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Sample records for alzheimer type onset

  1. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N.

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Operational Thought in Alzheimer's Disease Early Onset and SDAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Olga B.; Breslau, Lawrence D.

    For more than a decade it has been convention to assume that senile dementia Alzheimer's type (SDAT) and Alzheimer's disease early onset represent a unitary disease process with only an onset difference. This assumption has been neither confirmed nor disconfirmed. To address this issue, a study was conducted which analyzed the dissolution of…

  3. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C.

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  7. Differences in lateral hemispheric asymmetries of glucose utilization between early- and late-onset Alzheimer-type dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, E.; Friedland, R.P.; Ober, B.A.; Jagust, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    Positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose revealed greater right than left hemispheric impairment of cortical glucose metabolism in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease who were younger than 65 but not in those over 65. This asymmetry was related to poor visuospatial performance.

  8. Whole Exome Analysis of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    is genetically associated with Alzheimer disease. Nat Genet 2007;39(2):168-177. 33. McKhann G, Drachman D, Folstein M. Clinical diagnosis of...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary focus toward identification of Alzheimer disease (AD) risk genes over the past five years has...been testing the common disease common variant (CDCV) hypothesis through the use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in late onset Alzheimer

  9. Whole Exome Analysis of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Mayeux RP, Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium. Whole-exome sequencing of Hispanic early-onset Alzheimer disease families identifies rare variants...majority of genetic risk for this form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. We performed Whole-Exome Sequencing (WES) on 55 individuals in 19 Caribbean...EOAD and ~11% of EOAD overall, leaving the majority of genetic risk for the most severe form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. Methods We

  10. Chromosome 14 and late-onset familial alzheimer disease (FAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Anderson, L.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.; Payami, H.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.; Alonso, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) is genetically heterogeneous. Two loci responsible for early-onset FAD have been identified: the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 and the as-yet-unidentified locus on chromosome 14. The genetics of late-onset FAD is unresolved. Maximum-likelihood, affected-pedigree-member (APM), and sib-pair analysis were used, in 49 families with a mean age at onset [>=]60 years, to determine whether the chromosome 14 locus is responsible for late-onset FAD. The markers used were D14S53, D14S43, and D14S52. The LOD score method was used to test for linkage of late-onset FAD to the chromosome 14 markers, under three different models: age-dependent penetrance, an affected-only analysis, and age-dependent penetrance with allowance for possible age-dependent sporadic cases. No evidence for linkage was obtained under any of these conditions for the late-onset kindreds, and strong evidence against linkage (LOD score [>=]2.0) to this region was obtained. Heterogeneity tests of the LOD score results for the combined group of families (early onset, Volga Germans, and late onset) favored the hypothesis of linkage to chromosome 14 with genetic heterogeneity. The positive results are primarily from early-onset families. APM analysis gave significant evidence for linkage of D14S43 and D14S52 to FAD in early-onset kindreds (P<.02). No evidence for linkage was found for the entire late-onset family group. Significant evidence for linkage to D14S52, however, was found for a subgroup of families of intermediate age at onset (mean age at onset [>=]60 years and <70 years). These results indicate that the chromosome 14 locus is not responsible for Alzheimer disease in most late-onset FAD kindreds but could play a role in a subset of these kindreds. 37 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. Chromosome 14 and late-onset familial Alzheimer disease (FAD)

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Payami, Haydeh; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Orr, Harry T.; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Anderson, Leojean; Nemens, Ellen; White, June A.; Alonso, M. Elisa; Ball, Melvyn J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Morris, John C.; Chui, Helena; Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Heston, Leonard L.; Martin, George M.; Bird, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) is genetically heterogeneous. Two loci responsible for early-onset FAD have been identified: the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 and the as-yet-unidentified locus on chromosome 14. The genetics of late-onset FAD is unresolved. Maximum-likelihood, affected-pedigree-member (APM), and sib-pair analyses were used, in 49 families with a mean age at onset ≥60 years, to determine whether the chromosome 14 locus is responsible for late-onset FAD. The markers used were D14S53, D14S43, and D14S52. The LOD score method was used to test for linkage of late-onset FAD to the chromosome 14 markers, under three different models: age-dependent penetrance, an affected-only analysis, and age-dependent penetrance with allowance for possible age-dependent sporadic cases. No evidence for linkage was obtained under any of these conditions for the late-onset kindreds, and strong evidence against linkage (LOD score ≤ –2.0) to this region was obtained. Heterogeneity tests of the LOD score results for the combined group of families (early onset, Volga Germans, and late onset) favored the hypothesis of linkage to chromosome 14 with genetic heterogeneity. The positive results are primarily from early-onset families. APM analysis gave significant evidence for linkage of D14S43 and D14S52 to FAD in early-onset kindreds (P < .02). No evidence for linkage was found for the entire late-onset family group. Significant evidence for linkage to D14S52, however, was found for a subgroup of families of intermediate age at onset (mean age at onset ≥60 years and <70 years). These results indicate that the chromosome 14 locus is not responsible for Alzheimer disease in most late-onset FAD kindreds but could play a role in a subset of these kindreds. PMID:8352272

  12. Voice Onset Time Production in Speakers with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Julie; Ryalls, Jack; Brice, Alejandro; Whiteside, Janet

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, voice onset time (VOT) measurements were compared between a group of individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a group of healthy age- and gender-matched peers. Participants read a list of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, which included the six stop consonants. The VOT measurements were made from…

  13. Evidence for apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4 association in early-onset Alzheimer`s patients with late-onset relatives

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Tur, J.; Delacourte, A.; Chartier-Harlin, M.C.

    1995-12-18

    Recently several reports have extended the apolipoprotein E (APOE) {epsilon}4 association found in late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (LOAD) patients to early-onset (EO) AD patients. We have studied this question in a large population of 119 EOAD patients (onset {<=}60 years) in which family history was carefully assessed and in 109 controls. We show that the APOE {epsilon}A allele frequency is increased only in the subset of patients who belong to families where LOAD secondary cases are present. Our sampling scheme permits us to demonstrate that, for an individual, bearing at least one {epsilon}4 allele increases both the risk of AD before age 60 and the probability of belonging to a family with late-onset affected subjects. Our results suggest that a subset of EOAD cases shares a common determinism with LOAD cases. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Clustering and age of onset in familial late onset Alzheimer`s disease are determined at the apoliopoprotein E locus

    SciTech Connect

    Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.

    1994-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is of great importance in the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Thus, inheritance of the ApoE4 allele predisposes to the occurrences of late onset disease and decreases the onset age in families with pathogenic mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene. We analysed ApoE genotypes in 35 families multiply affected by AD and confirm that familial clustering in late onset AD is associated with the ApoE4 allele. This allele occurs in the great majority (82%) of late onset familial Alzheimer cases. Elderly unaffected sibs (80-90 years) have an allele frequency that is not significantly different to that of normal controls. Data presented from our family sets together previously published data is suggestive that the effect of a single ApoE4 allele is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 5 years and that the effect of ApoE4 homozygosity is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 10 years of age. Data shows significant difference between the frequency of the ApoE4 allele in the familial AD probands and controls and in both sets of unaffected sibs, p<0.01.

  15. New cardiovascular targets to prevent late onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2015-09-15

    The prevalence of dementia rises to between 20% and 40% with advancing age. The dominant cause of dementia in approximately 70% of these patients is Alzheimer disease. There is no effective disease-modifying pharmaceutical treatment for this neurodegenerative disease. A wide range of Alzheimer drugs that appeared effective in animal models have recently failed to show clinical benefit in patients. However, hopeful news has emerged from recent studies that suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease may also reduce the prevalence of dementia due to Alzheimer disease. This review summarizes the evidence for this link between cardiovascular disease and late onset Alzheimer dementia. Only evidence from human research is considered here. Longitudinal studies show an association between high blood pressure and pathological accumulation of the protein amyloid-beta42, and an even stronger association between vascular stiffness and amyloid accumulation, in elderly subjects. Amyloid-beta42 accumulation is considered to be an early marker of Alzheimer disease, and increases the risk of subsequent cognitive decline and development of dementia. These observations could provide an explanation for recent observations of reduced dementia prevalence associated with improved cardiovascular care.

  16. Age-at-Onset in Late Onset Alzheimer Disease is Modified by Multiple Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; Jun, Gyungah; Reitz, Christiane; Kunkle, Brian W.; Perry, William; Park, YoSon; Beecham, Gary W.; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Wang, Li-San; Kauwe, John S.K.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Crane, Paul K.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Barmada, Michael M.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kramer, Patricia; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Hardy, John; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Larson, Eric B.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J.; Reiman, Eric M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Morris, John C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Goate, Alison M.; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance As APOE locus variants contribute to both risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease and differences in age-at-onset, it is important to know if other established late-onset Alzheimer disease risk loci also affect age-at-onset in cases. Objectives To investigate the effects of known Alzheimer disease risk loci in modifying age-at-onset, and to estimate their cumulative effect on age-at-onset variation, using data from genome-wide association studies in the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC). Design, Setting and Participants The ADGC comprises 14 case-control, prospective, and family-based datasets with data on 9,162 Caucasian participants with Alzheimer’s occurring after age 60 who also had complete age-at-onset information, gathered between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites by participating studies. Data on genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most significantly associated with risk at ten confirmed LOAD loci were examined in linear modeling of AAO, and individual dataset results were combined using a random effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis approach to determine if they contribute to variation in age-at-onset. Aggregate effects of all risk loci on AAO were examined in a burden analysis using genotype scores weighted by risk effect sizes. Main Outcomes and Measures Age at disease onset abstracted from medical records among participants with late-onset Alzheimer disease diagnosed per standard criteria. Results Analysis confirmed association of APOE with age-at-onset (rs6857, P=3.30×10−96), with associations in CR1 (rs6701713, P=7.17×10−4), BIN1 (rs7561528, P=4.78×10−4), and PICALM (rs561655, P=2.23×10−3) reaching statistical significance (P<0.005). Risk alleles individually reduced age-at-onset by 3-6 months. Burden analyses demonstrated that APOE contributes to 3.9% of variation in age-at-onset (R2=0.220) over baseline (R2=0.189) whereas the other nine loci together contribute to 1.1% of

  17. What can we learn from study of Alzheimer's disease in patients with Down syndrome for early-onset Alzheimer's disease in the general population?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The clinical and scientific study of dementia in adults with Down syndrome led to the development of the amyloid hypothesis as a fundamental concept in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The journey started with the discovery of the structure and metabolic processing of β-amyloid brain deposits associated with Alzheimer's dementia in adults with Down syndrome, and then the prediction and confirmation of the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21. The processes and genes responsible for tau hyperphosphorylation contributing to toxic brain deposits were additionally identified. With increasing sophistication in genetic experimental techniques, additional mechanisms associated with excessive amyloid deposits were postulated and tested in brains of people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease and in those with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. This in turn led to the proposal and testing for particular genetic defects associated with familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Nearly 200 genetic causes of early-onset types of Alzheimer's disease have since been identified. Only a minority of these causes are on chromosome 21, although the aetiology of excess amyloid production remains fundamental to their pathogenesis. Knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in predisposed families and in people with Down syndrome is a step closer to prevention or cure of this devastating disease. PMID:21542885

  18. Age at onset of Alzheimer's disease: clue to the relative importance of etiologic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    Clues to the relative importance of possible etiologic factors for dementia of the Alzheimer type may be gained by examining the fit of case series to Sartwell's model of the distribution of incubation periods. If age at disease onset is used as the incubation period of this disease, a genetic or environmental factor acting during the prenatal period is suggested if the distribution of these ages fits the lognormal curve; otherwise, environmental factors acting after birth are implicated. Case series were identified from the literature. Four case series were found which contained sufficiently detailed data to permit this secondary analysis; only one case series was population-based. The distribution of age at disease onset for each series was graphically and statistically assessed for fit to the logarithmic normal distribution. Each case series fit the lognormal curve well. This suggests that research into the etiology of dementia of the Alzheimer type should focus on the prenatal experiences of patients with this disease.

  19. TYROBP genetic variants in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pottier, Cyril; Ravenscroft, Thomas A; Brown, Patricia H; Finch, NiCole A; Baker, Matt; Parsons, Meeia; Asmann, Yan W; Ren, Yingxue; Christopher, Elizabeth; Levitch, Denise; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Cruchaga, Carlos; Campion, Dominique; Nicolas, Gaël; Richard, Anne-Claire; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose T; Zuchner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael A; Bu, Guojun; Younkin, Steven; Knopman, David S; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to identify new candidate genes potentially involved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Exome sequencing was conducted on 45 EOAD patients with either a family history of Alzheimer's disease (AD, <65 years) or an extremely early age at the onset (≤55 years) followed by multiple variant filtering according to different modes of inheritance. We identified 29 candidate genes potentially involved in EOAD, of which the gene TYROBP, previously implicated in AD, was selected for genetic and functional follow-up. Using 3 patient cohorts, we observed rare coding TYROBP variants in 9 out of 1110 EOAD patients, whereas no such variants were detected in 1826 controls (p = 0.0001), suggesting that at least some rare TYROBP variants might contribute to EOAD risk. Overexpression of the p.D50_L51ins14 TYROBP mutant led to a profound reduction of TREM2 expression, a well-established risk factor for AD. This is the first study supporting a role for genetic variation in TYROBP in EOAD, with in vitro support for a functional effect of the p.D50_L51ins14 TYROBP mutation on TREM2 expression.

  20. Deciphering the mechanism underlying late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Krstic, Dimitrije; Knuesel, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Despite tremendous investments in understanding the complex molecular mechanisms underlying Alzheimer disease (AD), recent clinical trials have failed to show efficacy. A potential problem underlying these failures is the assumption that the molecular mechanism mediating the genetically determined form of the disease is identical to the one resulting in late-onset AD. Here, we integrate experimental evidence outside the 'spotlight' of the genetic drivers of amyloid-β (Aβ) generation published during the past two decades, and present a mechanistic explanation for the pathophysiological changes that characterize late-onset AD. We propose that chronic inflammatory conditions cause dysregulation of mechanisms to clear misfolded or damaged neuronal proteins that accumulate with age, and concomitantly lead to tau-associated impairments of axonal integrity and transport. Such changes have several neuropathological consequences: focal accumulation of mitochondria, resulting in metabolic impairments; induction of axonal swelling and leakage, followed by destabilization of synaptic contacts; deposition of amyloid precursor protein in swollen neurites, and generation of aggregation-prone peptides; further tau hyperphosphorylation, ultimately resulting in neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal death. The proposed sequence of events provides a link between Aβ and tau-related neuropathology, and underscores the concept that degenerating neurites represent a cause rather than a consequence of Aβ accumulation in late-onset AD.

  1. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F.

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. [Verbal fluency among healthy elderly: a study of three complex verbal fluency tasks under healthy older people and patients with neurocognitive disorder or onset dementia of the Alzheimer type].

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, S; Galoppin, A; Willemarck, N

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to provide normative data for a phonological alternating task (FAT), a semantic alternating task (SAT) and an excluded letter task (ELT). The tasks were administered to 146 Flemish-speaking, cognitively healthy elderly. Data from 102 were used and were classified according to the significant variables. Subsequently, these tasks were administered to seven patients diagnosed with mild neurocognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment, MCI) and seven patients with onset dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). Results of the standard study show that the level of education is a significant variable for all complex VFT and age for the SAT and the ELT, while age related deterioration is highest for the ELT. The error rate is highest for the ELT and lowest for the SAT. Analysis of the time duration shows that data should be collected for at least 2 min. The patients scored significantly lower than the normgroup of healthy adults. The error rate is highest for the SAT and lowest for the ELT.

  3. A large early-onset Alzheimer`s disease pedigree linked to chromosome 14q24.3

    SciTech Connect

    Hannequin, D.; Campion, D.; Brice, A.

    1994-09-01

    A large French pedigree including 34 subjects with early-onset progressive dementia was identified. In patients, the mean age-at-onset was 46 {plus_minus} 3.5 (SD) years and the mean age at death 52.6 {plus_minus} 5.7 (SD) years. No evidence for anticipation or genetic imprinting was found. Twelve patients were clinically diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s disease (AD) according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. Myoclonus and extrapyramidal signs were common and seizures were found in all affected subjects. At autopsy, neuropathological changes typical of AD were present in two brains. A significant lod score of 5.38 was observed at a recombination fraction of {theta} = 0.0 with the genetic marker D14S43, thereby establishing that the responsible gene was located on chromosome 14q24.3. Furthermore, no obligate recombinant was observed with markers D14S77 and D14S71. Typing other genetic markers in this region will allow us to localize more precisely the pathological gene.

  4. Glucose Metabolic Brain Networks in Early-Onset vs. Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Eunjoo; Na, Duk L.; Jeong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) shows distinct features from late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). To explore the characteristics of EAD, clinical, neuropsychological, and functional imaging studies have been conducted. However, differences between EAD and LAD are not clear, especially in terms of brain connectivity and networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD by adopting graph theory measures. Methods: We analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images to investigate the distinct features of metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD. Using metabolic connectivity and graph theory analysis, metabolic network differences between LAD and EAD were explored. Results: Results showed the decreased connectivity centered in the cingulate gyri and occipital regions in EAD, whereas decreased connectivity in the occipital and temporal regions as well as increased connectivity in the supplementary motor area were observed in LAD when compared with age-matched control groups. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were decreased in EAD but not in LAD. EAD showed progressive network deterioration as a function of disease severity and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, mainly in terms of connectivity between the cingulate gyri and occipital regions. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were also decreased along with disease severity. Conclusion: These results indicate that EAD and LAD have distinguished features in terms of metabolic connectivity, with EAD demonstrating more extensive and progressive deterioration. PMID:27445800

  5. Could clinical profile influence CSF biomarkers in early-onset Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Koric, Lejla; Felician, Olivier; Guedj, Eric; Hubert, Anne Michele; Mancini, Julien; Boucraut, Jose; Ceccaldi, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    In common forms of Alzheimer disease (AD), anterograde memory impairment is the first deficit to occur. However, the disease, especially in its presenile forms, may also manifest itself through initial deficits that are predominantly of a nonmemory type. These distinct clinical profiles, which reflect the distinct topography of the underlying pathologic processes, may also differ in terms of their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid-beta 42 peptide in the CSF of "atypical" (nonmemory) early-onset AD patients. CSF biomarkers were evaluated in 22 atypical patients, and compared with those from a group of 13 "typical" patients, with a memory onset form of the disease. Our results show that independently of age, disease duration, education level, and clinical severity indices, patients with an atypical onset have significantly higher levels of total tau in the CSF (P=0.023). These findings indicate that an assessment of CSF biomarkers may be of particular use in the clinical diagnosis of "atypical-onset" forms of early-onset AD in which the initial symptoms involve language and visuospatial abilities rather than memory. In addition, they highlight the heterogeneity of pathologic processes in AD, suggesting more intense degeneration in the forms of the disease that primarily involve neocortical structures.

  6. Tumor diagnosis preceding Alzheimer's disease onset: is there a link between cancer and Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Cinturino, Antonio; Arnao, Valentina; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Cupidi, Chiara; Aridon, Paolo; Ragonese, Paolo; Savettieri, Giovanni; D'Amelio, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Studies reporting an inverse association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer are scant. Available data are mostly based on ancillary findings of mortality data or obtained from studies evaluating frequency of neoplasms in AD patients independently if they occurred before or after AD. Moreover, some studies estimated frequencies of neoplasms in demented individuals, who were not necessarily AD patients. We estimated frequency of tumors preceding the onset of AD in AD patients and compared it to that of age- and gender-matched AD-free individuals. Occurrence of tumors preceding AD onset was assessed through a semi-structured questionnaire. Tumors were categorized as benign, malignant, or of uncertain classification and as endocrine-related or not. Odds ratios (OR), used as measure of the association between the two diseases, were adjusted for tumor categories and known risk factors for AD and tumors. We included 126 AD patients and 252 matched controls. Tumor frequency before AD onset was 18.2% among cases and 24.2% among controls. There was a suggestive trend of an overall inverse association between the two diseases (adjusted OR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-1.1; p = 0.11). Risk for neoplasms was significantly reduced only for women (adjusted OR, 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.03) and for endocrine related tumors (adjusted OR, 0.5; 95% CI 0.2-1; p = 0.04). Our study confirms the inverse association reported in previous epidemiological studies. Though our findings might be explained by processes playing an opposite role in tumors development and neurodegeneration, they are also suggestive for a possible role of estrogen.

  7. Late-onset Alzheimer's risk variants in memory decline, incident mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Crook, Julia E; Pedraza, Otto; Thomas, Colleen S; Pankratz, V Shane; Allen, Mariet; Nguyen, Thuy; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D; Roberts, Rosebud O; Lucas, John A; Smith, Glenn E; Ivnik, Robert J; Machulda, Mary M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    We tested association of nine late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with memory and progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or LOAD (MCI/LOAD) in older Caucasians, cognitively normal at baseline and longitudinally evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester and Jacksonville (n>2000). Each variant was tested both individually and collectively using a weighted risk score. APOE-e4 associated with worse baseline memory and increased decline with highly significant overall effect on memory. CLU-rs11136000-G associated with worse baseline memory and incident MCI/LOAD. MS4A6A-rs610932-C associated with increased incident MCI/LOAD and suggestively with lower baseline memory. ABCA7-rs3764650-C and EPHA1-rs11767557-A associated with increased rates of memory decline in subjects with a final diagnosis of MCI/LOAD. PICALM-rs3851179-G had an unexpected protective effect on incident MCI/LOAD. Only APOE-inclusive risk scores associated with worse memory and incident MCI/LOAD. The collective influence of the nine top LOAD GWAS variants on memory decline and progression to MCI/LOAD appears limited. Discovery of biologically functional variants at these loci may uncover stronger effects on memory and incident disease.

  8. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  9. Evidence that PICALM affects age at onset of Alzheimer's dementia in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma L; Mok, Kin; Hanney, Marisa; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Williams, Julie; Ballard, Clive

    2013-10-01

    It is known that individuals with Down syndrome develop Alzheimer's disease with an early age at onset, although associated genetic risk factors have not been widely studied. We tested whether genes that increase the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease influence the age at onset in Down syndrome using genome-wide association data for age at onset of dementia in a small sample of individuals (N = 67) with Down syndrome. We tested for association with loci previously associated with Alzheimer's disease risk and, despite the small size of the study, we detected associations with age at onset of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome with PICALM (β = 3.31, p = 0.011) and the APOE loci (β = 3.58, p = 0.014). As dementia in people with Down syndrome is relatively understudied, we make all of these data publicly available to encourage further analyses of the problem of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

  10. Onset of hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Girard, Stéphane D; Jacquet, Marlyse; Baranger, Kévin; Migliorati, Martine; Escoffier, Guy; Bernard, Anne; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Féron, François; Rivera, Santiago; Roman, François S; Marchetti, Evelyne

    2014-07-01

    The 5XFAD mice are an early-onset transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in which amyloid plaques are first observed between two and four months of age in the cortical layer five and in the subiculum of the hippocampal formation. Although cognitive alterations have been described in these mice, there are no studies that focused on the onset of hippocampus-dependent memory deficits, which are a hallmark of the prodromal stage of AD. To identify when the first learning and memory impairments appear, 5XFAD mice of two, four, and six months of age were compared with their respective wild-type littermates using the olfactory tubing maze, which is a very sensitive hippocampal-dependent task. Deficits in learning and memory started at four months with a substantial increase at six months of age while no olfactory impairments were observed. The volumetric study using magnetic resonance imaging of the whole brain and specific areas (olfactory bulb, striatum, and hippocampus) did not reveal neuro-anatomical difference. Slight memory deficits appeared at 4 months of age in correlation with an increased astrogliosis and amyloid plaque formation. This early impairment in learning and memory related to the hippocampal dysfunction is particularly suited to assess preclinical therapeutic strategies aiming to delay or suppress the onset of AD.

  11. Central obesity in the elderly is related to late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, José A; Cheng, Derek; Tang, Ming Xin; Schupf, Nicole; Mayeux, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The evidence relating obesity measured with body mass index (BMI) in the elderly to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) is conflicting. Central obesity in middle age is related to a higher risk of LOAD, but data in the elderly are lacking. We explored whether measures of central obesity, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were better predictors of LOAD compared with BMI in the elderly. Participants were 1459 persons aged 65 years and older without dementia at baseline, with follow-up, and with anthropometric data from a longitudinal study of aging in New York City. Proportional hazards regression was used for multivariable analyses relating BMI, waist circumference, and WHR to LOAD. There were 145 cases of Alzheimer disease in 5734 person-years of follow-up. Only WHR was related to higher LOAD risk (hazard ratio of the fourth quartile compared with the first=2.5; 95% confidence interval=1.3, 4.7) after adjustment for age, sex, education, ethnic group, Apolipoprotein E-ε4, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and stroke. Our results support the notion that central obesity is related to a higher risk of LOAD.

  12. Cerebral glucose metabolic patterns in Alzheimer's disease. Effect of gender and age at dementia onset

    SciTech Connect

    Small, G.W.; Kuhl, D.E.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Ashford, J.W.; Metter, E.J.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    No previous study of Alzheimer's disease has, to our knowledge, assessed the effect of both age at dementia onset and gender on cerebral glucose metabolic patterns. To this end, we used positron emission tomography (fludeoxyglucose F 18 method) to study 24 patients with clinical diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease. Comparisons of the 13 patients with early-onset dementia (less than 65 years of age) with the 11 patients with late-onset dementia (greater than 65 years of age) revealed significantly lower left parietal metabolic ratios (left posterior parietal region divided by the hemispheric average) in the early-onset group. The metabolic ratio of posterior parietal cortex divided by the relatively disease-stable average of caudate and thalamus also separated patients with early-onset dementia from those with late-onset dementia, but not men from women. Further comparisons between sexes showed that, in all brain regions studied, the 9 postmenopausal women had higher nonweighted mean metabolic rates than the 15 men from the same age group, with hemispheric sex differences of 9% on the right and 7% on the left. These results demonstrate decreased parietal ratios in early-onset dementia of Alzheimer's disease, independent of a gender effect.

  13. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  14. Genome scan in familial late-onset Alzheimer's disease: a locus on chromosome 6 contributes to age-at-onset.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Marchani, Elizabeth E; Cheung, Charles Y K; Steinbart, Ellen J; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Bird, Thomas D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, genetically complex, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of late life. Although several genes are known to play a role in early-onset AD, identification of the genetic basis of late onset AD (LOAD) has been challenging, with only the APOE gene known to have a high contribution to both AD risk and age-at-onset. Here, we present the first genome-scan analysis of the complete, well-characterized University of Washington LOAD sample of 119 pedigrees, using age-at-onset as the trait of interest. The analysis approach used allows for a multilocus trait model while at the same time accommodating age censoring, effects of APOE as a known genetic covariate, and full pedigree and marker information. The results provide strong evidence for linkage of loci contributing to age-at-onset to genomic regions on chromosome 6q16.3, and to 19q13.42 in the region of the APOE locus. There was evidence for interaction between APOE and the locus on chromosome 6q and suggestive evidence for linkage to chromosomes 11p13, 15q12-14, and 19p13.12. These results provide the first independent confirmation of an AD age-at-onset locus on chromosome 6 and suggest that further efforts towards identifying the underlying causal locus or loci are warranted.

  15. Emotional Prosody Perception and Production in Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horley, Kaye; Reid, Amanda; Burnham, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated emotional prosody in patients with moderate Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) With Late Onset. It was expected that both expression and reception of prosody would be impaired relative to age-matched controls. Method: Twenty DAT and 20 control participants engaged in 2 expressive and 2 receptive…

  16. Prospective Study of the Prevalence of Alzheimer-Type Dementia in Institutionalized Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, F. E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Institutionalized patients with Down syndrome (N=307) were monitored for 5 to 10 years to determine prevalence of Alzheimer-type dementia. Prevalence increased from 11% between ages 40 and 49 to 77% between 60 and 69. All patients 70 and over had dementia. Mean age of onset of dementia was 56 years. Neuropathological findings were consistent with…

  17. Midlife adiposity predicts earlier onset of Alzheimer's dementia, neuropathology and presymptomatic cerebral amyloid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Y-F; An, Y; Bilgel, M; Wong, D F; Troncoso, J C; O'Brien, R J; Breitner, J C; Ferruci, L; Resnick, S M; Thambisetty, M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how midlife risk factors influence age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may provide clues to delay disease expression. Although midlife adiposity predicts increased incidence of AD, it is unclear whether it affects AAO and severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology. Using a prospective population-based cohort, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), this study aims to examine the relationships between midlife body mass index (BMI) and (1) AAO of AD (2) severity of Alzheimer's neuropathology and (3) fibrillar brain amyloid deposition during aging. We analyzed data on 1394 cognitively normal individuals at baseline (8643 visits; average follow-up interval 13.9 years), among whom 142 participants developed incident AD. In two subsamples of BLSA, 191 participants underwent autopsy and neuropathological assessment, and 75 non-demented individuals underwent brain amyloid imaging. Midlife adiposity was derived from BMI data at 50 years of age. We find that each unit increase in midlife BMI predicts earlier onset of AD by 6.7 months (P=0.013). Higher midlife BMI was associated with greater Braak neurofibrillary but not CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) neuritic plaque scores at autopsy overall. Associations between midlife BMI and brain amyloid burden approached statistical significance. Thus, higher midlife BMI was also associated with greater fibrillar amyloid measured by global mean cortical distribution volume ratio (P=0.075) and within the precuneus (left, P=0.061; right, P=0.079). In conclusion, midlife overweight predicts earlier onset of AD and greater burden of Alzheimer's neuropathology. A healthy BMI at midlife may delay the onset of AD.

  18. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  19. Transmission and age-at-onset patterns in familial Alzheimer's disease: evidence for heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Farrer, L A; Myers, R H; Cupples, L A; St George-Hyslop, P H; Bird, T D; Rossor, M N; Mullan, M J; Polinsky, R; Nee, L; Heston, L

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated age at onset and lifetime risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in 70 kindreds with familial AD (designated FAD) composed of 541 affected and 1,066 unaffected offspring of demented parents who were identified retrospectively. Using a survival analysis method which takes into account affected persons with unknown onset ages and unaffected persons with unknown censoring ages, we found lifetime risk of AD among at-risk offspring by age 87 to be 64%. Analysis of age at onset among kindreds showed evidence for a bimodal distribution: in this sample, families with a mean onset age of less than 58 years were designated as having early-onset, while late-onset families had a mean onset age greater than 58 years. At-risk offspring in early-onset families had an estimated lifetime risk for dementia of 53%, which is significantly less than the risk of 86% that was estimated for offspring in late-onset families. Men and women in early-onset families had equivalent risk of dementia. In late-onset families, the risk to female offspring was somewhat higher than to male offspring but this difference was marginally significant. Lifetime risk of dementia in early-onset FAD kindreds is consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance model. Our results may suggest that late-onset FAD has at least 2 etiologies; AD in some families may be transmitted as a dominant trait, whereas a proportion of cases in these and other late-onset families may be caused by other genetic or shared environmental factors.

  20. Typical and atypical appearance of early-onset Alzheimer's disease: A clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological study.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Kobayashi, Ryota; Hayashi, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The International Working Group (IWG) has classified Alzheimer's disease (AD) as two different types, the typical form and the atypical form, but clinicopathological studies of atypical AD are limited. Because atypical AD cases usually present with early-onset dementia, we investigated 12 patients with early-onset AD, including two patients with typical AD and 10 patients with atypical AD. Of these patients, six had the posterior variant, three had the frontal variant and one had the logopenic variant mixed with semantic dementia. We reported MRI, single-photon emission CT and neuropathological findings in six representative cases. We also described a "left temporal variant" of AD presenting with transcortical cortical sensory aphasia, which has not been reported previously and is another subtype of the posterior variant of AD. We found a significant correlation between regional cerebral blood flow and counts of NFTs in the cerebral cortices. An atypical presentation with focal neuropsychological symptoms roughly correlated with the density of NFTs in the cerebral cortex and more directly related to spongiform changes in the superficial layers of these areas. In contrast, the distribution of amyloid depositions was diffuse and did not necessarily correlate with focal neuropsychological symptoms. Braak staging or ABC score is not necessarily appropriate to evaluate atypical AD, and instead, spongiform changes in addition to tau pathology in the association cortices better explain the diversity of atypical AD. Interestingly, another patient with a posterior variant of AD had a novel type of atypical plaque, which we referred to as "lucent plaque". They were recognizable with HE staining in the circumference and dystrophic neurites were abundant with Gallyas-Braak staining. These plaques demonstrated intense immunoreactivity to both tau AT-8 and amyloid β (Aβ), suggesting a peculiar coexistence pattern of amyloid and tau in these plaques. Clinicopathological studies

  1. Genomic linkage between Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Haque, Absarul; Alam, Qamre; Gan, Siew H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Damanhouri, Ghazi A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major health concern that affects nearly every society worldwide. The disease is an irreversible, progressive and age-related neurodegenerative disorder. It is characterized by impaired cognitive function and the diffuse deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The causes of AD and the underlying mechanisms that trigger the onset of the disease are still a matter of debate. Several epidemiological studies have shown that the development of AD is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). In this review, we provide evidence for the link between T2D and AD, highlighting the critical role of insulin in the pathogenesis of these diseases, and we provide information on the genes that might be involved in the interplay between these two disorders. New insight into the complex biology of AD is necessary for the early diagnosis of the disease, the development of novel drug therapies and the prevention of these health issues.

  2. Polymorphisms in BACE2 may affect the age of onset Alzheimer's dementia in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mok, Kin Y; Jones, Emma L; Hanney, Marisa; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Williams, Julie; Ballard, Clive; Hardy, John

    2014-06-01

    It is known that Alzheimer's disease (AD) presents at an early age in people with Down syndrome (DS). The trisomy 21 in DS provides an opportunity to study the effect of duplicated genes in AD. APP and BACE2 are 2 genes located in chromosome 21 and related to AD. We looked into our cohort of 67 DS cases with dementia for the effect of BACE2 variants in age of onset of dementia. Of the 83 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 6 were associated with age of onset and another 8 SNPs were borderline associated. Our finding also replicated a previous study showing association of rs2252576 with AD.

  3. Difference in imaging biomarkers of neurodegeneration between early and late-onset amnestic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Anne-Laure; Giusiano, Bernard; Joubert, Sven; Duprat, Lauréline; Didic, Mira; Gueriot, Claude; Koric, Lejla; Boucraut, José; Felician, Olivier; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Guedj, Eric; Ceccaldi, Mathieu

    2017-02-21

    Neuroimaging biomarkers differ between patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Whether these changes reflect cognitive heterogeneity or differences in disease severity is still unknown. This study aimed at investigating changes in neuroimaging biomarkers, according to the age of onset of the disease, in mild amnestic Alzheimer's disease patients with positive amyloid biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid. Both patient groups were impaired on tasks assessing verbal and visual recognition memory. EOAD patients showed greater executive and linguistic deficits, while LOAD patients showed greater semantic memory impairment. In EOAD and LOAD, hypometabolism involved the bilateral temporoparietal junction and the posterior cingulate cortex. In EOAD, atrophy was widespread, including frontotemporoparietal areas, whereas it was limited to temporal regions in LOAD. Atrophic volumes were greater in EOAD than in LOAD. Hypometabolic volumes were similar in the 2 groups. Greater extent of atrophy in EOAD, despite similar extent of hypometabolism, could reflect different underlying pathophysiological processes, different glucose-based compensatory mechanisms or distinct level of premorbid atrophic lesions.

  4. MTHFR Gene Mutations: A Potential Marker of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2015-01-01

    Recent epigenome-wide association studies have confirmed the importance of epigenetic effects mediated by DNA methylation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Metabolic folate pathways and methyl donor reactions facilitated by B-group vitamins may be critical in the pathogenesis of LOAD. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations were studied in consecutive Alzheimer's Disease & Memory Clinic patients up to December 2014. DNA analyses of MTHFR-C667T and - A1298C homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms in 93 consecutive elderly patients revealed high prevalence of MTHFR mutations (92.5%). Findings require confirmation in a larger series, but MTHFR mutations may become a LOAD marker, opening novel possibilities for prevention and treatment.

  5. Multilingualism (but not always bilingualism) delays the onset of Alzheimer disease: evidence from a bilingual community.

    PubMed

    Chertkow, Howard; Whitehead, Victor; Phillips, Natalie; Wolfson, Christina; Atherton, Julie; Bergman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Bialystok et al in Neuropsychologia (vol. 45, pgs. 459 to 464) suggested that early bilingualism produced a statistically significant 4.1-year delay in onset of memory loss symptoms in older individuals with Alzheimer disease, possibly reflecting an increase in the cognitive reserve of these individuals. That study focused on multilingual elderly patients of whom 90% were immigrants. Our memory clinic, in Montreal Canada, has the advantage of having a large set of individuals who are either multilingual immigrants to Canada, or who are nonimmigrants but raised in both official languages of Canada--French and English. We thus attempted to replicate the above findings using a larger cohort in a different setting. We examined age at diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and age at symptom onset for all unilingual versus multilingual participants, and then for those who were nonimmigrant English/French bilinguals. Overall, we found a small but significant protective effect of more than 2 languages spoken, but we found no significant benefit in bilinguals overall in relation to age at diagnosis or age at symptom onset. However, in the immigrant group, the results mirrored those of Bialystok et al with 2 or more languages delaying the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease by almost 5 years. A trend toward the same effect was also seen in nonimmigrants whose first language was French. In contrast, in nonimmigrants whose first language was English, no such effect was found. These results are discussed in relation to the earlier findings and the theory of cognitive reserve.

  6. Senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, J.T.; Kenny, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers on Alzheimer's Disease. They are divided into several topics. The topic headings are: Clinical Evaluation, Management, and Treatment; Related Clinical Disorders; Epidemiology and Genetics; Basic Science; and National Perspectives and Future Directions.

  7. Mutation analysis of sporadic early-onset Alzheimer's disease using the NeuroX array.

    PubMed

    Barber, Imelda S; Braae, Anne; Clement, Naomi; Patel, Tulsi; Guetta-Baranes, Tamar; Brookes, Keeley; Medway, Christopher; Chappell, Sally; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose; Hernandez, Dena; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Mann, David M; Morgan, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    We have screened sporadic early-onset Alzheimer's disease (sEOAD, n = 408) samples using the NeuroX array for known causative and predicted pathogenic variants in 16 genes linked to familial forms of neurodegeneration. We found 2 sEOAD individuals harboring a known causative variant in PARK2 known to cause early-onset Parkinson's disease; p.T240M (n = 1) and p.Q34fs delAG (n = 1). In addition, we identified 3 sEOAD individuals harboring a predicted pathogenic variant in MAPT (p.A469T), which has previously been associated with AD. It is currently unknown if these variants affect susceptibility to sEOAD, further studies would be needed to establish this. This work highlights the need to screen sEOAD individuals for variants that are more classically attributed to other forms of neurodegeneration.

  8. The apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster and late-onset Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Nemens, E.; Olson, J.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Kukull, W.A.; Payami, H.; Boehnke, M.; Wijsman, E.M.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele E4 and FAD in late-onset families; the E4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the E4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant. No association between the E4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between E4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the E4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (Z[sub SND] = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained. For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls or allele frequencies from the families were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased. For the ENVG group, results for ApoE and ApoCII were uniformly negative. Affected-pedigree-member analysis gave significant results for the late-onset kindreds, for ApoE, when control allele frequencies were used but not when allele frequencies were derived from the families. 58 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. The Apolipoprotein E/CI/CII Gene Cluster and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Payami, Haydeh; Olson, Jane M.; Boehnke, Michael; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Orr, Harry T.; Kukull, Walter A.; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Nemens, Ellen; White, June A.; Alonso, M. Elisa; Taylor, Todd D.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Morris, John; Chui, Helena; Sadovnick, Adele D.; Martin, George M.; Larson, Eric B.; Heston, Leonard L.; Bird, Thomas D.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    1994-01-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele ε4 and FAD in late-onset families; the ε4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the ε4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant (standard normal deviate [ZSND]) = 7.37, P < 10−9; and ZSND = 4.07, P < .00005, respectively). No association between the ε4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between ε4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the ε4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (ZSND = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained (model 1, maximum Z [Zmax] = 0.61, recombination fraction [θ] = .30; model 2, Zmax = 0.47, θ = .20). For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls (model 1, Zmax = 2.02, θ = .15; model 2, Zmax = 3.42, θ = .05) or allele frequencies from the families (model 1, Zmax = 1.43, θ = .15; model 2, Zmax = 1.70, θ = .05) were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased (model 1, Zmax = 3.17,

  10. SORL1 mutations in early- and late-onset Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuccaro, Michael L.; Carney, Regina M.; Zhang, Yalun; Bohm, Christopher; Kunkle, Brian W.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Cukier, Holly N.; Mayeux, Richard; St. George-Hyslop, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the clinical and molecular effect of mutations in the sortilin-related receptor (SORL1) gene. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing in early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) and late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) families followed by functional studies of select variants. The phenotypic consequences associated with SORL1 mutations were characterized based on clinical reviews of medical records. Functional studies were completed to evaluate β-amyloid (Aβ) production and amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking associated with SORL1 mutations. Results: SORL1 alterations were present in 2 EOAD families. In one, a SORL1 T588I change was identified in 4 individuals with AD, 2 of whom had parkinsonian features. In the second, an SORL1 T2134 alteration was found in 3 of 4 AD cases, one of whom had postmortem Lewy bodies. Among LOAD cases, 4 individuals with either SORL1 A528T or T947M alterations had parkinsonian features. Functionally, the variants weaken the interaction of the SORL1 protein with full-length APP, altering levels of Aβ and interfering with APP trafficking. Conclusions: The findings from this study support an important role for SORL1 mutations in AD pathogenesis by way of altering Aβ levels and interfering with APP trafficking. In addition, the presence of parkinsonian features among select individuals with AD and SORL1 mutations merits further investigation. PMID:27822510

  11. A genetic screen of the mutations in the Korean patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    An, Seong Soo; Park, Sun Ah; Bagyinszky, Eva; Bae, Sun Oh; Kim, Yoon-Jeong; Im, Ji Young; Park, Kyung Won; Park, Kee Hyung; Kim, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kim, Jong Hun; Han, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Seong Hye; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) has distinct clinical characteristics in comparison to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). The genetic contribution is suggested to be more potent in EOAD. However, the frequency of causative mutations in EOAD could be variable depending on studies. Moreover, no mutation screening study has been performed yet employing large population in Korea. Previously, we reported that the rate of family history of dementia in EOAD patients was 18.7% in a nationwide hospital-based cohort study, the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS) study. This rate is much lower than in other countries and is even comparable to the frequency of LOAD patients in our country. To understand the genetic characteristics of EOAD in Korea, we screened the common Alzheimer's disease (AD) mutations in the consecutive EOAD subjects from the CREDOS study from April 2012 to February 2014. We checked the sequence of APP (exons 16-17), PSEN1 (exons 3-12), and PSEN2 (exons 3-12) genes. We identified different causative or probable pathogenic AD mutations, PSEN1 T116I, PSEN1 L226F, and PSEN2 V214L, employing 24 EOAD subjects with a family history and 80 without a family history of dementia. PSEN1 T116I case demonstrated autosomal dominant trait of inheritance, with at least 11 affected individuals over 2 generations. However, there was no family history of dementia within first-degree relation in PSEN1 L226F and PSEN2 V214L cases. Approximately, 55.7% of the EOAD subjects had APOE ε4 allele, while none of the mutation-carrying subjects had the allele. The frequency of genetic mutation in this study is lower compared to the studies from other countries. The study design that was based on nationwide cohort, which minimizes selection bias, is thought to be one of the contributors to the lower frequency of genetic mutation. However, the possibility of the greater likeliness of earlier onset of sporadic AD in Korea cannot be excluded. We

  12. Familial late-onset Alzheimer's disease: description of an Italian family with four affected siblings and one case of early-onset dementia in the preceding generation.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Carlo; Arosio, Beatrice; Cantatore, Alessandra; Viti, Niccolò; Giunco, Fabrizio; Bagarolo, Renzo; Nicolini, Paola; Gussago, Cristina; Ferri, Evelyn; Casati, Martina; Rossi, Paolo Dionigi; Casè, Alessandra; Bergamaschini, Luigi; Vergani, Carlo; Mari, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    We describe a family composed of six siblings, four of which affected by late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We constructed the family pedigree, evaluated mutations usually associated with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2), and assessed polymorphisms in the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene and in cytokine genes that we had previously found to be associated with a higher risk of LOAD (IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α). Results showed that all subjects carried one ε4 allele of the APOE gene and those with the earliest age of onset exhibited the AA (-1082) IL-10 and the CC (-174) IL-6 genotypes. The only male had a genetic profile which also included the A (-308) TNF-α allele. These data confirm the role of the APOE gene as genetic risk factor in LOAD, and suggest that the risk of developing AD may be governed by a "susceptibility profile" involving polymorphisms in inflammatory genes.

  13. Multipoint oligogenic analysis of age-at-onset data with applications to Alzheimer disease pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Daw, E W; Heath, S C; Wijsman, E M

    1999-01-01

    It is usually difficult to localize genes that cause diseases with late ages at onset. These diseases frequently exhibit complex modes of inheritance, and only recent generations are available to be genotyped and phenotyped. In this situation, multipoint analysis using traditional exact linkage analysis methods, with many markers and full pedigree information, is a computationally intractable problem. Fortunately, Monte Carlo Markov chain sampling provides a tool to address this issue. By treating age at onset as a right-censored quantitative trait, we expand the methods used by Heath (1997) and illustrate them using an Alzheimer disease (AD) data set. This approach estimates the number, sizes, allele frequencies, and positions of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In this simultaneous multipoint linkage and segregation analysis method, the QTLs are assumed to be diallelic and to interact additively. In the AD data set, we were able to localize correctly, quickly, and accurately two known genes, despite the existence of substantial genetic heterogeneity, thus demonstrating the great promise of these methods for the dissection of late-onset oligogenic diseases. PMID:10053019

  14. Age-Specific Epigenetic Drift in Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sun-Chong; Oelze, Beatrice; Schumacher, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Despite an enormous research effort, most cases of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) still remain unexplained and the current biomedical science is still a long way from the ultimate goal of revealing clear risk factors that can help in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of the disease. Current theories about the development of LOAD hinge on the premise that Alzheimer's arises mainly from heritable causes. Yet, the complex, non-Mendelian disease etiology suggests that an epigenetic component could be involved. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in post-mortem brain samples and lymphocytes, we have performed an analysis of DNA methylation across 12 potential Alzheimer's susceptibility loci. In the LOAD brain samples we identified a notably age-specific epigenetic drift, supporting a potential role of epigenetic effects in the development of the disease. Additionally, we found that some genes that participate in amyloid-β processing (PSEN1, APOE) and methylation homeostasis (MTHFR, DNMT1) show a significant interindividual epigenetic variability, which may contribute to LOAD predisposition. The APOE gene was found to be of bimodal structure, with a hypomethylated CpG-poor promoter and a fully methylated 3′-CpG-island, that contains the sequences for the ε4-haplotype, which is the only undisputed genetic risk factor for LOAD. Aberrant epigenetic control in this CpG-island may contribute to LOAD pathology. We propose that epigenetic drift is likely to be a substantial mechanism predisposing individuals to LOAD and contributing to the course of disease. PMID:18628954

  15. Clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging features of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Alberici, Antonella; Benussi, Alberto; Premi, Enrico; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Early Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) is a rare condition, frequently associated with genetic causes. The dissemination of genetic testing along with biomarker determinations have prompted a wider recognition of EOAD in experienced clinical settings. However, despite the great efforts in establishing the contribution of causative genes to EOAD, atypical disease presentation and clinical features still makes its diagnosis and treatment a challenge for the clinicians. This review aims to provide an extensive evaluation of literature data on EOAD, in order to improve understanding and knowledge of EOAD, underscore its significant impact on patients and their caregivers and influence public policies. This would be crucial to define the urgency of evidence-based treatment approaches.

  16. Projections of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset.

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S; Kawas, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to project the future prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the potential impact of interventions to delay disease onset. METHODS: The numbers of individuals in the United States with Alzheimer's disease and the numbers of newly diagnosed cases that can be expected over the next 50 years were estimated from a model that used age-specific incidence rates summarized from several epidemiological studies, US mortality rates, and US Bureau of the Census projections. RESULTS: in 1997, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States was 2.32 million (range: 1.09 to 4.58 million); of these individuals, 68% were female. It is projected that the prevalence will nearly quadruple in the next 50 years, by which time approximately 1 in 45 Americans will be afflicted with the disease. Currently, the annual number of new incident cases in 360,000. If interventions could delay onset of the disease by 2 years, after 50 years there would be nearly 2 million fewer cases than projected; if onset could be delayed by 1 year, there would be nearly 800,000 fewer prevalent cases. CONCLUSIONS: As the US population ages, Alzheimer's disease will become an enormous public health problem. interventions that could delay disease onset even modestly would have a major public health impact. PMID:9736873

  17. Executive Abilities as Reflected by Clock Hand Placement: Frontotemporal Dementia Versus Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Robin J; Barsuglia, Joseph; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Eknoyan, Donald; Sabodash, Valeriy; Lee, Grace J; Mendez, Mario F

    2015-12-01

    The clock-drawing test (CDT) is widely used in clinical practice to diagnose and distinguish patients with dementia. It remains unclear, however, whether the CDT can distinguish among the early-onset dementias. Accordingly, we examined the ability of both quantitative and qualitative CDT analyses to distinguish behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and early-onset Alzheimer disease (eAD), the 2 most common neurodegenerative dementias with onset <65 years of age. We hypothesized that executive aspects of the CDT would discriminate between these 2 disorders. The study compared 15 patients with bvFTD and 16 patients with eAD on the CDT using 2 different scales and correlated the findings with neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. The total CDT scores did not discriminate bvFTD and eAD; however, specific analysis of executive hand placement items successfully distinguished the groups, with eAD exhibiting greater errors than bvFTD. The performance on those executive hand placement items correlated with measures of naming as well as visuospatial and executive function. On tensor-based morphometry of the magnetic resonance images, executive hand placement correlated with right frontal volume. These findings suggest that lower performance on executive hand placement items occurs with involvement of the right dorsolateral frontal-parietal network for executive control in eAD, a network disproportionately affected in AD of early onset. Rather than the total performance on the clock task, the analysis of specific errors, such as executive hand placement, may be useful for early differentiation of eAD, bvFTD, and other conditions.

  18. Screening exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in sporadic early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Imelda S; García-Cárdenas, Jennyfer M; Sakdapanichkul, Chidchanok; Deacon, Christopher; Zapata Erazo, Gabriela; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose; Hernandez, Dena; Singleton, Andrew; Guetta-Baranes, Tamar; Braae, Anne; Clement, Naomi; Patel, Tulsi; Brookes, Keeley; Medway, Christopher; Chappell, Sally; Mann, David M; Morgan, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) can be familial (FAD) or sporadic EOAD (sEOAD); both have a disease onset ≤65 years of age. A total of 451 sEOAD samples were screened for known causative mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. Four samples were shown to be heterozygous for 1 of 3 known causative mutations: p.A713T, p.V717I, and p.V717G; this highlights the importance of screening EOAD patients for causative mutations. Additionally, we document an intronic 6 base pair (bp) deletion located 83 bp downstream of exon 17 (rs367709245, IVS17 83-88delAAGTAT), which has a nonsignificantly increased minor allele frequency in our sEOAD cohort (0.006) compared to LOAD (0.002) and controls (0.002). To assess the effect of the 6-bp deletion on splicing, COS-7 and BE(2)-C cells were transfected with a minigene vector encompassing exon 17. There was no change in splicing of exon 17 from constructs containing either wild type or deletion inserts. Sequencing of cDNA generated from cerebellum and temporal cortex of a patient harboring the deletion found no evidence of transcripts with exon 17 removed.

  19. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of late-onset Alzheimer disease genetic susceptibility risks in a Canadian population.

    PubMed

    Omoumi, Ardeshir; Fok, Alice; Greenwood, Talitha; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Feldman, Howard H; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R

    2014-04-01

    We performed case-control studies using 2 Canadian cohorts to examine the role of 10 promising Alzheimer's disease (AD) loci identified in recent genomewide association studies. Patients age 65 years and older diagnosed with AD at baseline (prevalent cases) or who developed AD during follow-up assessments (incident cases) were compared with control subjects with no cognitive impairment. Our prevalent case study comparing prevalent AD cases (n = 428) with participants with no cognitive impairment (n = 524) revealed a significant association of rs6656401 and rs3818361 (CR1), rs2075650 (TOMM40), rs7561528 (BIN1), and rs3865444 (CD33) with late-onset AD that were robust to adjustment with age and apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype. The incident case study comparing patients who developed AD during longitudinal observation (n = 152) with participants with no cognitive impairment found that rs2075650 (TOMM40) and rs3865444 (CD33) influence the risk of developing AD in this population. In addition, pooled analysis of our AD patients confirmed that CR1, TOMM40, BIN1, and CD33 contribute to late-onset AD susceptibility, in addition to apolipoprotein E.

  1. The Neuronal Sortilin-Related Receptor Gene SORL1 and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joseph H.; Barral, Sandra; Reitz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that two clusters of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the neuronal sortilin-related receptor gene (SORL1) are causally associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). At the cellular level, SORL1 is thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking of amyloid precursor protein. When this gene is suppressed, toxic amyloid β production is increased, and high levels of amyloid β are associated with a higher AD risk. Extending the cellular findings, gene expression studies show that SORL1 is differentially expressed in AD patients compared with controls. Furthermore, several genetic studies have identified allelic and haplotypic SORL1 variants associated with late-onset AD, and these variants confer small to modest risk of AD. Taken together, the evidence for SORL1 as a causative gene is compelling. However, putative variants have not yet been identified. Further research is necessary to determine its utility as a diagnostic marker of AD or as a target for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:18713574

  2. A Unified Hypothesis of Early- and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD) and late-onset sporadic AD (LOSAD) both follow a similar pathological and biochemical course that includes: neuron and synapse loss and dysfunction, microvascular damage, microgliosis, extracellular amyloid-β deposition, tau phosphorylation, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, endoreduplication and related cell cycle events in affected brain regions. Any mechanistic explanation of AD must accommodate these biochemical and neuropathological features for both forms of the disease. In this insight paper we provide a unifying hypothesis for EOFAD and LOSAD that proposes that the aberrant re-entry of terminally differentiated, post-mitotic neurons into the cell division cycle is a common pathway that explains both early and late-onset forms of AD. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease process, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical (e.g. tau phosphorylation), neuropathological (e.g. neuron hypertrophy; polypoidy) and cognitive changes observed in EOFAD and LOSAD. Genetic mutations in AβPP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 that alter amyloid-β precursor protein and Notch processing drive reactivation of the cell cycle in EOFAD, while age-related reproductive endocrine dyscrasia that upregulates mitogenic TNF signaling and AβPP processing toward the amyloidogenic pathway drives reactivation of the cell cycle in LOSAD. In essence, AβPP and presenilin mutations initiate early, what endocrine dyscrasia initiates later: aberrant cell cycle re-entry of post-mitotic neurons leading to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD. Inhibition of cell cycle re-entry in post-mitotic neurons may be a useful therapeutic strategy to prevent, slow or halt disease progression.

  3. Cholesterol and Alzheimer Type Dementia among Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a summary of research by Warren Zigman and colleagues investigating the link between cholesterol levels and Alzheimer type dementia among adults with Down syndrome. Warren Zigman and colleagues followed 123 adults with Down syndrome between May 1998 and April 2006. The participants were aged between 41 and 78 years at the…

  4. Selective Attention in Early Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Duque, Diego; Black, Sandra E.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored possible deficits in selective attention brought about by Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DAT). In three experiments, we tested patients with early DAT, healthy elderly, and young adults under low memory demands to assess perceptual filtering, conflict resolution, and set switching abilities. We found no evidence of impaired…

  5. Brain expression of presenilins in sporadic and early-onset, familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, P. M.; Cataldo, A. M.; Kao, B. H.; Rudnicki, A. G.; Qin, X.; Yang, J. L.; Jiang, Y.; Picciano, M.; Hulette, C.; Lippa, C. F.; Bird, T. D.; Nochlin, D.; Walter, J.; Haass, C.; Lévesque, L.; Fraser, P. E.; Andreadis, A.; Nixon, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the presenilin proteins cause early-onset, familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We characterized the cellular localization and endoproteolysis of presenilin 2 (PS2) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in brains from 25 individuals with presenilin-mutations causing FAD, as well as neurologically normal individuals and individuals with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). RESULTS: Amino-terminal antibodies to both presenilins predominantly decorated large neurons. Regional differences between the broad distributions of the two presenilins were greatest in the cerebellum, where most Purkinje cells showed high levels of only PS2 immunoreactivity. PS2 endoproteolysis in brain yielded multiple amino-terminal fragments similar in size to the PS1 amino-terminal fragments detected in brain. In addition, two different PS2 amino-terminal antibodies also detected a prominent 42 kDa band that may represent a novel PS2 form in human brain. Similar to PS1 findings, neither amino-terminal nor antiloop PS2 antibodies revealed substantial full-length PS2 in brain. Immunocytochemical examination of brains from individuals with the N141I PS2 mutation or eight different PS1 mutations, spanning the molecule from the second transmembrane domain to the large cytoplasmic loop domain, revealed immunodecoration of no senile plaques and only neurofibrillary tangles in the M139I PS1 mutation stained with PS1 antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Overall presenilin expression and the relative abundance of full-length and amino-terminal fragments in presenilin FAD cases were similar to control cases and sporadic AD cases. Thus, accumulation of full-length protein or other gross mismetabolism of neither PS2 nor PS1 is a consequence of the FAD mutations examined. PMID:11126202

  6. Candidate blood proteome markers of Alzheimer's disease onset and progression: a systematic review and replication study.

    PubMed

    Kiddle, Steven J; Sattlecker, Martina; Proitsi, Petroula; Simmons, Andrew; Westman, Eric; Bazenet, Chantal; Nelson, Sally K; Williams, Stephen; Hodges, Angela; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Newhouse, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Dobson, Richard J B

    2014-01-01

    A blood-based protein biomarker, or set of protein biomarkers, that could predict onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) would have great utility; potentially clinically, but also for clinical trials and especially in the selection of subjects for preventative trials. We reviewed a comprehensive list of 21 published discovery or panel-based (> 100 proteins) blood proteomics studies of AD, which had identified a total of 163 candidate biomarkers. Few putative blood-based protein biomarkers replicate in independent studies but we found that some proteins do appear in multiple studies; for example, four candidate biomarkers are found to associate with AD-related phenotypes in five independent research cohorts in these 21 studies: α-1-antitrypsin, α-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein E, and complement C3. Using SomaLogic's SOMAscan proteomics technology, we were able to conduct a large-scale replication study for 94 of the 163 candidate biomarkers from these 21 published studies in plasma samples from 677 subjects from the AddNeuroMed (ANM) and the Alzheimer's Research UK/Maudsley BRC Dementia Case Registry at King's Health Partners (ARUK/DCR) research cohorts. Nine of the 94 previously reported candidates were found to associate with AD-related phenotypes (False Discovery Rate (FDR) q-value < 0.1). These proteins show sufficient replication to be considered for further investigation as a biomarker set. Overall, we show that there are some signs of a replicable signal in the range of proteins identified in previous studies and we are able to further replicate some of these. This suggests that AD pathology does affect the blood proteome with some consistency.

  7. When aging-onset diabetes is coming across with Alzheimer disease: comparable pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Pei, Yijin; Zhou, Guangji

    2013-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose because of the insulin-resistance and insulin-deficiency in Type 2, while the insulin deficiency due to destruction of islet cells in the pancreas in Type 1. The development of Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors. Aging patients with diabetes are at increased risk of developing cognitive and memory dysfunctions, which is one of the significant symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD). Also, over 2/3 of AD patients were clinically indentified with impairment of glucose. Cognitive dysfunction would be associated with poor self-care ability in diabetes patients. This review will briefly summarize the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of these two diseases and highlight similarities in their pathophysiologies. Furthermore, we will shortly discuss recent progress in the insulin-targeted strategy, aiming to explore the inner linkage between these two diseases in aging populations.

  8. A genomewide screen for late-onset Alzheimer disease in a genetically isolated Dutch population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; Sleegers, Kristel; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Kayser, Manfred; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Feng, Bing-Jian; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; van Swieten, John; Axenovich, Tatiana I; Heutink, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Oostra, Ben A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2007-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. We conducted a genome screen of 103 patients with late-onset AD who were ascertained as part of the Genetic Research in Isolated Populations (GRIP) program that is conducted in a recently isolated population from the southwestern area of The Netherlands. All patients and their 170 closely related relatives were genotyped using 402 microsatellite markers. Extensive genealogy information was collected, which resulted in an extremely large and complex pedigree of 4,645 members. The pedigree was split into 35 subpedigrees, to reduce the computational burden of linkage analysis. Simulations aiming to evaluate the effect of pedigree splitting on false-positive probabilities showed that a LOD score of 3.64 corresponds to 5% genomewide type I error. Multipoint analysis revealed four significant and one suggestive linkage peaks. The strongest evidence of linkage was found for chromosome 1q21 (heterogeneity LOD [HLOD]=5.20 at marker D1S498). Approximately 30 cM upstream of this locus, we found another peak at 1q25 (HLOD=4.0 at marker D1S218). These two loci are in a previously established linkage region. We also confirmed the AD locus at 10q22-24 (HLOD=4.15 at marker D10S185). There was significant evidence of linkage of AD to chromosome 3q22-24 (HLOD=4.44 at marker D3S1569). For chromosome 11q24-25, there was suggestive evidence of linkage (HLOD=3.29 at marker D11S1320). We next tested for association between cognitive function and 4,173 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the linked regions in an independent sample consisting of 197 individuals from the GRIP region. After adjusting for multiple testing, we were able to detect significant associations for cognitive function in four of five AD-linked regions, including the new region on chromosome 3q22-24 and regions 1q25, 10q22-24, and 11q25. With use of cognitive function as an endophenotype of AD, our study indicates the that the RGSL2, RALGPS2, and C1orf49 genes

  9. Chromosome-12 Mapping of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease among Caribbean Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Mayeux, R.; Lee, J. H.; Romas, S. N.; Mayo, D.; Santana, V.; Williamson, J.; Ciappa, A.; Rondon, H. Z.; Estevez, P.; Lantigua, R.; Medrano, M.; Torres, M.; Stern, Y.; Tycko, B.; Knowles, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Linkage to chromosome 12p for familial Alzheimer disease (AD) has been inconsistent. Using 35 markers near the centromere of chromosome 12, we investigated 79 Caribbean Hispanic families with AD. Two-point linkage analysis using affected sib pairs yielded LOD scores of 3.15 at D12S1623 and 1.43 at D12S1042. The LOD score at D12S1623 decreased to 1.62 in families with late-onset (age >65 years) AD (LOAD), but the LOD score at D12S1042 was unchanged. Among families negative for the apolipoprotein E (APOE-ε4) allele, the LOD score for D12S1623 was lower (1.01), whereas that for D12S1042 increased to 1.73. Among families positive for the APOE-ε4 allele, none of the LOD scores reached 1. Multipoint affected-relative-pair analysis showed peaks at D12S1623 (nonparametric linkage [NPL] score 1.52; P=.028) and near D12S1042, at D12S1057 (NPL score 1.57; P=.027). NPL scores for both D12S1623 and D12S1057 increased in families affected with LOAD, but, in APOE-ε4–negative families, only scores for the region flanking D12S1623 remained elevated (NPL score 1.74; P=.013). This study of Caribbean Hispanics with familial AD extends and provides modest evidence of linkage to loci on chromosome 12p. Linkage varied by age at onset of AD and by the presence or absence of the APOE-ε4 allele. PMID:11715112

  10. Association of HMGCR polymorphism with late-onset Alzheimer's disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Zhan-Jie; Kong, Ling-Li; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) acts as a potential genetic modifier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous reports identified that HMGCR rs3846662 polymorphism is associated with biosynthesis of cholesterol in AD pathology. In order to assess the involvement of the HMGCR polymorphism in the risk of late-onset AD (LOAD) in northern Han Chinese, we performed a case–control study of 2334 unrelated subjects (984 cases and 1350 age- and gender-matched controls) to evaluate the genotype and allele distributions of the HMGCR rs3846662 with LOAD. The genotype distribution (GG, AG, AA) of rs3846662 was significantly different between LOAD patients and controls (P = 0.003), but the allele distribution did not reach a significant difference (P = 0.614). After adjusting for age, gender and the APOE ε4 status, the minor A allele of rs3846662 was validated as a protective factor for LOAD in dominant model (OR = 0.796, P = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.657–0.965). Interestingly, we observed rs3846662 polymorphism was only significantly associated with LOAD in APOE ε4 non-carriers (OR = 0.735, P = 0.005, 95% CI = [0.593, 0.912]). In conclusion, our study demonstrates A allele of HMGCR rs3846662 acts as a protective factor for LOAD in northern Han Chinese. PMID:27009838

  11. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms, Endophenotypes, and Syndromes in Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: Focus on APOE Gene

    PubMed Central

    Panza, Francesco; Seripa, Davide; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Frisardi, Vincenza; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pilotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms, previously denominated as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, are common features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are one of the major risk factors for institutionalization. At present, the role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients is unclear. In this paper, we summarized the findings of the studies of neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropsychiatric syndromes/endophenotypes in AD in relation to APOE genotypes, with special attention to the possible underlying mechanisms. While some studies failed to find a significant association between APOE and neuropsychiatric symptoms in late-onset AD, other studies reported a significant association between the APOE ε4 allele and an increase in agitation/aggression, hallucinations, delusions, and late-life depression or anxiety. Furthermore, some negative studies that focused on the distribution of APOE genotypes between AD patients with or without neuropsychiatric symptoms further emphasized the importance of subgrouping neuropsychiatric symptoms in distinct neuropsychiatric syndromes. Explanations for the variable findings in the existing studies included differences in patient populations, differences in the assessment of neuropsychiatric symptomatology, and possible lack of statistical power to detect associations in the negative studies. PMID:21559196

  12. Evidence for defective retinoid transport and function in late onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Ann B.; Pardee, Arthur B.

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis of this article is that late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is influenced by the availability in brain of retinoic acid (RA), the final product of the vitamin A (retinoid) metabolic cascade. Genetic, metabolic, and environmental/dietary evidence is cited supporting this hypothesis. Significant genetic linkages to AD are demonstrated for markers close to four of the six RA receptors, RA receptor G at 12q13, retinoid X receptor B at 6p21.3, retinoid X receptor G at 1q21, and RA receptor A at 17q21. Three of the four retinol-binding proteins at 3q23 and 10q23 and the RA-degrading cytochrome P450 enzymes at 10q23 and 2p13 map to AD linkages. Synthesis of the evidence supports retinoid hypofunction and impaired transport as contributing factors. These findings suggest testable experiments to determine whether increasing the availability of retinoid in brain, possibly through pharmacologic targeting of the RA receptors and the cytochrome P450 RA-inactivating enzymes, can prevent or decrease amyloid plaque formation. PMID:12604774

  13. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early‐Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei‐Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega‐Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A.; Diehl‐Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P.; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late‐onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole‐genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early‐onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta‐analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60–3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26411346

  14. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole-genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta-analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60-3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated.

  15. Case-control study of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    French, L.R.; Schuman, L.M.; Mortimer, J.A.; Hutton, J.T.; Boatman, R.A.; Christians, B.

    1985-03-01

    A case-control study to assess factors of possible etiologic significance to dementia of the Alzheimer type was conducted with 78 male cases diagnosed in 1979-1982 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and age-race-sex-matched hospital and neighborhood controls (14 of 16 autopsied cases were histopathologically confirmed). Information was obtained on variables relevant to vital, genetic, and immunologic hypotheses, and on possible occupational and environmental exposures, drug use, psychologic stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The only major difference between patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and controls was a significantly greater occurrence of antecedent head trauma in the patients (odds ratio = 4.50). This finding is consistent with the literature on posttraumatic dementia but its importance is presently unclear.

  16. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  17. An advanced white matter tract analysis in frontotemporal dementia and early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mendez, Mario F; Baboyan, Vatche G; Jin, Yan; Melrose, Rebecca J; Jimenez, Elvira E; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-12-01

    Cortical and subcortical nuclei degenerate in the dementias, but less is known about changes in the white matter tracts that connect them. To better understand white matter changes in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), we used a novel approach to extract full 3D profiles of fiber bundles from diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and map white matter abnormalities onto detailed models of each pathway. The result is a spatially complex picture of tract-by-tract microstructural changes. Our atlas of tracts for each disease consists of 21 anatomically clustered and recognizable white matter tracts generated from whole-brain tractography in 20 patients with bvFTD, 23 with age-matched EOAD, and 33 healthy elderly controls. To analyze the landscape of white matter abnormalities, we used a point-wise tract correspondence method along the 3D profiles of the tracts and quantified the pathway disruptions using common diffusion metrics - fractional anisotropy, mean, radial, and axial diffusivity. We tested the hypothesis that bvFTD and EOAD are associated with preferential degeneration in specific neural networks. We mapped axonal tract damage that was best detected with mean and radial diffusivity metrics, supporting our network hypothesis, highly statistically significant and more sensitive than widely studied fractional anisotropy reductions. From white matter diffusivity, we identified abnormalities in bvFTD in all 21 tracts of interest but especially in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus, frontal callosum, anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum bundles and left superior longitudinal fasciculus. This network of white matter alterations extends beyond the most commonly studied tracts, showing greater white matter abnormalities in bvFTD versus controls and EOAD patients. In EOAD, network alterations involved more posterior white matter - the parietal sector of the corpus callosum and parahipoccampal cingulum bilaterally

  18. Disrupted rich club network in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mezher, Adam; Mendez, Mario F.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    In network analysis, the so-called ‘rich club’ describes the core areas of the brain that are more densely interconnected among themselves than expected by chance, and has been identified as a fundamental aspect of the human brain connectome. This is the first in-depth diffusion imaging study to investigate the rich club along with other organizational changes in the brain's anatomical network in behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and a matched cohort with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Our study sheds light on how bvFTD and EOAD affect connectivity of white matter fiber pathways in the brain, revealing differences and commonalities in the connectome among the dementias. To analyze the breakdown in connectivity, we studied 3 groups: 20 bvFTD, 23 EOAD and 37 healthy elderly controls. All participants were scanned with diffusion-weighted MRI, and based on whole-brain probabilistic tractography and cortical parcellations, we analyzed the rich club of the brain's connectivity network. This revealed distinct patterns of disruption in both forms of dementia. In the connectome, we detected less disruption overall in EOAD than in bvFTD (False Discovery Rate (FDR) critical Pperm=5.7×10−3, 10,000 permutations), with more involvement of richly interconnected areas of the brain (chi-squared PΧ2=1.4×10−4) – predominantly posterior cognitive alterations. In bvFTD, we found a greater spread of disruption including the rich club (FDR critical Pperm=6×10−4), but especially more peripheral alterations (PΧ2=6.5×10−3), particularly in medial frontal areas of the brain, in line with the known behavioral socioemotional deficits seen in these patients. PMID:26678225

  19. Evidence that the APOE locus influences rate of disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.; Crawford, F.; Osborne, A.; Diaz, P.

    1995-02-27

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosome 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and non-stringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease free survival age within late onset families. One explanation for the age dependent association reported by other groups, and our results, is that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease process in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause the disease. We suggest this hypothesis is compatible with the current literature regarding APOE and AD. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Diagnostic criteria for primary neuronal degeneration of the Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Eisdorfer, C; Cohen, D

    1980-10-01

    The diagnosis of patients presenting with memory or attentional deficits characteristic of dementia is a growing problem. Dementia may be symptomatic of a range of reversible medical and psychiatric conditions which appear to be indistinguishable from primary neuronal degeneration of the Alzheimer's type. While Alzheimer's disease is a neuropathological diagnosis, the importance of establishing a presumptive diagnosis which can be employed for investigational as well as clinical use is underscored. This paper proposes a diagnostic schema which reflects the current understanding of this disorder. There must be evidence of gradual progressive mental deterioration in attention, learning, memory, cognitive style, motivation, and higher order thinking. A comprehensive medical and psychiatric evaluation is obligatory to eliminate reversible physical illness, psychiatric disorder, or cerebrovascular condition as underlying causes of cognitive dysfunction.

  1. A novel presenilin 1 mutation (Ala275Val) as cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Luedecke, Daniel; Becktepe, Jos S; Lehmbeck, Jan T; Finckh, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Raina; Jahn, Holger; Boelmans, Kai

    2014-04-30

    Mutations in the presenilin 1 (PS1) gene (PSEN1) are associated with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD). Here, we report on a 50-year-old patient presenting with progressive deterioration of his short-term memory and a family history of early-onset dementia. Diagnostic workup included a neuropsychological examination, structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total tau, phosphorylated tau, and Aβ42 levels, as well as sequencing relevant fragments of the genes PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP. Additionally, we were able to obtain archival paraffin-embedded cerebellar tissue from the patient's father for cosegregation analysis. Clinical, neuropsychological and MR imaging data were indicative of early-onset Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers showed a typical pattern for Alzheimer disease. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous nucleotide transition (c.824C>T) in exon 8 of PSEN1, leading to an amino acid change from alanine to valine at codon 275 (Ala275Val). The same mutation was found in an archival brain specimen of the patient's demented father, but not in a blood sample of the non-demented mother. This mutation alters a conserved residue in the large hydrophilic loop of PS1, suggesting pathogenic relevance. Cosegregegation analysis and the structural as well as the presumed functional role of the mutated and highly conserved residue suggest FAD causing characteristics of the novel PSEN1 mutation Ala275Val.

  2. Over-representation of the APOE*4 allele in autopsy confirmed early- and late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboh, M.I.; DeKosky, S.T.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E binds to {beta}-amyloid peptide in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Recent studies have identified the APOE*4 allele as a major predisposing genetic factor for late-onset familial AD as well as in sporadic AD. Most of these association studies are based on clinically diagnosed AD cases with little data available on autopsy confirmed, definite AD. To characterize the distribution of APOE polymorphism in autopsy confirmed sporadic AD cases, we determined APOE genotypes in 111 DNA samples (aged 51-101 years) extracted from brain tissues which were available from the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. The APOE data was compared between the AD group and 3 samples of population controls from Western Pennsylvania consisting of a young cohort (N=473, aged 18-48 years), middle cohort (N=473, aged 42-50 years) and an old cohort (N=870, aged 65-90 years). The frequency of the APOE*4 allele was similar in the young and middle cohorts (0.12) and slightly lower in the old cohort (0.10). However, the frequency of the APOE*4 allele was three times higher in both early-onset (<65 years; 0.36) and late-onset ({ge}65 years; 0.38) sporadic AD cases compared to the control groups (p<0.0001). In the AD cohort the frequency of the APOE*4 allele was similar across all age groups (<65, 65-75, 76-85, 86+) and so was in men and women (0.40 vs. 0.37). The E*4 homozygosity was observed in 18% of AD cases compared to 1% in each of the three control groups. The E*4 heterozygosity was present in 50% of AD cases compared to 17% in the control old cohort and 22% in both the young and middle control cohorts. These data confirm that the APOE*4 allele is a major risk factor for AD regardless of age-at-diagnosis or family history.

  3. Comparison between Early-Onset and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Amnestic Presentation: CSF and 18F-FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Koch, Giacomo; Toniolo, Sofia; Belli, Lorena; Lorenzo, Francesco Di; Gaudenzi, Sara; Schillaci, Orazio; Bozzali, Marco; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Martorana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the differences in brain glucose consumption between patients with early onset of Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, aged ≤65 years) and patients with late onset of Alzheimer's disease (LOAD, aged >65 years). Methods Differences in brain glucose consumption between the groups have been evaluated by means of Statistical Parametric Mapping version 8, with the use of age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination and cerebrospinal fluid values of AΒ1-42, phosphorylated Tau and total Tau as covariates in the comparison between EOAD and LOAD. Results As compared to LOAD, EOAD patients showed a significant decrease in glucose consumption in a wide portion of the left parietal lobe (BA7, BA31 and BA40). No significant differences were obtained when subtracting the EOAD from the LOAD group. Conclusions The results of our study show that patients with EOAD show a different metabolic pattern as compared to those with LOAD that mainly involves the left parietal lobe. PMID:27195000

  4. Haloperidol disrupts, clozapine reinstates the circadian rest-activity cycle in a patient with early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wirz-Justice, A; Werth, E; Savaskan, E; Knoblauch, V; Gasio, P F; Müller-Spahn, F

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of the circadian rest-activity cycle in a patient with early-onset Alzheimer disease for 555 days revealed marked changes in the timing and amount of nocturnal activity. After neuroleptic medication was changed to haloperidol, the rest-activity cycle became completely arrhythmic for two months, concomitant with a marked worsening of cognitive state. Circadian integrity returned together with clinical improvement when the patient was subsequently treated with clozapine. This observation suggests that the known tendency for patients with Alzheimer disease to develop sleep-wake cycle disturbances may be aggravated by a classic neuroleptic; in contrast, the atypical neuroleptic clozapine may consolidate it. Similar observations in schizophrenic patients indicate that this chronobiological finding is drug- and not illness-related.

  5. [The Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) and Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) in the diagnosis of Alzheimer type dementia].

    PubMed

    Krzymińska, E; Rossa, G; Krzymiński, S

    1993-01-01

    Described are two scales for the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer type and for identifying its following stages solely on the basis of social functioning and on daily activity level of the patient. The authors of the scale, Resiberg et al. based their findings on the conclusion that dementia of the Alzheimer type is a rare clinical syndrome with a characteristic onset and development which are identical in over 90% of patients. The GDS (Global Deterioration Scale) separates the course of dementia into 6 stages. The FAST (Functional Assessment Scale) separates deterioration into 16 stages. Both scales, especially allow for the systematic tracking of course of the uncomplicated Alzheimer's case. They also show the appearance of any additional somatic and psychopathological factors which cause the state of the patient to appear worst than could result from the current stage the patient is in. They ease the differentiation between dementia of the Alzheimer type and dementia of other aetiology. Apart from these scales, especially the FAST, allow to the estimation with significant accuracy how long the current stage, as well as the whole illness will last in a given patient. Similarly, predictions may be made as to the time and in what order particular life functions will be diminishing in specific patients until the terminal state.

  6. Discovery of gene-gene interactions across multiple independent datasets of Late Onset Alzheimer Disease from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Bush, William S.; Jiang, Lan; Brown-Gentry, Kristin D.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Dudek, Scott M.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Naj, Adam; Kunkle, Brian W.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Martin, Eden R.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has a complex genetic etiology, involving locus heterogeneity, polygenic inheritance and gene-gene interactions; however, the investigation of interactions in recent GWAS has been limited. We used a biological knowledge-driven approach to evaluate gene-gene interactions for consistency across thirteen datasets from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium. Fifteen SNP-SNP pairs within three gene-gene combinations were identified: SIRT1 x ABCB1, PSAP x PEBP4, and GRIN2B x ADRA1A. Additionally, we extend a previously identified interaction from an endophenotype analysis between RYR3 x CACNA1C. Finally, post hoc gene expression analyses of the implicated SNPs further implicate SIRT1 and ABCB1, and implicate CDH23 which was most recently identified as an AD risk locus in an epigenetic analysis of AD. The observed interactions in this manuscript highlight ways in which genotypic variation related to disease may depend on the genetic context in which it occurs. Further, our results highlight the utility of evaluating genetic interactions to explain additional variance in AD risk and identify novel molecular mechanisms of AD pathogenesis. PMID:26827652

  7. Discovery of gene-gene interactions across multiple independent data sets of late onset Alzheimer disease from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Timothy J; Bush, William S; Jiang, Lan; Brown-Gentry, Kristin D; Torstenson, Eric S; Dudek, Scott M; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Naj, Adam; Kunkle, Brian W; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2016-02-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) has a complex genetic etiology, involving locus heterogeneity, polygenic inheritance, and gene-gene interactions; however, the investigation of interactions in recent genome-wide association studies has been limited. We used a biological knowledge-driven approach to evaluate gene-gene interactions for consistency across 13 data sets from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP pairs within 3 gene-gene combinations were identified: SIRT1 × ABCB1, PSAP × PEBP4, and GRIN2B × ADRA1A. In addition, we extend a previously identified interaction from an endophenotype analysis between RYR3 × CACNA1C. Finally, post hoc gene expression analyses of the implicated SNPs further implicate SIRT1 and ABCB1, and implicate CDH23 which was most recently identified as an AD risk locus in an epigenetic analysis of AD. The observed interactions in this article highlight ways in which genotypic variation related to disease may depend on the genetic context in which it occurs. Further, our results highlight the utility of evaluating genetic interactions to explain additional variance in AD risk and identify novel molecular mechanisms of AD pathogenesis.

  8. Common genetic variation within the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 and late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Biechele, Travis; Wavrant De-Vrieze, Fabienne; Avila, Miguel E.; Major, Michael B.; Myers, Amanda; Sáez, Katia; Henríquez, Juan P.; Zhao, Alice; Wollmer, M. Axel; Nitsch, Roger M.; Hock, Christoph; Morris, Chris M.; Hardy, John; Moon, Randall T.

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage studies have defined a broad susceptibility region for late-onset Alzheimer's disease on chromosome 12, which contains the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) gene, a coreceptor for Wnt signaling. Here, we report the association between common LRP6 variants and late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a multicenter case-control series as well as in a large family-based series ascertained by the National Institute of Mental Health–National Institute on Aging Genetics Initiative. As shown in the genome-wide linkage studies, our association depends mainly on apolipoprotein E-ε4 (APOE-ε4) carrier status. Haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a set of seven allelic variants of LRP6 identified a putative risk haplotype, which includes a highly conserved coding sequence SNP: Ile-1062 → Val. Functional analyses revealed that the associated allele Val-1062, an allele previously linked to low bone mass, has decreased β-catenin signaling in HEK293T cells. Our study unveils a genetic relationship between LRP6 and APOE and supports the hypothesis that altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling may be involved in this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:17517621

  9. The midlife cognitive profiles of adults at high risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease: The PREVENT study.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Karen; Carrière, Isabelle; Su, Li; O'Brien, John T; Lovestone, Simon; Wells, Katie; Ritchie, C W

    2017-03-29

    Although biomarker studies of late-onset Alzheimer's disease suggest pathology to be present decades before diagnosis, little is known about cognitive performance at this stage. A sample of 210 adults (aged 40-59) of whom 103 have a parent diagnosed with dementia (family history subgroup) underwent computerized cognitive testing. ApoE status was determined, and 193 subjects had magnetic resonance imaging. Distance from dementia onset was estimated in relation to age of parental diagnosis, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Incidence of Dementia Risk Scores were calculated. Lower hippocampal volumes (P = .04) were associated with poorer spatial location recall and higher Dementia Risk Scores with poorer visual recognition (P = .0005), and lower brain and hippocampal volume (P < .0001, P = .04, respectively). Family history subgroup participants closer to dementia onset had lower scores on visual working memory (P = .05), whereas those with an ApoE ε4 allele performed better on form perception (P = .005). Middle-aged adults at risk of dementia show evidence of poorer cognitive performance, principally in visuospatial functions.

  10. The association between APOE ε4 and Alzheimer-type dementia among memory clinic patients is confined to those with a higher education. The DESCRIPA Study.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Angelique P A; Bosma, Hans; Visser, Pieter-Jelle; Zeegers, Maurice P; Graff, Caroline; Ewers, Michael; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Jones, Roy W; Kehoe, Patrick G; Lenoir, Hermine; Minthon, Lennart; Nobili, Flavio M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie; Scheltens, Philip; Soininen, Hilkka; Spiru, Luiza; Tsolaki, Magda; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Vellas, Bruno; Wilcock, Gordon; Elias-Sonnenschein, Lyzel S; Verhey, Frans R J

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the interaction between the APOE ε4 allele and education level in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) among memory clinic patients from the multicenter DESCRIPA study. Subjects (n = 544) were followed for 1 to 5 years. We used Cox's stratified survival modeling, adjusted for age, gender, and center. APOE ε4 predicted the onset of AD-type dementia in middle (HR 3.45 95% CI 1.79-6.65, n = 222) and high (HR 3.67 95% CI 1.36-9.89, n = 139) but not in low educated subjects (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.38-1.72, n = 183). This suggests that mechanisms in developing Alzheimer-type dementia may differ between educational groups that raises questions related to Alzheimer-type dementia prevention.

  11. Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the link to tyrosine hydroxylase and probable nutritional strategies.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Shahida, Khan; Gan, Siew Hua; Firoz, Ck; Khan, Aziz; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Kamal, Warda; Kamal, Mohammad A; Tan, Yi; Qu, Xianqin; Reale, Marcella

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are chronic health disorders that affect millions of people around the world. According to recent studies, there are molecular similarities in the inflammatory pathways involved in both AD and T2DM, which opens a new avenue for researchers with different perspectives to target the cause of these diseases rather than their obvious symptoms. Several links between inflammation, cardiovascular disease, T2DM and central nervous system disorders such as AD and Parkinson's disease have been elucidated. Mutations in the hippocampal-β-amyloid precursor protein gene in genetically high-risk individuals have been shown to cause the early onset of AD symptoms. The overexpression of β-amyloid protein in the hippocampal region and the synaptotoxicity that occurs as a result have been considered a typical feature of AD and leads to neuronal loss and cognitive decline. However, the identity of the cellular components that cause the late onset of the disease seen in the majority of the cases is still unknown. Synaptic insults associated with neuronal dysfunction may involve several cascades and molecules, one of which has been hypothesized to be tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The axons of the noradrenergic cells that project to the hippocampus appear to be affected by the β-amyloid protein, which subsequently contributes to TH loss in Alzheimer brain cells. In this review, we attempt to shed light on the important mechanisms involved in AD as well as T2DM such as inflammatory factors, abnormalities in the insulin signaling system and the possible role of the endocrine enzyme TH.

  12. Infantile childhood onset of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Santorelli, Filippo; Bertini, Enrico; Balestri, Martina; Cursi, Laura; Tessa, Alessandra; Pierelli, Francesco; Casali, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a late-onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia caused by triplet CAG/CTG expansion in the ATX2 gene. The initial symptoms usually appear when subjects are in their 30s.Pediatric onset is less common and usually associated with larger triplet expansions. We here report the case of a 1-year-old girl who presented with facial dysmorphism,dystonic features, developmental delay, and retinitis pigmentosa.She was diagnosed as carrying an expanded CAG/CTG tract (92 repeats) before a molecular diagnosis of SCA2 was made in her father. Facial dysmorphism associated with developmental delay and retinitis pigmentosa in early childhood should prompt a careful family investigation for ataxia and study of ATX2.

  13. Specific BACE1 genotypes provide additional risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease in APOE epsilon 4 carriers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Gabriel; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, François R; Michon, Agnès; Mulligan, Reinhild; Duriaux Saïl, Geneviève; Bouras, Constantin; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2003-05-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized neuropathologically by neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. A key component of plaques is A beta, a polypeptide derived from A beta-precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic cleavage catalyzed by beta and gamma-secretase. We hypothesized that sequence variation in genes BACE1 (on chromosome 11q23.3) and BACE2 (on chromosome 21q22.3), which encode two closely related proteases that seem to act as the APP beta-secretase, may represent a genetic risk factor for AD. We analyzed the frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BACE1 and BACE2 genes in a community-based sample of 96 individuals with late-onset AD and 170 controls selected randomly among residents of the same community. The genotype data in both study groups did not demonstrate any association between AD and BACE1 or BACE2. After stratification for APOE status, however, an association between a BACE1 polymorphism located within codon V262 and AD in APOE epsilon 4 carriers was observed (P = 0.03). We conclude that sequence variation in the BACE1 or BACE 2 gene is not a significant risk factor for AD; however, a combination of a specific BACE1 allele and APOE epsilon 4 may increase the risk for Alzheimer disease over and above that attributed to APOE epsilon 4 alone.

  14. Early role of vascular dysregulation on late-onset Alzheimer's disease based on multifactorial data-driven analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iturria-Medina, Y.; Sotero, R. C.; Toussaint, P. J.; Mateos-Pérez, J. M.; Evans, A. C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Mesulam, M Marcel; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, AnnMarie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms underlying late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) are poorly characterized from an integrative perspective. Here spatiotemporal alterations in brain amyloid-β deposition, metabolism, vascular, functional activity at rest, structural properties, cognitive integrity and peripheral proteins levels are characterized in relation to LOAD progression. We analyse over 7,700 brain images and tens of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Through a multifactorial data-driven analysis, we obtain dynamic LOAD–abnormality indices for all biomarkers, and a tentative temporal ordering of disease progression. Imaging results suggest that intra-brain vascular dysregulation is an early pathological event during disease development. Cognitive decline is noticeable from initial LOAD stages, suggesting early memory deficit associated with the primary disease factors. High abnormality levels are also observed for specific proteins associated with the vascular system's integrity. Although still subjected to the sensitivity of the algorithms and biomarkers employed, our results might contribute to the development of preventive therapeutic interventions. PMID:27327500

  15. Gene Interactions and Structural Brain Change in Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subjects Using the Pipeline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Zamanyan, Alen; Shi, Ran; Genco, Alex; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article investigates subjects aged 55 to 65 from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database to broaden our understanding of early-onset (EO) cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers. Methods Nine of the subjects had EO-AD (Alzheimer's disease) and 27 had EO-MCI (mild cognitive impairment). The 15 most important neuroimaging markers were extracted with the Global Shape Analysis (GSA) Pipeline workflow. The 20 most significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were chosen and were associated with specific neuroimaging biomarkers. Results We identified associations between the neuroimaging phenotypes and genotypes for a total of 36 subjects. Our results for all the subjects taken together showed the most significant associations between rs7718456 and L_hippocampus (volume), and between rs7718456 and R_hippocampus (volume). For the 27 MCI subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs6446443 and R_superior_frontal_gyrus (volume), and between rs17029131 and L_Precuneus (volume). For the nine AD subjects, we found the most significant associations between rs16964473 and L_rectus gyrus (surface area), and between rs12972537 and L_rectus_gyrus (surface area). Conclusion We observed significant correlations between the SNPs and the neuroimaging phenotypes in the 36 EO subjects in terms of neuroimaging genetics. However, larger sample sizes are needed to ensure that the effects will be detectable for a reasonable false-positive error rate using the GSA and Plink Pipeline workflows. PMID:25670955

  16. In their own words: The experience and needs of children in younger-onset Alzheimer's disease and other dementias families.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Caroline Rosenthal; Rhames, Kate

    2016-05-26

    Because of the age of persons diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer's disease or other dementias (YOD), an important and as yet relatively little explored area of YOD, particularly in the United States, is the impact on young children of having a parent with YOD. After reviewing the small but growing research in this area, we report on findings from 12 in-depth interviews with children and well-parents in families with a parent with YOD on the experience and needs of children having a parent with this diagnosis. Children report disruption in many aspects of their lives: their developmental trajectory, emotional and psychological development, familial and broader social relationships, and financial stability. Despite these significant disruptions, and a dearth of information, resources, and services tailored to their individual and familial needs, these children demonstrate remarkable resilience and self-awareness. We discuss implications for interventions with these families.

  17. De novo deleterious genetic variations target a biological network centered on Aβ peptide in early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Nicolas, G; Seaman, M N J; Pottier, C; Breusegem, S Y; Mathur, P P; Jenardhanan, P; Le Guennec, K; Mukadam, A S; Quenez, O; Coutant, S; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Boland, A; Deleuze, J-F; Frebourg, T; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that de novo variants (DNV) might participate in the genetic determinism of sporadic early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD, onset before 65 years). We investigated 14 sporadic EOAD trios first by array-comparative genomic hybridization. Two patients carried a de novo copy number variation (CNV). We then performed whole-exome sequencing in the 12 remaining trios and identified 12 non-synonymous DNVs in six patients. The two de novo CNVs (an amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication and a BACE2 intronic deletion) and 3/12 non-synonymous DNVs (in PSEN1, VPS35 and MARK4) targeted genes from a biological network centered on the Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. We showed that this a priori-defined genetic network was significantly enriched in amino acid-altering DNV, compared with the rest of the exome. The causality of the APP de novo duplication (which is the first reported one) was obvious. In addition, we provided evidence of the functional impact of the following three non-synonymous DNVs targeting this network: the novel PSEN1 variant resulted in exon 9 skipping in patient's RNA, leading to a pathogenic missense at exons 8-10 junction; the VPS35 missense variant led to partial loss of retromer function, which may impact neuronal APP trafficking and Aβ secretion; and the MARK4 multiple nucleotide variant resulted into increased Tau phosphorylation, which may trigger enhanced Aβ-induced toxicity. Despite the difficulty to recruit Alzheimer disease (AD) trios owing to age structures of the pedigrees and the genetic heterogeneity of the disease, this strategy allowed us to highlight the role of de novo pathogenic events, the putative involvement of new genes in AD genetics and the key role of Aβ network alteration in AD.

  18. Late-onset bipolar illness: the geriatric bipolar type VI.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jean-Michel; Kaladjian, Arthur; Adida, Marc; Fakra, Eric

    2012-03-01

    In parallel to considerable progress in understanding and treatment of bipolarity and despite growing interest in old age psychiatry, late-onset bipolar illness (LOBI) has remained relatively understudied so far, probably in reason of its complexity. To update available data, a systematic review was conducted, focusing on the main issues addressed in literature in regard to this topic. In addition to data on epidemiology, clinical features and treatment, five main issues could be identified: LOBI as secondary disorder, LOBI as expression of a lower vulnerability to the disease, LOBI as subform of pseudodementia, LOBI as risk factor for developing dementia, and LOBI as bipolar type VI (bipolarity in the context of dementia like processes). Levels of available evidence were found to vary according to the addressed issue. Although the concept of bipolar type VI could be criticized for subsuming under one single heading all the four other issues, this concept may be of pragmatic value in helping clinicians to orientate both diagnosis process and treatment decisions. Among others, the question as to whether some forms of bipolar type VI could constitute a special risk factor for developing dementia deserves further investigation. More studies are also needed to better disentangle the effects of age at onset from those of age itself.

  19. Elevated galanin may predict the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus for development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrated that type 2 diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, i.e., the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are frequently companied with Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Despite many studies recently probed into the comorbid state of both diseases, so far the precise mechanism for this association is poorly understood. Emerging evidences suggest that defects in galanin play a central role on type 2 diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. This review provides a new insight into the multivariate relationship among galanin, type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the effect of galanin system on the cross-talk between both diseases in human and rodent models. The current data support that activating central GalR2 attenuates insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease feature in animal models. These may help us better understanding the pathogenesis of both diseases and provide useful hints for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. The role of variation at AβPP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT in late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Amy; Russo, Giancarlo; Richards, Alexander; Moskvina, Valentina; Ivanov, Dobril; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Chapman, Jade; Hamshere, Marian; Pahwa, Jaspreet Singh; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad R; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle S; Passmore, Peter A; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Johnston, Janet A; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Kölsch, Heike; Heun, Reinhard; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison M; Kauwe, John S K; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C; Mayo, Kevin; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew B; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Pankratz, V Shane; Younkin, Steven G; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter A; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Williams, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Rare mutations in AβPP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 cause uncommon early onset forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and common variants in MAPT are associated with risk of other neurodegenerative disorders. We sought to establish whether common genetic variation in these genes confer risk to the common form of AD which occurs later in life (>65 years). We therefore tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms at these loci for association with late-onset AD (LOAD) in a large case-control sample consisting of 3,940 cases and 13,373 controls. Single-marker analysis did not identify any variants that reached genome-wide significance, a result which is supported by other recent genome-wide association studies. However, we did observe a significant association at the MAPT locus using a gene-wide approach (p = 0.009). We also observed suggestive association between AD and the marker rs9468, which defines the H1 haplotype, an extended haplotype that spans the MAPT gene and has previously been implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. In summary common variants at AβPP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 and MAPT are unlikely to make strong contributions to susceptibility for LOAD. However, the gene-wide effect observed at MAPT indicates a possible contribution to disease risk which requires further study.

  1. A Mutation in DAOA Modifies the Age of Onset in PSEN1 E280A Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Jorge I.; Rivera, Dora; Mastronardi, Claudio A.; Patel, Hardip R.; Tobón, Carlos; Villegas, Andrés; Cai, Yeping; Easteal, Simon; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported age of onset (AOO) modifier genes in the world's largest pedigree segregating early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), caused by the p.Glu280Ala (E280A) mutation in the PSEN1 gene. Here we report the results of a targeted analysis of functional exonic variants in those AOO modifier genes in sixty individuals with PSEN1 E280A AD who were whole-exome genotyped for ~250,000 variants. Standard quality control, filtering, and annotation for functional variants were applied, and common functional variants located in those previously reported as AOO modifier loci were selected. Multiloci linear mixed-effects models were used to test the association between these variants and AOO. An exonic missense mutation in the G72 (DAOA) gene (rs2391191, P = 1.94 × 10−4, PFDR = 9.34 × 10−3) was found to modify AOO in PSEN1 E280A AD. Nominal associations of missense mutations in the CLUAP1 (rs9790, P = 7.63 × 10−3, PFDR = 0.1832) and EXOC2 (rs17136239, P = 0.0325, PFDR = 0.391) genes were also found. Previous studies have linked polymorphisms in the DAOA gene with the occurrence of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy, aggression, delusions, hallucinations, and psychosis in AD. Our findings strongly suggest that this new conspicuous functional AOO modifier within the G72 (DAOA) gene could be pivotal for understanding the genetic basis of AD. PMID:26949549

  2. Segregation analysis of Alzheimer pedigrees: Rare Mendelian dominant mutation(s) explain a minority of early-onset cases

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.; Campion, D.; Babron, M.C.; Darpoux, F.C.

    1996-02-16

    Segregation analysis of Alzheimer disease (AD) in 92 families ascertained through early-onset ({le}age 60 years) AD (EOAD) probands has been carried out, allowing for a mixture in AD inheritance among probands. The goal was to quantify the proportion of probands that could be explained by autosomal inheritance of a rare disease allele {open_quotes}a{close_quotes} at a Mendelian dominant gene (MDG). Our data provide strong evidence for a mixture of two distributions; AD transmission is fully explained by MDG inheritance in <20% of probands. Male and female age-of-onset distributions are significantly different for {open_quotes}AA{close_quote} but not for {open_quotes}aA{close_quote} subjects. For {open_quotes}aA{close_quote} subjects the estimated penetrance value was close to 1 by age 60. For {open_quotes}AA{close_quotes} subjects, it reaches, by age 90, 10% (males) and 30% (females). We show a clear cutoff in the posterior probability of being an MDG case. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Regulatable transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease: onset, reversibility and spreading of Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Hochgräfe, Katja; Sydow, Astrid; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2013-09-01

    Accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins such as Tau is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease and fronto-temporal dementias. To link Tau pathology to cognitive impairments and defects in synaptic plasticity, we created four inducible Tau transgenic mouse models with expression of pro- and anti-aggregant variants of either full-length human Tau (hTau40/ΔK280 and hTau40/ΔK280/PP) or the truncated Tau repeat domain (Tau(RD)/ΔK280 and Tau(RD)/ΔK280/PP). Here we review the histopathological features caused by pro-aggregant Tau, and correlate them with behavioral deficits and impairments in synaptic transmission. Both pro-aggregant Tau variants cause Alzheimer-like features, including synapse loss, mis-localization of Tau into the somatodendritic compartment, conformational changes and hyperphosphorylation. However, there is a clear difference in the extent of Tau aggregation and neurotoxicity. While pro-aggregant full-length hTau40/ΔK280 leads to a 'pre-tangle' pathology, the repeat domain Tau(RD)/ΔK280 causes massive formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, both Tau variants cause co-aggregation of human and mouse Tau and similar functional impairments. Thus, earlier Tau pathological stages and not necessarily neurofibrillary tangles are critical for the development of cognitive malfunctions. Most importantly, memory and synapses recover after switching off expression of pro-aggregant Tau. The rescue of functional impairments correlates with the rescue of most Tau pathological changes and most strikingly the recovery of synapses. This implies that tauopathies as such are reversible, provided that amyloidogenic Tau is removed. Therefore, our Tau transgenic mice may serve as model systems for in vivo validation of therapeutic strategies and drug candidates with regard to cognition and synaptic function.

  4. A preliminary study of the whole-genome expression profile of sporadic and monogenic early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Altirriba, Jordi; Botta-Orfila, Teresa; Balasa, Mircea; Fernández, Manel; Ferrer, Isidre; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative dementia. Approximately 10% of cases present at an age of onset before 65 years old, which in turn can be monogenic familial AD (FAD) or sporadic early-onset AD (sEOAD). Mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP genes have been linked with FAD. The aim of our study is to describe the brain whole-genome RNA expression profile of the posterior cingulate area in sEOAD and FAD caused by PSEN1 mutations (FAD-PSEN1). Fourteen patients (7 sEOAD and 7 FAD-PSEN1) and 7 neurologically healthy control subjects were selected and whole-genome expression was measured using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 microarrays. We identified statistically significant expression changes in sEOAD and FAD-PSEN1 brains with respect to control subjects (3183 and 3350 differentially expressed genes [DEG] respectively, false discovery rate-corrected p < 0.05). Of them, 1916 DEG were common between the 2 comparisons. We did not identify DEG between sEOAD and FAD-PSEN1. Microarray data were validated through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In silico analysis of DEG revealed an alteration in biological pathways related to intracellular signaling pathways (particularly calcium signaling), neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions, axon guidance, and long-term potentiation in both groups of patients. In conclusion, the altered biological final pathways in sEOAD and FAD-PSEN1 are mainly related with cell signaling cascades, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes. We hypothesize that these 2 groups of early-onset AD with distinct etiologies and likely different could present a neurodegenerative process with potential different pathways that might converge in a common and similar final stage of the disease.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 modifies age-at-onset of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ju; Oliveira, Sofia A; Xu, Puting; Martin, Eden R; Stenger, Judith E; Scherzer, Clemens R; Hauser, Michael A; Scott, William K; Small, Gary W; Nance, Martha A; Watts, Ray L; Hubble, Jean P; Koller, William C; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Mathew B; Hiner, Bradley C; Jankovic, Joseph; Goetz, Christopher G; Mastaglia, Frank; Middleton, Lefkos T; Roses, Allen D; Saunders, Ann M; Schmechel, Donald E; Gullans, Steven R; Haines, Jonathan L; Gilbert, John R; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Hulette, Christine; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2003-12-15

    We previously reported genetic linkage of loci controlling age-at-onset in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) to a 15 cM region on chromosome 10q. Given the large number of genes in this initial starting region, we applied the process of 'genomic convergence' to prioritize and reduce the number of candidate genes for further analysis. As our second convergence factor we performed gene expression studies on hippocampus obtained from AD patients and controls. Analysis revealed that four of the genes [stearoyl-CoA desaturase; NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 1 beta subcomplex 8; protease, serine 11; and glutathione S-transferase, omega-1 (GSTO1)] were significantly different in their expression between AD and controls and mapped to the 10q age-at-onset linkage region, the first convergence factor. Using 2814 samples from our AD dataset (1773 AD patients) and 1362 samples from our PD dataset (635 PD patients), allelic association studies for age-at-onset effects in AD and PD revealed no association for three of the candidates, but a significant association was found for GSTO1 (P=0.007) and a second transcribed member of the GST omega class, GSTO2 (P=0.005), located next to GSTO1. The functions of GSTO1 and GSTO2 are not well understood, but recent data suggest that GSTO1 maybe involved in the post-translational modification of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta. This is provocative given reports of the possible role of inflammation in these two neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  7. Linking insulin with Alzheimer's disease: emergence as type III diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sara; Mahmood, Zahra; Zahid, Saadia

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has characteristic neuropathological abnormalities including regionalized neurodegeneration, neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition, activation of pro-apoptotic genes, and oxidative stress. As the brain functions continue to disintegrate, there is a decline in person's cognitive abilities, memory, mood, spontaneity, and socializing behavior. A framework that sequentially interlinks all these phenomenons under one event is lacking. Accumulating evidence has indicated the role of insulin deficiency and insulin resistance as mediators of AD neurodegeneration. Herein, we reviewed the evidence stemming from the development of diabetes agent-induced AD animal model. Striking evidence has attributed loss of insulin receptor-bearing neurons to precede or accompany initial stage of AD. This state seems to progress with AD such that, in the terminal stages, it worsens and becomes global. Oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, APP-Aβ deposition, and impaired glucose and energy metabolism have all been linked to perturbation in insulin/IGF signaling. We conclude that AD could be referred to as "type 3 diabetes". Moreover, owing to common pathophysiology with diabetes common therapeutic regime could be effective for AD patients.

  8. Can Alzheimer disease be a form of type 3 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Accardi, Giulia; Caruso, Calogero; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Camarda, Cecilia; Monastero, Roberto; Candore, Giuseppina

    2012-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and metabolic syndrome are two highly prevalent pathological conditions of Western society due to incorrect diet, lifestyle, and vascular risk factors. Recent data have suggested metabolic syndrome as an independent risk factor for AD and pre-AD syndrome. Furthermore, biological plausibility for this relationship has been framed within the "metabolic cognitive syndrome" concept. Due to the increasing aging of populations, prevalence of AD in Western industrialized countries will rise in the near future. Thus, new knowledge in the area of molecular biology and epigenetics will probably help to make an early molecular diagnosis of dementia. An association between metabolic syndrome and specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene INPPL1, encoding for SHIP2, a SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase involved in insulin signaling, has been described. According to recent data suggesting that Type 2 diabetes represents an independent risk factor for AD and pre-AD, preliminary results of a case-control study performed to test the putative association between three SNPs in the SHIP2 gene and AD show a trend toward association of these SNPs with AD.

  9. Alzheimer type II astrocytes in the brains of pigs with salt poisoning (water deprivation/intoxication).

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W; Blumbergs, P C; Williamson, M M

    2010-10-01

    The finding of Alzheimer type II astrocytes, in addition to the pathognomonic combination of laminar cerebrocortical necrosis and eosinophil infiltration, in the brains of pigs is reported for the first time in cases of indirect salt poisoning following water deprivation.

  10. Variants in the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA7), Apolipoprotein E ε4, and the Risk of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Jun, Gyungah; Naj, Adam; Rajbhandary, Ruchita; Vardarajan, Badri Narayan; Wang, Li-San; Valladares, Otto; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Larson, Eric B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Evans, Denis; De Jager, Philip L.; Crane, Paul K.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Murrell, Jill R.; Raj, Towfique; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Logue, Mark; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Green, Robert C.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Go, Rodney C. P.; Griffith, Patrick; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Lopez, Oscar L.; Bennett, David A.; Hendrie, Hugh; Hall, Kathleen S.; Goate, Alison M.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Importance Genetic variants associated with susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer disease are known for individuals of European ancestry, but whether the same or different variants account for the genetic risk of Alzheimer disease in African American individuals is unknown. Identification of disease-associated variants helps identify targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment. Objective To identify genetic loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease in African Americans. Design, Setting, and Participants The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) assembled multiple data sets representing a total of 5896 African Americans (1968 case participants, 3928 control participants) 60 years or older that were collected between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites. The association of Alzheimer disease with genotyped and imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was assessed in case-control and in family-based data sets. Results from individual data sets were combined to perform an inverse variance–weighted meta-analysis, first with genome-wide analyses and subsequently with gene-based tests for previously reported loci. Main Outcomes and Measures Presence of Alzheimer disease according to standardized criteria. Results Genome-wide significance in fully adjusted models (sex, age, APOE genotype, population stratification) was observed for a SNP in ABCA7 (rs115550680, allele = G; frequency, 0.09 cases and 0.06 controls; odds ratio [OR], 1.79 [95% CI, 1.47-2.12]; P = 2.2 × 10–9), which is in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs previously associated with Alzheimer disease in Europeans (0.8Alzheimer disease but not reaching significance in genome-wide analyses were replicated in gene-based analyses

  11. A scan of chromosome 10 identifies a novel locus showing strong association with late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S K; Maxwell, Taylor J; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O'Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10-specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P < .05). Five of these markers replicated at P < .05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P = .0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  12. "Boomerang Neuropathology" of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease is Shrouded in Harmful "BDDS": Breathing, Diet, Drinking, and Sleep During Aging.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-07-01

    Brain damage begins years before substantial neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's dementia. Crucial fundamental activities of life are breathing, eating, drinking, and sleeping. When these pivotal functions are maligned over a prolonged period, they impart escalating dyshomeostasis. The latter may lead to disastrous consequences including cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current theme here is that multiple pathophysiological derangements are promoted over a prolonged period by the very fundamental activities of life-when "rendered unhealthy." They may converge on several regulating/modulating factors (e.g., mitochondrial energy production, oxidative stress, innate immunity, and vascular function) and promote insidious neuropathology that culminates in cognitive decline in the aged. This is of course associated with the accumulation of amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Epidemiological, biomarker, and neuroimaging studies have provided significant copious evidence on the presence of indolent prodromal AD neuropathology many years prior to symptomatic onset. Progressive oxidative damage to specific gene promoters may result in gene silencing. A mechanistic link may possibly exist between epigenomic state, DNA damage, and chronically unhealthy/dysfunctional body systems. This paper, therefore, addresses and delineates the deleterious pathophysiological impact triggered by dysfunctional breathing, harmful diet, excess of alcohol consumption, and sleep deprivation; indeed, their impact may alter epigenetic state. It is mandatory, therefore, to abrogate cognitive decline and attenuate AD pathology through adoption of a healthy lifestyle, in conjunction with combination therapy with known moderators of cognitive decline. This strategy may thwart multiple concurrent and synergistic pathologies, including epigenetic dysfunction. A multi-factorial therapeutic intervention is required to overcome wide ranging neuropathology and multi

  13. Experimental induction of type 2 diabetes in aging-accelerated mice triggered Alzheimer-like pathology and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C; Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD.

  14. Association between Mitofusin 2 Gene Polymorphisms and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jong; Park, Jin Kyung; Kang, Won Sub; Kim, Su Kang; Han, Changsu; Na, Hae Ri; Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Young Youl; Park, Moon Ho

    2017-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent and early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The morphologic changes observed in the AD brain could be caused by a failure of mitochondrial fusion mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms of two genes involved in mitochondrial fusion mechanisms, optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) and mitofusin 2 (MFN2), were associated with AD in the Korean population by analyzing genotypes and allele frequencies. Methods One coding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the MFN2, rs1042837, and two coding SNPs in the OPA1, rs7624750 and rs9851685, were compared between 165 patients with AD (83 men and 82 women, mean age 72.3±4.41) and 186 healthy control subjects (82 men and 104 women, mean age 76.5±5.98). Results Among these three SNPs, rs1042837 showed statistically significant differences in allele frequency, and genotype frequency in the co-dominant 1 model and in the dominant model. Conclusion These results suggest that the rs1042837 polymorphism in MFN2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:28096879

  15. Assessment of the genetic variance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Hoyt, Kaitlyn B; Boehme, Kevin; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Kauwe, John S K

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex genetic disorder with no effective treatments. More than 20 common markers have been identified, which are associated with AD. Recently, several rare variants have been identified in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), Triggering Receptor Expressed On Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) and Unc-5 Netrin Receptor C (UNC5C) that affect risk for AD. Despite the many successes, the genetic architecture of AD remains unsolved. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to (1) estimate phenotypic variance explained by genetics; (2) calculate genetic variance explained by known AD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); and (3) identify the genomic locations of variation that explain the remaining unexplained genetic variance. In total, 53.24% of phenotypic variance is explained by genetics, but known AD SNPs only explain 30.62% of the genetic variance. Of the unexplained genetic variance, approximately 41% is explained by unknown SNPs in regions adjacent to known AD SNPs, and the remaining unexplained genetic variance outside these regions.

  16. Rare Functional Variant in TM2D3 is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Megan L.; Naj, Adam; Vronskaya, Maria; DeStefano, Anita L.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Smith, Albert V.; Amin, Najaf; Sims, Rebecca; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Lopez, Oscar L.; Beiser, Alexa; Ikram, M. Arfan; Garcia, Melissa E.; Hayward, Caroline; Ripatti, Samuli; Franks, Paul W.; Hallmans, Göran; Rolandsson, Olov; Jansson, Jan-Håkon; Porteous, David J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Levy, Daniel; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Emilsson, Valur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Aspelund, Thor; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Wang, Li-San; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shulman, Joshua M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    We performed an exome-wide association analysis in 1393 late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) cases and 8141 controls from the CHARGE consortium. We found that a rare variant (P155L) in TM2D3 was enriched in Icelanders (~0.5% versus <0.05% in other European populations). In 433 LOAD cases and 3903 controls from the Icelandic AGES sub-study, P155L was associated with increased risk and earlier onset of LOAD [odds ratio (95% CI) = 7.5 (3.5–15.9), p = 6.6x10-9]. Mutation in the Drosophila TM2D3 homolog, almondex, causes a phenotype similar to loss of Notch/Presenilin signaling. Human TM2D3 is capable of rescuing these phenotypes, but this activity is abolished by P155L, establishing it as a functionally damaging allele. Our results establish a rare TM2D3 variant in association with LOAD susceptibility, and together with prior work suggests possible links to the β-amyloid cascade. PMID:27764101

  17. The onset of galactic winds in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Tucker, W.; David, L. P.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers report on a program using Einstein x ray observations of the x ray spectra and surface brightness profiles (or extents) of a large sample of early-type (elliptical and SO) galaxies for which the goal is to determine the critical optical luminosity for which galactic winds are important. For galaxies in which the x ray emission is dominated by hydrostatic coronae, the x ray spectra will be relatively soft (characterized by a temperature of approx. 10 to the 7th power K), while for galaxies with a galactic wind, the emission will be dominated by the spectrally harder discrete sources (since the x ray emission from the wind is essentially negligible). In this new sample of 180 galaxies, there are 28 early type galaxies with sufficient counts to obtain a spectrum with the Einstein Image Proportional Counter (IPC). This sample more than doubles the total number of early-type galaxies in earlier compilations (Forman, Jones, and Tucker 1985; Canizares et al. 1987). The new spectral observations will help determine the critical optical luminosity for the onset of galactic winds which is important for understanding the chemical evolution of galaxies and of the intergalactic medium. The implications of galactic winds for the heavy element enrichment and energy content of the intracluster medium are discussed.

  18. A novel presenilin 1 mutation (L174 M) in a large Cuban family with early onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bertoli Avella, A M; Marcheco Teruel, B; Llibre Rodriguez, J J; Gomez Viera, N; Borrajero Martinez, I; Severijnen, E A; Joosse, M; van Duijn, C M; Heredero Baute, L; Heutink, P

    2002-10-01

    We studied a Cuban family with presenile dementia (autosomal dominant) consisting of 281 members within six generations, the proband descended from a Spanish founder. Mean age at onset was 59 years of age. Memory impairment was the main symptom in all patients, additionally, ischemic episodes were described in 4 (n = 18) patients. Neuropathological examination of brain material (1 patient) revealed neuronal loss, amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Thirty DNA samples were genotyped (regions on chromosome 1, 3, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 20, and 21). A maximum Lod score of 3.79 at theta = 0 was obtained for marker D14S43, located in a 9-cM interval in which all patients shared the same haplotype. Sequencing of the PSEN1 gene revealed a heterozygous base substitution, C520A (exon 6), which is predicted to cause an amino acid change from leucine to methionine in the TMIII of the presenilin 1 protein. The mutation was found to co-segregate with the disease phenotype and the associated disease haplotype. The C --> A change was not observed in 80 control chromosomes from the Cuban population. Leucine at position 174 is highly conserved among species and is identical in presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 proteins. We propose the L174 M mutation might lead to an abnormal N-terminal and probably C-terminal fragments and malfunction of the protein complex. In conclusion, we found a novel PSEN1 mutation in a large family with clinical and pathological diagnosis of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, which may be relevant for other Hispanic populations.

  19. R47H Variant of TREM2 Associated With Alzheimer Disease in a Large Late-Onset Family

    PubMed Central

    Korvatska, Olena; Leverenz, James B.; Jayadev, Suman; McMillan, Pamela; Kurtz, Irina; Guo, Xindi; Rumbaugh, Malia; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Dorschner, Michael O.; Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Yu, Chang-En; Brkanac, Zoran; Garden, Gwenn A.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The R47H variant in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 gene (TREM2), a modulator of the immune response of microglia, is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Objective To investigate a large family with late-onset AD (LOAD), in which R47H cosegregated with 75% of cases. Design, Setting, and Participants This study includes genetic and pathologic studies of families with LOAD from 1985 to 2014. A total of 131 families with LOAD (751 individuals) were included from the University of Washington Alzheimer Disease Research Center. To identify LOAD genes/risk factors in the LOAD123 family with 21 affected members and 12 autopsies, we sequenced 4 exomes. Candidate variants were tested for cosegregation with the disease. TREM2 R47H was genotyped in an additional 130 families with LOAD. We performed clinical and neuropathological assessments of patients with and without R47H and evaluated the variant's effect on brain pathology, cellular morphology, and expression of microglial markers. Main Outcomes and Measures We assessed the effect of TREM2 genotype on age at onset and disease duration. We compared Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores, presence of α-synuclein and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 aggregates, and additional vascular or Parkinson pathology in TREM2 R47H carriers vs noncarriers. Microglial activation was assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Results Twelve of 16 patients with AD in the LOAD123 family carried R47H. Eleven patients with dementia had apolipoprotein E 4 (ApoE4) and R47H genotypes. We also found a rare missense variant, D353N, in a nominated AD risk gene, unc-5 homolog C (UNC5C), in 5 affected individuals in the LOAD123 family. R47H carriers demonstrated a shortened disease duration (mean [SD], 6.7 [2.8] vs 11.1 [6.6] years; 2-tailed t test; P = .04) and more frequent α-synucleinopathy. The

  20. Increased frequency of T cells expressing IL-10 in Alzheimer disease but not in late-onset depression patients.

    PubMed

    Torres, Karen Cecília; Araújo Pereira, Patrícia; Lima, Giselle Sabrina; Bozzi, Isadora Cristina; Rezende, Vitor Bortolo; Bicalho, Maria Aparecida; Moraes, Edgar Nunes; Miranda, Débora Marques; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2013-12-02

    Higher risk of dementia is expected for patients with late onset depression (LOD) history. The IL-10 polymorphisms are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). On the other hand, there is no study associating IL-10 polymorphisms to LOD. This study aimed to investigate the -1082G/A polymorphism association in LOD, AD patients and controls and also the peripheral expression of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells. It was done in a case-control study comparing immune system phenotype and genetic polymorphism association among control individuals, LOD and AD patients. Participants were 569 subjects composed the genetics sample (249 AD, 222 LOD and 98 controls) from a tertiary medical center based on Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Flow cytometry analysis was performed in 55 people (22 AD patients, 11 LOD patients and 22 controls). A real time PCR for IL-10 SNP (rs 1800896) through genotyping analysis and flow cytometry evaluation of CD4+ T cells expressing IL-10 was done. An increased CD4+ T cells expressing IL-10 were detected only in the AD group. There was no difference detected in allele or genotype analysis for IL-10 polymorphism among LOD, AD patients or controls. IL-10 might have a role in the modulation of immune response in AD patients, however it is not presented in LOD population.

  1. The PREVENT study: a prospective cohort study to identify mid-life biomarkers of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Craig W; Ritchie, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies indicate that significant decreases in the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be obtained by targeting multiple middle-age risk factors. However, as dementia is unlikely to be diagnosed for decades, short-term outcome measures are required. AD biomarker changes precede clinical symptoms by many years, but their sensitivity to mid-life change remains unknown. Methods and analysis PREVENT is a prospective cohort study examining biomarker status at mid-life in at least 150 individuals genetically at high, medium or low risk of late-onset AD. Participants are children of individuals with or without a diagnosed AD allocated to high, medium and low-risk groups according to parental clinical status and ApoE genotype. The biomarkers examined over 2 years are plasma and CSF Aβ42 amyloid, Tau and pTau, proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, medial temporal-lobe atrophy, white matter lesion volume, cognitive performance related to transentorhinal and hippocampal functioning and hypothalamic−pituitary−adrenal and sympathetic axes regulation. Ethics and dissemination Detected pathologies are communicated to the participant's general practitioner with their permission. Risk status by genotype would not be revealed. The results of the study would be published in peer-reviewed journals and validated biomarkers used to construct a randomised controlled intervention study. PMID:23166135

  2. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on memory in animals with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, N V; Poltavtseva, R A; Samokhin, A N; Sukhikh, G T

    2013-11-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells improved spatial memory in bulbectomized mice with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. The positive effect was observed in 1 month after intracerebral transplantation and in 3 months after systemic injection of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. No cases of malignant transformation were noted. These findings indicate prospects of using mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells for the therapy of Alzheimer disease and the possibility of their systemic administration for attaining the therapeutic effect.

  3. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of Alzheimer's, ... two times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease than whites and less likely to have a ...

  4. Integrated systems approach identifies genetic nodes and networks in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Gaiteri, Chris; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Wang, Zhi; McElwee, Joshua; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A.; Zhang, Chunsheng; Xie, Tao; Tran, Linh; Dobrin, Radu; Fluder, Eugene; Clurman, Bruce; Melquist, Stacey; Narayanan, Manikandan; Suver, Christine; Shah, Hardik; Mahajan, Milind; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lamb, John R.; Bennett, David A; Molony, Cliona; Stone, David J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Myers, Amanda J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Neumann, Harald; Zhu, Jun; Emilsson, Valur

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The genetics of complex disease produce alterations in the molecular interactions of cellular pathways whose collective effect may become clear through the organized structure of molecular networks. To characterize molecular systems associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), we constructed gene regulatory networks in 1647 post-mortem brain tissues from LOAD patients and non-demented subjects, and demonstrate that LOAD reconfigures specific portions of the molecular interaction structure. Through an integrative network-based approach, we rank-ordered these network structures for relevance to LOAD pathology, highlighting an immune and microglia-specific module dominated by genes involved in pathogen phagocytosis, containing TYROBP as a key regulator and up-regulated in LOAD. Mouse microglia cells over-expressing intact or truncated TYROBP revealed expression changes that significantly overlapped the human brain TYROBP network. Thus the causal network structure is a useful predictor of response to gene perturbations and presents a novel framework to test models of disease mechanisms underlying LOAD. PMID:23622250

  5. Inhibition of GSK-3 Ameliorates Aβ Pathology in an Adult-Onset Drosophila Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killick, Richard; Augustin, Hrvoje; Gandy, Carina; Allen, Marcus J.; Hardy, John; Lovestone, Simon; Partridge, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Aβ peptide accumulation is thought to be the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with downstream neurotoxic effects including the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is increasingly implicated as playing a pivotal role in this amyloid cascade. We have developed an adult-onset Drosophila model of AD, using an inducible gene expression system to express Arctic mutant Aβ42 specifically in adult neurons, to avoid developmental effects. Aβ42 accumulated with age in these flies and they displayed increased mortality together with progressive neuronal dysfunction, but in the apparent absence of neuronal loss. This fly model can thus be used to examine the role of events during adulthood and early AD aetiology. Expression of Aβ42 in adult neurons increased GSK-3 activity, and inhibition of GSK-3 (either genetically or pharmacologically by lithium treatment) rescued Aβ42 toxicity. Aβ42 pathogenesis was also reduced by removal of endogenous fly tau; but, within the limits of detection of available methods, tau phosphorylation did not appear to be altered in flies expressing Aβ42. The GSK-3–mediated effects on Aβ42 toxicity appear to be at least in part mediated by tau-independent mechanisms, because the protective effect of lithium alone was greater than that of the removal of tau alone. Finally, Aβ42 levels were reduced upon GSK-3 inhibition, pointing to a direct role of GSK-3 in the regulation of Aβ42 peptide level, in the absence of APP processing. Our study points to the need both to identify the mechanisms by which GSK-3 modulates Aβ42 levels in the fly and to determine if similar mechanisms are present in mammals, and it supports the potential therapeutic use of GSK-3 inhibitors in AD. PMID:20824130

  6. Strong association of lipid metabolism related microRNA binding sites polymorphisms with the risk of late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Zhao, Da-Long; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Meng-Shan; Wan, Yu; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Dan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-10-27

    Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) through cell biological and epidemiological studies, genetic studies linking lipid metabolism and LOAD are still not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert post-transcriptional down-regulation and their target sequence on the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR) may be altered by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We therefore explore whether the six loci in Clusterin gene (CLU) (rs9331949), Lipoprotein lipase gene (LPL) (rs1059507, rs3200218, rs3208305, rs3735964) and Low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 (LRP6) (rs2160525) could modulate LOAD risk through the alteration of miRNA binding sites. We performed a case-control study of 2338 unrelated subjects (984 cases and 1354 age- and gender-matched controls) in Northern Han Chinese. We found that the minor C allele in rs9331949 was significantly increased the risk of LOAD (P&lt;0.001, OR=1.31, 95% CI=1.14-1.51), even after adjusting for multiple testing. Logistic analysis identified the rs9331949 polymorphism was still strongly associated with LOAD, even in Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele noncarrier subgroups. However, the other five loci were not significantly associated with LOAD after Bonferroni adjustment. In conclusion, we have identified that the locus (rs9331949) located in the binding site of 3' UTR of CLU has a strong association with LOAD rather than loci in LPL and LRP6. However, additional independent replication is required for further validation.

  7. [Impact of facial emotional recognition alterations in Dementia of the Alzheimer type].

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Wanda; Cossini, Florencia; Politis, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Face recognition of basic emotions is independent of other deficits in dementia of the Alzheimer type. Among these deficits, there is disagreement about what emotions are more difficult to recognize. Our aim was to study the presence of alterations in the process of facial recognition of basic emotions, and to investigate if there were differences in the recognition of each type of emotion in Alzheimer's disease. With three tests of recognition of basic facial emotions we evaluated 29 patients who had been diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer type and 18 control subjects. Significant differences were obtained in tests of recognition of basic facial emotions and between each. Since the amygdala, one of the brain structures responsible for emotional reaction, is affected in the early stages of this disease, our findings become relevant to understand how this alteration of the process of emotional recognition impacts the difficulties these patients have in both interpersonal relations and behavioral disorders.

  8. Shared genetic etiology underlying Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ke; Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Ho, Lap; Luo, Wei; Li, Shuyu; Chen, Rong; Li, Tongbin; Dubner, Lauren; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports the observation that subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at higher risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether and how these two conditions are causally linked is unknown. Possible mechanisms include shared genetic risk factors, which were investigated in this study based on recent genome wide association study (GWAS) findings. In order to achieve our goal, we retrieved single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with T2D and AD from large-scale GWAS meta-analysis consortia and tested for overlap among the T2D- and AD-associated SNPs at various p-value thresholds. We then explored the function of the shared T2D/AD GWAS SNPs by leveraging expressional quantitative trait loci, pathways, gene ontology data, and co-expression networks. We found 927 SNPs associated with both AD and T2D with p-value ≤0.01, an overlap significantly larger than random chance (overlapping p-value of 6.93E-28). Among these, 395 of the shared GWAS SNPs have the same risk allele for AD and T2D, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms underlying the development of both AD and T2D. Genes influenced by shared T2D/AD SNPs with the same risk allele were first identified using a SNP annotation variation (ANNOVAR) software, followed by using Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator (DAPPLE) software to identify additional proteins that are known to physically interact with the ANNOVAR gene annotations. We found that gene annotations from ANNOVAR and DAPPLE significantly enriched specific KEGG pathways pertaining to immune responses, cell signaling and neuronal plasticity, cellular processes in which abnormalities are known to contribute to both T2D and AD pathogenesis. Thus, our observation suggests that among T2D subjects with common genetic predispositions (e.g., SNPs with consistent risk alleles for T2D and AD), dysregulation of these pathogenic pathways could contribute to the elevated risks for AD in subjects. Interestingly, we

  9. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; González de San Román, Estíbaliz; Giralt, M Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The activity of CB1 cannabinoid receptors was studied in postmortem brain samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during clinical deterioration. CB1 activity was higher at earlier AD stages in limited hippocampal areas and internal layers of frontal cortex, but a decrease was observed at the advanced stages. The pattern of modification appears to indicate initial hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system in brain areas that lack classical histopathological markers at earlier stages of AD, indicating an attempt to compensate for the initial synaptic impairment, which is then surpassed by disease progression. These results suggest that initial CB1 stimulation might have therapeutic relevance.

  10. Prediction of psychosis onset in Alzheimer disease: the role of depression symptom severity and the HTR2A T102C polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wilkosz, Patricia A; Kodavali, Chowdari; Weamer, Elise A; Miyahara, Sachiko; Lopez, Oscar L; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; DeKosky, Steven T; Sweet, Robert A

    2007-12-05

    Psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD + P) identify a heritable phenotype associated with a more severe course. We recently found an association of AD + P with depression symptom severity. Reports have shown an association of a serotonin-2A receptor (HTR2A) gene T102C polymorphism with AD + P and with depression during AD. We examined the interaction of this common genetic polymorphism with depression and increased psychosis risk. Subjects with possible or probable AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) without psychosis at study entry were genotyped for the HTR2A T102C polymorphism and reassessed every 6 months until psychosis onset. Psychotic and depressive symptoms were rated using the CERAD behavioral rating scale (CBRS). Cox proportional hazard models with time-dependent covariates were used to examine associations with psychosis onset. A total of 324 Caucasian subjects completed at least one follow-up exam. Depressive symptom severity was a strong predictor of psychosis onset. Neither psychosis onset nor depression severity was associated with the HTR2A genotype. Genotype interacted with depression severity to moderate the risk of AD + P onset. This did not result from an interaction of HTR2A genotype with antidepressant use. Psychosis onset in AD is strongly associated with severity of depressive symptoms, an association that may be modified by HTR2A genotype.

  11. Type 2 diabetes aggravates Alzheimer's disease-associated vascular alterations of the aorta in mice.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Carvalho, Cristina; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, diabetes mellitus is considered a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and both diseases are characterized by vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the effects of high-sucrose-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the aorta of wild type (WT) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were investigated. 3xTg-AD mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and an increase in postprandial glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular nitrotyrosine, superoxide anion (O2•-), receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels when compared to WT mice. High-sucrose intake caused a significant increase in body weight, postprandial glycemia, HbA1c, triglycerides, plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and vascular nitrotyrosine, O2•-, RAGE, and MCP-1 levels in both WT and 3xTg-AD mice when compared to the respective control group. Also, a significant decrease in nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation was observed in 3xTg-AD and sucrose-treated WT mice. In conclusion, AD and T2D promote similar vascular dysfunction of the aorta, this effect being associated with elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress and inflammation. Also, AD-associated vascular alterations are potentiated by T2D. These findings support the idea that metabolic alterations predispose to the onset and progression of dementia.

  12. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  13. Affective false memories in Dementia of Alzheimer's Type.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Colangelo, Mirco; Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the production of inferential false memories for complex pictorial stimuli and the implications of affective content in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A group of 24 AD patients and a group of 24 healthy older adults studied a sequence of pictures depicting stories that included positive, negative or neutral consequences of an unseen action, and then completed an old-new picture recognition test. The number of causal errors was higher in healthy older adults compared to AD patients but affective content attenuated the effect. Causal errors increased in AD patients when stories included affective (positive or negative) outcomes. In addition, negative content produced a larger number of errors than positive content across groups. This data confirms that although memory processing is poorer in AD, it is sensitive to affective content. Accordingly, the nature of affective false memory errors suggest the need to consider the use of affective information in the development of new cognitive training procedures.

  14. Order and Disorder in Conversation: Encounters with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Nicole; Guendouzi, Jacqueline A.

    2005-01-01

    After a brief introduction to Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (DAT), its behavioral diagnostic symptom complex and a summary of communicative implications, we present data from two conversations involving participants with and without DAT. We discuss the concept of "order" in conversation, and the central importance of interactional monitoring.…

  15. Does insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus protect against Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Rdzak, Grzegorz M; Abdelghany, Osama

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the United States. A better understanding of the disease's underlying pathways may provide novel treatment and/or prevention strategies for this progressive chronic neurodegenerative disorder. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the possible links between insulin and Alzheimer's disease. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia causes adaptive changes in the brain, including an improved ability to use alternative fuels. Insulin has been shown to facilitate reduction of intracellular amyloid plaque and downregulation of amyloid-β-derived diffusible ligand-binding sites. Insulin also promotes tau hypophosphorylation, which stabilizes microtubules and promotes tubulin polymerization. Excess exogenous insulin may also play a role in overcoming the decreased utilization and transport of glucose in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Intranasal insulin therapy may have beneficial effects on cognition and function in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as having only minor adverse effects, and this route of administration been the focus in clinical trials. These data support the mechanistic pathways that might link excess exogenous insulin administered to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus to possible protection from Alzheimer's disease and provide a rationale for using insulin to prevent the disease in high-risk patients.

  16. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca(2+) release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensivelys tudied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models.The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology.The expression of RyanR3 was also elevated in hippocampus of APPPS1 mice (Thy1-APPKM670/671NL, Thy1-PS1L166P).In young (≤ 3 mo) APPPS1 mice, the deletion of RyanR3 increased hippocampal neuronal network excitability and accelerated AD pathology, leading to mushroom spine loss and increased amyloid accumulation. In contrast, deletion of RyanR3 in older APPPS1 mice (≥ 6 mo) rescued network excitability and mushroom spine loss, reduced amyloid plaque load and reduced spontaneous seizure occurrence.Our data suggests a dual role for RyanR3 in AD pathology. In young AD neurons, RyanR3 protects AD neurons from synaptic and network dysfunction. In older AD neurons, increased RyanR3 activity contributes to pathology. These results imply that blockade of RyanR3 may be beneficial for those in the later stages of the disease, but RyanR activators may be beneficial when used prior to disease onset or in its initial stages. Caffeine is an activator of RyanRs and our results may help to explain a complex epidemiological connection between coffee consumption in mid-life and risk of AD development in old age.

  17. The brain insulin signal transduction system and sporadic (type II) Alzheimer disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, S

    2002-03-01

    Nosologically, Alzheimer disease may not be considered to be a single disorder in spite of a common clinical phenotype. Only a small proportion of about 5% to 10% of all Alzheimer cases is due to genetic mutations (type I) whereas the great majority of patients was found to be sporadic in origin. It may be assumed that susceptibility genes along with lifestyle risk factors contribute to the causation of the age-related sporadic Alzheimer disease (type II). In this context, the desensitization of the neuronal insulin receptor similar to not-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus may be of pivotal significance. This abnormality along with a reduction in brain insulin concentration is assumed to induce a cascade-like process of disturbances including cellular glucose, acetylcholine, cholesterol, and ATP associated with abnormalities in membrane pathology and the formation of both amyloidogenic derivatives and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Sporadic Alzheimer disease may, thus, be considered to be the brain type of diabetes mellitus II. Experimental evidence is provided and discussed.

  18. Single-subject gray matter graph properties and their relationship with cognitive impairment in early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Yeung, Hiu M; Sikkes, Sietske A M; Möller, Christiane; Smits, Lieke L; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Barkhof, Frederik

    2014-06-01

    Abstract We investigated the relationships between gray matter graph properties and cognitive impairment in a sample of 215 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and also whether age of disease onset modifies such relationships. We expected that more severe cognitive impairment in AD would be related to more random graph topologies. Single-subject gray matter graphs were constructed from T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. The following global and local graph properties were calculated: betweenness centrality, normalized clustering coefficient γ, and normalized path length λ. Local clustering, path length, and betweenness centrality measures were determined for 90 anatomically defined areas. Regression models with as interaction term age of onset (i.e., early onset when patients were ≤65 years old and late onset when they were >65 years old at the time of diagnosis)×graph property were used to assess the relationships between cognitive functioning in five domains (memory, language, visuospatial, attention, and executive). Worse cognitive impairment was associated with more random graphs, as indicated by low γ, λ, and betweenness centrality values. Three interaction effects for age of onset×global graph property were found: Low γ and λ values more strongly related to memory impairment in early-onset patients; low beta values were significantly related to impaired visuospatial functioning in late-onset patients. For the local graph properties, language impairment showed the strongest relationship with decreased clustering coefficient in the left superior temporal gyrus across the entire sample. Our study shows that single-subject gray matter graph properties are associated with individual differences in cognitive impairment.

  19. Exome sequencing identifies 2 novel presenilin 1 mutations (p.L166V and p.S230R) in British early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S; Medway, Chirstopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Mann, David; Snowden, Julie; Neary, David; Harris, Jeniffer; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-10-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) represents 1%-2% of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases, and it is generally characterized by a positive family history and a rapidly progressive symptomatology. Rare coding and fully penetrant variants in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) are the only causative mutations reported for autosomal dominant AD. Thus, in this study we used exome sequencing data to rapidly screen rare coding variability in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in a British cohort composed of 47 unrelated EOAD cases and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven. We report 2 novel and likely pathogenic variants in PSEN1 (p.L166V and p.S230R). A comprehensive catalog of rare pathogenic variants in the AD Mendelian genes is pivotal for a premortem diagnosis of autosomal dominant EOAD and for the differential diagnosis with other early onset dementias such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

  20. Bender-Gestalt Test performance in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Storandt, M

    1990-12-01

    Bender-Gestalt Test performances of 144 persons with very mild, mild, or moderate senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and 96 healthy older adults ranging in age from 63 to 95 were compared. Total scores and error types according to the modified Hutt-Briskin scoring system are reported. The Bender-Gestalt Test does not appear to be useful in differentiating very mild or mild SDAT from normal aging.

  1. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  2. C-338A polymorphism of the endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE-1) gene and the susceptibility to sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, Renato; Gambina, Giuseppe; Broggio, Elisabetta; Ruggeri, Maria; Corbo, Rosa Maria

    2008-01-01

    The human endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) is involved in beta-amyloid synthesis and regulation of the endothelin-1 (ET-1) vasoconstricting peptide. We investigated the distribution of the C-338A polymorphism of the ECE-1b gene in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and in coronary artery disease (CAD) to verify its role in the onset of these two complex diseases. Two cohorts of 458 Italian Caucasian LOAD patients and 165 CAD patients were examined for the C-338A polymorphism and compared with respective control samples (260 and 106 subjects, respectively) . The A allele was less present in LOAD patients than in controls, but an at limits statistically significant difference was achieved only in subjects aged less than 80 years, where only the AA genotypes appeared to have a protective role against the onset of the sporadic LOAD. For the overall CAD sample the pattern was similar and significant differences were observed only in subjects non carrying the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e*4 allele, where the A allele carrying genotypes had a protective role against the onset of the disease.

  3. APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations in early-onset Alzheimer disease: A genetic screening study of familial and sporadic cases

    PubMed Central

    Lanoiselée, Hélène-Marie; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Lacour, Morgane; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Martinaud, Olivier; Quillard-Muraine, Muriel; de la Sayette, Vincent; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Sarazin, Marie; le Ber, Isabelle; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Jonveaux, Thérèse; Rouaud, Olivier; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Félician, Olivier; Godefroy, Olivier; Formaglio, Maite; Croisile, Bernard; Auriacombe, Sophie; Chamard, Ludivine; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sauvée, Mathilde; Marelli-Tosi, Cecilia; Gabelle, Audrey; Ozsancak, Canan; Pariente, Jérémie; Paquet, Claire; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Background Amyloid protein precursor (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN2) mutations cause autosomal dominant forms of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD-EOAD). Although these genes were identified in the 1990s, variant classification remains a challenge, highlighting the need to colligate mutations from large series. Methods and findings We report here a novel update (2012–2016) of the genetic screening of the large AD-EOAD series ascertained across 28 French hospitals from 1993 onwards, bringing the total number of families with identified mutations to n = 170. Families were included when at least two first-degree relatives suffered from early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) with an age of onset (AOO) ≤65 y in two generations. Furthermore, we also screened 129 sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease with an AOO below age 51 (44% males, mean AOO = 45 ± 2 y). APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 mutations were identified in 53 novel AD-EOAD families. Of the 129 sporadic cases screened, 17 carried a PSEN1 mutation and 1 carried an APP duplication (13%). Parental DNA was available for 10 sporadic mutation carriers, allowing us to show that the mutation had occurred de novo in each case. Thirteen mutations (12 in PSEN1 and 1 in PSEN2) identified either in familial or in sporadic cases were previously unreported. Of the 53 mutation carriers with available cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, 46 (87%) had all three CSF biomarkers—total tau protein (Tau), phospho-tau protein (P-Tau), and amyloid β (Aβ)42—in abnormal ranges. No mutation carrier had the three biomarkers in normal ranges. One limitation of this study is the absence of functional assessment of the possibly and probably pathogenic variants, which should help their classification. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a nonnegligible fraction of PSEN1 mutations occurs de novo, which is of high importance for genetic counseling, as PSEN1 mutational screening is currently performed in familial cases only

  4. Clinical and Molecular Studies Reveal a PSEN1 Mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian Family with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R.; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F.; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30 to 70% of familial early onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment was completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family. PMID:24495933

  5. Clinical and molecular studies reveal a PSEN1 mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian family with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B; Bird, Thomas D

    2014-03-20

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30-70% of familial early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment were completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family.

  6. Investigating the role of rare coding variability in Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP) in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Niblock, Michael; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Adnan, Jihad; Killick, Richard; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    The overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between late-onset apparently sporadic Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and other neurodegenerative dementias (frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) raise the question of whether shared genetic risk factors may explain the similar phenotype among these disparate disorders. To investigate this intriguing hypothesis, we analyzed rare coding variability in 6 Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP), in 141 LOAD patients and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven, from the UK. In our cohort, 14 LOAD cases (10%) and 11 controls (6%) carry at least 1 rare variant in the genes studied. We report a novel variant in PSEN1 (p.I168T) and a rare variant in PSEN2 (p.A237V), absent in controls and both likely pathogenic. Our findings support previous studies, suggesting that (1) rare coding variability in PSEN1 and PSEN2 may influence the susceptibility for LOAD and (2) GRN, MAPT, and PRNP are not major contributors to LOAD. Thus, genetic screening is pivotal for the clinical differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:25104557

  7. [Diabetes type 2 and Alzheimer disease - one or two diseases? Mechanisms of association].

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Małgorzata

    2013-07-23

    Some epidemiological data and pathophysiological evidence suggest similarities and connection of two amyloidoses: diabetes mellitus type 2, (DM2) (non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). What they have in common is insulin resistance, neurodegeneration, development and progression of dementia, and the fact that in the course of both diseases fibrillar aggregates of specific proteins are accumulated in affected organs. What is more, experimental evidence also supports the hypothesis that small prefibrillar aggregates that emerge prior to the appearance of mature fibrils are responsible for a key step in development and cytotoxicity of both diseases. They also have similar pathogenic effects. Both peptides possess the common receptor AMY3. More and more evidence is accumulating that key cell regulation processes are similar for both diseases as well. The question is raised: can Alzheimer be a new form of diabetes disease?

  8. The onset of galactic winds in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    1992-01-01

    We completed the spectral analysis of 31 early-type galaxies to investigate whether their x-ray emission was predominantly due to thermal bremsstrahlung from a hot gaseous corona or emission from discrete, galactic sources such as x-ray binaries. If a corona dominates the x-ray emission, its spectra is expected to be relatively cool (0.5 - 1 keV) compared to the harder emission associated with x-ray binaries in our galaxy, the Magellanic Clouds and M31. While it is generally accepted that the x-ray emission in luminous E and S0 galaxies arises from hot coronae, the status of hot gas in lower luminosity (and hence lower mass) galaxies is less clear. Calculations show that, for a given supernova rate, a critical galaxy luminosity (mass) exists below which the gas cannot be gravitationally confined and a galactic wind is predicted to be effective in expelling gas from the galaxy. Since significant mass (a dark halo) is required to hold a hot, gaseous corona around a galaxy, we expect that the faintest, smallest galaxies will not have a hot corona, but their x-ray emission will be dominated by galactic sources or by an active galactic nuclei. In the sample we tested which spanned the absolute magnitude range from -21.5 to -19.5, we found that except for two galaxies whose x-ray emission was dominated by an active nucleus, that the others were consistent with emission from hot gas. We also found that there is a correlation between gas temperature and galaxy magnitude (mass), such that the brighter, more luminous galaxies have hotter gas temperatures. Thus even at relatively faint magnitudes, the dominant emission from early-type galaxies appears to be hot gas. We also carried out an investigation of the x-ray surface brightness distribution of the x-ray emission for about 100 early type galaxies to determine whether the x-ray emission from galaxies are extended. Extended x-ray emission is expected if the emission is due to a hot gaseous corona. We determined the ratio

  9. [A case report of early-onset Alzheimer's disease with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed as APPV717I mutation by genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Takashi; Ochi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Yoshida, Taku; Abe, Masao; Toyota, Yasutaka; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to confirm a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) because patients sometimes have non-specific cortical features, such as psychiatric symptoms, executive functional impairment, and pyramidal symptoms, along with typical symptoms, such as recent memory impairment and disorientation. We encountered a patient with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed with EOAD on genetic testing. A right-handed sixty-year-old man, whose mother was suspected of having dementia, developed memory impairment at the age of fifty, disorientation at the age of fifty-six, and both visual hallucination and dressing apraxia at the age of fifty-nine. After admission to a psychiatric hospital for treatment, his symptoms disappeared with antipsychotic medication. However, his ADL were declining and so he was referred to our university hospital. He had frontal lobe symptoms, pyramidal signs, and extrapyramidal signs with severe dementia. Neuropsychological examinations were not possible because of sedation. On brain MRI, he showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. HMPO-SPECT showed hypoperfusion of cerebral cortices diffusely. We decided to perform genetic testing because he had both family and alcohol abuse histories. He showed EOAD with V717I mutation of the amyloid precursor protein gene. After the discontinuation of antipsychotics, excessive sedation and extrapyramidal signs disappeared. A dose of 10 mg of donepezil was effective to improve motivation and activity, and his mini mental examination score was calculable after recovery. The case supports usefulness of applying genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease to patients with early onset dementia, even when they do not have a family history.

  10. Is obsessive-compulsive symptomatology a risk factor for Alzheimer-type dementia?

    PubMed

    Dondu, Ayse; Sevincoka, Levent; Akyol, Ali; Tataroglu, Cengiz

    2015-02-28

    In the present study, we hypothesized that lifetime Obsessive-Compulsive (OC) symptomatology would be risk factors for the development of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). For this aim, first we compared 39 patients with AD and 30 age and gender matched control subjects. We have found that lifetime and current OC symptoms (OCs) and comorbid diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder in AD patients were significantly more prevalent than in control group. AD patients had more likely to have lifetime and current hoarding, and checking obsessions compared to controls. The rate of lifetime and current hoarding, and checking compulsions also appeared to be higher in AD patients in comparison to control subjects. Hoarding and checking obsessions, and compulsions seemed to proceed through the dementia in contrast to other OCs. The mean number of lifetime compulsions seemed to predict the diagnosis of AD. When we compared AD patients with and without OCs, we have found that OC symptomatology prior to AD did not cause an earlier onset of dementia and more severe cognitive impairment. Further longitudinal clinical, genetic and neuroimaging investigations are required to determine if lifetime presence of OCs would predispose to the development of later AD.

  11. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  12. Do adolescent drug users fare the worst? Onset type, juvenile delinquency, and criminal careers.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Angton, Alexia; Behnken, Monic P; Kusow, Abdi M

    2015-02-01

    Although substance abuse often accompanies delinquency and other forms of antisocial behavior, there is less scholarly agreement about the timing of substance use vis-à-vis an individual's antisocial trajectory. Similarly, although there is extraordinary evidence that onset is inversely related to the severity of the criminal career, there is surprisingly little research on the offense type of onset or the type of antisocial behavior that was displayed when an individual initiated his or her offending career. Drawing on data from a sample of serious adult criminal offenders (N = 500), the current study examined 12 forms of juvenile delinquency (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, auto theft, arson, weapons, sexual offense, drug sales, and drug use) in addition to age at arrest onset, age, sex, race to explore their association with chronicity (total arrests), extreme chronicity (1 SD above the mean which was equivalent to 90 career arrests), and lambda (offending per year). The only onset offense type that was significantly associated with all criminal career outcomes was juvenile drug use. Additional research on the offense type of delinquent onset is needed to understand launching points of serious antisocial careers.

  13. Association of the 3' UTR transcription factor LBP-1c/CP2/LSF polymorphism with late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Luedecking-Zimmer, Erin; DeKosky, Steven T; Nebes, Robert; Kamboh, M Ilyas

    2003-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder. To date, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the only established susceptibility gene for late-onset AD. ApoE accounts for less than 50% of the risk of AD, indicating the presence of other unknown susceptibility loci. Linkage studies have indicated chromosome 12 as the most likely location for another late-onset AD locus. We examined seven polymorphisms in five candidate genes located in and around the linkage peaks on chromosome 12 in 564 cases and 523 controls. The genes included complement component 1R (C1R), vitamin D receptor (VDR), scavenger-receptor B1 (SR-B1), low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1), and transcription factor LBP-1c/CP2/LSF. We found no association with C1R, VDR, SR-B1, and LRP1 polymorphisms. However, the frequency of the A allele of the 3' (untranslated region) UTR LBP-1c/CP2/LSF polymorphism was higher in controls than cases (0.071 vs. 0.051; P = 0.042) with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.96; P = 0.0498). Our data suggest that the LBP-1c/CP2/LSF polymorphism may have a moderate protective effect against the risk of AD.

  14. Neuroethics, confidentiality, and a cultural imperative in early onset Alzheimer disease: a case study with a First Nation population.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Shaun; Beattie, B Lynn; Vedan, Richard; Dwosh, Emily; Bruce, Lindsey; Illes, Judy

    2013-10-16

    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society's immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics provides a pragmatic and constructive pathway to guide advancements in neuroscience in a manner that is culturally nuanced and relevant. Here we review a case study of one issue in culturally oriented neuroscience research where it is evident that traditional research ethics must be broadened and the values and needs of diverse populations considered for meaningful and relevant research practices. A global approach to neuroethics has the potential to furnish critical engagement with cultural considerations of advancements in neuroscience.

  15. [A Japanese family with familial Alzheimer's disease associated with presenilin 1 mutation: relationship between younger age of onset and ApoE gene polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Marui, Wami; Iseki, Eizo; Sugiyama, Naoya; Matsumura, Takehiko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Odawara, Toshinari; Hino, Hiroaki; Kosaka, Kenji

    2003-04-01

    We previously reported a Japanese family with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease associated with G 209 R presenilin 1(PS 1) mutation. There have been six patients across three generations in this family. In the present report, we described the clinical course, findings with neuroimaging and results of genetic examination of PS 1 and apolipoprotein E(ApoE) in three of six patients(II-1, III-1 and 2). The clinical course was common to all three patients. Memory disturbance, disorientation, amnestic aphasia, personality changes and perseveration appeared at early stages, whereas Gerstmann's syndrome, myoclonus and general convulsion were recognized at advanced stages. CT disclosed mild brain atrophy in the temporal lobes at early stages and diffuse brain atrophy predominantly in the fronto--temporal lobes at advanced stages. SPECT exhibited hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal areas at early stages and hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal and parieto-occipital areas at advanced stages. The age of onset in six patients demonstrated two clusters at age 53-55(I-1, II-1, 2 and 5) and age 46-48(III-1 and 2). PS 1 genotyping demonstrated that the heterozygous exonic missense mutation G 209 R was confirmed in all three patients. Regarding the ApoE genotyping, II-1(mother) was epsilon 3/epsilon 3, whereas III-1 and 2(children) were epsilon 3/epsilon 4. These findings suggest the possibility that there might be a gene dose effect, since the age of onset ranged from 5 to 7 years younger in patients who received epsilon 4 alleles from the father.

  16. Focal cerebral hypoperfusion and selective cognitive deficit in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed Central

    Celsis, P; Agniel, A; Puel, M; Rascol, A; Marc-Vergnes, J P

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was investigated using single photon emission computed tomography and xenon-133 intravenous injection in six patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) with atypical focal clinical presentation, and in 20 age-matched healthy volunteers. The patients had a progressive and preponderant cognitive deficit and a focal hypoperfusion that correlated with the neuropsychological findings, whereas the average flow did not significantly differ from that of controls. The assessment of concordant haemodynamic and neuropsychological focal abnormalities could be useful in the diagnosis of atypical cases of DAT. Images PMID:3501801

  17. Cognitive performance in senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type: the Kitchen Task Assessment.

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Edwards, D F

    1993-05-01

    The Kitchen Task Assessment (KTA) is a functional measure that records the level of cognitive support required by a person with Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (SDAT) to complete a cooking task successfully. The results allow the clinician to help caregivers understand the level of support the impaired person needs to perform daily living tasks. This paper presents the validity and internal consistency of the KTA. Data were collected from 106 persons diagnosed with SDAT. Construct validity was established by examining the relationship between subjects' performance on the KTA and standard neuropsychological measures.

  18. Type II diabetes of early onset: a distinct clinical and genetic syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    O'Rahilly, S; Spivey, R S; Holman, R R; Nugent, Z; Clark, A; Turner, R C

    1987-01-01

    The inheritance of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes was studied by a continuous infusion of glucose test in all available first degree relatives of 48 diabetic probands of various ages and with differing severity of disease. In an initial study of 38 type II diabetic subjects and their first degree relatives six islet cell antibody negative patients with early onset disease (aged 25-40 at diagnosis) were found to have a particularly high familial prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance. Nine of 10 parents available for study either had type II diabetes or were glucose intolerant. A high prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance was also found in their siblings (11/16;69%). In a second study of the families of a further 10 young diabetic probands (presenting age 25-40) whose islet cell antibody state was unknown a similar high prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance was found among parents of the five islet cell antibody negative probands (8/9; 89%) but not among parents of the five islet cell antibody positive probands (3/8;38%). Islet cell antibody negative diabetics with early onset type II disease may have inherited a diabetogenic gene or genes from both parents. They commonly need insulin to maintain adequate glycaemic control and may develop severe diabetic complications. Early onset type II diabetes may represent a syndrome in which characteristic pedigrees, clinical severity, and absence of islet autoimmunity make it distinct from either type I diabetes, maturity onset diabetes of the young, or late onset type II diabetes. PMID:3107658

  19. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  20. Preparing for presymptomatic DNA testing for early onset Alzheimer's disease/cerebral haemorrhage and hereditary Pick disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tibben, A; Stevens, M; de Wert, G M; Niermeijer, M F; van Duijn, C M; van Swieten, J C

    1997-01-01

    The acceptability of presymptomatic testing in 21 people at 50% risk for the APP-692 mutation causing presenile Alzheimer's disease or cerebral haemorrhage resulting from cerebral amyloid angiopathy (FAD-CH), and in 43 people at 50% risk for hereditary Pick disease (HPD) was assessed. Neither group differed in demographic variables. Thirty-nine people (64%) in the whole group would request presymptomatic testing if it were clinically available, although two-thirds did not yet feel ready to take it. The most important reasons in the HPD and FAD-CH group for taking the test were: to further basic research (42% and 47%, respectively), informing children (47% and 50%, respectively), future planning (29% and 47%, respectively), and relieving uncertainty (46% and 27%, respectively). The most commonly cited effect of an unfavourable test result concerned increasing problems for spouses (75% and 76%, respectively) and children (61% and 57%, respectively). Most respondents denied that an unfavourable result would have adverse effects on personal mood or relationship. One-third of all respondents favoured prenatal testing where one of the parents had an increased risk for HPD or FAD-CH. Participants would encourage their offspring to have the test before starting a relationship (35%) and before family planning (44%). Thirty-seven percent of the respondents would encourage their children to opt for prenatal diagnosis. People at risk for HPD were significantly more preoccupied with the occurrence of potential symptoms in themselves, compared with those at risk for FAD-CH, reflecting the devastating impact that disinhibition in the affected patient has on the family. Our findings underline the need for adequate counselling and the availability of professional and community resources to deal with the impact of test results in subjects and their relatives. PMID:9032652

  1. Pooling/bootstrap-based GWAS (pbGWAS) identifies new loci modifying the age of onset in PSEN1 p.Glu280Ala Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, J I; Chandrasekharappa, S C; Henao, E; Martinez, A F; Harper, U; Jones, M; Solomon, B D; Lopez, L; Garcia, G; Aguirre-Acevedo, D C; Acosta-Baena, N; Correa, J C; Lopera-Gómez, C M; Jaramillo-Elorza, M C; Rivera, D; Kosik, K S; Schork, N J; Swanson, J M; Lopera, F; Arcos-Burgos, M

    2013-01-01

    The literature on GWAS (genome-wide association studies) data suggests that very large sample sizes (for example, 50,000 cases and 50,000 controls) may be required to detect significant associations of genomic regions for complex disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because of the challenges of obtaining such large cohorts, we describe here a novel sequential strategy that combines pooling of DNA and bootstrapping (pbGWAS) in order to significantly increase the statistical power and exponentially reduce expenses. We applied this method to a very homogeneous sample of patients belonging to a unique and clinically well-characterized multigenerational pedigree with one of the most severe forms of early onset AD, carrying the PSEN1 p.Glu280Ala mutation (often referred to as E280A mutation), which originated as a consequence of a founder effect. In this cohort, we identified novel loci genome-wide significantly associated as modifiers of the age of onset of AD (CD44, rs187116, P=1.29 × 10−12; NPHP1, rs10173717, P=1.74 × 10−12; CADPS2, rs3757536, P=1.54 × 10−10; GREM2, rs12129547, P=1.69 × 10−13, among others) as well as other loci known to be associated with AD. Regions identified by pbGWAS were confirmed by subsequent individual genotyping. The pbGWAS methodology and the genes it targeted could provide important insights in determining the genetic causes of AD and other complex conditions. PMID:22710270

  2. Acute-Onset Type 1 Diabetes that Developed During the Administration of Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Iwaku, Kenji; Otuka, Fumiko; Taniyama, Matsuo

    2017-01-01

    The patient was 32-year-old man, who received olanzapine for schizophrenia and developed polyuria and thirst without drinking soft-drinks after 4 months. Five months after the initiation of treatment, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis (blood glucose: 490 mg/dL, HbA1c: 15.5%). He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-Ab: 5.6 U/mL, IA-2 Ab: 5.9 U/mL, fasting C-peptide: 0.12 ng/mL) and was put on intensive insulin therapy. At four months after the onset of 1A diabetes, he experienced a honeymoon phase that was sustained until the 40th month of treatment. We hypothesize that the administration of olanzapine to a patient with pre-type 1A diabetes induced marked hyperglycemia and accelerated the onset of type 1A diabetes. PMID:28154279

  3. A case of possibly pathogenic PSEN2 R62C mutation in a patient with probable early-onset Alzheimer's dementia supported by structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Won; An, Seong Soo; Bagyinszky, Eva; Kim, SangYun

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old Korean male patient with dementia was diagnosed with probable early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). He presented with memory problems, personality changes, and disorientation. His family history of dementia was probably negative, since no family member with dementia was found or mentioned. Mild cortical atrophy was observed upon magnetic resonance imaging analyses of his brain, and the single-photon emission computed tomography analysis revealed hypoperfusion in the frontal, temporal, and limbic lobes. The patient was tested for mutations in APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, PGRN, MAPT, and PRNP genes. Genetic analysis revealed R62C mutation in PSEN2 gene. PSEN2 R62C mutation was previously reported in European populations, including Dutch and Belgian families with AD. Herein, we present the first case report of PSEN2 R62C mutation in Asia. PolyPhen-2 and SIFT software analyses predicted this mutation as "possibly damaging", suggesting its potential involvement with AD. In silico protein structural prediction analyses of PSEN2 R62 and C62 revealed two divergent structures, suggesting that large perturbations of R62C mutation might cause dysfunctions of PSEN2, which may alter the normal amyloid production.

  4. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of blood serum for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: specificity relative to other types of dementia.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikova, Elena; Kazakov, Oleksandr; Halamkova, Lenka; Celmins, Dzintra; Malone, Paula; Molho, Eric; Zimmerman, Earl A; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-07-01

    The key moment for efficiently and accurately diagnosing dementia occurs during the early stages. This is particularly true for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this proof-of-concept study, we applied near infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy of blood serum together with advanced multivariate statistics for the selective identification of AD. We analyzed data from 20 AD patients, 18 patients with other neurodegenerative dementias (OD) and 10 healthy control (HC) subjects. NIR Raman microspectroscopy differentiated patients with more than 95% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated the high discriminative power of artificial neural network (ANN) classification models, thus revealing the high potential of this developed methodology for the differential diagnosis of AD. Raman spectroscopic, blood-based tests may aid clinical assessments for the effective and accurate differential diagnosis of AD, decrease the labor, time and cost of diagnosis, and be useful for screening patient populations for AD development and progression. Multivariate data analysis of blood serum Raman spectra allows for the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer's disease, other types of dementia and healthy individuals.

  6. Bayer-activities of daily living scale in mild and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Nagaratnam, Kujan; O'Mara, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the reliability of the Bayer-Activities of Daily Living (B-ADL) scale when used as a cognitive screening instrument for mild and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer type. This is a retrospective study of 66 patients with dementia. The B-ADL scale was completed by the caregiver or the family member at the first encounter. The internal consistency was found to be 0.94 for the 27 patients that completed all 25 questions in the scale. Significant correlation and receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis were found for the B-ADL total score and subscale 1 (tasks requiring short- and long-term memory) for Clinical Dementia Rating scale. Severity of dementia by the B-ADL scale is statistically similar but not the same as Mini-Mental State Examination. Our findings confirm that B-ADL scale is a valid indicator of the cognitive status of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Does study partner type impact the rate of Alzheimer's disease progression?

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Zhou, Yan; Karlawish, Jason; Elashoff, David

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) do not have a spouse. Despite this, the majority of AD research participants enroll with a spouse study partner. It remains unclear if differences between AD patients who do and do not have a spouse may bias study results. In this study, we examined whether AD patients with different study partner types (spouse versus adult child) demonstrate different rates of disease progression over two years on three outcome measures commonly used in AD research, including clinical trials. We used data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to examine disease progression in participants age 55-90 with probable AD dementia. We examined disease progression as measured by the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale-Sum of the Boxes score, the Mini Mental Status Examination, and the Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Analyses were performed on data for all available eligible participants from the NACC UDS and after performing a propensity-matching model to better account for inherent differences between the populations of interest. Propensity matching was successful only when models did not include age and gender. For both propensity-matched analyses and those of all available data, we did not observe any differences between the study partner populations for any outcome measure. These results suggest that if investigators can improve in recruiting AD patients with adult child caregivers to research, the implications to study results may be minimal.

  8. Early onset type 2 diabetes in Jamaica and in Mexico. Opportunities derived from an interethnic study.

    PubMed

    Irving, Rachael; Tusié-Luna, Ma Teresa; Mills, James; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie; McLaughlin, Wayne; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Populations with Amerindian or African heritages are the one with the highest prevalence of diabetes worldwide. A large percentage of these individuals survived famine. However, the survival effect has become detrimental to their descendents living in an environment of caloric surplus. In countries, like Mexico and Jamaica, in which diabetes is highly prevalent, the onset of the disease happens at earlier ages. Our objective is to summarize diabetes data from Mexico and Jamaica and to discuss the opportunities that can result from an interethnic study. On one hand, the prevalence of diabetes in Jamaica is 17.9% in the 15+ age group. Jamaican researchers have built a cohort of families with early onset type 2 diabetes. In this population, this form of the disease is unrelated to MODY genes. On the other hand, the prevalence of diabetes in adult Mexicans is 14.4%. The group in which the greater percentual changes have occurred is the adults who are below the age of 40. More than two thirds of the early onset cases studied have a body mass index that is >25 kg/m2 and the clinical characteristics of metabolic syndrome. A minority of them has mutations in the MODY genes. The joint study of Mexican and Jamaican cohorts of early onset type 2 diabetes cases will be useful to identify new genetic and environmental players in the pathogenesis of this entity.

  9. Type-specific capsular antigen is associated with virulence in late-onset group B Streptococcal type III disease.

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, M E; Boyer, K M; Papierniak, C K; Levine, L; Gotoff, S P

    1984-01-01

    Strain differences have been postulated to explain the observation that group B Streptococcus type III (GBS III) late-onset disease occurs in only a fraction of colonized infants. To determine the distribution of type-specific polysaccharide antigen (Ag) in GBS III, Ag was measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis in both supernatant fluids and EDTA extracts and by radial immunodiffusion in multiple HCl extracts of the pellet from cultures of 10 strains of GBS III. Capsular Ag was defined as the sum of Ag in EDTA extracts + Ag in multiple HCl extracts. Both Ag in EDTA extracts and Ag in supernatant fluids correlated with capsular Ag (r = 0.94). GBS III strains were obtained from the blood of 19 infants with late-onset sepsis, from the cerebrospinal fluid or blood of 22 infants with late-onset meningitis, and from mucosal surfaces of both 18 infants and 12 mothers of infants with low levels of type-specific antibody and asymptomatic colonization. Mean values of Ag in supernatant fluids in strains from infants with late-onset sepsis (1.50 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml) and late-onset meningitis (1.67 +/- 0.09 micrograms/ml) were significantly greater than those in asymptomatic colonization strains (1.14 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml; P less than 0.001). The number of organisms required for a 50% lethal dose in the chick embryo, determined in 29 strains, was inversely related to Ag in supernatant fluids (r = -0.60). The demonstration that the quantity of capsular Ag produced by GBS III strains is related to their virulence in chick embryos and to their invasiveness in susceptible infants supports the hypothesis that Ag is a virulence factor in humans. Images PMID:6423540

  10. Vascular dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease: a potential etiological linkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuzhou; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Kream, Richard M; Mantione, Kirk J; Stefano, George B

    2014-08-01

    The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity leading to whole organ metabolic homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key etiological factor leading to moderate to severe vasculopathies observed in both Type 2 diabetic and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Accordingly, evidence-based epidemiological factors support a compelling hypothesis stating that metabolic rundown encountered in Type 2 diabetes engenders severe cerebral vascular insufficiencies that are causally linked to long term neural degenerative processes in AD. Of mechanistic importance, Type 2 diabetes engenders an immunologically mediated chronic pro-inflammatory state involving interactive deleterious effects of leukocyte-derived cytokines and endothelial-derived chemotactic agents leading to vascular and whole organ dysfunction. The long term negative consequences of vascular pro-inflammatory processes on the integrity of CNS basal forebrain neuronal populations mediating complex cognitive functions establish a striking temporal comorbidity of AD with Type 2 diabetes. Extensive biomedical evidence supports the pivotal multi-functional role of constitutive nitric oxide (NO) production and release as a critical vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant, mechanism within the vascular endothelium. Within this context, we currently review the functional contributions of dysregulated endothelial NO expression to the etiology and persistence of Type 2 diabetes-related and co morbid AD-related vasculopathies. Additionally, we provide up-to-date perspectives on critical areas of AD research with special reference to common NO-related etiological factors linking Type 2 diabetes to the pathogenesis of AD.

  11. Type-1 interferon signaling mediates neuro-inflammatory events in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Juliet M; Minter, Myles R; Newman, Andrew G; Zhang, Moses; Adlard, Paul A; Crack, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    A neuro-inflammatory response has been implicated in human patients and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type-1 interferons are pleiotropic cytokines involved in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response; however, their role in AD is unknown. This study investigated the contribution of type-1 IFN signaling in the neuro-inflammatory response to amyloid-beta (Aβ) in vitro and in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed a 2-fold increase in IFNα in APP/PS1 brains compared with control brains. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction also identified increased IFNα and IFNβ expression in human pre-frontal cortex from AD patients. In vitro studies in primary neurons demonstrated Aβ-induced type-1 IFN expression preceded that of other classical pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1-β, and IL-6. Significantly, ablation of type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 expression in BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary neurons afforded protection against Aβ-induced toxicity. This study supports a role for type-1 interferons in the pro-inflammatory response and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests that blocking type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 maybe a therapeutic target to limit the disease progression.

  12. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  13. Alzheimer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Alzheimer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Alzheimer disease : Alzheimer's Association -- www.alz.org Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center -- www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers ...

  14. Maternal and neonatal outcomes by labor onset type and gestational age

    PubMed Central

    Bailit, Jennifer L.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Reddy, Uma M.; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor H.; Hibbard, Judith U.; Ramirez, Mildred M.; Branch, D. Ware; Burkman, Ronald; Haberman, Shoshana; Hatjis, Christos G.; Hoffman, Matthew K.; Kominiarek, Michelle; Landy, Helain J.; Learman, Lee A.; Troendle, James; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Wilkins, Isabelle; Sun, Liping; Zhang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to determine maternal and neonatal outcomes by labor onset type and gestational age. STUDY DESIGN We used electronic medical records data from 10 US institutions in the Consortium on Safe Labor on 115,528 deliveries from 2002 through 2008. Deliveries were divided by labor onset type (spontaneous, elective induction, indicated induction, unlabored cesarean). Neonatal and maternal outcomes were calculated by labor onset type and gestational age. RESULTS Neonatal intensive care unit admissions and sepsis improved with each week of gestational age until 39 weeks (P < .001). After adjusting for complications, elective induction of labor was associated with a lower risk of ventilator use (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28 – 0.53), sepsis (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.26 – 0.49), and neonatal intensive care unit admissions (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.48 – 0.57) compared to spontaneous labor. The relative risk of hysterectomy at term was 3.21 (95% CI, 1.08 – 9.54) with elective induction, 1.16 (95% CI, 0.24 – 5.58) with indicated induction, and 6.57 (95% CI, 1.78 – 24.30) with cesarean without labor compared to spontaneous labor. CONCLUSION Some neonatal outcomes improved until 39 weeks. Babies born with elective induction are associated with better neonatal outcomes compared to spontaneous labor. Elective induction may be associated with an increased hysterectomy risk. PMID:20207242

  15. A Deeper Look into Type 1 Diabetes – Imaging Immune Responses during Onset of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes execute the killing of insulin-producing beta cells during onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). The research community has come far in dissecting the major events in the development of this disease, but still the trigger and high-resolved information of the immunological events leading up to beta cell loss are missing. During the past decades, intravital imaging of immune responses has led to significant scientific breakthroughs in diverse models of disease, including T1D. Dynamic imaging of immune cells at the pancreatic islets during T1D onset has been made possible through the development of both advanced microscopes, and animal models that allow long-term immobilization of the pancreas. The use of these modalities has revealed a milling microenvironment at the pancreatic islets during disease onset with a plethora of active players. Clues to answering the remaining questions in this disease may lie in intravital imaging, including how key immune cells traffic to and from the pancreas, and how cells interact at this target tissue. This review highlights and discusses recent studies, models, and techniques focused to understand the immune responses during T1D onset through intravital imaging. PMID:27574523

  16. Auditory and Visual Cues for Topic Maintenance with Persons Who Exhibit Dementia of Alzheimer's Type

    PubMed Central

    Teten, Amy F.; Dagenais, Paul A.; Friehe, Mary J.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of auditory and visual redirections in facilitating topic coherence for persons with Dementia of Alzheimer's Type (DAT). Five persons with moderate stage DAT engaged in conversation with the first author. Three topics related to activities of daily living, recreational activities, food, and grooming, were broached. Each topic was presented three times to each participant: once as a baseline condition, once with auditory redirection to topic, and once with visual redirection to topic. Transcripts of the interactions were scored for overall coherence. Condition was a significant factor in that the DAT participants exhibited better topic maintenance under visual and auditory conditions as opposed to baseline. In general, the performance of the participants was not affected by the topic, except for significantly higher overall coherence ratings for the visually redirected interactions dealing with the topic of food. PMID:26171273

  17. Shared Neuropathological Characteristics of Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease: Impacts on Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer M; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-09-01

    In the past few decades, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as older individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), has increased. While the consumption of diets high in fat (total and saturated) have been linked to increased risk of AD, diets rich in antioxidants, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3 fatty acids are associated with decreased risk. Additionally, AD patients are at increased risk for developing T2DM. Recent research suggests that there are stronger similarities between AD and T2DM than have previously been considered. Here we review the neurocognitive and inflammatory effects of high-fat diet consumption, its relationship to AD, and the treatment potential of dietary interventions that may decrease risk of cognitive decline and other associated neuropathological changes, such as insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory processes.

  18. Social Network Data Validity: The Example of the Social Network of Caregivers of Older Persons with Alzheimer-Type Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpentier, Normand

    2007-01-01

    This article offers reflection on the validity of relational data such as used in social network analysis. Ongoing research on the transformation of the support network of caregivers of persons with an Alzheimer-type disease provides the data to fuel the debate on the validity of participant report. More specifically, we sought to understand the…

  19. Enhanced levels of mitochondrial enzyme 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 in patients with Alzheimer disease and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kristofiková, Zdena; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Katerina; Bartos, Ales; Klaschka, Jan; Rícný, Jan; Rípová, Daniela; Homola, Jirí

    2009-10-01

    The multifunctional mitochondrial enzyme 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 might play a role in the development of Alzheimer disease via its high-affinity binding to amyloid beta peptides and its neuronal over-expression. It is suggested that the cerebrospinal fluid levels of the enzyme, free or bound to amyloid beta peptides, are a potential specific biomarker of Alzheimer disease. However, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to play a role in many neurological diseases including multiple sclerosis. In this study, the specificity of changes in relation to the enzyme over-expression was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent and surface plasmon resonance sensors. The data indicated pronounced increases in the enzyme levels, specifically to 179% in multiple sclerosis and to 573% in Alzheimer disease when compared to the age-matched controls. Although the differences between both diseases were statistically significant, enzyme levels do not appear to be a highly specific biomarker of Alzheimer disease. On the other hand, enhancement in levels of the enzyme bound to amyloid beta peptides was only observed in people with Alzheimer disease, which suggests that the complex should be further considered as a possible biomarker. In patients with multiple sclerosis, our results are the first to demonstrate significant changes in enzyme expression and to suggest possible alterations in amyloid beta peptides.

  20. Alzheimer-type neuropathology in a 28 year old patient with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease after dural grafting.

    PubMed

    Preusser, M; Ströbel, T; Gelpi, E; Eiler, M; Broessner, G; Schmutzhard, E; Budka, H

    2006-03-01

    We report the case of a 28 year old man who had received a cadaverous dura mater graft after a traumatic open skull fracture with tearing of the dura at the age of 5 years. A clinical suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was confirmed by a brain biopsy 5 months prior to death and by autopsy, thus warranting the diagnosis of iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) according to WHO criteria. Immunohistochemistry showed widespread cortical depositions of disease associated prion protein (PrP(sc)) in a synaptic pattern, and western blot analysis identified PrP(sc) of type 2A according to Parchi et al. Surprisingly, we found Alzheimer-type senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in widespread areas of the brain. Plaque-type and vascular amyloid was immunohistochemically identified as deposits of beta-A4 peptide. CERAD criteria for diagnosis of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD) were met in the absence of neurofibrillar tangles or alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusions. There was no family history of AD, CJD, or any other neurological disease, and genetic analysis showed no disease specific mutations of the prion protein, presenilin 1 and 2, or amyloid precursor protein genes. This case represents (a) the iCJD case with the longest incubation time after dural grafting reported so far, (b) the youngest documented patient with concomitant CJD and Alzheimer-type neuropathology to date, (c) the first description of Alzheimer-type changes in iCJD, and (d) the second case of iCJD in Austria. Despite the young patient age, the Alzheimer-type changes may be an incidental finding, possibly related to the childhood trauma.

  1. Altered Kv3.3 channel gating in early-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 13.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Natali A; Lin, Meng-Chin A; Papazian, Diane M

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in Kv3.3 cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). Depending on the causative mutation, SCA13 is either a neurodevelopmental disorder that is evident in infancy or a progressive neurodegenerative disease that emerges during adulthood. Previous studies did not clarify the relationship between these distinct clinical phenotypes and the effects of SCA13 mutations on Kv3.3 function. The F448L mutation alters channel gating and causes early-onset SCA13. R420H and R423H suppress Kv3 current amplitude by a dominant negative mechanism. However, R420H results in the adult form of the disease whereas R423H produces the early-onset, neurodevelopmental form with significant clinical overlap with F448L. Since individuals with SCA13 have one wild type and one mutant allele of the Kv3.3 gene, we analysed the properties of tetrameric channels formed by mixtures of wild type and mutant subunits. We report that one R420H subunit and at least one R423H subunit can co-assemble with the wild type protein to form active channels. The functional properties of channels containing R420H and wild type subunits strongly resemble those of wild type alone. In contrast, channels containing R423H and wild type subunits show significantly altered gating, including a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of activation, slower activation, and modestly slower deactivation. Notably, these effects resemble the modified gating seen in channels containing a mixture of F448L and wild type subunits, although the F448L subunit slows deactivation more dramatically than the R423H subunit. Our results suggest that the clinical severity of R423H reflects its dual dominant negative and dominant gain of function effects. However, as shown by R420H, reducing current amplitude without altering gating does not result in infant onset disease. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that changes in Kv3.3 gating contribute significantly to an early age of onset in SCA13.

  2. Clinicopathological features of familial Alzheimer's disease associated with the M139V mutation in the presenilin 1 gene. Pedigree but not mutation specific age at onset provides evidence for a further genetic factor.

    PubMed

    Fox, N C; Kennedy, A M; Harvey, R J; Lantos, P L; Roques, P K; Collinge, J; Hardy, J; Hutton, M; Stevens, J M; Warrington, E K; Rossor, M N

    1997-03-01

    Sixteen affected individuals are described from two families with early onset autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease. A mutation at codon 139 in the presenilin 1 gene on chromosome 14 results in a methionine to valine substitution which cosegregates with the disease in these families. Onset of dementia was before the age of 50 years in all individuals. The ages at onset within each family were tightly clustered but were significantly different between the families; this difference could not be accounted for by apolipoprotein E status and suggests the existence of a further genetic factor that modifies age at disease onset. The pattern of cognitive decline was similar in both families: early memory loss (initially selective for verbal memory in some individuals) was followed soon after by loss of arithmetic skills while naming and object perception skills were relatively preserved. A speech production deficit was observed in three members of one family but not in the other. Seizures were common and usually predated by myoclonic jerks by a number of years. Serial MRIs showed progressive cortical atrophy with periventricular white matter change appearing 3-4 years into the disease. PET revealed parieto-temporal hypometabolism in all individuals scanned. The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was confirmed with typical histopathology in one individual from each family.

  3. Comparison of Age of Onset and Frequency of Diabetic Complications in the Very Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in elderly people has increased dramatically in the last few decades. This study was designed to clarify the clinical characteristics of type 2 diabetes in patients aged ≥80 years according to age of onset. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 289 patients aged ≥80 years with type 2 diabetes at the outpatient diabetes clinics of Kangwon National University Hospital from September 2010 to June 2014. We divided the patients into middle-age-onset diabetes (onset before 65 years of age) and elderly-onset diabetes (onset at 65+ years of age). Results There were 141 male and 148 female patients. The patients had a mean age of 83.2±2.9 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 14.3±10.4 years. One hundred and ninety-nine patients had elderly-onset diabetes. The patients with elderly-onset diabetes had a significantly lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, lower serum creatinine levels, lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, and similar coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction rates compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. There was no frequency difference in coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction and HbA1c levels between three subgroups (<5, 5 to 15, and ≥15 years) of diabetes duration in elderly onset diabetes. However, both in the elderly onset diabetes and middle-age-onset diabetes, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was increasing rapidly according to the duration of diabetes. Conclusion We report that individuals with elderly-onset diabetes have a lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy and similar cardiovascular complications compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. PMID:27586451

  4. Early-onset facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 with some atypical features.

    PubMed

    Dorobek, Małgorzata; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Lemmers, Richard J L F; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Frants, Rune R; Gawel, Malgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy cases with facial weakness before the age of 5 and signs of shoulder weakness by the age of 10 are defined as early onset. Contraction of the D4Z4 repeat on chromosome 4q35 is causally related to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1, and the residual size of the D4Z4 repeat shows a roughly inverse correlation with the severity of the disease. Contraction of the D4Z4 repeat on chromosome 4q35 is believed to induce a local change in chromatin structure and consequent transcriptional deregulation of 4qter genes. We present early-onset cases in the Polish population that amounted to 21% of our total population with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. More than 27% of them presented with severe phenotypes (wheelchair dependency). The residual D4Z4 repeat sizes ranged from 1 to 4 units. In addition, even within early-onset facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 phenotypes, some cases had uncommon features (head drop, early disabling contractures, progressive ptosis, and respiratory insufficiency and cardiomyopathy).

  5. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  6. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus: lessons learned from the TODAY study.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sumana; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2014-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasingly diagnosed in obese children and adolescents. Evidence suggests that this disease commonly progresses more rapidly in youth compared with adults and is associated with high rates of early microalbuminuria, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study was the first multiethnic, multicenter randomized trial in the United States to compare 3 treatment approaches in obese youth with new-onset type 2 diabetes (n=699; ages 10-17 years): monotherapy with metformin, metformin with rosiglitazone, and metformin with an intensive lifestyle intervention. The primary outcome was glycemic control. Diabetes-related complications and cardiovascular risk factors were also examined. Approximately half of the participants could not maintain glycemic control by using metformin alone. Combination therapy with metformin and rosiglitazone resulted in better durability of glycemic control, and metformin plus intensive lifestyle intervention was intermediate but not superior to metformin alone. Deterioration in glycemic control was associated with rapid loss of beta cell function, not worsened insulin sensitivity, and could not be explained by differences in adherence or body mass index. After 3.9 years, 236 (33.8%) of participants had hypertension and 116 participants (16.6%) had microalbuminuria. Only 55.9% of participants had a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL (to convert to mmol/L, multiply by 0.0259) after 3 years, and 71 of 517 participants (13.7%) had retinopathy. The significance of the findings from this important trial for the management of youth and young adults with youth-onset type 2 diabetes and its complications is discussed. An aggressive multifaceted approach is needed to prevent or forestall premature microvascular and macrovascular complications in youth-onset type 2 diabetes.

  7. Relative risk of Alzheimer disease and age-at-onset distributions, based on APOE genotypes among elderly African Americans, caucasians, and hispanics in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M.X.; Liu, X.H.; Stern, Y.

    1996-03-01

    Apolipoprotein-E {epsilon}4 (APOE-{epsilon}4) has been consistently associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and may be responsible for an earlier age at onset. We have previously reported a diminished association between APOE-{epsilon}4 and AD in African Americans. Using a new method, which allows inclusion of censored information, we compared relative risks by APOE genotypes in an expanded collection of cases and controls from three ethnic groups in a New York community. The relative risk for AD associated with APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygosity was increased in all ethnic groups (African American relative risk [RR] = 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-5.9; Caucasian RR = 7.3, 95% CI = 2.5-21.6; and Hispanic RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1-5.7), compared with those with APOE-{epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotypes. The risk was also increased for APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygous Caucasians (RR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.7-5.1) and Hispanics (RR = 1.6,95% CI = 1.1-2.3), but not for African Americans (RR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-0.9). The age distribution of the proportion of Caucasians and Hispanics without AD was consistently lower for APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygous and APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygous individuals than for those with other APOE genotypes. In African Americans this relationship was observed only in APOE-{epsilon}4 homozygotes. These results confirm that APOE genotypes influence the RR of AD in Caucasians and Hispanics. Differences in risk among APOE-{epsilon}4 heterozygote African Americans suggest that other genetic or environmental factors may modify the effect of APOE-{epsilon}4 in some populations. 58 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Plasma oxidative stress parameters in men and women with early stage Alzheimer type dementia.

    PubMed

    Puertas, M C; Martínez-Martos, J M; Cobo, M P; Carrera, M P; Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress is one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, indicating that may play a key role in this disease. In our study, we measured the levels of oxidative stress indicators (TBARS and protein carbonyls content) and the non-enzymatic (glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG)) and enzymatic (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) defense systems in the plasma of 46 patients diagnosed of ATD and 46 age-matched controls. We found decreased levels in total GSH in ATD patients, although healthy control women showed lower levels of total GSH than healthy control men. On the contrary, we found increased levels of TBARS and carbonyl groups content in ATD patients in both genders. The activity of the plasma antioxidant enzymes showed no changes for SOD activity in ATD patients, independently of the gender, although western blot analysis showed an increase in SOD-1 protein. CAT activity was also decreased in ATD patients, although this decrease is mainly due to the decrease found in men but not in women. However, western blot analysis did not show differences in CAT protein between controls and ATD patients. Finally, a decrease of GPx activity was found in ATD patients in both genders. However, as with CAT protein, western blot analysis did not show differences in GPx protein between controls and ATD patients. Our results suggest that there is a defect in the antioxidant defense system that is incapable of responding to increased free radical production, which may lead to oxidative damage and the development of the pathological alterations that characterize the neurodegenerative disorder of patients with ATD. Thus, oxidative damage could be one important aspect for the onset of ATD and oxidative stress markers could be useful to diagnose the illness in their earliest stages through both non-invasive, reliable and cost-affordable methods.

  9. Early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Nonamnestic Subtypes and Type 2 AD

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most prevalent neurodegenerative dementia, are usually elderly; however, ~4–5% develop early-onset AD (EOAD) with onset before age 65. Most EOAD is sporadic, but about 5% of patients with EOAD have an autosomal dominant mutation such as Presenilin 1, Presenilin 2, or alterations in the Amyloid Precursor Protein gene. Although most Alzheimer’s research has concentrated on older, late-onset AD (LOAD), there is much recent interest and research in EOAD. These recent studies indicate that EOAD is a heterogeneous disorder with significant differences from LOAD. From 22–64% of EOAD patients have a predominant nonamnestic syndrome presenting with deficits in language, visuospatial abilities, praxis, or other non-memory cognition. These nonamnestic patients may differ in several ways from the usual memory or amnestic patients. Patients with nonamnestic EOAD compared to typical amnestic AD have a more aggressive course, lack the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) susceptibility gene for AD, and have a focus and early involvement of non-hippocampal areas of brain, particularly parietal neocortex. These differences in the EOAD subtypes indicate differences in the underlying amyloid cascade, the prevailing pathophysiological theory for the development of AD. Together the results of recent studies suggest that nonamnestic subtypes of EOAD constitute a Type 2 AD distinct from the usual, typical disorder. In sum, the study of EOAD can reveal much about the clinical heterogeneity, predisposing factors, and neurobiology of this disease. PMID:23178565

  10. Reversal of new-onset type 1 diabetes in mice by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanting; Ouyang, Jian; Yang, Rong; Chen, Junhao; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojun; Burt, Richard K

    2008-09-19

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has recently been performed as a novel strategy to treat patients with new-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the mechanism of autologous HSCT-induced remission of diabetes remains unknown. In order to help clarify the mechanism of remission-induction following autologous HSCT in patients with T1D, mice treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin to induce diabetes were used as both donors (n=20) and recipients (n=20). Compared to streptozocin-treated mice not receiving transplantation, syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (syn-BMT) from a streptozocin-treated diabetic donor, if applied during new-onset T1D (day 10 after diabetes onset), can reverse hyperglycemia without relapse (P<0.001), maintain normal blood insulin levels (P<0.001), and preserve islet cell mass. Compared to diabetic mice not undergoing HSCT, syn-BMT, results in restoration of Tregs in spleens (P<0.01), increased Foxp3 mRNA expression (P<0.01) and increased Foxp3 protein expression (P<0.05). This diabetic-remission-inducing effect occurred in mice receiving bone marrow from either streptozocin-treated diabetic or non-diabetic normal donors. We conclude that autologous HSCT remission of diabetes is more than transient immune suppression, and is capable of prolonged remission-induction via regeneration of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs.

  11. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  12. Peripheral blood monocyte gene expression profile clinically stratifies patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katharine M; Gallego, Patricia; An, Xiaoyu; Best, Shannon E; Thomas, Gethin; Wells, Christine; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2012-05-01

    Novel biomarkers of disease progression after type 1 diabetes onset are needed. We profiled peripheral blood (PB) monocyte gene expression in six healthy subjects and 16 children with type 1 diabetes diagnosed ∼3 months previously and analyzed clinical features from diagnosis to 1 year. Monocyte expression profiles clustered into two distinct subgroups, representing mild and severe deviation from healthy control subjects, along the same continuum. Patients with strongly divergent monocyte gene expression had significantly higher insulin dose-adjusted HbA(1c) levels during the first year, compared with patients with mild deviation. The diabetes-associated expression signature identified multiple perturbations in pathways controlling cellular metabolism and survival, including endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress (e.g., induction of HIF1A, DDIT3, DDIT4, and GRP78). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) of a 9-gene panel correlated with glycemic control in 12 additional recent-onset patients. The qPCR signature was also detected in PB from healthy first-degree relatives. A PB gene expression signature correlates with glycemic control in the first year after diabetes diagnosis and is present in at-risk subjects. These findings implicate monocyte phenotype as a candidate biomarker for disease progression pre- and postonset and systemic stresses as contributors to innate immune function in type 1 diabetes.

  13. Diabetes type II: a risk factor for depression-Parkinson-Alzheimer?

    PubMed

    Riederer, Peter; Bartl, Jasmin; Laux, Gerd; Grünblatt, Edna

    2011-02-01

    There is ample evidence that impairments in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are of etiopathobiochemical importance in a subgroup of patients with "depression", causing hypercortisolaemia as major metabolic effect. Chronic hypercortisolaemia causes insulin resistance. Therefore, it is not surprising that epidemiological studies demonstrate an association of "depression" with diabetes type II and vice versa. Chronic stress and hypercortisolaemia are conditions, which have been suggested to be causal for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as brain insulin resistance is associated with β-Amyloid-accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein. Depression is one of the significant symptomatology preceding AD. It is however, not known whether "depression" associated with hypercortisolaemia is the subgroup at risk for AD. In contrast to a subgroup of "depression" and to AD, in Parkinson's disease (PD) there is only weak evidence for an association with diabetes type II and insulin resistance. As "depression" is preceding PD in up to half of such patients, it remains to be elucidated whether this is a subgroup of depressed patients, which is not associated with disturbances of the HPA axis and hypercortisolaemia. Improved clinical and biochemical/molecular knowledge about "depression" associated with AD and PD in comparison to "pure" depression might lead to improved therapeutic strategies and even drug development focusing subtypes of "depression".

  14. Heterogeneity in red wine polyphenolic contents differentially influences Alzheimer's disease-type neuropathology and cognitive deterioration.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lap; Chen, Ling Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Wei; Talcott, Stephen T; Ono, Kenjiro; Teplow, David; Humala, Nelson; Cheng, Alice; Percival, Susan S; Ferruzzi, Mario; Janle, Elsa; Dickstein, Dara L; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2009-01-01

    We recently found that moderate consumption of two unrelated red wines generate from different grape species, a Cabernet Sauvignon and a muscadine wine that are characterized by distinct component composition of polyphenolic compounds, significantly attenuated the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type brain pathology and memory deterioration in a transgenic AD mouse model. Interestingly, our evidence suggests that the two red wines attenuated AD phenotypes through independent mechanisms. In particular, we previously found that treatment with Cabernet Sauvignon reduced the generation of AD-type amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. In contrast, evidence from our present study suggests that muscadine treatment attenuates Abeta neuropathology and Abeta-related cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice by interfering with the oligomerization of Abeta molecules to soluble high-molecular-weight Abeta oligomer species that are responsible for initiating a cascade of cellular events resulting in cognitive decline. Collectively, our observations suggest that distinct polyphenolic compounds from red wines may be bioavailable at the organism level and beneficially modulate AD phenotypes through multiple Abeta-related mechanisms. Results from these studies suggest the possibility of developing a "combination" of dietary polyphenolic compounds for AD prevention and/or therapy by modulating multiple Abeta-related mechanisms.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid cortisol and clinical disease progression in MCI and dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Popp, Julius; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Heuser, Isabella; Peters, Oliver; Hüll, Michael; Schröder, Johannes; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Lewczuk, Piotr; Schneider, Anja; Jahn, Holger; Luckhaus, Christian; Perneczky, Robert; Frölich, Lutz; Wagner, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Wiltfang, Jens; Kornhuber, Johannes; Jessen, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Increased peripheral and central nervous system cortisol levels have been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect dysfunction of cerebral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, brain exposure to high cortisol concentrations may also accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at early clinical stages of AD and whether plasma and CSF cortisol levels are associated with clinical disease progression. Morning plasma and CSF cortisol concentrations were obtained from the subjects with AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment of AD type (MCI-AD), MCI of other type (MCI-O), and controls with normal cognition included in a multicenter study from the German Dementia Competence Network. A clinical and neuropsychological follow-up was performed in a subgroup of participants with MCI-AD, MCI-O, and AD dementia. CSF cortisol concentrations were increased in the subjects with AD dementia or MCI-AD compared with subjects with MCI-O or normal cognition. After controlling for possible confounders including CSF measures of amyloid beta1-42 and total tau, higher baseline CSF cortisol levels were associated with faster clinical worsening and cognitive decline in MCI-AD. The findings suggest that HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at the MCI stage of AD and may accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline.

  16. Inflammatory signaling in Alzheimer disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To help define the relationships among inflammation, Alzheimer disease, and depression, the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium analyzed an array of inflammatory biomarkers in a cohort of patients with Alzheimer disease and in controls. Inflammation severity was highly correlated with earlier age at onset of Alzheimer disease and was also associated with cognitive decline. The relationship between inflammation and depression was not as clear, and it varied with aspects of depression, gender, and the presence of Alzheimer disease.

  17. Regional cerebral metabolic alterations in dementia of the Alzheimer type: positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Ganz, E.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Koss, B.; Ober, B.A.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-08-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia in adults. Despite recent advances in our understanding of its anatomy and chemistry, we remain largely ignorant of its pathogenesis, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Dynamic positron emission tomography using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed on the Donner 280-crystal ring in 10 subjects with dementia of the Alzheimer type and six healthy age-matched controls. Ratios comparing mean counts per resolution element in frontal, temporoparietal, and entire cortex regions in brain sections 10 mm thick obtained 40-70 min following FDG injection showed relatively less FDG uptake in the temporoparietal cortex bilaterally in all the Alzheimer subjects (p less than 0.01). Left-right alterations were less prominent than the anteroposterior changes. This diminished uptake was due to lowered rates of FDG use and suggests that the metabolic effects of Alzheimer disease are most concentrated in the temporoparietal cortex. Positron emission tomography is a most powerful tool for the noninvasive in vivo assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset.

    PubMed

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset

    PubMed Central

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 Type 1 Narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling. PMID:25771509

  20. Association between clusterin gene polymorphism rs11136000 and late-onset Alzheimer's disease susceptibility: A review and meta-analysis of case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjin; Tan, Jiping; Xu, Wei; Chen, Jinwen; Wang, Luning

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association between rs11136000 in clusterin (CLU) and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) by meta-analysis. Several databases including PubMed, EMbase, CBMdisc and CMCC were searched for relevant case-control studies based on defined selection criteria. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the rs11136000 genotype and allele distribution were analyzed with RevMan and Stata software. The control population and heterogeneity between populations were examined in the selected studies using the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Overall OR among the frequencies of the genotype and allele in both patients with AD and controls was estimated using fixed or random effect models. The summary of the OR and 95% CI were then analyzed to obtain the effects across the studies. Publication bias was examined using a funnel plot, Egger's test and Begg's test, and a Fail-safe Number (Nfs). A total of 20 reports were used. The summary OR for studies in the Caucasian population with a frequency of TT+TC/CC genotype and T/C allele at rs11136000 locus in CLU were 0.79 (95% CI, 0.73–0.86; P<0.00001) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.85–0.90; P<0.00001). The summary OR for the studies conducted in the Asian population were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.81–0.99; P=0.04) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.81–0.93; P<0.0001). The summary OR in other mixed ethnic groups with regards to the frequency of T/C allele was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.68–0.99; P=0.04). These results demonstrated the presence of a statistically significant difference in LOAD susceptibility between individuals with the T allele CLU rs11136000 polymorphism and those without. The studies conducted in populations of African descent or Hispanics showed no statistically significant difference. Negligible publication bias was present, with Nfs being 750.604. In summary, polymorphism rs11136000 in the CLU gene may contribute to susceptibility to LOAD, and the presence of the T allele may reduce the risk of LOAD in

  1. Onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes during pregnancy: Prevalence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Hélène; Lepercq, Jacques; Timsit, José

    2010-08-01

    Although this has been recently challenged, gestational diabetes mellitus (gestational diabetes) is still defined as an "impairment of glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy". According to this definition, all pathophysiological conditions leading to beta cell deficiency may reveal as gestational diabetes, due to the physiological insulin resistance associated with pregnancy. In rare patients, gestational diabetes is associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies and with a high risk of progression to overt type 1 diabetes after delivery. This condition has often been compared to the Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults. The frequency of islet autoantibodies in gestational diabetes has been assessed in many studies, but data about the clinical presentation of this subtype and about its prognosis are few. We review these studies and discuss the links of autoimmune gestational diabetes with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Linking Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus via aberrant insulin signaling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mohammad A; Priyamvada, Shubha; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Tabrez, Shams; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two progressive and devastating health disorders afflicting millions of people worldwide. The probability and incidence of both have increased considerably in recent years consequent to increased longevity and population growth. Progressively more links are being continuously found between inflammation and central nervous system disorders like AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury and even cancers of the nervous tissue. The depth of the relationship depends on the timing and extent of anti- or pro-inflammatory gene expression. Inflammation has also been implicated in T2DM. Misfolding and fibrillization (of tissue specific and/or non-specific proteins) are features common to both AD and T2DM and are induced by as well as contribute to inflammation and stress (oxidative/ glycation). This review appraises the roles of inflammation and abnormalities in the insulin signaling system as important shared features of T2DM and AD. The capacity of anti-cholinesterases in reducing the level of certain common inflammatory markers in particular if they may provide therapeutic potential to mitigate awry mechanisms leading to AD.

  3. Thyroid medication use and subsequent development of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between medication use and the development of Alzheimer’s disease have been investigated since the late 1900s. Thyroid hormone supplementation is rarely a studied medication class in this area of research. We examined data from participants enrolled in longitudinal studies at the Washington University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center for associations between thyroid disease, thyroid hormone supplementation therapy, and subsequent development of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). Data collected between April 1992 and June 2008 from 499 participants, 184 men and 315 women, were analyzed. Mean age was 76.9 years (S.D. = 9.2). At baseline, 61 participants reported thyroid medication use and 87 were identified as having a history of thyroid dysfunction. These participants progressed to a DAT diagnosis more rapidly than individuals not taking thyroid medication (HR: 1.67, 95% CI: 0.99–2.78, p = 0.054). While an interesting trend was seen, baseline thyroid disease was not significantly (p=.093) associated with time to DAT diagnosis. Our findings suggest that utilization of thyroid medication may be associated with the development of DAT. PMID:19666883

  4. Musical structural determinants of emotional judgments in dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Lise; Peretz, Isabelle; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2009-01-01

    People with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) may well be emotionally soothed by listening to music. However, very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the anecdotal evidence. DAT does damage certain cerebral structures that subsume emotional processing, and some studies have demonstrated deficits affecting emotional judgments of facial expression and prosody in DAT. Accordingly, this study addressed the question of whether DAT might leave musical emotional judgment intact. Twelve early DAT participants and 12 healthy elderly participants took part in this study. Emotional judgments were examined in relation to mode and tempo, two important structural properties that contribute to the happy-sad distinction in music. Their respective contributions were assessed in four different experimental conditions. The DAT participants' responses were similar to those of healthy elderly participants, showing spared ability to employ tempo and mode as cues for emotional interpretation. The DAT participants' performance was not correlated with their global cognitive functioning. These results constitute a preliminary empirical demonstration that, in early DAT, musical emotional judgments appear to be based on normal structural analysis of musical input.

  5. The pancreas-brain axis: insight into disrupted mechanisms associating type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Desai, Gauri S; Zheng, Chen; Geetha, Thangiah; Mathews, Suresh T; White, B Douglas; Huggins, Kevin W; Zizza, Claire A; Broderick, Tom L; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and observational studies indicate a positive correlation between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and dementia, with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with insulin-treated diabetes patients. The purpose of this review is to reveal the molecular mechanisms that connect physiological and pathological processes commonly observed in T2DM and AD. Conformational modifications in peptide residues, such as amyloid-β peptide in AD and amylin in T2DM have been shown to instigate formation of insoluble protein aggregates that get deposited in extracellular spaces of brain and pancreatic tissue thus disrupting their normal function. Impaired insulin signaling plays a critical role in AD pathogenesis by reducing IRS-associated PI3 kinase activity and increasing GSK-3β activity. GSK-3β has been suggested to be a component of the γ-secretase complex and is involved in amyloid-β protein precursor processing. GSK-3β along with CDK5 is responsible for hyperphosphorylation of tau leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. In summary, there is evidence to believe that a molecular link connects AD and T2DM and has potential for further investigation toward development of an effective therapeutic target.

  6. Increased cortical atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Biessels, G J; De Leeuw, F‐E; Lindeboom, J; Barkhof, F; Scheltens, P

    2006-01-01

    Background The risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increased in type 2 diabetes (DM2). This increased risk has been attributed to vascular comorbidity, but other mechanisms, such as accelerated ageing of the brain, have also been implicated. Objective To determine whether AD in patients with DM2 is associated with an increased occurrence of vascular lesions in the brain, by increased cerebral atrophy, or a combination of both. Methods In total, 29 patients with AD and DM2 and 58 patients with AD and without DM2 were included in the study. Clinical characteristics were recorded, and a neuropsychological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan were performed. MRI scans were rated for cortical and subcortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy, white matter lesions, and infarcts. Results The neuropsychological profiles of the two groups were identical. Patients with AD and DM2 had increased cortical atrophy on MRI (p<0.05) compared with the non‐DM2 group. In addition, infarcts were more common (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI 0.8 to 7.8), but this effect did not account for the increased atrophy. The other MR measures did not differ between the groups. Conclusion The results suggest that non‐vascular mechanisms, leading to increased cortical atrophy, are also involved in the increased risk of AD in DM2. PMID:16484636

  7. Selegiline versus L-acetylcarnitine in the treatment of Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Campi, N; Todeschini, G P; Scarzella, L

    1990-01-01

    Forty elderly patients (13 men and 27 women, aged 56 to 80 years) were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized, parallel study to assess the efficacy and safety of selegiline (10 mg, once daily) and that of L-acetylcarnitine (500 mg, twice daily) in the treatment of patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer-type disorders. The treatments lasted 90 days, after a run-in period of 15 days. An extensive psychometric examination, carried out at baseline and subsequently at every 30 days of treatment, was used for evaluation of efficacy. Drug safety was assessed by noting any adverse effects that occurred during treatment and by performing laboratory tests at the beginning and end of treatment. According to the resulting data, selegiline therapy led to a global improvement in the capacity for the processing, storage, and retrieval of given information. Improvements in verbal fluency and visuospatial abilities were also noted. The marked between-group differences demonstrate that, at the dosage used, selegiline was far more effective than L-acetylcarnitine with respect to the degree of improvement. Finally, tolerability of both drugs was excellent, inasmuch as neither the monitoring for adverse drug reactions nor laboratory tests revealed any abnormalities resulting from therapy.

  8. Oligomerization of beta-amyloid of the Alzheimer's and the Dutch-cerebral-haemorrhage types.

    PubMed Central

    Sian, A K; Frears, E R; El-Agnaf, O M; Patel, B P; Manca, M F; Siligardi, G; Hussain, R; Austen, B M

    2000-01-01

    A novel ELISA has been developed which detects oligomerization of beta-amyloid (A beta). Oligomerization, fibrillization and neurotoxicity of native A beta associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) type has been compared with E22Q A beta (amyloid beta-protein containing residues 1--40 with the native Glu at residue 22 changed to Gln) implicated in Dutch cerebral haemorrhage disease. Solutions of A beta rapidly yield soluble oligomers in a concentration-dependent manner, which are detected by the ELISA, and by size-exclusion gel chromatography. Conformational changes from disordered to beta-sheet occur more slowly than oligomerization, and fibrils are produced after prolonged incubation. The E22Q A beta oligomerizes, changes conformation and fibrillizes more rapidly than the native form and produces shorter stubbier fibrils. Aged fibrillar preparations of E22Q A beta are more potent than aged fibrils of native A beta in inducing apoptotic changes and toxic responses in human neuroblastoma cell lines, whereas low-molecular-mass oligomers in briefly incubated solutions are much less potent. The differences in the rates of oligomerization of the two A beta forms, their conformational behaviour over a range of pH values, and NMR data reported elsewhere, are consistent with a molecular model of oligomerization in which strands of A beta monomers initially overcome charge repulsion to form dimers in parallel beta-sheet arrangement, stabilized by intramolecular hydrophobic interactions, with amino acids of adjacent chains in register. PMID:10861242

  9. Evidence for a dissociation of structural and semantic knowledge in dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT).

    PubMed

    Hajilou, B Bruce; Done, D John

    2007-03-02

    Object recognition and naming deficits in dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) have typically been attributed to deficits in semantic processing, with only a few studies proposing loci of deficits other than semantic. One possible cause of DAT object recognition impairments could involve deficits in processing structural aspects of visually presented items. In this paper, we assess the performance of a group of mild DAT patients on two tasks of structural access, object decision, and the complete/incomplete task (based on part-whole matching task), as well as on a semantic probes task, designed to assess the patients' semantic knowledge of the same items for which structural knowledge had earlier been assessed. The DAT patients were substantially impaired in their performance on tasks of structural access. Further, no evidence for item-to-item consistency in the DAT patients' errors for the structural and semantic tasks was found, raising the possibility that structural and semantic knowledge may become differentially impaired in DAT.

  10. [Longitudinal study of procedural memory in patients with Alzheimer-type dementia].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hiroko; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Arakaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Kawachi, Juro

    2002-04-01

    We never forget how to ride a bicycle, and it is thought that procedural memories are retained for a long time. Recently, it was reported that patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type(DAT) could not only acquire, but also retain, long-lasting procedural memories. Previous group studies had shown procedural memory retention times of only 1 month in DAT patients, while amnesic patients and healthy people could retain such memories for 12 months. The relationship between the ability to retain procedural memory and the stage of the disease is not clear, as to date there has been no longitudinal study of procedural memory retention in DAT patients. Thus, we examined DAT patients' ability to retain long-term procedural memories (after 1, 5 and 20 months), and analyzed the relationship between procedural memory ability and the progress of disease. Motor-type procedural memory was examined using the mirror tracing task and the bi-manual coordinated tracing task. All three of the DAT patients showed improvement in their performance. The time required for the tracing was reduced between trials, and the improvement did not disappear between sessions, or rather, their times further decreased in subsequent sessions. Even the most severe DAT patient (Mini Mental State Examination(MMSE) score of 4) was able to acquire the procedural memory and retain it for at least 3 months. Furthermore, one of the subjects showed retention of the procedural memory at 20 months. Our results suggest that DAT patients can retain procedural memories for extended periods, with no relationship between retention ability and disease progression. It is possible for even severely demented patients to acquire and retain motor-type procedural memories. Cognitive rehabilitation in DAT appears to be effective, and it is possible for DAT patients to learn new things. It may be that DAT patients can ameliorate their quality of life by using retained procedural memory.

  11. Brain local and regional neuroglial alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: cell types, responses and implications.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Adolfo; Álvarez, María-Isabel; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Merino, José-Joaquín; Rodríguez, José Julio

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death, neurons are dynamically accompanied by neuroglial cells in a very close morphological and functional relationship. Three families have been classically considered within the CNS: astroglia, oligodendroglia and microglia. Many types/subtypes (including NGR2+ cells), with a wide variety of physiological and pathological effects on neurons, have been described using morphological and immunocytochemical criteria. Glio-glial, glio-neuronal and neuro-glial cell signaling and gliotransmission are phenomena that are essential to support brain functions. Morphofunctional changes resulting from the plasticity of all the glial cell types parallel the plastic neuronal changes that optimize the functionality of neuronal circuits. Moreover, neuroglia possesses the ability to adopt a reactive status (gliosis) in which, generally, new functions arise to improve and restore if needed the neural functionality. All these features make neuroglial cells elements of paramount importance when attempting to explain any physiological or pathological processes in the CNS, because they are involved in both, neuroprotection/neurorepair and neurodegeneration. There exist diverse and profound, regional and local, neuroglial changes in all involutive processes (physiological and pathological aging; neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer ´s disease -AD-), but today, the exact meaning of such modifications (the modifications of the different neuroglial types, in time and place), is not well understood. In this review we consider the different neuroglial cells and their responses in order to understand the possible role they fulfill in pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment (preventive or palliative) of AD. The existence of differentiated and/or concurrent pathogenic and neuro-protective/neuro-restorative astroglial and microglial responses is highlighted.

  12. Estimation of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 Cuban patients by survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Mederos, L E; Falcón, N S; Almira, Y R; Zaldivar, Y G; Almarales, D C; Góngora, E M; Herrera, M P; Batallán, K E; Armiñán, R R; Manresa, M V; Cruz, G S; Laffita-Mesa, J; Cyuz, T M; Chang, V; Auburger, G; Gispert, S; Pérez, L V

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have investigated the close association that exists between CAG repeat number and the age at onset in SCA2 = spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. These studies have focused on affected individuals. To further characterize this association and estimate the risk of a carrier developing SCA2 at a particular age as a function of a specific CAG repeat size, we have analyzed a large group of 924 individuals, including 394 presymptomatic and 530 affected individuals with a CAG repeat length of 32-79 units. Using a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, we obtained cumulative probability curves for disease manifestation at a particular age for each CAG repeat length in the 34-45 range. These curves were significantly different (p < 0.001) and showed small overlap. All these information may be very valuable in predictive-testing programs, in the planning of studies for the identification of other genetic and environmental factors as modifiers of age at onset, and in the design of clinical trials for people at enlarged risk for SCA2.

  13. Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes-related alterations in brain mitochondria, autophagy and synaptic markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristina; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy in the brain of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. Isolated brain mitochondria and homogenates from cerebral cortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT), triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) and T2D mice were used to evaluate mitochondrial functional parameters and protein levels of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and synaptic integrity markers, respectively. A significant decrease in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and energy levels was observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Also, a significant decrease in the levels of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) and glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) was observed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Moreover, both brain regions of 3xTg-AD mice present lower levels of nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) 1 while the levels of NRF2 are lower in both brain regions of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. A decrease in mitochondrial encoded, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) was also observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice although only statistically significant in T2D cortex. Furthermore, a decrease in the levels of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) in the cerebral cortex of 3xTg-AD mice and in hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice and a decrease in the levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP 25) in the hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice were observed suggesting synaptic integrity loss. These results support the idea that alterations in mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy cause synaptic damage in AD and T2D.

  14. The onset of chromospheric activity among the A- and F- type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore; Landsman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations of C II lambda1335 and C IV lambda1549 and ground-based observations of He I lambda5876 have previously discovered intense levels of chromospheric activity among early F type stars. Virtually all F dwarfs show stronger chromospheric and transition region emission than do the cooler and more deeply convective dwarf stars like the Sun. The IUE spectra and those of He lambda5876 place the onset of stellar activity along the main sequence near a color B - V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type FO and an effective temperature of 7300 K. However, existing X-ray observations of A and F stars suggest that coronal activity may reach a peak blueward of this high temperature boundary at B - V = 0.28 before vanishing among the early and mid A-type stars. Discussed are preliminary results of a new effort to refine the location of the high temperature boundary to chromospheric activity among A- and F- type stars, making use of low dispersion short-wavelength spectra from the IUE archives from which the strengths of C IV, C II, and Lyman alpha emission have been measured.

  15. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutation that is associated with disease onset in infancy disrupts axonal pathfinding during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi A; Mock, Allan F; Sagasti, Alvaro; Papazian, Diane M

    2012-11-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) channel. SCA13 exists in two forms: infant onset is characterized by severe cerebellar atrophy, persistent motor deficits and intellectual disability, whereas adult onset is characterized by progressive ataxia and progressive cerebellar degeneration. To test the hypothesis that infant- and adult-onset mutations have differential effects on neuronal development that contribute to the age at which SCA13 emerges, we expressed wild-type Kv3.3 or infant- or adult-onset mutant proteins in motor neurons in the zebrafish spinal cord. We characterized the development of CaP (caudal primary) motor neurons at ∼36 and ∼48 hours post-fertilization using confocal microscopy and 3D digital reconstruction. Exogenous expression of wild-type Kv3.3 had no significant effect on CaP development. In contrast, CaP neurons expressing the infant-onset mutation made frequent pathfinding errors, sending long, abnormal axon collaterals into muscle territories that are normally innervated exclusively by RoP (rostral primary) or MiP (middle primary) motor neurons. This phenotype might be directly relevant to infant-onset SCA13 because interaction with inappropriate synaptic partners might trigger cell death during brain development. Importantly, pathfinding errors were not detected in CaP neurons expressing the adult-onset mutation. However, the adult-onset mutation tended to increase the complexity of the distal axonal arbor. From these results, we speculate that infant-onset SCA13 is associated with marked changes in the development of Kv3.3-expressing cerebellar neurons, reducing their health and viability early in life and resulting in the withered cerebellum seen in affected children.

  17. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia in an elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Mayuko; Sakaeda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mika; Miki, Toshifumi; Saito, Junko; Chikamori, Masayasu; Tomita, Hideharu; Ichikawa, Hiromoto; Yoshimoto, Kaori; Takamatsu, Masahiro; Okada, Mitsuo; Aono, Rei; Enzan, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Takako

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with consciousness disturbance. The results of brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal, but triphasic waves were noted on electroencephalography. His plasma ammonia level was elevated due to which encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemia was suspected. However, his liver function was normal, and no evidence of cirrhosis or portal-systemic shunt was noted. The patient's medical history revealed that he had a tendency to excessively consume pulse products since childhood, and an amino acid analysis showed elevation of citrulline and arginine levels. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with an extremely rare case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia, which was triggered by cessation of the intake of pulse foods (soybeans and peanuts) due to dental problems.

  18. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  19. Breakout character of islet amyloid polypeptide hydrophobic mutations at the onset of type-2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.

    2014-11-01

    Toxic fibrillar aggregates of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) appear as the physical outcome of a peptidic phase transition signaling the onset of type-2 diabetes mellitus in different mammalian species. In particular, experimentally verified mutations on the amyloidogenic segment 20-29 in humans, cats, and rats are highly correlated with the molecular aggregation propensities. Through a microcanonical analysis of the aggregation of IAPP20 -29 isoforms, we show that a minimalist one-bead hydrophobic-polar continuum model for protein interactions properly quantifies those propensities from free-energy barriers. Our results highlight the central role of sequence-dependent hydrophobic mutations on hot spots for stabilization, and thus for the engineering, of such biological peptides.

  20. Genetic aspects of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bird, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia and represents a major public health problem. The neuropathologic findings of amyloid-beta plaques and tau containing neurofibrillary tangles represent important molecular clues to the underlying pathogenesis. Genetic factors are well recognized, but complicated. Three rare forms of autosomal-dominant early-onset familial Alzheimer disease have been identified and are associated with mutations in amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, and presenilin 2 genes. The more common late-onset form of Alzheimer disease is assumed to be polygenic/multifactorial. However, thus far the only clearly identified genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease is Apo lipoprotein E. The epsilon4 allele of Apo lipoprotein E influences age at onset of Alzheimer disease, but is neither necessary nor sufficient for the disease. The search continues for the discovery of additional genetic influences.

  1. Exercise testing in late-onset glycogen storage disease type II patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Morandi, Lucia; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has recently became available for patients with glycogen storage disease type II. Previous studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy, however, data on physiological variables related to exercise tolerance are scarce. Four glycogen storage disease type II late-onset patients (45 ± 6 years) performed an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer, up to voluntary exhaustion, before (BEFORE) and after 12 months of ERT (AFTER). Peak workload, oxygen uptake, heart rate, cardiac output (by impedance cardiography) and vastus lateralis oxygenation indices (by continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) were determined. Peak workload and oxygen uptake values significantly increased during ERT (54 ± 30 vs. 63 ± 31 watt, and 17.2 ± 4.4 vs. 19.7 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min, respectively, in BEFORE vs. AFTER). On the other hand, for both peak cardiac output (12.3 ± 5.3 vs. 14.8 ± 4.5L/min) and the NIRS-determined peak skeletal muscle fractional O(2) extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values during a transient limb ischemia (30 ± 39% vs. 38 ± 28%), the observed increases were not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that in glycogen storage disease type II patients enzyme replacement therapy is associated with a mild improvement of exercise tolerance. The findings need to be validated during a longer follow-up on a larger group of patients.

  2. A nanotechnological approach to the management of Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alam, Qamre; ZubairAlam, Mohammad; Karim, Sajjad; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A; Jiman-Fatani, Asif; Damanhouri, Ghazi A; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Haque, Absarul

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are both prevalent in older individuals and have gained significant attention due to alarming rates of increase. The high incidences of these diseases pose a great socioeconomic burden and cause major public health concerns worldwide. A number of studies have established potential links between AD and T2D, supporting the hypothesis that T2D is linked with an increased risk of AD and that controlling diabetes could have a positive impact on the prevention of AD. At present, both diseases lack precise diagnostic approaches for early intervention and effective cure. Further, the currently available diagnostic tools for AD screening are insufficiently sensitive and robust for preventive measures. Although several drugs are used for the treatment of both these diseases, none of these drugs offers complete remission of the disease, merely symptomatic relief. Moreover, these drugs have limited efficacy because of problems such as conventional drug delivery systems beyond the blood brain barrier, a lack of target specificity and diminished potency. From this perspective, the emerging field of nanotechnology has offered new techniques and tools to overcome these challenges. In this review, we discuss the direct and indirect limitations of existing therapies and describe alternative potential nanotechnological approaches that could be utilized to overcome these limitations. New insight in the field of nanomedicine is necessary for early diagnosis, the development of novel drug therapies, the action of drugs and prevention, as well as for gaining an in-depth understanding of the complex biology of both diseases.

  3. Multiple patterns of writing disorders in dementia of the Alzheimer type and their evolution.

    PubMed

    Luzzatti, Claudio; Laiacona, Marcella; Agazzi, Daniela

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the results obtained from a writing task given to 23 Italian patients suffering from mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT). Spelling performance was tested with a task that taps the sub-word-level (spelling of regular words and nonwords), and the lexical route (spelling of regular and irregular words), in line with contemporary models of writing. Each patient's performance was classified according to the emergence of dissociated patterns of damage between regular words and nonwords and between regular and irregular words. The 23 DAT patients span the whole spectrum of dysgraphic taxonomy; five showed the characteristic pattern of impairment of surface dysgraphia, two showed the characteristics of phonological dysgraphia, while a mixed pattern (i.e. better performance on regular words compared to irregular words and regular nonwords) emerged in seven cases. Three patients presented undifferentiated writing disorders, two were completely agraphic, while four patients showed only minimal or no writing defects. The rate of dissociated impairments in the lexical and the sub-word-level routine is very similar to that observed after acute focal brain damage, which contradicts the hypothesis that degenerative brain damage selectively impairs writing performance along the lexical-semantic route. To test the hypothesis that surface sub-word-level processing abilities are affected only during the evolution of the disease, nine patients were tested longitudinally after an interval of 6-12 months. Once again, the data showed high variability across subjects, and do not seem to support involvement of the sub-word-level spelling routine only at a late stage in the development of the disease.

  4. Mitochondrial enzyme expression in the hippocampus in relation to Alzheimer-type pathology.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Z; Esiri, M M; LeGris, M; Matthews, P M

    1999-04-01

    Recent reports have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the progression of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, both increases and decreases in the activity of cytochrome oxidase have been described in the hippocampi of AD patients. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and quantitative autoradiographic methods to study the expression pattern of two cytochrome oxidase subunit proteins (nuclear-encoded COX IV and mitochondrial-encoded COX I) in the hippocampus in relation to the development of AD-type pathology. We found heterogeneous expression of both COX subunits in AD with an increased expression of both subunit proteins in healthy, non-tangle-bearing, neurones but absence of both subunit proteins in tangle-bearing neurones. Levels of COX IV but not of COX I were related to the amount of hyperphosphorylated tau accumulated in the same hippocampal region but not to the amount of amyloid deposited in sporadic AD. In Down's syndrome COX I and COX IV were similarly increased in the presence of AD pathology in non-tangle-bearing neurones. However, in these cases levels of enzyme expression were correlated to the amount of amyloid accumulation but not the amount of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus. We believe that heterogeneity of expression of mitochondrial enzyme proteins between neurones may contribute to the conflicting conclusions in previous reports regarding relative levels of cytochrome oxidase activity in the hippocampus in AD. We hypothesise that the increased mitochondrial enzyme expression in healthy-appearing neurones of AD brains may represent a physiological response to increased functional demand on surviving neurones as a consequence of AD-related neuronal pathology.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Other Pathogens are Key Causative Factors in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Steven A; Harris, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on research in epidemiology, neuropathology, molecular biology, and genetics regarding the hypothesis that pathogens interact with susceptibility genes and are causative in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sporadic AD is a complex multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with evidence indicating coexisting multi-pathogen and inflammatory etiologies. There are significant associations between AD and various pathogens, including Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Cytomegalovirus, and other Herpesviridae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, spirochetes, Helicobacter pylori, and various periodontal pathogens. These pathogens are able to evade destruction by the host immune system, leading to persistent infection. Bacterial and viral DNA and RNA and bacterial ligands increase the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules and activate the innate and adaptive immune systems. Evidence demonstrates that pathogens directly and indirectly induce AD pathology, including amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, phosphorylation of tau protein, neuronal injury, and apoptosis. Chronic brain infection with HSV-1, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and spirochetes results in complex processes that interact to cause a vicious cycle of uncontrolled neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Infections such as Cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal pathogens induce production of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines that may cross the blood-brain barrier to promote neurodegeneration. Pathogen-induced inflammation and central nervous system accumulation of Aβ damages the blood-brain barrier, which contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) enhances brain infiltration by pathogens including HSV-1 and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. ApoE4 is also associated with an increased pro-inflammatory response by the immune system. Potential antimicrobial treatments for AD are discussed, including the rationale for antiviral and antibiotic clinical trials.

  6. Differential alterations of cortical glutamatergic binding sites in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, D.T.; Dewar, D.; Graham, D.I.; Brooks, D.N.; McCulloch, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Involvement of cortical glutamatergic mechanisms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) has been investigated with quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography. The distribution and density of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake sites and glutamate receptor subtypes--kainate, quisqualate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate--were measured in adjacent sections of frontal cortex obtained postmortem from six patients with SDAT and six age-matched controls. The number of senile plaques was determined in the same brain region. Binding of D-(3H)aspartate to Na(+)-dependent uptake sites was reduced by approximately 40% throughout SDAT frontal cortex relative to controls, indicating a general loss of glutamatergic presynaptic terminals. (3H)Kainate receptor binding was significantly increased by approximately 70% in deep layers of SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls, whereas this binding was unaltered in superficial laminae. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.914) between kainate binding and senile plaque number in deep cortical layers. Quisqualate receptors, as assessed by 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-(3H)methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid binding, were unaltered in SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls. There was a small reduction (25%) in N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive (3H)glutamate binding only in superficial cortical layers of SDAT brains relative to control subjects. (3H)Glutamate binding in SDAT subjects was unrelated to senile plaque number in superficial cortical layers (r = 0.104). These results indicate that in the presence of cortical glutamatergic terminal loss in SDAT plastic alterations occur in some glutamate receptor subtypes but not in others.

  7. Profiling of circulating microRNAs in children with recent onset of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Erener, Suheda; Marwaha, Ashish; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is clinically silent until the majority of β cells are destroyed. There is an unmet need for reliable and cost-effective biomarkers to predict and diagnose diabetes at an early stage. A number of stable microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported in serum and plasma and are now being investigated as biomarkers of different diseases. We measured the levels of 745 miRNAs in sera of children with recent-onset T1D and age-matched controls using locked nucleic acid–enhanced (LNA-enhanced) quantitative PCR profiling. Thirty-five miRNAs were significantly different between the groups, and 27 miRNAs were elevated in T1D. Good discriminating power was obtained for 6 miRNAs (miR-454-3p, miR-222-3p, miR-144-5p, miR-345-5p, miR-24-3p, and miR-140-5p), which were not elevated at later stages of diabetes. In silico pathway analysis, based on inferred miRNA target genes, associated glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis as well as PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and Wnt signaling pathways with early stages of T1D. Among the 27 upregulated miRNAs in T1D, 2 miRNAs significantly correlated with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), as did 5 of 8 downregulated miRNAs. A total of 134 miRNAs significantly correlated with HbA1c when stratifying hyperglycemia-induced miRNAs from T1D-specific miRNAs. In conclusion, we have identified a serum miRNA pattern of recent-onset T1D and signaling pathways that may be involved in its pathogenesis. PMID:28239651

  8. Rapid Deterioration of Insulin Secretion in Obese Adolescents Preceding the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Deborah A.; Hornung, Lindsey N.; Herbers, Patricia M.; Prigeon, Ron; Woo, Jessica G.; D'Alessio, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify pathophysiologic changes that lead to the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in adolescents. Study design Obese adolescents with NGT (n=41) were studied longitudinally over 4 years with serial measure of the acute insulin response to IV glucose (AIRg) as well as proinsulin (PI) concentrations. Insulin resistance was estimated with HOMA modeling, the disposition index (DI) computed as AIRg × 1/HOMA-IR, and IV glucose tolerance estimated as the glucose disappearance constant (kg). Results Four adolescents developed diabetes during the study (DM), and the rest of the cohort remained non-diabetic (NDM). Baseline PI exceeded the interquartile range of the NDM group in 3 of 4 subjects with DM and all had > 85% reduction from baseline AIRg, and DI, within 6 months of diagnosis. All the subjects with DM gained weight over the course of the study but these changes paralleled those for the NDM group. HOMA-IR increased substantially in 1 of the subjects with DM at the time of diagnosis, but was comparable with baseline in the other 3. The DI and kg of the subjects with DM was below the 10th percentile of the NDM group before and after diagnosis. Conclusion Conversion from NGT to T2DM in adolescents can occur rapidly, and T2DM onset is heralded by a substantial decline in AIRg and DI, as well as increased release of PI. These results support loss of beta-cell function as the proximate step in the development of T2DM in this age group. PMID:25557969

  9. Alzheimer's Genes: Are You at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of Alzheimer's disease. As research on the genetics of Alzheimer's progresses, researchers are uncovering links between late-onset ... Neuron. 2014;83:11. Sherva R, et al. Genetics of Alzheimer disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. ...

  10. Counseling Patients with Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBarge, Emily

    1981-01-01

    Discusses symptoms of Alzheimer Disease and suggests client-centered counseling techniques to use with patients and family. Considers the disease's effect on family relationships relative to stage of family development. Examines the adjustment of the caregiving spouse. Offers practical suggestions for coping. (RC)

  11. Averting Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type in Women: Can Counselors Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthit, Kathryn Z.

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in late life, taking its greatest toll on women over age 80. This article provides an overview of AD, including risk factors and counseling strategies targeting risk. Counseling strategies address stress, cardiovascular health, social integration, depression, and holistic wellness.

  12. Effects of Attention on Dichotic Listening in Elderly and Patients with Dementia of the Alzheimer Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouma, Anke; Gootjes, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an overview of our studies in elderly and Alzheimer patients employing Kimura's dichotic digits paradigm as a measure for left hemispheric predominance for processing language stimuli. In addition to structural brain mechanisms, we demonstrated that attention modulates the direction and degree of ear asymmetry in dichotic…

  13. Driving and Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Beliefs and Cessation Strategies among Stakeholders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkinson, Margaret A.; Berg-Weger, Marla L.; Carr, David B.; Meuser, Thomas M.; Palmer, Janice L.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Powlishta, Kimberly K.; Foley, Daniel J.; Morris, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Although driving by persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an important public health concern, we know little about the attitudes and perceptions of key stakeholders regarding driving safety in these individuals or the factors that precipitate and influence driving assessment and cessation decisions. Design and Methods: We convened 10…

  14. Immunohistochemical screening for antibodies in recent onset type 1 narcolepsy and after H1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid M; Peeters, Els; Lammers, Gert J; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-06-15

    Narcolepsy type 1 patients typically have undetectable hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a result of a selective loss of the hypocretin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. An autoimmune attack targeting hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons is hypothesised. So far, no direct evidence for an autoimmune attack was found. One of the major limitations of previous studies was that none included patients close to disease onset. We screened serum of 21 narcolepsy type 1 patients close to disease onset (median 11 months), including 8 H1N1 vaccinated patients, for antibodies against hypocretin neurons using immunohistochemistry. No autoantibodies against hypocretin neurons could be detected.

  15. Exercise testing in late-onset glycogen storage disease type II patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Morandi, Lucia; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has recently became available for patients with glycogen storage disease type II. Previous studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy, however, data on physiological variables related to exercise tolerance are scarce. Four glycogen storage disease type II late-onset patients (45 ± 6 years) performed an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer, up to voluntary exhaustion, before (BEFORE) and after 12 months of ERT (AFTER). Peak workload, oxygen uptake, heart rate, cardiac output (by impedance cardiography) and vastus lateralis oxygenation indices (by continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) were determined. Peak workload and oxygen uptake values significantly increased during ERT (54 ± 30 vs. 63 ± 31 watt, and 17.2 ± 4.4 vs. 19.7 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min, respectively, in BEFORE vs. AFTER). On the other hand, for both peak cardiac output (12.3 ± 5.3 vs. 14.8 ± 4.5 L/min) and the NIRS-determined peak skeletal muscle fractional O2 extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values during a transient limb ischemia (30 ± 39% vs. 38 ± 28%), the observed increases were not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that in glycogen storage disease type II patients enzyme replacement therapy is associated with a mild improvement of exercise tolerance. The findings need to be validated during a longer follow-up on a larger group of patients. PMID:23182645

  16. Analyzing gene expression from whole tissue vs. different cell types reveals the central role of neurons in predicting severity of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Stempler, Shiri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression resulting from Alzheimer's disease have received considerable attention in recent years. Although expression has been investigated separately in whole brain tissue, in astrocytes and in neurons, a rigorous comparative study quantifying the relative utility of these sources in predicting the progression of Alzheimer's disease has been lacking. Here we analyze gene expression from neurons, astrocytes and whole tissues across different brain regions, and compare their ability to predict Alzheimer's disease progression by building pertaining classification models based on gene expression sets annotated to different biological processes. Remarkably, we find that predictions based on neuronal gene expression are significantly more accurate than those based on astrocyte or whole tissue expression. The findings explicate the central role of neurons, particularly as compared to glial cells, in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and emphasize the importance of measuring gene expression in the most relevant (pathogenically 'proximal') single cell types.

  17. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  18. Alzheimer's Project

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... As the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been ... Alzheimer's I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a ...

  19. Capsaicin reduces Alzheimer-associated tau changes in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetes rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weijie; Liu, Juanhong; Ma, Delin; Yuan, Gang; Lu, Yan; Yang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a high-risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to impaired insulin signaling pathway in brain. Capsaicin is a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist which was proved to ameliorate insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated whether dietary capsaicin could reduce the risk of AD in T2D. T2D rats were fed with capsaicin-containing high fat (HF) diet for 10 consecutive days (T2D+CAP). Pair-fed T2D rats (T2D+PF) fed with the HF-diet of average dose of T2D+CAP group were included to control for the effects of reduced food intake and body weight. Capsaicin-containing standard chow was also introduced to non-diabetic rats (NC+CAP). Blood glucose and insulin were monitored. The phosphorylation level of tau at individual sites, the activities of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were analyzed by Western blots. The results revealed that the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at sites Ser199, Ser202 and Ser396 in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group were decreased significantly, but these phospho-sites in T2D+PF group didn't show such improvements compared with T2D group. There were almost no changes in non-diabetic rats on capsaicin diet (NC+CAP) compared with the non-diabetic rats with normal chow (NC). Increased activity of PI3K/AKT and decreased activity of GSK-3β were detected in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group compared with T2D group, and these changes did not show in T2D+PF group either. These results demonstrated that dietary capsaicin appears to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of AD-associated tau protein by increasing the activity of PI3K/AKT and inhibiting GSK-3β in hippocampus of T2D rats, which supported that dietary capsaicin might have a potential use for the prevention of AD in T2D.

  20. Inhibitory Activities of Antioxidant Flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on Amyloid Aggregation Related to Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Hanaki, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Irie, Kazuhiro; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of amyloid aggregation is promising for the treatment of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ten antioxidant flavonoids isolated from the medicinal halophyte Tamarix gallica were tested for their amyloid aggregation inhibition potential. Glucuronosylated flavonoids show relatively strong inhibitory activity of Amyloid β (Aβ) and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) aggregation compared to their aglycone analogs. Structure-activity relationship of the flavonoids suggests that the catechol moiety is important for amyloid aggregation inhibition, while the methylation of the carboxyl group in the glucuronide moiety and of the hydroxyl group in the aglycone flavonoids decreased it.

  1. Up-regulation of E2F-1 in Down's syndrome brain exhibiting neuropathological features of Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Motonaga, K; Itoh, M; Hirayama, A; Hirano, S; Becker, L E; Goto, Y; Takashima, S

    2001-06-29

    We studied the expression of the apoptosis-related protein, E2F-1, in Down's syndrome (DS) brains. The immunoreactivity for E2F-1 was detected in the pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex from DS brains exhibiting the neuropathological features of dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT), in accordance with the amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposition in the neuron. Therefore, the implication is that A beta deposition may trigger E2F-1-mediated neuronal apoptosis in DS brains with DAT.

  2. Cortisol Levels in Children With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristen M; Fazzio, Pamela; Oberfield, Sharon E; Gallagher, Mary P; Aranoff, Gaya S

    2017-02-01

    There is little data documenting cortisol levels in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), despite the fact that untreated adrenal insufficiency (AI) could worsen the outcome of DKA. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed serum cortisol levels in 28 children with DKA and new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus evaluated at our center over a 5-year period. Average duration of diabetes-related symptoms was positively associated with age ( P = .002), and significantly lower hemoglobin A1c levels were observed in the youngest children. The mean cortisol level was 40.9 µg/dL, with a range of 7.8 to 119 µg/dL. Cortisol levels were found to be inversely associated with serum pH ( P = .007). There was no difference in the clinical outcome of the 4 patients who had cortisol levels less than 18 µg/dL. Overall, we did not find clinical or laboratory evidence of diminished cortisol reserve; however, the possibility of AI must be kept in mind when treating children with DKA.

  3. Immunoproteomic Profiling of Antiviral Antibodies in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Using Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wallstrom, Garrick; Davis, Amy; Wang, Jie; Park, Jin; Throop, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Yu, Xiaobo; Wasserfall, Clive; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The rapid rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) suggests the involvement of environmental factors including viral infections. We evaluated the association between viral infections and T1D by profiling antiviral antibodies using a high-throughput immunoproteomics approach in patients with new-onset T1D. We constructed a viral protein array comprising the complete proteomes of seven viruses associated with T1D and open reading frames from other common viruses. Antibody responses to 646 viral antigens were assessed in 42 patients with T1D and 42 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (mean age 12.7 years, 50% males). Prevalence of antiviral antibodies agreed with known infection rates for the corresponding virus based on epidemiological studies. Antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were significantly higher in case than control subjects (odds ratio 6.6; 95% CI 2.0–25.7), whereas the other viruses showed no differences. The EBV and T1D association was significant in both sex and age subgroups (≤12 and >12 years), and there was a trend toward early EBV infections among the case subjects. These results suggest a potential role for EBV in T1D development. We believe our innovative immunoproteomics platform is useful for understanding the role of viral infections in T1D and other disorders where associations between viral infection and disease are unclear. PMID:26450993

  4. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered.

  5. Late onset pityriasis rubra pilaris type IV treated with low-dose acitretin.

    PubMed

    Mota, Fernando; Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Selores, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology and great clinical variability. It has been divided into six categories. Types III, IV, and V occur in childhood and are distinguished by their clinical presentation, age of onset, and course. We report a 19-year-old male patient with a 2-week history of pruritic, scaling dermatosis of the hands, feet, elbows, and knees. He had no family history of skin disease. On physical examination, we observed circumscribed, reddish-orange, scaling plaques affecting the elbows and knees and a waxy palmoplantar keratoderma. The skin biopsy showed acanthosis, alternating orthokeratosis, parakeratosis, and follicular plugging suggestive of pityriasis rubra pilaris. The patient started treatment with oral acitretin, 25 mg every other day. The treatment was tolerated well, and after 6 months the lesions had resolved completely. Pityriasis rubra pilaris is a chronic papulosquamous disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by reddish-orange scaly plaques, palmoplantar keratoderma, and keratotic follicular papules. There is still no consensus regarding the treatment, but therapeutic options include systemic retinoids, particularly acitretin in the recommended dose of 0.5 to 0.75 mg/kg/day. In our case, the patient was treated with a low-dose regimen of acitretin, which was effective and well tolerated.

  6. ILAE focal cortical dysplasia type IIIc in the ictal onset zone in epileptic patients with solitary meningioangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mukae, Nobutaka; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Morioka, Takato; Murakami, Nobuya; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Sakata, Ayumi; Iihara, Koji

    2014-12-01

    "Solitary" meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare, benign, hamartomatous lesion of the cerebral cortex and frequently leads to epilepsy. However, the source of the epileptogenicity in meningioangiomatosis remains controversial. We report two surgically-treated meningioangiomatosis cases with medically intractable epilepsy. In both cases, chronic subdural electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings identified the ictal onset zone on apparently normal cortex, adjacent to and/or above the meningioangiomatosis lesion, not on the meningioangiomatosis lesion itself. The ictal onset zone was resected, along with the MA lesion, and good seizure outcome was achieved. Histological examination of the ictal onset zone revealed the presence of ILAE focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIIc. Our case studies suggest that in the surgical management of epilepsy with meningioangiomatosis, it is important to identify undetected, but epileptogenic, ILAE FCD Type IIIc, using preoperative multimodal examinations, including chronic ECoG recordings.

  7. Early-Onset Network Hyperexcitability in Presymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice Is Suppressed by Passive Immunization with Anti-Human APP/Aβ Antibody and by mGluR5 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Kazim, Syed F; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Zhao, Wangfa; Wong, Robert K S; Bianchi, Riccardo; Iqbal, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal network hyperexcitability appears to be an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and may contribute to memory impairment. It remains unclear if network hyperexcitability precedes memory impairment in mouse models of AD and what are the underlying cellular mechanisms. We thus evaluated seizure susceptibility and hippocampal network hyperexcitability at ~3 weeks of age [prior to amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque deposition, neurofibrillary pathology, and cognitive impairment] in a triple transgenic mouse model of familial AD (3xTg-AD mouse) that harbors mutated human Aβ precursor protein (APP), tau and presenilin 1 (PS1) genes. Audiogenic seizures were elicited in a higher proportion of 3xTg-AD mice compared with wild type (WT) controls. Seizure susceptibility in 3xTg-AD mice was attenuated either by passive immunization with anti-human APP/Aβ antibody (6E10) or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) with the selective antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP). In in vitro hippocampal slices, suppression of synaptic inhibition with the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, induced prolonged epileptiform (>1.5 s in duration) ictal-like discharges in the CA3 neuronal network in the majority of the slices from 3xTg-AD mice. In contrast, only short epileptiform (<1.5 s in duration) interictal-like discharges were observed following bicuculline application in the CA3 region of WT slices. The ictal-like activity in CA3 region of the hippocampus was significantly reduced in the 6E10-immunized compared to the saline-treated 3xTg-AD mice. MPEP acutely suppressed the ictal-like discharges in 3xTg-AD slices. Remarkably, epileptiform discharge duration positively correlated with intraneuronal human (transgenic) APP/Aβ expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Our data suggest that in a mouse model of familial AD, hypersynchronous network activity underlying seizure susceptibility precedes

  8. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Jennings, J. Richard; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Zgibor, Janice C.; Costacou, Tina; Boudreau, Robert M.; Miller, Rachel; Orchard, Trevor J.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and correlates of clinically relevant cognitive impairment in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS During 2010–2013, 97 adults diagnosed with T1D and aged <18 years (age and duration 49 ± 7 and 41 ± 6 years, respectively; 51% female) and 138 similarly aged adults without T1D (age 49 ± 7 years; 55% female) completed extensive neuropsychological testing. Biomedical data on participants with T1D were collected periodically since 1986–1988. Cognitive impairment status was based on the number of test scores ≥1.5 SD worse than demographically appropriate published norms: none, mild (only one test), or clinically relevant (two or more tests). RESULTS The prevalence of clinically relevant cognitive impairment was five times higher among participants with than without T1D (28% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), independent of education, age, or blood pressure. Effect sizes were large (Cohen d 0.6–0.9; P < 0.0001) for psychomotor speed and visuoconstruction tasks and were modest (d 0.3–0.6; P < 0.05) for measures of executive function. Among participants with T1D, prevalent cognitive impairment was related to 14-year average A1c >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; P = 0.009), proliferative retinopathy (OR 2.8; P = 0.01), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (OR 2.6; P = 0.03) measured 5 years earlier; higher BMI (OR 1.1; P = 0.03); and ankle-brachial index ≥1.3 (OR 4.2; P = 0.01) measured 20 years earlier, independent of education. CONCLUSIONS Clinically relevant cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1D. In this aging cohort, chronic hyperglycemia and prevalent microvascular disease were associated with cognitive impairment, relationships shown previously in younger populations with T1D. Two additional potentially modifiable risk factors for T1D-related cognitive impairment, vascular health and BMI

  9. Effects of attention on dichotic listening in elderly and patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Anke; Gootjes, Liselotte

    2011-07-01

    This article presents an overview of our studies in elderly and Alzheimer patients employing Kimura's dichotic digits paradigm as a measure for left hemispheric predominance for processing language stimuli. In addition to structural brain mechanisms, we demonstrated that attention modulates the direction and degree of ear asymmetry in dichotic listening. Elderly showed increasingly more difficulties focusing attention on the left ear (LE) with advancing age. Alzheimer patients showed severe deficits to allocate attention to the LE, which could result in a right ear advantage. These results may be attributed to a breakdown of the cortical attentional network which is mediated by frontal (inhibitory control of attention) and parietal regions (spatial attention and 'disengagement processes'). Both interhemispheric disconnectivity (callosal atrophy) and intrahemispheric disconnectivity (subcortical white matter lesions) appear to be important factors contributing to these findings.

  10. Visual association test to detect early dementia of the Alzheimer type

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, J; Schmand, B; Tulner, L; Walstra, G; Jonker, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: The visual association test (VAT) is a brief learning task based on imagery mnemonics. The test materials consist of six line drawings of pairs of interacting objects or animals—for example, an ape holding an umbrella. The person is asked to name each object and, later, is presented with one object from the pair and asked to name the other. Objective: To verify that the task induces robust incidental or effortless learning (study 1), and to study the efficiency of the test as a discriminator between early dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and non-demented people (study 2) and non-DAT types of dementia (study 3). Methods: Study 1: two groups of elderly volunteers were administered the VAT. The stimuli were presented in the interactive fashion to group A—for example, a monkey carrying an umbrella (n=83)—and side by side to group B—for example, separate pictures of a monkey alone and an umbrella alone (n=79). Group B received learning instructions, but group A did not. Study 2: three groups of subjects were selected from a population based follow up study: incident DAT cases (n=24), cognitively declining subjects not diagnosed with dementia (n=21), and stable non-demented subjects (n=204). Test performance of the non-demented group at baseline was compared with that of patients with DAT at the time of their diagnosis, of patients with DAT a year before their diagnosis, and of non-demented declining subjects at baseline. Study 3: subjects were patients referred for neuropsychological assessment because of suspected dementia. They were diagnosed by consensus criteria of various dementia syndromes. Results: Study 1: recall was more than twice as high in group A as in group B. Thus interactive presentation, even in the absence of learning instructions, enhances learning. Study 2: at a level of 97.5% specificity, the VAT had a sensitivity of 87.5% for DAT cases at the time of diagnosis and 66.7% one year before diagnosis. The cognitively declining

  11. Geometric phase transition in the cellular network of the pancreatic islets may underlie the onset of type 1diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xujing

    Living systems are characterized by complexity in structure and emergent dynamic orders. In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles phase transition in a dynamic system: quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we investigate this idea in a real example, the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells and the onset of type 1 diabetes. Within each islet, the β-cells are electrically coupled to each other, and function as a network with synchronized actions. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity, and the critical point where the islet cellular network loses site percolation, is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold β-cell loss that causes islet functional failure. Numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β-cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after disease onset and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining a long time mystery in the clinical study of type 1 diabetes: the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesized that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network. We further discuss the potential applications in identifying disease-driving factors, and the critical parameters that are predictive of disease onset.

  12. [Interaction between neuropsychological deficit in execution/ performance and ability to carry out daily activities in Alzheimer type dementia].

    PubMed

    Perea, M V; Ladera, V

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish whether the results obtained in a sample of 54 patients with alzheimer-type dementia, while carrying out different executive-praxia tasks is related to or influences the daily life and habits of these people, as analyzed on the Blessed dementia scale. The diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia was established on the criteria developed by the NINCDS-ADRDA. Physical, neurological, neuropsychological, EEG and tomo-densitometric examinations were done in all cases. Executive-praxia function was analyzed on 5 sub-scales; non-symbolic praxias, bucco-facial praxias, purposeless reflex praxias, reflex praxias with objects/instruments and praxias of ideas. There were significant differences depending on the praxias used. The more difficult tasks were evaluated by execution praxias involving ideational, non-symbolic executive praxias. The changes found on the subscale of activities of daily living were partly due to poor non-symbolic, ideatorial praxic execution and to a lesser extent to the poor results of the purposeless reflexive symbolic praxic execution and bucco-facial praxia. On the sub-scale of changes in habits, the non-symbolic praxias and ideatorial praxias explain the small percentage variation found on this sub-scale.

  13. In vivo seeding and cross-seeding of localized amyloidosis: a molecular link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, Marie E; Paulsson, Johan F; Schultz, Sebastian W; Ingelsson, Martin; Westermark, Per; Westermark, Gunilla T

    2015-03-01

    Several proteins have been identified as amyloid forming in humans, and independent of protein origin, the fibrils are morphologically similar. Therefore, there is a potential for structures with amyloid seeding ability to induce both homologous and heterologous fibril growth; thus, molecular interaction can constitute a link between different amyloid forms. Intravenous injection with preformed fibrils from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), proIAPP, or amyloid-beta (Aβ) into human IAPP transgenic mice triggered IAPP amyloid formation in pancreas in 5 of 7 mice in each group, demonstrating that IAPP amyloid could be enhanced through homologous and heterologous seeding with higher efficiency for the former mechanism. Proximity ligation assay was used for colocalization studies of IAPP and Aβ in islet amyloid in type 2 diabetic patients and Aβ deposits in brains of patients with Alzheimer disease. Aβ reactivity was not detected in islet amyloid although islet β cells express AβPP and convertases necessary for Aβ production. By contrast, IAPP and proIAPP were detected in cerebral and vascular Aβ deposits, and presence of proximity ligation signal at both locations showed that the peptides were <40 nm apart. It is not clear whether IAPP present in brain originates from pancreas or is locally produced. Heterologous seeding between IAPP and Aβ shown here may represent a molecular link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer disease.

  14. Correlates of Age Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Among Relatively Young Black and White Adults in a Community

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Xu, Ji-Hua; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The risk factors for middle-age onset of type 2 diabetes are well known. However, information is scant regarding the age onset of type 2 diabetes and its correlates in community-based black and white relatively young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective cohort study consisted of normoglycemic (n = 2,459) and type 2 diabetic (n = 144) adults aged 18–50 years who were followed for an average of 16 years. RESULTS The incidence rate of the onset of type 2 diabetes was 1.6, 4.3, 3.9, and 3.4 per 1,000 person-years for age-groups 18–29, 30–39, and 40–50 and total sample, respectively. Incidences of diabetes increased with age by race and sex groups (P for trend ≤0.01); higher in black females versus white females and blacks versus whites in total sample (P < 0.05). In a multivariable Cox model, baseline parental diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 5.24) and plasma insulin were significantly associated with diabetes incidence at the youngest age (18–29 years); black race, BMI, and glucose at age 30–39 years; female sex, parental diabetes (HR 2.44), BMI, ratio of triglycerides and HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C ratio), and glucose at age 40–50 years; and black race, parental diabetes (HR 2.44), BMI, TG/HDL-C ratio, and glucose in whole cohort. Further, patients with diabetes, regardless of age onset, displayed a significantly higher prevalence of maternal history of diabetes at baseline (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In relatively young adults, predictability of baseline cardiometabolic risk factors along with race, sex, and parental history of diabetes for the onset of type 2 diabetes varied by age-group. These findings have implications for early prevention and intervention in relatively young adults. PMID:22399694

  15. Muscle spindle alterations precede onset of sensorimotor deficits in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E.

    PubMed

    Villalón, E; Jones, M R; Sibigtroth, C; Zino, S J; Dale, J M; Landayan, D S; Shen, H; Cornelison, D D W; Garcia, M L

    2017-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy, affecting approximately 2.8 million people. The CMT leads to distal neuropathy that is characterized by reduced motor nerve conduction velocity, ataxia, muscle atrophy and sensory loss. We generated a mouse model of CMT type 2E (CMT2E) expressing human neurofilament light E396K (hNF-L(E396K) ), which develops decreased motor nerve conduction velocity, ataxia and muscle atrophy by 4 months of age. Symptomatic hNF-L(E396K) mice developed phenotypes that were consistent with proprioceptive sensory defects as well as reduced sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, while thermal sensitivity and auditory brainstem responses were unaltered. Progression from presymptomatic to symptomatic included a 50% loss of large diameter sensory axons within the fifth lumbar dorsal root of hNF-L(E396K) mice. Owing to proprioceptive deficits and loss of large diameter sensory axons, we analyzed muscle spindle morphology in presymptomatic and symptomatic hNF-L(E396K) and hNF-L control mice. Muscle spindle cross-sectional area and volume were reduced in all hNF-L(E396K) mice analyzed, suggesting that alterations in muscle spindle morphology occurred prior to the onset of typical CMT pathology. These data suggested that CMT2E pathology initiated in the muscle spindles altering the proprioceptive sensory system. Early sensory pathology in CMT2E could provide a unifying hypothesis for the convergence of pathology observed in CMT.

  16. The mechanisms of sudden-onset type adverse reactions to oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hama, R; Bennett, C L

    2017-02-01

    Oseltamivir is contraindicated for people aged 10-19 in principle in Japan, due to concern about abnormal behaviours. Sudden death is another concern. This review examines growing evidence of their association and discusses underlying mechanisms of these sudden-onset type reactions to oseltamivir. First, the importance of animal models and the concept of human equivalent dose (HED) is summarized. Second, the specific condition for oseltamivir use, influenza infection, is reviewed. Third, findings from toxicity studies conducted prior to and after the marketing of oseltamivir are reported on to provide context on the observation of a possible causal association. Fourth, similarity and consistency of toxicity in humans with that in other animals is described. Finally, coherence of toxicokinetic and molecular level of evidence (channels, receptors and enzymes), including differences from the toxicity of other neuraminidase inhibitors, is reviewed. It is concluded that unchanged oseltamivir has various effects on the central nervous system (CNS) that may be related to clinical findings including hypothermia, abnormal behaviours including with fatal outcome, and sudden death. Among receptors and enzymes related to CNS action, it is known that oseltamivir inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are closely related to hypothermia, as well as human monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), which is closely related to abnormal or excitatory behaviours. Receptors such as GABAA , GABAB and NMDA and their related receptors/channels including Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels are thought to be other candidates for investigation related to respiratory suppression followed by sudden death and psychotic reactions (both acute and chronic), respectively.

  17. Effect of Pioglitazone on the Course of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Kimberly Sue; Godil, Mushtaq Ahmed; Lane, Andrew Harry; Wilson, Thomas Allen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by insulin deficiency resulting from progressive destruction of β cells. The histological hallmark of the diabetic islet is mononuclear cell infiltration. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate PPARg and enhance the actions of insulin. Studies in non-obese diabetic and streptocotozin-treated mouse models demonstrated that pretreatment with TZDs prevented the development of T1DM. The purpose of this study was to examine whether pioglitazone, given with insulin, preserved β cell function in patients with new-onset T1DM. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study. Subjects received pioglitazone or placebo. Blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-peptide, and liver enzymes were measured at baseline. Boost© stimulated C-peptide responses were measured at baseline and at 24 weeks. Blood sugar, insulin dose, height, weight, and liver enzymes were monitored at each visit. HbA1c was performed every 12 weeks. Results: Of the 15 patients, 8 received pioglitazone, and 7 - placebo. There was no clinical improvement in HbA1c between or within groups at the completion of the study. Mean peak C-peptide values were similar between groups at baseline. Mean peak C-peptide level was slightly higher at 24 weeks in the pioglitazone group compared to the placebo (1.8 vs. 1.5 ng/mL) which was considered as clinically insignificant. The interaction of HbA1c and insulin dose (HbA1c* insulin/kg/day), which combines degree of diabetic control and dose of insulin required to achieve this control, showed transient improvement in the pioglitazone group at 12 weeks but was not sustained at 24 weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, pioglitazone did not preserve β cell function when compared to placebo. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379032

  18. A novel PSEN1 mutation (I238M) associated with early-onset Alzheimer's disease in an African-American woman.

    PubMed

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Benzinger, Tammie; Kepe, Vladimir; Fagan, Anne; Coppola, Giovanni; Porter, Verna; Hecimovic, Silva; Chakraverty, Suma; Alvarez-Retuerto, Ana Isabel; Goate, Alison; Ringman, John M

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in PSEN1 are the most common cause of autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). We describe an African-American woman with a family history consistent with FAD who began to experience cognitive decline at age 50. Her clinical presentation, MRI, FDG-PET, and PIB-PET scan findings were consistent with AD and she was found to have a novel I238M substitution in PSEN1. As this mutation caused increased production of Aβ42 in an in vitro assay, was not present in two population databases, and is conserved across species, it is likely to be pathogenic for FAD.

  19. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal.

  20. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease.

  1. [SERUM LEVEL OF ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTE ACTIVATING POLYPEPTIDE-II IN CHILDHOOD-ONSET TYPE 1 DIABETIC PATIENTS AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS].

    PubMed

    Mogylnytska, L A

    2015-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins in adolescence, and its progression is determined by the same risk factors as in adults. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is a multifunctional cytokine with proinflammatory and antiangiogenetic activity that may play a pathogenic role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to determine the serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and obese adolescents. We found increased of serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and in patients with obesity that do not suffer from diabetes. Also, the level of EMAP-II correlated with the serum level of glycosylated hemoglobin and blood glucose, and key markers of lipid metabolism, body mass index. Increased serum level of EMAP-II may be one of the pathway of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes.

  2. The PTPN22 C1858T gene variant is associated with proinsulin in new-onset type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN22) has been established as a type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene. A recent study found the C1858T variant of this gene to be associated with lower residual fasting C-peptide levels and poorer glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. We investigated the association of the C1858T variant with residual beta-cell function (as assessed by stimulated C-peptide, proinsulin and insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c), glycemic control, daily insulin requirements, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetes-related autoantibodies (IA-2A, GADA, ICA, ZnT8Ab) in children during the first year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Methods The C1858T variant was genotyped in an international cohort of children (n = 257 patients) with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes during 12 months after onset. We investigated the association of this variant with liquid-meal stimulated beta-cell function (proinsulin and C-peptide) and antibody status 1, 6 and 12 months after onset. In addition HbA1c and daily insulin requirements were determined 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after diagnosis. DKA was defined at disease onset. Results A repeated measurement model of all time points showed the stimulated proinsulin level is significantly higher (22%, p = 0.03) for the T allele carriers the first year after onset. We also found a significant positive association between proinsulin and IA levels (est.: 1.12, p = 0.002), which did not influence the association between PTPN22 and proinsulin (est.: 1.28, p = 0.03). Conclusions The T allele of the C1858T variant is positively associated with proinsulin levels during the first 12 months in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children. PMID:21429197

  3. Comparison of executive and visuospatial memory function in Huntington's disease and dementia of Alzheimer type matched for degree of dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, K W; Sahakian, B J; Quinn, N P; Marsden, C D; Robbins, T W

    1995-01-01

    Groups of patients with Hungington's disease and probable dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) matched for level of dementia on the basis of mini mental state examination scores were compared in several tests of visual memory and tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction. Whereas recall of patients with DAT tended to be worse on the Kendrick object learning test, the two groups were equivalent on tests of sensorimotor ability and delayed matching to sample performance. By contrast, the patients with Huntington's disease were significantly worse on tests of pattern and spatial recognition, simultaneous matching to sample, visuospatial paired associates, and on three tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction--namely, the Tower of London test of planning, spatial working memory, and a visual discrimination learning and reversal paradigm. The impairments in these tests, however, did not always qualitatively resemble those seen in patients with frontal lobe damage and may be more characteristic of primary neostriatal deficit. In the visual discrimination paradigm the patients with Hungtington's disease were significantly worse than the patients with DAT at the simple reversal stage, where they displayed significant preservation to the previously rewarded alternative. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that patients with Huntington's disease exhibit deficits in tests sensitive to frontostriatal dysfunction and that this form of intellectual deterioration is qualitatively distinct from that seen in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:7745410

  4. A comparison of ADAS and EEG in the discrimination of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type from healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Ihl, R; Brinkmeyer, J; Jänner, M; Kerdar, M S

    2000-01-01

    Neuropsychometric tests (for instance the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale, ADAS) and the EEG are often used in the diagnostic procedure of dementia. The validity of the instruments is only poorly investigated. The study aimed to investigate the accuracy of the discrimination between healthy controls and patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) by ADAS and EEG. Thirty-six patients with DAT and 44 healthy controls were included. In a discriminant analysis of the 21 ADAS items and 18 EEG parameters (6 frequency bands, 12 topographic parameters), 6 ADAS items turned out to discriminate both groups with 100% sensitivity and specificity (remembering instructions, depression, following commands, pacing, restlessness and word finding difficulties). Regarding EEG parameters, 4 (topography of beta- and delta-activity and amplitude of delta-activity) led to a sensitivity and specificity of over 90%. Thus, both methods demonstrated an excellent discrimination between healthy controls and DAT. The slightly higher discrimination with the ADAS may depend on its closer relation to clinical symptoms. However, the EEG measuring functional activity reached nearly the same result. Both methods provide complementary information. A combination of both methods in the diagnostic procedure to detect dementia is recommended.

  5. Rodent models of neuroinflammation for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazem, Amir; Sankowski, Roman; Bacher, Michael; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease remains incurable, and the failures of current disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's disease could be attributed to a lack of in vivo models that recapitulate the underlying etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease is not based on mutations related to amyloid-β (Aβ) or tau production which are currently the basis of in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease. It has recently been suggested that mechanisms like chronic neuroinflammation may occur prior to amyloid-β and tau pathologies in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of rodent models of neuroinflammation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Our search criteria were based on characteristics of an idealistic disease model that should recapitulate causes, symptoms, and lesions in a chronological order similar to the actual disease. Therefore, a model based on the inflammation hypothesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease should include the following features: (i) primary chronic neuroinflammation, (ii) manifestations of memory and cognitive impairment, and (iii) late development of tau and Aβ pathologies. The following models fit the pre-defined criteria: lipopolysaccharide- and PolyI:C-induced models of immune challenge; streptozotocin-, okadaic acid-, and colchicine neurotoxin-induced neuroinflammation models, as well as interleukin-1β, anti-nerve growth factor and p25 transgenic models. Among these models, streptozotocin, PolyI:C-induced, and p25 neuroinflammation models are compatible with the inflammation hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Genetic Association between Presenilin 2 Polymorphisms and Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia of Lewy Body Type in a Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayako; Shibata, Nobuto; Kasanuki, Koji; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Ohnuma, Tohru; Takeshita, Yoshihide; Kawai, Eri; Takayama, Toshiki; Nishioka, Kenya; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Hisashi; Arai, Heii

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Common polymorphisms affect gene activity and increase the risk of AD. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms in the PSEN2 gene showed Lewy body dementia (LBD) phenotypes clinically. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether PSEN2 gene polymorphisms were associated with AD or LBD. Methods Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gene were analyzed using a case-control study design comprising 288 AD patients, 76 LBD patients, and 105 age-matched controls. Results Linkage disequilibrium (LD) examination showed strong LD from rs1295645 to rs8383 on the gene in our cases from Japan. There were no associations between the SNPs studied here and AD onset, and haplotypic analyses did not detect genetic associations between AD and the PSEN2 gene. Although the number of the cases was small, the SNPs studied did not modify the risk of developing LBD in a Japanese population. Conclusion The common SNPs of the PSEN2 gene did not affect the risk of AD or LBD in a Japanese population. Because genetic variability of the PSEN2 gene is associated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in AD and LBD, further detailed analyses considering BPSD of both diseases would be required. PMID:27065294

  7. Structures of the Alzheimer's Wild-Type Aβ1-40 Dimer from Atomistic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Bogdan; Tran, Thanh T; Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Sterpone, Fabio; Nguyen, Phuong H; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2015-08-20

    We have studied the dimer of amyloid beta peptide Aβ of 40 residues by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics. The Aβ-dimers have been found to be the smallest toxic species in Alzheimer's disease, but their inherent flexibilities have precluded structural characterization by experimental methods. Though the 24-μs-scale simulation reveals a mean secondary structure of 18% β-strand and 10% α helix, we find transient configurations with an unstructured N-terminus and multiple β-hairpins spanning residues 17-21 and 30-36, but the antiparallel and perpendicular peptide orientations are preferred over the parallel organization. Short-lived conformational states also consist of all α topologies, and one compact peptide with β-sheet structure stabilized by a rather extended peptide with α-helical content. Overall, this first all-atom study provides insights into the equilibrium structure of the Aβ1-40 dimer in aqueous solution, opening a new avenue for a comprehensive understanding of the impact of pathogenic and protective mutations in early-stage Alzheimer's disease on a molecular level.

  8. Identifying Niemann-Pick type C in early-onset ataxia: two quick clinical screening tools.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Fleszar, Zofia; Schöls, Ludger; Just, Jennifer; Bauer, Peter; Torres Martin, Juan V; Kolb, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare multisystemic lysosomal disorder which, albeit treatable, is still starkly underdiagnosed. As NP-C features early onset ataxia (EOA) in 85-90 % of cases, EOA presents a promising target group for undiagnosed NP-C patients. Here, we assessed the ability of the previously established NP-C suspicion index (SI) and a novel abbreviated '2/3 SI' tool for rapid appraisal of suspected NP-C in unexplained EOA. This was a retrospective observational study comparing 'NP-C EOA' cases (EOA patients with confirmed NP-C) with non-NP-C EOA controls (EOA patients negative for NP-C gene mutations). NP-C risk prediction scores (RPS) from both the original and 2/3 SIs were calculated and their discriminatory performance evaluated. Among 133 patients (47 NP-C EOA cases; 86 non-NP-C EOA controls), moderate (40-69 points) and high (≥70 points) RPS were common based on original SI assessments in non-NP-C EOA controls [16 (19 %) and 8 (9 %), respectively], but scores ≥70 points were far more frequent [46 (98 %)] among NP-C EOA cases. RPS cut-off values provided 98 % sensitivity and 91 % specificity for NP-C at 70-point cut-off, and ROC analysis revealed an AUC of 0.982. Using the 2/3 SI, 90 % of NP-C EOA cases had scores of 2 or 3, and RPS analysis showed an AUC of 0.961. In conclusion, the NP-C SI and the new, quick-to-apply 2/3 SI distinguished well between NP-C and non-NP-C patients, even in EOA populations with high background levels of broadly NPC-compatible multisystemic disease features. While the original SI showed the greatest sensitivity, both tools reliably aided identification of patients with unexplained EOA who warranted further investigation for NP-C.

  9. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  10. Mutations in KCNJ11 are associated with the development of autosomal dominant, early-onset type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuaki; Yasuda, Takao; Liu, Yanjun; Hu, Hai-rong; He, Guang; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Mingming; Zhuang, Langen; Zheng, Taishan; Friedman, Theodore C.; Xiang, Kunsan

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis More than 90% of Chinese familial early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus is genetically unexplained. To investigate the molecular aetiology, we identified and characterised whether mutations in the KCNJ11 gene are responsible for these families. Methods KCNJ11 mutations were screened for 96 familial early-onset type 2 diabetic probands and their families. Functional significance of the identified mutations was confirmed by physiological analysis, molecular modelling and population survey. Results Three novel KCNJ11 mutations, R27H, R192H and S116F117del, were identified in three families with early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Mutated KCNJ11 with R27H or R192H markedly reduced ATP sensitivity (E23K>R27H>C42R>R192H>R201H), but no ATP-sensitive potassium channel currents were detected in the loss-of-function S116F117del channel in vitro. Molecular modelling indicated that R192H had a larger effect on the channel ATP-binding pocket than R27H, which may qualitatively explain why the ATP sensitivity of the R192H mutation is seven times less than R27H. The shape of the S116F117del channel may be compressed, which may explain why the mutated channel had no currents. Discontinuation of insulin and implementation of sulfonylureas for R27H or R192H carriers and continuation/switch to insulin therapy for S116F117del carriers resulted in good glycaemic control. Conclusions/interpretation Our results suggest that genetic diagnosis for the KCNJ11 mutations in familial early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus may help in understanding the molecular aetiology and in providing more personalised treatment for these specific forms of diabetes in Chinese and other Asian patients. PMID:24018988

  11. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  12. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  13. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  14. No Protective Effect of Calcitriol on β-Cell Function in Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Carla; Pitocco, Dario; Napoli, Nicola; Di Stasio, Enrico; Maggi, Daria; Manfrini, Silvia; Suraci, Concetta; Cavallo, Maria Gisella; Cappa, Marco; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We investigated whether supplementation of the active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) in recent-onset type 1 diabetes can protect β-cell function evaluated by C-peptide and improve glycemic control assessed by A1C and insulin requirement. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-four subjects (aged 11–35 years, median 18 years) with recent-onset type 1 diabetes and high basal C-peptide >0.25 nmol/l were randomized in a double-blind trial to 0.25 μg/day calcitriol or placebo and followed-up for 2 years. RESULTS At 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, A1C and insulin requirement in the calcitriol group did not differ from the placebo group. C-peptide dropped significantly (P < 0.001) but similarly in both groups, with no significant differences at each time point. CONCLUSIONS At the doses used, calcitriol is ineffective in protecting β-cell function in subjects (including children) with recent-onset type 1 diabetes and high C-peptide at diagnosis. PMID:20805274

  15. Social Network Data Validity: The Example of the Social Network of Caregivers of Older Persons with Alzheimer-Type Dementia*

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Normand; Ducharme, Francine

    2010-01-01

    This article offers reflection on the validity of relational data such as used in social network analysis. Ongoing research on the transformation of the support network of caregivers of persons with an Alzheimer-type disease provides the data to fuel the debate on the validity of participant report. More specifically, we sought to understand the factors that might influence the description of the support network by persons involved in caregiving. The issue warrants special attention, given that social relations – in their form and their content – constitute the raw material of network analysis. We propose that how persons describe their social network corresponds to a subjective process that rests, in part, on their representation of their cultural and social universe. PMID:20737030

  16. Comparison between New-Onset and Old-Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes with Ketosis in Rural Regions of China.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichun; Yang, Xia; Shi, Degang; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) with ketosis was common because of late diagnosis and lacking adequate treatment in rural regions of China. This study aimed to provide the data of T2D with ketosis among inpatients in a south-west border city of China. Methods. Data of 371 patients of T2D with ketosis who were hospitalized between January 2011 and July 2015 in Baoshan People's Hospital, Yunnan, China, were analyzed. New-onset and old-diagnosed T2D patients presenting with ketosis were compared according to clinical characteristics, laboratory results, and chronic diabetic complications. Results. Overall, the blood glucose control was poor in our study subjects. Male predominated in both groups (male prevalence was 68% in new-onset and 64% in old-diagnosed groups). Overweight and obesity accounted for 50% in new-onset and 46% in old-diagnosed cases. Inducements of ketosis were 13.8% in new-onset and 38.7% in old-diagnosed patients. Infections were the first inducements in both groups. The prevalence of chronic complications of diabetes was common in both groups. Conclusions. More medical supports were needed for the early detection and adequate treatment of diabetes in rural areas of China.

  17. Genetic heterogeneity and Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Bird, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    In some early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) families, inheritance is autosomal dominant. (Early-onset AD is arbitarily defined as onset at {le} 60 years.) Two loci have been identified which are causative for early-onset familial AD (FAD). One is the amyloid precursor protein gene in which specific mutation have been identified. The second is a locus at 14q24.3 (AD3) which has been localized by linkage analysis; the gene and specific mutations have not been identified. Linkage studies place this locus between D14S61 and D14S63. These 2 loci, however, do not account for all early-onset FAD. The Volga German (VG) kindreds are descendants of families which emigrated from Germany to the Volga river region of Russia and subsequently to the US; AD in these families is hypothesized to be the result of a common genetic founder. The average age-at-onset in these families is 57 years. Linkage analysis for this group has been negative for the APP gene and for chromosome 14 markers. Thus, there is at least 1 other early-onset FAD locus. Recently, the {epsilon}4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) was identified as a risk-factor for late-onset AD. In a series of 53 late-onset kindreds, a strong genetic association was observed between the ApoE {epsilon}4 allele and AD. However, when linkage analysis was performed using a highly polymorphic locus at the ApoCII gene, which is within 30 kb of ApoE, significant evidence for co-segregation was not observed. This and other data suggests that while ApoE is an age-at-onset modifying locus, another gene(s), located elsewhere, contribute(s) to late-onset AD. Thus, there is probably at least 1 other late-onset locus. Once the VG locus is identified, it will be possible to determine whether an allelic variant of this locus is responsible for late-onset FAD.

  18. Influence of Fiber Type Composition and Capillary Density on Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-25

    ade:ute nct bo- lic adjustments due to the progressive increments n exercise intensity during testing , each load was performcd for four minutes (30). The...velocity was directly related to the treadmill running velocity required to elicit the onset of lactate accumulation. Furthermore, the velocity...Kreb’s cycle and the electrontranspot-t chain as well as capillary density are very sensitive to changes in the environmental stress (26). Interestingly

  19. Alzheimer's Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get involved Last Updated: Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ... your eyes while supporting our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s. Sunglasses Wear purple on The Longest ...

  20. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000760.htm Alzheimer disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease is one form of dementia. It affects memory, ...

  1. MAPT H1 Haplotype is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Risk in APOEɛ4 Noncarriers: Results from the Dementia Genetics Spanish Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Pau; Moreno, Fermín; Clarimón, Jordi; Ruiz, Agustín; Combarros, Onofre; Calero, Miguel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Bullido, Maria J; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Carro, Eva; Antonell, Anna; Coto, Eliecer; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Hernandez, Isabel; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Lleó, Alberto; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Vázquez-Higuera, José Luis; Infante, Jon; Rábano, Alberto; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí, Meritxell; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Barandiarán, Myriam; Gorostidi, Ana; Frank-García, Ana; Sastre, Isabel; Lorenzo, Elena; Pastor, María A; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Lennarz, Martina; Maier, Wolfang; Rámirez, Alfredo; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Lee, Suzee E; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    The MAPT H1 haplotype has been linked to several disorders, but its relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. A rare variant in MAPT (p.A152T) has been linked with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD. We genotyped H1/H2 and p.A152T MAPT in 11,572 subjects from Spain (4,327 AD, 563 FTD, 648 Parkinson's disease (PD), 84 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 5,950 healthy controls). Additionally, we included 101 individuals from 21 families with genetic FTD. MAPT p.A152T was borderline significantly associated with FTD [odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; p = 0.063], but not with AD. MAPT H1 haplotype was associated with AD risk (OR = 1.12; p = 0.0005). Stratification analysis showed that this association was mainly driven by APOE ɛ4 noncarriers (OR = 1.14; p = 0.0025). MAPT H1 was also associated with risk for PD (OR = 1.30; p = 0.0003) and PSP (OR = 3.18; p = 8.59 × 10-8) but not FTD. Our results suggest that the MAPT H1 haplotype increases the risk of PD, PSP, and non-APOE ɛ4 AD.

  2. White Matter Deterioration May Foreshadow Impairment of Emotional Valence Determination in Early-Stage Dementia of the Alzheimer Type

    PubMed Central

    Rajmohan, Ravi; Anderson, Ronald C.; Fang, Dan; Meyer, Austin G.; Laengvejkal, Pavis; Julayanont, Parunyou; Hannabas, Greg; Linton, Kitten; Culberson, John; Khan, Hafiz M. R.; De Toledo, John; Reddy, P. Hemachandra; O’Boyle, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In Alzheimer Disease (AD), non-verbal skills often remain intact for far longer than verbally mediated processes. Four (1 female, 3 males) participants with early-stage Clinically Diagnosed Dementia of the Alzheimer Type (CDDAT) and eight neurotypicals (NTs; 4 females, 4 males) completed the emotional valence determination test (EVDT) while undergoing BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We expected CDDAT participants to perform just as well as NTs on the EVDT, and to display increased activity within the bilateral amygdala and right anterior cingulate cortex (r-ACC). We hypothesized that such activity would reflect an increased reliance on these structures to compensate for on-going neuronal loss in frontoparietal regions due to the disease. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine if white matter (WM) damage had occurred in frontoparietal regions as well. CDDAT participants had similar behavioral performance and no differences were observed in brain activity or connectivity patterns within the amygdalae or r-ACC. Decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were noted, however, for the bilateral superior longitudinal fasciculi and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). We interpret these findings to suggest that emotional valence determination and non-verbal skill sets are largely intact at this stage of the disease, but signs foreshadowing future decline were revealed by possible WM deterioration. Understanding how non-verbal skill sets are altered, while remaining largely intact, offers new insights into how non-verbal communication may be more successfully implemented in the care of AD patients and highlights the potential role of DTI as a presymptomatic biomarker. PMID:28298891

  3. Donepezil as add-on treatment of psychotic symptoms in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Joseph; Brettholz, Izidor; Shneidman, Michael; Lerner, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, the neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been managed with neuroleptics or benzodiazepines, which have serious side effects. Preliminary observations suggest the possible value of cholinesterase inhibitors in the amelioration of psychotic symptoms in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type, dementia with Lewy bodies, and in patients with Parkinson's disease. Twelve inpatients with AD with psychotic symptoms and lack of improvement of their delusions/hallucinations during perphenazine treatment (8 mg/day) for 3 weeks received random open-label donepezil 5 mg daily in addition to an ongoing treatment of 8 mg/day perphenazine or 16 mg/day perphenazine. Assessments conducted at baseline and after weeks 2 and 4 included the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Global Deterioration Scale, the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, and the Clinical Global Impressions scale. Frequency of extrapyramidal symptoms was measured according to the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale. The donepezil-perphenazine group exhibited substantially greater and clinical improvements in mental state. At the end of the trial (4 weeks), Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale scores revealed significant differences between both groups (p = 0.006). The Clinical Global Impressions scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination scores also showed significant differences between the donepezil-perphenazine group and the perphenazine group (p = 0.028 and p = 0.027 respectively). No significant differences were found in the Global Deterioration Scale scores. Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale scores showed a significant deterioration in extrapyramidal symptoms in the perphenazine group compared with the donepezil-perphenazine group (p = 0.016). Donepezil augmentation of neuroleptics may be appropriate for those patients for whom neuroleptic monotherapy either does not lead to symptom remission or is associated with intolerable adverse effects. This was an open

  4. Effect of Gallic Acid on Dementia Type of Alzheimer Disease in Rats: Electrophysiological and Histological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hajipour, Somayeh; Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoob; Eidi, Akram; Mortazavi, Pejman; Valizadeh, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effect of gallic acid (GA) on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and histological changes in animal model of Alzheimer disease (AD) induced by beta-amyloid (Aβ). Methods: Sixty-four adult male Wistar rats (300±20 g) were divided into 8 groups: 1) Control (Cont); 2) AD; 3) Sham; 4–7) AD+GA (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg for 10 days, orally) or vehicle, 8) Cont+GA100, Aβ (1μg/μL in each site) was infused into hippocampus bilaterally. Changes of amplitude and slope of LTP induced in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) were evaluated by high frequency stimulation (HFS) of perforant path (PP). Results: Data showed that LTP amplitude and area under curve significantly impaired in AD rats (P<0.001), while significantly improved in AD rats treated with GA (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Current findings suggest that GA reduces neural damage and brain amyloid neuropathology and improves cognitive function via free radicals scavenging and inhibiting oligomerization of Aβ but with no effect on healthy rats. PMID:27303604

  5. Serum alpha 1-antichymotrypsin level as a marker for Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, J; Schleissner, L; Tachiki, K H; Kling, A S

    1995-01-01

    Excessive alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) in brain has been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We measured serum ACT by radial immunodiffusion in 57 patients with presumed AD, 110 healthy controls (24 children; 86 adults), 67 non-AD patients from a geriatric private practice and a VA nursing home, and 136 asthmatics (56 adults; 80 children) as an inflammatory disease control group. Serum ACT was significantly higher in AD (73.1 +/- 22 mg/dl) than in healthy controls (47.9 +/- 8.1 mg/dl) or non-AD patients (61.8 +/- 23.9 mg/dl). A level of 60 mg/dl best separated AD patients from controls or non-AD patients. Serial measurements served to distinguish elevations of ACT level in AD from non-AD inflammatory conditions; the ACT level in the latter returned to normal with therapy or time, but the levels in AD remained elevated. A measure of serum ACT by radial immunodiffusion can be used to support a diagnosis of AD disease but not necessarily as a screening test due to the potentially large number of false positives (26% in the population studied) should malignancy or inflammatory disease be concurrent.

  6. Onset seasons and clinical outcomes in patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection: an observational retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoran; Huang, Bi; Yang, Yanmin; Hui, Rutai; Lu, Haisong; Zhao, Zhenhua; Lu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shu; Fan, Xiaohan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association of onset season with clinical outcome in type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Design A single-centre, observational retrospective study. Setting The study was conducted in Fuwai Hospital, the National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Beijing, China. Participants From 2008 to 2010, a set of consecutive patients with type A AAD, confirmed by CT scanning, were enrolled and divided into four groups according to onset season: winter (December, January and February), spring (March, April and May), summer (June, July and August) and autumn (September, October and November). The primary end points were in-hospital death and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results Of the 492 cases in this study, 129 occurred in winter (26.2%), 147 in spring (29.9%), 92 in summer (18.7%), and 124 in autumn (25.2%). After a median follow-up of 20.4 months (IQR 9.7–38.9), the in-hospital mortality in cases occurring in autumn was higher than in the other three seasons (23.4% vs 8.4%, p<0.01). Long-term mortality was comparable among the four seasonal groups (p=0.63). After adjustment for age, gender and other risk factors, onset in autumn was still an independent factor associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality (HR 2.05; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.64, p=0.02) in addition to surgical treatment. Further analysis showed that the seasonal effect on in-hospital mortality (autumn vs other seasons: 57.4% vs 27.3%, p<0.01) was only significant in patients who did not receive surgical treatment. No seasonal effect on long-term clinical outcomes was found in this cohort. Conclusions Onset in autumn may be a factor that increases the risk of in-hospital death from type A AAD, especially in patients who receive conservative treatment. Immediate surgery improves the short-term and long-term outcomes regardless of onset season. PMID:28242769

  7. In vivo ROS production and use of oxidative stress-derived biomarkers to detect the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Umeno, Aya; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2017-04-03

    Breakthroughs in biochemistry have furthered our understanding of the onset and progression of various diseases, and have advanced the development of new therapeutics. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are ubiquitous in biological systems. ROS can be formed non-enzymatically by chemical, photochemical and electron transfer reactions, or as the byproducts of endogenous enzymatic reactions, phagocytosis, and inflammation. Imbalances in ROS homeostasis, caused by impairments in antioxidant enzymes or non-enzymatic antioxidant networks, increase oxidative stress, leading to the deleterious oxidation and chemical modification of biomacromolecules such as lipids, DNA, and proteins. While many ROS are intracellular signaling messengers and most products of oxidative metabolisms are beneficial for normal cellular function, the elevation of ROS levels by light, hyperglycemia, peroxisomes, and certain enzymes causes oxidative stress-sensitive signaling, toxicity, oncogenesis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Although the underlying mechanisms of these diseases are manifold, oxidative stress caused by ROS is a major contributing factor in their onset. This review summarizes the relationship between ROS and oxidative stress, with special reference to recent advancements in the detection of biomarkers related to oxidative stress. Further, we will introduce biomarkers for the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes, with a focus on our recent work.

  8. Possible Role of Interleukin-1β in Type 2 Diabetes Onset and Implications for Anti-inflammatory Therapy Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Maedler, Kathrin; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence of a role of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes progression has led to the development of therapies targeting the immune system. We develop a model of interleukin-1β dynamics in order to explain principles of disease onset. The parameters in the model are derived from in vitro experiments and patient data. In the framework of this model, an IL-1β switch is sufficient and necessary to account for type 2 diabetes onset. The model suggests that treatments targeting glucose bear the potential of stopping progression from pre-diabetes to overt type 2 diabetes. However, once in overt type 2 diabetes, these treatments have to be complemented by adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies in order to stop or decelerate disease progression. Moreover, the model suggests that while glucose-lowering therapy needs to be continued all the way, dose and duration of the anti-inflammatory therapy needs to be specifically controlled. The model proposes a framework for the discussion of clinical trial outcomes. PMID:25167060

  9. Molecular and Clinical Correlations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type I: Evidence for Familial Effects on the Age at Onset

    PubMed Central

    Ranum, Laura P. W.; Chung, Ming-Yi; Banfi, Sandro; Bryer, Alan; Schut, Lawrence J.; Ramesar, Raj; Duvick, Lisa A.; McCall, Alanna; Subramony, S. H.; Goldfarb, Lev; Gomez, Christopher; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk A.; Orr, Harry T.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    1994-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of debilitating neurodegenerative diseases for which a clinical classification system has proved unreliable. We have recently isolated the gene for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and have shown that the disease is caused by an expanded, unstable, CAG trinucleotide repeat within an expressed gene. Normal alleles have a size range of 19–36 repeats, while SCA1 alleles have 42-81 repeats. In this study, we examined the frequency and variability of the SCA1 repeat expansion in 87 kindreds with diverse ethnic backgrounds and dominantly inherited ataxia. All nine families for which linkage to the SCA1 region of 6p had previously been established showed repeat expansion, while 3 of the remaining 78 showed a similar abnormality. For 113 patients from the families with repeat expansion, inverse correlations between CAG repeat size and both age at onset and disease duration were observed. Repeat size accounted for 66% of the variation in age at onset in these patients. After correction for repeat size, interfamilial differences in age at onset remained significant, suggesting that additional genetic factors affect the expression of the SCA1 gene product. PMID:8037204

  10. Severe, fetal-onset form of olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia in three sibs: PCH type 5?

    PubMed

    Patel, Millan S; Becker, Laurence E; Toi, Ants; Armstrong, Dawna L; Chitayat, David

    2006-03-15

    We present three siblings with a precise onset of fetal seizure-like activity who had severe olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia (OPCH) and degeneration. Autopsies at 20, 27, and 37 weeks gestation showed diffuse central nervous system volume loss that was most marked for the cerebellum and brain stem structures. Neuropathological abnormalities included dysplastic, C-shaped inferior olivary nuclei, absent or immature dentate nuclei, and cell paucity more marked for the cerebellar vermis than the hemispheres. Delayed development was seen in layer 2 of the cerebral cortex and in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Prenatal monitoring defined a developmental window of 16-18 weeks gestation when ultrasonic assessment of cerebellar width was used for prenatal diagnosis. We discuss our findings in the context of the differential diagnosis for infantile (O)PCH and propose a classification scheme for the pontocerebellar hypoplasias. These patients represent the earliest reported with OPCH and provide unique information regarding the developmental neuropathology of this condition.

  11. Prophylactic fenbendazole therapy does not affect the incidence and onset of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Franke, Deanna D H; Shirwan, Haval

    2006-03-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is a common, highly efficacious broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug used to treat and limit rodent pinworm infections. However, the effect of its prophylactic use on the immune response of rodents is largely undefined. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model commonly used to study type 1 diabetes (T1D). Parasitic infections will inhibit diabetes development in NOD mice; thus, in the presence of contamination, prophylactic treatment with anthelmintics must be considered to maintain experimental research. Herein, we investigated the prophylactic use of FBZ in NOD mice to determine its effect on the incidence and onset of diabetes, lymphocyte sub-populations and T cell proliferative responses. NOD mice were separated into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received a diet containing FBZ. Animals were monitored for the incidence and onset of T1D. At matched time points, diabetic and non-diabetic mice were killed and splenic lymphocytes analyzed for various cell sub-populations and mitogen-induced proliferative responses using flow cytometry. Treated and control mice were monitored >23 weeks with no detectable effects on the incidence or onset of diabetes. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in lymphocyte sub-populations and mitogen-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses between control and treatment groups. These results suggest that prophylactic FBZ treatment does not significantly alter the incidence or onset of diabetes in NOD mice. The prophylactic use of FBZ, therefore, presents a viable approach for the prevention of pinworm infection in precious experimental animals with substantial scientific and economic benefits.

  12. Development of early-onset type 2 diabetes in the young: implications for child bearing.

    PubMed

    Homko, Carol J; Reece, E Albert

    2003-08-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing in children and adolescents worldwide, particularly among minority youth. This has led to an increase in the number of pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes, which has now exceeded pregnancies complicated by type 1 diabetes. Although the data are somewhat limited, those studies that are available seem to indicate that the rate of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes is at least as great, if not greater, for type 2 as for type 1 diabetes. It has been postulated that some of the excess risk is due to the fact that women with type 2 diabetes are older, heavier, less likely to seek early prenatal care, and are generally in less satisfactory glycemic control. This article reviews the existing data on pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes and the implications for management and prevention.

  13. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D.

  14. Early-onset fetal hydrops and muscle degeneration in siblings due to a novel variant of type IV glycogenosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, P M; Brueton, L A; Murphy, K W; Worthington, V C; Bjelogrlic, P; Lazda, E J; Sabire, N J; Sewry, C A

    1999-09-10

    We report on 3 consecutive sib fetuses, presenting at 13, 12, and 13 weeks of gestation, respectively, with fetal hydrops, limb contractures, and akinesia. Autopsy of the first fetus showed subcutaneous fluid collections and severe degeneration of skeletal muscle. Histologic studies demonstrated massive accumulation of diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the skeletal muscle cells and epidermal keratinocytes of all 3 fetuses. Enzyme studies of fibroblasts from the 3rd fetus showed deficient activity of glycogen brancher enzyme, indicating that this is a new, severe form of glycogenosis type IV with onset in the early second trimester.

  15. Onset condition of pulsating cone-jet mode of electrohydrodynamic jetting for plane, hole, and pin type electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojun; Song, Junyoung; Chung, Jaewon; Hong, Daehie

    2010-11-01

    In this work, electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jetting phenomena were observed for three different types of bottom electrode (plane, hole, pin) at constant back pressure condition of the reservoir. Especially, we have focused on the measurement and numerical prediction of the onset voltage for pulsating Taylor cone jetting, changing glass capillary nozzle diameter (outer diameter: 16-47 μm), hydrostatic back pressure head in the reservoir, and the distance between the nozzle and the bottom electrode to provide design information on the EHD multinozzle head.

  16. The choroid plexus transcriptome reveals changes in type I and II interferon responses in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Sandro Dá; Ferreira, Ana C; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Sousa, João C; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Sousa, Nuno; Palha, Joana A; Marques, Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a marked decline in cognition and memory function. Increasing evidence highlights the essential role of neuroinflammatory and immune-related molecules, including those produced at the brain barriers, on brain immune surveillance, cellular dysfunction and amyloid beta (Aβ) pathology in AD. Therefore, understanding the response at the brain barriers may unravel novel pathways of relevance for the pathophysiology of AD. Herein, we focused on the study of the choroid plexus (CP), which constitutes the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, in aging and in AD. Specifically, we used the PDGFB-APPSwInd (J20) transgenic mouse model of AD, which presents early memory decline and progressive Aβ accumulation, and littermate age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, to characterize the CP transcriptome at 3, 5-6 and 11-12months of age. The most striking observation was that the CP of J20 mice displayed an overall overexpression of type I interferon (IFN) response genes at all ages. Moreover, J20 mice presented a high expression of type II IFN genes in the CP at 3months, which became lower than WT at 5-6 and 11-12months. Importantly, along with a marked memory impairment and increased glial activation, J20 mice also presented a similar overexpression of type I IFN genes in the dorsal hippocampus at 3months. Altogether, these findings provide new insights on a possible interplay between type I and II IFN responses in AD and point to IFNs as targets for modulation in cognitive decline.

  17. MicroRNA-139 modulates Alzheimer's-associated pathogenesis in SAMP8 mice by targeting cannabinoid receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Bao, J S; Su, J H; Huang, W

    2017-02-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, and is the most common type of dementia in the elderly population. Growing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in neuroinflammation associated with AD progression. In this study, we analyzed the expression of microRNA-139 (miR-139) as well as the learning and memory function in AD. We observed that the miR-139 expression was significantly higher in the hippocampus of aged senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice (2.92 ± 0.13) than in the control mice (1.49 ± 0.08). Likewise, the overexpression of miR-139 by means of hippocampal injection impaired the hippocampus-dependent learning and memory formation. In contrast, the downregulation of miR-139 in mice improved learning and memory function in the mice. The level of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), a potential target gene of miR-139, was inversely correlated with the miR-139 expression in primary hippocampal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-139 inversely modulated the responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Together, our findings demonstrate that miR-139 exerts a pathogenic effect in AD by modulating CB2-meditated neuroinflammatory processes.

  18. Identifying Early Onset of Hearing Loss in Young Adults With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Using High Frequency Audiometry.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, S S; Jaya, V; Moses, Anand; Muraleedharan, A

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder caused by hyperglycemia which leads to dysfunction of various organs. Hearing acuity is equally hindered by this disorder. Among individuals with DM audiological characteristics of DM type 1 are of great concern in the literature. This study aims at establishing high frequency audiometry (HFA) as a useful tool in identifying early onset of hearing loss in individuals with DM type 2. 20 non-diabetic participants and 20 individuals with DM type 2 in the age range of 20-40 years were considered for the study. Subjects in both groups underwent otoscopic examination, PTA at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 kHz and HFA at 9, 10, 11.2, 12.5, 14 and 16 kHz. Results revealed statistically significant difference in thresholds of both PTA and HFA at all frequencies across the group, but the mean threshold difference between the diabetic and non-diabetic group was marked in HFA than in PTA. In the diabetic subjects the thresholds of PTA was within 25 dBHL at all frequencies when compared to the thresholds of HFA. Individuals with DM type 2 showed bilateral symmetrical mild hearing loss in HFA and the hearing loss increased with ascending test frequencies from 9,000 to 16,000 Hz. Mild hearing loss in HFA is an indicator for early onset of hearing loss in DM type 2. Hence this present study emphasis the clinical utility of HFA in young adults with DM type 2.

  19. Preventing schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease: comparative ethics.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    2001-08-01

    Schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease are both diseases of the brain that involve genetic susceptibility factors and for which the prevention or delay of symptom onset are important research goals. This paper provides some comparisons between current preventive efforts in schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease, focusing on certain ethical features of these endeavors such as potential discrimination, misdiagnosis, and stigma.

  20. Classification and basic pathology of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Duyckaerts, Charles; Delatour, Benoît; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The lesions of Alzheimer disease include accumulation of proteins, losses of neurons and synapses, and alterations related to reactive processes. Extracellular Abeta accumulation occurs in the parenchyma as diffuse, focal or stellate deposits. It may involve the vessel walls of arteries, veins and capillaries. The cases in which the capillary vessel walls are affected have a higher probability of having one or two apoepsilon 4 alleles. Parenchymal as well as vascular Abeta deposition follows a stepwise progression. Tau accumulation, probably the best histopathological correlate of the clinical symptoms, takes three aspects: in the cell body of the neuron as neurofibrillary tangle, in the dendrites as neuropil threads, and in the axons forming the senile plaque neuritic corona. The progression of tau pathology is stepwise and stereotyped from the entorhinal cortex, through the hippocampus, to the isocortex. The neuronal loss is heterogeneous and area-specific. Its mechanism is still discussed. The timing of the synaptic loss, probably linked to Abeta peptide itself, maybe as oligomers, is also controversial. Various clinico-pathological types of Alzheimer disease have been described, according to the type of the lesions (plaque only and tangle predominant), the type of onset (focal onset), the cause (genetic or sporadic) and the associated lesions (Lewy bodies, vascular lesions, hippocampal sclerosis, TDP-43 inclusions and argyrophilic grain disease).

  1. Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the rise of type 2 diabetes in youth, it is critical to investigate factors such as physical activity (PA) and time spent sedentary that may be contributing to this public health problem. This article describes PA and sedentary time in a large cohort of youth with type 2 diabetes and compares t...

  2. Type 2 diabetes as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease: the confounders, interactions, and neuropathology associated with this relationship.

    PubMed

    Vagelatos, Nicholas T; Eslick, Guy D

    2013-01-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore whether type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We also reviewed interactions with smoking, hypertension, and apolipoprotein E ɛ4. Using a series of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Current Contents Connect, and Google Scholar), we identified a total of 15 epidemiologic studies. Fourteen studies reported positive associations, of which 9 were statistically significant. Risk estimates ranged from 0.83 to 2.45. The pooled adjusted risk ratio was 1.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.41, 1.75), with a population-attributable risk of 8%. Smoking and hypertension, when comorbid with T2DM, had odds of 14 and 3, respectively. Of the 5 studies that investigated the interaction between T2DM and apolipoprotein E ɛ4, 4 showed positive associations, of which 3 were significant, with odds ranging from 2.4 to 4.99. The pooled adjusted risk ratio was 2.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.51, 5.61). Risk estimates were presented in the context of a key confounder-cerebral infarcts-which are more common in those with T2DM and might contribute to the manifestation of clinical AD. We provide evidence from clinico-neuropathologic studies that demonstrates the following: First, cerebral infarcts are more common than AD-type pathology in those with T2DM and dementia. Second, those with dementia at postmortem are more likely to have both AD-type and cerebrovascular pathologies. Finally, cerebral infarcts reduce the number of AD lesions required for the manifestation of clinical dementia, but they do not appear to interact synergistically with AD-type pathology. Therefore, the increased risk of clinically diagnosed AD seems to be mediated through cerebrovascular pathology.

  3. Early Alzheimer's disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-01-01

    The genetics community working on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has made remarkable progress in the past 20 years. The cumulative efforts by multiple groups have lead to the identification of three autosomal dominant genes for early onset AD. These are the amyloid-beta protein precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin1 and 2. The knowledge derived from this work has firmly established Abeta as a critical disease molecule and lead to candidate drugs currently in treatment trials. Work on a related disease, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism - chromosome 17 type has also added to our understanding of pathogenesis by revealing that tau, the protein component of neurofibrillary tangles, is also a critical molecule in neurodegeneration. Lessons learned that still influence work on human genetics include the need to recognize and deal with genetic heterogeneity, a feature common to many genetic disorders. Genetic heterogeneity, if recognized, can be source of information. Another critical lesson is that clinical, molecular, and statistical scientists need to work closely on disease projects to succeed in solving the complex problems of common genetic disorders.

  4. Examination of blood-brain barrier permeability in dementia of the Alzheimer type with (68Ga)EDTA and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schlageter, N.L.; Carson, R.E.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with (/sup 68/Ga)ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ((/sup 68/Ga)EDTA) was used to examine the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in five patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and in five healthy age-matched controls. Within a scanning time of 90 min, there was no evidence that measurable intravascular tracer entered the brain in either the dementia or the control group. An upper limit for the cerebrovascular permeability-surface area product of (68Ga)EDTA was estimated as 2 X 10(-6) s-1 in both groups. The results provide no evidence for breakdown of the BBB in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type.

  5. Decreased cord-blood phospholipids in young age-at-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Daria; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Larsson, Helena E; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ivarsson, Sten A; Lernmark, Ake; Oresic, Matej

    2013-11-01

    Children developing type 1 diabetes may have risk markers already in their umbilical cord blood. It is hypothesized that the risk for type 1 diabetes at an early age may be increased by a pathogenic pregnancy and be reflected in altered cord-blood composition. This study used metabolomics to test if the cord-blood lipidome was affected in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 8 years of age. The present case-control study of 76 index children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 8 years of age and 76 healthy control subjects matched for HLA risk, sex, and date of birth, as well as the mother's age and gestational age, revealed that cord-blood phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were significantly decreased in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 4 years of age. Reduced levels of triglycerides correlated to gestational age in index and control children and to age at diagnosis only in the index children. Finally, gestational infection during the first trimester was associated with lower cord-blood total lysophosphatidylcholines in index and control children. In conclusion, metabolomics of umbilical cord blood may identify children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes. Low phospholipid levels at birth may represent key mediators of the immune system and contribute to early induction of islet autoimmunity.

  6. Association Analyses of Variants in the DIO2 Gene with Early-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Pima Indians

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Yunhua Li; Ortega, Emilio; Kobes, Sayuko; Bogardus, Clifton; Baier, Leslie J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The type 2 deiodinase gene (DIO2) encodes a deiodinase that converts the thyroid prohormone, thyroxine, to the biologically active triiodothyronine. Thyroid hormones regulate energy balance and may also influence glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesized that variations in DIO2 could contribute to obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Pima Indians. Methods Sequencing of the DIO2 gene in DNA from 83 Pima Indians identified 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Several of these SNPs were in perfect genotypic concordance among the 83 samples that were sequenced, and all 12 could be divided into five linkage disequilibrium groups. One representative SNP from each group (Thr92Ala, rs225011, rs225015, rs6574549, and a rare 5′ flanking SNP) was selected for further genotyping for association analyses. In this study, the five selected variants in DIO2, as described above, were genotyped in three groups of Pima Indians: (i) a case (n=150)/control (n=150) group for early-onset T2DM (onset age <25 years); (ii) a case (n=362)/control (n=127) group for obesity; (iii) a large (n=1,311, cases n=810/controls n=501) family-based group, of which 256 nondiabetic subjects had undergone detailed metabolic phenotyping. Results The Thr92Ala variant common in Pima Indians, rs225011, and rs225015 were modestly associated with early-onset T2DM (p=0.01–0.04) in the case–control study, but were not associated with obesity in the obesity case–control study, nor associated with T2DM (at any age) or body–mass index (BMI; as a quantitative trait) in the family-based analysis. Thr92Ala, rs225011, rs225015, and rs6574549 were also nominally associated with hepatic glucose output (p=0.02). rs6574549 was associated with fasting insulin (p=0.02), insulin action (p=0.04), and energy expenditure (p=0.02). None of these nominal associations remained statistically significant after corrections for multiple testing. Conclusions We propose that variation in DIO2 may

  7. Amelioration of cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration by curcumin in rat model of sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT).

    PubMed

    Ishrat, Tauheed; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Yousuf, Seema; Ahmad, Muzamil; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Ahmad, Ajmal; Islam, Fakhrul

    2009-09-01

    Recent evidence indicates that curcumin (CUR), the principal curcuminoid of turmeric, exhibits antioxidant potential and protects the brain against various oxidative stressors. The aim of the present study was to examine the modulating impacts of CUR against cognitive deficits and oxidative damage in intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) infused rats. Rats were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg), while sham rats received the same volume of vehicle and then supplemented with CUR (80 mg/kg) for three weeks. After two weeks of ICV-STZ infusion, rats were tested for cognitive performance using passive avoidance and water maze tasks and then sacrificed for biochemical and histopathological assays. ICV-STZ rats showed significant cognitive deficits, which were significantly improved by CUR supplementation. CUR supplementation significantly augmented increased 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and malonaldehyde (MDA), thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), protein carbonyl (PC) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG); decreased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and its dependent enzymes (Glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and glutathione reductase [GR]) in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex; and increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the hippocampus of ICV-STZ rats. The study suggests that CUR is effective in preventing cognitive deficits, and might be beneficial for the treatment of sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT).

  8. Elevated Risk of Type 2 Diabetes for Development of Alzheimer Disease: a Key Role for Oxidative Stress in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological data show that the incidence of AD increases with age and doubles every 5 years after 65 years of age. From a neuropathological point of view, amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) leads to senile plaques, which, together with hyperphosphorylated tau-based neurofibrillary tangles and synapse loss, are the principal pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species, and induces calcium-dependent excitotoxicity, impairment of cellular respiration, and alteration of synaptic functions associated with learning and memory. Oxidative stress was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which (i) represents another prevalent disease associated with obesity and often aging, and (ii) is considered to be a risk factor for AD development. T2DM is characterized by high blood glucose levels resulting from increased hepatic glucose production, impaired insulin production and peripheral insulin resistance, which close resemble to the brain insulin resistance observed in AD patients. Furthermore, growing evidence suggest that oxidative stress play a pivotal role in the development of insulin resistance and vice versa. This review article provides molecular aspects and the pharmacological approaches from both preclinical and clinical data and interpreted from the point of view of oxidative stress with the aim to highlight progresses in this field. PMID:24949886

  9. Turn-taking and speech act patterns in the discourse of senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type patients.

    PubMed

    Ripich, D N; Vertes, D; Whitehouse, P; Fulton, S; Ekelman, B

    1991-04-01

    Conversational discourse patterns of 11 normal elderly and 11 senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT) patients engaged in dyadic interaction with an examiner were examined. Differences in word usage, turn taking, and speech act production were investigated both for the two-subject groups and for the examiner's conversations with each group. Compensatory shifts in discourse by participants are identified. For the subject, differences were shown on words per turn with SDAT subjects speaking in shorter turns and in nonverbal responses with SDAT subjects using this strategy more frequently. Speech act categories of Requestives and Assertives also differed with SDAT subjects using more Requestives and fewer Assertives. The SDAT subjects had significantly more occurrences of unintelligible utterances. For the examiner, words per turn differed with the examiner using shorter turns with SDAT subjects. No differences were shown in the examiner's patterns of speech act usage, nonverbal responses, or intelligibility. In general, these results indicate significant discourse differences in the words per turn level for all participants and speech act levels of conversation for SDAT subjects. They also indicate generally maintained interaction patterns by speakers so that the discourse genre of conversation is sustained. The pattern of compensatory shifts in discourse suggests retained flexibility in the communication system of early and mid stage SDAT patients.

  10. Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes for development of Alzheimer disease: a key role for oxidative stress in brain.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological data show that the incidence of AD increases with age and doubles every 5 years after 65 years of age. From a neuropathological point of view, amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) leads to senile plaques, which, together with hyperphosphorylated tau-based neurofibrillary tangles and synapse loss, are the principal pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species, and induces calcium-dependent excitotoxicity, impairment of cellular respiration, and alteration of synaptic functions associated with learning and memory. Oxidative stress was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which (i) represents another prevalent disease associated with obesity and often aging, and (ii) is considered to be a risk factor for AD development. T2DM is characterized by high blood glucose levels resulting from increased hepatic glucose production, impaired insulin production and peripheral insulin resistance, which close resemble to the brain insulin resistance observed in AD patients. Furthermore, growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of insulin resistance and vice versa. This review article provides molecular aspects and the pharmacological approaches from both preclinical and clinical data interpreted from the point of view of oxidative stress with the aim of highlighting progresses in this field.

  11. Thinking outside the box: Alzheimer-type neuropathology that does not map directly onto current consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter T; Kukull, Walter A; Frosch, Matthew P

    2010-05-01

    The brains of many cognitively impaired patients fall into neuropathologic diagnostic categories that cannot be defined explicitly by guidelines of the National Institute on Aging and Reagan Institute. Here, 2 specific case categories are considered: i) "tangle-intensive" patients with the highest density of neurofibrillary tangles (as graded by the Braak staging system) but only moderate density of neuritic amyloid plaques (as graded by the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease); and ii) "plaque-intensive" patients with intermediate severity neurofibrillary tangles and high density of neuritic amyloid plaques. To understand these technically unclassifiable cases better, we analyzed 1,677 cases with antemortem diagnoses of dementia from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Registry; this registry includes both clinical and pathologic data from the National Institute on Aging-funded Alzheimer Disease Center. To evaluate the diagnostic tendencies of Alzheimer Disease Center neuropathologists, we assessed how the plaque-intensive and tangle-intensive cases were diagnosed. Tangle-intensive cases were more likely to be designated "high likelihood" that the dementia was due to Alzheimer disease, whereas plaque-intensive cases were typically designated as "intermediate likelihood." Only the Braak Stage VI tangle-intensive cases had lower final Mini-Mental State Examination scores than the plaque-intensive cases (p < 0.02). We conclude that more explicit diagnostic categories and a better understanding of the pathology in earlier phases of the disease may be helpful for guiding neuropathologists in the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

  12. Optogenetic Stimulation Shifts the Excitability of Cerebral Cortex from Type I to Type II: Oscillation Onset and Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Michael; Truccolo, Wilson; Ermentrout, Bard

    2017-01-01

    Constant optogenetic stimulation targeting both pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons has recently been shown to elicit propagating waves of gamma-band (40–80 Hz) oscillations in the local field potential of non-human primate motor cortex. The oscillations emerge with non-zero frequency and small amplitude—the hallmark of a type II excitable medium—yet they also propagate far beyond the stimulation site in the manner of a type I excitable medium. How can neural tissue exhibit both type I and type II excitability? We investigated the apparent contradiction by modeling the cortex as a Wilson-Cowan neural field in which optogenetic stimulation was represented by an external current source. In the absence of any external current, the model operated as a type I excitable medium that supported propagating waves of gamma oscillations similar to those observed in vivo. Applying an external current to the population of inhibitory neurons transformed the model into a type II excitable medium. The findings suggest that cortical tissue normally operates as a type I excitable medium but it is locally transformed into a type II medium by optogenetic stimulation which predominantly targets inhibitory neurons. The proposed mechanism accounts for the graded emergence of gamma oscillations at the stimulation site while retaining propagating waves of gamma oscillations in the non-stimulated tissue. It also predicts that gamma waves can be emitted on every second cycle of a 100 Hz oscillation. That prediction was subsequently confirmed by re-analysis of the neurophysiological data. The model thus offers a theoretical account of how optogenetic stimulation alters the excitability of cortical neural fields. PMID:28118355

  13. Differential Insulitic Profiles Determine the Extent of β-Cell Destruction and the Age at Onset of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leete, Pia; Willcox, Abby; Krogvold, Lars; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Foulis, Alan K; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells following the infiltration of leukocytes (including CD8(+), CD4(+), and CD20(+) cells) into and around pancreatic islets (insulitis). Recently, we reported that two distinct patterns of insulitis occur in patients with recent-onset T1D from the U.K. and that these differ principally in the proportion of infiltrating CD20(+) B cells (designated CD20Hi and CD20Lo, respectively). We have now extended this analysis to include patients from the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (U.S.) and Diabetes Virus Detection (DiViD) study (Norway) cohorts and confirm that the two profiles of insulitis occur more widely. Moreover, we show that patients can be directly stratified according to their insulitic profile and that those receiving a diagnosis before the age of 7 years always display the CD20Hi profile. By contrast, individuals who received a diagnosis beyond the age of 13 years are uniformly defined as CD20Lo. This implies that the two forms of insulitis are differentially aggressive and that patients with a CD20Hi profile lose their β-cells at a more rapid rate. In support of this, we also find that the proportion of residual insulin-containing islets (ICIs) increases in parallel with age at the onset of T1D. Importantly, those receiving a diagnosis in, or beyond, their teenage years retain ∼40% ICIs at diagnosis, implying that a functional deficit rather than an absolute β-cell loss may be causal for disease onset in these patients. We conclude that appropriate patient stratification will be critical for correct interpretation of the outcomes of intervention therapies targeted to islet-infiltrating immune cells in T1D.

  14. Late-Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type II (Pompe's Disease) with a Novel Mutation: A Malaysian Experience.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Abdul Wahab, Siti Aishah; Yakob, Yusnita; Lock Hock, Ngu; Thong, Wong Kum; Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Pompe's disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-1,4-glucosidase, resulting in excessive accumulation of glycogen in the lysosomes and cytoplasm of all tissues, most notably in skeletal muscles. We present a case of adult-onset Pompe's disease with progressive proximal muscles weakness over 5 years and respiratory failure on admission, requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Electromyography showed evidence of myopathic process with small amplitudes, polyphasic motor unit action potentials, and presence of pseudomyotonic discharges. Muscle biopsy showed glycogen-containing vacuoles in the muscle fibers consistent with glycogen storage disease. Genetic analysis revealed two compound heterozygous mutations at c.444C>G (p.Tyr148∗) in exon 2 and c.2238G>C (p.Trp746Cys) in exon 16, with the former being a novel mutation. This mutation has not been reported before, to our knowledge. The patient was treated with high protein diet during the admission and subsequently showed good clinical response to enzyme replacement therapy with survival now to the eighth year. Conclusion. In patients with late-onset adult Pompe's disease, careful evaluation and early identification of the disease and its treatment with high protein diet and enzyme replacement therapy improve muscle function and have beneficial impact on long term survival.

  15. The future of treating youth-onset type 2 diabetes: focusing upstream and extending our influence into community environments.

    PubMed

    Amed, Shazhan

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in youth is on the rise and many of these youth already have comorbidity at disease onset. The TODAY trial clearly demonstrated the challenges of treating this disease. Obesity is a key risk factor in the development of youth-onset T2D, and its prevention can mitigate the risk for developing T2D. However, childhood obesity prevention efforts to date have shown only modest effectiveness. Considering the larger, complex socioeconomic and cultural contexts that influence health behaviors among children and their families can enhance prevention efforts. Community-based participatory, multi-component, multi-setting childhood obesity prevention initiatives designed using the socio-ecological model and systems theory have been effective in sustainably decreasing childhood overweight and obesity. To advance our progress in treating and preventing T2D in youth, we must apply this new knowledge on community-wide childhood obesity prevention to enhance the impact of individual-level therapeutic strategies such as the TODAY intervention.

  16. Reversal of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes With an Agonistic TLR4/MD-2 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Kyle J; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Kachapati, Kritika; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wu, Yuehong; Katz, Jonathan D; Ascherman, Dana P; Ridgway, William M

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is currently an incurable disease, characterized by a silent prodromal phase followed by an acute clinical phase, reflecting progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Autoreactive T cells play a major role in β-cell destruction, but innate immune cell cytokines and costimulatory molecules critically affect T-cell functional status. We show that an agonistic monoclonal antibody to TLR4/MD-2 (TLR4-Ab) reverses new-onset diabetes in a high percentage of NOD mice. TLR4-Ab induces antigen-presenting cell (APC) tolerance in vitro and in vivo, resulting in an altered cytokine profile, decreased costimulatory molecule expression, and decreased T-cell proliferation in APC:T-cell assays. TLR4-Ab treatment increases T-regulatory cell (Treg) numbers in both the periphery and the pancreatic islet, predominantly expanding the Helios(+)Nrp-1(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset. TLR4-Ab treatment in the absence of B cells in NOD.scid mice prevents subsequent T cell-mediated disease, further suggesting a major role for APC tolerization in disease protection. Specific stimulation of the innate immune system through TLR4/MD-2, therefore, can restore tolerance in the aberrant adaptive immune system and reverse new-onset T1D, suggesting a novel immunological approach to treatment of T1D in humans.

  17. A Statistical Study of Solar Type-III Bursts and Auroral Kilometric Radiation Onsets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    19821. Solar flares often eject energetic particles into the solar wind . These streaming particles can be detected by satellite par- ticle detectors...The stream moving through the solar wind creates a bump-on-tail type electron distribution. Because fast particles arrive before the slow particles in...These antennas are designated I he S and Z atitennas, respectlivey. The experiment is designed to study the coronal magnetic tield and solar wind

  18. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  19. Assessing onset and length of greening period in six vegetation types in Oaxaca, Mexico, using NDVI-precipitation relationships.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mendoza, L; Galicia, L; Cuevas-Fernández, M L; Magaña, V; Gómez, G; Palacio-Prieto, J L

    2008-07-01

    Variations in the normalized vegetation index (NDVI) for the state of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico, were analyzed in terms of precipitation anomalies for the period 1997-2003. Using 10-day averages in NDVI data, obtained from AVHRR satellite information, the response of six types of vegetation to intra-annual and inter-annual fluctuations in precipitation were examined. The onset and temporal evolution of the greening period were studied in terms of precipitation variations through spectral analysis (coherence and phase). The results indicate that extremely dry periods, such as those observed in 1997 and 2001, resulted in low values of NDVI for much of Oaxaca, while good precipitation periods produced a rapid response (20-30 days of delay) from a stressed to a non-stressed condition in most vegetation types. One of these rapid changes occurred during the transition from dry to wet conditions during the summer of 1998. As in many parts of the tropics and subtropics, the NDVI reflects low frequency variations in precipitation on several spatial scales. Even after long dry periods (2001-2002), the various regional vegetation types are capable of recovering when a good rainy season takes place, indicating that vegetation types such as the evergreen forests in the high parts of Oaxaca respond better to rainfall characteristics (timing, amount) than to temperature changes, as is the case in most mid-latitudes. This finding may be relevant to prepare climate change scenarios for forests, where increases in surface temperature and precipitation anomalies are expected.

  20. Exercise and cognitive function: a hypothesis for the association of type II diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease from an evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Gilberto NO

    2009-01-01

    The association of type II diabetes mellitus (DM2) with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has received considerable attention in recent years. In the present paper, a hypothesis for this association from an evolutionary perspective, with emphasis on the close interplay between exercise and cognitive function, will be advanced in order to provide a biological rationale for the notion that the fundamental metabolic features of DM2 act in the brain over a protracted time span to induce the neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease thereby producing cognitive impairment. It is hoped that this hypothesis puts the association of DM2 and AD on firm conceptual grounds from a biological perspective and offers directions for further research. PMID:19825199

  1. Is it really Alzheimer's?

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Dementia is a syndrome of intellectual impairment. Established criteria can be used to diagnose dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) and to categorize it into three stages. This article compares DAT with other types of dementia and outlines the characteristic clinical differences. Some neurobehavioural testing is described. PMID:8019191

  2. Age-of-onset or behavioral sub-types? A prospective comparison of two approaches to characterizing the heterogeneity within antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Burt, S Alexandra; Donnellan, M Brent; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2011-07-01

    There are two common approaches to sub-typing the well-documented heterogeneity within antisocial behavior: age-of-onset (i.e., childhood-onset versus adolescence-onset; see Moffitt 1993) and behavioral (i.e., physical aggression versus non-aggressive rule-breaking). These approaches appear to be associated, such that aggression is more characteristic of childhood-onset antisocial behavior whereas rule-breaking is linked to both child- and adolescence-onset antisocial behavior. However, it remains unclear which approach, if either, better explains the heterogeneity within antisocial behavior. We examined this question in a prospective sample of male twins, assessed at the ages of 11, 14, 17, and 24 years. Although the age-of-onset subtypes predicted adult antisocial behavior in the expected direction when analyzed alone, this association dissipated once we controlled for aggression and rule-breaking. Such findings suggest that the behavioral sub-types of antisocial behavior may be a stronger predictor of later antisocial outcomes than is its age-of-onset.

  3. Age-of-onset or Behavioral Sub-types? A Prospective Comparison of Two Approaches to Characterizing the Heterogeneity within Antisocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Donnellan, M. Brent; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    There are two common approaches to sub-typing the well-documented heterogeneity within antisocial behavior: age-of-onset (i.e., childhood-onset versus adolescence-onset; see Moffitt, 1993) and behavioral (i.e., physical aggression versus non-aggressive rule-breaking). These approaches appear to be associated, such that aggression is more characteristic of childhood-onset antisocial behavior whereas rule-breaking is linked to both child- and adolescence-onset antisocial behavior. However, it remains unclear which approach, if either, better explains the heterogeneity within antisocial behavior. We examined this question in a prospective sample of male twins, assessed at the ages of 11, 14, 17, and 24 years. Although the age-of-onset subtypes predicted adult antisocial behavior in the expected direction when analyzed alone, this association dissipated once we controlled for aggression and rule-breaking. Such findings suggest that the behavioral sub-types of antisocial behavior may be a stronger predictor of later antisocial outcomes than is their age-of-onset. PMID:21298333

  4. Clinical relevance of epigenetics in the onset and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Zullo, Alberto; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Fabbricini, Rossella; Soricelli, Andrea; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-01-06

    Epigenetics is involved in the altered expression of gene networks that underlie insulin resistance and insufficiency. Major genes controlling β-cell differentiation and function, such as PAX4, PDX1, and GLP1 receptor, are epigenetically controlled. Epigenetics can cause insulin resistance through immunomediated pro-inflammatory actions related to several factors, such as NF-kB, osteopontin, and Toll-like receptors. Hereafter, we provide a critical and comprehensive summary on this topic with a particular emphasis on translational and clinical aspects. We discuss the effect of epigenetics on β-cell regeneration for cell replacement therapy, the emerging bioinformatics approaches for analyzing the epigenetic contribution to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the epigenetic core of the transgenerational inheritance hypothesis in T2DM, and the epigenetic clinical trials on T2DM. Therefore, prevention or reversion of the epigenetic changes occurring during T2DM development may reduce the individual and societal burden of the disease.

  5. Central vascular disease and exacerbated pathology in a mixed model of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan Jose; Jimenez-Palomares, Margarita; Murillo-Carretero, Maria Isabel; Infante-Garcia, Carmen; Berrocoso, Esther; Hernandez-Pacho, Fernando; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso Maria; Cozar-Castellano, Irene; Garcia-Alloza, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Aging remains the main risk factor to suffer Alzheimer's disease (AD), though epidemiological studies also support that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major contributor. In order to explore the close relationship between both pathologies we have developed an animal model presenting both AD and T2D, by crossing APP/PS1 mice (AD model) with db/db mice (T2D model). We traced metabolic and cognitive evolution before T2D or AD pathology is present (4 weeks of age), when T2D has debuted but no senile plaques are present (14 weeks of age) and when both pathologies are well established (26 weeks of age). APP/PS1xdb/db mice showed an age-dependent synergistic effect between T2D and AD. Significant brain atrophy and tau pathology were detected in the cortex by 14 weeks, that spread to the hippocampus by 26 weeks of age. Severe cognitive impairment was also detected as soon as at 14 weeks of age. Interestingly, in APP/PS1xdb/db mice we observed a shift in Aβ soluble/insoluble levels, and whereas more toxic soluble species were favoured, senile plaques (SP) were reduced. An overall increase of microglia activation was observed in APP/PS1xdb/db mice. We also found exacerbated hemorrhagic burden in APP/PS1xdbd/db mice, suggesting that blood brain barrier alterations may be responsible for the early pathological features observed. Moreover, metabolic parameters can predict many of these alterations, supporting a role for T2D in AD pathology. This new model provides a relevant tool to further explore the relationship between T2D, AD and vascular implications, offering the possibility to assess therapeutic approaches, that by improving T2D metabolic control could delay or prevent AD pathology.

  6. Glio-vascular changes during ageing in wild-type and Alzheimer's disease-like APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Janota, C S; Brites, D; Lemere, C A; Brito, M A

    2015-09-16

    Vascular and glial involvement in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), and age-related brain vulnerabilities have been suggested. Therefore, we sought to: (i) investigate which vascular and glial events are evident in ageing and/or AD, (ii) to establish the temporal evolution of vascular and glial changes in AD-like and wild-type (WT) mice and (iii) to relate them to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation. We examined immunohistochemically hippocampi and cortex from APP/PS1dE9 and WT C57BL/6 mice along ageing and disease progression (young-adulthood, middle- and old-age). Ageing resulted in the increase in receptor for advanced glycation endproducts expression, as well as the entrance of thrombin and albumin in hippocampal parenchyma. In contrast, the loss of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) positive cells, in both regions, was only related to AD pathogenesis. Hypovascularization was affected by both ageing and AD in the hippocampus, but resulted from the interaction between both factors in the cortex. Astrogliosis was a result of AD in hippocampus and of both factors in cortex, while microgliosis was associated with fibrillar amyloid plaques in AD-like mice and with the interaction between both factors in each of the studied regions. In sum, these data show that senile plaques precede vascular and glial alterations only in hippocampus, whereas in cortex, vascular and glial alterations, namely the loss of PDGFR-β-positive cells and astrogliosis, accompanied the first senile plaques. Hence, this study points to vascular and glial events that co-exist in AD pathogenesis and age-related brain vulnerabilities.

  7. Failure to control prepotent pathways in early stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type: evidence from dichotic listening.

    PubMed

    Duchek, Janet M; Balota, David A

    2005-09-01

    The authors examined the right ear advantage in a dichotic listening task in healthy aging and very mild and mild stages of Alzheimer's disease. Subjects were simultaneously presented 3 pairs of digits to the left and right ears (e.g., left ear: 4, 3, 1; right ear: 9, 2, 5) for immediate ordered recall. Four lists of triads were presented, varying in presentation rate between digit pairs within a triad (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 s). Results indicated that the very mild and mild Alzheimer's groups showed a larger right ear advantage in free recall compared with the healthy controls, indicating a tendency to respond to the prepotent left hemisphere pathway for language processing. Also, the right ear advantage and proportion of switches made during recall were correlated with psychometric measures of frontal lobe function in the mild Alzheimer's group but not in the very mild or healthy control groups.

  8. The early onset of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis has a strong genetic influence: role of HLA and KIR genes.

    PubMed

    Podhorzer, A; Paladino, N; Cuarterolo, M L; Fainboim, H A; Paz, S; Theiler, G; Capucchio, M; López, S I; Machicote, A; Montal, S; Podesta, G; Fainboim, L

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported a strong association between HLA-DRB1*1301 and type 1 pediatric autoimmune hepatitis (PAH) and between HLA-DR*0405 and adult autoimmune hepatitis (AAH). Because human killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors are known to be associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, we investigated the frequencies of HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and KIR genes in 144 type 1 PAH and 86 AAH patients, which were compared with 273 healthy controls. We demonstrated in PAH the increased frequency of the functional form of KIR2DS4-Full Length (KIR2DS4-FL), which in combination with HLA-DRB1*1301 revealed a strong synergistic effect (odds ratio=36.5). PAH-KIR2DS4-FL+ subjects have shown an increased frequency of their putative HLA-C*02, 04 and 06 ligands. KIR analysis of PAH also revealed a decreased frequency of KIR2DL2 gene and its ligand. In contrast, AAH cases have shown a weaker increased frequency of KIR2DS4-FL, a lack of synergistic effect with HLA class II antigens and a moderate association with HLA-DRB1*0405. Of note, we demonstrated that liver T cells have a unique pattern of KIR expression. These results show a KIR gene involved in autoimmune hepatitis and suggest a stronger genetic influence for the early onset type I autoimmune hepatitis.

  9. Linkage of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of age at onset to a genetic location on chromosome 10q in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, R; Blangero, J; Almasy, L; Dyer, T D; Williams, K L; Leach, R J; O'Connell, P; Stern, M P

    1999-01-01

    Since little is known about chromosomal locations harboring type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes, we conducted a genomewide scan for such genes in a Mexican American population. We used data from 27 low-income extended Mexican American pedigrees consisting of 440 individuals for whom genotypic data are available for 379 markers. We used a variance-components technique to conduct multipoint linkage analyses for two phenotypes: type 2 diabetes (a discrete trait) and age at onset of diabetes (a truncated quantitative trait). For the multipoint analyses, a subset of 295 markers was selected on the basis of optimal spacing and informativeness. We found significant evidence that a susceptibility locus near the marker D10S587 on chromosome 10q influences age at onset of diabetes (LOD score 3.75) and is also linked with type 2 diabetes itself (LOD score 2.88). This susceptibility locus explains 63.8%+/-9.9% (P=. 000016) of the total phenotypic variation in age at onset of diabetes and 65.7%+/-10.9% (P=.000135) of the total variation in liability to type 2 diabetes. Weaker evidence was found for linkage of diabetes and of age at onset to regions on chromosomes 3p, 4q, and 9p. In conclusion, our strongest evidence for linkage to both age at onset of diabetes and type 2 diabetes itself in the Mexican American population was for a region on chromosome 10q. PMID:10090898

  10. Stress increases the risk of type 2 diabetes onset in women: A 12-year longitudinal study using causal modelling

    PubMed Central

    Oldmeadow, Christopher; Hure, Alexis; Luu, Judy; Loxton, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Modifiable risk factors have been found to contribute up to 60% of type 2 diabetes risk. However, type 2 diabetes continues to rise despite implementation of interventions based on traditional risk factors. There is a clear need to identify additional risk factors for chronic disease prevention. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived stress and type 2 diabetes onset, and partition the estimates into direct and indirect effects. Methods and findings Women born in 1946–1951 (n = 12,844) completed surveys for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health in 1998, 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. The total causal effect was estimated using logistic regression and marginal structural modelling. Controlled direct effects were estimated through conditioning in the regression model. A graded association was found between perceived stress and all mediators in the multivariate time lag analyses. A significant association was found between hypertension, as well as physical activity and body mass index, and diabetes, but not smoking or diet quality. Moderate/high stress levels were associated with a 2.3-fold increase in the odds of diabetes three years later, for the total estimated effect. Results were only slightly attenuated when the direct and indirect effects of perceived stress on diabetes were partitioned, with the mediators only explaining 10–20% of the excess variation in diabetes. Conclusions Perceived stress is a strong risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The majority of the effect estimate of stress on diabetes risk is not mediated by the traditional risk factors of hypertension, physical activity, smoking, diet quality, and body mass index. This gives a new pathway for diabetes prevention trials and clinical practice. PMID:28222165

  11. Cognitive and Disease-Modifying Effects of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Inhibition in Male Tg2576 Mice, a Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sooy, Karen; Noble, June; McBride, Andrew; Binnie, Margaret; Yau, Joyce L. W.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Walker, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids has been linked to age-related cognitive decline and may play a role in Alzheimer's disease. In the brain, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) amplifies intracellular glucocorticoid levels. We show that short-term treatment of aged, cognitively impaired C57BL/6 mice with the potent and selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor UE2316 improves memory, including after intracerebroventricular drug administration to the central nervous system alone. In the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, UE2316 treatment of mice aged 14 months for 4 weeks also decreased the number of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the cerebral cortex, associated with a selective increase in local insulin-degrading enzyme (involved in Aβ breakdown and known to be glucocorticoid regulated). Chronic treatment of young Tg2576 mice with UE2316 for up to 13 months prevented cognitive decline but did not prevent Aβ plaque formation. We conclude that reducing glucocorticoid regeneration in the brain improves cognition independently of reduced Aβ plaque pathology and that 11β-HSD1 inhibitors have potential as cognitive enhancers in age-associated memory impairment and Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26305888

  12. Regulatory T cell-associated activity in photopheresis-induced immune tolerance in recent onset type 1 diabetes children

    PubMed Central

    Jonson, C-O; Pihl, M; Nyholm, C; Cilio, C M; Ludvigsson, J; Faresjö, M

    2008-01-01

    Extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP) has demonstrated immunological effects. The proposed cytotoxic lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) involvement, together with forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β are associated with regulatory T cell activity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the regulatory T cell-associated effect of ECP in recent onset type 1 diabetic (T1D) children. Children (n = 20) with T1D received photopheresis 8-methoxypsoralen + ECP or placebo + shampheresis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected pretreatment (day 1) and post-treatment (day 90) were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and T1D-associated glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) peptide a.a. 247–279. CTLA-4, sCTLA-4, FoxP3 and TGF-β mRNA transcription was quantified. Photopheresis-treated individuals' relative mRNA expression was generally maintained during the course of the study. Placebo individuals increased in spontaneous CTLA-4 mRNA (P< 0·05) but decreased in expression after stimulation with GAD65-peptide (P< 0·05) and PHA (P< 0·05). Spontaneous TGF-β (P< 0·05) increased whereas PHA- (P< 0·01) and GAD65-peptide (P< 0·01)-induced TGF-β expression decreased in the placebo group, whereas it was maintained in the treated group. Without intervention, expression of CTLA-4 and TGF-β, stimulated with PHA and GAD65 peptide, decreased with time, with a parallel reduction of GAD65-peptide and PHA-stimulated TGF-β expression. These parameters were counteracted by ECP. In conclusion, our results indicate that ECP maintains regulatory T cell-associated activity in recent-onset T1D. PMID:18549445

  13. Capsaicin reduces Alzheimer-associated tau changes in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetes rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weijie; Liu, Juanhong; Ma, Delin; Yuan, Gang; Lu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a high-risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) due to impaired insulin signaling pathway in brain. Capsaicin is a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist which was proved to ameliorate insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated whether dietary capsaicin could reduce the risk of AD in T2D. T2D rats were fed with capsaicin-containing high fat (HF) diet for 10 consecutive days (T2D+CAP). Pair-fed T2D rats (T2D+PF) fed with the HF-diet of average dose of T2D+CAP group were included to control for the effects of reduced food intake and body weight. Capsaicin-containing standard chow was also introduced to non-diabetic rats (NC+CAP). Blood glucose and insulin were monitored. The phosphorylation level of tau at individual sites, the activities of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were analyzed by Western blots. The results revealed that the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at sites Ser199, Ser202 and Ser396 in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group were decreased significantly, but these phospho-sites in T2D+PF group didn’t show such improvements compared with T2D group. There were almost no changes in non-diabetic rats on capsaicin diet (NC+CAP) compared with the non-diabetic rats with normal chow (NC). Increased activity of PI3K/AKT and decreased activity of GSK-3β were detected in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group compared with T2D group, and these changes did not show in T2D+PF group either. These results demonstrated that dietary capsaicin appears to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of AD-associated tau protein by increasing the activity of PI3K/AKT and inhibiting GSK-3β in hippocampus of T2D rats, which supported that dietary capsaicin might have a potential use for the prevention of AD in T2D. PMID:28225806

  14. Perinatal triphenyl phosphate exposure accelerates type 2 diabetes onset and increases adipose accumulation in UCD-type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Green, Adrian J; Graham, James L; Gonzalez, Eduardo A; La Frano, Michael R; Petropoulou, Syrago-Styliani E; Park, June-Soo; Newman, John W; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; La Merrill, Michele A

    2017-03-01

    Triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) is a flame retardant additive frequently found in consumer products and household dust. We administered 170μg of TPhP in maternal food from gestational day 8.5 to weaning and evaluated metabolic phenotypes of 3.5 month old male and female rats, and weight-matched males up to 6 months, to assess the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Perinatal TPhP exposure increased body and fat mass in 3.5 month old male and female rats, while leptin and cumulative energy intake were elevated in males and females, respectively. Independent of body mass, perinatal TPhP exposure accelerated T2DM onset in males and increased plasma non-esterified- fasting fatty acids. These observations suggest that perinatal exposure to TPhP exacerbates the development of obesity in male and female UCDavis-T2DM rats and accelerates T2DM onset in male UCD-T2DM rats.

  15. Criminal history and assault of dating partners: the role of type of prior crime, age of onset, and gender.

    PubMed

    Straus, Murray A; Ramirez, I Luis

    2004-08-01

    Some studies of assaults on intimate partners have found that most of the perpetrators are not violent outside the family, which suggests a specialized type of crime. However, other studies found domestic violence offenders tend to have extensive criminal histories. To further investigate the extent to which partner assaults are part of a more general pattern of criminal behavior or a specialized type of crime, we studied the dating relationships of 653 university students. Thirty-one percent reported assaulting a partner in the previous 12 months. The rate of assault on partners by females did not differ significantly for males (29%) and females (32%). We also found high rates of other self-reported crime, and much higher rates by males. For example, over one half of the male students and almost one third of the female students reported having stolen money. The male students reported an average of 3.4 crimes committed, and the female students an average of 1.4 crimes. These high crime rates and gender differences are consistent with many previous studies. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a history of prior criminal acts is associated with an increased probability of assaulting a partner. The relationship was greater when there was prior violent crime compared to property crime, when there was early onset of criminal behavior, and when the offender was female. The implications of the findings for understanding partner assaults, criminal careers, and gender differences in the etiology of violence against intimate partners are discussed.

  16. Identifying, by first-principles simulations, Cu[amyloid-β] species making Fenton-type reactions in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Hureau, Christelle; Andreussi, Oliviero; Faller, Peter

    2013-12-27

    According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) play a causative role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), of which oligomeric forms are proposed to be the most neurotoxic by provoking oxidative stress. Copper ions seem to play an important role as they are bound to Aβ in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of AD. Moreover, Cu-Aβ complexes are able to catalyze the production of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, and oligomeric Cu-Aβ was reported to be more reactive. The flexibility of the unstructured Aβ peptide leads to the formation of a multitude of different forms of both Cu(I) and Cu(II) complexes. This raised the question of the structure-function relationship. We address this question for the biologically relevant Fenton-type reaction. Computational models for the Cu-Aβ complex in monomeric and dimeric forms were built, and their redox behavior was analyzed together with their reactivity with peroxide. A set of 16 configurations of Cu-Aβ was studied and the configurations were classified into 3 groups: (A) configurations that evolve into a linearly bound and nonreactive Cu(I) coordination; (B) reactive configurations without large reorganization between the two Cu redox states; and (C) reactive configurations with an open structure in the Cu(I)-Aβ coordination, which have high water accessibility to Cu. All the structures that showed high reactivity with H2O2 (to form HO(•)) fall into class C. This means that within all the possible configurations, only some pools are able to produce efficiently the deleterious HO(•), while the other pools are more inert. The characteristics of highly reactive configurations consist of a N-Cu(I)-N coordination with an angle far from 180° and high water crowding at the open side. This allows the side-on entrance of H2O2 and its cleavage to form a hydroxyl radical. Interestingly, the reactive Cu(I)-Aβ states originated mostly from the dimeric starting models, in agreement with the higher reactivity of

  17. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  18. Cytochrome c oxidase deficit is associated with the seizure onset zone in young patients with focal cortical dysplasia Type II.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lili; Greiner, Hansel M; Mangano, Francesco T; Horn, Paul S; Leach, James L; Miles, Michael V

    2015-10-01

    It has been postulated that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important factor in epileptogenesis of intractable epilepsy. The current study tests the hypothesis that mitochondrial Complex IV (CIV) or cytochrome c oxidase dysfunction is associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Subjects were selected based on: age <19y; epilepsy surgery between May, 2010 and October, 2011; pathological diagnosis of isolated focal cortical dysplasia Type I (FCDI) or Type II (FCDII); and sufficient residual cortical tissue to conduct analysis of electron transport chain complex (ETC) activity in SOZ and adjacent cortical regions. In this retrospective study, patients were identified who had sufficient unfixed, frozen brain tissue for biochemical analysis in tissue homogenates. Specimens were subtyped using ILAE classification for FCD, and excluded if diagnosed with FCD Type III or dual pathology. Analysis of ETC activity in resected tissues was conducted independently and without knowledge of the identity, diagnosis, or clinical status of individual subjects. Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria, including 6 FCDI and 11 FCDII. Comparison of adjacent cortical resections showed decreased CIV activity in the SOZ of the FCDII group (P = 0.003), but no significant CIV difference in adjacent tissues of the FCDI group. Because of the importance of CIV as the terminal and rate-limiting complex in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, these authors conclude that 1) a deficit of CIV is associated with the SOZ of patients with FCDII; 2) CIV deficiency may contribute to the spectrum of FCD neuropathology; and 3) further investigation of CIV in FCD may lead to the discovery of new targets for neuroprotective therapies for patients with intractable epilepsy.

  19. Understanding Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... no cure for the disease that takes away memory and, ultimately, life itself. What Is Alzheimer's Disease ( ... the parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language. Although scientists are learning more every ...

  20. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. AD begins slowly. It first involves the parts of ...

  1. Alzheimer's Myths

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia . Myth 2: Alzheimer’s disease is not fatal. Reality: Alzheimer's disease has no survivors. It destroys brain ... any threat. Myth 5: Aspartame causes memory loss. Reality: This artificial sweetener, marketed under such brand names ...

  2. Diabetes Onset at 31–45 Years of Age is Associated with an Increased Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wenjun; Ni, Lisha; Lu, Qianyi; Zou, Chen; Zhao, Minjie; Xu, Xun; Chen, Haibing; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This hospital-based, cross-sectional study investigated the effect of age of diabetes onset on the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. A total of 5,214 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to the Department of Ophthalmology at the Shanghai First People’s Hospital from 2009 to 2013 was eligible for inclusion. Diabetic retinopathy status was classified using the grading system of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). Logistic and hierarchical regression analyses were used to identify independent variables affecting the development of DR. Upon multiple logistic regression analysis, patient age at the time of diabetes onset was significantly associated with development of DR. Further, when the risk of retinopathy was stratified by patient age at the onset of diabetes, the risk was highest in patients in whom diabetes developed at an age of 31–45 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.815 [1.139–2.892]; p = 0.012). Furthermore, when patients were divided into four groups based on the duration of diabetes, DR development was maximal at a diabetes onset age of 31–45 years within each group. A diabetes onset age of 31–45 years is an independent risk factor for DR development in Chinese type 2 DM patients. PMID:27897261

  3. Reflections on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, S L

    1982-02-01

    As longevity increases, society will face a silent epidemic of idiopathic dementias. The concept, Alzheimer's disease, reflects a cumbersome and vaguely-defined cluster of signs, symptoms and other variables which might more appropriately be labelled as the idiopathic dementias, Alzheimer-type or IDAT. Diagnosis, which is made by exclusion and treatment, primarily custodial, demonstrates the complex nature and unfortunate prognosis of the problem. Dramatic progress, nevertheless, has been made in various scientific aspects of the issue, namely, in histology, genetics and neurochemistry. The resulting evidence warrants further speculation on the role of central cholinergic neurotransmission in cognitive functioning.

  4. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  5. Morphologically distinct types of amyloid plaques point the way to a better understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, M R; Nagele, R G

    2010-04-01

    The details of the sequence of pathological events leading to neuron death in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not known. Even the formation of amyloid plaques, one of the major histopathological hallmarks of AD, is not clearly understood; both the origin of the amyloid and the means of its deposition remain unclear. It is still widely considered, however, that amyloid plaques undergo gradual growth in the interstitial space of the brain via continual extracellular deposition of amyloid beta peptides at "seeding sites," and that these growing plaques encroach progressively on neurons and their axons and dendritic processes, eventually leading to neuronal death. Actually, histopathological evidence to support this mechanism is sparse and of uncertain validity. The fact that the amyloid deposits in AD brains that are collectively referred to as plaques are of multiple types and that each seems to have a different origin often is overlooked. We have shown experimentally that many of the so-called "diffuse amyloid plaques," which lack associated inflammatory cells, are either the result of leaks of amyloid from blood vessels at focal sites of blood-brain barrier breaches or are artifacts resulting from grazing sections through the margins of dense core plaques. In addition, we have provided experimental evidence that neuronal death via necrosis leaves a residue that takes the form of a spheroid "cloud" of amyloid, released by cell lysis, surrounding a dense core that often contains neuronal nuclear material. Support for a neuronal origin for these "dense core amyloid plaques" includes their ability to attract inflammatory cells (microglia and immigrant macrophages) and that they contain nuclear and cytoplasmic components that are somewhat resistant to proteolysis by lysosomes released during neuronal cell lysis. We discuss here the clinical and therapeutic importance of recognizing that amyloid deposition occurs both within neurons (intracellular) and in the interstitial

  6. Energy and the Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed

    Mamelak, Mortimer

    2017-04-01

    The high energy demands of the poorly myelinated long axon hippocampal and cortical neurons render these neurons selectively vulnerable to degeneration in Alzheimer's disease. However, pathology engages all of the major elements of the neurovascular unit of the mature Alzheimer brain, the neurons, glia and blood vessels. Neurons present with retrograde degeneration of the axodendritic tree, capillaries with string vessels and markedly reduced densities and glia with signs of inflammatory activation. The neurons, capillaries and astrocytes of the mature Alzheimer brain harbor structurally defective mitochondria. Clinically, reduced glucose utilization, decades before cognitive deterioration, betrays ongoing energy insufficiency. β-hydroxybutyrate and γ-hydroxybutyrate can both provide energy to the brain when glucose utilization is blocked. Early work in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease demonstrate their ability to reverse the pathological changes in the Alzheimer brain and initial clinical trials reveal their ability to improve cognition and every day function. Supplying the brain with energy holds great promise for delaying the onset of Alzheimer's disease and slowing its progress.

  7. Interleukin-1 antagonism moderates the inflammatory state associated with Type 1 diabetes during clinical trials conducted at disease onset.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Wang, Xujing; Chen, Yi-Guang; Jia, Shuang; Kaldunski, Mary L; Greenbaum, Carla J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Hessner, Martin J

    2016-04-01

    It was hypothesized that IL-1 antagonism would preserve β-cell function in new onset Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the Anti-Interleukin-1 in Diabetes Action (AIDA) and TrialNet Canakinumab (TN-14) trials failed to show efficacy of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or canakinumab, as measured by stimulated C-peptide response. Additional measures are needed to define immune state changes associated with therapeutic responses. Here, we studied these trial participants with plasma-induced transcriptional analysis. In blinded analyses, 70.2% of AIDA and 68.9% of TN-14 participants were correctly called to their treatment arm. While the transcriptional signatures from the two trials were distinct, both therapies achieved varying immunomodulation consistent with IL-1 inhibition. On average, IL-1 antagonism resulted in modest normalization relative to healthy controls. At endpoint, signatures were quantified using a gene ontology-based inflammatory index, and an inverse relationship was observed between measured inflammation and stimulated C-peptide response in IL-1Ra- and canakinumab-treated patients. Cytokine neutralization studies showed that IL-1α and IL-1β additively contribute to the T1D inflammatory state. Finally, analyses of baseline signatures were indicative of later therapeutic response. Despite the absence of clinical efficacy by IL-1 antagonist therapy, transcriptional analysis detected immunomodulation and may yield new insight when applied to other clinical trials.

  8. Cortisol Levels in Children With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristen M.; Fazzio, Pamela; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Gallagher, Mary P.; Aranoff, Gaya S.

    2017-01-01

    There is little data documenting cortisol levels in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), despite the fact that untreated adrenal insufficiency (AI) could worsen the outcome of DKA. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed serum cortisol levels in 28 children with DKA and new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus evaluated at our center over a 5-year period. Average duration of diabetes-related symptoms was positively associated with age (P = .002), and significantly lower hemoglobin A1c levels were observed in the youngest children. The mean cortisol level was 40.9 mg/dL, with a range of 7.8 to 119 mg/dL. Cortisol levels were found to be inversely associated with serum pH (P = .007). There was no difference in the clinical outcome of the 4 patients who had cortisol levels less than 18 mg/dL. Overall, we did not find clinical or laboratory evidence of diminished cortisol reserve; however, the possibility of AI must be kept in mind when treating children with DKA. PMID:28145127

  9. Phenotypic and environmental factors associated with elevated autoantibodies at clinical onset of paediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Pezic, Angela; Cameron, Fergus J.; Rodda, Christine; Ellis, Justine A.; Kemp, Andrew S.; Carlin, John; Dwyer, Terence

    2012-01-01

    To examine possible determinants of autoantibody levels at type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) onset. We assessed levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 islet cell antigen (GADA) and anti-insulin antibodies (IAA) in 247 incident T1DM cases presenting <15 years of age in Melbourne from 1st March 2008 to 30th June 2010. 58.9% (142/241) of cases were GADA seropositive and 42.3% (94/222) were IAA seropositive. Factors associated with elevated IAA antibodies included younger age and red hair phenotype. Factors associated with elevated GAD antibodies included lower birthweight and recent eczema. Intriguingly, low recent or past sun exposure was only associated with elevated GADA levels among children presenting at age <5 years, not older (difference in effect, p<0.05 for 4 of 5 associations). These findings show that environmental and phenotypic factors are associated with autoantibody levels at time of presentation for T1DM. We recommend such environmental and phenoytypic factors should be examined in further detail. PMID:24371576

  10. [EEG background activity in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type--with special reference to analysis by t-statistic significance probability mapping (SPM) in Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia].

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, T; Hagimoto, H; Saito, T; Endo, K; Ishii, M; Yamaguchi, T; Kajiwara, A; Matsushita, M

    1989-01-01

    EEG power amplitude and power ratio data obtained from 15 (3 men and 12 women) patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 8 (2 men and 6 women) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) were compared with similar data from 40 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Compared with the healthy controls, both patient groups demonstrated increased EEG background slowing, and it indicated more slower in AD than in SDAT. Moreover, both groups showed characteristic findings respectively on EEG topography and t-statistic significance probability mapping (SPM). The differences between AD and their controls indicated high slowing with reductions in alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2 activity. The SPMs of power ratio in theta and alpha 2 bands showed most prominent significance in the right posterior-temporal region and delta and beta bands did in the frontal region. Severe AD indicated only frontal delta slowing compared to mild AD. The differences between SDAT and their controls indicated only mild slowing in delta and theta bands. The SPM of power amplitude showed occipital slowing, whereas the SPM of power ratio showed the slowing in the frontal region. Judging from both topographic findings, these were considered to denote diffuse slow tendency. In summary, these results presumed that in AD, cortical damages followed by EEG slowing with reductions of alpha 2 and beta bands originated rapidly and thereafter developed subcortical (non-specific area in thalamus) changes with frontal delta activity on SPM. On the other hand, in SDAT, diffuse cortico-subcortical damages with diffuse slowing on EEG topography were caused gradually.

  11. Dual onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus and Graves' disease during treatment with pegylated interferon alpha-2b and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Kataoka, Yuko; Tachikawa, Kazushige; Koguchi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Currently, a combination therapy of pegylated (PEG) interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and ribavirin are being widely used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We describe here a case of dual onset of type 1 DM accompanied by ketoacidosis, and Graves' disease during the combination therapy via the autoimmune process.

  12. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  13. Causes of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, D G; Feldman, H

    2000-01-01

    It is now understood that genetic factors play a crucial role in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare mutations in at least 3 genes are responsible for early-onset familial AD. A common polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene is the major determinant of risk in families with late-onset AD, as well as in the general population. Advanced age, however, remains the major established risk factor for AD, although environmental variables may also have some role in disease expression. Some pathogenic factors directly associated with aging include oxidative damage and mutations in messenger RNA. Other factors unrelated to the aging process may, in the future, be amenable to therapeutic intervention by way of estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, anti-inflammatory drug therapy and reducing vascular risk factors. Older theories, such as aluminum playing a role in the pathogenesis of AD, have been mostly discarded as our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of AD has advanced. PMID:11216203

  14. Modulation of age at onset in Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patients originated from eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Biswanath; Ghosh, Subho; Gangopadhyay, Prasanta K; Das, Shaymal K; Roy, T; Sinha, Krishna K; Jha, Dilip K; Mukherjee, Subhash C; Chakraborty, Ambar; Singhal, Bhim S; Bhattacharya, Anup K; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P

    2003-07-17

    To identify the genetic modifier(s) that might alter the age at onset in Huntington's disease (HD) we have analyzed variations in GluR6 kainate receptor (GluR6), CA150 gene, Delta2642 and polymorphic CCG repeat variation in huntingtin (htt) gene in 77 HD patients and normal individuals. In addition, variation in the RAI1 gene was analyzed in 30 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2) patients and normal individuals to show the possible influence on the age at onset. Multiple regression analysis indicated that variation in GluR6 and CCG repeat genotype might explain 6.2% and 3.1%, respectively, of the variability in the age at onset in HD. Similar analysis with SCA2 patients indicated that RAI1 might explain about 13% of the variability in the age at onset. Specific alleles in GluR6 and CA150 locus were only observed in HD patients.

  15. ESTIMATING THE HEIGHT OF CMEs ASSOCIATED WITH A MAJOR SEP EVENT AT THE ONSET OF THE METRIC TYPE II RADIO BURST DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24

    SciTech Connect

    Mäkelä, P.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2015-06-10

    We studied the coronal mass ejection (CME) height at the onset of 59 metric type II radio bursts associated with major solar energetic particle (SEP) events, excluding ground level enhancements (GLEs), during solar cycles 23 and 24. We calculated CME heights using a simple flare-onset method used by Gopalswamy et al. to estimate CME heights at the metric type II onset for cycle 23 GLEs. We found the mean CME height for non-GLE events (1.72 R{sub ☉}) to be ∼12% greater than that (1.53 R{sub ☉}) for cycle 23 GLEs. The difference could be caused by more impulsive acceleration of the GLE-associated CMEs. For cycle 24 non-GLE events, we compared the CME heights obtained using the flare-onset method and the three-dimensional spherical-shock fitting method and found the correlation to be good (CC = 0.68). We found the mean CME height for cycle 23 non-GLE events (1.79 R{sub ☉}) to be greater than that for cycle 24 non-GLE events (1.58 R{sub ☉}), but statistical tests do not definitely reject the possibility of coincidence. We suggest that the lower formation height of the shocks during cycle 24 indicates a change in the Alfvén speed profile because solar magnetic fields are weaker and plasma density levels are closer to the surface than usual during cycle 24. We also found that complex type III bursts showing diminution of type III emission in the 7–14 MHz frequency range are more likely associated with events with a CME height at the type II onset above 2 R{sub ☉}, supporting suggestions that the CME/shock structure causes the feature.

  16. Glutathione-s-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms and associations with type 1 diabetes age-at-onset.

    PubMed

    Bekris, Lynn M; Shephard, Cindy; Peterson, Morgan; Hoehna, Jana; Van Yserloo, Brian; Rutledge, Elizabeth; Farin, Federico; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Lernmark, Ake

    2005-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by pancreatic beta cell destruction involving auto-reactive T-cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of insulin. Monozygotic twin studies show a 20-60% concordance with T1D indicating there may be an environmental component to the disease. Glutathione (GSH) is the major endogenous antioxidant produced by the cell. GSH participates directly in the neutralization of free radicals and plays a role in the immune response. Glutathione-s-transferases (GSTs) conjugate GSH to free-radicals or xenobiotics. GST activity depletes GSH levels and may either detoxify or enhance the toxicity of a compound. Glutathione-s-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) and glutathione-s-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1) have polymorphic homozygous deletion (null) genotypes resulting in complete absence of enzyme activity. GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes in Caucasian populations have frequencies of approximately 40-60% and 15-20%, respectively. GST null genotypes have been associated with susceptibility to cancer and protection against chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate associations with GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms in a group T1D patients and control subjects 0-35 years old who participated in the Combined Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry and Diabetes Incidence Study (1986-1988). Results show that the presence of the GSTM1 and not the null genotype (OR, 2.13 95% CI, 1.23-3.70, p-value, 0.007, Bonferroni corrected p-value, 0.035) may be a susceptibility factor in T1D 14-20 years old. These results suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype is associated with T1D protection and T1D age-at-onset and that susceptibility to T1D may involve GST conjugation.

  17. Association study of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and childhood-onset mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer H; Wigg, Karen G; King, Nicole; Burcescu, Irina; Vetró, Agnes; Kiss, Eniko; Baji, Ildikó; George, Charles J; Kennedy, James L; Kovacs, Maria; Barr, Cathy L

    2005-01-05

    Childhood-onset mood disorders (COMD) are often familial, and twin studies of COMD provide compelling evidence that genetic factors are involved. Deficits in neural plasticity have been suggested to underlie the development of depression. The receptor tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) and its ligand, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play essential roles in neural plasticity, and mRNA expression of both of these genes has been shown to be influenced by stress and chronic antidepressant treatment. In addition, TrkB knock-out mice display inappropriate stress coping mechanisms. Having previously shown that BDNF is associated with COMD, in this study we investigated the gene encoding TrkB, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (NTRK2) as a susceptibility factor in COMD. We tested for association of NTRK2 with COMD in two independent samples: (a) a case-control sample matched on ethnicity and gender, consisting of 120 cases who met DSM III/IV criteria for major depressive or dysthymic disorder before age 14 or bipolar I/II before the age of 18, and controls, and (b) a family based control sample of 113 families collected in Hungary, identified by a proband between the age of 7 and 14 who met DSM IV criteria for major depressive disorder or bipolar I/II disorder. There was no evidence for an allelic or genotypic association of three polymorphisms of NTRK2 with COMD in the case-control sample. Also, in the family based sample, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), we did not identify any evidence of allelic association for each marker individually or when haplotypes were analyzed. Based on these results, using these three polymorphisms, we do not find support for NTRK2 as a susceptibility gene for COMD.

  18. Alzheimer disease and genetics: anticipating the questions.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Debra L

    2006-12-01

    Three genes with autosomal dominant mutations have been identified that may lead to Alzheimer symptoms in carriers before they reach age 60. Genetic tests exist for Alzheimer disease, but they are considered useful only for the small number of families with a history of early-onset illness. As researchers continue to uncover evidence of genetic links to Alzheimer disease, nurses can expect to field questions from family members about genetic testing. The article presents a variety of questions nurses may be asked, as well as possible answers.

  19. Retromer deficiency observed in Alzheimer's disease causes hippocampal dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and Abeta accumulation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Alim; Flores, Ingrid; Zhang, Hong; Yu, Rui; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Planel, Emmanuel; Herman, Mathieu; Ho, Lingling; Kreber, Robert; Honig, Lawrence S; Ganetzky, Barry; Duff, Karen; Arancio, Ottavio; Small, Scott A

    2008-05-20

    Although deficiencies in the retromer sorting pathway have been linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease, whether these deficiencies underlie the disease remains unknown. Here we characterized two genetically modified animal models to test separate but related questions about the effects that retromer deficiency has on the brain. First, testing for cognitive defects, we investigated retromer-deficient mice and found that they develop hippocampal-dependent memory and synaptic dysfunction, which was associated with elevations in endogenous Abeta peptide. Second, testing for neurodegeneration and amyloid deposits, we investigated retromer-deficient flies expressing human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) and human beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE) and found that they develop neuronal loss and human Abeta aggregates. By recapitulating features of the disease, these animal models suggest that retromer deficiency observed in late-onset Alzheimer's disease can contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  20. Neuronutrition and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balenahalli N.; Rao, T.S. Sathyanarayana; Prakasam, Annamalai; Sambamurti, Kumar; Rao, K.S. Jagannatha

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurological disorder with several unequivocally identified genetic risk factors. Among the several environmental factors proposed for AD, dietary protective and risk factors have been most compelling. In particular, diets rich in saturated fatty acids and alcohol, and deficient in antioxidants and vitamins appear to promote the onset of the disease, while diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants, and wine likely suppress its onset. Evidence suggests that diets rich in polyphenols and some spices suppress the onset of AD by scavenging free radicals and preventing oxidative damage. Metal ions are known to catalyze the production of free radicals and induce mental retardation or dementia. Several studies have also identified metals such as Pb, Fe, Al, Cu and Zn in AD pathogenesis. While specific chelators have been tested for therapy, they have not been very successful probably due to late administration after brain damage has been triggered. Since several dietary polyphenols are known to chelate metals, their routine use may also be protective against the onset of AD. PMID:20308778

  1. Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162495.html Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race Type of ... HealthDay News) -- Could cholesterol-fighting statins fend off Alzheimer's disease? A new, large study suggests that if ...

  2. Expression of Alzheimer-Type Neurofibrillary Epitopes in Primary Rat Cortical Neurons Following Infection with Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Underly, Robert; Song, Mee-Sook; Dunbar, Gary L.; Weaver, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The neurofibrillary tau pathology and amyloid deposits seen in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also have been seen in bacteria-infected brains. However, few studies have examined the role of these bacteria in the generation of tau pathology. One suggested link between infection and AD is edentulism, the complete loss of teeth. Edentulism can result from chronic periodontal disease due to infection by Enterococcus faecalis. The current study assessed the ability to generate early Alzheimer-like neurofibrillary epitopes in primary rat cortical neurons through bacterial infection by E. faecalis. Seven-day old cultured neurons were infected with E. faecalis for 24 and 48 h. An upward molecular weight shift in tau by Western blotting (WB) and increased appearance of tau reactivity in cell bodies and degenerating neurites was found in the 48 h infection group for the antibody CP13 (phospho-Serine 202). A substantial increase in reactivity of Alz-50 was seen at 24 and 48 h after infection. Furthermore, extensive microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) reactivity also was seen at 24 and 48 h post-infection. Our preliminary findings suggest a potential link between E. faecalis infection and intracellular changes that may help facilitate early AD-like neurofibrillary pathology. HighlightsEnterococcus faecalis used in the generation of AD neurofibrillary epitopes in rat.Infection increases Alz-50, phospho-Serine 202 tau, and MAP2 expression.Infection by Enterococcus may play a role in early Alzheimer neurofibrillary changes. PMID:26834627

  3. Sarcomatoid Type Primary Pericardial Mesothelioma with a Long-term Survival after the Onset of Cardiac Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Saisho, Chika; Ishii, Hidenobu; Edakuni, Nobutaka; Imamura, Yohei; Tokito, Takaaki; Kinoshita, Takashi; Azuma, Koichi; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    Primary pericardial malignant mesothelioma is a very rare clinical entity and its prognosis is very poor. We herein report a 67-year-old man who presented with pericardial mesothelioma that was diagnosed 21 months after the onset of cardiac tamponade as the initial manifestation. Despite undergoing pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial fenestration at the onset of cardiac tamponade, we were unable to make a conclusive diagnosis of mesothelioma based on the cytological and histological findings. This unusual case had a relatively long progression-free period without treatment before the appearance of pleural tumors that showed the histological features of malignant sarcomatoid mesothelioma.

  4. [Neuroimaging for patients with Alzheimer disease in routine practice].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    In routine practice neuroimaging has been applied as an adjunct technique for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in routine practice. Of the several neuroimaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been commonly used in Japan; further software programs are used to aid statistical analysis of the imaging results. For example voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer disease (VSRAD) for MRI and easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) are used for the analysis of MRI and SPECT. In the early stage of Alzheimer disease, specific findings of regional atrophy and perfusion reduction are observed in some areas. In the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and parietal cortex, perfusion reduction was more frequently observed than atrophy. On the other hand, in the medial temporal structures, perfusion reduction was less frequently observed than atrophy. Perfusion reduction in the the posterior cingulate gyrus precuneus and in the parietal cortex was more prominent in the case of patients with early-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. Further, atrophy in the medial temporal structures was more prominent in the case of patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease than in the case of those with early-onset Alzheimer disease. These findings are helpful for differentiating of Alzheimer disease from other diseases characterized by dementia.

  5. Relationship between blood flow kinetics and severity of Alzheimer's disease: assessment of severity using a questionnaire-type examination, Alzheimer's disease assessment scale, cognitive sub-scale (ADAS(cog)).

    PubMed

    Nebu, A; Ikeda, M; Fukuhara, R; Shigenobu, K; Maki, N; Hokoishi, K; Komori, K; Yasuoka, T; Tanabe, H

    2001-01-01

    We assessed hemokinetics associated with changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) severity in 90 AD patients by researching the relationship between AD Assessment Scale, cognitive sub-scale (ADAS(cog)) scores and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In the present study, we employed the questionnaire-type ADAS(cog) examination to accurately assess the severity of AD. Between five groups classified on the basis of ADAS(cog) score, significant differences were observed in parietal, lateral temporal and superior frontal rCBF. In addition, in parietal and lateral temporal regions, significant correlations were also observed between ADAS(cog) score and rCBF. In superior frontal rCBF, significant differences were noted only between group 5 (> or =40 ADAS(cog) points) and each of the other groups; there was no significant correlation between rCBF and ADAS(cog) score. Thus, we propose the following mechanism for blood flow kinetics associated with changed severity: In an early stage of AD, blood flow in the medial temporal cortex is impaired, and gradually involves the temporoparietal regions. While the medial temporal impairment of blood flow reaches a plateau, temporoparietal blood flow continues to be impaired well into a severe stage, at which point blood flow impairment in the frontal region is initiated.

  6. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  7. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  8. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase 2 in brains of patients with Down's syndrome and dementia of Alzheimer type: specific localization in affected neurones and axons.

    PubMed

    Oka, A; Takashima, S

    1997-03-24

    Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting studies with an antibody against cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) were performed in the cerebral cortex of patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). A high level of COX2 expression was observed in DAT and older DS patients, specifically localized in neurones with neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and damaged axons. Furthermore, immunohistochemical study of patients with DS of varying age showed that the induction of COX2 correlated well with the appearance of NFT as well as with ageing. These findings demonstrated the induction of COX2 in DAT and DS, which may lead to the production of free radicals and may be causally related to neuronal degeneration.

  9. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals.

  10. Life Course Socioeconomic Transition and its Association with Early Onset Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol for a Sequential Exploratory Mixed Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Raman, V Kutty; Nochikattil, Santhosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of early onset type 2 diabetes (Diabetes below the age of 45 years) is increasing worldwide. Transition in socio-economic position–i.e. Life Course Socio-Economic Transition (LSET) - may contribute to the development of early onset T2D through complex processes involving economic and occupational opportunities as well as individual life style choices. Aim To develop and validate the life course socioeconomic transition questionnaire and to know the association between life courses socioeconomic transition and early onset type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods This study follows sequential exploratory mixed method study design. It consists of one qualitative strand followed by two quantitative strands. Qualitative strand consist of in- depth interview among the community dwellers to develop a tool for measuring LSET. Two quantitative strands consist of the validation of the questionnaire by conducting cross-sectional survey among 200 randomly selected community dwellers and a hospital based case control study using the same questionnaire. Results Those who have a history of lower SEP during his childhood period and enjoying higher SEP during his adulthood period have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes at their younger age (18-45 years). Conclusion This study will help to develop a validated life course socioeconomic transition questionnaire and application of that tool in an epidemiological study. PMID:27504317

  11. Polymorphism on Chromosome 9p21.3 Is Associated with Severity and Early-Onset CAD in Type 2 Diabetic Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Abid, Kaouthar; Mili, Donia; Kenani, Abderraouf

    2015-01-01

    Multiple association studies found that the human 9p21.3 chromosome locus is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of the severity and early-onset of coronary artery disease with variant rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21.3 polymorphism and the impact of this variant on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. The study population consisted of a control CAD group (101 patients) and 273 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients. Severity and extent of coronary atherosclerosis were scored numerically using the Gensini scoring system. The diabetic population was divided into three groups according to Gensini score: Group 1: no stenosis; Group 2: moderate CAD; Group 3, severe CAD. The homozygous CC genotype of rs1333049 was significantly associated with CAD in Group 2 (OR: 1.36; p = 0.02) and Group 3 (OR: 5.77, p < 0.001) compared to Group 1 (OR: 0.18; p = 0.2) and control group (OR: 0.22; p = 0.21). Among diabetic patients with early-onset CAD, CC genotype carriers had significantly higher Gensini scores than non-CC genotype carriers (49 ± 21.3 versus 14.87 ± 25.22; p < 0.001). The homozygous CC genotype of rs1333049 confers a magnified risk of early-onset and severe CAD in type 2 diabetic Tunisian population.

  12. An Isolated Case of Late-onset Amyloidogenic Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy Associated with a Mutant Transthyretin Substituting Methionine for Valine at Position 30 Showing Latent Progressive Cardiac Involvement Confirmed by Serial Annual Electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Chikako; Takaya, Tomofumi; Mori, Shumpei; Hasegawa, Kohei; Soga, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K.; Morinaga, Yukiko; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Late-onset amyloidogenic transthyretin (ATTR) type familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) shows features distinct from those of early-onset hereditary ATTR type FAP. We herein describe an asymptomatic 68-year-old man with late-onset ATTR type FAP whose serial annual electrocardiograms demonstrated progressive left bundle branch block. Latent but severe cardiac involvement seems to be one feature of late-onset ATTR type FAP, similar to senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA). Early differential diagnosis of late-onset ATTR type FAP from SSA is important because, currently, only the former has new therapeutic options available in Japan. The present case report, therefore, highlights the necessity of careful observation for periodic electrocardiograms. PMID:28090046

  13. Clinical and laboratory analysis of late-onset glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) in Uighur: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Luo, Qiong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical, biochemical and genetic mutation characteristics of two cases of late-onset glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) in Uighur. The clinical data and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) genetic test results of two cases of late-onset GA-I in Uighur were collected and analyzed, and reviewed with relevant literature. One patient with late-onset GA-I primarily exhibited clinical intermittent headache, while the other patient was asymptomatic. The urinary organic acid analysis detected a large number of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, 3-hydroxy-propionic acid. One patient exhibited white matter degeneration in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the other patient showed no abnormality. The two patients both exhibited c. 1204C >T, p.R402W, heterozygous mutation, and c. 532G >A, p.G178R, heterozygous mutation. Besides central nervous system infectious diseases, patients with clinical headache, cranial MRI-suggested bilateral temporal lobe arachnoid cyst and abnormal signals in the basal ganglia should be highly suspected as late-onset GA-I. Early diagnosis and correct treatment are key to improve its prognosis. PMID:28352331

  14. A positive family history of hypertension might be associated with an accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes: Results from the National Center Diabetes Database (NCDD-02).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Mori, Yasumichi; Yamashita, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hidekatsu; Mishima, Shuichi; Handa, Nobuhiro; Shimokawa, Kotaro; Yoshida, Akiko; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Shimbo, Takuro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2017-03-18

    Type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by a combination of decreased insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity, can be delayed or prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviors. Therefore, it is important that the population in general understands their personal risk at an early age to reduce their chances of ever developing the disease. A family history of hypertension is known to be associated with insulin resistance, but the effect of a family history of hypertension on the onset of type 2 diabetes has not well been examined. We performed a retrospective study examining patient age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by analyzing a dataset of 1,299 patients (1,021 men and 278 women) who had been diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes during a health checkup. The mean ± standard deviation of the patient age at the time of the diagnosis of diabetes was 49.1 ± 10.4 years for patients with a family history of hypertension and 51.8 ± 11.4 years for patients without a family history of hypertension (p < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis showed a significant association between a family history of hypertension and a younger age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, independent of a family history of diabetes mellitus and a male sex, suggesting that a positive family history of hypertension might be associated with the accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes.

  15. Alzheimer disease: focus on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately 5.3 million Americans. This debilitating disease is marked by memory loss, confusion, and loss of cognitive ability. The exact cause of Alzheimer disease is unknown although research suggests that it might result from a combination of factors. The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Radiologic imaging can help physicians detect these structural characteristics and monitor disease progression and brain function. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered first-line imaging modalities for the routine evaluation of Alzheimer disease.

  16. A Case of Successful Coil Embolization for a Late-Onset Type Ia Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Chimney Technique.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JRAAs) are challenging to treat by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures. The chimney technique with EVAR (Ch-EVAR) is one of the feasible and less invasive treatments for JRAAs. However, the main concern of Ch-EVAR is the potential risk of "gutters," which can lead to type Ia endoleak (EL). Most type Ia ELs after Ch-EVAR procedures occurred intraoperatively, and these ELs could be treated using an endovascular technique. However, late-onset type Ia ELs could be extremely rare, which might have a fear of conservative treatment. Type Ia ELs are associated with an increased risk of aneurysm rupture; therefore reintervention is recommended as soon as possible, and we should be aware of the occurrence of type Ia ELs after the Ch-EVAR procedure.

  17. Two siblings with early onset fetal akinesia deformation sequence and hydranencephaly: further evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance of hydranencephaly, fowler type.

    PubMed

    Witters, I; Moerman, Ph; Devriendt, K; Braet, P; Van Schoubroeck, D; Van Assche, F A; Fryns, J P

    2002-02-15

    We report a 13-week-old female fetus with early onset fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) and hydranencephaly. In a previous pregnancy, the same ultrasonographic findings were noted at 13 weeks. Fetopathological examination of both female fetuses confirmed FADS with severe arthogryposis, multiple pterygia, and muscular hypoplasia. Neuropathological examination showed massive cystic dilatation of the cerebral ventricles (hydranencephaly) with calcification of the basal ganglion and brain stem and a proliferative vasculopathy throughout the central nervous system. The findings in the two female siblings document the earliest echographic diagnosis of hydranencephaly, Fowler type, and this observation further supports autosomal recessive inheritance of this distinct type of hydranencephaly.

  18. Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation for persons with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's or vascular type: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments, and particularly memory deficits, are a defining feature of the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interventions that target these cognitive deficits and the associated difficulties with activities of daily living are the subject of ever-growing interest. Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation are specific forms of non-pharmacological intervention to address cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes. The present review is an abridged version of a Cochrane Review and aims to systematically evaluate the evidence for these forms of intervention in people with mild Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published in English, comparing cognitive rehabilitation or cognitive training interventions with control conditions and reporting relevant outcomes for the person with dementia or the family caregiver (or both), were considered for inclusion. Eleven RCTs reporting cognitive training interventions were included in the review. A large number of measures were used in the different studies, and meta-analysis could be conducted for several primary and secondary outcomes of interest. Several outcomes were not measured in any of the studies. Overall estimates of the treatment effect were calculated by using a fixed-effects model, and statistical heterogeneity was measured by using a standard chi-squared statistic. One RCT of cognitive rehabilitation was identified, allowing the examination of effect sizes, but no meta-analysis could be conducted. Cognitive training was not associated with positive or negative effects in relation to any of the reported outcomes. The overall quality of the trials was low to moderate. The single RCT of cognitive rehabilitation found promising results in relation to some patient and caregiver outcomes and was generally of high quality. The available evidence regarding cognitive training remains limited, and the quality of the evidence needs to improve

  19. Effects of enzyme replacement therapy on five patients with advanced late-onset glycogen storage disease type II: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Yoshihiko; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Chikako; Wakita, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Yoko; Fukumoto, Yutaka; Oya, Yasushi; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Murata, Miho

    2012-03-01

    We examined the efficacy of 2-year enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant human α-glucosidase (GAA; Myozyme®) in five long-term ventilator-dependent adults and aged patients with advanced, late-onset glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII, also known as Pompe disease). Although all patients had advanced respiratory failure and were ventilator-dependent for more than 6 years, four showed obvious improvements in muscle strength, pulmonary function, and activities of daily living after ERT. Improvement in each parameter was more prominent in the first year than in the second year. Values in the second year were still significantly better than those at study entry and indicate stabilization in the clinical status of all patients. These results suggest that ERT continues to be effective in the second year of treatment even in patients suffering from advanced late-onset GSDII disease with severe respiratory failure.

  20. Gender specific associations between types of childhood maltreatment and the onset, escalation and severity of substance use in cocaine dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott M; Garcia, Miguel; Sinha, Rajita

    2006-01-01

    We examined associations between types of childhood maltreatment and the onset, escalation, and severity of substance use in cocaine dependent adults. In men (n = 55), emotional abuse was associated with a younger age of first alcohol use and a greater severity of substance abuse. In women (n = 32), sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and overall maltreatment was associated with a younger age of first alcohol use, and emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and overall maltreatment was associated with a greater severity of substance abuse. There was no association between childhood maltreatment and age of nicotine or cocaine use. However, age of first alcohol use predicted age of first cocaine use in both genders. All associations were stronger in women. Findings suggest that early intervention for childhood victims, especially females, may delay or prevent the early onset of alcohol use and reduce the risk for a more severe course of addiction.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, George T

    2003-01-01

    The defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease is cognitive impairment, but commonly this impairment is accompanied by mood and behavioral symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, inappropriate behavior, sleep disturbance, psychosis, and agitation. The symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are not normative to the aging process. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in the majority of cases can be made with confidence through office-based clinical assessment and informant interview. Alzheimer's disease is the most common of the dementing disorders and is exponentially increasing in incidence, projected to affect 8.64 million people in the United States by the year 2047. At present, no treatment can prevent or cure Alzheimer's disease, and the fact that Alzheimer's affects a geriatric population makes treatment all the more challenging. Therapies that could delay onset of symptoms even briefly would have a major impact on public health. As the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease increases, researchers are examining the efficacy of treatment options beyond the realm of the established cholinesterase inhibitors.

  2. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date.

  3. A rapid gene delivery-based mouse model for early-stage Alzheimer disease-type tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Siman, Robert; Lin, Yin-Guo; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri; Dong, Yina

    2013-11-01

    The perforant pathway projection from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to the hippocampal dentate gyrus is critically important for long-term memory and develops tau and amyloid pathologies and progressive degeneration starting in the early stages of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, perforant pathway function has not been assessed in experimental models of AD, and a therapeutic agent that protects its structure and function has not yet been identified. Therefore, we developed a new adeno-associated virus-based mouse model for perforant pathway tauopathy. Microinjection into the lateral EC of vectors designed to express either human tau bearing a pathogenic P301L mutation or enhanced green fluorescent protein as a control selectively drove transgene expression in lateral EC layer II perikarya and along the entire rostrocaudal extent of the lateral perforant pathway afferents and dentate terminal field. After human tau expression, hyperphosphorylated tau accumulated only within EC layer II perikarya, thereby modeling Braak stage I of transentorhinal AD tauopathy. Expression of pathologic human tau but not enhanced green fluorescent protein led to specific dose-dependent apoptotic death of perforant pathway neurons and loss of synapses in as little as 2 weeks. This novel adeno-associated virus-based method elicits rapid tauopathy and tau-mediated neurodegeneration localized to the mouse perforant pathway and represents a new experimental approach for studying tau-driven pathogenic processes and tau-based treatment strategies in a highly vulnerable neural circuit.

  4. Thinking outside the box: Alzheimer-type neuropathology that does not map directly onto current consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Kukull, Walter A.; Frosch, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitively impaired patients’ brains fall into neuropathologic diagnostic categories that cannot be defined explicitly by the National Institute on Aging and Reagan Institute (NIA-RI) guidelines. Two specific case categories are considered: “tangle-intensive” patients with the highest density of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, as graded by the Braak staging system) but only moderate density of neuritic amyloid plaques (NPs, as graded by CERAD); and conversely “plaque-intensive” patients with intermediate severity NFTs and high density of NPs. To better understand these technically unclassifiable cases, we analyzed NACC Registry data, which includes both clinical and pathological information from the National Institute on Aging-funded Alzheimer Disease Centers (ADCs). 1,672 cases with antemortem diagnoses of dementia were included. To evaluate the diagnostic tendencies of ADC neuropathologists, we assessed how the plaque-intensive and tangle-intensive cases were diagnosed ultimately. Tangle-intensive cases were more likely to be designated “High likelihood” that the dementia was due to AD, whereas plaque-intensive cases were typically designated “Intermediate likelihood”. Only the Braak stage VI “tangle-intensive” cases had lower final MMSE scores than the “plaque-intensive” cases (P<0.02). We conclude that more explicit diagnostic categories, along with better understanding of pathology in earlier phases of the disease, may be helpful to better guide neuropathologists. PMID:20418781

  5. Habitual physical activity (HPA) as a factor in sustained executive function in Alzheimer-type dementia: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Farina, Nicolas; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from studies on healthy older adults and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) populations suggests that physical activity interventions have a positive effect on executive function. In this study, we consider whether HPA is positively associated with executive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Eighty-two participants with a diagnosis of mild to moderate AD completed six measures of executive function. Objective measures of physical status were taken. In addition, informants completed questionnaires on the participants' HPA and other lifestyle factors. A composite measure of executive function was the primary outcome. A multistage multiple regression was used to determine how much variance HPA accounted for. The final model comprised disease severity, cognitive reserve, cognitive activities, neuropsychiatric status and HPA status. The final model accounted for a total of 57% of the variance of executive performance, of which HPA itself accounted for 8% of the variance. HPA status is associated executive performance in an AD population even after controlling for key covariates. The findings encourage clinicians to recommend HPA and its cognitive benefits to AD patients and their carers.

  6. Dysregulation of the nutrient/stress sensor O-GlcNAcylation is involved in the etiology of cardiovascular disorders, type-2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Tony; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Guinez, Céline; Olivier, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Mortuaire, Marlène; Vercoutter-Edouart, Anne-Sophie; Michalski, Jean-Claude

    2010-02-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is widespread within the cytosolic and nuclear compartments of cells. This post-translational modification is likely an indicator of good health since its intracellular level correlates with the availability of extracellular glucose. Apart from its status as a nutrient sensor, O-GlcNAcylation may also act as a stress sensor since it exerts its fundamental effects in response to stress. Several studies report that the cell quickly responds to an insult by elevating O-GlcNAcylation levels and by unmasking a newly described Hsp70-GlcNAc binding property. From a more practical point of view, it has been shown that O-GlcNAcylation impairments contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease (AD), three illnesses common in occidental societies. Many studies have demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation operates as a powerful cardioprotector and that by raising O-GlcNAcylation levels, the organism more successfully resists trauma-hemorrhage and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Recent data have also shown that insulin resistance and, more broadly, type-2 diabetes can be controlled by O-GlcNAcylation of the insulin pathway and O-GlcNAcylation of the gluconeogenesis transcription factors FoxO1 and CRCT2. Lastly, the finding that AD may correspond to a type-3 diabetes offers new perspectives into the knowledge of the neuropathology and into the search for new therapeutic avenues.

  7. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  8. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Results Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Conclusions Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life. PMID:27347422

  9. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition.

  10. Emergence of OXA-162 Carbapenemase- and DHA-1 AmpC Cephalosporinase-Producing Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Causing Community-Onset Infection in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Evangelia; Poulou, Aggeliki; Dimitroulia, Evangelia; Politi, Lida; Ranellou, Kyriaki; Gennimata, Vassiliki; Markou, Fani; Pournaras, Spyros

    2015-01-01

    OXA-48-like carbapenemases have only recently emerged in Europe. OXA-162 is a rare OXA-48 variant usually coexpressed with extended-spectrum β-lactamases. Here, we report the identification of the first OXA-162 carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, which coexpressed an AmpC cephalosporinase (DHA-1), retrieved from a patient in Greece. They belonged to a single sequence type (ST11) and caused the first documented community-onset urinary tract infections attributable to an OXA-48-like-producing Enterobacteriaceae strain. PMID:26666930

  11. Insulin as a Bridge between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease – How Anti-Diabetics Could be a Solution for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Inês; Candeias, Emanuel; Santos, Maria S.; de Oliveira, Catarina R.; Moreira, Paula I.; Duarte, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are two major health issues nowadays. T2D is an ever increasing epidemic, affecting millions of elderly people worldwide, with major repercussions in the patients’ daily life. This is mostly due to its chronic complications that may affect brain and constitutes a risk factor for AD. T2D principal hallmark is insulin resistance which also occurs in AD, rendering both pathologies more than mere unrelated diseases. This hypothesis has been reinforced in the recent years, with a high number of studies highlighting the existence of several common molecular links. As such, it is not surprising that AD has been considered as the “type 3 diabetes” or a “brain-specific T2D,” supporting the idea that a beneficial therapeutic strategy against T2D might be also beneficial against AD. Herewith, we aim to review some of the recent developments on the common features between T2D and AD, namely on insulin signaling and its participation in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ) plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation (the two major neuropathological hallmarks of AD). We also critically analyze the promising field that some anti-T2D drugs may protect against dementia and AD, with a special emphasis on the novel incretin/glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. PMID:25071725

  12. Insulin as a Bridge between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease - How Anti-Diabetics Could be a Solution for Dementia.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Inês; Candeias, Emanuel; Santos, Maria S; de Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I; Duarte, Ana I

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are two major health issues nowadays. T2D is an ever increasing epidemic, affecting millions of elderly people worldwide, with major repercussions in the patients' daily life. This is mostly due to its chronic complications that may affect brain and constitutes a risk factor for AD. T2D principal hallmark is insulin resistance which also occurs in AD, rendering both pathologies more than mere unrelated diseases. This hypothesis has been reinforced in the recent years, with a high number of studies highlighting the existence of several common molecular links. As such, it is not surprising that AD has been considered as the "type 3 diabetes" or a "brain-specific T2D," supporting the idea that a beneficial therapeutic strategy against T2D might be also beneficial against AD. Herewith, we aim to review some of the recent developments on the common features between T2D and AD, namely on insulin signaling and its participation in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ) plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation (the two major neuropathological hallmarks of AD). We also critically analyze the promising field that some anti-T2D drugs may protect against dementia and AD, with a special emphasis on the novel incretin/glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

  13. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N M; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-05-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non-Alzheimer

  14. An elderly-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) with pseudo-hypertrophy of paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Takahashi, Masanori P; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in LMNA, encoding A-type lamins, lead to diverse disorders, collectively called "laminopathies," which affect the striated muscle, cardiac muscle, adipose tissue, skin, peripheral nerve, and premature aging. We describe a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) carrying a heterozygous p.Arg377His mutation in LMNA, in whom skeletal muscle symptom onset was at the age of 65 years. Her weakness started at the erector spinae muscles, which showed marked pseudo-hypertrophy even at the age of 72 years. Her first episode of syncope was at 44 years; however, aberrant cardiac conduction was not revealed until 60 years. The p.Arg377His mutation has been previously reported in several familial LMNA-associated myopathies, most of which showed muscle weakness before the 6th decade. This is the first report of pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles in LMNA-associated myopathies. The pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles and the elderly-onset of muscle weakness make this case unique and reportable.

  15. Invokana (Canagliflozin) as a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and sodium glucose co-transporter 2: advancement in Alzheimer's disease- diabetes type 2 linkage via an enzoinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed M D; Shakil, Shahnawaz; Biswas, Deboshree; Shakil, Shazi; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Bagga, Paramdeep; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a primary target for Alzheimer's therapy while recently sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) has gained importance as a potential target for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) therapy. The present study emphasizes the molecular interactions between a new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antidiabetic drug 'Invokana' (chemically known as Canagliflozin) with AChE and SGLT2 to establish a link between the treatment of T2DM and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Docking study was performed using 'Autodock4.2'. Both hydrophobic and π-π interactions play an important role in the correct positioning of Canagliflozin within SGLT2 and catalytic site (CAS) of AChE to permit docking. Free energy of binding (ΔG) for 'Canagliflozin-SGLT2' interaction and 'Canagliflozin - CAS domain of AChE' interaction were found to be -10.03 kcal/mol and -9.40 kcal/mol, respectively. During 'Canagliflozin-SGLT2' interaction, Canagliflozin was found to interact with the most important amino acid residue Q457 of SGLT2. This residue is known for its interaction with glucose during reabsorption in kidney. However, 'Canagliflozin-CAS domain of AChE' interaction revealed that out of the three amino acids constituting the catalytic triad (S203, H447 and E334), two amino acid residues (S203 and H447) interact with Canagliflozin. Hence, Invokana (Canagliflozin) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of AChE and SGLT2. However, scope still remains in the determination of the three-dimensional structure of SGLT2-Canagliflozin and AChE-Canagliflozin complexes by X-ray crystallography to validate the described data. Since the development of diabetes is associated with AD, the design of new AChE inhibitors based on antidiabetic drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial. Moreover, the present computational study reveals that Invokana (Canagliflozin) is expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against diabetes associated neurological disorders.

  16. [Quantitative evaluation of the burden of those giving home care for senile dementia of Alzheimer type subjects using the burnout scale of pines].

    PubMed

    Kameda, N; Hattori, A; Nishinaga, M; Tuchimochi, H; Nakahara, K; Oouchi, A; Matsushita, T; Kanemaru, K; Yamanouchi, H; Orimo, H

    2001-05-01

    We quantitatively measured the physical and psychological burden of caregivers of 25 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). The Barthel Index (BADL, full score: 20 points) and the caregiver burden in terms of physical symptoms correlated well (r = -0.964, p < 0.001), as did the degree of abnormal behavior and caregiver burden in terms of psychological symptoms (r = 0.946, p < 0.001). The correlation with the burnout scale (BOS) of Pines was best when both factors of psychological and physical symptoms were included. The correlation between BOS and the caregiver burden in terms of both physical and psychological symptoms was r = 0.874, p < 0.001, and the correlation between BOS and "the degree of abnormal behavior" +(20- "BADL") was r = 0.853, p < 0.001. The burden in terms of physical symptoms increased as the BADL score decreased, but the burden in terms of psychological symptoms increased initially and decreased in the last phase of the disease. We conclude that the BOS score of SDAT caregivers was stable in the initial phase, then increased rapidly, thereafter preserved high, and dropped rapidly as the BADL score decreased.

  17. Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Patients with Down Syndrome Reproduce Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease Type Pathology in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dashinimaev, Erdem B; Artyuhov, Alexander S; Bolshakov, Alexey P; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina A; Vasiliev, Andrey V

    2017-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk of developing pathology similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Modeling of this pathology in vitro may be useful for studying this phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed three different cultures of neural cells carrying trisomy of chromosome 21, which were generated by directed differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). We report here that in vitro generated DS neural cells have abnormal metabolism of amyloid-β (Aβ) manifested by increased secretion and accumulation of Aβ granules of Aβ42 pathological isoform with upregulated expression of the APP gene. Additionally, we found increased expression levels of genes that are considered to be associated with AD (BACE2, RCAN1, ETS2, TMED10), as compared to healthy controls. Thus, the neural cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells with DS reproduce initial cellular signs of AD-type pathology and can be useful tools for modeling and studying this variant of AD in vitro.

  18. Predicting Conversion to Dementia of the Alzheimer Type in a Healthy Control Sample: The Power of Errors in Stroop Color Naming

    PubMed Central

    Balota, David A.; Tse, Chi-Shing; Hutchison, Keith A.; Spieler, Daniel H.; Duchek, Janet M.; Morris, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates which cognitive functions in older adults at time A are predictive of conversion to dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) at time B. Forty-seven healthy individuals were initially tested in 1992–1994 on a trial-by-trial computerized Stroop task along with a battery of psychometric measures that tap general knowledge, declarative memory, visual spatial processing, and processing speed. Twelve of these individuals subsequently developed DAT. The errors on the color incongruent trials (along with the difference between congruent and incongruent trials), and changes in the reaction time distributions were the strongest predictors of conversion to DAT, consistent with recent arguments regarding the sensitivity of these measures. Notably in the psychometric measures, there was little evidence of a difference in declarative memory between converters and nonconverters, but there was some evidence of changes in visual-spatial processing. Discussion focuses on the accumulating evidence suggesting a role of attentional control mechanisms as an early marker for the transition from healthy cognitive aging to DAT. PMID:20230140

  19. Can verbal instruction enhance the recall of an everyday task and promote error-monitoring in people with dementia of the Alzheimer-type?

    PubMed

    Balouch, Sara; Rusted, Jennifer M

    2017-03-01

    People with dementia of the Alzheimer-type (DAT) have difficulties with performing everyday tasks, and error awareness is poor. Here we investigate whether recall of actions and error monitoring in everyday task performance improved when they instructed another person on how to make tea. In this situation, both visual and motor cues are present, and attention is sustained by the requirement to keep instructing. The data were drawn from a longitudinal study recording performance in four participants with DAT, filmed regularly for five years in their own homes, completing three tea-making conditions: performed-recall (they made tea themselves); instructed-recall (they instructed the experimenter on how to make tea); and verbal-recall (they described how to make tea). Accomplishment scores (percentage of task they correctly recalled), errors and error-monitoring were coded. Task accomplishment was comparable in the performed-recall and instructed-recall conditions, but both were significantly better than task accomplishment in the verbal-recall condition. Third person instruction did not improve error-monitoring. This study has implications for everyday task rehabilitation for people with DAT.

  20. Viscoelastic and ultrastructural characteristics of whole blood and plasma in Alzheimer-type dementia, and the possible role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    PubMed

    Bester, Janette; Soma, Prashilla; Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-11-03

    Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Patients typically present with neuro- and systemic inflammation and iron dysregulation, associated with oxidative damage that reflects in hypercoagulability. Hypercoagulability is closely associated with increased fibrinogen and in AD patients fibrinogen has been implicated in the development of neuroinflammation and memory deficits. There is still no clear reason precisely why (a) this hypercoagulable state, (b) iron dysregulation and (c) increased fibrinogen could together lead to the loss of neuronal structure and cognitive function. Here we suggest an alternative hypothesis based on previous ultrastructural evidence of the presence of a (dormant) blood microbiome in AD. Furthermore, we argue that bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, might be the cause of the continuing and low-grade inflammation, characteristic of AD. Here, we follow an integrated approach, by studying the viscoelastic and ultrastructural properties of AD plasma and whole blood by using scanning electron microscopy, Thromboelastography (TEG®) and the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT®). Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence and close proximity of microbes to erythrocytes. TEG® analysis showed a hypercoagulable state in AD. TEG® results where LPS was added to naive blood showed the same trends as were found with the AD patients, while the GTT® results (where only platelet activity is measured), were not affected by the added LPS, suggesting that LPS does not directly impact platelet function. Our findings reinforce the importance of further investigating the role of LPS in AD.

  1. Correlation Between Cerebral Atrophy and Texture Features in Alzheimer-type Dementia Brains: A 3-Year Follow-up MRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    We assessed relationships between six texture features and changes in atrophy of the cerebral parenchyma, the hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus in the Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD) brain to determine whether or not the features reflect cerebral atrophy in ATD patients. The subjects of this study were 10 ATD patients, and underwent an magnetic resonanse imaging test of the head annually for at least 3 consecutive years. They consisted of three men and seven women, with a mean age of 71.4 ± 6.7 years. The results of study, the mean run length nonuniformity (RLN), angular second moment (ASM), and contrast (CON) increased with time, whereas the mean gray level nonuniformity (GLN), run percentage (RPC), and entropy (ENT) decreased with time. There was a statistically significant correlation between brain-intracranial area ratio (BIR) and GLN (p = 0.039), between BIR and ASM (p = 0.011), and between BIR and ENT (p = 0.023) as well as between parahippocampal-intracranial area ratio and GLN (p = 0.049). These results indicate that the six texture features were shown to reflect gray matter atrophy associated with ATD and to change with the progress of the disease. Although the course of ATD can be followed up by measuring a hippocampal area or volume and determining a decrease in the area or volume, texture features should be a more effective instrument for identifying the progress of ATD.

  2. Adenosine Type A2A Receptor in Peripheral Cell from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, Vascular Dementia, and Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: A New/Old Potential Target.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Beatrice; Casati, Martina; Gussago, Cristina; Ferri, Evelyn; Abbate, Carlo; Scortichini, Valeria; Colombo, Elena; Rossi, Paolo Dionigi; Mari, Daniela

    2016-09-06

    As the European population gets older, the incidence of neurological disorders increases with significant impact on social costs. Despite differences in disease etiology, several brain disorders in the elderly (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus) share dementia as a common clinical feature. The current treatment for the majority of these diseases is merely symptomatic and does not modify the course of the illness. Symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus are the only ones that can be modified if they are recognized in time and treated appropriately. Therefore, an important clinical strategy may be disclosed by pathogenic pathways that can be modified and to find drugs that can slow down or even arrest disease progression. Possibly a way to answer this question could be by re-examining all the molecules which have so far succeeded in improving many aspects of cognitive deterioration in some neurodegenerative conditions, that were not considered because of controversial opinions. The main purpose of this summary is to further substantiate the hypothesis that the pathway of adenosine type A2A receptor could be used as a potential target to develop new/old therapeutic strategies.

  3. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  4. The Effect of Resting Heart Rate on the New Onset of Microalbuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Subanalysis of the ROADMAP Study.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Bramlage, Peter; Haller, Hermann; Ruilope, Luis M; Böhm, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The association between resting heart rate and new-onset microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes is not clear. The objective of the current analysis was to assess the relationship between heart rate and incidence of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data from the Randomised Olmesartan and Diabetes Microalbuminuria Prevention (ROADMAP) study were retrospectively analyzed. New-onset microalbuminuria was documented and related to heart rate as recorded at baseline and last assessment, and the mean of the measurements taken during the double-blind part of the ROADMAP trial. Patients (n = 4299) had a mean age of 57.8 ± 8.7 years and 46.3% were male. Characteristics were not different between the olmesartan and the placebo groups, except for a higher systolic blood pressure (136.7 vs 135.7 mm Hg; P = 0.04) and albumin creatinine ratio (5.9 vs 5.5; P = 0.03). Increased risk of microalbuminuria was found with increasing heart rate, independent of whether baseline [highest vs lowest quartile odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03-1.87; P = 0.032], last assessment (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.26-2.31; P = 0.001), or mean heart rate was considered (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.30-2.41; P = 0.0003). The greater risk of new-onset microalbuminuria with a high baseline heart rate was also found when data were adjusted for mean systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.00-1.82; P = 0.0496; interaction P < 0.0001). Although there was no risk increase with baseline heart rate in the placebo group (P = 0.8253 for trend), microalbuminuria was less frequent in patients receiving olmesartan in the low heart rate quartiles (P = 0.002 for trend). A low heart rate reduces the risk of patients with type 2 diabetes developing microalbuminuria, independent of blood pressure. The data demonstrate potential benefits of reducing the heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients, and indicate that olmesartan could, in

  5. The diagnosis of young-onset dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M; Warren, Jason D

    2010-01-01

    A diagnosis of dementia is devastating at any age but diagnosis in younger patients presents a particular challenge. The differential diagnosis is broad as late presentation of metabolic disease is common and the burden of inherited dementia is higher in these patients than in patients with late-onset dementia. The presentation of the common degenerative diseases of late life, such as Alzheimer's disease, can be different when presenting in the fifth or sixth decade. Moreover, many of the young-onset dementias are treatable. The identification of causative genes for many of the inherited degenerative dementias has led to an understanding of the molecular pathology, which is also applicable to later-onset sporadic disease. This understanding offers the potential for future treatments to be tailored to a specific diagnosis of both young-onset and late-onset dementia. PMID:20650401

  6. Intestinal mucosal adherence and translocation of commensal bacteria at the early onset of type 2 diabetes: molecular mechanisms and probiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Jacques; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Klopp, Pascale; Vachoux, Christelle; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Smirnova, Natalia; Bergé, Mathieu; Sulpice, Thierry; Lahtinen, Sampo; Ouwehand, Arthur; Langella, Philippe; Rautonen, Nina; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Burcelin, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    A fat-enriched diet modifies intestinal microbiota and initiates a low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. Here, we demonstrate that before the onset of diabetes, after only one week of a high-fat diet (HFD), live commensal intestinal bacteria are present in large numbers in the adipose tissue and the blood where they can induce inflammation. This translocation is prevented in mice lacking the microbial pattern recognition receptors Nod1 or CD14, but overtly increased in Myd88 knockout and ob/ob mouse. This ‘metabolic bacteremia’ is characterized by an increased co-localization with dendritic cells from the intestinal lamina propria and by an augmented intestinal mucosal adherence of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. The bacterial translocation process from intestine towards tissue can be reversed by six weeks of treatment with the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, which improves the animals' overall inflammatory and metabolic status. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the early onset of HFD-induced hyperglycemia is characterized by an increased bacterial translocation from intestine towards tissues, fuelling a continuous metabolic bacteremia, which could represent new therapeutic targets. PMID:21735552

  7. Results from the University of Toronto continuous flow diffusion chamber at ICIS 2007: instrument intercomparison and ice onsets for different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Demott, P. J.; Möhler, O.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Toronto continuous flow diffusion chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study heterogeneous ice nucleation at the International Workshop on Comparing Ice Nucleation Measuring Systems (ICIS 2007) which also represented the 4-th ice nucleation workshop, on 14-28 September 2007. One goal of the workshop was to inter-compare different ice nucleation measurement techniques using the same aerosol sample source and preparation method. The aerosol samples included four types of desert mineral dust, graphite soot particles, and live and dead bacterial cells (Snomax®). This paper focuses on the UT-CFDC results, with a comparison to techniques of established heritage including the Colorado State CFDC and the AIDA expansion chamber. Good agreement was found between the different instruments with a few specific differences, especially at low temperatures, perhaps due to the variation in how onset of ice formation is defined between the instruments and the different inherent residence times. It was found that when efficiency of ice formation is based on the lowest onset relative humidity, Snomax® particles were most efficient followed by the desert dusts and then soot. For all aerosols, deposition mode freezing was only observed for T<45 K except for the dead bacteria where freezing occurred below water saturation as warm as 263 K.

  8. Glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch and mTOR signaling activation are early-onset features of SBMA muscle modified by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Parodi, Sara; Armirotti, Andrea; Borgia, Doriana; Pellegrini, Matteo; Urciuolo, Anna; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Marabita, Manuela; Romanello, Vanina; Gatto, Pamela; Blaauw, Bert; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sambataro, Fabio; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Sorarù, Gianni; Vergani, Lodovica; Sandri, Marco; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanism by which expansion of polyglutamine in AR causes muscle atrophy is unknown. Here, we investigated pathological pathways underlying muscle atrophy in SBMA knock-in mice and patients. We show that glycolytic muscles were more severely affected than oxidative muscles in SBMA knock-in mice. Muscle atrophy was associated with early-onset, progressive glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch. Whole genome microarray and untargeted lipidomic analyses revealed enhanced lipid metabolism and impaired glycolysis selectively in muscle. These metabolic changes occurred before denervation and were associated with a concurrent enhancement of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) expression. At later stages of disease, we detected mitochondrial membrane depolarization, enhanced transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression and autophagy, and mTOR-induced protein synthesis. Several of these abnormalities were detected in the muscle of SBMA patients. Feeding knock-in mice a high-fat diet (HFD) restored mTOR activation, decreased the expression of PGC1α, TFEB, and genes involved in oxidative metabolism, reduced mitochondrial abnormalities, ameliorated muscle pathology, and extended survival. These findings show early-onset and intrinsic metabolic alterations in SBMA muscle and link lipid/glucose metabolism to pathogenesis. Moreover, our results highlight an HFD regime as a promising approach to support SBMA patients.

  9. Increase in Peripheral Blood Intermediate Monocytes is Associated with the Development of Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoya; Mou, Wenjun; Su, Chang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Hui; Cao, Bingyan; Li, Xiaoqiao; Wu, Di; Ni, Xin; Gui, Jingang; Gong, Chunxiu

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes play important roles in antigen presentation and cytokine production to achieve a proper immune response, and are therefore largely implicated in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the change in the intermediate (CD14+CD16+) monocyte subset in children with recent-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and its possible association with clinical parameters reflecting islet β-cell dysfunction. Compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls, intermediate monocytes were expanded in children with T1DM, which was positively associated with hemoglobin A1C and negatively associated with serum insulin and C-peptide. Interestingly, the intermediate monocytes in T1DM patients expressed higher levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR and CD86, suggesting better antigen presentation capability. Further analysis revealed that the frequency of CD45RO+CD4+ memory T cells was increased in the T1DM patients, and the memory T cell content was well correlated with the increase in intermediate monocytes. These results suggest that expanded intermediate monocytes are a predictive factor for the poor residual islet β-cell function in children with recent-onset T1DM. PMID:28255273

  10. Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1 complicated by sudden onset anterior spinal artery thrombosis, tetraparesis and respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Zayyani, Najah R; Al Miamini, Wail; Khoujah, Amer M; Alharbi, Zeyad; Diari, Mohd S

    2011-04-15

    Chiari in 1891 described a constellation of anomalies at the base of the brain inherited congenitally, the characteristic of which are (1) extension of a tongue of cerebellar tissue posterior to the medulla and cord that extends into the cervical spinal canal; (2) caudal displacement of the medulla and the inferior part of the fourth ventricle into the cervical canal; and (3) a frequent but not invariable association with syringomyelia or a spinal developmental abnormality. Chiari recognized four types of abnormalities. Presently, the term has come to be restricted to Chiari's types I and II, that is, to cerebellomedullary descent without and with a meningomyelocele, respectively. The association of Arnold-Chairi malformation and high cervical cord infarction is unusual. The most common syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS), is caused by interruption of blood flow to the anterior spinal artery, producing ischaemia in the anterior two-thirds of the cord, with resulting neurologic deficits. Causes of ASAS include aortic disease, postsurgical, sepsis, hypotension and thromboembolic disorders. The authors present an interesting case of cervical cord infarction due to anterior spinal artery thrombosis in a patient of type 1 Arnold-Chiari malformation without any of the above predisposing factors.

  11. The Alzheimer's Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Alzheimer's Project Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Alzheimer's Project A 4-Part Documentary Series Starting May ...

  12. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients.

  13. Rapid onset of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion induced by duloxetine in an elderly type 2 diabetic patient with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Shinji; Kaneto, Hideaki; Tanabe, Akihito; Irie, Shintaro; Hirata, Yurie; Shimoda, Masashi; Kohara, Kenji; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Duloxetine, a serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is widely used for the treatment of diabetic painful neuropathy (DPN) because of the efficacy and safety profile. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, which is strongly associated duloxetine, is a rare but occasionally life-threatening adverse effect. Here, we report a case of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion that rapidly developed after starting duloxetine in an elderly Japanese female type 2 diabetes mellitus patient. Furthermore, we discuss the possible relationship between the onset of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and the gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 isoform 1A2 and 2D6, both of which are responsible for duloxetine metabolism.

  14. De novo exonic mutation in MYH7 gene leading to exon skipping in a patient with early onset muscular weakness and fiber-type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Pajusalu, Sander; Talvik, Inga; Noormets, Klari; Talvik, Tiina; Põder, Haide; Joost, Kairit; Puusepp, Sanna; Piirsoo, Andres; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H; Nikopensius, Tiit; Annilo, Tarmo; Nõukas, Margit; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin; Reimand, Tiia

    2016-03-01

    Here we report on a case of MYH7-related myopathy in a boy with early onset of muscular weakness and delayed motor development in infancy. His most affected muscles were neck extensors showing a dropped head sign, proximal muscles of lower limbs with positive Gower's sign, and trunk muscles. Brain and spinal cord MRI scans, echocardiography, and laboratory analyses including creatine kinase and lactate did not reveal any abnormalities. Muscle histopathology showed fiber-type disproportion. Whole exome sequencing of the parents-offspring trio revealed a novel de novo c.5655G>A p.(Ala1885=) synonymous substitution of the last nucleotide in exon 38 of the MYH7 gene. Further RNA investigations proved the skipping of exon 38 (p.1854_1885del). This is a first report of an exon-skipping mutation in the MYH7 gene causing myopathy. This report broadens both the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of MYH7-related myopathies.

  15. Enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa in 44 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type 2: 12-month results of an observational clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Strothotte, S; Strigl-Pill, N; Grunert, B; Kornblum, C; Eger, K; Wessig, C; Deschauer, M; Breunig, F; Glocker, F X; Vielhaber, S; Brejova, A; Hilz, M; Reiners, K; Müller-Felber, W; Mengel, E; Spranger, M; Schoser, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Late-onset glycogen storage disease type 2 (GSD2)/Pompe disease is a progressive multi-system disease evoked by a deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) activity. GSD2 is characterized by respiratory and skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy, resulting in functional disability and reduced life span. Since 2006 alglucosidase alfa has been licensed as a treatment in all types of GSD2/Pompe disease. We here present an open-label, investigator-initiated observational study of alglucosidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in 44 late-onset GSD2 patients with various stages of disease severity. Alglucosidase alfa was given i.v. at the standard dose of 20 mg/kg every other week. Assessments included serial arm function tests (AFT), Walton Gardner Medwin scale (WGMS), timed 10-m walk tests, four-stair climb tests, modified Gowers' maneuvers, 6-min walk tests, MRC sum score, forced vital capacities (FVC), creatine kinase (CK) levels and SF-36 self-reporting questionnaires. All tests were performed at baseline and every 3 months for 12 months of ERT. We found significant changes from baseline in the modified Gowers' test, the CK levels and the 6-min walk test (341 +/- 149.49 m, median 342.25 m at baseline; 393 +/- 156.98 m; median 411.50 m at endpoint; p = 0.026), while all other tests were unchanged. ERT over 12 months revealed minor allergic reactions in 10% of the patients. No serious adverse events occurred. None of the patients died or required de novo ventilation. Our clinical outcome data imply stabilization of neuromuscular deficits over 1 year with mild functional improvement.

  16. Using qualitative methods to inform the trade-off between content validity and consistency in utility assessment: the example of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Key stakeholders regard generic utility instruments as suitable tools to inform health technology assessment decision-making regarding allocation of resources across competing interventions. These instruments require a 'descriptor', a 'valuation' and a 'perspective' of the economic evaluation. There are various approaches that can be taken for each of these, offering a potential lack of consistency between instruments (a basic requirement for comparisons across diseases). The 'reference method' has been proposed as a way to address the limitations of the Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY). However, the degree to which generic measures can assess patients' specific experiences with their disease would remain unresolved. This has been neglected in the discussions on methods development and its impact on the QALY values obtained and resulting cost per QALY estimate underestimated. This study explored the content of utility instruments relevant to type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as examples, and the role of qualitative research in informing the trade-off between content coverage and consistency. Method A literature review was performed to identify qualitative and quantitative studies regarding patients' experiences with type 2 diabetes or AD, and associated treatments. Conceptual models for each indication were developed. Generic- and disease-specific instruments were mapped to the conceptual models. Results Findings showed that published descriptions of relevant concepts important to patients with type 2 diabetes or AD are available for consideration in deciding on the most comprehensive approach to utility assessment. While the 15-dimensional health related quality of life measure (15D) seemed the most comprehensive measure for both diseases, the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI 3) seemed to have the least coverage for type 2 diabetes and the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) for AD. Furthermore, some of the utility instruments contained items that

  17. The effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators on type 2 diabetes onset in women: Basic and clinical insights.

    PubMed

    Xu, Beibei; Lovre, Dragana; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2017-01-20

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are a class of compounds that interact with estrogen receptors (ERs) and exert agonist or antagonist effects on ERs in a tissue-specific manner. Tamoxifen, a first generation SERM, is used for treatment of ER positive breast cancer. Raloxifene, a second generation SERM, was used to prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis. The third-generation SERM bazedoxifene (BZA) effectively prevents osteoporosis while preventing estrogenic stimulation of breast and uterus. Notably, BZA combined with conjugated estrogens (CE) is a new menopausal treatment. The menopausal state predisposes to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and therefore the effects of SERMs on metabolic homeostasis are gaining attention. Here, we summarize knowledge of SERMs' impacts on metabolic, homeostasis, obesity and diabetes in rodent models and postmenopausal women.

  18. East-west type precursor activity prior to the auroral onset: Ground-based and THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskaya, I. V.; Kornilov, I. A.; Kornilova, T. A.

    2015-02-01

    Using ground-based optical observations, we study an auroral breakup event, focusing on the wave-like signatures of the east-west (E-W) type auroral activities which appear before breakup. By conjunction with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) P2 and P5 measurements, it is shown that the underlying wave mode can be identified as the ballooning mode. Considering the similarity of the wave-like characteristics derived from ground-based auroral and THEMIS spacecraft observations, we argue that the E-W activities under study may be related to ballooning waves propagating in the plasma sheet. The implications for mechanisms of substorm triggering are discussed.

  19. Leaky splicing mutation in the acid maltase gene is associated with delayed onset of glycogenosis type II

    SciTech Connect

    Boerkoel, C.F.; Exelbert, R.; Nicastri, C.; Nichols, R.C.; Plotz, P.H.; Raben, N.; Miller, F.W.

    1995-04-01

    An autosomal recessive deficiency of acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA), type II glycogenosis, is genetically and clinically heterogeneous. The discovery of an enzyme-inactivating genomic deletion of exon 18 in three unrelated genetic compound patients - two infants and and adult - provided a rare opportunity to analyze the effect of the second mutation in patients who displayed dramatically different phenotypes. A deletion of Lys-903 in one patient and a substitution of Arg for Leu-299 in another resulted in the fatal infantile form. In the adult, a T-to-G base change at position-13 of intron 1 resulted in alternatively spliced transcripts with deletion of exon 2, the location of the start codon. The low level of active enzyme (12% of normal) generated from the leakage of normally spliced mRNA sustained the patient to adult life. 61 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sequential NMR resonance assignment and structure determination of the Kunitz-type inhibitor domain of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Heald, S L; Tilton, R F; Hammond, L J; Lee, A; Bayney, R M; Kamarck, M E; Ramabhadran, T V; Dreyer, R N; Davis, G; Unterbeck, A

    1991-10-29

    Certain precursor proteins (APP751 and APP770) of the amyloid beta-protein (AP) present in Alzheimer's disease contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APPI). In this study, the domain is obtained as a functional inhibitor through both recombinant (APPIr) and synthetic (APPIs) methodologies, and the solution structure of APPI is determined by 1H 2D NMR techniques. Complete sequence-specific resonance assignments (except for P13 and G37 NH) for both APPIr and APPIs are achieved using standard procedures. Ambiguities arising from degeneracies in the NMR resonances are resolved by varying sample conditions. Qualitative interpretation of short- and long-range NOEs reveals secondary structural features similar to those extensively documented by NMR for bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). A more rigorous interpretation of the NOESY spectra yields NOE-derived interresidue distance restraints which are used in conjunction with dynamic simulated annealing to generate a family of APPI structures. Within this family, the beta-sheet and helical regions are in good agreement with the crystal structure of BPTI, whereas portions of the protease-binding loops deviate from those in BPTI. These deviations are consistent with those recently described in the crystal structure of APPI (Hynes et al., 1990). Also supported in the NMR study is the hydrophobic patch in the protease-binding domain created by side chain-side chain NOE contacts between M17 and F34. In addition, the NMR spectra indicate that the rotation of the W21 ring in APPI is hindered, unlike Y21 in BPTI, showing a greater than 90% preference for one orientation in the hydrophobic groove.

  1. Naringenin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) caused by the intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin in rat model.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Badruzzaman; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Khan, Andleeb; Ahmed, Md Ejaz; Ishrat, Tauheed; Tabassum, Rizwana; Vaibhav, Kumar; Ahmad, Ajmal; Islam, Fakhrul

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) as well as age related cognitive deficit. The present study was designed to investigate the pre-treatment effects of naringenin (NAR), a polyphenolic compound on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress in the hippocampus, and hippocampal neuron injury in a rat model of AD-TNDCI. The rats were pre-treated with NAR at a selective dose (50mg/kg, orally) for 2 weeks followed by intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) (3mg/kg; 5μl per site) injection bilaterally. Behavioral alterations were monitored after 2 weeks from the lesion using passive avoidance test and Morris water maze paradigm. Three weeks after the lesion, the rats were sacrificed for measuring non-enzymatic [4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malonaldehyde (MDA), thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), protein carbonyl (PC), reduced glutathione (GSH)] content and enzymatic [glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase] activity in the hippocampus, and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) positive neuron, and histopathology of hippocampal neurons. The non-enzymatic level and enzymatic activity was significantly increased and decreased, respectively, with striking impairments in spatial learning and memory, loss of ChAT positive neuron and severe damage to hippocampal neurons in the rat induced by ICV-STZ. These abnormalities were significantly improved by NAR pre-treatment. The study suggests that NAR can protect against cognitive deficits, neuronal injury and oxidative stress induced by ICV-STZ, and may be used as a potential agent in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD-TNDCI.

  2. [Long-term effect of a cognitive intervention on learning and participation in a significant leisure activity in early dementia of Alzheimer type: a case study].

    PubMed

    Provencher, Véronique; Bier, Nathalie; Audet, Thérèse; Gagnon, Lise

    2009-06-01

    Decreased ability to accomplish significant leisure activities often occurs in early stages of dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). As a long term effect, it may eventually affect the quality of life of the patient as well as that of the caregiver's. In a previous study, a woman with early DAT (77 years old, MMSE: 24/30) improved her participation in 2 leisure activities (listening to music and praying in a group) following the learning of a few tasks (e.g. using a radio cassette, remembering the significance of an pre-programmed ring) as a result of a cognitive intervention. The present study presents the long term effect of this intervention on the retention of the learned tasks and on spontaneous participation in both leisure activities of her daily living. Measures of tasks' learning and spontaneous participation in activities have been obtained through direct observation (ex: ability to use the tasks learned without assistance) and telephone conversations with the caregiver. The measures were taken 9 to 15 months post-intervention. Nine months after the end of the intervention, the participant could no longer use the radio cassette, but was able to remember the significance of the pre-programmed ring. Similarly, she stopped listening to music, but still attended her prayer group. The intervention appears to maintain participation in a leisure activity for several months in a patient with early DAT, in spite of expected functional decline. This functional impact can be achieved through retention of specific learned tasks as well as by strong external cues (daily pre-programmed ring), and can increase the quality of life for patients with DAT.

  3. CBF tomograms with (/sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO in patients with dementia (Alzheimer type and HIV) and Parkinson's disease--initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, D.C.; Ell, P.J.; Burns, A.; Philpot, M.; Levy, R.

    1988-12-01

    We present preliminary data on the utility of functional brain imaging with (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the study of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), HIV-related dementia syndrome, and the on-off syndrome of Parkinson's disease. In comparison with a group of age-matched controls, the DAT patients revealed distinctive bilateral temporal and posterior parietal deficits, which correlate with detailed psychometric evaluation. Patients with amnesia as the main symptom (group A) showed bilateral mesial temporal lobe perfusion deficits (p less than 0.02). More severely affected patients (group B) with significant apraxia, aphasia, or agnosia exhibited patterns compatible with bilateral reduced perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex, as well as reduced perfusion to both temporal lobes, different from the patients of the control group (p less than 0.05). SPECT studies of HIV patients with no evidence of intracraneal space occupying pathology showed marked perfusion deficits. Patients with Parkinson's disease and the on-off syndrome studied during an on phase (under levodopa therapy) and on another occasion after withdrawal of levodopa (off) demonstrated a significant change in the uptake of (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO in the caudate nucleus (lower on off) and thalamus (higher on off). These findings justify the present interest in the functional evaluation of the brain of patients with dementia. (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)/SPECT appear useful and highlight individual disorders of flow in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

  4. Alien hand sign in association with Alzheimer's histopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, J A; Lantos, P L; Jackson, M; Marsden, C D; Scadding, J W; Rossor, M N

    1993-01-01

    A 68 year old man is described with an alien left hand, cortical myoclonus, bilateral parietal lobe dysfunction and memory impairment but preserved language skills. The clinical diagnosis was of corticobasal degeneration but at necropsy, four years after the onset of symptoms, the pathology was of Alzheimer's disease together with some scattered chromatolytic pale neurons in the cerebral cortex. The alien hand sign has not previously been described in Alzheimer's dementia and is an illustration of the clinical heterogeneity that may occur in association with Alzheimer histopathology. Images PMID:8410026

  5. [Connections between sleep and Alzheimer's disease : Insomnia, amnesia and amyloid].

    PubMed

    Busche, M A; Kekuš, M; Förstl, H

    2017-03-01

    Sleep plays an essential role in memory consolidation. Although sleep problems are common in Alzheimer's disease, they are not usually thought to be key features of the disease; however, new experimental research has shown that sleep disturbances not only occur before the onset of typical cognitive deficits but are also associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and may have a decisive influence on the symptoms and course. Thus, sleep disturbances may be potentially modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease that deserve more attention in research, diagnostics and treatment.

  6. Controlling the onset of OB/OM in a semiconductor quantum well system in an inverted Y-type configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheli, Ali; Hamedi, H. R.; Sahrai, M.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) is numerically investigated in a four-level inverted Y-type semiconductor quantum well (SQW) structure immersed in a unidirectional ring cavity. In the four-level SQW system under consideration, a closed loop configuration is coupled to the upper level through a tunable probe field. We show that the OB threshold intensity can be controlled via the intensity of coupling fields which gives rise to the absorption variation of the probe field. In addition, due to the existence of the closed-loop configuration, the OB and OM behaviors of the proposed SQW medium are dependent on the relative phase of the applied fields. It is found that the OB can be switched to OM or vice versa by properly adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields. The results may provide new possibilities in real experiments for realizing an all-optical switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  7. Characteristics of children and adolescents at onset of type 2 diabetes in a Tertiary Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Nahar, Jebun; Tayyeb, Samin; Mohsin, Fauzia; Nahar, Nazmun; Azad, Kishwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent data show that the prevalence of diabetes among children and adolescents is increasing in some ethnic groups. The worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity has been accompanied by an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in youth. Methods: The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics of children and adolescents diagnosed ≤18 years who had features of T2D and presented at Changing Diabetes in Children, Paediatric Diabetes Clinic at Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation of Diabetes, Endocrine, and Metabolic Disorders. All patients who were newly diagnosed and came to the clinic from March 2011 to March 2015 were included. Results: Among 939 newly registered patients, 77 (8%) had a diagnosis of T2D. The age at diagnosis was 9–10 years in 11 patients (14%), 11–14 years in 46 (60%) and 15–17 years in other 20 patients (26%). Majority of the children had a positive family history of T2D (94%) and 58% were obese. Median fasting insulin (27.9 [17.3–99.3]) was high in 76% patients. Insulin was started initially along with metformin in 40 patients and could be stopped in six patients in 3 months. Conclusion: Our study reflects that T2D is emerging as a problem in children and adolescents in Bangladesh. PMID:27730073

  8. Decreased percentage of NKG2D+NK cells in patients with incident onset of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yupan; Wang, Haifeng; Lou, Xiaoqian; Qu, Xiaozhang; Gao, Lichao; Liu, Xiaolei; Li, Man; Guo, Hui; Jiang, Yanfang

    2017-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by absolute insulin deficiency owing to autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β cells. A significant decrease in natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood has been observed in patients with untreated T1DM. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of NK cells and their subsets in young T1DM patients. A total of 30 children and adolescents with untreated T1DM and 27 healthy controls (HC) were recruited in this study. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the percentage of peripheral blood CD3-CD56+ NK cells and NK cells subsets (CD56bright, CD56dim and CD56neg), were significantly decreased in the T1DM patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, the percentage of inducible CD107a+ and IFN-γ-secreting NK cells was significantly decreased compared to HC. Interestingly, the percentage of NKG2D+ NK cells negatively correlated with the level of serum TCHOL and TG in T1DM patients. Our data indicate that decreased number and impaired function of NK cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM.

  9. Towards an Earlier and Timely Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: Is it Time to Change Criteria to Define Disease Onset?

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Manuela; Nigi, Laura; Dotta, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the immune-mediated form of diabetes requiring insulin treatment and affecting both children and adults. The incidence of T1D is increasing dramatically and has doubled in the past 2 decades. In the recent years, significant knowledge on the disease natural history has been gained and, nowadays, diabetes-related autoantibodies make T1D a predictable disease. Despite this great advance in the field of T1D, we still use diagnostic criteria defined by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in 1997. In other autoimmune endocrine disorders (e.g., Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Addison's disease), that share several features with T1D, diagnosis is made early in the presence of circulating autoantibodies together with subclinical thyroid/adrenal functional impairment and treatments are often provided in the absence of a frank clinical glandular insufficiency. With this review, we propose to anticipate diagnosis also in T1D at the stage in which subjects have circulating multiple islet autoantibodies, are dysglycemic but are still insulin independent. We believe that anticipating T1D diagnosis can lead to better disease management and prevention of secondary complications but can also provide the possibility to perform earlier and likely more effective interventions for a disease that to date has proven controllable but still incurable.

  10. Coxsackie B4 virus infection of β cells and natural killer cell insulitis in recent-onset type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Dotta, Francesco; Censini, Stefano; van Halteren, Astrid G. S.; Marselli, Lorella; Masini, Matilde; Dionisi, Sabrina; Mosca, Franco; Boggi, Ugo; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Prato, Stefano Del; Elliott, John F.; Covacci, Antonello; Rappuoli, Rino; Roep, Bart O.; Marchetti, Piero

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells. Several studies have suggested an association between Coxsackie enterovirus seroconversion and onset of disease. However, a direct link between β cell viral infection and islet inflammation has not been established. We analyzed pancreatic tissue from six type 1 diabetic and 26 control organ donors. Immunohistochemical, electron microscopy, whole-genome ex vivo nucleotide sequencing, cell culture, and immunological studies demonstrated Coxsackie B4 enterovirus in specimens from three of the six diabetic patients. Infection was specific of β cells, which showed nondestructive islet inflammation mediated mainly by natural killer cells. Islets from enterovirus-positive samples displayed reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose and other secretagogues. In addition, virus extracted from positive islets was able to infect β cells from human islets of nondiabetic donors, causing viral inclusions and signs of pyknosis. None of the control organ donors showed signs of viral infection. These studies provide direct evidence that enterovirus can infect β cells in patients with type 1 diabetes and that infection is associated with inflammation and functional impairment. PMID:17360338

  11. The onset of flood basalt volcanism, Northern Paraná Basin, Brazil: A precise U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon age for a Chapecó-type dacite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Freitas, Vivian Azor; Heaman, Larry H.

    2011-02-01

    We report the first U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon date for a felsic volcanic rock from the Paraná Large Igneous Province in south Brazil. The new date of 134.3 ± 0.8 Ma for a hypocrystalline Chapecó-type dacite from Ourinhos (northern Paraná basin) is an important regional time marker for the onset of flood basalt volcanism in the northern and western portion of the province. The dated dacite was erupted onto basement rocks and is overlain by a high-Ti basalt sequence, interpreted to be correlative with Pitanga basalts elsewhere. This new U-Pb date for the Ourinhos dacite is consistent with the local stratigraphy being slightly older than the few reliable step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dates currently available for overlying high-Ti basalts (133.6-131.5 Ma). This indicates an ~ 3 Ma time span for the building of the voluminous high-Ti lava sequence of the Paraná basin. On the other hand, it overlaps the 40Ar/39Ar dates (134.8-134.1 Ma) available for the stratigraphically older low-Ti basalt (Gramado + Esmeralda types) and dacite-rhyolite (Palmas type) sequences from South Brazil, which is consistent with the short-lived character of this volcanism and its rapid succession by the high-Ti sequence.

  12. Can oral infection be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Singhrao, Sim K.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a scourge of longevity that will drain enormous resources from public health budgets in the future. Currently, there is no diagnostic biomarker and/or treatment for this most common form of dementia in humans. AD can be of early familial-onset or sporadic with a late-onset. Apart from the two main hallmarks, amyloid-beta and neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation is a characteristic feature of AD neuropathology. Inflammation may be caused by a local central nervous system insult and/or by peripheral infections. Numerous microorganisms are suspected in AD brains ranging from bacteria (mainly oral and non-oral Treponema species), viruses (herpes simplex type I), and yeasts (Candida species). A causal relationship between periodontal pathogens and non-oral Treponema species of bacteria has been proposed via the amyloid-beta and inflammatory links. Periodontitis constitutes a peripheral oral infection that can provide the brain with intact bacteria and virulence factors and inflammatory mediators due to daily, transient bacteremias. If and when genetic risk factors meet environmental risk factors in the brain, disease is expressed, in which neurocognition may be impacted, leading to the development of dementia. To achieve the goal of finding a diagnostic biomarker and possible prophylactic treatment for AD, there is an initial need to solve the etiological puzzle contributing to its pathogenesis. This review therefore addresses oral infection as the plausible etiology of late-onset AD (LOAD). PMID:26385886

  13. Large Pre- and Postexercise Rapid-Acting Insulin Reductions Preserve Glycemia and Prevent Early- but Not Late-Onset Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Matthew D.; Walker, Mark; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.; Stevenson, Emma J.; Bracken, Richard M.; Bain, Stephen C.; West, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the acute and 24-h glycemic responses to reductions in postexercise rapid-acting insulin dose in type 1 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After preliminary testing, 11 male patients (24 ± 2 years, HbA1c 7.7 ± 0.3%; 61 ± 3.4 mmol/mol) attended the laboratory on three mornings. Patients consumed a standardized breakfast (1 g carbohydrate ⋅ kg−1 BM; 380 ± 10 kcal) and self-administered a 25% rapid-acting insulin dose 60 min prior to performing 45 min of treadmill running at 72.5 ± 0.9% VO2peak. At 60 min postexercise, patients ingested a meal (1 g carbohydrate ⋅ kg−1 BM; 660 ± 21 kcal) and administered a Full, 75%, or 50% rapid-acting insulin dose. Blood glucose concentrations were measured for 3 h postmeal. Interstitial glucose was recorded for 20 h after leaving the laboratory using a continuous glucose monitoring system. RESULTS All glycemic responses were similar across conditions up to 60 min postexercise. After the postexercise meal, blood glucose was preserved under 50%, but declined under Full and 75%. Thence at 3 h, blood glucose was highest under 50% (50% [10.4 ± 1.2] vs. Full [6.2 ± 0.7] and 75% [7.6 ± 1.2 mmol ⋅ L−1], P = 0.029); throughout this period, all patients were protected against hypoglycemia under 50% (blood glucose ≤3.9; Full, n = 5; 75%, n = 2; 50%, n = 0). Fifty percent continued to protect patients against hypoglycemia for a further 4 h under free-living conditions. However, late-evening and nocturnal glycemia were similar; as a consequence, late-onset hypoglycemia was experienced under all conditions. CONCLUSIONS A 25% pre-exercise and 50% postexercise rapid-acting insulin dose preserves glycemia and protects patients against early-onset hypoglycemia (≤8 h). However, this strategy does not protect against late-onset postexercise hypoglycemia. PMID:23514728

  14. Relationship of lipid and lipoprotein ratios with coronary severity in patients with new on-set coronary artery disease complicated with type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ying; Chen, Juan; Chen, Man-Hua; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Li, Sha; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Rui-Xia; Dong, Qian; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) progression. Although previous studies have demonstrated the association of lipid and lipoprotein ratios with CAD, no data are currently available concerning the relationship between lipid and lipoprotein ratios and the severity of new on-set CAD in diabetics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of lipid and lipoprotein ratios in predicting the severity of CAD in patients with type 2 DM (T2DM). Methods A total of 380 consecutive T2DM patients with new on-set CAD were enrolled in the present study. Then, they were classified into the three groups according to Gensini score (GS) tertiles. The relationship between lipid and lipoprotein ratios currently used and the GS was investigated. Results Positive correlations of natural log-transformed GS (lnGS) with apolipoprotein B to apoA-I ratio (apoB/apoA-I), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to apoA-I ratio (non-HDL-C/apoA-I), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to apoA-I ratio (LDL-C/apoA-I) were found (r = 0.18, 0.13, 0.12, respectively, all P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated apoB/apoA-I as the strongest predictor for high GS (OR = 5.67, 95% CI: 1.45–23.92, P = 0.003). Area under receivers operating characteristic curve of apoB/apoA-I was 0.63 (95% CI: 0.60–0.66, P = 0.001) for predicting high GS. The optimal cutoff value of apoB/apoA-I to predict high GS was 0.72 with the sensitivity of 61.2% and the specificity of 62.1%. Conclusions Lipid and lipoprotein ratios might be useful for predicting the severity of new on-set CAD in T2DM patients, and the apoB/apoA-I appeared as the most significant predictor in this population. PMID:27781059

  15. Earlier Age of Onset of Chronic Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy or Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; van Rijn, Bas B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Boer, Jolanda M A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-12-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of a history of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the risk and age of onset of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, independent of hypertension and T2D. Between 1993 and 1997, 22 265 ever-pregnant women were included from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-NL study, aged 20 to 70 years at baseline. Details on complications of pregnancy and known hypertension were obtained by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at enrollment. Participants were followed for the occurrence of CVD events. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazard (with HDP and GDM as time-dependent variables for T2D and CVD) models. At enrollment, women with a HDP reported diagnosis of hypertension 7.7 years earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9-8.5) and women with GDM reported diagnosis of T2D 7.7 years earlier (95% CI 5.8-9.6) than women without pregnancy complications. After adjustment for potential confounders, HDP was associated with presence of hypertension at enrollment (odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.98-2.28) and onset of CVD later in life (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.32). After including the intermediates hypertension and T2D in the model, the risk of CVD later in life decreased (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). GDM was associated with an increased risk of developing T2D later in life (hazard ratio 3.68, 95% CI 2.77-4.90), but not with risk of CVD. HDP and GDM have a substantial impact on the risk of CVD and are potentially important indicators for preventive cardiovascular risk management.

  16. Phenotype of a patient with a de novo mutation in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1beta/maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 gene.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christof; Böttcher, Yvonne; Kovacs, Peter; Halbritter, Jan; Stumvoll, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 1beta cause various phenotypes including maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5) and kidney disease. We provide molecular and pathophysiologic characterization of a 23-year-old male patient with clinical presentation typical for MODY5 with renal involvement. Clinical studies (including intravenous glucose tolerance test and magnetic resonance imaging) of the patient and 5 family members in comparison with unrelated control subjects and molecular analysis of the HNF-1beta gene (direct sequencing, paternity testing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for parental mosaicism) were performed. The patient was born with low birth weight (2250 g), whereas his dizygotic twin sister was of normal weight (3500 g) and healthy. He had cystic renal dysplasia with progressive renal failure and pancreas atrophy with beta-cell dysfunction and early-onset diabetes mellitus but no family history of diabetes. Intravenous glucose tolerance test showed a markedly reduced but not absent acute insulin response compared with controls (n = 6). A mutation in the HNF-1beta gene S148L (C443T) in exon 2 within the pseudo-POU domain was identified. All other family members and the control group (n = 255) did not have the mutation, suggesting that we described a de novo mutation in HNF-1beta. Paternity was confirmed, and no signs of mosaicism in DNA analysis of both parents could be detected. Of note, the low birth weight of the patient in contrast to his healthy twin sister provides interesting support for the fetal insulin hypothesis for reduced birth weight.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-2 reduces intestinal permeability but does not modify the onset of type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Hadjiyanni, Irene; Li, Kunmin Karen; Drucker, Daniel J

    2009-02-01

    The development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to environmental factors and dietary components. Increasing evidence indicates that the integrity of the gut mucosa plays a role in the development of autoimmune diseases, and evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies demonstrates that increased leakiness of the intestinal epithelium precedes the development of type 1 diabetes. However, there is limited information on modulation of gut barrier function and its relationship to diabetes development. Here we show that the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a model of T1D, exhibits enhanced intestinal transcellular permeability before the development of autoimmune diabetes. Treatment of NOD mice with a glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analog, synthetic human [Gly(2)] glucagon-like peptide-2 (h[Gly(2)]GLP-2, increased the length and weight of the small bowel and significantly improved jejunal transepithelial resistance. However, chronic administration of once daily h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 failed to delay or reverse the onset of T1D when treatment was initiated in young, normoglycemic female NOD mice. Furthermore, h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 administration had no significant effect on lymphocyte subpopulations in NOD mice. These findings demonstrate that h[Gly(2)]GLP-2-mediated enhancement of gut barrier function in normoglycemic NOD mice disease is not sufficient to prevent or delay the development of experimental T1D.

  18. Novel role of red wine-derived polyphenols in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease dementia and brain pathology: experimental approaches and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that by the middle of this century, as many as 14 million Americans will have Alzheimer's disease, creating an enormous strain on families, the health care system and the federal budget. There are still widespread misconceptions about issues related to the prevention and/or treatment of disease pathogenesis, leaving us unprepared to deal with the disease. To address these challenges, several therapeutic approaches are currently under investigation, mainly in an attempt to delay disease onset and eventually slow down its progression. Recent epidemiological evidence has implicated the protective role of dietary polyphenols from grape products against Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that certain bioactive grape-derived polyphenols may protect against Alzheimer's disease-type cognitive deterioration, in part by interfering with the generation and assembly of β-amyloid peptides into neurotoxic oligomeric aggregated species. Brain-targeting polyphenols have been shown to significantly reduce the generation of β-amyloid peptides in primary cortico-hippocampal neuron cultures, and preliminary results indicate that they may influence neuronal synaptic plasticity. Recent evidence has also implicated the role of certain grape-derived preparations in beneficially modulating tau neuropathology, including reducing tau aggregation. Studies suggest that dietary polyphenolics may benefit Alzheimer's disease by modulating multiple disease-modifying modalities, both β-amyloid-dependent and independent mechanisms, and provide impetus for the development of polyphenolic compounds for Alzheimer's disease prevention and/or therapy.

  19. Epilepsy and Cognitive Impairments in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palop, Jorge J.; Mucke, Lennart

    2010-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with cognitive decline and increased incidence of seizures. Seizure activity in AD has been widely interpreted as a secondary process resulting from advanced stages of neurodegeneration, perhaps in combination with other age-related factors. However, recent findings in animal models of AD have challenged this notion, raising the possibility that aberrant excitatory neuronal activity represents a primary upstream mechanism that may contribute to cognitive deficits in these models. The following observations suggest that such activity may play a similar role in humans with AD: (1) patients with sporadic AD have an increased incidence of seizures that appears to be independent of disease stage and highest in cases with early onset; (2) seizures are part of the natural history of many pedigrees with autosomal dominant early-onset AD, including those with mutations in presenilin-1, presenilin-2, or the amyloid precursor protein, or with duplications of wild-type amyloid precursor protein; (3) inheritance of the major known genetic risk factor for AD, apolipoprotein E4, is associated with subclinical epileptiform activity in carriers without dementia; and (4) some cases of episodic amnestic wandering and disorientation in AD are associated with epileptiform activity and can be prevented with antiepileptic drugs. Here we review recent experimental data demonstrating that high levels of β-amyloid in the brain can cause epileptiform activity and cognitive deficits in transgenic mouse models of AD. We conclude that β-amyloid peptides may contribute to cognitive decline in AD by eliciting similar aberrant neuronal activity in humans and discuss potential clinical and therapeutic implications of this hypothesis. PMID:19204149

  20. Epilepsy and cognitive impairments in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Palop, Jorge J; Mucke, Lennart

    2009-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with cognitive decline and increased incidence of seizures. Seizure activity in AD has been widely interpreted as a secondary process resulting from advanced stages of neurodegeneration, perhaps in combination with other age-related factors. However, recent findings in animal models of AD have challenged this notion, raising the possibility that aberrant excitatory neuronal activity represents a primary upstream mechanism that may contribute to cognitive deficits in these models. The following observations suggest that such activity may play a similar role in humans with AD: (1) patients with sporadic AD have an increased incidence of seizures that appears to be independent of disease stage and highest in cases with early onset; (2) seizures are part of the natural history of many pedigrees with autosomal dominant early-onset AD, including those with mutations in presenilin-1, presenilin-2, or the amyloid precursor protein, or with duplications of wild-type amyloid precursor protein; (3) inheritance of the major known genetic risk factor for AD, apolipoprotein E4, is associated with subclinical epileptiform activity in carriers without dementia; and (4) some cases of episodic amnestic wandering and disorientation in AD are associated with epileptiform activity and can be prevented with antiepileptic drugs. Here we review recent experimental data demonstrating that high levels of beta-amyloid in the brain can cause epileptiform activity and cognitive deficits in transgenic mouse models of AD. We conclude that beta-amyloid peptides may contribute to cognitive decline in AD by eliciting similar aberrant neuronal activity in humans and discuss potential clinical and therapeutic implications of this hypothesis.

  1. Amplification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 and Human Herpes Virus Type 5 Polymerase Gene Segment From Formalin-Fixed Brain Tissue From Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    and newborn infants exposed in utero, active HHV5 infection only occurs in individuals with 2 immune defects such as AIDS and immunosuppressed organ...described PCR based detection of HSV1 viral DNA in specific formalin-fixed brain tissue regions of Alzheimer patients (14). Recently, Hemling and coworkers...Texas. Formalin-fixed Alzheimer patient brain tissue was obtained from the Honolulu Heart Program, Honolulu, Hawaii. 5 METHODS The extraction and

  2. Studies on the correlation with olfactory dysfunction in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Ameer; Lee, Ji Hye; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of proteinaceous deposits in the brain. AD often results in olfactory dysfunction and impaired olfactory perceptual acuity may be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Until recently, there is no Alzheimer's nanoscope or any other high-end microscope developed to be capable of seeing buried feature of AD clearly. Modern neuroimaging techniques are more effective only after the occurrence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, early detection of Alzheimer's disease is critical in developing effective treatment of AD. H and E (Haematoxyline and Eosin) staining is performed for examining gross morphological changes, while TUNEL (transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining for monitoring neuronal death in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and western blot are performed to examine β-amyloid protein expression. AD model animals were Tg2576 (transgenic mice that overexpress a mutated form of the Aβ precursor protein), and 6 month (before onset of AD symptoms) and 14 month (after onset of AD symptoms) old WT (wild type) and transgenic mice were compared in their olfactory system. We found that in OE of Tg2576 mice, thickness and total number of cells were decreased, while the numbers of TUNEL-positive neurons, caspase-3 activation were significantly increased compared with age-matched WT. Our results demonstrate that the olfactory system may get deteriorated before onset of AD symptoms. Our findings imply that an olfactory biopsy could be served as an early and relatively simple diagnostic tool for potential AD patients.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    MedlinePlus

    ... a rate twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers In 2016, 15.9 ... Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  4. Periodontal disease's contribution to Alzheimer's disease progression in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamer, Angela R; Fortea, Juan O; Videla, Sebastià; Mayoral, Angela; Janal, Malvin; Carmona-Iragui, Maria; Benejam, Bessy; Craig, Ronald G; Saxena, Deepak; Corby, Patricia; Glodzik, Lidia; Annam, Kumar Raghava Chowdary; Robbins, Miriam; de Leon, Mony J

    2016-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are at an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). After 60 years of age, >50% of DS subjects acquire dementia. Nevertheless, the age of onset is highly variable possibly because of both genetic and environmental factors. Genetics cannot be modified, but environmental risk factors present a potentially relevant intervention for DS persons at risk for AD. Among them, inflammation, important in AD of DS type, is potential target. Consistent with this hypothesis, chronic peripheral inflammation and infections may contribute to AD pathogenesis in DS. People with DS have an aggressive form of periodontitis characterized by rapid progression, significant bacterial and inflammatory burden, and an onset as early as 6 years of age. This review offers a hypothetical mechanistic link between periodontitis and AD in the DS population. Because periodontitis is a treatable condition, it may be a readily modifiable risk factor for AD.

  5. Optical light curve of GRB 121011A: a textbook for the onset of GRB afterglow in a mixture of ISM and wind-type medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wei, Jian-Yan; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Han, Xu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical observations of GRB 121011A by the 0.8m TNT facility at Xinglong observatory, China. The light curve of the optical afterglow shows a smooth and featureless bump during the epoch of ˜130 s and ˜5000 s with a rising index of 1.57 ± 0.28 before the break time of 539 ± 44 s, and a decaying index of about 1.29 ± 0.07 up to the end of our observations. Moreover, the X-ray light curve decays in a single power-law with a slope of about 1.51 ± 0.03 observed by XRT onboard Swift from 100 s to about 10 000 s after the burst trigger. The featureless optical light curve could be understood as an onset process under the external-shock model. The typical frequency has been below or near the optical one before the deceleration time, and the cooling frequency is located between the optical and X-ray wavelengths. The external medium density has a transition from a mixed stage of ISM and wind-type medium before the peak time to the ISM at the later phase. The joint-analysis of X-ray and optical light curves shows that the emissions from both frequencies are consistent with the prediction of the standard afterglow model without any energy injections, indicating that the central engine has stopped its activity and does not restart anymore after the prompt phase.

  6. High Incidence of Unrecognized Visceral/Neurological Late-onset Niemann-Pick Disease, type C1 Predicted by Analysis of Massively Parallel Sequencing Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Cross, Joanna L.; Iben, James; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Cougnoux, Antony; Platt, Frances M.; Ory, Daniel S.; Ponting, Chris P.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NPC) is a recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either NPC1 or NPC2. The diagnosis is difficult and frequently delayed. Ascertainment is likely incomplete due to both these factors and that the full phenotypic spectrum may not have been fully delineated. Given the recent development of a blood-based diagnostic test and development of potential therapies, it is important to understand the incidence of NPC and to define at risk patient populations. Method We evaluated data from four large massively parallel exome sequencing data sets. Variant sequences were identified and classified as pathogenic or non-pathogenic based on a combination of literature review and bioinformatic analysis. This methodology provided an unbiased approach to determining the allele frequency. Results Our data suggests an incidence rate for NPC1 and NPC2 of 1/92,104 and 1/2,858,998, respectively. However, evaluation of common NPC1 variants, suggests that there may be a late-onset NPC1phenotype with a markedly higher incidence on the order of 1/20,000–39,000. Conclusions We determined a combined incidence of classical NPC of 1/89,229 or 1.12 affected patients per 100,000 conceptions, but predict incomplete ascertainment of a lateonset phenotype of NPC1. This finding strongly supports the need for increased screening of potential patients. PMID:25764212

  7. Impact of sustained virological response to chronic hepatitic C antiviral therapy on new onset diabetes mellitus type 2 after controlling for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prashant; Pant, Chaitanya; Taylor, Ryan; Oni, Olurinde

    2017-04-01

    The high cost associated with antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection mandates further investigation in the context of preventing complications such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We determined the cumulative incidence of DM2 in subjects with chronic HCV infection who received concomitant pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from Veterans Administrations Informatics and Computing Infrastructure (VINCI) to identify an adult cohort of patients without diabetes with chronic HCV infection who received Peg-IFN-based therapy between October 2001 and December 2011. Patients with history of HIV, hepatitis B infection, hepatocellular cancer (HCC), non-HCC cancers, and history of transplantation were excluded. Sustained virological response (SVR) was defined as negative HCV RNA 3 months after completion of therapy. Using Cox proportional hazards regression for multivariable analysis, we determined that patients who achieved SVR were at a significantly less risk of developing DM2. Adjusted survival rates showed that the responders' group was significantly less likely to develop DM2 over time (HR 0.60, CI 0.48 to 0.74, p<0.001). Peg-IFN-based therapy in chronic HCV patients that resulted in SVR significantly decreased the risk of developing DM2 and independently predicts the development of new onset disease after controlling for correlates of metabolic syndrome.

  8. Germline mutations in NF1 and BRCA1 in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1 and early-onset breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Campos, Berta; Balmaña, Judith; Gardenyes, Josep; Valenzuela, Irene; Abad, Oscar; Fàbregas, Pere; Volpini, Víctor; Díez, Orland

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common dominant autosomal disorder caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. The main manifestations of NF1 are café-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, intertriginous freckling, Lisch nodules, and malignancy, including peripheral nerve sheath tumors, central nervous system gliomas, and a variety of other tumors not so clearly defined. The association between NF1 and breast cancer or other gynecologic malignancies seems uncommon and has been scarcely referred in the literature. We describe a family with two females affected by both NF1 and early-onset breast cancer, and a male with NF1. We evaluated whether the concomitance of both disorders could be attributed to a NF1 mutation and its supposed increased risk of breast cancer or to the concurrence of two NF1 and BRCA1/2 germline mutations. Mutation analyses identified a frameshift mutation in BRCA1 and a nonsense mutation in NF1. Our findings stress the importance of considering all phenotypic features in families with both NF1 and breast tumors. To offer a specific risk assessment and management of both conditions, NF1 and BRCA1/2 cancer predisposing genes should be analyzed.

  9. A Case of Cauda Equina Syndrome in Early-Onset Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Clinically Similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Ha, Sam Yeol; Nam, Taek Kyun

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) which seemed clinically similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type1 (CMT1). CIDP is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy, either progressive or relapsing-remitting. It is a non-hereditary disorder characterized by symmetrical motor and sensory deficits. Rarely, spinal nerve roots can be involved, leading to CES by hypertrophic cauda equina. A 34-year-old man presented with low back pain, radicular pain, bilateral lower-extremity weakness, urinary incontinence, and constipation. He had had musculoskeletal deformities, such as hammertoes and pes cavus, since age 10. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse thickening of the cauda equina. Electrophysiological testing showed increased distal latency, conduction blocks, temporal dispersion, and severe nerve conduction velocity slowing (3 m/s). We were not able to find genetic mutations at the PMP 22, MPZ, PRX, and EGR2 genes. The pathologic findings of the sural nerve biopsy revealed thinly myelinated nerve fibers with Schwann cells proliferation. We performed a decompressive laminectomy, intravenous IgG (IV-IgG) and oral steroid. At 1 week after surgery, most of his symptoms showed marked improvements except foot deformities. There was no relapse or aggravation of disease for 3 years. We diagnosed the case as an early-onset CIDP with cauda equine syndrome, whose initial clinical findings were similar to those of CMT1, and successfully managed with decompressive laminectomy, IV-IgG and oral steroid. PMID:25237436

  10. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  11. Proinsulin and heat shock protein 90 as biomarkers of beta-cell stress in the early period after onset of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    WATKINS, RENECIA A.; EVANS-MOLINA, CARMELLA; TERRELL, JENNIFER K.; DAY, KATHLEEN H.; GUINDON, LYNETTE; RESTREPO, IVAN A.; MIRMIRA, RAGHAVENDRA G.; BLUM, JANICE S.; DIMEGLIO, LINDA A.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid evaluation of therapies designed to preserve β cells in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is hampered by limited availability of sensitive β-cell health biomarkers. In particular, biomarkers elucidating the presence and degree of β-cell stress are needed. We characterized β-cell secretory activity and stress in 29 new-onset T1D subjects (10.6 ± 3.0 years, 55% male) at diagnosis and then 8.2 ± 1.2 weeks later at first clinic follow-up. We did comparisons with 16 matched healthy controls. We evaluated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), β-cell function (random C-peptide [C] and proinsulin [PI]), β-cell stress (PI:C ratio), and the β-cell stress marker heat shock protein (HSP)90 and examined these parameters’ relationships with clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis. Mean diagnosis HbA1c was 11.3% (100 mmol/mol) and 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) at follow-up. C-peptide was low at diagnosis (P < 0.001 vs controls) and increased at follow-up (P < 0.001) to comparable with controls. PI did not differ from controls at diagnosis but increased at follow-up (P = 0.003) signifying increased release of PI alongside improved insulin secretion. PI:C ratios and HSP90 concentrations were elevated at both time points. Younger subjects had lower C-peptide and greater PI, PI:C, and HSP90. We also examined islets isolated from prediabetic nonobese diabetic mice and found that HSP90 levels were increased ~4-fold compared with those in islets isolated from matched CD1 controls, further substantiating HSP90 as a marker of β-cell stress in T1D. Our data indicate that β-cell stress can be assessed using PI:C and HSP90. This stress persists after T1D diagnosis. Therapeutic approaches to reduce β-cell stress in new-onset T1D should be considered. PMID:26397425

  12. Cognitive disability in alzheimer's disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Corsi, M; Di Raimo, T; Di Lorenzo, C; Rapp-Ricciardi, M; Archer, T; Ricci, S; Businaro, R

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive disability linked to neurodegenerative diseases and in particular to Alzheimer's disease, remains an increasing cause for concern through a dramatic prevalence increment and associated socio-economic burdens. Initially Alzheimer's disease develops asymptomatically with primary clinical signs, such as memory impairment, decline of spatial and perceptual abilities, occurring at a later stage. This delay implies the possibility of promoting early interventions during the pre-symptomatic stage of the disease. Different strategies have been applied in order to prevent/delay onset of Alzheimer's disease or at least to improve quality of life and health conditions of Alzheimer's disease patients and their caregivers, especially in the absence of current viable therapies. Multidomain interventions, aimed at affecting several risk factors simultaneously, offer a versatility that may attain improved outcomes in comparison with single-domain prevention trials. These multidomain interventions involve diet, physical exercise, cognitive training and social activities, while music therapy, improving self-consciousness and reducing neurofibrils, may contribute to deceleration/delay onset of Alzheimer's disease progression. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) provides broad applications to improve quality of life and well-being of Alzheimer's disease patients and caregivers, suffering from psychological distress, as well as reducing additional public health costs.

  13. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  14. Disease progression and search for monogenic diabetes among children with new onset type 1 diabetes negative for ICA, GAD- and IA-2 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate disease progression the first 12 months after diagnosis in children with type 1 diabetes negative (AAB negative) for pancreatic autoantibodies [islet cell autoantibodies(ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and insulinoma-associated antigen-2 antibodies (IA-2A)]. Furthermore the study aimed at determining whether mutations in KCNJ11, ABCC8, HNF1A, HNF4A or INS are common in AAB negative diabetes. Materials and methods In 261 newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes, we measured residual β-cell function, ICA, GADA, and IA-2A at 1, 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. The genes KCNJ11, ABCC8, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS were sequenced in subjects AAB negative at diagnosis. We expressed recombinant K-ATP channels in Xenopus oocytes to analyse the functional effects of an ABCC8 mutation. Results Twenty-four patients (9.1%) tested AAB negative after one month. Patients, who were AAB-negative throughout the 12-month period, had higher residual β-cell function (P = 0.002), lower blood glucose (P = 0.004), received less insulin (P = 0.05) and had lower HbA1c (P = 0.02) 12 months after diagnosis. One patient had a heterozygous mutation leading to the substitution of arginine at residue 1530 of SUR1 (ABCC8) by cysteine. Functional analyses of recombinant K-ATP channels showed that R1530C markedly reduced the sensitivity of the K-ATP channel to inhibition by MgATP. Morover, the channel was highly sensitive to sulphonylureas. However, there was no effect of sulfonylurea treatment after four weeks on 1.0-1.2 mg/kg/24 h glibenclamide. Conclusion GAD, IA-2A, and ICA negative children with new onset type 1 diabetes have slower disease progression as assessed by residual beta-cell function and improved glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis. One out of 24 had a mutation in ABCC8, suggesting that screening of ABCC8 should be considered in patients with AAB negative type 1 diabetes. PMID:20863361

  15. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's disease: at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Orly; Marr, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    While a massive and progressive neuronal loss in specific areas such as the hippocampus and cortex unequivocally underlies cognitive deterioration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease, noteworthy alterations take place in the neurogenic microenvironments, namely, the subgranule layer of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone. Compromised neurogenesis presumably takes place earlier than onset of hallmark lesions or neuronal loss, and may play a role in the initiation and progression of neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease. Neurogenesis in the adult brain is thought to play a role in numerous forms and aspects of learning and memory and contribute to the plasticity of the hippocampus and olfactory system. Misregulated or impaired neurogenesis on the other hand, may compromise plasticity and neuronal function in these areas and exacerbate neuronal vulnerability. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests that molecular players in Alzheimer's disease, including PS1, APP and its metabolites, play a role in adult neurogenesis. In addition, recent studies suggest that alterations in tau phosphorylation are pronounced in neurogenic areas, and may interfere with the potential central role of tau proteins in neuronal maturation and differentiation. On the other hand, numerous neurogenic players, such as Notch-1, ErbB4 and L1 are substrates of alpha- beta- and gamma- secretase that play a major role in Alzheimer's disease. This review will discuss current knowledge concerning alterations of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with specific emphasis on the cross-talk between signaling molecules involved in both processes, and the ways by which familial Alzheimer's disease-linked dysfunction of these signaling molecules affect neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  16. An autopsied case of MM1 + MM2-cortical with thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted MRI before clinical onset.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-02-01

    A 78-year-old Japanese man presented with rapidly progressive dementia and gait disturbances. Eight months before the onset of clinical symptoms, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) demonstrated hyperintensities in the right temporal, right parietal and left medial occipital cortices. Two weeks after symptom onset, DWI showed extensive hyperintensity in the bilateral cerebral cortex, with regions of higher brightness that existed prior to symptom onset still present. Four weeks after clinical onset, periodic sharp wave complexes were identified on an electroencephalogram. Myoclonus was observed 8 weeks after clinical onset. The patient reached an akinetic mutism state and died 5 months after onset. Neuropathological examination showed widespread cerebral neocortical involvement of fine vacuole-type spongiform changes with large confluent vacuole-type spongiform changes. Spongiform degeneration with neuron loss and hypertrophic astrocytosis was also observed in the striatum and medial thalamus. The inferior olivary nucleus showed severe neuron loss with hypertrophic astrocytosis. Prion protein (PrP) immunostaining showed widespread synaptic-type PrP deposition with perivacuolar-type PrP deposition in the cerebral neocortex. Mild to moderate PrP deposition was also observed extensively in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum and brainstem, but it was not apparent in the inferior olivary nucleus. PrP gene analysis showed no mutations, and polymorphic codon 129 showed methionine homozygosity. Western blot analysis of protease-resistant PrP showed both type 1 scrapie type PrP (PrP(Sc) ) and type 2 PrP(Sc) . Based on the relationship between the neuroimaging and pathological findings, we speculated that cerebral cortical lesions with large confluent vacuoles and type 2 PrP(Sc) would show higher brightness and continuous hyperintensity on DWI than those with fine vacuoles and type 1 PrP(Sc) . We believe the present patient had a combined form of MM1

  17. Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Shi, Jessica; Yaeger, Devin M; Ager, Rahasson; LaFerla, Frank M

    2016-05-01

    Despite intensive research efforts over the past few decades, the mechanisms underlying the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unknown. This fact is of major concern because the number of patients affected by this medical condition is increasing exponentially and the existing treatments are only palliative in nature and offer no disease modifying affects. Interestingly, recent epidemiological studies indicate that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing AD, suggesting that diabetes may play a causative role in the development of AD pathogenesis. Therefore, elucidating the molecular interactions between diabetes and AD is of critical significance because it might offer a novel approach to identifying mechanisms that may modulate the onset and progression of sporadic AD cases. This review highlights the involvement of several novels pathological molecular mechanisms induced by diabetes that increase AD pathogenesis. Furthermore, we discuss novel findings in animal model and clinical studies involving the use of anti-diabetic compounds as promising therapeutics for AD.

  18. Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Wang, Tao; Jin, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common neurodegenerative disorder, which associates with impaired cognition. Gut microbiota can modulate host brain function and behavior via microbiota-gut-brain axis, including cognitive behavior. Germ-free animals, antibiotics, probiotics intervention and diet can induce alterations of gut microbiota and gut physiology and also host cognitive behavior, increasing or decreasing risks of AD. The increased permeability of intestine and blood-brain barrier induced by gut microbiota disturbance will increase the incidence of neurodegeneration disorders. Gut microbial metabolites and their effects on host neurochemical changes may increase or decrease the risk of AD. Pathogenic microbes infection will also increase the risk of AD, and meanwhile, the onset of AD support the "hygiene hypothesis". All the results suggest that AD may begin in the gut, and is closely related to the imbalance of gut microbiota. Modulation of gut microbiota through personalized diet or beneficial microbiota intervention will probably become a new treatment for AD.

  19. C-Peptide Response and HLA Genotypes in Subjects With Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes After Immunotherapy With DiaPep277

    PubMed Central

    Buzzetti, Raffaella; Cernea, Simona; Petrone, Antonio; Capizzi, Marco; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Zampetti, Simona; Guglielmi, Chiara; Venditti, Chiara; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether lower risk HLA class II genotypes would influence the efficacy of DiaPep277 therapy in protecting β-cell function evaluated by C-peptide secretion in recent-onset type 1 diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were collected from type 1 diabetic subjects enrolled in multicenter phase II studies with a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled design in whom fasting and stimulated C-peptide levels were measured. HLA genotypes were classified in high, moderate, and low risk categories. RESULTS A total of 146 subjects (aged 4.3 to 58.5 years) were enrolled, including 76 children (<18 years old) and 70 adults. At baseline, there was a significant increase in fasting, maximal, and area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide from high to moderate and low risk HLA genotypes in adults (P for trend <0.04) but not in children. Children showed a decrease of the three parameters over time regardless of therapy and HLA genotype. DiaPep277-treated adults with low risk genotype had significantly higher maximal and AUC C-peptide versus placebo at 12 months (0.04 ± 0.07 vs. −0.28 ± 0.09 nmol/L, P < 0.01, and 0.53 ± 1.3 vs. −4.59 ± 1.5 nmol/L, P < 0.05, respectively). In the moderate risk genotype group, Δmaximal and AUC C-peptide values were significantly higher in DiaPep277-treated versus placebo-treated patients (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS This exploratory study demonstrates that type 1 diabetic adults with low and moderate risk HLA genotypes benefit the most from intervention with DiaPep277; the only subgroup with an increase of C-peptide at 12 months after diagnosis was the low risk DiaPep277-treated subgroup. PMID:21896927

  20. Changes in Semantic Memory in Early Stage Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contrasts changes in semantic memory in elderly normal controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients before patients expressed symptoms. Found that controls generated more uncommon exemplars from closed semantic categories (fruits and vegetables) than did AD patients prior to presumed onset of AD. AD patients were just as productive as controls…

  1. Dementia in 2012: Further insights into Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    In 2012, studies of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD), late-onset AD, and a rare genetic mutation of amyloid precursor protein provided support for the critical role of amyloid in AD pathogenesis. Increasing evidence implicated cell-to-cell transmission in the spread of tau and amyloid, highlighting novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Alzheimer's: Making Mealtimes Easier

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014. Shatenstein B, et al. Dietary intervention in older adults with early-stage Alzheimer dementia: Early lessons learned. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging. 2008;12:461. Smith KL, et al. Weight loss and nutritional considerations in Alzheimer disease. 2008;27:381. Weight ...

  3. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. Total payments in 2016 for health care, long-term care and hospice services for people age ≥ 65 years with dementia are estimated to be $236 billion. The costs of Alzheimer's care may place a substantial financial burden on families, who often have to take money out of their retirement savings, cut back on buying food, and reduce their own trips to the doctor. In addition, many family members incorrectly believe that Medicare pays for nursing home care and other types of long-term care. Such findings highlight the need for solutions to prevent dementia-related costs from jeopardizing the health and financial security of the families of people with Alzheimer's and other dementias.

  4. High frequency of activated natural killer and natural killer T-cells in patients with new onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Xu, Bingchuan; Gao, Lichao; Sun, Xiguang; Qu, Xiaozhang; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Shumei; Feng, Junyan; Wang, Juan; Tang, Ying; Yan, Guoqiang; Gao, Xiuzhu; Jiang, Yanfang

    2012-05-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is crucial for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and immunocompetent cells, such as T-cells, B-cells, mast cells and macrophages, regulate the pathogenesis of T2DM. However, little is known about the role of natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells in the pathogenic process of T2DM. A total of 16 patients with new onset T2DM and nine healthy subjects were recruited, and the frequency of peripheral blood activated and inhibitory NK and NKT cells in individual subjects was determined by flow cytometry. The frequency of spontaneous and inducible interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and CD107a(+) NK cells was further examined, and the potential association of the frequency of NK cells with clinical measures was analyzed. While there was no significant difference in the frequency of peripheral blood NK and NKT cells between patients and controls, the frequency of NKG2D(+) NK and NKT cells in patients was significantly higher than those in the controls (P = 0.011). In contrast, the frequency of NKG2A(+) and KIR2DL3(+) inhibitory NK and NKT cells in patients was significantly lower than those in the controls (P = 0.002, P < 0.0001, respectively). Furthermore, the frequencies of NKG2D(+) NK cells were correlated significantly with the values of body mass index in patients. Moreover, the frequencies of spontaneous and inducible CD107a(+), but not IFN-γ-secreting, NK cells in patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.004, P < 0.0001). Our data indicated that a higher frequency of activated NK cells may participate in the obesity-related chronic inflammation involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  5. Extended phenotype description and new molecular findings in late onset glycogen storage disease type II: a northern Italy population study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Ronchi, Dario; Magri, Francesca; Lamperti, Costanza; Bordoni, Andreina; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid alpha-1,4-glucosidase deficiency and associated with recessive mutations in its coding gene GAA. Few studies have provided so far a detailed phenotypical characterization in late onset GSDII (LO-GSDII) patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation has been previously attempted with controversial results. We aim to provide an in-depth description of a cohort (n = 36) of LO-GSDII patients coming from the north of Italy and compare our population's findings to the literature. We performed a clinical record-based retrospective and prospective study of our patients. LO-GSDII in our cohort covers a large variability of phenotype including subtle clinical presentation and did not differ significantly from previous data. In all patients, molecular analysis disclosed GAA mutations, five of them being novel. To assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations we divided IVS1-32-13T>G heterozygous patients into two groups following the severity of the mutations on the second allele. Our patients harbouring "severe" mutations (n = 21) presented a strong tendency to have more severe phenotypes and more disability, more severe phenotypes and more disability, higher prevalence of assisted ventilation and a shorter time of evolution to show it. The determination of prognostic factors is mandatory in order to refine the accuracy of prognostic information, to develop follow-up strategy and, more importantly, to improve the decision algorithm for enzyme replacement therapy administration. The demonstration of genotype-phenotype correlations could help to reach this objective. Clinical assessment homogeneity is required to overcome limitations due to the lack of power of most studies.

  6. Alzheimer's disease: analyzing the missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex disorder influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Recent work has identified 11 AD markers in 10 loci. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to analyze >2 million SNPs for 10,922 individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium to assess the phenotypic variance explained first by known late-onset AD loci, and then by all SNPs in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium dataset. In all, 33% of total phenotypic variance is explained by all common SNPs. APOE alone explained 6% and other known markers 2%, meaning more than 25% of phenotypic variance remains unexplained by known markers, but is tagged by common SNPs included on genotyping arrays or imputed with HapMap genotypes. Novel AD markers that explain large amounts of phenotypic variance are likely to be rare and unidentifiable using genome-wide association studies. Based on our findings and the current direction of human genetics research, we suggest specific study designs for future studies to identify the remaining heritability of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Immunotherapeutic Approaches to Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsonego, Alon; Weiner, Howard L.

    2003-10-01

    Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are not classically considered mediated by inflammation or the immune system, in some instances the immune system may play an important role in the degenerative process. Furthermore, it has become clear that the immune system itself may have beneficial effects in nervous system diseases considered neurodegenerative. Immunotherapeutic approaches designed to induce a humoral immune response have recently been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These studies have led to human trials that resulted in both beneficial and adverse effects. In animal models, it has also been shown that immunotherapy designed to induce a cellular immune response may be of benefit in central nervous system injury, although T cells may have either a beneficial or detrimental effect depending on the type of T cell response induced. These areas provide a new avenue for exploring immune system-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and will be discussed here with a primary focus on Alzheimer's disease. We will also discuss how these approaches affect microglia activation, which plays a key role in therapy of such diseases.

  8. S182 and STM2 gene missense mutations in sporadic alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Susumu; Matsushita, Sachio; Hasegawa, Yoshio; Muramatsu, Taro

    1996-07-26

    The linkage of genes S182 and STM2 to early-onset or late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) was not found in a group of 97 clinically-diagnosed AD patients and 46 autopsy-confirmed AD cases, using PCR-RFLP methods. 7 refs.

  9. INSULIN RESISTANCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALZHEIMER-LIKE REDUCTIONS IN REGIONAL CEREBRAL GLUCOSE METABOLISM FOR COGNITIVELY NORMAL ADULTS WITH PRE-DIABETES OR EARLY TYPE 2 DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura D.; Cross, Donna; Minoshima, Satoshi; Belongia, Dana; Watson, G. Stennis; Craft, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance is a causal factor in pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), and also increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reductions in cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in parietotemporal, frontal, and cingulate cortex are also associated with increased AD risk, and can be observed years before dementia onset. Objectives We examined whether greater insulin resistance as indexed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) would be associated with reduced resting CMRglu in areas known to be vulnerable in AD in a sample of cognitively normal adults with newly diagnosed pre-diabetes or T2D (P-D/T2D). We also determined whether P-D/T2D adults have abnormal patterns of CMRglu during a memory encoding task. Design Randomized crossover design of resting and activation [F-18] FDG-PET. Setting University Imaging Center and VA Clinical Research Unit. Participants Participants included 23 older adults (mean age±SEM=74.4±1.4) with no prior diagnosis of or treatment for diabetes, but who met American Diabetes Association glycemic criteria for pre-diabetes (n=11) or diabetes (n=12) based on fasting or 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose values, and 6 adults (mean age±SEM=74.3±2.8) with normal fasting glucose and glucose tolerance. No participant met Petersen criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Intervention Fasting participants rested with eyes open in a dimly lit room and underwent resting and cognitive activation [F-18]FDG PET imaging on separate days, in randomized order, at 9 am. Following a 30-min transmission scan, subjects received an intravenous injection of 5 mCi [F-18]FDG, and the emission scan commenced 40 min post-injection. In the activation condition, a 35-min memory encoding task was initiated at the time of tracer injection. Subjects were instructed to remember a repeating list of 20 words that were randomly presented

  10. [Genetic aspects of Alzheimer's disease (Review)].

    PubMed

    El Kadmiri, N; Hamzi, K; El Moutawakil, B; Slassi, I; Nadifi, S

    2013-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative brain disorder, which concerns memory, cognition and behavior pattern. Its etiology is unknown, it is characterized by typical histological lesions: senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial pathology, characterized by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Genetic factors concern first of all the exceptional monogenic forms, characterized by early onset (<60 years), autosomal dominant forms. Mutations of the genes coding for amyloid-ß precursor protein or preselinins 1 and 2 are involved. The much more frequent sporadic forms also have genetic factors, the best studied being the apolipoprotein E4 coding allele and some more recent genotypes which will be mentioned. No causal, only symptomatic treatments are available.

  11. Relationship between Clinical Parameters and Brain Structure in Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients According to Onset Type: A Voxel-Based Morphometric Study

    PubMed Central

    de Leon, Mony; Wang, Xiuyuan; Kim, Hyun Young; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Yeon-Ha; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing, phenotypically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease affecting mainly the motor neuron system. The present voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study investigated whether patterns of brain atrophy differ among sporadic ALS subtypes. Material and methods Sporadic ALS patients (n = 62) with normal cognition and age-matched healthy controls (n = 57) were included in the study. ALS patients were divided into limb- and bulbar-onset groups according to clinical manifestations at symptom onset (n = 48 and 14, respectively). Clinical measures were ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) score, disease duration, and forced vital capacity (FVC). Patterns of brain atrophy between ALS subgroups were compared by VBM. Results In limb-onset ALS patients, atrophy was largely confined to the motor cortex and adjacent pre- and postcentral regions. However, in the bulbar-onset group, affected regions were more widespread and included these same areas but also extended to the bilateral frontotemporal and left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri, and multiple regression analysis revealed that their ALSFRS-R scores were associated with extensive loss of gray matter while FVC was related to atrophy in subcortical regions of the left superior temporal gyrus. In limb-onset ALS patients, disease duration was related to the degree of atrophy in the motor and adjacent areas. Conclusion Sporadic ALS subtypes show different patterns of brain atrophy. Neural networks related to limb and bulbar motor functions in each ALS subtype may underlie their distinct patterns of cerebral atrophy. That is, more extensive cortical and subcortical atrophy is correlated with greater ALSFRS-R severity and shorter disease duration in the bulbar-onset subtype and may explain the poor prognosis of these