen Downey, Mrazek, and Manton. Testimonies…

  6. Progress Report on Alzheimer's Disease: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document provides an overview of the state of scientific study of Alzheimer's disease, a disease of catastrophic proportions whose symptoms include serious forgetfulness; changes in personality; confused, restless, and irritable behavior; and problems with judgment, concentration, writing, reading, speech, and naming of objects. It discusses…

  7. Looking for Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Lynne Gershenson; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the correlates of symptom-seeking behavior for Alzheimer's disease (AD) among middle-aged persons. Symptom seeking, the tendency to search for signs of disease, is one manifestation of an individual's concern about developing AD. The data were obtained from a survey of two subsamples of 40-60 year old adults: 1) 108 adult…

  8. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  9. How Can Music Help People Who Have Alzheimer's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... help? How can music help people who have Alzheimer's disease? Answers from Jonathan Graff-Radford, M.D. ... provide emotional and behavioral benefits for people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. Musical memories ...

  10. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with mild Alzheimer's disease may be helped in day-to-day living by a list of daily plans notes ... help some people with mild Alzheimer's disease with day-to-day living. A big calendar, a list ...

  11. Auditory spatial processing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Golden, Hannah L; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Yong, Keir X X; Downey, Laura E; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    The location and motion of sounds in space are important cues for encoding the auditory world. Spatial processing is a core component of auditory scene analysis, a cognitively demanding function that is vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. Here we designed a novel neuropsychological battery based on a virtual space paradigm to assess auditory spatial processing in patient cohorts with clinically typical Alzheimer's disease (n = 20) and its major variant syndrome, posterior cortical atrophy (n = 12) in relation to healthy older controls (n = 26). We assessed three dimensions of auditory spatial function: externalized versus non-externalized sound discrimination, moving versus stationary sound discrimination and stationary auditory spatial position discrimination, together with non-spatial auditory and visual spatial control tasks. Neuroanatomical correlates of auditory spatial processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to healthy older controls, both patient groups exhibited impairments in detection of auditory motion, and stationary sound position discrimination. The posterior cortical atrophy group showed greater impairment for auditory motion processing and the processing of a non-spatial control complex auditory property (timbre) than the typical Alzheimer's disease group. Voxel-based morphometry in the patient cohort revealed grey matter correlates of auditory motion detection and spatial position discrimination in right inferior parietal cortex and precuneus, respectively. These findings delineate auditory spatial processing deficits in typical and posterior Alzheimer's disease phenotypes that are related to posterior cortical regions involved in both syndromic variants and modulated by the syndromic profile of brain degeneration. Auditory spatial deficits contribute to impaired spatial awareness in Alzheimer's disease and may constitute a novel perceptual model for probing brain network disintegration across the Alzheimer's disease

  12. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's disease: at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Orly; Marr, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    While a massive and progressive neuronal loss in specific areas such as the hippocampus and cortex unequivocally underlies cognitive deterioration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease, noteworthy alterations take place in the neurogenic microenvironments, namely, the subgranule layer of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone. Compromised neurogenesis presumably takes place earlier than onset of hallmark lesions or neuronal loss, and may play a role in the initiation and progression of neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease. Neurogenesis in the adult brain is thought to play a role in numerous forms and aspects of learning and memory and contribute to the plasticity of the hippocampus and olfactory system. Misregulated or impaired neurogenesis on the other hand, may compromise plasticity and neuronal function in these areas and exacerbate neuronal vulnerability. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests that molecular players in Alzheimer's disease, including PS1, APP and its metabolites, play a role in adult neurogenesis. In addition, recent studies suggest that alterations in tau phosphorylation are pronounced in neurogenic areas, and may interfere with the potential central role of tau proteins in neuronal maturation and differentiation. On the other hand, numerous neurogenic players, such as Notch-1, ErbB4 and L1 are substrates of alpha- beta- and gamma- secretase that play a major role in Alzheimer's disease. This review will discuss current knowledge concerning alterations of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with specific emphasis on the cross-talk between signaling molecules involved in both processes, and the ways by which familial Alzheimer's disease-linked dysfunction of these signaling molecules affect neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  13. New and emerging treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other dementias represent a significant and increasing clinical challenge. Dementia is also associated with a substantial economic cost and burden to health service provision. Existing treatments slow the progression of symptoms of the disease, but their efficacy does not extend to all patients and is not sustained beyond an average of 6 months. It is, therefore, critical to address the current lack of effective treatments to target the underlying pathology and disease process in Alzheimer's disease. This review aims to highlight the main areas of new therapeutic development and discuss some of the main therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Despite a number of promising rationales for therapeutic treatments in Alzheimer's disease, very few of these avenues have been developed beyond preclinical studies. The predominant focus of the current article is on treatments currently in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, but some other promising areas of development are also discussed. There are currently only three therapeutics being investigated in Phase III clinical trials. This emphasizes the substantial caution and underinvestment in treatment development in this area. There is a distinct lack of novel approaches in the pipeline, and whether there is a new disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer's disease in the next 5 years almost entirely depends on the success of currently ongoing immunotherapy studies. Importantly, there is potential benefit in exploring existing licensed treatments alongside novel drug development to increase the focus on novel targets within this time frame.

  14. [Melatonin agonist: a possible disease-modifying agent for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Etsuro

    2012-02-01

    Recent advance of therapeutic intervention makes immunotherapies disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Several lines of evidence indicated that melatonin or indole structures are candidates for disease-modifying agents in Alzheimer's disease. We herein reviewed the in vivo efficacy of melatonin in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease and discuss about a potential of melatonin agonist for treating Alzheimer's disease.

  15. [Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Donoso S, Archibaldo; Delgado D, Carolina

    2009-02-01

    The pharmacological interventions for Alzheimer disease should be based in its pathogenic mechanisms such as amyloidogenesis, tau hyperphosphorilation, disturbances in neurotransmission and changes in neuronal trophism. Other therapies derive from epidemiological observations, such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory drugs, estrogens, statins and anti hypertensive drugs. Some life style interventions, such as changes in diet, exercise and brain stimulation could also be beneficial for the prevention of Alzheimer disease. Ongoing research on pathogenic mechanisms promises the discovery of more effective therapies. Healthy life style should always be recommended due to its benefit and lack of untoward effects.

  16. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  17. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Flicker, Leon

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that some lifestyle factors are linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many of these are potentially modifiable and include smoking, physical activity, education, social engagement, cognitive stimulation, and diet. Modification of most of these factors has other health advantages, increasing the potential benefits of modifying the individual's lifestyle. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence is based on observational data, and where human trials have been performed they have used surrogate outcomes rather than the development of Alzheimer's disease. For many of these modifiable lifestyle factors, such trials may never be performed, and an individual's choice may need to be based on the available evidence.

  18. Nanomedicine for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Maria; Masserini, Massimo; Mancini, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects more than 35 million people worldwide and this number is presumed to double by the year 2050. Currently, there is no efficient therapy for this disorder but a promising approach is represented by nanotechnology, easily multifunctionalizable devices with size in the order of billionth of meter. This review provides a concise survey on the nano-based strategies for Alzheimer's disease treatment, aiming at carrying drugs across the blood-brain barrier, in particular to target the metabolism of β-amyloid peptide, a pivotal player in this pathology.

  19. C-1073 (mifepristone) in the adjunctive treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    DeBattista, Charles; Belanoff, Joseph

    2005-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is frequently associated with abnormalities in the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis. Elevated cortisol levels in Alzheimer's disease may in turn be associated with a more rapid progression of the illness. In addition, elevated cortisol levels may directly contribute to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease. Mifepristone is a potent antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor and blocks the central actions of cortisol. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of glucocorticoid receptor blockade with mifepristone on cognition in Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Verbal fluency in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Narahyana Bom; Barca, Maria Lage; Engedal, Knut; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz; Laks, Jerson

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare verbal fluency among Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression and to assess the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with the disease severity. METHODS: Patients from an outpatient university center with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or major depression were studied. Severity was staged using the Hoehn & Yahr scale, the Hamilton Depression scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating for Parkinson's disease, major depression, and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. All subjects were tested with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the digit span test, and the verbal fluency test (animals). We fit four types of regression models for the count variable: Poisson model, negative binomial model, zero-inflated Poisson model, and zero-inflated negative binomial model. RESULTS: The mean digit span and verbal fluency scores were lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 34) than in patients with major depression (n = 52) or Parkinson's disease (n = 17) (p<0.001). The average number of words listed was much lower for Alzheimer's disease patients (7.2 words) compared to the patients presenting with major depression (14.6 words) or Parkinson's disease (15.7 words) (KW test = 32.4; p<0.01). Major depression and Parkinson's disease groups listed 44% (ROM = 1.44) and 48% (ROM = 1.48) more words, respectively, compared to those patients with Alzheimer's disease; these results were independent of age, education, disease severity and attention. Independently of diagnosis, age, and education, severe disease showed a 26% (ROM = 0.74) reduction in the number of words listed when compared to mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Verbal fluency provides a better characterization of Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and Parkinson's disease, even at later stages. PMID:21655757

  1. 76 FR 68615 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8745 of November 1, 2011 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011... heartbreak of watching a loved one struggle with Alzheimer's disease is a pain they know all too well. Alzheimer's disease burdens an increasing number of our Nation's elders and their families, and it...

  2. 77 FR 11116 - Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    .... Accelerate the development of treatments that would prevent, halt, or reverse the course of Alzheimer's disease. Improve early diagnosis and coordination of care and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Improve... HUMAN SERVICES Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease AGENCY: Office of the...

  3. 78 FR 66611 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... like Alzheimer's disease and enhance our work on improving treatment. In September, the National... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9050 of October 31, 2013 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Alzheimer's disease is...

  4. [Predementia Alzheimer's disease. Benefits of early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Viloria, Aurora

    2011-10-01

    Given population aging and the rise in the number of persons with Alzheimer's disease, measures that aim not only to delay but also to prevent the development of this disease are increasingly required. Advances in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease support the need for a review of current clinical standards for mild cognitive impairment and provide new goals in the early treatment of this disease. The current diagnostic process should be refocussed toward the pathological substrate of this disease rather than symptoms in order to initiate therapeutic measures as soon as possible without waiting for clinical manifestations to appear. Such an approach is essential in patients with greater cognitive reserve, in whom the lesions are usually more severe at diagnosis and treatment is less effective. To identify disease-modifying therapies to delay the onset of the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in cognitively intact persons at high risk, biomarkers for this disease must be validated. A single biomarker is unlikely to provide the required diagnostic accuracy and therefore a multimodal approach, incorporating biochemical, neuropathological and anatomical and metabolic neuroimaging methods, should be employed. To optimize the results of drugs under investigation, a combination of biomarkers should be used to select appropriate participants in the earliest phases of the disease, and disease progression should be followed-up. Early diagnosis might clarify essential questions in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, such as the possibility of distinguishing among various subtypes, thus encouraging the development of optimal treatments for each. The ultimate goal is to develop disease-modifying treatments that could be initiated early, while patients are asymptomatic or only minimally symptomatic, to maintain their quality of life.

  5. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  6. Metaphor Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease: Novelty Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of…

  7. Infection, systemic inflammation, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siok Lam; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Kitazawa, Masashi

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia among elderly. Yet, its etiology remains largely unclear. In this review, we summarize studies that associate systemic infection and neuroinflammation with AD, while highlighting that early-life or life-long exposure to infectious agents predisposes one to develop AD at a later age.

  8. Alzheimer disease pharmacologic treatment and treatment research.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews marketed pharmacologic treatments for Alzheimer disease as well as their efficacy, effectiveness, adverse effects, and issues involved in their use, including duration of treatment, adverse events, and controversies. Current experimental drug development, including challenges to developing successful drugs for Alzheimer disease, are also reviewed and assessed. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the available pharmacologic treatment options. They show limited clinical effects over the shorter term for some patients, mild to moderate cholinergic adverse effects in a minority of patients, and potentially underappreciated toxicity over the longer term. No subsequent experimental drug in development has been successful thus far; there has not been a new drug marketed for Alzheimer disease since 2003. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are marketed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. Drug development programs aimed at new targets, including the amyloid-β cascade, have been unsuccessful thus far despite their designs to detect very small or minimal clinical effects from the experimental drugs. Marked advances in preclinical science nevertheless support a basis for considerable optimism that effective interventions will be found soon.

  9. Monoamine neurons in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A M; DeKosky, S T

    1993-01-01

    The integrity of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Loss of dopaminergic innervation of the neostriatum is a prominent age-related change, which corresponds with the age-related loss of dopaminergic cell bodies from the substantia nigra. This change is regionally specific, since dopaminergic innervation of the neocortex and the neostriatum are not affected. Although there is an age-related loss of noradrenergic cell bodies from the locus coeruleus, most studies indicate normal concentrations of noradrenaline in target areas. There is also evidence for reduced serotonergic innervation of the neocortex and, less convincingly, the neostriatum. Alzheimer's disease is associated with more pronounced noradrenergic and serotonergic denervation but, unlike normal aging, dopaminergic innervation of neostriatum is intact; although dopamine neurons are probably dysfunctional in this region. Studies relating neuronal markers to the symptomatology of Alzheimer's disease indicate that dysfunction of monoamine neurons is more closely linked to non-cognitive than to cognitive changes in behavior. In addition, monoaminergic therapies have been successful in ameliorating affective and psychotic behaviors along with sleep disturbances in both Alzheimer's disease and senescence. It seems likely that monoaminergic therapies (developed as we learn more about alterations in dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin) will continue to be necessary to treat such behavioral disturbances.

  10. Alzheimer's disease: analyzing the missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disorder influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Recent work has identified 11 AD markers in 10 loci. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to analyze >2 million SNPs for 10,922 individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium to assess the phenotypic variance explained first by known late-onset AD loci, and then by all SNPs in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium dataset. In all, 33% of total phenotypic variance is explained by all common SNPs. APOE alone explained 6% and other known markers 2%, meaning more than 25% of phenotypic variance remains unexplained by known markers, but is tagged by common SNPs included on genotyping arrays or imputed with HapMap genotypes. Novel AD markers that explain large amounts of phenotypic variance are likely to be rare and unidentifiable using genome-wide association studies. Based on our findings and the current direction of human genetics research, we suggest specific study designs for future studies to identify the remaining heritability of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Metaphor Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease: Novelty Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of…

  12. A light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2017-02-01

    It is generally believed that there are some connections between Alzheimer's disease and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings, loss of motivation and behavioral issues. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. Infrared light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research we have studied the effect of infrared light on Alzheimer's disease through transgenic mouse model. We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily included a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emitted infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by performing two tests: cognitive performance of mice in Morris water maze, and plaque load by immunofluorescence analysis. Immunofluorescence analysis was based on measuring the quantity of plaques in mouse brain slices. Our results show that infrared therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Ideational Action Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chainay, H.; Louarn, C.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2006-01-01

    We report data from a group of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease on a range of tasks requiring either stored semantic knowledge about objects (e.g., naming object use) or the execution of action to objects (e.g., miming and using objects). We found that the patients were impaired at miming in response to objects, even when they could describe…

  14. Famous forgetters: notable people and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M; Jones, Joni L

    2010-03-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become much more prevalent and as yet there is no cure. This has given rise to the situation Tithonus faced in Greek mythology of living longer but not staying young. In this article, the authors explore this phenomenon while reviewing some notable people and AD.

  15. Sporadic Alzheimer's disease begins as episodes of brain ischemia and ischemically dysregulated Alzheimer's disease genes.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Ryszard; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Kocki, Janusz; Brzozowska, Judyta; Januszewski, Sławomir; Furmaga-Jabłońska, Wanda; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2013-12-01

    The study of sporadic Alzheimer's disease etiology, now more than ever, needs an infusion of new concepts. Despite ongoing interest in Alzheimer's disease, the basis of this entity is not yet clear. At present, the best-established and accepted "culprit" in Alzheimer's disease pathology by most scientists is the amyloid, as the main molecular factor responsible for neurodegeneration in this disease. Abnormal upregulation of amyloid production or a disturbed clearance mechanism may lead to pathological accumulation of amyloid in brain according to the "amyloid hypothesis." We will critically review these observations and highlight inconsistencies between the predictions of the "amyloid hypothesis" and the published data. There is still controversy over the role of amyloid in the pathological process. A question arises whether amyloid is responsible for the neurodegeneration or if it accumulates because of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests that the pathophysiology and neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease comprises more than amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and finally brain atrophy with dementia. Nowadays, a handful of researchers share a newly emerged view that the ischemic episodes of brain best describe the pathogenic cascade, which eventually leads to neuronal loss, especially in hippocampus, with amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and irreversible dementia of Alzheimer type. The most persuasive evidences come from investigations of ischemically damaged brains of patients and from experimental ischemic brain studies that mimic Alzheimer-type dementia. This review attempts to depict what we know and do not know about the triggering factor of the Alzheimer's disease, focusing on the possibility that the initial pathological trigger involves ischemic episodes and ischemia-induced gene dysregulation. The resulting brain ischemia dysregulates additionally expression of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-processing enzyme genes

  16. Why do we get Alzheimer's disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2006-10-02

    Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Why Do We Get Alzheimer's Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2006-01-02

    Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Socio-economic Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Marešová, Petra; Mohelská, Hana; Dolejš, Josef; Kuča, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Social development, better living conditions and medical advances lead to the fact that more people have the opportunity to live longer than in the past. The aging population is a characteristic feature of demographic trends in developed countries. This trend is closely linked with the issue of increasing number of diseases in old age and increasing government expenditure on health and social care. The most frequently mentioned diseases in old age include dementia. The cause may lie in all kinds of diseases, the most common are Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease. Now the care of current 35 million patients with dementia costs over $ 600 billion per year, it is approximately one percent of global Gross Domestic Product. This review discusses the recent issues and questions in the area of social and economic aspects of Alzheimer's disease. It focuses in detail on the national strategies in the approach to Alzheimer's disease, the anticipated problems concerning the insufficient number of social workers and necessary expenses of state budgets in the future. The situation in the area of health insurance companies' expenditures is illustrated in the context of the analysis of long-term care systems, in the chosen countries within the European Union.

  20. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  1. Alzheimer disease: current concepts & future directions.

    PubMed

    Musiek, Erik S; Schindler, Suzanne E

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over age 65, and is expected to cause a major public health crisis as the number of older Americans rapidly expands in the next three decades. Herein, we review current strategies for diagnosis and management of AD, and discuss ongoing clinical research and future therapeutic directions in the battle against this devastating disease.

  2. Community management of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A

    1988-03-01

    Community-based long-term care for victims of AD requires coordination and creativity on the part of a variety of health care professionals, including nurses, physicians, social workers, ancillary therapists, day-care coordinators, and staff in state and federal agencies, as well as of a variety of nonprofessionals who can provide ongoing home care or community agency assistance. The primary role of the health care professional in the community is to assist family members and care agencies in identifying, assessing, and implementing appropriate care for the person with a dementing illness. Much of that role involves matching family and patient needs with available services and participating in local, state, and federal organizations that project the type and extent of services needed now and in the future. Nursing care ranges from participating at the organizational or planning level to actually implementing hands-on care.

  3. Accelerating stem cell trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Joshua G; Rao, Mahendra; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bulte, Jeff W M; Atala, Anthony; LaFerla, Frank M; Greely, Henry T; Sawa, Akira; Gandy, Sam; Schneider, Lon S; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2016-02-01

    At present, no effective cure or prophylaxis exists for Alzheimer's disease. Symptomatic treatments are modestly effective and offer only temporary benefit. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have the potential to enable development of so-called disease-in-a-dish personalised models to study disease mechanisms and reveal new therapeutic approaches, and large panels of iPSCs enable rapid screening of potential drug candidates. Different cell types can also be produced for therapeutic use. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration granted investigational new drug approval for the first phase 2A clinical trial of ischaemia-tolerant mesenchymal stem cells to treat Alzheimer's disease in the USA. Similar trials are either underway or being planned in Europe and Asia. Although safety and ethical concerns remain, we call for the acceleration of human stem cell-based translational research into the causes and potential treatments of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Connexins and Pannexins in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Giaume, Christian; Sáez, Juan C; Song, Weihong; Leybaert, Luc; Naus, Christian C

    2017-09-08

    By 2040 neurodegenerative diseases will become the world's second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease (WHO). Major efforts are required to elucidate the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. Connexin and pannexin membrane channel proteins are conduits through which neuronal, glial, and vascular tissues interact. In the normal brain, this interaction underlies homeostasis, metabolic supply and neuroprotection. In models of neuroinflammation these channels present aberrant functioning. Validation of the molecular mechanisms by which these membrane channels influence neurodegeneration particularly in Alzheimer's disease could lead to new and alternative therapeutic strategies targeting these channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Alzheimer’s Disease at a Glance Researchers have explored many ... health approaches for preventing or slowing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, there is no strong evidence that ...

  6. Research agenda for understanding Alzheimer disease in diverse populations: work group on cultural diversity, Alzheimer's association.

    PubMed

    Shadlen, Marie-Florence; McCormick, Wayne C; Larson, Eric B

    2002-01-01

    The emerging evidence of ethnic variations in apolipoprotein polymorphism and Alzheimer disease risk shows that one cannot generalize findings based on a single cultural group too broadly ( Tang et al., 2001). Presence of one apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele is a stronger risk factor for Alzheimer disease in whites and Asians than in blacks ( Farrer et al., 1997). Environmental or genetic cofactors may modulate the effects of epsilon 4 on beta-amyloid metabolism differently in different subpopulations ( Shadlen, 1998). Recognizing this, the Alzheimer's Association has extended its goals to strengthen the scientific information base on the interactions of population diversity and Alzheimer disease heterogeneity ( NIA, 1998). This new focus is timely since minority elderly are the most rapidly increasing segment of the elderly population ( Lilienfeld and Perl, 1994, Brookmeyer et al., 1998). In this article, the authors highlight recent progress in research on Alzheimer disease among culturally diverse populations with a special emphasis on gaps in the knowledge base. The authors recommend four priorities for future Alzheimer disease research: (1) determine whether genetic causative factors interact differently in different populations; (2) reexamine the nature and role of cerebral ischemia and infarction and variations in symptom severity of Alzheimer disease; (3) explore the interaction of genes and environmental influences that are protective against Alzheimer disease; and (4) recruit and enroll ethnically diverse subjects in Alzheimer disease clinical trials.

  7. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a “nucleoplasmic reticulum,” into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  8. [Genetic aspects of Alzheimer's disease (Review)].

    PubMed

    El Kadmiri, N; Hamzi, K; El Moutawakil, B; Slassi, I; Nadifi, S

    2013-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative brain disorder, which concerns memory, cognition and behavior pattern. Its etiology is unknown, it is characterized by typical histological lesions: senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial pathology, characterized by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Genetic factors concern first of all the exceptional monogenic forms, characterized by early onset (<60 years), autosomal dominant forms. Mutations of the genes coding for amyloid-ß precursor protein or preselinins 1 and 2 are involved. The much more frequent sporadic forms also have genetic factors, the best studied being the apolipoprotein E4 coding allele and some more recent genotypes which will be mentioned. No causal, only symptomatic treatments are available.

  9. Mild Alzheimer's disease: a "position paper".

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Voisin, T; Andrieu, S; Belliard, S; Belmin, J; Blanchard, F; Ceccaldi, M; Dartigues, J F; Defontaines, B; Lehericy, S; Mekies, C; Moreaud, O; Naccache, L; Nourhashemi, F; Ousset, P J; Pasquier, F; Payoux, P; Puisieux, F; Robert, P; Touchon, J; Vellas, B; Dubois, B

    2009-06-01

    Under the auspices of the Societe Francaise de Geriatrie et Gerontologie, a multi-disciplinary group of specialists in geriatrics, neurology, epidemiology, psychiatry, neuroradiology and nuclear medicine met with the aim of drawing up references on the methods for diagnosing and treating mild Alzheimer's disease. The critical analysis of international literature, conducted by Professor Bruno Vellas for the scientific committee, has served to support study of the latest knowledge in 2008. The multi-disciplinary group met on 14 and 15 May 2008 in order to set out the questions that this study must answer and to allocate draft studies. Thus, it has been possible to conduct a study focused on mild Alzheimer's disease, giving particular attention to diagnostic procedure, specific methods of treatment and the benefits of making a diagnosis.

  10. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-03

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination.

  11. Molecular Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria-Castro, Alfredo; Alvarado-Echeverría, Ileana; Monge-Bonilla, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a chronic or progressive syndrome, characterized by impaired cognitive capacity beyond what could be considered a consequence of normal aging. It affects the memory, thinking process, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning ability, language, and judgment; although awareness is usually unaffected. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia; symptoms include memory loss, difficulty solving problems, disorientation in time and space, among others. The disease was first described in 1906 at a conference in Tubingen, Germany by Alois Alzheimer. One hundred and ten years since its first documentation, many aspects of the pathophysiology of AD have been discovered and understood, however gaps of knowledge continue to exist. This literature review summarizes the main underlying neurobiological mechanisms in AD, including the theory with emphasis on amyloid peptide, cholinergic hypothesis, glutamatergic neurotransmission, the role of tau protein, and the involvement of oxidative stress and calcium. PMID:28588356

  12. 77 FR 66519 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ..., extend our support to Americans living with Alzheimer's, and press on toward promising new treatments... lays out a bold vision for Alzheimer's prevention and treatment, calling for a comprehensive... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8897 of November 1, 2012 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month,...

  13. Future targeted disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. Alzheimer's disease will be responsible for an enormous burden on the individual and the society, as with the aging of the population, the incidence and the prevalence will grow. Presently, the drugs used in Alzheimer's disease are only effective symptomatically and improve functioning. They do not halt the progression of the disease. With the recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease, there have been tremendous advances in the clinical trials of compounds that can modify the disease process. Numerous therapeutic interventions and neuroprotective approaches are also in trial phase. It seems that in near future some of these compounds may be found effective and safe for use in this disease there by reducing the incidence of this disease in years to come, thereby lessen the burden due to it. In this article various compounds that can modify the course of the disease are discussed. Some recent patents and inventions for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease have also been discussed.

  14. Preservation of musical memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Crystal, H A; Grober, E; Masur, D

    1989-12-01

    An 82 year old musician with Alzheimer's disease (AD) showed a preserved ability to play previously learned piano compositions from memory while being unable to identify the composer or titles of each work. He also showed a preserved ability to learn the new skill of mirror reading while being unable to recall or recognise new information. Both anterograde and retrograde procedural memory may be relatively spared in AD.

  15. Preservation of musical memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, H A; Grober, E; Masur, D

    1989-01-01

    An 82 year old musician with Alzheimer's disease (AD) showed a preserved ability to play previously learned piano compositions from memory while being unable to identify the composer or titles of each work. He also showed a preserved ability to learn the new skill of mirror reading while being unable to recall or recognise new information. Both anterograde and retrograde procedural memory may be relatively spared in AD. PMID:2614438

  16. Advances in diagnostic testing for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Suzanne E; McConathy, Jonathan; Ances, Beau M; Diamond, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia is based primarily on the clinical history and examination, but advances in understanding the pathophysiology of AD have led to new diagnostic methods. When used appropriately, the tests can provide strong positive or negative evidence AD dementia. This article described which patients may benefit from additional testing using Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) biomarkers, amyloid imaging, quantitative structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET).

  17. Recent advances in imaging Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braskie, Meredith N; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Advances in brain imaging technology in the past five years have contributed greatly to the understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we review recent research related to amyloid imaging, new methods for magnetic resonance imaging analyses, and statistical methods. We also review research that evaluates AD risk factors and brain imaging, in the context of AD prediction and progression. We selected a variety of illustrative studies, describing how they advanced the field and are leading AD research in promising new directions.

  18. [Progress in epigenetic research on Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Wei, Yang; Xu, Qian; Tang, Beisha

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, which features mainly with memory impairment as the initial symptom of progressive loss of cognitive function. Its main pathological changes include senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The pathogenesis of AD is still unclear, though it may be connected with aging, genetic factors and environmental factors. Among these, aging and environmental factors can be modified by epigenetics. In this paper, advances in the study of epigenetic mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of AD are reviewed.

  19. Children of Persons With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jarvik, Lissy; LaRue, Asenath; Blacker, Deborah; Gatz, Margaret; Kawas, Claudia; McArdle, John J.; Morris, John C.; Mortimer, James A.; Ringman, John M.; Ercoli, Linda; Freimer, Nelson; Gokhman, Izabella; Manly, Jennifer J.; Plassman, Brenda L.; Rasgon, Natalie; Roberts, Jeffrey Scott; Sunderland, Trey; Swan, Gary E.; Wolf, Phillip A.; Zonderman, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Children of persons with Alzheimer disease (AD), as a group, face an increased risk of developing AD. Many of them, throughout their adult lives, seek input on how to reduce their chances of one day suffering their parent’s fate. We examine the state of knowledge with respect to risk and protective factors for AD and recommend a research agenda with special emphasis on AD offspring. PMID:18317242

  20. Descriptive writing abilities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Neils, J; Boller, F; Gerdeman, B; Cole, M

    1989-10-01

    The descriptive writing abilities of 15 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) of mild to moderate severity were compared with 15 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Sixteen features of written linguistic ability were analyzed. AD subjects wrote shorter descriptive paragraphs than normal elderly subjects. Features related to letter or spelling errors and content words were found to be significantly different between the two groups, whereas functor word errors and number of attempted corrections did not significantly differ between the two groups.

  1. The dentate gyrus in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Thomas G

    2007-01-01

    As part of the hippocampus, the dentate gyrus is considered to play a crucial role in associative memory. The reviewed data suggest that the dentate gyrus withstands the formation of plaques, tangles and neuronal death until late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, changes related to a disconnecting process, and more subtle intrinsic alterations, may contribute to disturbances in memory and learning observed in early stages of AD.

  2. [Research progress of transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Ji, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. Drosophila has been regard as one of the ideal models for Alzheimer because of its unique advantage on genetic manipulation. AD transgenic drosophila models not only help to elucidate the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, but also provide potential screening models for drugs to treat the disease. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress using AD transgenic drosophila.

  3. Whole Exome Analysis of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Mayeux RP, Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium. Whole-exome sequencing of Hispanic early-onset Alzheimer disease families identifies rare variants...majority of genetic risk for this form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. We performed Whole-Exome Sequencing (WES) on 55 individuals in 19 Caribbean...EOAD and ~11% of EOAD overall, leaving the majority of genetic risk for the most severe form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. Methods We

  4. Smoking affects the phenotype of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, M N; Tyas, S L; Emery, S C; Hansen, L A; Alford, M F; Reid, R T; Tiraboschi, P; Thal, L J

    2005-04-12

    Because epidemiologic and in vitro evidence conflict, the authors studied the association between smoking and Alzheimer disease (AD) in 46 never, 47 former, and 15 active smokers with AD followed to autopsy. Disease parameters were examined by smoking status and amount smoked in bivariate tests and in multivariate models controlling for age, sex, education, and APOE status. Smoking status was not associated with cognitive or neuropathologic measures. However, active smokers were significantly younger at death and higher levels of smoking were associated with shorter disease duration.

  5. The superficial white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Piras, Fabrizio; Orfei, Maria Donata; Iorio, Mariangela; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in the large deep fibers of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the late myelinating superficial white matter comprised of intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received much attention. To investigate this area, we extracted a surface corresponding to the superficial white matter beneath the cortex and then applied a cortical pattern-matching approach which allowed us to register and subsequently sample diffusivity along thousands of points at the interface between the gray matter and white matter in 44 patients with Alzheimer's disease (Age: 71.02 ± 5.84, 16M/28F) and 47 healthy controls (Age 69.23 ± 4.45, 19M/28F). In patients we found an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across most of the superficial white matter (P < 0.001) with increases in diffusivity of more than 20% in the bilateral parahippocampal regions and the temporal and frontal lobes. Furthermore, diffusivity correlated with the cognitive deficits measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination scores (P < 0.001). The superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and is critical for the integration of multimodal information during brain maturation and aging. Here we show that there are major abnormalities in patients and the deterioration of these fibers relates to clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Amos, Edwin C.; Canick, Jonathan; Ackerley, Mary; Raji, Cyrus; Fiala, Milan; Ahdidan, Jamila

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems nationally and globally. Recently, the first description of the reversal of cognitive decline in patients with early Alzheimer's disease or its precursors, MCI (mild cognitive impairment) and SCI (subjective cognitive impairment), was published [1]. The therapeutic approach used was programmatic and personalized rather than monotherapeutic and invariant, and was dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND). Patients who had had to discontinue work were able to return to work, and those struggling at work were able to improve their performance. The patients, their spouses, and their co-workers all reported clear improvements. Here we report the results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing in ten patients with cognitive decline, nine ApoE4+ (five homozygous and four heterozygous) and one ApoE4−, who were treated with the MEND protocol for 5-24 months. The magnitude of the improvement is unprecedented, providing additional objective evidence that this programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. These results have far-reaching implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, MCI, and SCI; for personalized programs that may enhance pharmaceutical efficacy; and for personal identification of ApoE genotype. PMID:27294343

  7. Personalized medicine in Alzheimer's disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Souslova, Tatiana; Marple, Teresa C; Spiekerman, A Michael; Mohammad, Amin A

    2013-11-01

    Latest research in the mental health field brings new hope to patients and promises to revolutionize the field of psychiatry. Personalized pharmacogenetic tests that aid in diagnosis and treatment choice are now becoming available for clinical practice. Amyloid beta peptide biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease are now available. For the first time, radiologists are able to visualize amyloid plaques specific to Alzheimer's disease in live patients using Positron Emission Tomography-based tests approved by the FDA. A novel blood-based assay has been developed to aid in the diagnosis of depression based on activation of the HPA axis, metabolic, inflammatory and neurochemical pathways. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors have shown increased remission rates in specific ethnic subgroups and Cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms can predict antidepressant tolerability. The latest research will help to eradicate "trial and error" prescription, ushering in the most personalized medicine to date. Like all major medical breakthroughs, integration of new algorithms and technologies requires sound science and time. But for many mentally ill patients, diagnosis and effective therapy cannot happen fast enough. This review will describe the newest diagnostic tests, treatments and clinical studies for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and unipolar, major depressive disorder. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of Alzheimer's disease and Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Tiffany L

    2008-06-01

    This paper critically reviews the association of infection by Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aging population has increased interest in finding the cause of AD, but studies have yielded contradictory results that are likely due to varying diagnostic tools and different uses of diagnostic tests. Knowledge of AD's characteristics, risk factors, and hypothesized etiologies has expanded since Alois Alzheimer's initial description of AD. Epidemiologic and projection studies provide incidence estimates of AD through a two-stage method: (1) primary diagnosis of dementia by cognitive testing such as Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and (2) clinical diagnosis of AD through criteria such as National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA). Cross-sectional studies yield prevalence estimates of infection by C. pneumoniae by detecting immunoglobulins through laboratory tests such as microimmunofluorescence (MIF). Studies examining the association of C. pneumoniae and AD are limited, but brain autopsy provides information about presence, proximity to areas associated with AD, and bacterial load. Standardization of diagnostic techniques would allow for better comparability of studies, but uncertainty about the best method of diagnosis of infection by C. pneumoniae and AD may call for revised or novel diagnostic tools.

  9. Alzheimer's disease: a report from the 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka

    2015-10-01

    The 7th Kuopio Alzheimer symposium was held on 11-13 June, 2015, in Kuopio, Finland and attracted ~250 attendees from 14 different countries around the world. The theme for the symposium in its seventh year was 'From mechanisms to prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease'. The 3-day international scientific symposium composed of seven oral sessions and a poster session. The program, spanning from molecular mechanisms to prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, provided a forum for the attendees to share their research, network and to obtain a comprehensive overview of the current status and future directions of research into Alzheimer's disease.

  10. A case of combined Pick's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Lantos, P L

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of combined Pick's and Alzheimer's disease is rare, and over the years different authors have used different criteria to arrive at such a diagnosis. A case is reported of presenile dementia in which the histological changes of Pick's disease and Alzheimer's disease were mingled. The brain showed no focal atrophy, but the Pick changes were most numerous in the hippocampus and in the temporal lobe. An antibody against the 155 kilodalton component of neurofilaments demonstrated not only neurofibrillary tangles and components of senile plaques, but also Pick's inclusions. Images PMID:6310050

  11. Clioquinol for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jenagaratnam, L; McShane, R

    2006-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) may result in senile plaques being formed outside the brain as accumulation of beta-amyloid (Ass). To evaluate the efficacy of clioquinol for the treatment of cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease. The Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register was searched on 20 May 2005 using the terms clioquinol and PBT1. The Register contains records from major health care databases and many ongoing trial databases and is updated regularly. The Internet was searched using the term: clioquinol PBT1 Alzheimer*. Randomised double-blind trials in which treatment with clioquinol was administered to participants with Alzheimer's disease in parallel group comparison with placebo are included. Two reviewers (RM, LJ) independently assessed the quality of trials according to the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook. The primary outcome measures of interest were cognitive function (as measured by psychometric tests) and global impression. The secondary outcome measures of interest were in the following areas: quality of life, functional performance, effect on carer, safety and adverse effects, and death. There was one included trial of clioquinol compared with placebo in 36 patients. It is not clear from the trial that clioquinol shows any positive clinical result on patients with AD. The two statistically significant positive results were seen for the more severely affected subgroup of patients. This effect was not maintained at the 36 week end-point. The sample size was small. Details of randomisation procedure or blinding were not reported. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential for clioquinol as a treatment of AD. Trials of longer duration are also required, particularly because information about the side-effects of long-term use of clioquinol is limited.

  12. International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) aims to capture global Alzheimer's disease research funding.

    PubMed

    Liggins, Charlene; Snyder, Heather M; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Ryan, Laurie; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD research and research-related resources, major funding organizations are starting to utilize the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) to categorize their funding information. This information is captured in the International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) for further analysis. As of January, 2014, over fifteen organizations from the US, Canada, Europe and Australia have contributed their information. The goal of the IADRP project is to enable funding organizations to assess the changing landscape of AD research and coordinate strategies, leverage resources, and avoid duplication of effort.

  13. [Semantic memory training in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Goudour, Amandine; Samson, Séverine; Bakchine, Serge; Ehrlé, Nathalie

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of semantic stimulation of Alzheimer's patients on semantic memory comparatively to psychological support. We conducted semantic training with two target categories (musical instruments and human actions), because these concepts were massively failed in previous data collected in Alzheimer's disease. Ten patients (57-78 year old, MMSE scores from 17 to 26) were divided in an experimental and a control group where patients received psychological support instead of semantic cognitive training. Semantic abilities were significantly improved in patients from the experimental group, but only after semantic stimulation involving examples from musical instrument category. However, further analysis failed to show an item-specific improvement, suggesting that our results could be explained by a general increase of semantic retrieval. Results could also be explained by some motivational effect caused by more attractive material. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed.

  14. The Neuropsychological Profile of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Sandra; Wicklund, Alissa H.; Salmon, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessment has featured prominently over the past 30 years in the characterization of dementia associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Clinical neuropsychological methods have identified the earliest, most definitive cognitive and behavioral symptoms of illness, contributing to the identification, staging, and tracking of disease. With increasing public awareness of dementia, disease detection has moved to earlier stages of illness, at a time when deficits are both behaviorally and pathologically selective. For reasons that are not well understood, early AD pathology frequently targets large-scale neuroanatomical networks for episodic memory before other networks that subserve language, attention, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. This chapter reviews the pathognomonic neuropsychological features of AD dementia and how these differ from “normal,” age-related cognitive decline and from other neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia, including cortical Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22474609

  15. The neuropsychological profile of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sandra; Wicklund, Alissa H; Salmon, David P

    2012-04-01

    Neuropsychological assessment has featured prominently over the past 30 years in the characterization of dementia associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Clinical neuropsychological methods have identified the earliest, most definitive cognitive and behavioral symptoms of illness, contributing to the identification, staging, and tracking of disease. With increasing public awareness of dementia, disease detection has moved to earlier stages of illness, at a time when deficits are both behaviorally and pathologically selective. For reasons that are not well understood, early AD pathology frequently targets large-scale neuroanatomical networks for episodic memory before other networks that subserve language, attention, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. This chapter reviews the pathognomonic neuropsychological features of AD dementia and how these differ from "normal," age-related cognitive decline and from other neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia, including cortical Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and cerebrovascular disease.

  16. The Proteasome and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Pomatto, Laura Corrales-Diaz; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is projected to exceed more than 100 million cases worldwide by 2050. Aging is considered the primary risk factor for some 90% of Alzheimer's cases but a significant 10% of patients suffer from aggressive, early-onset forms of the disease. There is currently no effective Alzheimer's treatment and this, coupled with a growing aging population, highlights the necessity to understand the mechanism(s) of disease initiation and propagation. A major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates (an early marker of Alzheimer's disease), and neurofibrillary tangles, comprising the hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau. Recent Advances: Protein oxidation is frequently invoked as a potential factor in the progression of Alzheimer's disease; however, whether it is a cause or a consequence of the pathology is still being debated. The Proteasome complex is a major regulator of intracellular protein quality control and an essential proteolytic enzyme for the processing of both Aβ and Tau. Recent studies have indicated that both protein oxidation and excessive phosphorylation may limit Proteasomal processing of Aβ and Tau in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the Proteasome may be a key factor in understanding the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology; however, its significance is still very much under investigation. Discovering how the proteasome is affected, regulated, or dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease could be a valuable tool in the efforts to understand and, ultimately, eradicate the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 886-901.

  17. 'Making the best you can of it': living with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Hazel

    2008-04-01

    Drawing upon data from a qualitative study of persons who are in the early stage of the condition, this paper examines the meaning of Alzheimer's disease. It contrasts the meaning of the disease as portrayed in popular culture with its meaning as interpreted by persons living with it. Findings show that persons with the illness do not necessarily accept the negative cultural meaning of the disease, nor the helpless 'victim' role in which they are generally cast. With a determination to 'make the best of it', strategies such as humour, normalisation, present-time orientation, and life review are employed to create a meaningful life.

  18. Pattern of extrapyramidal signs in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often develop extrapyramidal signs (EPS), which increase in frequency as the disease progresses. We aimed to investigate the patterns of presentation of EPS in AD and their correlation with clinical and neuropathological features. 4284 subjects diagnosed with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database with at least one abnormal Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment were included. Individuals were assigned to a discovery sample and a sensitivity analysis sample (moderate and mild dementia, respectively) and a subset of subjects provided neuropathological data (n = 284). Individuals from the Washington Heights and Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) served as validation sample. Patterns of presentation of EPS were identified employing categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). Six principal components were identified in both mild and moderate AD samples: (I) hand movements, alternating movements, finger tapping, leg agility ("limbs bradykinesia"); (II) posture, postural instability, arising from chair, gait and body bradykinesia/hypokinesia ("axial"); (III) limb rigidity ("rigidity"); (IV) postural tremor; (V) resting tremor; (VI) speech and facial expression. Similar results were obtained in the WHICAP cohort. Individuals with hallucinations, apathy, aberrant night behaviors and more severe dementia showed higher axial and limb bradykinesia scores. "Limb bradykinesia" component was associated with a neuropathological diagnosis of Lewy body disease and "axial" component with reduced AD-type pathology. Patterns of EPS in AD show distinct clinical and neuropathological correlates; they share a pattern of presentation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  20. Advances in Alzheimer's disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Michael S; Aisen, Paul S

    2015-03-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the foremost cause of dementia worldwide. Clinically, AD manifests as progressive memory impairment followed by a gradual decline in other cognitive abilities leading to complete functional dependency. Recent biomarker studies indicate that AD is characterized by a long asymptomatic phase, with the development of pathology occurring at least a decade prior to the onset of any symptoms. Current FDA-approved treatments target neurotransmitter abnormalities associated with the disease but do not affect what is believed to be the underlying etiology. In this review, we briefly discuss the most recent therapeutic strategies being employed in AD clinical trials, as well the scientific rationale with which they have been developed.

  1. Peripheral cholesterol, metabolic disorders and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Dotti, Carlos Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Strong correlations have been made between high levels of blood cholesterol and the risk to suffer Alzheimer's disease (AD). The question arises on how a peripheral event contributes to a disease that so severely affects the integrity and function of the Central Nervous System. Hypercholesterolemia has been also associated to peripheral metabolic disorders like diabetes, obesity or atherosclerosis that, in turn, predispose to AD. Here we review data, which point to alterations in blood cholesterol levels as a link between these metabolic disorders and AD. We describe and discuss common, cholesterol-related, molecular mechanisms and strategies to fight these conditions that, altogether, constitute a major cause of death in our societies.

  2. Visual system manifestations of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kusne, Yael; Wolf, Andrew B; Townley, Kate; Conway, Mandi; Peyman, Gholam A

    2016-11-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an increasingly common disease with massive personal and economic costs. While it has long been known that AD impacts the visual system, there has recently been an increased focus on understanding both pathophysiological mechanisms that may be shared between the eye and brain and how related biomarkers could be useful for AD diagnosis. Here, were review pertinent cellular and molecular mechanisms of AD pathophysiology, the presence of AD pathology in the visual system, associated functional changes, and potential development of diagnostic tools based on the visual system. Additionally, we discuss links between AD and visual disorders, including possible pathophysiological mechanisms and their relevance for improving our understanding of AD.

  3. Red mold fermented products and Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is seen mainly in individuals over the age of 65, and the morbidity rate increases with age. Regarding the health function of Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), besides hypolipidemic and hypotensive effects, other health functions of RMR such as anti-oxidation, cancer prevention, anti-fatigue, and anti-obesity have also been reported. Many published studies have shown the efficacy of RMR in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. The current article discusses and provides evidence to support the beneficial potential of RMR in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease by discussing the pathogenic factors of Alzheimer's disease and the secondary metabolites of Monascus.

  4. The informatics core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative project has brought together geographically distributed investigators, each collecting data on the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The quantity and diversity of the imaging, clinical, cognitive, biochemical, and genetic data acquired and generated throughout the study necessitated sophisticated informatics systems to organize, manage, and disseminate data and results. We describe, here, a successful and comprehensive system that provides powerful mechanisms for processing, integrating, and disseminating these data not only to support the research needs of the investigators who make up the Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative cores, but also to provide widespread data access to the greater scientific community for the study of Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20451873

  5. Caloric Intake, Dietary Lifestyles, Macronutrient Composition, and Alzheimer' Disease Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria; Wang, Jun; Porter, Shanee; Ho, Lap

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition currently affecting over 5 million elderly individuals in the United States. There is much evidence suggesting that certain dietary lifestyles can help to prevent and possibly treat Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we discuss how certain cardiovascular and diabetic conditions can induce an increased susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms through which this occurs. We further discuss how the consumption of certain foods or food components can help to reduce one's risk for Alzheimer's disease and may possibly be developed as a therapeutic agent. PMID:21808725

  6. Alzheimer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Alzheimer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Alzheimer disease : Alzheimer's Association -- www.alz.org Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center -- www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers ...

  7. Reduced circulating angiogenic cells in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-T; Chu, K; Jung, K-H; Park, H-K; Kim, D-H; Bahn, J-J; Kim, J-H; Oh, M-J; Lee, S K; Kim, M; Roh, J-K

    2009-05-26

    Neurovascular dysfunction and senescent endothelium contribute to the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), provide a cellular reservoir for the endothelial replacement. To study the involvement of CACs in AD pathogenesis, we investigated the levels of CACs in patients with AD. Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AD (n = 55), patients with non-AD neurodegenerative diseases (n = 37), and nondemented risk factor control subjects (RF control, n = 55 and 37) were enrolled after matching for age, sex, and Framingham risk score. Peripheral blood samples were taken, and EPC colony-forming units (CFU-EPC) were cultured and counted. The patients with AD had significantly lower CFU-EPC than the RF controls. In the patients with AD, a lower CFU-EPC was independently associated with either a lower Mini-Mental State Examination score or a higher Clinical Dementia Rating scale score, indicating a greater reduction in CFU-EPC in advanced AD. Patients with non-AD neurodegenerative diseases did not show a significant decrease in CFU-EPC levels. Our results indicate that patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) have reduced circulating angiogenic cells, suggesting that an abnormal capacity to regenerate endothelium is associated with AD.

  8. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date.

  9. How does diabetes accelerate Alzheimer disease pathology?

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Kim, Bhumsoo; Rosko, Andrew; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-10-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer disease (AD)-two age-related diseases-are both increasing in prevalence, and numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The underlying biological mechanisms that link the development of diabetes with AD are not fully understood. Abnormal protein processing, abnormalities in insulin signaling, dysregulated glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, the formation of advanced glycation end products, and the activation of inflammatory pathways are features common to both diseases. Hypercholesterolemia is another factor that has received attention, owing to its potential association with diabetes and AD. This Review summarizes the mechanistic pathways that might link diabetes and AD. An understanding of this complex interaction is necessary for the development of novel drug therapies and lifestyle guidelines aimed at the treatment and/or prevention of these diseases.

  10. Brain PET in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Charles; Mena, Esther; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current role of brain PET in the diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia. The characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism on brain FDG-PET can help in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from other causes of dementia such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia of Lewy body. Amyloid brain PET may exclude significant amyloid deposition and thus Alzheimer's disease in appropriate clinical setting. FDG-PET and amyloid PET imaging are valuable in the assessment of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Developing novel blood-based biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Carrillo, Maria C; Grodstein, Francine; Henriksen, Kim; Jeromin, Andreas; Lovestone, Simon; Mielke, Michelle M; O'Bryant, Sid; Sarasa, Manual; Sjøgren, Magnus; Soares, Holly; Teeling, Jessica; Trushina, Eugenia; Ward, Malcolm; West, Tim; Bain, Lisa J; Shineman, Diana W; Weiner, Michael; Fillit, Howard M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the public health crisis of the 21st century. There is a clear need for a widely available, inexpensive and reliable method to diagnosis Alzheimer's disease in the earliest stages, track disease progression, and accelerate clinical development of new therapeutics. One avenue of research being explored is blood based biomarkers. In April 2012, the Alzheimer's Association and the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation convened top scientists from around the world to discuss the state of blood based biomarker development. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant discussion, including potential next steps to move this area of research forward.

  12. Determinants of carer stress in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Tarrier, N; Burns, A

    1998-04-01

    To explore the impact of subgroups and individual symptoms of non-cognitive disturbance on the carers of Alzheimer's disease patients. Cross-sectional study using clinically valid scales to assess patient symptomatology and self-report questionnaires to measure carer variables. Old age psychiatry outreach services in South and Central Manchester. 100 patients with Alzheimer's disease living at home and their carers. Subjective burden and distress in carers. Separate statistical analyses were performed for subgroups and individual symptoms of non-cognitive disturbance. For subgroups, multivariate analyses identified depression and behavioural disturbances in patients as significant predictors of subjective burden in carers. Carer distress was predicted by depression, psychosis and cognitive impairments in patients and carer gender. For individual symptoms of non-cognitive disturbance, three features of depression in patients (mood-related signs, physical signs and behaviour changes), walking disruptions and the patient-carer relationship predicted of subjective burden in carers. Variance in the level of carer distress was accounted for by sleep disruptions, hallucinations and mood-related depressive features in patients and carer gender. The findings confirm that the non-cognitive features of Alzheimer's disease are stressful for carers and indicate specific relationships between mood-related and behavioural signs of depression, walking and sleep disruptions and hallucinations in patients and adverse carer outcomes. Patient depression and the mood-related signs of depression in particular were the most consistent and powerful predictors of psychological morbidity in carers. Intervention strategies need to identify and target troublesome behaviours in patients and aim to either change these behaviours or alter the way carers respond to them. Thus, interventions need to be symptoms-rather than service-led and are likely to require multidisciplinary and multi

  13. Alzheimer's disease - the ways of prevention.

    PubMed

    Kivipelto, M; Solomon, A

    2008-01-01

    Several vascular and lifestyle related factors have been suggested to influence the development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), creating new prevention opportunities. This paper discusses current epidemiological evidence and new findings from the Finnish population based CAIDE study linking some of these factors to dementia/AD. Such findings provide an optimistic outlook especially for persons with genetic susceptibility; it may be possible to reduce the risk or postpone the onset of dementia by adopting healthy lifestyle options. The interplay of genes and environment in the aetiology of AD needs to be further investigated as well as the role of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions for the prevention of dementia.

  14. Recency effect in Alzheimer's disease: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, G A; Fadda, L; Sabbadini, M; Caltagirone, C

    1996-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that discrepant results regarding the recency effect in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are due to the different scoring procedures used by various authors and/or to the different number of terminal items attributed to the recency part of the curve. Our results indicate that the last two processed words are available to AD patients for recall, just as they are to controls. Words processed slightly earlier are less available to AD patients than to controls, presumably because of the accelerated forgetting rate in demented patients.

  15. Treatment of Alzheimer Disease With CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eugene R.; Hosfeld, Victor D.; Nadolski, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) primarily affects older adults. This neurodegenerative disorder is the most common cause of dementia and is a leading source of their morbidity and mortality. Patient care costs in the United States are about 200 billion dollars and will more than double by 2040. This case report describes the remarkable improvement in a patient with advanced AD in hospice who received 5 computed tomography scans of the brain, about 40 mGy each, over a period of 3 months. The mechanism appears to be radiation-induced upregulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against AD, which partially restored cognition, memory, speech, movement, and appetite. PMID:27103883

  16. Transforming growth factor beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Hu, S; Frey, W H; Ala, T A; Tourtellotte, W W; Peterson, P K

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized to be an inflammatory condition. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), counteract the inflammatory process. In the present study, we found that TGF-beta levels were elevated in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples obtained from AD patients < 6 h after death. Serum TGF-beta levels were also markedly elevated before death. These results suggest that elevated TGF-beta levels in AD may represent a protective host response to immunologically mediated neuronal injury. PMID:7496909

  17. Alzheimer's disease camouflaged by histrionic personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Dykierek, Petra; Hellwig, Bernhard; Zwernemann, Stefan; Meyer, Philipp T

    2012-02-01

    A common condition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unawareness of deficits. Different concepts try to elucidate the nature of this symptom. An essential question relates to the interaction of organic and psychogenic factors. Here we present a patient who displayed her cognitive deficits as attention-seeking behaviour. There was a history of histrionic personality disorder according to ICD-10 criteria. Unexpectedly, the final diagnosis after extensive diagnostic work-up was AD. The unusual coincidence of AD and a histrionic personality disorder hampered the clinical process of diagnosing dementia. We discuss unawareness as a complex concept incorporating neuroanatomical, psychiatric, and psychosocial aspects.

  18. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

  19. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  20. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  1. Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chintamaneni, Meena; Bhaskar, Manju

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of individuals worldwide. It is currently diagnosed only via clinical assessments and confirmed by postmortem brain pathology. The development of validated biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease is essential to improve diagnosis and accelerate the development of new therapies. Biochemical and neuroimaging markers could facilitate diagnosis, predict AD progression from a pre-AD state of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and be used to monitor efficacies of disease-modifying therapies. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau have diagnostic values in AD. Measurements of the above CSF markers in combination are useful in predicting the risk of progression from MCI to AD. New potential biomarkers are emerging, and CSF or plasma marker profiles may eventually become part of the clinician's toolkit for accurate AD diagnosis and management. These biomarkers along with clinical assessment, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging could achieve a much higher diagnostic accuracy for AD and related disorders in the future. PMID:22811931

  2. [A new definition for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 and 2010, the International Working Group on Research Criteria for Alzheimer's Disease introduced a new conceptual framework that included a diagnostic algorithm covering early prodromal stages. There is a growing consensus that Alzheimer's disease (AD) should be considered as a clinical-biological entity characterized by: i) a well-defined clinical phenotype (an amnestic syndrome of the hippocampal type in typical AD), and ii) biomarkers, especially pathophysiological biomarkers, of the underlying disease process. The IWG criteria created the possibility for AD to be diagnosed prior to the onset of dementia, and also integrated biomarkers into the diagnostic framework. Although these criteria were intended for research purposes, they are increasingly used in expert centers for early diagnosis, for example of young-onset AD and complex cases (posterior cortical atrophy, primary progressive aphasia, etc.), where biomarkers can improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this article we present this new approach, together with the results of ongoing validation studies and data obtained by a French research team.

  3. Classification and basic pathology of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Duyckaerts, Charles; Delatour, Benoît; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The lesions of Alzheimer disease include accumulation of proteins, losses of neurons and synapses, and alterations related to reactive processes. Extracellular Abeta accumulation occurs in the parenchyma as diffuse, focal or stellate deposits. It may involve the vessel walls of arteries, veins and capillaries. The cases in which the capillary vessel walls are affected have a higher probability of having one or two apoepsilon 4 alleles. Parenchymal as well as vascular Abeta deposition follows a stepwise progression. Tau accumulation, probably the best histopathological correlate of the clinical symptoms, takes three aspects: in the cell body of the neuron as neurofibrillary tangle, in the dendrites as neuropil threads, and in the axons forming the senile plaque neuritic corona. The progression of tau pathology is stepwise and stereotyped from the entorhinal cortex, through the hippocampus, to the isocortex. The neuronal loss is heterogeneous and area-specific. Its mechanism is still discussed. The timing of the synaptic loss, probably linked to Abeta peptide itself, maybe as oligomers, is also controversial. Various clinico-pathological types of Alzheimer disease have been described, according to the type of the lesions (plaque only and tangle predominant), the type of onset (focal onset), the cause (genetic or sporadic) and the associated lesions (Lewy bodies, vascular lesions, hippocampal sclerosis, TDP-43 inclusions and argyrophilic grain disease).

  4. [Caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Hirono, Nobutsugu

    2010-07-01

    The term "caring" refers to the process aimed at enabling people with disabilities to achieve and maintain optimal functioning. According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) proposed by the World Health Organization in 2001, the functioning involves all aspects of daily life and applies to 3 levels: body functions and structures, activities, and participation. Caring is of 2 types; (1) therapeutic care, which restores and maintains the body functions; and (2) compensatory care, which compensates for the impairment of body functions and thus enhances and maintains the level of activity and participation. Alzheimer disease impairs multiple domains, including cognitive function and behaviors; therefore, it is very important to systematically and individually assess these impairments in each domain. Because there is inadequate data on the efficacy of cognitive training, compensatory care is principally used to overcome cognitive dysfunction. Caregivers should be equipped with skills required to cope with behavioral problems so that they can compensate for and even reduce these problems. Further, caregivers should not be overburdened, as this is reported to be a significant predictor for the poor outcome of patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, appropriate information regarding the disease, the impairments caused by it, the skills required to cope with these impairments, and social support services should be provided to the caregivers.

  5. [Neuroimaging for patients with Alzheimer disease in routine practice].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    In routine practice neuroimaging has been applied as an adjunct technique for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in routine practice. Of the several neuroimaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been commonly used in Japan; further software programs are used to aid statistical analysis of the imaging results. For example voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer disease (VSRAD) for MRI and easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) are used for the analysis of MRI and SPECT. In the early stage of Alzheimer disease, specific findings of regional atrophy and perfusion reduction are observed in some areas. In the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and parietal cortex, perfusion reduction was more frequently observed than atrophy. On the other hand, in the medial temporal structures, perfusion reduction was less frequently observed than atrophy. Perfusion reduction in the the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and in the parietal cortex was more prominent in the case of patients with early-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. Further, atrophy in the medial temporal structures was more prominent in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of those with early-onset Alzheimer disease. These findings are helpful for differentiating of Alzheimer disease from other diseases characterized by dementia.

  6. Prevention of Alzheimer disease: The roles of nutrition and primary care.

    PubMed

    Bane, Tabitha J; Cole, Connie

    2015-05-15

    Risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. Due to lack of effective treatments for Alzheimer disease, nutrition and primary prevention becomes important.

  7. Novel targets for Alzheimer's disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Joshua D.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which no cure exists. There is substantial need for new therapies that offer improved symptomatic benefit and disease-slowing capabilities. In recent decades there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular and cellular changes associated with AD pathology. This has resulted in identification of a large number of new drug targets. These targets include but are not limited to therapies that aim to prevent production of or remove the beta amyloid (Aβ) protein that accumulates in neuritic plaques; prevent the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into paired helical filaments of the microtubule-associated protein tau; and aim to keep neurons alive and functioning normally in the face of these pathologic challenges. We provide a review of these targets for drug development. PMID:20420492

  8. How does diabetes accelerate Alzheimer disease pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Kim, Bhumsoo; Rosko, Andrew; Feldman, Eva L.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer disease (AD)—two age-related diseases—are both increasing in prevalence, and numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared with healthy individuals. The underlying biological mechanisms that link the development of diabetes with AD are not fully understood. Abnormal protein processing, abnormalities in insulin signaling, dysregulated glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, the formation of advanced glycation end products, and the activation of inflammatory pathways are features common to both diseases. Hypercholesterolemia is another factor that has received attention, owing to its potential association with diabetes and AD. This Review summarizes the mechanistic pathways that might link diabetes and AD. An understanding of this complex interaction is necessary for the development of novel drug therapies and lifestyle guidelines aimed at the treatment and/or prevention of these diseases. PMID:20842183

  9. Alzheimer's Disease and Exercise: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cass, Shane P

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that impairs memory and cognitive judgment. It is the leading cause of dementia in late adult life and is associated with a significant social burden and increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Because of mixed effectiveness of medications, exercise has been considered as a treatment for pre-clinical AD, late stage AD, and as a prevention strategy. Exercise appears to improve brain blood flow, increase hippocampal volume, and improve neurogenesis. Prospective studies indicate that physical inactivity is one of the most common preventable risk factors for developing AD and that higher physical activity levels are associated with a reduced risk of development of disease. Exercise as a treatment for AD shows improvement in cognitive function, decreased neuropsychiatric symptoms, and a slower decline in activities of daily living (ADL). Exercise has been shown to have fewer side effects and better adherence compared to medications.

  10. PART is part of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Duyckaerts, Charles; Braak, Heiko; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Buée, Luc; Del Tredici, Kelly; Goedert, Michel; Halliday, Glenda; Neumann, Manuela; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Tolnay, Markus; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2015-05-01

    It has been proposed that tau aggregation confined to entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, with no or only minimal Aβ deposition, should be considered as a 'primary age-related tauopathy' (PART) that is not integral to the continuum of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we examine the evidence that PART has a pathogenic mechanism and a prognosis which differ from those of AD. We contend that no specific property of the entorhinal-hippocampal tau pathology makes it possible to predict either a limited progression or the development of AD, and that biochemical differences await an evidence base. On the other hand, entorhinal-hippocampal tau pathology is an invariant feature of AD and is always associated with its development. Rather than creating a separate disease entity, we recommend the continued use of an analytical approach based on NFT stages and Aβ phases with no inference about hypothetical disease processes.

  11. [Correlation between Alzheimer disease and cataract].

    PubMed

    Liu, S S; Zhu, S Q

    2017-04-11

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is a leading cause of dementia among elders. In the early phase of AD, even if neuropathological changes presented, but little to none clinical symptoms were found. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose AD in the beginning of the disease. It is vital to find a noninvasive way for both diagnose and prognosis of AD. Studies have found that β-amyloid (Aβ) works as a connection between AD and cataract. This review will discuss AD and its associated markers which may be present in the lens and cataract related AD to provide more basis for early diagnosis of AD. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 314-316).

  12. Imbalanced cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xue-shan, Zhao; Juan, Peng; Qi, Wu; Zhong, Ren; Li-hong, Pan; Zhi-han, Tang; Zhi-sheng, Jiang; Gui-xue, Wang; Lu-shan, Liu

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that is mainly caused by β-amyloid accumulation. A large number of studies have shown that elevated cholesterol levels may perform a function in AD pathology, and several cholesterol-related gene polymorphisms are associated with this disease. Although numerous studies have shown the important function of cholesterol in AD pathogenesis and development, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To further elucidate cholesterol metabolism disorder and AD, we first, review metabolism and regulation of the cholesterol in the brain. Second, we summarize the literature stating that hypercholesterolemia is one of the risk factors of AD. Third, we discuss the main mechanisms of abnormal cholesterol metabolism that increase the risk of AD. Finally, the relationships between AD and apolipoprotein E, PCSK9, and LRP1 are discussed in this article.

  13. Novel therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Bonda, David J; Lee, Hyun-Pil; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Friedlich, Avi L; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A

    2010-03-01

    As the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide, Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to be a burden for patients and their families. In addition, with the global population of aged individuals increasing exponentially, AD represents a significant economic burden to society. The development of an effective approach for the treatment of AD is thus of major importance, as current treatment strategies are limited to agents that attenuate disease symptomatology without addressing the causes of disease. A considerable need exists for the development of an effective therapy to prevent, or at least delay, the progression of AD. Current hypotheses for the pathogenesis of AD are discussed in this review, with a particular emphasis on the implications of these hypotheses with respect to treatment strategies and preventive measures.

  14. Alzheimer's disease prevention: A way forward.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Pareja, F; Llamas-Velasco, S; Villarejo-Galende, A

    2016-12-01

    This review proposes a more optimistic view of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in contrast to that contributed by the ageing of the population and the failure of potentially curative therapies (vaccines and others). Treatment failure is likely due to the fact that AD gestates in the brain for decades but manifests in old age. This review updates the concept of AD and presents the results of recent studies that show that primary prevention can reduce the incidence and delay the onset of the disease. Half of all cases of AD are potentially preventable through education, the control of cardiovascular risk factors, the promotion of healthy lifestyles and specific drug treatments. These approaches could substantially reduce the future incidence rate of this disease.

  15. Are Judgments of Semantic Relatedness Systematically Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, M.; Bell, B.; Graham, K. S.; Rogers, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a triadic comparison task in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls to contrast (a) multidimensional scaling (MDS) and accuracy-based assessments of semantic memory, and (b) degraded-store versus degraded-access accounts of semantic impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Similar to other studies using triadic…

  16. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  17. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  18. Gait variability in community dwelling adults with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kate E; Merory, John R; Wittwer, Joanne E

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that measures of gait variability are associated with falling in older adults. However, few studies have measured gait variability in people with Alzheimer disease, despite the high incidence of falls in Alzheimer disease. The purpose of this study was to compare gait variability of community-dwelling older adults with Alzheimer disease and control subjects at various walking speeds. Ten subjects with mild-moderate Alzheimer disease and ten matched control subjects underwent gait analysis using an electronic walkway. Participants were required to walk at self-selected slow, preferred, and fast speeds. Stride length and step width variability were determined using the coefficient of variation. Results showed that stride length variability was significantly greater in the Alzheimer disease group compared with the control group at all speeds. In both groups, increases in walking speed were significantly correlated with decreases in stride length variability. Step width variability was significantly reduced in the Alzheimer disease group compared with the control group at slow speed only. In conclusion, there is an increase in stride length variability in Alzheimer disease at all walking speeds that may contribute to the increased incidence of falls in Alzheimer disease.

  19. A holistic approach to caring for people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Louise

    This article adopts a holistic view of Alzheimer's disease. Biomedical, psychological and social aspects of the condition are discussed, and aetiology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment explored. A range of approaches to working with people with Alzheimer's disease, based on a psychological model of dementia, is described including reminiscence and cognitive stimulation therapy.

  20. Distinct Mechanisms of Impairment in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapstone, Mark; Dickerson, Kathryn; Duffy, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Similar manifestations of functional decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease obscure differences in the underlying cognitive mechanisms of impairment. We sought to examine the contributions of top-down attentional and bottom-up perceptual factors to visual self-movement processing in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We administered a novel…

  1. Operational Thought in Alzheimer's Disease Early Onset and SDAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Olga B.; Breslau, Lawrence D.

    For more than a decade it has been convention to assume that senile dementia Alzheimer's type (SDAT) and Alzheimer's disease early onset represent a unitary disease process with only an onset difference. This assumption has been neither confirmed nor disconfirmed. To address this issue, a study was conducted which analyzed the dissolution of…

  2. Production of Complex Syntax in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study compared the production of complex syntax by 16 older adults diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease and 25 age-matched control subjects. It found that although individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease did not produce frank lexical or grammatical errors, they did find it difficult to access the "best fit" between meaning and…

  3. Are Judgments of Semantic Relatedness Systematically Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, M.; Bell, B.; Graham, K. S.; Rogers, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a triadic comparison task in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls to contrast (a) multidimensional scaling (MDS) and accuracy-based assessments of semantic memory, and (b) degraded-store versus degraded-access accounts of semantic impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Similar to other studies using triadic…

  4. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  5. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  6. Distinct Mechanisms of Impairment in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapstone, Mark; Dickerson, Kathryn; Duffy, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Similar manifestations of functional decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease obscure differences in the underlying cognitive mechanisms of impairment. We sought to examine the contributions of top-down attentional and bottom-up perceptual factors to visual self-movement processing in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We administered a novel…

  7. Factors associated with psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, N.; Mori, E.; Yasuda, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Imamura, T.; Shimomura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Yamashita, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Many clinical and biological factors have been reported to be associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease, although the associations were variable. The aim of this study was to clarify factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
METHODS—Psychiatric functioning was studied in 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease based on the results of the behavioural pathology in Alzheimer's disease rating scale or the neuropsychiatric inventory. The effects of sex, education level, age, duration of illness, cognitive function, and apolipoprotein E genotype were investigated for dichotomous psychotic status with a multiple logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS—Of the 228 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 118 (51.8%) showed evidence of delusions or hallucinations. Of these, 94 had delusions only, three had hallucinations only, and 21 had both. Older age, female sex, longer duration of illness, and more severe cognitive impairment were the factors independently associated with the presence of psychosis. The presence of psychosis was not significantly related to either educational level or apolipoprotein E genotype.
CONCLUSIONS—Age, sex, and severity of illness were independent factors associated with the presence of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The reason why some patients with Alzheimer's disease develop psychosis remains unclear. There may be distinctive subtypes of Alzheimer's disease or the presence of individual factors which affect the development of psychosis.

 PMID:9598682

  8. Energy expenditure, energy intake, and weight loss in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Poehlman, E T; Dvorak, R V

    2000-02-01

    Alzheimer disease is one of the leading causes of death among older individuals. Unexplained weight loss and cachexia are frequent clinical findings in patients with Alzheimer disease. Thus, it has been postulated that Alzheimer disease may be associated with dysfunction in body weight regulation. This brief review examines the interrelations among energy intake, energy expenditure, and body composition in Alzheimer disease. We explored whether abnormally high daily energy expenditures, low energy intakes, or both contribute to unexplained weight loss and a decline in nutritional status. Specifically, we considered studies that examined energy intake, body composition, and daily energy expenditure and its components. The application of doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry to understand the etiology of wasting has increased our knowledge regarding the relation among energy expenditure, physical activity levels, and body composition in Alzheimer disease patients. Although the number of studies are limited, results do not support the notion that a hypermetabolic state contributes to unexplained weight loss in Alzheimer disease, even in cachectic patients. Recent findings are presented suggesting an association between abnormally elevated levels of physical activity energy expenditure and elevated appendicular skeletal muscle mass and energy intake in Alzheimer disease patients. Clinical strategies aimed at developing lifestyle and dietary interventions to maintain adequate energy intake, restore energy balance, and maintain skeletal muscle mass should be a future area of investigation in Alzheimer disease research.

  9. Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Lessons from the Nun Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdon, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a woman who maintained high cognitive test scores until her death at 101 years of age despite anatomical evidence of Alzheimer's disease. The woman was part of a larger "Nun Study" in which 678 sisters donated their brains to teach others about the etiology of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Findings are discussed. (RJM)

  10. Graph Theory and Brain Connectivity in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    delEtoile, Jon; Adeli, Hojjat

    2017-04-01

    This article presents a review of recent advances in neuroscience research in the specific area of brain connectivity as a potential biomarker of Alzheimer's disease with a focus on the application of graph theory. The review will begin with a brief overview of connectivity and graph theory. Then resent advances in connectivity as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease will be presented and analyzed.

  11. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia including Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Corriveau, Roderick A; Craft, Suzanne; Faber, James E; Greenberg, Steven M; Knopman, David; Lamb, Bruce T; Montine, Thomas J; Nedergaard, Maiken; Schaffer, Chris B; Schneider, Julie A; Wellington, Cheryl; Wilcock, Donna M; Zipfel, Gregory J; Zlokovic, Berislav; Bain, Lisa J; Bosetti, Francesca; Galis, Zorina S; Koroshetz, Walter; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-06-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate the linkage of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia such as Alzheimer's disease. In December, 2013, the Alzheimer's Association, with scientific input from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute from the National Institutes of Health, convened scientific experts to discuss the research gaps in our understanding of how vascular factors contribute to Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant discussion, including an outline of next steps needed to move this area of research forward. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuppurainen, Marjo; Rikkonen, Toni; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Kröger, Heikki; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Twenty-year follow-up data from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention study cohort were used. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to all women aged 47–56 years, residing in Kuopio Province starting in 1989 until 2009, every 5th year. Register-based information on HT prescriptions was available since 1995. Probable AD cases, based on DSM-IV and National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke–Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria, were identified from the special reimbursement register (1999–2009). The study population included 8,195 women (227 cases of incident AD). Results: Postmenopausal estrogen use was not associated with AD risk in register-based or self-reported data (hazard ratio/95% confidence interval 0.92/0.68–1.2, 0.99/0.75–1.3, respectively). Long-term self-reported postmenopausal HT was associated with reduced AD risk (0.53/0.31–0.91). Similar results were obtained with any dementia diagnosis in the hospital discharge register as an outcome. Conclusions: Our results do not provide strong evidence for a protective association between postmenopausal HT use and AD or dementia, although we observed a reduced AD risk among those with long-term self-reported HT use. PMID:28202700

  13. Physical activity, brain plasticity, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Weinstein, Andrea M; Lopez, Oscar L

    2012-11-01

    In this review we summarize the epidemiological, cross-sectional, and interventional studies examining the association between physical activity and brain volume, function, and risk for Alzheimer's disease. The epidemiological literature provides compelling evidence that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of dementia in late life. In addition, randomized interventions using neuroimaging tools have reported that participation in physical activity increases the size of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas, which may lead to a reduction in memory impairments. Consistent with these findings, longitudinal studies using neuroimaging tools also find that the volume of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas are larger in individuals who engaged in more physical activity earlier in life. We conclude from this review that there is convincing evidence that physical activity has a consistent and robust association with brain regions implicated in age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to summarizing this literature we provide recommendations for future research on physical activity and brain health. Copyright © 2012 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early onset Alzheimer's disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Toral Rios, Danira; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world's population aged more than 60-65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology.

  15. Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Toral Rios, Danira; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world's population aged more than 60–65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology. PMID:24669286

  16. CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer disease: "noncognitive" outcomes.

    PubMed

    Roe, Catherine M; Fagan, Anne M; Grant, Elizabeth A; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C

    2013-12-03

    To test whether CSF Alzheimer disease biomarkers (β-amyloid 42 [Aβ42], tau, phosphorylated tau at threonine 181 [ptau181], tau/Aβ42, and ptau181/Aβ42) predict future decline in noncognitive outcomes among individuals cognitively normal at baseline. Longitudinal data from participants (N = 430) who donated CSF within 1 year of a clinical assessment indicating normal cognition and were aged 50 years or older were analyzed. Mixed linear models were used to test whether baseline biomarker values predicted future decline in function (instrumental activities of daily living), weight, behavior, and mood. Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were also examined. Abnormal levels of each biomarker were related to greater impairment with time in behavior (p < 0.035) and mood (p < 0.012) symptoms, and more difficulties with independent activities of daily living (p < 0.012). However, biomarker levels were unrelated to weight change with time (p > 0.115). As expected, abnormal biomarker values also predicted more rapidly changing Mini-Mental State Examination (p < 0.041) and Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (p < 0.001) scores compared with normal values. CSF biomarkers among cognitively normal individuals are associated with future decline in some, but not all, noncognitive Alzheimer disease symptoms studied. Additional work is needed to determine the extent to which these findings generalize to other samples.

  17. [Non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Schiaratura, Loris Tamara

    2008-09-01

    This review underlines the importance of non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease. A social psychological perspective of communication is privileged. Non-verbal behaviors such as looks, head nods, hand gestures, body posture or facial expression provide a lot of information about interpersonal attitudes, behavioral intentions, and emotional experiences. Therefore they play an important role in the regulation of interaction between individuals. Non-verbal communication is effective in Alzheimer's disease even in the late stages. Patients still produce non-verbal signals and are responsive to others. Nevertheless, few studies have been devoted to the social factors influencing the non-verbal exchange. Misidentification and misinterpretation of behaviors may have negative consequences for the patients. Thus, improving the comprehension of and the response to non-verbal behavior would increase first the quality of the interaction, then the physical and psychological well-being of patients and that of caregivers. The role of non-verbal behavior in social interactions should be approached from an integrative and functional point of view.

  18. Alzheimer's Disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an insidious neurological disorder that affects memory, one of the human brain's main cognitive functions. Around 5.2 million Americans currently have AD, and the number threatens to climb to 7 million by 2020. Our native country, Colombia, is no exception with an estimated 260,000 individuals to be affected by AD in 2020. A large, genetically-isolated community in Antioquia, Colombia, with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation is ideally suited for the study of molecular mechanisms of AD, and hence accelerate the discovery of new or alternative treatment approaches. In this regard, polyphenols--also known as polyhydroxyphenols--have shown antioxidant activity, gene regulation, metal chelator and anti-amyloidogenic aggregation effects. However, further in vitro and in vivo investigations are warranted to validate their use in clinical trials. Drosophila melanogaster is increasingly being used as a valid in vivo model of AD. Here, we summarise data published within the past 16 years (1998-2014) on the molecular biology of AD and the use of polyphenols in the fly to understand the molecular actions and feasibility of these compounds in the treatment of AD.

  19. Do statins prevent Alzheimer's disease? A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Daneschvar, Homayoun L; Aronson, Mark D; Smetana, Gerald W

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and occurs commonly in patients 65 and older. There is an urgent need to find an effective management that could help prevent or at least slow down the progress of this major public health problem. Cholesterol related pathways might play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Treatment with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) has been suggested to promote the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we discuss potential pathogenetic pathways for the development of Alzheimer's disease and review the evidence regarding the value of statins as a strategy to prevent or delay progression of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diminished glucose transport and phosphorylation in Alzheimer`s disease determined by dynamic FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Piert, M.; Koeppe, R.A.; Giordani, B.; Berent, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Using dynamic [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and PET, kinetic rate constants that describe influx (K{sub 1}) and efflux (k{sub 2}) of FDG as well s phosphorylation (k{sub 3}) and dephosphorylation (k{sub 4}) were determined in patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease and similarly aged normal controls. The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMR{sub glu}) was calculated from individually fitted rate constants in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Dynamic PET scans were obtained in normal controls (n = 10, mean age = 67) and Alzheimer`s disease patients (n = 8, mean age = 67) for 60 min following injection of 10 mCi of FDG. The Alzheimer`s disease group was characterized by decreases of the CMR{sub glu} ranging from 13.3% in the frontal to 40.9% in the parietal cortex, which achieved significance in all regions except the thalamus. K{sub 1} was significantly reduced in the parietal (p < 0.01) and temporal cortices (p < 0.005), temporal and occipital cortex, and in the putamen and cerebellum (p < 0.05). The rate constants k{sub 2} and k{sub 4} were unchanged in the Alzheimer`s disease group. These data suggest that hypometabolism in Alzheimer`s disease is related to reduced glucose phosphorylation activity as well as diminished glucose transport, particularly in the most metabolically affected areas of the brain, the parietal and temporal cortex. 60 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Challenges and opportunities: recruitment and retention of African Americans for Alzheimer disease research: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Edna L; Gwyther, Lisa P; Edmonds, Henry L

    2010-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the recruitment and retention of African Americans for research in Alzheimer disease have been regarded as difficult undertakings with poor results. The typical explanation for failure to respond to research participation options is a widespread mistrust of research and the biomedical community. Mistrust is a reasonable response; given the historic reality of malfeasance, victimization, and mistreatment over the course of the research participation history of African Americans. The challenges are real but there are opportunities for successful recruitment and retention of African Americans for research including research on Alzheimer disease. Participation, however, comes with specific terms and considerations. Two of the most prominent criteria for research recruitment and retention are the transparency and accountability of the investigator, which may determine how he or she proceeds from the start of the process throughout the steps of recruitment, retention, and subsequent follow-up with the community.

  2. When is category specific in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Laws, Keith R; Gale, Tim M; Leeson, Verity C; Crawford, John R

    2005-08-01

    Mixed findings have emerged concerning whether category-specific disorders occur in Alzheimer's disease. Factors that may contribute to these inconsistencies include: ceiling effects/skewed distributions for control data in some studies; differences in the severity of cognitive deficit in patients; and differences in the type of analysis (in particular, if and how controls are used to analyse single case data). We examined picture naming in Alzheimer's patients and matched elderly healthy normal controls in three experiments. These experiments used stimuli that did and did not produce ceiling effects/skewed data in controls. In Experiment 1, we examined for category effects in individual DAT patients using commonly used analyses for single cases (chi2 and z-scores). The different techniques produced quite different outcomes. In Experiment 2a, we used the same techniques on a different group of patients with similar outcomes. Finally, in Experiment 2b, we examined the same patients but (a) used stimuli that did not produce ceiling effects/skewed distributions in healthy controls, and (b) used statistical methods that did not treat the control sample as a population. We found that ceiling effects in controls may markedly inflate the incidence of dissociations in which living things are differentially impaired and seriously underestimate dissociations in the opposite direction. In addition, methods that treat the control sample as a population led to inflation in the overall number of dissociations detected. These findings have implications for the reliability of category effects previously reported both in Alzheimer patients and in other pathologies. In particular, they suggest that the greater proportion of living than nonliving deficits reported in the literature may be an artifact of the methods used.

  3. [Prevention of dementia (including Alzheimer's disease)].

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, H H

    2004-05-01

    Prevention of dementia: Life expectancy still increases linearly, and the elderly part of the European population grows rapidly in relation to the young. Dementia, however, grows even more rapidly, because it increases exponentially after age 65; it will become a great burden if nothing is done. The discussion so far is concentrated on treatment, whereas prevention is neglected. The therapy of dementia, however, has limited effect. Contrary to a widespread opinion prevention is possible. Genetic factors alone dominate the fate of cognition only in about 3 % of the cases. Besides age, lifestyle and the vascular risk factors exercise a great influence. High blood pressure carries a fourfold risk, diabetes more than doubles the risk both of the vascular and of the Alzheimer type; combined even more. Especially cerebral microangiopathy is strongly associated with Alzheimer's dementia, it triggers the vicious circle which leads to amyloid deposition. The importance of the circulation is underestimated, because most of the microvascular cerebral lesions are not perceived by the patient. All the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease after age 65 are also vascular risk factors especially for microangiopathy: Apo-E4, oestrogen deficiency, insulin resistance, diabetes, arterial hypertension, high cholesterol, old age and increased plasma homocystin which is often caused by alcohol consumption even in moderate doses. A healthy life style with daily outdoor activity and a Mediterranean diet not only reduces the risk of dementia, but also of coronary death and cancer. Cognitively stimulating activity protects even more than physical activity against dementia; the basis for this is acquired in youth by education. Therapy with statins is advisable if atherosclerosis cannot be reasonably counteracted by physical activity and diet.

  4. Epileptic activity in Alzheimer's disease: causes and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Zeman, Adam Z; Miller, Bruce L

    2017-04-01

    Epileptic activity is frequently associated with Alzheimer's disease; this association has therapeutic implications, because epileptic activity can occur at early disease stages and might contribute to pathogenesis. In clinical practice, seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease can easily go unrecognised because they usually present as non-motor seizures, and can overlap with other symptoms of the disease. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, seizures can hasten cognitive decline, highlighting the clinical relevance of early recognition and treatment. Some evidence indicates that subclinical epileptiform activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease, detected by extended neurophysiological monitoring, can also lead to accelerated cognitive decline. Treatment of clinical seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease with select antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), in low doses, is usually well tolerated and efficacious. Moreover, studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease suggest that certain classes of AEDs that reduce network hyperexcitability have disease-modifying properties. These AEDs target mechanisms of epileptogenesis involving amyloid β and tau. Clinical trials targeting network hyperexcitability in patients with Alzheimer's disease will identify whether AEDs or related strategies could improve their cognitive symptoms or slow decline.

  5. N-Terminal Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Sharma, Bhanushee; Belfort, Georges

    2017-03-15

    Although the amyloid (abeta peptide, Aβ) hypothesis is 25 years old, is the dominant model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and guides the development of potential treatments, it is still controversial. One possible reason is a lack of a mechanistic path from the cleavage products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) such as soluble Aβ monomer and soluble molecular fragments to the deleterious effects on synaptic form and function. From a review of the recent literature and our own published work including aggregation kinetics and structural morphology, Aβ clearance, molecular simulations, long-term potentiation measurements with inhibition binding, and the binding of a commercial monoclonal antibody, aducanumab, we hypothesize that the N-terminal domains of neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are implicated in causing the disease.

  6. Amerindian genetic ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Benedet, Andrea L; Moraes, Clayton F; Camargos, Einstein F; Oliveira, Larissa F; Souza, Vinícius C; Lins, Túlio C; Henriques, Adriane D; Carmo, Dayanne G S; Machado-Silva, Wilcelly; Araújo, Carla Nunes; Córdova, Cláudio; Pereira, Rinaldo W; Nóbrega, Otávio T

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide, and bears remarkable evidence for a differential prevalence among continental populations. In this scenario, estimating ancestry proportions in recently admixed populations is a strategy that can help increasing knowledge about the genetic structure of this complex trait. Our purpose was to assess mean ancestry estimates for the three main parental contributors to the Brazilian contingent (European, African and Amerindian) using a panel of 12 ancestry informative markers. Outpatients with the late-onset form of AD (n = 120) were compared for ancestry levels with non-cognitively impaired subjects (n = 412) in the Midwest Brazil, controlling for classic clinical, social and anthropometric risk factors. Our findings show a 3-fold greater genetic Amerindian content among control subjects compared to AD patients (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that the allelic architecture of Native Americans can confer protection against the onset of the disease. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Metabolic profiling of Alzheimer's disease brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Toyo'Oka, Toshimasa

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease and can be definitively diagnosed after death through an examination of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in several brain regions. It is to be expected that changes in the concentration and/or localization of low-molecular-weight molecules are linked to the pathological changes that occur in AD, and determining their identity would provide valuable information regarding AD processes. Here, we propose definitive brain metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. The acquired data were subjected to principal components analysis to differentiate the frontal and parietal lobes of the AD/Control groups. Significant differences in the levels of spermine and spermidine were identified using S-plot, mass spectra, databases and standards. Based on the investigation of the polyamine metabolite pathway, these data establish that the downstream metabolites of ornithine are increased, potentially implicating ornithine decarboxylase activity in AD pathology.

  8. Next Generation Sequencing in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Lars

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in the history of human genetics research, it is now both technically feasible and economically affordable to screen individual genomes for novel disease-causing mutations at base-pair resolution using "next-generation sequencing" (NGS). One popular aim in many of today's NGS studies is genome resequencing (in part or whole) to identify DNA variants potentially accounting for the "missing heritability" problem observed in many genetically complex traits. Thus far, only relatively few projects have applied these powerful new technologies to search for novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) related sequence variants. In this review, I summarize the findings from the first NGS-based resequencing studies in AD and discuss their potential implications and limitations. Notable recent discoveries using NGS include the identification of rare susceptibility modifying alleles in APP, TREM2, and PLD3. Several other large-scale NGS projects are currently underway so that additional discoveries can be expected over the coming years.

  9. The role of inflammasome in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chan, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease with clinical characteristics of memory loss, dementia and cognitive impairment. Although the pathophysiologic mechanism is not fully understood, inflammation has been shown to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AD. Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is characterized by the activation of glial cells and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that inflammasomes, which cleave precursors of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 to generate their active forms, play an important role in the inflammatory response in the CNS and in AD pathogenesis. Therefore, modulating inflammasome complex assembly and activation could be a potential strategy for suppressing inflammation in the CNS. This review aims to provide insight into the role of inflammasomes in the CNS, with respect to the pathogenesis of AD, and may provide possible clues for devising novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. L-Arginine and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jing; Horky, Laura L.; Friedlich, Avi L.; Shi, Ying; Rogers, Jack T.; Huang, Xudong

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and loss of cognitive and memory functions. Although the exact causes of AD are still unclear, evidence suggests that atherosclerosis, redox stress, inflammation, neurotransmitter dysregulation, and impaired brain energy metabolism may all be associated with AD pathogenesis. Herein, we explore a possible role for L-arginine (L-arg) in AD, taking into consideration known functions for L-arg in atherosclerosis, redox stress and the inflammatory process, regulation of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, and modulation of glucose metabolism and insulin activity. L-arg, a precursor of nitric oxide and polyamine, exhibits multiple functions in human health and may play a prominent role in age-related degenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:19079617

  11. Improved candidate drug mining for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia for older people. Although several antidementia drugs such as donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine have been developed, the effectiveness of AD drug therapy is still far from satisfactory. Recently, the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been chosen as one of the personalized medicine markers. Many pharmacogenomics databases have been developed to provide comprehensive information by associating SNPs with drug responses, disease incidence, and genes that are critical in choosing personalized therapy. However, we found that some information from different sets of pharmacogenomics databases is not sufficient and this may limit the potential functions for pharmacogenomics. To address this problem, we used approximate string matching method and data mining approach to improve the searching of pharmacogenomics database. After computation, we can successfully identify more genes linked to AD and AD-related drugs than previous online searching. These improvements may help to improve the pharmacogenomics of AD for personalized medicine.

  12. Biomarkers of Alzheimer Disease in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Irizarry, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Plasma and serum biochemical markers proposed for Alzheimer disease (AD) are based on pathophysiologic processes such as amyloid plaque formation [amyloid β-protein (Aβ), Aβ autoantibodies, platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) isoforms], inflammation (cytokines), oxidative stress (vitamin E, isoprostanes), lipid metabolism (apolipoprotein E, 24S-hydroxycholesterol), and vascular disease [homocysteine, lipoprotein (a)]. Most proteins or metabolites evaluated in plasma or serum thus far are, at best, biological correlates of AD: levels are statistically different in AD versus controls in some cohorts, but they lack sensitivity or specificity for diagnosis or for tracking response to therapy. Approaches combining panels of existing biomarkers or surveying the range of proteins in plasma (proteomics) show promise for discovering biomarker profiles that are characteristic of AD, yet distinct from nondemented patients or patients with other forms of dementia. PMID:15717023

  13. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  14. [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease and future approaches].

    PubMed

    Forette, Françoise; Hauw, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The progressive neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease leads to neurochemical abnormalities which provide the basis for symptomatic treatments. Four cholinesterase inhibitors were released in this indication. Meta-analyses have confirmed a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning and activities of daily living. The NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was also approved for the treatment of moderate to severe and may be associated. Progress in the patho-physiology of the disease offers some hope of new treatments acting on the cerebral lesions. The amyloid hypothesis allowed the emergence of active or passive immunotherapies, and of secretase inhibitors or modulators. Recent studies have targeted the P tau protein. The brain plasticity and the uses of stem cells offer more distant hope.

  15. Alzheimer's disease public-private partnerships: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Kim, Hye; Bain, Lisa J; Egge, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-11-01

    The National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease highlights the need for coordinated public-private partnerships. In recent years, the number of collaborations and consortia have expanded and grown in Alzheimer's research. The Alzheimer's Association compiles this annually updated compendium to centralize this inventory of partnerships in an effort to synergize these activities. This manuscript reflects the 2014 landscape of non-profit organizations who engage in public-private partnerships to promote and support dementia research.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Serý, Omar; Povová, Jana; Míšek, Ivan; Pešák, Lukáš; Janout, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    More than 100 years after description of Alzheimer's disease (AD), two major pathological processes observed already by Alois Alzheimer, remain as the main explanation of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Important molecular interactions leading to AD neuropathology were described in amyloid cascade and in tau protein function. No clinical trials with novel therapies based on amyloid cascade and tau protein hypotheses have been successful. The main aim of recent research is focused on the question what is primary mechanism leading to the molecular development of AD pathology. Promising explanation of triggering mechanism can be seen in vascular pathology that have direct influence on the development of pathological processes typical for Alzheimer disease. Novel insight into a number of cellular signaling mechanisms, as well as mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease could also bring explanations of initial processes leading to the development of this pathology.

  17. Alzheimer's disease: The next frontier-Special Report 2017.

    PubMed

    Karlawish, Jason; Jack, Clifford R; Rocca, Walter A; Snyder, Heather M; Carrillo, Maria C

    2017-04-01

    In the history of medicine, one means to progress is when we make the decision that our assumptions and definitions of disease are no longer consistent with the scientific evidence, and no longer serve our health care needs. The arc of scientific progress is now requiring a change in how we diagnose Alzheimer's disease. Both the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) 2011 workgroup and the International Work Group (IWG) have proposed guidelines that use detectable measures of biological changes in the brain, commonly known as biological markers, or biomarkers, as part of the diagnosis. This Special Report examines how the development and validation of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers-including those detectable in the blood or cerebral spinal fluid, or through neuroimaging-is a top research priority. This has the potential to markedly change how we diagnose Alzheimer's disease and, as a result, how we count the number of people with this disease. As research advances a biomarker-based method for diagnosis and treatment at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease, we envision a future in which Alzheimer's disease is placed in the same category as other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, which can be readily identified with biomarkers and treated before irrevocable disability occurs. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alzheimer's Disease: Dawn of a New Era?

    PubMed

    Amirrad, Farideh; Bousoik, Emira; Shamloo, Kiumars; Al-Shiyab, Hassan; Nguyen, Viet-Huong V; Montazeri Aliabadi, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive decline in cognition and memory, leading to significant impairment in daily activities and ultimately death. It is the most common cause of dementia, the prevalence of which increases with age; however, age is not the only predisposing factor. The pathology of this cognitive impairing disease is still not completely understood, which has limited the development of valid therapeutic options. Recent years have witnessed a wide range of novel approaches to combat this disease, so that they greatly increased our understanding of the disease and of the unique drug development issues associated with this disease. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of the history, the clinical presentation and diagnosis, and we undertake a comprehensive review of the various approaches that have been brought to clinical trials in recent years, including immunotherapeutic approaches, tau-targeted strategies, neurotransmitter-based therapies, neurotropic and hematopoietic growth factors, and antioxidant therapies, trying to highlight the lessons learned from these approaches. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  19. Hippocampal atrophy rates in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, W J.P.; Sluimer, J D.; Barnes, J; van der Flier, W M.; Sluimer, I C.; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Vrenken, H; Barkhof, F

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the added value of hippocampal atrophy rates over whole brain volume measurements on MRI in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls. Methods: We included 64 patients with AD (67 ± 9 years; F/M 38/26), 44 patients with MCI (71 ± 6 years; 21/23), and 34 controls (67 ± 9 years; 16/18). Two MR scans were performed (scan interval: 1.8 ± 0.7 years; 1.0 T), using a coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. At follow-up, 3 controls and 23 patients with MCI had progressed to AD. Hippocampi were manually delineated at baseline. Hippocampal atrophy rates were calculated using regional, nonlinear fluid registration. Whole brain baseline volumes and atrophy rates were determined using automated segmentation and registration tools. Results: All MRI measures differed between groups (p < 0.005). For the distinction of MCI from controls, larger effect sizes of hippocampal measures were found compared to whole brain measures. Between MCI and AD, only whole brain atrophy rate differed significantly. Cox proportional hazards models (variables dichotomized by median) showed that within all patients without dementia, hippocampal baseline volume (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.7 [95% confidence interval: 1.5–22.2]), hippocampal atrophy rate (5.2 [1.9–14.3]), and whole brain atrophy rate (2.8 [1.1–7.2]) independently predicted progression to AD; the combination of low hippocampal volume and high atrophy rate yielded a HR of 61.1 (6.1–606.8). Within patients with MCI, only hippocampal baseline volume and atrophy rate predicted progression. Conclusion: Hippocampal measures, especially hippocampal atrophy rate, best discriminate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls. Whole brain atrophy rate discriminates Alzheimer disease (AD) from MCI. Regional measures of hippocampal atrophy are the strongest predictors of progression to AD. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; BET = brain

  20. Hippocampal hyperactivation in presymptomatic familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Budson, Andrew E; Celone, Kim; Ruiz, Adriana; Newmark, Randall; Castrillón, Gabriel; Lopera, Francisco; Stern, Chantal E

    2010-12-01

    The examination of individuals who carry fully penetrant genetic alterations that result in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides a unique model for studying the early presymptomatic disease stages. In AD, deficits in episodic and associative memory have been linked to structural and functional changes within the hippocampal system. This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to examine hippocampal function in a group of healthy, young, cognitively-intact presymptomatic individuals (average age 33.7 years) who carry the E280A presenilin-1 (PS1) genetic mutation for FAD. These PS1 subjects will go on to develop the first symptoms of the disease around the age of 45 years. Our objective was to examine hippocampal function years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Twenty carriers of the Alzheimer's-associated E280A PS1 mutation and 19 PS1-negative control subjects participated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, education level, and neuropsychological test performance. All participants performed a face-name associative encoding task while in a Phillips 1.5T fMRI scanner. Analysis focused on the hippocampal system. Despite identical behavioral performance, presymptomatic PS1 mutation carriers exhibited increased activation of the right anterior hippocampus during encoding of novel face-name associations compared to matched controls. Our results demonstrate that functional changes within the hippocampal memory system occur years before cognitive decline in FAD. These presymptomatic changes in hippocampal physiology in FAD suggest that hippocampal fMRI patterns during associative encoding may also provide a preclinical biomarker in sporadic AD.

  1. Alzheimer disease and pre-emptive suicide.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dena S

    2014-08-01

    There is a flood of papers being published on new ways to diagnose Alzheimer disease (AD) before it is symptomatic, involving a combination of invasive tests (eg, spinal tap), and pen and paper tests. This changes the landscape with respect to genetic tests for risk of AD, making rational suicide a much more feasible option. Before the availability of these presymptomatic tests, even someone with a high risk of developing AD could not know if and when the disease was approaching. One could lose years of good life by committing suicide too soon, or risk waiting until it was too late and dementia had already sapped one of the ability to form and carry out a plan. One can now put together what one knows about one's risk, with continuing surveillance via these clinical tests, and have a good strategy for planning one's suicide before one becomes demented. This has implications for how these genetic and clinical tests are marketed and deployed, and the language one uses to speak about them. The phrase 'there is nothing one can do' is insulting and disrespectful of the planned suicide option, as is the language of the Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's Disease (REVEAL) studies and others that conclude that it is 'safe' to tell subjects their risk status for AD. Further, the argument put forward by some researchers that presymptomatic testing should remain within research protocols, and the results not shared with subjects until such time as treatments become available, disrespects the autonomy of people at high risk who consider suicide an option.

  2. Domain adaptation for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, research focuses on the early computer-aided diagnosis of dementia with the goal to understand the disease process, determine risk and preserving factors, and explore preventive therapies. By now, large amounts of data from multi-site studies have been made available for developing, training, and evaluating automated classifiers. Yet, their translation to the clinic remains challenging, in part due to their limited generalizability across different datasets. In this work, we describe a compact classification approach that mitigates overfitting by regularizing the multinomial regression with the mixed ℓ1/ℓ2 norm. We combine volume, thickness, and anatomical shape features from MRI scans to characterize neuroanatomy for the three-class classification of Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. We demonstrate high classification accuracy via independent evaluation within the scope of the CADDementia challenge. We, furthermore, demonstrate that variations between source and target datasets can substantially influence classification accuracy. The main contribution of this work addresses this problem by proposing an approach for supervised domain adaptation based on instance weighting. Integration of this method into our classifier allows us to assess different strategies for domain adaptation. Our results demonstrate (i) that training on only the target training set yields better results than the naïve combination (union) of source and target training sets, and (ii) that domain adaptation with instance weighting yields the best classification results, especially if only a small training component of the target dataset is available. These insights imply that successful deployment of systems for computer-aided diagnostics to the clinic depends not only on accurate classifiers that avoid overfitting, but also on a dedicated domain adaptation strategy.

  3. Diagnostics and therapy of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elzbieta; Szymański, Paweł; Zurek, Elzbieta

    2007-04-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is described as a degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by a noticeable cognitive decline defined by a loss of memory and learning ability, together with a reduced ability to perform basic activities of daily living. In the brain of an AD patients is the dramatic decrease in cholinergic innervation in the cortex and hippocampus due to the loss of neurons in the basal forebrain. The above findings led to the development of the cholinergic hypothesis, which proposes that the cognitive loss associated with AD is related to decreased cortical cholinergic neurotransmission. In brain of Alzheimer's patient's one ascertained presence of neuritic plaques containing the beta-amyloid peptide and protein tau. Biochemical and genetics studies implicated a central role for beta-amyloid in the pathological cascade of events in AD. The most therapeutic strategies in AD have been directed to two main targets: the beta-amyloid peptide and the cholinergic neurotransmission. The first approach is to act on the amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. The second main approach is to slow of decline of neuronal degeneration or increasing cholinergic transmission. Diagnosis of AD is very difficult and to date no specific diagnostic tests of the disease are available. Intellectual function testing to determine the degree of cognitive status during routine medical examination is a useful supplementary method of diagnosing dementia. The permissible result, come down from radiopharmacy, which is an integral part of a nuclear medicine. A radiopharmaceutical may be defined as a pharmaceutical substance containing radioactive atoms. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are capable of mapping the distribution of radionuclides in three dimensions, producing maps of brain biochemical and physiological processes. The techniques are reasonably sensitive and specific in differentiating AD from

  4. Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p < 10−16, r2 > 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

  5. Micronutrient supplementation in mild Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Planas, M; Conde, M; Audivert, S; Pérez-Portabella, C; Burgos, R; Chacón, P; Rossello, J; Boada, M; Tàrraga, L L

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate if nutritional supplementation with or without micronutrient enhancement prevent weight loss and the progression of the disease in mild Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Mild AD patients were recruited from an Alzheimer Day Centre. Subjects received oral liquid supplements with (Study-group: S) or without (Control-group: C) micronutrient enhancement. Intake assessment, nutritional status, biochemical parameters, cognitive function, and eating behaviour disorders were determined at baseline and at 6 months of treatment. At baseline both groups were not different in any variable measured. They were norm nourished, with normal biochemical parameters. Blandford scale demonstrated a mild alteration of feeding behaviour, the cognitive scale classified the patients as impaired and there was presence of memory complaints. After 6 months of nutritional supplements, a similar increase in energy consumption was observed in both groups of patients (P<0.05). In the within-group analysis, we found a trend (P=0.05) to increase body mass index; a significant increase in triceps skin fold thickness, mid-upper-arm circumference and serum magnesium, zinc and selenium, and a significant reduction in serum vitamin E (P<0.001, each). Serum cholesterol decreased substantially only in the S-group (P=0.025). No significant differences at baseline, within-group, neither between-group analysis in feeding behaviour nor in cognitive function were observed. According to our results no benefits in the progression of the disease was observed with micronutrient enhancement supplements. Effectiveness of nutritional supplements in preventing weight loss in mild AD patients showed a similar behaviour as observed in other populations. Due to the beneficial evolution of serum cholesterol in the S-group, this intervention deserves further investigation.

  6. [Connections between sleep and Alzheimer's disease : Insomnia, amnesia and amyloid].

    PubMed

    Busche, M A; Kekuš, M; Förstl, H

    2017-03-01

    Sleep plays an essential role in memory consolidation. Although sleep problems are common in Alzheimer's disease, they are not usually thought to be key features of the disease; however, new experimental research has shown that sleep disturbances not only occur before the onset of typical cognitive deficits but are also associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and may have a decisive influence on the symptoms and course. Thus, sleep disturbances may be potentially modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease that deserve more attention in research, diagnostics and treatment.

  7. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  8. Toward precision medicine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Christiane

    2016-03-01

    In Western societies, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and the sixth leading cause of death. In recent years, the concept of precision medicine, an approach for disease prevention and treatment that is personalized to an individual's specific pattern of genetic variability, environment and lifestyle factors, has emerged. While for some diseases, in particular select cancers and a few monogenetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis, significant advances in precision medicine have been made over the past years, for most other diseases precision medicine is only in its beginning. To advance the application of precision medicine to a wider spectrum of disorders, governments around the world are starting to launch Precision Medicine Initiatives, major efforts to generate the extensive scientific knowledge needed to integrate the model of precision medicine into every day clinical practice. In this article we summarize the state of precision medicine in AD, review major obstacles in its development, and discuss its benefits in this highly prevalent, clinically and pathologically complex disease.

  9. The news advances on Alzheimer's disease's therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, H-Q; Zhang, X; Huang, W-J; Chen, W-W

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifaceted disorder, characterized by the failure of memory and dementia. AD affects mostly elder above 65 years of age and is confirmed by post-mortem detection in the brain, of extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These pathological hallmarks appear in the brain when the disease is already installed. The difficulty of earlier diagnosis and possibly, the poor understanding of the disease etiology, limit the benefits afforded by available treatments. Indeed, several putative drugs resulting from thorough investigations in preclinical studies have failed to produce clinical results, suggesting the development of further therapeutic alternatives. Recently, the regular practice of physical activity has been shown as one of the effective preventive or curative mean against AD. This finding rekindles the debate on the place of the intrinsic vascular component in the AD pathogenesis which is an aspect of the disease often considered as a distinct pathology. A new integrative conception of the disease may offer an advantage to current therapies which may gain in potency if combined in a multi-target manner to yield true improvements. This review will revisit the pathophysiology of AD and discuss the advanced therapeutics currently in use.

  10. Robust gene dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuemei; Bai, Zhouxian; Wang, Jiajia; Xie, Bin; Sun, Jiya; Han, Guangchun; Song, Fuhai; Crack, Peter J; Duan, Yong; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    The brain transcriptome of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reflects the prevailing disease mechanism at the gene expression level. However, thousands of genes have been reported to be dysregulated in AD brains in existing studies, and the consistency or discrepancy among these studies has not been thoroughly examined. Toward this end, we conducted a comprehensive survey of the brain transcriptome datasets for AD and other neurological diseases. We first demonstrated that the frequency of observed dysregulation in AD was highly correlated with the reproducibility of the dysregulation. Based on this observation, we selected 100 genes with the highest frequency of dysregulation to illustrate the core perturbation in AD brains. The dysregulation of these genes was validated in several independent datasets for AD. We further identified 12 genes with strong correlation of gene expression with disease progression. The relevance of these genes to disease progression was also validated in an independent dataset. Interestingly, we found a transcriptional "cushion" for these 100 genes in the less vulnerable visual cortex region, which may be a critical component of the protection mechanism for less vulnerable brain regions. To facilitate the research in this field, we have provided the expression information of ~8000 relevant genes on a publicly accessible web server AlzBIG (http://alz.big.ac.cn).

  11. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  12. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  13. Alzheimer's disease: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory deficits and other cognitive disturbances. Neuropathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and cortex and the abnormal extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β and intracellular tau protein. Current research on AD is focused on the mechanisms underlying the abnormal oligomerization, fibrillation, and accumulation of the amyloid-β and tau proteins, mechanisms that may alter the dynamics of this accumulation and on experimental therapeutics approaches aimed at the clearance of the abnormally folded proteins and other potentially neuroprotective interventions. This review will summarize the main areas of investigation in AD and present ways forward for future work.

  14. Preclinical Alzheimer disease-the challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Reisa A; Karlawish, Jason; Johnson, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that the pathophysiological process of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to clinically obvious symptoms, and the concept of a presymptomatic or preclinical stage of AD is becoming more widely accepted. Advances in biomarker studies have enabled detection of AD pathology in vivo in clinically normal older individuals. The predictive value of these biomarkers at the individual patient level, however, remains to be elucidated. The ultimate goal of identifying individuals in the preclinical stages of AD is to facilitate early intervention to delay and perhaps even prevent emergence of the clinical syndrome. A number of challenges remain to be overcome before this concept can be validated and translated into clinical practice.

  15. Nutrition and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Ying-Li; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD. PMID:23865055

  16. [Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Shigeta, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, and is the commonest cause of dementia. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) were developed under the cholinergic hypothesis of AD. Therapeutic strategies with these drugs aimed to enhance cholinergic neurotransmission in specific parts of the brain, and to improve the clinical symptoms of AD. Donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine are commonly used AChEIs in pharmacotherapy for AD, slowing the progression and controlling the symptoms of AD. Although these drugs have different pharmacological properties, there is no clear evidence of differences between them with respect to efficacy. It is possible to adapt AChEIs for the pharmacotherapy of other conditions, such as vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Down syndrome.

  17. Developing therapeutic vaccines against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Drummond, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. It is characterized by an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. In AD these normal proteins accumulate, leading to aggregation and a conformational change forming oligomeric and fibrillary species with a high β-sheet content. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches result in dramatic reduction of Aβ pathology in AD animal models. However, there is much more limited evidence in human studies of significant clinical benefits from these strategies and it is becoming apparent that they may only be effective very early in AD. Vaccination targeting only tau pathology has shown benefits in some mouse studies but human studies are limited. Greater therapeutic efficacy for the next generation of vaccine approaches will likely benefit from specifically targeting the most toxic species of Aβ and tau, ideally simultaneously.

  18. Air pollution, oxidative stress, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Paula Valencia; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of people worldwide and will continue to affect millions more with population aging on the rise. AD causality is multifactorial. Known causal factors include genetic predisposition, age, and sex. Environmental toxins such as air pollution (AP) have also been implicated in AD causation. Exposure to AP can lead to chronic oxidative stress (OS), which is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Whereas AP plays a role in AD pathology, the epidemiological evidence for this association is limited. Given the significant prevalence of AP exposure combined with increased population aging, epidemiological evidence for this link is important to consider. In this paper, we examine the existing evidence supporting the relationship between AP, OS, and AD and provide recommendations for future research on the population level, which will provide evidence in support of public health interventions.

  19. Growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; U, Hoi Sang; Alksne, John; Bakay, Roy A; Pay, Mary Margaret; Merrill, David; Thal, Leon J

    2002-11-15

    The capacity to prevent neuronal degeneration and death during the course of progressive neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD) would represent a significant advance in therapy. Nervous system growth factors are families of naturally produced proteins that, in animal models, exhibit extensive potency in preventing neuronal death due to a variety of causes, reversing age-related atrophy of neurons, and ameliorating functional deficits. The main challenge in translating growth factor therapy to the clinic has been delivery of growth factors to the brain in sufficient concentrations to influence neuronal function. One means of achieving growth factor delivery to the central nervous system in a highly targeted, effective manner may be gene therapy. In this article the authors summarize the development and implementation of nerve growth factor gene delivery as a potential means of reducing cell loss in AD.

  20. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  1. New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mona; Adem, Abdu; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) remains a highly viable target for the symptomatic improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) because cholinergic deficit is a consistent and early finding in AD. The treatment approach of inhibiting peripheral AchE for myasthenia gravis had effectively proven that AchE inhibition was a reachable therapeutic target. Subsequently tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine were developed and approved for the symptomatic treatment of AD. Since then, multiple cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) continue to be developed. These include newer ChEIs, naturally derived ChEIs, hybrids, and synthetic analogues. In this paper, we summarize the different types of ChEIs in development and their respective mechanisms of actions. This pharmacological approach continues to be active with many promising compounds. PMID:22216416

  2. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  3. Memory for music in Alzheimer's disease: unforgettable?

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2009-03-01

    The notion that memory for music can be preserved in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has been raised by a number of case studies. In this paper, we review the current research examining musical memory in patients with AD. In keeping with models of memory described in the non-musical domain, we propose that various forms of musical memory exist, and may be differentially impaired in AD, reflecting the pattern of neuropathological changes associated with the condition. Our synthesis of this literature reveals a dissociation between explicit and implicit musical memory functions. Implicit, specifically procedural musical memory, or the ability to play a musical instrument, can be spared in musicians with AD. In contrast, explicit musical memory, or the recognition of familiar or unfamiliar melodies, is typically impaired. Thus, the notion that music is unforgettable in AD is not wholly supported. Rather, it appears that the ability to play a musical instrument may be unforgettable in some musicians with AD.

  4. Implicit verbal memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Spinnler, H

    1994-09-01

    Word stem completion and word identification were used in two repetition priming experiments to evaluate the implicit memory performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. This issue was also approached using various meta-analyses combining and contrasting previously reported data. While the experimental results suggested that AD patients present preserved repetition priming in both tasks, the meta-analytic approach showed an impairment in stem completion in comparison to word identification. Converging evidence cautiously suggested to accept the results of the meta-analysis. The above dissociation has been interpreted as showing differences in the specific contribution of data- and conceptually-driven processes in the two implicit tasks. A further meta-analysis on the effect of reduced perceptual availability of the study material on the same two tasks indicated that this variable affected repetition priming in word identification more heavily than in stem completion. The impact of such a dissociation on theories of implicit memory is discussed.

  5. Angiotensins in Alzheimer's disease - friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2009-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important regulator of blood pressure. Observational and experimental studies suggest that alterations in blood pressure and components of the brain RAS contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), resulting in changes that can lead or contribute to cognitive decline. The complexity of the RAS and diversity of its interactions with neurological processes have recently become apparent but large gaps in our understanding still remain. Modulation of activity of components of the brain RAS offers substantial opportunities for the treatment and prevention of dementia, including AD. This paper reviews molecular, genetic, experimental and clinical data as well as the therapeutic opportunities that relate to the involvement of the RAS in AD.

  6. The blood brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A; de Wit, N M; van der Flier, W M; de Vries, H E

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting millions of people worldwide. One of the prominent causative factors of AD pathogenesis is cerebral vascular dysfunction, which results in diminished cerebral perfusion. Moreover, due to the loss of the protective function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), impaired clearance of excess neurotoxic amyloid beta (Aβ) occurs, causing vascular perturbation and diminished cognitive functioning. The relationship between the prevalence of AD and vascular risk factors is complex and not fully understood. In this review we illustrate the vascular risk factors, their effects on BBB function and their contributions to the onset of AD. Additionally, we discuss the underlying factors that may lead to altered neurovascular function and/or cerebral hypoperfusion in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring copper chelation in Alzheimer's disease protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of aging people in the U.S. alone. Clinical studies have indicated that metal chelation is a promising new approach in alleviating the symptoms of AD. Our study explores the as yet undetermined mechanism of copper chelation in amyloid-β, a protein implicated in AD. The structure of amyloid-β is derived from experimental results and incorporates a planar copper-ion-binding structure in a semi-solvated state. We investigate the chelation process using the nudged elastic band method implemented in our ab initio real-space multigrid code. We find that an optimal sequence of unbonding and rebonding events as well as proton transfers are required for a viable chelation process. These findings provide fundamental insight into the process of chelation that may lead to more effective AD therapies.

  8. Developing Therapeutic Vaccines Against Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Drummond, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. It is characterized by an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. In AD these normal proteins accumulate, leading to aggregation and a conformational change forming oligomeric and fibrillary species with a high β-sheet content. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches result in dramatic reduction of Aβ pathology in AD animal models. However, there is much more limited evidence in human studies of significant clinical benefits from these strategies and it is becoming apparent that they may only be effective very early in AD. Vaccination targeting only tau pathology has shown benefits in some mouse studies but human studies are limited. Greater therapeutic efficacy for the next generation of vaccine approaches will likely benefit from specifically targeting the most toxic species of Aβ and tau, ideally simultaneously. PMID:26577574

  9. Implicit memory for music in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Halpern, A R; O'Connor, M G

    2000-07-01

    Short, unfamiliar melodies were presented to young and older adults and to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in an implicit and an explicit memory task. The explicit task was yes-no recognition, and the implicit task was pleasantness ratings, in which memory was shown by higher ratings for old versus new melodies (the mere exposure effect). Young adults showed retention of the melodies in both tasks. Older adults showed little explicit memory but did show the mere exposure effect. The AD patients showed neither. The authors considered and rejected several artifactual reasons for this null effect in the context of the many studies that have shown implicit memory among AD patients. As the previous studies have almost always used the visual modality for presentation, they speculate that auditory presentation, especially of nonverbal material, may be compromised in AD because of neural degeneration in auditory areas in the temporal lobes.

  10. Preserved conceptual priming in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla A R; Lloyd-Jones, Toby J

    2006-10-01

    We assessed Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy older adult control (HC) group performance on: (1) a conceptual priming task, in which participants had to make a semantic decision as to whether a degraded picture of an object encountered previously belonged to the category of living or non-living things; and (2) a recognition memory task. The AD group showed a dissociation between impaired performance on the recognition task and preserved priming for semantic decisions to degraded pictures. We argue that it is not whether priming is conceptual or perceptual that is important for the observation of priming in AD, rather it is the nature of the response that is required (c.f., Gabrieli et al., 1999).

  11. Retromer in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott A; Petsko, Gregory A

    2015-03-01

    Retromer is a protein assembly that has a central role in endosomal trafficking, and retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. First linked to Alzheimer disease, retromer dysfunction causes a range of pathophysiological consequences that have been shown to contribute to the core pathological features of the disease. Genetic studies have established that retromer dysfunction is also pathogenically linked to Parkinson disease, although the biological mechanisms that mediate this link are only now being elucidated. Most recently, studies have shown that retromer is a tractable target in drug discovery for these and other disorders of the nervous system.

  12. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  13. Immune blood biomarkers of Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Hripsime; Goldenson, Ben; Tse, Eric; Masoumi, Ava; Porter, Verna; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sayre, James; Ong, Reno; Mahanian, Michelle; Koo, Patrick; Bae, Susan; Micic, Miodrag; Liu, Philip T; Rosenthal, Mark J; Fiala, Milan

    2009-05-29

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients have an impairment of anti-amyloid-beta (Abeta) innate immunity and a defect in immune gene transcription [Fiala, M., Liu, P.T., Espinosa-Jeffrey, A., Rosenthal, M.J., Bernard, G., Ringman, J.M., Sayre, J., Zhang, L., Zaghi, J., Dejbakhsh, S., Chiang, B., Hui, J., Mahanian, M., Baghaee, A., Hong, P., Cashman, J., 2007b. Innate immunity and transcription of MGAT-III and Toll-like receptors in Alzheimer's disease patients are improved by bisdemethoxycurcumin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104, 12849-12854]. Early diagnosis is a cornerstone of preventive approaches to AD. Phospho-tau and Abeta CSF levels are useful markers of neurodegeneration but not of a process leading to neurodegeneration. To detect an early biomarker of AD, we developed a flow cytometric test of Abeta phagocytosis, which was 94% positive (<400 MFI units) in AD patients (mean age+/-SEM 77+2.2 years; mean score+/-SEM 198.6+/-25.5 MFI units) and 60% positive in MCI patients (77+/-5.6 years; 301+/-106 MFI units). Control subjects, active senior university professors, were 100% negative (74.2+/-4.2 years; 1348+/-174 MFI units). The test had a low specificity in older caregivers and older amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We also tested transcriptional regulation of the genes MGAT-III and Toll-like receptor-3 in macrophages. Macrophages of "Type I" patients (a majority of patients) showed gene down regulation at baseline and up regulation by curcuminoids; macrophages of "Type II" patients showed opposite responses. The results of flow cytometric testing suggest that normal Abeta phagocytosis is associated with healthy cognition and lesser risk of AD. The significance of abnormal results in aged persons should be investigated by prospective studies to determine the risk of AD.

  14. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia.

  15. Metabolite Profiling of Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Christian; Berndt, Peter; Busch, Kristina; Schmitz, Oliver; Wiemer, Jan; Most, Veronique; Hampel, Harald; Kastler, Jürgen; Senn, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of cognitive functions. Today the diagnosis of AD relies on clinical evaluations and is only late in the disease. Biomarkers for early detection of the underlying neuropathological changes are still lacking and the biochemical pathways leading to the disease are still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the metabolic changes resulting from the disease phenotype by a thorough and systematic metabolite profiling approach. For this purpose CSF samples from 79 AD patients and 51 healthy controls were analyzed by gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. In total 343 different analytes have been identified. Significant changes in the metabolite profile of AD patients compared to healthy controls have been identified. Increased cortisol levels seemed to be related to the progression of AD and have been detected in more severe forms of AD. Increased cysteine associated with decreased uridine was the best paired combination to identify light AD (MMSE>22) with specificity and sensitivity above 75%. In this group of patients, sensitivity and specificity above 80% were obtained for several combinations of three to five metabolites, including cortisol and various amino acids, in addition to cysteine and uridine. PMID:22359596

  16. Targeting synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, Robert; Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Collingridge, Graham

    2012-12-01

    In the past years, major efforts have been made to understand the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has been translated into extensive experimental approaches aimed at slowing down or halting disease progression. Advances in transgenic (Tg) technologies allowed the engineering of different mouse models of AD recapitulating a range of AD-like features. These Tg models provided excellent opportunities to analyze the bases for the temporal evolution of the disease. Several lines of evidence point to synaptic dysfunction as a cause of AD and that synapse loss is a pathological correlate associated with cognitive decline. Therefore, the phenotypic characterization of these animals has included electrophysiological studies to analyze hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation, a widely recognized cellular model for learning and memory. Transgenic mice, along with non-Tg models derived mainly from exogenous application of Aβ, have also been useful experimental tools to test the various therapeutic approaches. As a result, numerous pharmacological interventions have been reported to attenuate synaptic dysfunction and improve behavior in the different AD models. To date, however, very few of these findings have resulted in target validation or successful translation into disease-modifying compounds in humans. Here, we will briefly review the synaptic alterations across the different animal models and we will recapitulate the pharmacological strategies aimed at rescuing hippocampal plasticity phenotypes. Finally, we will highlight intrinsic limitations in the use of experimental systems and related challenges in translating preclinical studies into human clinical trials.

  17. [A guide to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno

    2005-11-15

    Despite the evolution of an increase of medical formation, only 50% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are diagnosed in France. It is pity, given the fact that the diagnosis of AD is relatively easy and can often be made without hospitalisation. The first stage of the medical inquiry is based on the clinical observation. It is established that the progression of the symptoms follows the progression of the brain lesions. A deficit in episodic memory is the earliest and most predominant cognitive change of AD. This is consistent with the precocious involvement of mesial temporal structures. This pattern, so-called "memory disorders of the hippocampal type," is highly suggestive of AD and markedly differs from that of other dementing illnesses. As the disease progresses and involves neocortical associative areas, patients demonstrate impairments in instrumental functions such as language, praxia, gnosia, and visuoconstructive functions. The second stage of the diagnosis is based on neuroimagery. MRI shows a bilateral atrophy of hippocampal formations even in the early stages of the disease. Standard biological parameters are normal. According to the context of occurrences of the disease or to the existence of atypical clinical or radiological changes, additional investigations can be proposed.

  18. Open questions for Alzheimer's disease immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golde, Todd E

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps more definitively than any other class of novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy, pre-clinical studies in mouse models of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition have established the disease-modifying potential of anti-Aβ immunotherapy. Despite disappointing results to date from anti-Aβ immunotherapy therapeutic trials, there is continued hope that such immunotherapies, especially if used in the preclinical stages, could prove to be the first disease-modifying therapies available for AD. The general optimism that Aβ-targeting and emerging tau-targeting immunotherapies may prove to be disease modifying is tempered by many unanswered questions regarding these therapeutic approaches, including but not limited to i) lack of precise understanding of mechanisms of action, ii) the factors that regulate antibody exposure in the brain, iii) the optimal target epitope, and iv) the mechanisms underlying side effects. In this review I discuss how answering these and other questions could increase the likelihood of therapeutic success. As passive immunotherapies are also likely to be extremely expensive, I also raise questions relating to cost-benefit of biologic-based therapies for AD that could limit future impact of these therapies by limiting access due to economic constraints.

  19. Role of physical exercise in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEI-WEI; ZHANG, XIA; HUANG, WEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on the brain and general wellness are well recognised, but not particularly well known to the general public. Understanding the importance of integrating active behavior for overall health is crucial at any age and particularly for the elderly who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease mainly affecting individuals aged >65 years. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-β, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of the protein tau, brain atrophy and dementia. The beneficial effects of physical exercise have been observed on the maintenance of brain size and efficiency for the prevention of AD risks, such as obesity, hypertension and stroke. These effects are extended to individuals with, or at risk of dementia and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, although extensive studies are required to fully understand the mechanisms by which physical exercise procures beneficial effects, data suggest the relevance of integrating physical exercise in the prevention and/or cure of AD, disease whose incidence is predicted to increase in the future. Such an increase, may pose medical, social and economical challenges for populations and the health care system worldwide. In the present review we assess the positive aspects of physical exercise with regard to prevention and cure of AD. PMID:27073621

  20. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Nacmias, B; Piaceri, I; Bagnoli, S; Tedde, A; Piacentini, S; Sorbi, S

    2014-01-01

    The genetics of neurodegenerative diseases has an important role to clarify the pathogenetic mechanism, the diagnosis and finally the therapeutic and ethical implications. Moreover, the genetic approach to the study of the main clinical forms of dementia (Alzheimer's disease-AD and Frontotemporal Dementia-FTD) suggests clinical guidelines for helping families to navigate through these complexities. AD and FTD are multifactorial, genetically complex diseases involving many candidate genes. Mutations in three genes (i.e. Amyloid Precursor Protein, APP; presenilin 1, PSEN1; presenilin 2, PSEN2) have been linked to 50% of all familial forms of AD (FAD). Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have involved an increasing number of genes with a possible role in the disease pathogenesis. Up to now, the genetics of familial forms of FTD is related to 7 genes: the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) progranulin (GRN), the valosin-containing protein (VCP), chromatin-modifying 2B (CHMP2B), the TARDNA binding protein 43 encoding gene (TARBDP), fused in sarcoma (FUS) and the last hexanucleotide expansion repeats in the open reading frame of chromosome 9 (C9orf72). Pre-test counseling and the identification of genetic defects are important in both patients and asymptomatic at risk family members. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Copernicus revisited: amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J; Shukitt-Hale, B; Denisova, N A; Martin, A; Perry, G; Smith, M A

    2001-01-01

    The beta-amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has dominated the thinking and research in this area for over a decade and a half. While there has been a great deal of effort in attempting to prove its centrality in this devastating disease, and while an enormous amount has been learned about its properties (e.g., putative toxicity, processing and signaling), Abeta has not proven to be both necessary and sufficient for the development, neurotoxicity, and cognitive deficits associated with this disease. Instead, the few treatments that are available have emerged from aging research and are primarily directed toward modification of acetylcholine levels. Clearly, it is time to rethink this position and to propose instead that future approaches should focus upon altering the age-related sensitivity of the neuronal environment to insults involving such factors as inflammation and oxidative stress. In other words "solve the problems of aging and by extension those of AD will also be reduced." This review is being submitted as a rather Lutherian attempt to "nail an alternative thesis" to the gate of the Church of the Holy Amyloid to open its doors to the idea that aging is the most pervasive element in this disease and Abeta is merely one of the planets.

  2. Neural stem cells and Alzheimer's disease: challenges and hope.

    PubMed

    Zhongling Feng; Gang Zhao; Lei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of synapses and neurons in brain regions critical for learning and memory functions. The endogenous generation of new neurons in certain regions of the mature brain, derived from primitive cells termed neural stem cells, has raised hope that neural stem cells may be recruited for structural brain repair. Stem cell therapy has been suggested as a possible strategy for replacing damaged circuitry and restoring learning and memory abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the promising investigations that are raising hope, and understanding the challenges behind translating underlying stem cell biology into novel clinical therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Building a roadmap for developing combination therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Sperling, Reisa; Katz, Russell; Berry, Donald; Dilts, David; Hanna, Debra; Salloway, Stephen; Trojanowski, John Q; Bountra, Chas; Krams, Michael; Luthman, Johan; Potkin, Steven; Gribkoff, Val; Temple, Robert; Wang, Yaning; Carrillo, Maria C; Stephenson, Diane; Snyder, Heather; Liu, Enchi; Ware, Tony; McKew, John; Fields, F Owen; Bain, Lisa J; Bens, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Combination therapy has proven to be an effective strategy for treating many of the world's most intractable diseases. A growing number of investigators in academia, industry, regulatory agencies, foundations and advocacy organizations are interested in pursuing a combination approach to treating Alzheimer's disease. A meeting co-hosted by the Accelerate Cure/Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease Coalition, the Critical Path Institute and the Alzheimer's Association addressed challenges in designing clinical trials to test multiple treatments in combination and outlined a roadmap for making such trials a reality.

  4. Crowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Genevera I; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Bare, Christopher J; Beaton, Derek; Bellotti, Roberto; Bennett, David A; Boehme, Kevin L; Boutros, Paul C; Caberlotto, Laura; Caloian, Cristian; Campbell, Frederick; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Beibei; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chien, Ting-Ying; Clark, Tim; Das, Sudeshna; Davatzikos, Christos; Deng, Jieyao; Dillenberger, Donna; Dobson, Richard J B; Dong, Qilin; Doshi, Jimit; Duma, Denise; Errico, Rosangela; Erus, Guray; Everett, Evan; Fardo, David W; Friend, Stephen H; Fröhlich, Holger; Gan, Jessica; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glaab, Enrico; Green, Robert C; Guan, Yuanfang; Hong, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chao; Hwang, Jinseub; Ibrahim, Joseph; Inglese, Paolo; Iyappan, Anandhi; Jiang, Qijia; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Klein, Arno; Kong, Dehan; Krause, Roland; Lalonde, Emilie; Lauria, Mario; Lee, Eunjee; Lin, Xihui; Liu, Zhandong; Livingstone, Julie; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Lovestone, Simon; Ma, Tsung-Wei; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Mangravite, Lara M; Maxwell, Taylor J; Merrill, Emily; Nagorski, John; Namasivayam, Aishwarya; Narayan, Manjari; Naz, Mufassra; Newhouse, Stephen J; Norman, Thea C; Nurtdinov, Ramil N; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Pawitan, Yudi; Peng, Shengwen; Peters, Mette A; Piccolo, Stephen R; Praveen, Paurush; Priami, Corrado; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Senger, Philipp; Shen, Xia; Simmons, Andrew; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Tung, Yi-An; Tustison, Nicholas J; Varol, Erdem; Vradenburg, George; Weiner, Michael W; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Lei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Jia; Yang, Hojin; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yunyun; Zhu, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-06-01

    Identifying accurate biomarkers of cognitive decline is essential for advancing early diagnosis and prevention therapies in Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's disease DREAM Challenge was designed as a computational crowdsourced project to benchmark the current state-of-the-art in predicting cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer's disease based on high dimensional, publicly available genetic and structural imaging data. This meta-analysis failed to identify a meaningful predictor developed from either data modality, suggesting that alternate approaches should be considered for prediction of cognitive performance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perception of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Saifadini, Rostam; Tajadini, Haleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehrabani, Mitra; Kamalinegad, Mohamad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. In regards to the world's aging population, control and treatment of AD will be one of the major concerns of global public health in the next century. Alzheimer disease was not mentioned with the same phrase or its equivalent in traditional medical texts. The main of present paper was to investigate symptoms and causes of alzheimer disease from the view point of Iranian traditional medicine. In this qualitative study, we searched reliable sources of Iranian traditional medicine such as Canon of Medicide by Avicenna (Al-Quanon fi- tibb), Aghili cure by Aghili's (Molajat-E-aghili), Tib-E-Akbari, Exire -E-Aazam and Sharh-E-Asbab and some reliable resources of neurology were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlap in terms of symptoms with alzheimer disease. By taking from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Findings showed that alzheimer disease has the most overlap with Nesyan (fisad-e-zekr, fisad-e-fekr and fisad-e-takhayol) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a perfect overlap and there are causes, including coldness and dryness of the brain or coldness and wetness that could also lead to alzheimer disease according to Iranian traditional medicine. According to Iranian traditional medicine, The brain dystemperement is considered the main causes of alzheimer disease. By correcting the brain dystemperement, alzheimer can be well managed. This study helps to suggest a better strategy for preventing and treating alzheimer in the future.

  6. Perception of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saifadini, Rostam; Tajadini, Haleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehrabani, Mitra; Kamalinegad, Mohamad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. In regards to the world’s aging population, control and treatment of AD will be one of the major concerns of global public health in the next century. Alzheimer disease was not mentioned with the same phrase or its equivalent in traditional medical texts. The main of present paper was to investigate symptoms and causes of alzheimer disease from the view point of Iranian traditional medicine. Evidence Acquisition: In this qualitative study, we searched reliable sources of Iranian traditional medicine such as Canon of Medicide by Avicenna (Al-Quanon fi- tibb), Aghili cure by Aghili’s (Molajat-E-aghili), Tib-E-Akbari, Exire -E-Aazam and Sharh-E-Asbab and some reliable resources of neurology were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlap in terms of symptoms with alzheimer disease. By taking from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Results: Findings showed that alzheimer disease has the most overlap with Nesyan (fisad-e-zekr, fisad-e-fekr and fisad-e-takhayol) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a perfect overlap and there are causes, including coldness and dryness of the brain or coldness and wetness that could also lead to alzheimer disease according to Iranian traditional medicine. Conclusions: According to Iranian traditional medicine, The brain dystemperement is considered the main causes of alzheimer disease. By correcting the brain dystemperement, alzheimer can be well managed. This study helps to suggest a better strategy for preventing and treating alzheimer in the future. PMID:27247784

  7. Common inflammatory mechanisms in Lewy body disease and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mrak, Robert E; Griffin, W Sue T

    2007-08-01

    Cortical Lewy body disease as a cause of dementia has been recognized for more than 40 years. Only in the past 15 to 20 years, however, has the true frequency of this entity come to be appreciated, primarily because of the advent of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical diagnostic techniques. We now know that there is frequent and extensive overlap, both clinically and pathologically, between Lewy body and Alzheimer diseases. Although some of this overlap may be attributable to common genetic and environmental risk factors, it is also now apparent that the 2 diseases share common neuroinflammatory mechanisms involving activation of microglia, overexpression of interleukin-1 and other inflammatory mediators, and inflammatory toxicity to neurons. Activated microglia are found in association with alpha-synuclein-containing neurons and glia in Parkinson disease, in dementia with Lewy bodies, and in multiple system atrophy, and these associations are reminiscent of microglial associations with neurofibrillary tangle-containing neurons in Alzheimer disease. In vitro and in vivo experimental work has shown reciprocal induction between alpha-synuclein and injured neurons on one hand and activated microglia and cytokine overexpression on the other. These neuroinflammatory processes may be a common link driving progression in both diseases and explaining the frequent overlap between the 2 diseases.

  8. Alzheimer disease and cerebrovascular pathology: an update.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, K A

    2002-05-01

    Recent epidemiological and clinico-pathologic data suggest overlaps between Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebrovascular lesions that may magnify the effect of mild AD pathology and promote progression of cognitive decline or even may precede neuronal damage and dementia. Vascular pathology in the aging brain and in AD includes: 1. cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) with an incidence of 82-98% often associated with ApoE epsilon 2 and causing a) cerebral mass hemorrhages (around 70%, mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes), b) multiple or recurrent microhemorrhages (15%), and c) ischemic (micro-)infarcts or lacunes (around 20%). The frequency of these lesions increases with the severity of CAA and shows no correlation with that of senile amyloid plaques. CAA, significantly more frequent in patients with cerebral hemorrhages or infarcts than in aged controls, is an important risk factor for cerebrovascular lesions in AD. 2. Microvascular changes with decreased density and structural abnormalities causing regional metabolic and blood-brain barrier dysfunctions with ensuing neuronal damage. In large autopsy series of demented aged subjects, around 80% show Alzheimer type pathology, 20-40% with additional, often minor vascular lesions, 7-10% "pure" vascular dementia, and 3-5% "mixed" dementia (combination of AD and vascular encephalopathy). AD cases with additional minor cerebrovascular lesions have significantly more frequent histories of hypertension or infarcts than "pure" AD patients. Vascular lesions in AD include cortical microinfarcts, subcortical lacunes, white matter lesions / leukoencephalopathy, small hemorrhages and corticosubcortical infarcts, while in mixed type dementia multiple larger or hemispheral infarcts are more frequent. Small infarcts in AD patients have no essential impact on global cognitive decline which mainly depends on the severity of Alzheimer pathology, but in early stage of AD they may influence and promote the development of dementia

  9. Estrogen Intake and Copper Depositions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Amtage, Florian; Birnbaum, Dzelila; Reinhard, Thomas; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Weiller, Cornelius; Mader, Irina; Meyer, Philipp T.; Rijntjes, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with chronic postmenopausal estrogen intake with presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the cornea and Alzheimer's disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of estrogen intake and copper accumulation in various tissues, including the central nervous system. Sonography was compatible with copper accumulation in the basal ganglia, but the patient showed no clinical signs of Wilson's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography revealed a typical pattern for Alzheimer's disease. We propose increased copper levels as a direct effect of estrogen intake due to an augmented ATP7A-mRNA in the intestine. Moreover, we discuss the impact of elevated free serum copper on accompanying Alzheimer's disease, knowing that copper plays a crucial role in the formation of amyloid plaques and tau aggregation. This might offer a partial explanation for the observation that postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25076894

  10. Neuroprotective strategies involving ROS in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Magali; Beal, M Flint

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which oxidative stress is a key hallmark. It occurs early in disease pathogenesis and can exacerbate its progression. Several causes of oxidative stress have been determined over the years. First, mitochondria play an important role in the generation and accumulation of free radicals. In addition to mitochondria, inflammation can also induce oxidative damage, especially via microglia, and microglia are also important for Aβ clearance. In AD, both mitochondrial function and inflammatory response are affected, leading to increased ROS formation and oxidative damage to lipid, proteins, and nucleic acids. Some other sources have also been identified. From these findings, various neuroprotective strategies against ROS-mediated damages have been elaborated in AD research. This review recapitulates some of the major strategies used to prevent oxidative stress and disease progression. Outcomes from in vitro and in vivo studies using models of AD are encouraging. However, only a few clinical trials have provided positive results in terms of slowing down cognitive decline. Nonetheless, there is still hope for improved compounds that would better target pathways implicated in ROS production. In fact, facilitating the endogenous antioxidant system by modulating transcription has great promise for AD therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Voluntary Imitation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Ambra; Casteran, Matthieu; Ballay, Yves; Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients' behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e., a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person's action and translating this perception into one's own action, was affected in patients with AD. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator.

  12. Bimanual Gesture Imitation in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanin, G Nter; Benke, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Unimanual gesture production or imitation has often been studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD) during apraxia testing. In the present study, it was hypothesized that bimanual motor tasks may be a sensitive method to detect impairments of motor cognition in AD due to increased demands on the cognitive system. We investigated bimanual, meaningless gesture imitation in 45 AD outpatients, 38 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 50 normal controls (NC) attending a memory clinic. Participants performed neuropsychological background testing and three tasks: the Interlocking Finger Test (ILF), Imitation of Alternating Hand Movements (AHM), and Bimanual Rhythm Tapping (BRT). The tasks were short and easy to administer. Inter-rater reliability was high across all three tests. AD patients performed significantly poorer than NC and MCI participants; a deficit to imitate bimanual gestures was rarely found in MCI and NC participants. Sensitivity to detect AD ranged from 0.5 and 0.7, specificity beyond 0.9. ROC analyses revealed good diagnostic accuracy (0.77 to 0.92). Impairment to imitate bimanual gestures was mainly predicted by diagnosis and disease severity. Our findings suggest that an impairment to imitate bimanual, meaningless gestures is a valid disease marker of mild to moderate AD and can easily be assessed in memory clinic settings. Based on our preliminary findings, it appears to be a separate impairment which can be distinguished from other cognitive deficits.

  13. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  14. Dysregulation of dynorphins in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, T; Marinova, Z; Kuzmin, A; Seidah, N G; Haroutunian, V; Terenius, L; Bakalkin, G

    2007-11-01

    The opioid peptides dynorphins may be involved in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) by inducing neurodegeneration or cognitive impairment. To test this hypothesis, the dynorphin system was analyzed in postmortem samples from AD and control subjects, and subjects with Parkinson or cerebro-vascular diseases for comparison. Dynorphin A, dynorphin B and related neuropeptide nociceptin were determined in the Brodmann area 7 by radioimmunoassay. The precursor protein prodynorphin, processing convertase PC2 and the neuroendocrine pro7B2 and 7B2 proteins required for PC2 maturation were analyzed by Western blot. AD subjects displayed robustly elevated levels of dynorphin A and no differences in dynorphin B and nociceptin compared to controls. Subjects with Parkinson or cerebro-vascular diseases did not differ from controls with respect to any of the three peptides. PC2 levels were also increased, whereas, those of prodynorphin and pro7B2/7B2 were not changed in AD. Dynorphin A levels correlated with the neuritic plaque density. These results along with the known non-opioid ability of dynorphin A to induce neurodegeneration suggest a role for this neuropeptide in AD neuropathology.

  15. Apolipoprotein E receptor pathways in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Carlo, Anne-Sophie; Willnow, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of patients worldwide. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, the formation of neurotoxic oligomers composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is the main mechanism that causes synaptic dysfunction and, eventually, neuronal cell death in this condition. Intriguingly, apolipoprotein E (apoE), the most important genetic risk factor for sporadic AD, emerges as a key factor that contributes to many aspects of the amyloid cascade including the clearance of Aβ from brain interstitial fluid and the ability of this peptide to form neurotoxic oligomers. Central to the activity of apoE in the healthy and in the diseased brain are apoE receptors that interact with this protein to mediate its multiple cellular and systemic effects. This review describes the molecular interactions that link apoE and its cellular receptors with neuronal viability and function, and how defects in these pathways in the brain promote neurodegeneration. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease cognitive symptoms].

    PubMed

    Abel, Carlos; Allegri, Ricardo F; Garau, Laura; Genovese, Osvaldo; Mangone, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    This chapter will focus in the currently treatments for Alzheimer Disease. The meeting points in the proposed pathogenesis of the disease are the cholinergic and the cascade amyloid hypothesis based mainly in postmortem brain changes: 1- Pathological based on greater density of neuritic plaques and the characteristic presence of neurofibrillary tangles associated with neuronal loss, synaptic alterations and evidence for chronic inflammatory reactions, 2) Biochemical based on major depletion of cortical cholinergic innervation, dramatic loss in levels of biochemically determined choline acetyltransferase, accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide, oxidation, glutamatergic excitotoxicity and activation of the apoptotic cascade. The currently available therapies based on the hypothesized pathophysiology of AD are: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) and the NMDA receptor inhibitor Memantine. None of the "head to head" analyses done with cholinesterase inhibitors (CI) were able to demonstrate a between group effect for efficacy. However the treatment planning is based on their differences, their titration phase to reach the therapeutic doses, interactions and side effects. The non pharmacological treatment in the early and late stages of the disease, the different cognitive stimulation techniques and available prevention trials are also addressed and discussed.

  17. Economic cost of Alzheimer disease in Israel.

    PubMed

    Beeri, Michal Schnaider; Werner, Perla; Adar, Zvi; Davidson, Michael; Noy, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the cost of Alzheimer disease (AD) in Israel. Seventy-one AD patients who lived in the community, 50 institutionalized AD patients, both AD groups' respective primary caregivers, and 50 healthy elderly subjects were interviewed. The interviews covered information about the number of caregivers' hours invested in caring for the patient and amount of expenditures such as in house paid help and payments for day care. The annual social cost of caring for a person with AD in Israel was approximately $17,000, whether the patient lived at home or in a nursing home, but the cost components differed in the two groups. For community-dwelling patients, 60% of the cost represented an imputed value of unpaid indirect care compared with 12% for institutionalized patients. Also, in both residences, the private cost was significantly higher than the public cost, i.e., more 75% of the services provided to patients were paid out of pocket. Cost of institutionalization was the major component of the social cost. The cost of the disease increased with functional and cognitive deterioration for the community-dwelling group only. With projected increases in the number of persons at risk for developing AD, the economic impact of the disease on future costs will be significant. Efforts to delay deterioration and, as a result, delay institutionalization seem crucial for cost containment.

  18. Role of RAGE in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiyou; Liu, Nannuan; Wang, Chuanling; Qin, Biyong; Zhou, Yingjun; Xiao, Ming; Chang, Liying; Yan, Liang-Jun; Zhao, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a receptor of the immunoglobulin super family that plays various important roles under physiological and pathological conditions. Compelling evidence suggests that RAGE acts as both an inflammatory intermediary and a critical inducer of oxidative stress, underlying RAGE-induced Alzheimer-like pathophysiological changes that drive the process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A critical role of RAGE in AD includes beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation, the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, failure of synaptic transmission, and neuronal degeneration. The steady-state level of Aβ depends on the balance between production and clearance. RAGE plays an important role in the Aβ clearance. RAGE acts as an important transporter via regulating influx of circulating Aβ into brain, whereas the efflux of brain-derived Aβ into the circulation via BBB is implemented by LRP1. RAGE could be an important contributor to Aβ generation via enhancing the activity of β- and/or γ-secretases and activating inflammatory response and oxidative stress. However, sRAGE-Aβ interactions could inhibit Aβ neurotoxicity and promote Aβ clearance from brain. Meanwhile, RAGE could be a promoting factor for the synaptic dysfunction and neuronal circuit dysfunction which are both the material structure of cognition, and the physiological and pathological basis of cognition. In addition, RAGE could be a trigger for the pathogenesis of Aβ and tau hyper-phosphorylation which both participate in the process of cognitive impairment. Preclinical and clinical studies have supported that RAGE inhibitors could be useful in the treatment of AD. Thus, an effective measure to inhibit RAGE may be a novel drug target in AD.

  19. Genome scan on Swedish Alzheimer's disease families.

    PubMed

    Sillén, A; Forsell, C; Lilius, L; Axelman, K; Björk, B F; Onkamo, P; Kere, J; Winblad, B; Graff, C

    2006-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disease, which affects approximately 40% of the population at an age above 90 years. The heritability is estimated to be greater than 60% and there are rare autosomal dominant forms indicating a significant genetic influence on the disease process. Despite the successes in the early 1990s when four genes were identified, which directly cause the disease (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2) or greatly increase the risk of disease development (APOE), it has proved exceedingly difficult to identify additional genes involved in the pathogenesis. However, several linkage and association studies have repeatedly supported the presence of susceptibility genes on chromosomes (chrms) 9, 10 and 12. The study populations have, however, mostly been of great genetic heterogeneity, and this may have contributed to the meagre successes in identifying the disease associated genetic variants. In this study, we have performed a genome wide linkage study on 71 AD families from the relatively genetically homogeneous Swedish population where it is also possible to study the genetic ancestry in public databases. We have performed nonparametric linkage analyses in the total family material as well as stratified the families with respect to the presence or absence of APOE varepsilon4. Our results suggest that the families included in this study are tightly linked to the APOE region, but do not show evidence of linkage to the previously reported linkages on chrms 9, 10 and 12. Instead, we observed the next highest LOD score on chromosome 5q35 in the total material. Further, the data suggest that the major fraction of families linked to this region is APOE varepsilon4 positive.

  20. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  3. Cognitive disability in alzheimer's disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Corsi, M; Di Raimo, T; Di Lorenzo, C; Rapp-Ricciardi, M; Archer, T; Ricci, S; Businaro, R

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive disability linked to neurodegenerative diseases and in particular to Alzheimer's disease, remains an increasing cause for concern through a dramatic prevalence increment and associated socio-economic burdens. Initially Alzheimer's disease develops asymptomatically with primary clinical signs, such as memory impairment, decline of spatial and perceptual abilities, occurring at a later stage. This delay implies the possibility of promoting early interventions during the pre-symptomatic stage of the disease. Different strategies have been applied in order to prevent/delay onset of Alzheimer's disease or at least to improve quality of life and health conditions of Alzheimer's disease patients and their caregivers, especially in the absence of current viable therapies. Multidomain interventions, aimed at affecting several risk factors simultaneously, offer a versatility that may attain improved outcomes in comparison with single-domain prevention trials. These multidomain interventions involve diet, physical exercise, cognitive training and social activities, while music therapy, improving self-consciousness and reducing neurofibrils, may contribute to deceleration/delay onset of Alzheimer's disease progression. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) provides broad applications to improve quality of life and well-being of Alzheimer's disease patients and caregivers, suffering from psychological distress, as well as reducing additional public health costs.

  4. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Nitsch, R M; Blusztajn, J K; Pittas, A G; Slack, B E; Growdon, J H; Wurtman, R J

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease. PMID:1311847

  5. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitsch, R. M.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Pittas, A. G.; Slack, B. E.; Growdon, J. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease.

  6. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitsch, R. M.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Pittas, A. G.; Slack, B. E.; Growdon, J. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease.

  7. The neurobiology of Alzheimer disease defined by neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C; Kreisl, William C; Berman, Karen F

    2012-08-01

    In 2011, a new set of new guidelines for the research diagnosis of three stages of Alzheimer disease was promulgated by the US National Institute of Aging and the Alzheimer Association. For the first time, they include the diagnosis of presymptomatic Alzheimer disease, recognizing that the disease process begins years before cognitive impairment develops. Awareness of this fact has largely been driven by neuroimaging, and particularly by imaging amyloid β (abeta) deposition in the brain, a procedure approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use in April 2012. In Alzheimer disease, abeta deposition antecedes, probably by decades, the onset of cognitive impairment. In brain regions with greatest abeta deposition, synaptic dysfunction can be imaged beginning at preclinical stages. In regions that are not identical with the ones with greatest abeta deposition but heavily connected with them, regional atrophy and loss of white-matter anisotropy can be detected later in the course of the disease, near the time when mild cognitive impairment supervenes. Together with neuropsychological testing, imaging can improve the prediction of worsening to Alzheimer disease among patients with mild cognitive impairment. These findings have huge implications for research on therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer disease. For instance, while so far only patients with the clinical diagnosis have been treated with immunotherapy targeting abeta removal, a consensus is building that to be effective, this therapy should be given in the preclinical stages of the disease, which are assessed most advantageously by means of neuroimaging.

  8. Assessment of Alzheimer's disease symptom recognition in Korean Americans and psychometric analysis of Alzheimer's Disease Symptom Recognition Scale (ADSRS).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang E; Casado, Banghwa Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study examined recognition of Alzheimer's disease symptoms among Korean Americans (KAs) and assessed psychometric properties of the Alzheimer's Disease Symptom Recognition Scale (ADSRS). A cross-sectional survey collected data from 209 KAs, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results show that KAs recognized symptoms related to memory and cognitive functioning well, but had very limited recognition of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Psychometric analysis of ADSRS identified 4 factors in their symptom recognition. Findings suggest a need to raise awareness of Alzheimer's symptoms over the course of the disease. Assessment using ADSRS can be incorporated in communication in the practice context and public outreach.

  9. The draft "National Plan" to address Alzheimer's disease - National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA).

    PubMed

    Khachaturian, Zaven S; Khachaturian, Ara S; Thies, William

    2012-05-01

    This perspective updates the status of the "National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease" and the recommendations of the NAPA Advisory Council's Sub-committee on Research. Here, we identify some of the critical issues the future reiterations of the National Plan should consider during implementation phase of the plan. The Journal invites the scientific community to contribute additional ideas and suggestions towards a national research initiative. Copyright © 2012 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Support for an hypothesis linking Alzheimer`s disease and Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, L.N.; Benjamin, M.B.; Dressler, D.

    1994-09-01

    A connection between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is indicated by the fact that Down syndrome individuals develop AD neuropathology by the third or fourth decade of life. One explanation for the connection between AD and Down syndrome would be that the overexpression of a gene or genes on chromosome 21 results in Alzheimer`s disease, the most likely candidate being the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. However, mutations in the APP gene have been found to be associated with only a very small percentage of familial AD cases. An alternative cause of some Alzheimer`s disease cases may be sporadic trisomy of chromosome 21, resulting from mutations or toxins that cause chromosome nondisjunction. Several predictions can be made based on this hypothesis. One prediction is that there should be more trisomy 21 in cells from AD individuals than from unaffected controls. Using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization to compare the number of trisomy chromosome 21 cells in cultured fibroblasts from AD and unaffected individuals, we have shown that there are a significantly larger number of trisomy 21 cells from AD individuals. Another prediction is that a defect in the mitotic spindle apparatus could be the underlying cause of the aneuploidy. Cultured lymphoblasts from AD and unaffected individuals were briefly exposed to the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine. As assayed by the subsequent appearance of metaphase chromosomes showing centromere separation, cells from AD patients were significantly more sensitive to colchicine treatment compared to cells from unaffected individuals, supporting the prediction of an altered spindle apparatus. Finally, we would predict that both types of patients should share some physical symptoms. We have also found that AD, like Down`s patients, are hypersensitive to the effect of the cholinergic antagonist, tropicamide, on pupil dilation, which may serve as a diagnostic test for Alzheimer`s disease.

  11. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N M; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-05-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non-Alzheimer

  13. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. Objectives To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. Methods A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. Results Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (±3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence fertile, those at the middle fertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years’ longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest fertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years’ longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusion Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose–response effect. PMID:17846408

  14. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A; Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2007-09-11

    We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (+/-3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence tertile, those at the middle tertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years' longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest tertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years' longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose-response effect.

  15. Evidence for ordering of Alzheimer disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jack, Clifford R; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Wiste, Heather J; Weigand, Stephen D; Aisen, Paul S; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Bernstein, Matthew A; Petersen, Ronald C; Weiner, Michael W; Knopman, David S

    2011-12-01

    To empirically assess the concept that Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers significantly depart from normality in a temporally ordered manner. Validation sample. Multisite, referral centers. A total of 401 elderly participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative who were cognitively normal, who had mild cognitive impairment, or who had AD dementia. We compared the proportions of 3 AD biomarker values (the Aβ42 level in cerebrospinal fluid [CSF], the total tau level in CSF, and the hippocampal volume adjusted for intracranial volume [hereafter referred to as the adjusted hippocampal volume]) that were abnormal as cognitive impairment worsened. Cut points demarcating normal vs abnormal for each biomarker were established by maximizing diagnostic accuracy in independent autopsy samples. Three AD biomarkers (ie, the CSF Aβ42 level, the CSF total tau level, and the adjusted hippocampal volume). Within each clinical group of the entire sample (n = 401), the CSF Aβ42 level was abnormal more often than was the CSF total tau level or the adjusted hippocampal volume. Among the 298 participants with both baseline and 12-month data, the proportion of participants with an abnormal Aβ42 level did not change from baseline to 12 months in any group. The proportion of participants with an abnormal total tau level increased from baseline to 12 months in cognitively normal participants (P = .05) but not in participants with mild cognitive impairment or AD dementia. For 209 participants with an abnormal CSF Aβ42 level at baseline, the percentage with an abnormal adjusted hippocampal volume but normal CSF total tau level increased from baseline to 12 months in participants with mild cognitive impairment. No change in the percentage of MCI participants with an abnormal total tau level was seen between baseline and 12 months. A reduction in the CSF Aβ42 level denotes a pathophysiological process that significantly departs from normality (ie, becomes dynamic) early

  16. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and chronic periodontitis: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Gaur, Sumit; Agnihotri, Rupali

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, an affliction of old age, is one of the leading causes for dementia worldwide. Various risk factors including family history, genetics and infections have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The cognitive decline in this condition is mainly a result of the formation of amyloid deposits that provoke neuroinflammation, ultimately resulting in cell death. Recently, an association between peripheral inflammation and Alzheimer's disease was hypothesized. It was suggested that chronic systemic inflammation worsened the inflammatory processes in the brain. This was mainly attributed to increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1, interleukin -6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the plasma. As chronic periodontitis is a widespread peripheral immunoinflammatory condition, it has been proposed to play a significant role in the aggravation of Alzheimer's disease. With this background, the current review focuses on the relationship between Alzheimer's disease and chronic periodontitis, and its therapeutic implications.

  18. Lentivirus-expressed siRNA vectors against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kevin A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and the accumulation of APP products ultimately leads to the familiar histopathological and clinical manifestations associated with this most common form of dementia. A protein that has been shown to promote APP accumulation is beta-secretase (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, or BACE1), which is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid in those affected with Alzheimer disease. Through in vivo studies using APP transgenic mice, we demonstrated that decreasing the expression of BACE1 via lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA has the potential for significantly reducing the cleavage of APP, accumulation of these products, and consequent neurodegeneration. As such, lentiviral-expressed siRNA against BACE1 is a therapeutic possibility in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. We detail the use of lentivirus-expressed siRNA as a method to ameliorate Alzheimer disease neuropathology in APP transgenic mice.

  19. Ayurvedic medicinal plants for Alzheimer's disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-associated, irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, unusual behavior, personality changes, and a decline in cognitive function. No cure for Alzheimer's exists, and the drugs currently available to treat the disease have limited effectiveness. It is believed that therapeutic intervention that could postpone the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease would dramatically reduce the number of cases in the next 50 years. Ayurvedic medicinal plants have been the single most productive source of leads for the development of drugs, and over a hundred new products are already in clinical development. Indeed, several scientific studies have described the use of various Ayurvedic medicinal plants and their constituents for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact mechanism of their action is still not clear, phytochemical studies of the different parts of the plants have shown the presence of many valuable compounds, such as lignans, flavonoids, tannins, polyphenols, triterpenes, sterols, and alkaloids, that show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-cholinesterase, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects. This review gathers research on various medicinal plants that have shown promise in reversing the Alzheimer's disease pathology. The report summarizes information concerning the phytochemistry, biological, and cellular activities and clinical applications of these various plants in order to provide sufficient baseline information that could be used in drug discovery campaigns and development process, thereby providing new functional leads for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22747839

  20. Origins of delusions in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Suzanne J; Gould, Rebecca L; Powell, John F; Howard, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Research over the past two decades supports a shared aetiology for delusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and schizophrenia. Functional networks involved in salience attribution and belief evaluation have been implicated in the two conditions, and striatal D2/3 receptors are increased to a comparable extent. Executive/frontal deficits are common to both disorders and predict emergent symptoms. Putative risk genes for schizophrenia, which may modify the AD process, have been more strongly implicated in delusions than those directly linked with late-onset AD. Phenotypic correlates of delusions in AD may be dependent upon delusional subtype. Persecutory delusions occur early in the disease and are associated with neurochemical and neuropathological changes in frontostriatal circuits. In contrast, misidentification delusions are associated with greater global cognitive deficits and advanced limbic pathology. It is unclear whether the two subtypes are phenomenologically and biologically distinct or are part of a continuum, in which misidentification delusions manifest increasingly as the pathological process extends. This has treatment implications, particularly if they are found to have discrete chemical and/or pathological markers.

  1. Proton pump inhibitors: predisposers to Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Fallahzadeh, M K; Borhani Haghighi, A; Namazi, M R

    2010-04-01

    The abnormal processing of amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) and resultant formation of fibrillar A beta (fA beta) are major events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Microglia as the phagocytic cells of the brain can engulf and digest fA beta within their acidic lysosomes. The lysosomes of AD patients are less acidic and therefore less capable of clearance of fA beta. Vacuolar proton pumps (V-ATPases) which are found abundantly in microglia and macrophages, acidify lysosomes by pumping protons into these structures. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can inhibit V-ATPases of the lysosomes. These drugs are shown to penetrate the blood-brain barrier in animals. PPIs are consumed for long periods in conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, with the resultant exposure of the human brain to the substantial amounts of PPIs. We hypothesize that by blocking the V-ATPases on microglial lysosomes, PPIs may basify lysosomes and hamper degradation of fA beta. Chronic consumption of PPIs may thus be a risk factor for AD.

  2. Brain injury, neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    With as many as 300,000 United States troops in Iraq and Afghanistan having suffered head injuries (Miller, 2012), traumatic brain injury (TBI) has garnered much recent attention. While the cause and severity of these injuries is variable, severe cases can lead to lifelong disability or even death. While aging is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is now becoming clear that a history of TBI predisposes the individual to AD later in life (Sivanandam and Thakur, 2012). In this review article, we begin by defining hallmark pathological features of AD and the various forms of TBI. Putative mechanisms underlying the risk relationship between these two neurological disorders are then critically considered. Such mechanisms include precipitation and ‘spreading’ of cerebral amyloid pathology and the role of neuroinflammation. The combined problems of TBI and AD represent significant burdens to public health. A thorough, mechanistic understanding of the precise relationship between TBI and AD is of utmost importance in order to illuminate new therapeutic targets. Mechanistic investigations and the development of preclinical therapeutics are reliant upon a clearer understanding of these human diseases and accurate modeling of pathological hallmarks in animal systems. PMID:23874297

  3. Physical activity and Alzheimer disease course.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A; Brickman, Adam M; Cosentino, Stephanie; Schupf, Nicole; Xin-Tang, Ming; Gu, Yian; Stern, Yaakov

    2011-05-01

    To examine the association between physical activity (PA) and Alzheimer disease (AD) course. PA has been related to lower risk for AD. Whether PA is associated with subsequent AD course has not been investigated. In a population-based study of individuals aged 65 years and older in New York who were prospectively followed up with standard neurologic and neuropsychological evaluations (every ~1.5 years), 357 participants i) were nondemented at baseline and ii) were diagnosed with AD during follow-up (incident AD). PA (sum of participation in a variety of physical activities, weighted by the type of activity [light, moderate, and severe]) obtained 2.4 (standard deviation [SD], 1.9) years before incidence was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models and of cognitive decline in generalized estimating equation models that were adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, education, comorbidities, and duration between PA evaluation and dementia onset. One hundred fifty incident AD cases (54%) died during the course of 5.2 (SD, 4.4) years of follow-up. When compared with incident AD cases who were physically inactive, those with some PA had lower mortality risk, whereas incident AD participants with much PA had an even lower risk. Additional adjustments for apolipoprotein genotype, smoking, comorbidity index, and cognitive performance did not change the associations. PA did not affect rates of cognitive or functional decline. Exercise may affect not only risk for AD but also subsequent disease duration: more PA is associated with prolonged survival in AD.

  4. Genetics of Psychosis of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chintan; DeMichele-Sweet, Mary Ann A.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms, comprised of delusions and hallucinations, occur in about half of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD with psychosis, AD+P). These individuals have greater agitation, aggression, depression, functional impairment, and mortality than individuals without psychosis (AD−P). Although the exact etiopathogenesis of AD+P is unclear, the rapidly developing field of genomics continues to expand our understanding of this disease. Several independent studies have demonstrated familial aggregation and heritability of AD+P. Linkage studies have been suggestive of loci on several chromosomes associated with AD+P. Association studies examining apolipoprotein E gene, the best established genetic risk factor for late-onset AD, did not find any significant association of this gene with AD+P. Other candidate gene studies focusing on monoamine neurotransmitter systems have yielded equivocal results. A genome-wide association study and studies examining copy number variations recently have detected suggestive associations, but have been underpowered. Approaches to increase sizes of AD+P samples for genome wide association studies are discussed. PMID:26756273

  5. Oxidative stress, protein modification and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, A; Lanzillotta, C; Perluigi, M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-06-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the elderly population with complex etiology. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain different causes of AD, but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In this review, we focus attention on the oxidative-stress hypothesis of neurodegeneration and we discuss redox proteomics approaches to analyze post-mortem human brain from AD brain. Collectively, these studies have provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms involved both in the pathogenesis and progression of AD, demonstrating the impairment of numerous cellular processes such as energy production, cellular structure, signal transduction, synaptic function, mitochondrial function, cell cycle progression, and degradative systems. Each of these cellular functions normally contributes to maintain healthy neuronal homeostasis, so the deregulation of one or more of these functions could contribute to the pathology and clinical presentation of AD. In particular, we discuss the evidence demonstrating the oxidation/dysfunction of a number of enzymes specifically involved in energy metabolism that support the view that reduced glucose metabolism and loss of ATP are crucial events triggering neurodegeneration and progression of AD.

  6. The genetics and neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D; Montine, Thomas J

    2012-09-01

    Here we review the genetic causes and risks for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early work identified mutations in three genes that cause AD: APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2. Although mutations in these genes are rare causes of AD, their discovery had a major impact on our understanding of molecular mechanisms of AD. Early work also revealed the ε4 allele of the APOE as a strong risk factor for AD. Subsequently, SORL1 also was identified as an AD risk gene. More recently, advances in our knowledge of the human genome, made possible by technological advances and methods to analyze genomic data, permit systematic identification of genes that contribute to AD risk. This work, so far accomplished through single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, has revealed nine new genes implicated in AD risk (ABCA7, BIN1, CD33, CD2AP, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A4E/MS4A6A, and PICALM). We review the relationship between these mutations and genetic variants and the neuropathologic features of AD and related disorders. Together, these discoveries point toward a new era in neurodegenerative disease research that impacts not only AD but also related illnesses that produce cognitive and behavioral deficits.

  7. Can sleep apnea cause Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Pan, Weihong; Kastin, Abba J

    2014-11-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasing health concerns. The objective of this study is to review systematically the effects of OSA on the development of AD. The search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL, and followed by a manual search of references of published studies. Cross-sectional, cohorts, and randomized clinical trials were reviewed. Besides clinical studies, we also discuss neuroimaging data, experimental animal evidence, and molecular mechanisms. Although a causal relationship between OSA and AD is not yet established, OSA induces neurodegenerative changes as a result of two major contributing processes: sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. As such, inflammation and cellular stress are sufficient to impair cell-cell interactions, synaptic function, and neural circuitry, leading to a decline of cognitive behavior. Sustained OSA could promote cognitive dysfunction, overlapping with that in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Early treatment by positive airway pressure and other current standards of care should have a positive impact to alleviate structural and functional deterioration. With better understanding of the cellular and neurophysiological mechanisms by which OSA contributes to AD, we may identify novel molecular targets for intervention.

  8. Aluminum and Alzheimer's disease: a new look.

    PubMed

    Miu, Andrei C; Benga, Oana

    2006-11-01

    Despite the circumstantial and sometimes equivocal support, the hypothetic involvement of aluminum (Al) in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has subsisted in neuroscience. There are very few other examples of scientific hypotheses on the pathogenesis of a disease that have been revisited so many times, once a new method that would allow a test of Al's accumulations in the brain of AD patients or a comparison between Al-induced and AD neuropathological signs has become available. Although objects of methodological controversies for scientists and oversimplification for lay spectators, several lines of evidence have strongly supported the involvement of Al as a secondary aggravating factor or risk factor in the pathogenesis of AD. We review evidence on the similarities and dissimilarities between Al-induced neurofibrillary degeneration and paired helical filaments from AD, the accumulation of Al in neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques from AD, the neuropathological dissociation between AD and dialysis associated encephalopathy, and the epidemiological relations between Al in drinking water and the prevalence of AD. We also critically analyze the prospects of Al-amyloid cascade studies and other evolving lines of evidence that might shed insights into the link between Al and AD. The message between the lines of the following article is that the involvement of Al in the pathogenesis of AD should not be discarded, especially in these times when the amyloid dogma of AD etiology shows its myopia.

  9. The incidence and prevalence of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornutiu, Gavril

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has grown progressively over the past 100 years. The present study monitored the evolution of AD incidence in relation to several factors known as favoring it, in a county in Romania, between 1980 and 2006. The annual incidence of AD in our clinic over a period of 27 years was determined along with 17 hereditary, medical, sociodemographic and environmental parameters. The results show a relatively steady curve until 1994, followed by a doubling of the incidence with a tendency to continuous growth. During this period, none of the known pathogenic factors--medical, psychological or sociodemographic--suffered any mathematically significant transformation. The only significant change for this population was the access to industrialized and preserved food and fizzy drinks which came from the western world, immediately after the borders had opened (1989). Therefore, the cause of the increased AD incidence must be looked for in food hygiene, and we must accept the notion of an ecologically caused disease. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. New Perspectives on Alzheimer's Disease and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Deborah R; Clare Morris, Martha; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Shah, Raj C; Sijben, John; Yaffe, Kristine; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows nutritional factors influence the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its rate of clinical progression. Dietary and lifestyle guidelines to help adults reduce their risk have been developed. However, the clinical dementia picture remains complex, and further evidence is required to demonstrate that modifying nutritional status can protect the brain and prevent, delay, or reduce pathophysiological consequences of AD. Moreover, there is a pressing need for further research because of the global epidemic of overweight and obesity combined with longer life expectancy of the general population and generally observed decreases in body weight with aging and AD. A new research approach is needed, incorporating more sophisticated models to account for complex scenarios influencing the relationship between nutritional status and AD. Systematic research should identify and address evidence gaps. Integrating longitudinal epidemiological data with biomarkers of disease, including brain imaging technology, and randomized controlled interventions may provide greater insights into progressive and subtle neurological changes associated with dietary factors in individuals at risk for or living with AD. In addition, greater understanding of mechanisms involved in nutritional influences on AD risk and progression, such as oxidative stress and loss of neuronal membrane integrity, will better inform possible interventional strategies. There is consensus among the authors that nutritional deficits, and even states of excess, are associated with AD, but more work is needed to determine cause and effect. Appropriately designed diets or nutritional interventions may play a role, but additional research is needed on their clinical-cognitive effectiveness.

  11. Brain injury, neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Joshua J; Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    With as many as 300,000 United States troops in Iraq and Afghanistan having suffered head injuries (Miller, 2012), traumatic brain injury (TBI) has garnered much recent attention. While the cause and severity of these injuries is variable, severe cases can lead to lifelong disability or even death. While aging is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is now becoming clear that a history of TBI predisposes the individual to AD later in life (Sivanandam and Thakur, 2012). In this review article, we begin by defining hallmark pathological features of AD and the various forms of TBI. Putative mechanisms underlying the risk relationship between these two neurological disorders are then critically considered. Such mechanisms include precipitation and 'spreading' of cerebral amyloid pathology and the role of neuroinflammation. The combined problems of TBI and AD represent significant burdens to public health. A thorough, mechanistic understanding of the precise relationship between TBI and AD is of utmost importance in order to illuminate new therapeutic targets. Mechanistic investigations and the development of preclinical therapeutics are reliant upon a clearer understanding of these human diseases and accurate modeling of pathological hallmarks in animal systems.

  12. Alzheimer disease immunotherapeutics: then and now.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Sk, Shashikantha; Singh Malik, Jagbir

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a public health priority and one of the major contributors to morbidity and global non-communicable disease burden, thus necessitating the need for significant health-care interventions. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60-70% of cases. The cause and progression of AD are not well understood but have been thought to be due at least in part to protein misfolding (proteopathy) manifest as plaque accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau proteins in brain. There are about 8 million new cases per year. The total number of people with dementia is projected to almost double every 20 years, to 66 million in 2030 and 115 million in 2050. Immunotherapy in AD aimed at β-amyloid covers 2 types of vaccination: active vaccination against Aβ42 in which patients receive injections of the antigen itself, or passive vaccination in which patients receive injections of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against Aβ42. Three of the peptide vaccines for active immunizations, CAD106, ACC001, and Affitope, are in phase 2 clinical trials. Three of the mAbs solanezumab, gantenerumab, and crenezumab, are or were in phase 2 and 3 clinical studies. While the phase 3 trials failed, one of these may have shown a benefit at least in mild forms of AD. There is a need for a greater initiative in the development of immunotherapeutics. Several avenues have been explored and still to come.

  13. Involvement of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Castellani, Rudy J; Zhu, Xiongwei; Moreira, Paula I; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-07-01

    Genetic and lifestyle-related risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with an increase in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress is involved at an early stage of the pathologic cascade. Moreover, oxidative stress is mechanistically and chronologically associated with other key features of AD, namely, metabolic, mitochondrial, metal, and cell-cycle abnormalities. Contrary to the commonly held notion that pathologic hallmarks of AD signify etiology, several lines of evidence now indicate that aggregation of amyloid-beta and tau is a compensatory response to underlying oxidative stress. Therefore, removal of proteinaceous accumulations may treat the epiphenomenon rather than the disease and may actually enhance oxidative damage. Although some antioxidants have been shown to reduce the incidence of AD, the magnitude of the effect may be modified by individual factors such as genetic predisposition (e.g. apolipoprotein E genotype) and habitual behaviors. Because caloric restriction, exercise, and intellectual activity have been experimentally shown to promote neuronal survival through enhancement of endogenous antioxidant defenses, a combination of dietary regimen of low total calorie and rich antioxidant nutrients and maintaining physical and intellectual activities may ultimately prove to be one of the most efficacious strategies for AD prevention.

  14. The infectious etiology of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sochocka, Marta; Zwolińska, Katarzyna; Leszek, Jerzy

    2017-03-13

    Inflammation is a part of the first line of defense of the body against invasive pathogens, and plays a crucial role in tissue regeneration and repair. A proper inflammatory response ensures the suitable resolution of inflammation and elimination of harmful stimuli, but when the inflammatory reactions are inappropriate it can lead to damage of the surrounding normal cells. The relationship between infections and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) etiology, especially late-onset AD (LOAD) has been continuously debated over the past three decades. It is suggested that chronic viral, bacterial and fungal infections might be causative factors for the inflammatory pathway for AD. Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis of the role of neurotropic viruses from the Herpesviridae family, especially Human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Human herpesvirus 2 (HHV-2), in AD neuropathology. Recent investigations also indicate the association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and dementia. Among bacteria special attention is focused on spirochetes family and on periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola that could cause chronic periodontitis and possibly contribute to the clinical onset of AD. This review discusses whether infections could be a causative factor that promotes the progression of AD and summarizes recent investigations associating infectious agents and chronic inflammation with AD. Preventive and therapeutic approaches to AD in the context of an infectious etiology of the disease are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Genetics of psychosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chintan; DeMichele-Sweet, Mary Ann A; Sweet, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms, comprised of delusions and hallucinations, occur in about half of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD with psychosis, AD+P). These individuals have greater agitation, aggression, depression, functional impairment, and mortality than individuals without psychosis (AD-P). Although the exact etiopathogenesis of AD+P is unclear, the rapidly developing field of genomics continues to expand our understanding of this disease. Several independent studies have demonstrated familial aggregation and heritability of AD+P. Linkage studies have been suggestive of loci on several chromosomes associated with AD+P. Association studies examining apolipoprotein E gene, the best established genetic risk factor for late-onset AD, did not find any significant association of this gene with AD+P. Other candidate gene studies focusing on monoamine neurotransmitter systems have yielded equivocal results. A genome-wide association study and studies examining copy number variations recently have detected suggestive associations, but have been underpowered. Approaches to increase sizes of AD+P samples for genome wide association studies are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neurogenesis in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsu Tshen

    2010-10-01

    The brains of the adult mouse and human possess neural stem cells (NSCs) that retain the capacity to generate new neurons through the process of neurogenesis. They share the same anatomical locations of stem cell niches in the brain, as well as the prominent feature of rostral migratory stream formed by neuroblasts migrating from the lateral ventricles towards the olfactory bulb. Therefore the mouse possesses some fundamental features that may qualify it as a relevant model for adult human neurogenesis. Adult born young hippocampal neurons in the mouse display the unique property of enhanced plasticity, and can integrate physically and functionally into existing neural circuits in the brain. Such crucial properties of neurogenesis may at least partially underlie the improved learning and memory functions observed in the mouse when hippocampal neurogenesis is augmented, leading to the suggestion that neurogenesis induction may be a novel therapeutic approach for diseases with cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research towards this goal has benefited significantly from the use of AD mouse models to facilitate the understanding in the impact of AD pathology on neurogenesis. The present article reviews the growing body of controversial data on altered neurogenesis in mouse models of AD and attempts to assess their relative relevance to humans.

  17. The contribution of astrocytes to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Birch, Amy M

    2014-10-01

    Astrocytes were historically classified as supporting cells; however, it is becoming increasingly clear that they actively contribute to neuronal functioning under normal and pathological conditions. As interest in the contribution of neuroinflammation to Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has grown, manipulating glial cells has become an attractive target for future therapies. Astrocytes have largely been under-represented in studies that assess the role of glia in these processes, despite substantial evidence of astrogliosis in AD. The actual role of astrocytes in AD remains elusive, as they seem to adopt different functions dependent on disease progression and the extent of accompanying parenchymal inflammation. Astrocytes may contribute to the clearance of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and restrict the spread of inflammation in the brain. Conversely, they may contribute to neurodegeneration in AD by releasing neurotoxins and neglecting crucial metabolic roles. The present review summarizes current evidence on the multi-faceted functions of astrocytes in AD, highlighting the significant scope available for future therapeutic targets.

  18. Association between alcohol and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by dense deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein in the brain, failure of the memory and dementia. At present, there is no cure for AD and current treatments only provide a temporary reduction of symptoms. Thus, there is a need for effective preventive/curative strategic approaches. Accordingly, epidemiological studies have reported a reduction in the prevalence of AD in individuals ingesting low amounts of alcohol, while a moderate consumption of ethanol may protect against Aβ. These data are conflicting with other observations that assigned detrimental effects of heavy alcohol use on brain function, which are apparently similar to those observed in AD. These discrepancies questioned whether or not alcohol is a protective agent against the development of AD, whether the probable protective effects are influenced by the quantity and/or frequency of drinking. These issues are addressed in this review with the aim to suggest the real risk of alcohol for developing or preventing AD. PMID:27588045

  19. Impairment of homonymous processing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Massimo; D'Alessandro, Patrizia; Micheletti, Norma; Macone, Sara; Scarponi, Laura; Arcelli, Paola; Petrillo, Stefania Maria; Silvestrini, Mauro; Luzzi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    An important issue in research on language is how concepts are represented and associated with each other in the brain. Many investigations have focused on language ambiguity and the phenomenon of homonymy in which a single lexical item, presenting the same form, is related to different meanings. Our study aims to test the hypothesis that weak association of meaning characterizing homonyms may be especially prone to brain damage. To verify this hypothesis a test of attribution of the meaning of homonymous words, the Humpty Dumpty (HD) test, was applied to 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 50 healthy subjects. Results show that AD patients are impaired in the HD test in an early phase of disease and that performance correlates with naming ability and phonological fluency. The data are in keeping with a growing body of literature that supports dual impairment to the semantic system in AD, i.e., to semantic knowledge and active processing and access to the semantic field. The evaluation of the ability to resolve homonymous ambiguity, using the HD test, may provide a useful and quick clinical tool to detect the anomalies of the semantic network linked to either a loss of the core system where meaning of words is stored or an impairment of the access to an intact semantic representation.

  20. The role of adenosine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anisur

    2009-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system manifested by cognitive and memory deterioration, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, behavioral disturbances, and progressive impairment of daily life activities. Current pharmacotherapies are restricted to symptomatic interventions but do not prevent progressive neuronal degeneration. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to intervene with these progressive pathological processes. In the past several years adenosine, a ubiquitously released purine ribonucleoside, has become important for its neuromodulating capability and its emerging positive experimental effects in neurodegenerative diseases. Recent research suggests that adenosine receptors play important roles in the modulation of cognitive function. The present paper attempts to review published reports and data from different studies showing the evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and AD-related cognitive deficits. Epidemiological studies have found an association between coffee (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) consumption and improved cognitive function in AD patients and in the elderly. Long-term administration of caffeine in transgenic animal models showed a reduced amyloid burden in brain with better cognitive performance. Antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors mimic these beneficial effects of caffeine on cognitive function. Neuronal cell cultures with amyloid beta in the presence of an A2A receptor antagonist completely prevented amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity. These findings suggest that the adenosinergic system constitutes a new therapeutic target for AD, and caffeine and A2A receptor antagonists may have promise to manage cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  1. Novel disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive dementia in the elderly and places an enormous burden on the individual and society. Presently, the treatments for AD are only symptomatic and do not halt the progression of the disease. With the recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of AD in past years, numerous therapies which could modify the disease process are under active investigation. These therapies could attenuate or even reverse the neurodegenerative process by interfering with the underlying pathogenesis including amyloid-β production, tau hyperphosphorylation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and excitotoxicity. In this review, new disease-modifying therapies which reduce amyloid-β production, prevent tau hyperphosphorylation, and provide neuroprotective effects are described, including the results of in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials. Some typical therapies with disease-modifying effects have also been discussed.

  2. Ethnic differences in acetylcholinesterase inhibitor use for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kala M; Yin, Maggie; Resendez, Cynthia; Yaffe, Kristine

    2005-07-12

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChIs) have been demonstrated to improve Alzheimer disease symptoms. Whether the use of AChIs varies by ethnicity is unknown. More than 2500 ethnically diverse patients (6% African American, 14% Latino, and 7% Asian patients) from the Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers in California were studied. Compared with white patients with AD, minority patients had 40% lower odds of AChI use (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.5 to 0.7).

  3. Biomarkers in translational research of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Holtzman, David M

    2010-01-01

    The identification and characterization of amyloid-beta (Abeta) and tau as the main pathological substrates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have driven many efforts in search for suitable biomarkers for AD. In the last decade, research in this area has focused on developing a better understanding of the principles that govern protein deposition, mechanisms that link aggregation to toxicity and neuronal death, and a better understanding of protein dynamics in brain tissue, interstitial fluid and CSF. While Abeta and tau represent the two key pathological mediators of disease, other aspects of this multifaceted disease (e.g. oxidative stress, calcium-mediated toxicity, and neuroinflammation) are being unraveled, with the hope to develop a more comprehensive approach in exploring disease mechanisms. This has not only expanded possible areas for disease-modifying therapies, but has also allowed the introduction of novel, and potentially useful, fluid and radiological markers for the presence and progression of AD pathology. There is no doubt that the identification of several fluid and imaging biomarkers that can reliably detect the early stages of AD will have great implications in the design of clinical trials, in the selection of homogenous research populations, and in the assessment of disease outcomes. Markers with good diagnostic specificity will aid researchers in differentiating individuals with preclinical and probable AD from individuals who do not have AD pathology or have other dementing disorders. Markers that change with disease progression may offer utility in assessing the rates of disease progression and the efficacy of potential therapeutic agents on AD pathology. For both of these purposes, CSF Abeta42, amyloid imaging, and CSF tau appear to be very good markers of the presence of AD pathology as well as predictive of who will progress from MCI to AD. Volumetric MRI is also good at separating individuals with MCI and AD from controls and is predictive of

  4. [Mental time dysfunction in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases].

    PubMed

    Honma, Motoyasu; Kuroda, Takeshi; Futamura, Akinori; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2015-03-01

    Mental time is altered by a number of factors and the underlying neural processing involved is highly complicated. Recent research suggests that mental time in patients with particular neurological diseases is perceptually shorter than in normal individuals. This review introduces mental time dysfunction and a model for processing of mental time in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Although the two diseases show the same dysfunction of mental time in behavior, we expect the underlying neural mechanism to vary in each disease. It is possible that the dysfunction of mental time in Parkinson's disease is caused by the abnormal striatum acting as a pacemaker, while that in Alzheimer's disease is caused by abnormal hippocampal memory.

  5. 2011 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged ≥65 years. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2008 (preliminary data), heart disease deaths decreased by 13%, stroke deaths by 20%, and prostate cancer-related deaths by 8%, whereas deaths because of AD increased by 66%. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 people aged <65 years with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 69 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050, the time is expected to accelerate to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million people. Dramatic increases in the numbers of "oldest-old" (those aged ≥85 years) across all racial and ethnic groups will also significantly affect the numbers of people living with AD. In 2010, nearly 15 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $202 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are almost 3 times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments in 2011 for health care, long-term care, and hospice services for people aged ≥65years with AD and other dementias are expected to be $183 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health effect of AD, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. The report also examines the

  6. 2010 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is virtually tied with the sixth leading cause of death-diabetes. AD is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 and older. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2006, heart disease deaths decreased 11.1%, stroke deaths decreased 18.2%, and prostate cancer-related deaths decreased 8.7%, whereas deaths because of AD increased 46.1%. Older African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely than older white Americans to have AD or other dementia. Current estimates are that African-Americans are about 2 times more likely, and Hispanics about 1.5 times more likely, than their white counterparts to have these conditions. However, the relationship of race and ethnicity to the development of AD and other dementias is complex and not fully understood. In 2009, nearly 11 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 12.5 billion hours of care to persons with AD and other dementias; this care is valued at nearly $144 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments for 2010 for health care and long-term care services for people aged 65 and older with AD and other dementias are expected to be $172 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 persons under age 65 with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 70 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050 the time of every 70 seconds is expected to decrease to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a

  7. An image processing technique for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Massoud; Ebrahimi, Soltan Ahmed; Kiani, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) reportedly exhibit hypersensitivity to much diluted tropicamide solution (0.005%), a M4 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Therefore intraocular application of 0.005% tropicamide may be useful for screening dementia. The aim of this study was to simplify the pupil response test by using a new image analyzing system, which consists of a cheap, simple, and easy to use web-camera and a computer. METHODS: Intraocular tropicamide of 0.005% concentration was administered in 3 groups: Alzheimer's disease patients (n = 8, average age = 76 ± 5), non-Alzheimer's disease elderly (n = 6, average age = 65 ± 7), and young subjects (n = 8, average age = 28 ± 5). Every 5 minutes for 60 minutes, image of the eye's shape were taken, and the diameter of the pupils was measured. RESULTS: The results showed that differences in pupil dilation rate between Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's disease subjects were statistically significant. ROC analysis showed that after 35 minutes the sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, we concluded that this recording system might be an appropriate and reliable tool for pupil response diagnosis test of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21772885

  8. Altered Superficial White Matter on Tractography MRI in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Superficial white matter provides extensive cortico-cortical connections. This tractography study aimed to assess the diffusion characteristics of superficial white matter tracts in Alzheimer's disease. Methods Diffusion tensor 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired in 24 controls and 16 participants with Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychological test scores were available in some participants. Tractography was performed by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking (FACT) method. The superficial white matter was manually segmented and divided into frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AxD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of these tracts were compared between controls and participants with Alzheimer's disease and correlated with available cognitive tests while adjusting for age and white matter hyperintensity volume. Results Alzheimer's disease was associated with increased MD (p = 0.0011), increased RD (p = 0.0019) and increased AxD (p = 0.0017) in temporal superficial white matter. In controls, superficial white matter was associated with the performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Stroop and Trail Making Test B tests, whereas in Alzheimer's disease patients, it was not associated with the performance on cognitive tests. Conclusion Temporal lobe superficial white matter appears to be disrupted in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27489557

  9. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  10. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Combination therapy of donepezil and vitamin E in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Emily T; Scharre, Douglas W; Nagaraja, Haikady N; Davis, Rebecca A; Beversdorf, David Q

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed on 130 patients from the Ohio State University Memory Disorders Clinic to examine the long-term effects of combination therapy with donepezil and vitamin E on patients with Alzheimer disease. Subjects were included if they met National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for probable Alzheimer disease, had taken at least 5 mg donepezil and at least 1000 U vitamin E daily, had at least a 1-year follow-up while continuing these medications, and had a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10-24. The Mini-Mental State Examination was then recorded annually thereafter. These data were compared with the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease database for patients collected prior to the availability of these treatment options. Patients declined at a significantly lower rate as compared with the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease data. The long-term combination therapy of donepezil and vitamin E appears beneficial for patients with Alzheimer disease. Future prospective studies would be needed to compare combination treatment to vitamin E and donepezil alone.

  12. Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease-Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Lipincott, Walter

    2017-02-20

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by loss of memory and cognitive function. It is the common cause of dementia in elderly and is a global health concern as the population of people aged 85 and older, is growing alarmingly. Although pharmacotherapy for the treatment of AD has improved, lot of work remains to treat this devastating disease. AD pathology begins even before the onset of clinical symptoms. Because therapies could be more effective if implemented early in the disease progression, it is highly prudent to discover reliable biomarkers, to detect its exact pathophysiology during pre-symptomatic stage. Biomarker(s) with high sensitivity and specificity would facilitate AD diagnosis at early stages. Currently, CSF amyloid β 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau181 are used as AD biomarkers. This report describes conventional and potential in-vitro and in-vivo biomarkers of AD. Particularly, in-vitro transcriptomic, proteomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic; body fluid biomarkers (C-reactive proteins, homocysteine, α-sunuclein index, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate) from blood, serum, plasma, CSF, and saliva; and neuronal, platelets, and lymphocyte microRNA, mtDNA, and Charnoly body are detected. In-vivo physiological and neurobehavioral biomarkers are evaluated by analyzing computerized EEG, event-related potentials, circadian rhythm, and multimodality fusion imaging including: CT, MRI, SPECT, and PET. More specifically, PET imaging biomarkers representing reduced fronto-temporal 18FdG uptake, increased 11C or 18F-PIB uptake, 11C-PBR28 to measure 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker for inflammation; and 3-D MRI (ventriculomegaly)/MRS are performed for early and effective clinical management of AD.

  13. Alzheimer Disease: Scientific Breakthroughs and Translational Challenges.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Richard J; Beach, Thomas G; Knopman, David S; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) was originally conceived as a rare disease that caused presenile dementia but has come to be understood as the most prevalent cause of dementia at any age worldwide. It has an extended preclinical phase characterized by sequential changes in imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers with subtle memory decline beginning more than a decade before the emergence of symptomatic memory loss heralding the beginning of the mild cognitive impairment stage. The apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is a prevalent and potent risk factor for AD that has facilitated research into its preclinical phase. Cerebral Aβ levels build from preclinical through early dementia stages followed by hyperphosphorylated tau-related pathology, the latter driving cognitive deficits and dementia severity. Structural and molecular imaging can now recapitulate the neuropathology of AD antemortem. Autosomal dominant forms of early-onset familial AD gave rise to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, which, in turn, has led to therapeutic trials of immunotherapy designed to clear cerebral amyloid, but to date results have been disappointing. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple additional risk factors, but to date none have yielded an effective alternate therapeutic target. Current and future trials aimed at presymptomatic individuals either harboring cerebral amyloid or at genetically high risk offer the hope that earlier intervention might yet succeed where trials in patients with established dementia have failed. A major looming challenge will be that of expensive, incompletely effective disease-modifying therapy: who and when to treat, and how to pay for it. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Weak central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease(•).

    PubMed

    Mårdh, Selina

    2013-03-15

    Central coherence refers to the ability to interpret details of information into a whole. To date, the concept of central coherence is mainly used in research of autism, Asperger's syndrome and recently in the research on eating disorders. The main purpose of the present study was to examine central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Nine Alzheimer's disease patients and ten age- and gender-matched control subjects, who differed significantly in neurological assessment, were shown a picture of a fire. Compared to control subjects, the Alzheimer's disease patients described the picture in a fragmented way by mentioning details and separate objects without perceiving the context of the fire. In conclusion, patients with Alzheimer's disease are at the weak end of central coherence, and hence suffer from a fragmented view of their surroundings. The findings have important clinical implications for the understanding of patients with Alzheimer's diseaseand also for the possibility of caregivers to meet the Alzheimer's disease individual in an appropriate way in the everyday care.

  15. Possible relationship between Al/ferritin complex and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    De Sole, Pasquale; Rossi, Cristina; Chiarpotto, Michela; Ciasca, Gabriele; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Rossi, Concetta; Masullo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Ferritin is the main iron-storage protein capable of containing thousands of iron atoms. However, ferritin can bind in vitro other atoms such as aluminum and it has been shown that also in vivo atoms other than iron, as aluminum and zinc, are present in large amounts in ferritin. Since aluminum appears to be involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease, in the present study the specific content of aluminum in ferritin of Alzheimer's patients was analyzed and compared with other control groups. The content of Fe, Al and Zn of blood ferritin was measured by mass spectrometry in patients with Alzheimer's disease and compared with other clinical and control groups. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis of a functional role of ferritin as a regulatory protein of toxic metals and clearly indicate that ferritin from Alzheimer's patients has a content of aluminum higher than that of controls. The specific aluminum content of ferritin seems to be related to different disease stages of Alzheimer's disease. This result confirms the hypothesis of aluminum as a possible factor inducing the Alzheimer's disease and opens the ways to possible new diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [An update on the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Patricio; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2005-02-01

    Dementia in general, especially Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia, are diseases of high prevalence with severe socio-economic consequences in all countries. In recent years, due to the obtention of new pharmaceutical products acting on different brain neurotransmitters, there has been important changes in the therapy of these diseases. Although these drugs do not stop disease progression, there is consistent evidence of their usefulness in cognitive, behavioral and functional domains and of their pharmaco-economical justification. This article reviews the main drugs available for Alzheimer disease and some future therapeutic perspectives.

  17. Alzheimer's disease: the silver tsunami of the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ankita; Irwin, Madison; Singh, Aditi; Riccetti, Matthew; Singh, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder, has no cure to date. One of the causes of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) plaques, which result in the onset of neurodegeneration. It is not known how these plaques trigger the onset of neurodegeneration. There are several animal models developed to (i) study etiology of disease, (ii) look for genetic modifiers, and (iii) identify chemical inhibitors that can block neurodegeneration and help to find cure for this disease. An insect model of Drosophila melanogaster has also provided new insights into the disease. Here we will discuss the utility of the Drosophila eye model to study Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The Gut Microbiota and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunmei; Li, Guangning; Huang, Pengru; Liu, Zhou; Zhao, Bin

    2017-03-29

    The gut microbiota comprises a complex community of microorganism species that resides in our gastrointestinal ecosystem and whose alterations influence not only various gut disorders but also central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD, the most common form of dementia, is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired cognition and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ). Most notably, the microbiota-gut-brain axis is a bidirectional communication system that is not fully understood, but includes neural, immune, endocrine, and metabolic pathways. Studies in germ-free animals and in animals exposed to pathogenic microbial infections, antibiotics, probiotics, or fecal microbiota transplantation suggest a role for the gut microbiota in host cognition or AD-related pathogenesis. The increased permeability of the gut and blood-brain barrier induced by microbiota dysbiosis may mediate or affect AD pathogenesis and other neurodegenerative disorders, especially those associated with aging. In addition, bacteria populating the gut microbiota can secrete large amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might contribute to the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Moreover, imbalances in the gut microbiota can induce inflammation that is associated with the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and AD. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the current findings that may elucidate the role of the gut microbiota in the development of AD. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide new insights into novel therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. Copper Chelation in Alzheimer's Disease Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people in the U.S. AD is primarily characterized at the cellular level by densely tangled fibrils of amyloid- β protein. These protein clusters have been found in association with elevated levels of multiple transition metals, with copper being the most egregious. Interestingly, metal chelation has shown promise in attenuating the symptoms of AD in recent clinical studies. We investigate this process by constructing an atomistic model of the amyloid- β-copper complex and profile the energetic viability in each of its subsequent disassociation stages. Our results indicate that five energetic barriers must be overcome for full metal chelation. The energy barriers are biologically viable in the presence water mediated bond and proton transfer between the metal and the protein. We model the chelation reaction using a consecutive path nudged elastic band method implemented in our ab initio real-space multi-grid code to obtain a viable sequence. This reaction model details a physically consistent explanation of the chelation process that could lead to the discovery of more effective chelation agents in the treatment of AD.

  20. Signaling pathway cross talk in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Juan A; Rios, Juvenal A; Zolezzi, Juan M; Braidy, Nady; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2014-03-28

    Numerous studies suggest energy failure and accumulative intracellular waste play a causal role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular. AD is characterized by extracellular amyloid deposits, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, cholinergic deficits, synaptic loss, inflammation and extensive oxidative stress. These pathobiological changes are accompanied by significant behavioral, motor, and cognitive impairment leading to accelerated mortality. Currently, the potential role of several metabolic pathways associated with AD, including Wnt signaling, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1, silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) have widened, with recent discoveries that they are able to modulate several pathological events in AD. These include reduction of amyloid-β aggregation and inflammation, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, and increased availability of neuronal energy. This review aims to highlight the involvement of these new set of signaling pathways, which we have collectively termed "anti-ageing pathways", for their potentiality in multi-target therapies against AD where cellular metabolic processes are severely impaired.