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Sample records for alzheimer-like amyloid pathology

  1. Hippocampal Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Pathway Deregulation Profiles at Early and Late Stages in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's-Like Amyloid Pathology.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Crynen, Gogce; Paradis, Tiffany; Reed, Jon; Iulita, M Florencia; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Crawford, Fiona; Cuello, A Claudio

    2017-05-13

    The cerebral accumulation and cytotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ) is central to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. However, little is known about how the amyloid pathology affects the global expression of brain proteins at different disease stages. In order to identify genotype and time-dependent significant changes in protein expression, we employed quantitative proteomics analysis of hippocampal tissue from the McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat model of Alzheimer-like amyloid pathology. McGill transgenic rats were compared to wild-type rats at early and late pathology stages, i.e., when intraneuronal Aβ amyloid burden is conspicuous and when extracellular amyloid plaques are abundant with more pronounced cognitive deficits. After correction for multiple testing, the expression levels of 64 proteins were found to be considerably different in transgenic versus wild-type rats at the pre-plaque stage (3 months), and 86 proteins in the post-plaque group (12 months), with only 9 differentially regulated proteins common to the 2 time-points. This minimal overlap supports the hypothesis that different molecular pathways are affected in the hippocampus at early and late stages of the amyloid pathology throughout its continuum. At early stages, disturbances in pathways related to cellular responses to stress, protein homeostasis, and neuronal structure are predominant, while disturbances in metabolic energy generation dominate at later stages. These results shed new light on the molecular pathways affected by the early accumulation of Aβ and how the evolving amyloid pathology impacts other complex metabolic pathways.

  2. Functional impairment of microglia coincides with Beta-amyloid deposition in mice with Alzheimer-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Grietje; Halle, Annett; Matyash, Vitali; Rinnenthal, Jan L; Eom, Gina D; Bernhardt, Ulrike; Miller, Kelly R; Prokop, Stefan; Kettenmann, Helmut; Heppner, Frank L

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells closely interact with senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease and acquire the morphological appearance of an activated phenotype. The significance of this microglial phenotype and the impact of microglia for disease progression have remained controversial. To uncover and characterize putative changes in the functionality of microglia during Alzheimer's disease, we directly assessed microglial behavior in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy and acute brain slice preparations, we found that important microglial functions - directed process motility and phagocytic activity - were strongly impaired in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like pathology compared to age-matched non-transgenic animals. Notably, impairment of microglial function temporally and spatially correlated with Aβ plaque deposition, and phagocytic capacity of microglia could be restored by interventionally decreasing amyloid burden by Aβ vaccination. These data suggest that major microglial functions progressively decline in Alzheimer's disease with the appearance of Aβ plaques, and that this functional impairment is reversible by lowering Aβ burden, e.g. by means of Aβ vaccination.

  3. A novel transgenic rat model with a full Alzheimer's-like amyloid pathology displays pre-plaque intracellular amyloid-beta-associated cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Leon, Wanda Carolina; Canneva, Fabio; Partridge, Vanessa; Allard, Simon; Ferretti, Maria Teresa; DeWilde, Arald; Vercauteren, Freya; Atifeh, Ramtin; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Klein, William; Szyf, Moshe; Alhonen, Leena; Cuello, A Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology in which amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide accumulates in different brain areas leading to deposition of plaques and a progressive decline of cognitive functions. After a decade in which a number of transgenic (Tg) mouse models mimicking AD-like amyloid-deposition pathology have been successfully generated, few rat models have been reported that develop intracellular and extracellular Abeta accumulation, together with impairment of cognition. The generation of a Tg rat reproducing the full AD-like amyloid pathology has been elusive. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a new transgenic rat line, coded McGill-R-Thy1-APP, developed to express the human amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) carrying both the Swedish and Indiana mutations under the control of the murine Thy1.2 promoter. The selected mono-transgenic line displays an extended phase of intraneuronal Abeta accumulation, already apparent at 1 week after birth, which is widespread throughout different cortical areas and the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus). Homozygous Tg animals eventually produce extracellular Abeta deposits and, by 6 months of age, dense, thioflavine S-positive, amyloid plaques are detected, associated with glial activation and surrounding dystrophic neurites. The cognitive functions in transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rats, as assessed using the Morris water maze task, were found already altered as early as at 3 months of age, when no CNS plaques are yet present. The spatial cognitive impairment becomes more prominent in older animals (13 months), where the behavioral performance of Tg rats positively correlates with the levels of soluble Abeta (trimers) measured in the cortex.

  4. Brain inflammation and Alzheimer's-like pathology in individuals exposed to severe air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Reed, William; Maronpot, Robert R; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Delgado-Chavez, Ricardo; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana; Dragustinovis, Irma; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Solt, Anna C; Altenburg, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Swenberg, James A

    2004-01-01

    Air pollution is a complex mixture of gases (e.g., ozone), particulate matter, and organic compounds present in outdoor and indoor air. Dogs exposed to severe air pollution exhibit chronic inflammation and acceleration of Alzheimer's-like pathology, suggesting that the brain is adversely affected by pollutants. We investigated whether residency in cities with high levels of air pollution is associated with human brain inflammation. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), an inflammatory mediator, and accumulation of the 42-amino acid form of beta-amyloid (Abeta42), a cause of neuronal dysfunction, were measured in autopsy brain tissues of cognitively and neurologically intact lifelong residents of cities having low (n:9) or high (n:10) levels of air pollution. Genomic DNA apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, nuclear factor-kappaB activation and apolipoprotein E genotype were also evaluated. Residents of cities with severe air pollution had significantly higher COX2 expression in frontal cortex and hippocampus and greater neuronal and astrocytic accumulation of Abeta42 compared to residents in low air pollution cities. Increased COX2 expression and Abeta42 accumulation were also observed in the olfactory bulb. These findings suggest that exposure to severe air pollution is associated with brain inflammation and Abeta42 accumulation, two causes of neuronal dysfunction that precede the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Reduction of cerebral oxidative stress following environmental enrichment in mice with Alzheimer-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Blome, Mareike; Ambrée, Oliver; Sachser, Norbert; Paulus, Werner; Keyvani, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a key feature during progression of chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In aging humans and animals, voluntary exercise lowers oxidative stress reactions. Additionally, recent work in our lab demonstrated that cognitive and physical stimulation (termed environmental enrichment) counteracts amyloid beta pathology, neurovascular dysfunction and behavioral symptoms in mice with Alzheimer-like disease. Based on these facts, we hypothesized that cognitive and physical activity can also protect against oxidative stress in Alzheimer-diseased brain. We, therefore, kept female TgCRND8 mice under standard and enriched housing from day 30 until 5 months of age. Environmental stimulation attenuated pro-oxidative processes and triggered anti-oxidative defense mechanisms as indicated by diminished biomarkers for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, downregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative mediators, decreased expression of pro-apoptotic caspases, and upregulation of SOD1 and SOD2. This study identifies a thus far undescribed antagonizing effect of environmental stimulation on Alzheimer's disease-related oxidative damage.

  6. Cnga2 Knockout Mice Display Alzheimer's-Like Behavior Abnormities and Pathological Changes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ao-Ji; Liu, En-Jie; Huang, He-Zhou; Hu, Yu; Li, Ke; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is recognized as a potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have reported previously that olfactory deprivation by olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) induced Alzheimer's-like pathological changes and behavioral abnormalities. However, the acute OBX model undergoes surgical-induced brain parenchyma loss and unexpected massive hemorrhage so that it cannot fully mimic the progressive olfactory loss and neurodegeneration in AD. Here, we employed the mice loss of cyclic nucleotide-gated channel alpha 2 (Cnga2) which is critical for olfactory sensory transduction, to investigate the role of olfactory dysfunction in AD pathological process. We found that impaired learning and memory abilities, loss of dendrite spines, as well as decrement of synaptic proteins were displayed in Cnga2 knockout mice. Moreover, Aβ overproduction, tau hyperphosphorylation, and somatodendritic translocation were also found in Cnga2 knockout mice. Our findings suggest that progressive olfactory loss leads to Alzheimer's-like behavior abnormities and pathological changes.

  7. Intracerebroventricular Injection of Amyloid-β Peptides in Normal Mice to Acutely Induce Alzheimer-like Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yun; Lee, Dongkeun K; Chung, Bo-Ryehn; Kim, Hyunjin V; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-03-16

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a major pathological mediator of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the brains of AD patients, progressive accumulation of Aβ oligomers and plaques is observed. Such Aβ abnormalities are believed to block long-term potentiation, impair synaptic function, and induce cognitive deficits. Clinical and experimental evidences have revealed that the acute increase of Aβ levels in the brain allows development of Alzheimer-like phenotypes. Hence, a detailed protocol describing how to acutely generate an AD mouse model via the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ is necessary in many cases. In this protocol, the steps of the experiment with an Aβ-injected mouse are included, from the preparation of peptides to the testing of behavioral abnormalities. The process of preparing the tools and animal subjects before the injection, of injecting the Aβ into the mouse brain via ICV injection, and of assessing the degree of cognitive impairment are easily explained throughout the protocol, with an emphasis on tips for effective ICV injection of Aβ. By mimicking certain aspects of AD with a designated injection of Aβ, researchers can bypass the aging process and focus on the downstream pathology of Aβ abnormalities.

  8. Cdk5 is a New Rapid Synaptic Homeostasis Regulator Capable of Initiating the Early Alzheimer-Like Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yanghui; Zhang, Lei; Su, Susan C.; Tsai, Li-Huei; Julius Zhu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in synaptic plasticity, behavior, and cognition, yet its synaptic function remains poorly understood. Here, we report that physiological Cdk5 signaling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons regulates homeostatic synaptic transmission using an unexpectedly rapid mechanism that is different from all known slow homeostatic regulators, such as beta amyloid (Aβ) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc, aka Arg3.1). Interestingly, overproduction of the potent Cdk5 activator p25 reduces synapse density, and dynamically regulates synaptic size by suppressing or enhancing Aβ/Arc production. Moreover, chronic overproduction of p25, seen in Alzheimer's patients, induces initially concurrent reduction in synapse density and increase in synaptic size characteristic of the early Alzheimer-like pathology, and later persistent synapse elimination in intact brains. These results identify Cdk5 as the regulator of a novel rapid form of homeostasis at central synapses and p25 as the first molecule capable of initiating the early Alzheimer's synaptic pathology. PMID:26088971

  9. Experimental induction of type 2 diabetes in aging-accelerated mice triggered Alzheimer-like pathology and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C; Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD.

  10. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R inhibits microglial proliferation and prevents the progression of Alzheimer's-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Alonso, Adrian; Schetters, Sjoerd T T; Sri, Sarmi; Askew, Katharine; Mancuso, Renzo; Vargas-Caballero, Mariana; Holscher, Christian; Perry, V Hugh; Gomez-Nicola, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The proliferation and activation of microglial cells is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions. This mechanism is regulated by the activation of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), thus providing a target that may prevent the progression of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the study of microglial proliferation in Alzheimer's disease and validation of the efficacy of CSF1R-inhibiting strategies have not yet been reported. In this study we found increased proliferation of microglial cells in human Alzheimer's disease, in line with an increased upregulation of the CSF1R-dependent pro-mitogenic cascade, correlating with disease severity. Using a transgenic model of Alzheimer's-like pathology (APPswe, PSEN1dE9; APP/PS1 mice) we define a CSF1R-dependent progressive increase in microglial proliferation, in the proximity of amyloid-β plaques. Prolonged inhibition of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice by an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor (GW2580) resulted in the blockade of microglial proliferation and the shifting of the microglial inflammatory profile to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice resulted in an improved performance in memory and behavioural tasks and a prevention of synaptic degeneration, although these changes were not correlated with a change in the number of amyloid-β plaques. Our results provide the first proof of the efficacy of CSF1R inhibition in models of Alzheimer's disease, and validate the application of a therapeutic strategy aimed at modifying CSF1R activation as a promising approach to tackle microglial activation and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  11. Regulatory T cells delay disease progression in Alzheimer-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Dansokho, Cira; Ait Ahmed, Dylla; Aid, Saba; Toly-Ndour, Cécile; Chaigneau, Thomas; Calle, Vanessa; Cagnard, Nicolas; Holzenberger, Martin; Piaggio, Eliane; Aucouturier, Pierre; Dorothée, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies highlight the implication of innate and adaptive immunity in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, and foster immunotherapy as a promising strategy for its treatment. Vaccines targeting amyloid-β peptide provided encouraging results in mouse models, but severe side effects attributed to T cell responses in the first clinical trial AN1792 underlined the need for better understanding adaptive immunity in Alzheimer's disease. We previously showed that regulatory T cells critically control amyloid-β-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in both physiological and pathological settings. Here, we analysed the impact of regulatory T cells on spontaneous disease progression in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease. Early transient depletion of regulatory T cells accelerated the onset of cognitive deficits in APPPS1 mice, without altering amyloid-β deposition. Earlier cognitive impairment correlated with reduced recruitment of microglia towards amyloid deposits and altered disease-related gene expression profile. Conversely, amplification of regulatory T cells through peripheral low-dose IL-2 treatment increased numbers of plaque-associated microglia, and restored cognitive functions in APPPS1 mice. These data suggest that regulatory T cells play a beneficial role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, by slowing disease progression and modulating microglial response to amyloid-β deposition. Our study highlights the therapeutic potential of repurposed IL-2 for innovative immunotherapy based on modulation of regulatory T cells in Alzheimer's disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Hypertension accelerates the progression of Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Dere, Ekrem; Broquères-You, Dong; Bonnin, Philippe; Benessiano, Joëlle; Pocard, Marc; Mariani, Jean; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular impairment is frequent in patients with Alzheimer disease and is believed to influence clinical manifestation and severity of the disease. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially hypertension, have been associated with higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypertension, Alzheimer disease cross talk, we established a mouse model of dual pathology by infusing hypertensive doses of angiotensin II into transgenic APPPS1 mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor and presenilin 1 proteins. At 4.5 months, at the early stage of disease progression, only hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented impairment of temporal order memory performance in the episodic-like memory task. This cognitive deficit was associated with an increased number of cortical amyloid deposits (223±5 versus 207±5 plaques/mm(2); P<0.05) and a 2-fold increase in soluble amyloid levels in the brain and in plasma. Hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented several cerebrovascular alterations, including a 25% reduction in cerebral microvessel density and a 30% to 40% increase in cerebral vascular amyloid deposits, as well as a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the brain, compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice. Moreover, the brain levels of nitric oxide synthase 1 and 3 and the nitrite/nitrate levels were reduced in hypertensive APPPS1 mice (by 49%, 34%, and 33%, respectively, compared with wild-type mice; P<0.05). Our results indicate that hypertension accelerates the development of Alzheimer disease-related structural and functional alterations, partially through cerebral vasculature impairment and reduced nitric oxide production. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Exercise during pregnancy mitigates Alzheimer-like pathology in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Donath, Anja; Yarmolenko, Maksym; Uslar, Ellen; Conzen, Catharina; Kanakis, Dimitrios; Bosma, Claudius; Worm, Karl; Paulus, Werner; Keyvani, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity protects brain function in healthy individuals and those with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence for beneficial effects of parental exercise on the health status of their progeny is sparse and limited to nondiseased individuals. Here, we questioned whether maternal running interferes with offspring's AD-like pathology and sought to decipher the underlying mechanisms in TgCRND8 mice. Maternal stimulation was provided by voluntary wheel running vs. standard housing during pregnancy. Following 5 mo of standard housing of transgenic and wild-type offspring, their brains were examined for AD-related pathology and/or plasticity changes. Running during pregnancy reduced β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden (-35%, P=0.017) and amyloidogenic APP processing in transgenic offspring and further improved the neurovascular function by orchestrating different Aβ transporters and increasing angiogenesis (+29%, P=0.022). This effect was accompanied by diminished inflammation, as indicated by reduced microgliosis (-20%, P=0.002) and down-regulation of other proinflammatory mediators, and resulted in less oxidative stress, as nitrotyrosine levels declined (-28%, P=0.029). Moreover, plasticity changes (in terms of up-regulation of reelin, synaptophysin, and ARC) were found not only in transgenic but also in wild-type offspring. We conclude that exercise during pregnancy provides long-lasting protection from neurodegeneration and improves brain plasticity in the otherwise unstimulated progeny.

  14. Environmental enrichment enhances cellular plasticity in transgenic mice with Alzheimer-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Ambrée, Oliver; Tomm, Manuel; Habermann, Henrik; Sachser, Norbert; Paulus, Werner; Keyvani, Kathy

    2009-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by hippocampal neuronal loss and abnormal neurogenesis, both of which probably contributing to AD-related cognitive deficits. Mounting evidence indicates that cognitive and physical stimulation provided by environmental enrichment improves neurogenesis in healthy animals and counteracts beta-amyloid pathology in mouse models of AD. Here, we hypothesized that environmental enrichment has also an impact on hippocampal neurogenesis in mice with AD-like pathology. Therefore, TgCRND8 mice and wild type littermates were either housed under standard conditions or in an enriched environment for 4 months. Standard housed TgCRND8 mice revealed diminished hippocampal cell proliferation and reduced number of mature newborn neurons compared to wild type littermates under the same housing condition. However, environmental enrichment reversed this genotype effect. Here, we show that cognitive and physical stimulation is capable of increasing the number of newborn mature hippocampal neurons in transgenic mice to wild type levels. Moreover, the expression of various plasticity associated molecules was enhanced in transgenic mice due to enriched housing. This study identifies that environmental enrichment improves diminished cellular plasticity in AD brain, probably enhancing the brain capacity to better compensate for neurodegeneration.

  15. Human neural stem cells alleviate Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Shin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Haejin; Kim, Miri; Yun, Seokhwan; Hwang, Kyujin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-08-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an inexorable neurodegenerative disease that commonly occurs in the elderly. The cognitive impairment caused by AD is associated with abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau, which are accompanied by inflammation. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing, multipotential cells that differentiate into distinct neural cells. When transplanted into a diseased brain, NSCs repair and replace injured tissues after migration toward and engraftment within lesions. We investigated the therapeutic effects in an AD mouse model of human NSCs (hNSCs) that derived from an aborted human fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation. Cells were transplanted into the cerebral lateral ventricles of neuron-specific enolase promoter-controlled APPsw-expressing (NSE/APPsw) transgenic mice at 13 months of age. Implanted cells extensively migrated and engrafted, and some differentiated into neuronal and glial cells, although most hNSCs remained immature. The hNSC transplantation improved spatial memory in these mice, which also showed decreased tau phosphorylation and Aβ42 levels and attenuated microgliosis and astrogliosis. The hNSC transplantation reduced tau phosphorylation via Trk-dependent Akt/GSK3β signaling, down-regulated Aβ production through an Akt/GSK3β signaling-mediated decrease in BACE1, and decreased expression of inflammatory mediators through deactivation of microglia that was mediated by cell-to-cell contact, secretion of anti-inflammatory factors generated from hNSCs, or both. The hNSC transplantation also facilitated synaptic plasticity and anti-apoptotic function via trophic supplies. Furthermore, the safety and feasibility of hNSC transplantation are supported. These findings demonstrate the hNSC transplantation modulates diverse AD pathologies and rescue impaired memory via multiple mechanisms in an AD model. Thus, our data provide tangible preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a

  16. Uptake of silica nanoparticles: neurotoxicity and Alzheimer-like pathology in human SK-N-SH and mouse neuro2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xifei; He, Chun'e; Li, Jie; Chen, Hongbin; Ma, Quan; Sui, Xiaojing; Tian, Shengli; Ying, Ming; Zhang, Qian; Luo, Yougen; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-08-17

    Growing concern has been raised over the potential adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles on human health due to their increasing use in commercial and medical applications. Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are one of the most widely used nanoparticles in industry and have been formulated for cellular and non-viral gene delivery in the central nerve system. However, the potential neurotoxicity of SiNPs remains largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular uptake of SiNPs in human SK-N-SH and mouse neuro2a (N2a) neuroblastoma cells treated with 10.0 μg/ml of 15-nm SiNPs for 24 h by transmission electron microscopy. We found that SiNPs were mainly localized in the cytoplasm of the treated cells. The treatment of SiNPs at various concentrations impaired the morphology of SK-N-SH and N2a cells, characterized by increased number of round cells, diminishing of dendrite-like processes and decreased cell density. SiNPs significantly decreased the cell viability, induced cellular apoptosis, and elevated the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines. Additionally, increased deposit of intracellular β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)) and enhanced phosphorylation of tau at Ser262 and Ser396, two specific pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), were observed in both cell lines with SiNPs treatment. Concomitantly, the expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) was up-regulated, while amyloid-β-degrading enzyme neprilysin was down-regulated in SiNP-treated cells. Finally, activity-dependent phosphorylation of glycogen syntheses kinase (GSK)-3β at Ser9 (inactive form) was significantly decreased in SiNP-treated SK-N-SH cells. Taken together, these data demonstrated that exposure to SiNPs induced neurotoxicity and pathological signs of AD. The pre-Alzheimer-like pathology induced by SiNPs might result from the dys-regulated expression of APP/neprilysin and activation of GSK-3β. This is the first

  17. Blocking TGF-β–Smad2/3 innate immune signaling mitigates Alzheimer-like pathology

    PubMed Central

    Town, Terrence; Laouar, Yasmina; Pittenger, Christopher; Mori, Takashi; Szekely, Christine A; Tan, Jun; Duman, Ronald S; Flavell, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common dementia and is pathologically characterized by deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) into β-amyloid plaques, neuronal injury and low-level, chronic activation of brain immunity1. Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) are pleiotropic cytokines that have key roles in immune cell activation, inflammation and repair after injury2. We genetically interrupted TGF-β and downstream Smad2/3 signaling (TGF-β–Smad2/3) in innate immune cells by inducing expression of CD11c promoter–driven dominant-negative TGF-β receptor type II in C57BL/6 mice (CD11c-DNR)3, crossed these mice with mice overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein, the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease mouse model4, and evaluated Alzheimer's disease-like pathology. Aged double-transgenic mice showed complete mitigation of Tg2576-associated hyperactivity and partial mitigation of defective spatial working memory. Brain parenchymal and cerebrovascular β-amyloid deposits and Aβ abundance were markedly (up to 90%) attenuated in Tg2576–CD11c-DNR mice. This was associated with increased infiltration of Aβ-containing peripheral macrophages around cerebral vessels and β-amyloid plaques. In vitro, cultures of peripheral macrophages, but not microglia, from CD11c-DNR mice showed blockade of classical TGF-β–activated Smad2/3 but also showed hyperactivation of alternative bone morphogenic protein–activated Smad1/5/8 signaling and increased Aβ phagocytosis. Similar effects were noted after pharmacological inhibition of activin-like kinase-5, a type I TGF-β receptor. Taken together, our results suggest that blockade of TGF-β–Smad2/3 signaling in peripheral macrophages represents a new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18516051

  18. Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protect Against Scopolamine-Induced Alzheimer-Like Pathological Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Safar, Marwa M; Arab, Hany H; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with AD have displayed decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which repair and maintain the endothelial function. Transplantation of EPCs has emerged as a promising approach for the management of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, however, its impact on AD has been poorly described. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the effects of bone marrow-derived (BM) EPCs transplantation in repeated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, an experimental model that replicates biomarkers of AD. Intravenously transplanted BM-EPCs migrated into the brain of rats and improved the learning and memory deficits. Meanwhile, they mitigated the deposition of amyloid plaques and associated histopathological alterations. At the molecular levels, BM-EPCs blunted the increase of hippocampal amyloid beta protein (Aβ), amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reinstated the Aβ-degrading neprilysin together with downregulation of p-tau and its upstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). They also corrected the perturbations of neurotransmitter levels including restoration of acetylcholine and associated esterase along with dopamine, GABA, and the neuroexitatory glutamate. Furthermore, BM-EPCs induced behavioral recovery via boosting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream cAMP response element binding (CREB), suppression of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10). BM-EPCs also augmented Nrf2 and seladin-1. Generally, these actions were analogous to those exerted by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and the reference anti-Alzheimer donepezil. For the first time, these findings highlight the beneficial actions of BM-EPCs against the memory

  19. Reversal of Alzheimer's-like pathology and behavior in human APP transgenic mice by mutation of Asp664.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Veronica; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Banwait, Surita; Ataie, Marina; Logvinova, Anna V; Sitaraman, Sandhya; Carlson, Elaine; Sagi, Sarah A; Chevallier, Nathalie; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A; Bredesen, Dale E

    2006-05-02

    The deficits characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are believed to result, at least in part, from the neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid peptides, a set of 39-43 amino acid fragments derived proteolytically from beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP also is cleaved intracytoplasmically at Asp-664 to generate a second cytotoxic peptide, APP-C31, but whether this C-terminal processing of APP plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD is unknown. Therefore, we compared elements of the Alzheimer's phenotype in transgenic mice modeling AD with vs. without a functional Asp-664 caspase cleavage site. Surprisingly, whereas beta-amyloid production and plaque formation were unaltered, synaptic loss, astrogliosis, dentate gyral atrophy, increased neuronal precursor proliferation, and behavioral abnormalities were completely prevented by a mutation at Asp-664. These results suggest that Asp-664 plays a critical role in the generation of Alzheimer-related pathophysiological and behavioral changes in human APP transgenic mice, possibly as a cleavage site or via protein-protein interactions.

  20. TRACE COPPER LEVELS IN THE DRINKING WATER, BUT NOT ZINC OR ALUMINUM INFLUENCE CNS ALZHEIMER-LIKE PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    SPARKS, D.L.; FRIEDLAND, R.; PETANCESKA, S.; SCHREURS, B.G.; SHI, J.; PERRY, G.; SMITH, M.A.; SHARMA, A.; DEROSA, S.; ZIOLKOWSKI, C.; STANKOVIC, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests copper may influence the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by reducing clearance of the amyloid beta protein (Aβ) from the brain. Previous experiments show that addition of only 0.12 PPM copper (one-tenth the Environmental Protection Agency Human consumption limits) to distilled water was sufficient to precipitate the accumulation of Aβ in the brains of cholesterol-fed rabbits (1). Here we report that addition of copper to the drinking water of spontaneously hypercholesterolemic Watanabe rabbits, cholesterol-fed beagles and rabbits, PS1/APP transgenic mice produced significantly enhanced brain levels of Aβ. In contrast to the effects of copper, we found that aluminum- or zinc-ion-supplemented distilled water did not have a significant effect on brain Aβ accumulation in cholesterol-fed rabbits. We also report that administration of distilled water produced a reduction in the expected accumulation of Aβ in three separate animal models. Collectively, these data suggest that water quality may have a significant influence on disease progression and Aβ neuropathology in AD. PMID:16886094

  1. Trace copper levels in the drinking water, but not zinc or aluminum influence CNS Alzheimer-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D L; Friedland, R; Petanceska, S; Schreurs, B G; Shi, J; Perry, G; Smith, M A; Sharma, A; Derosa, S; Ziolkowski, C; Stankovic, G

    2006-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests copper may influence the progression of Alzheimer's disease by reducing clearance of the amyloid beta protein (Abeta) from the brain. Previous experiments show that addition of only 0.12 PPM copper (one-tenth the Environmental Protection Agency Human consumption limits) to distilled water was sufficient to precipitate the accumulation of Abeta in the brains of cholesterol-fed rabbits (1). Here we report that addition of copper to the drinking water of spontaneously hypercholesterolemic Watanabe rabbits, cholesterol-fed beagles and rabbits, PS1/APP transgenic mice produced significantly enhanced brain levels of Abeta. In contrast to the effects of copper, we found that aluminum- or zinc-ion-supplemented distilled water did not have a significant effect on brain Ab accumulation in cholesterol-fed rabbits. We also report that administration of distilled water produced a reduction in the expected accumulation of Ab in three separate animal models. Collectively, these data suggest that water quality may have a significant influence on disease progression and Ab neuropathology in AD.

  2. Tannic acid is a natural β-secretase inhibitor that prevents cognitive impairment and mitigates Alzheimer-like pathology in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takashi; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Koyama, Naoki; Arendash, Gary W; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Kakuda, Nobuto; Horikoshi-Sakuraba, Yuko; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2012-02-24

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is essential for production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that form β-amyloid plaques in brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Recent focus has been directed toward a group of naturally occurring anti-amyloidogenic polyphenols known as flavonoids. We orally administered the flavonoid tannic acid (TA) to the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) and evaluated cognitive function and AD-like pathology. Consumption of TA for 6 months prevented transgene-associated behavioral impairment including hyperactivity, decreased object recognition, and defective spatial reference memory, but did not alter nontransgenic mouse behavior. Accordingly, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular β-amyloid deposits and abundance of various Aβ species including oligomers were mitigated in TA-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with decreased cleavage of the β-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment, lowered soluble APP-β production, reduced β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein stability and activity, and attenuated neuroinflammation. As in vitro validation, we treated well characterized mutant human APP-overexpressing murine neuron-like cells with TA and found significantly reduced Aβ production associated with less amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that dietary supplementation with TA may be prophylactic for AD by inhibiting β-secretase activity and neuroinflammation and thereby mitigating AD pathology.

  3. Ferulic Acid Is a Nutraceutical β-Secretase Modulator That Improves Behavioral Impairment and Alzheimer-like Pathology in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takashi; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is required for production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that comprise β-amyloid plaques in brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Recent AD therapeutic interest has been directed toward a group of anti-amyloidogenic compounds extracted from plants. We orally administered the brain penetrant, small molecule phenolic compound ferulic acid (FA) to the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) and evaluated behavioral impairment and AD-like pathology. Oral FA treatment for 6 months reversed transgene-associated behavioral deficits including defective: hyperactivity, object recognition, and spatial working and reference memory, but did not alter wild-type mouse behavior. Furthermore, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular β-amyloid deposits as well as abundance of various Aβ species including oligomers were decreased in FA-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with decreased cleavage of the β-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment, reduced β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein stability and activity, attenuated neuroinflammation, and stabilized oxidative stress. As in vitro validation, we treated well-characterized mutant human APP-overexpressing murine neuron-like cells with FA and found significantly decreased Aβ production and reduced amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Collectively, these results highlight that FA is a β-secretase modulator with therapeutic potential against AD. PMID:23409038

  4. Role of melatonin in Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-zhi; Wang, Ze-fen

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive loss of memory and deterioration of comprehensive cognition, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques of aggregated beta-amyloid (Abeta), and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles that contain hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Recent studies showed that melatonin, an indoleamine secreted by the pineal gland, may play an important role in aging and AD as an antioxidant and neuroprotector. Melatonin decreases during aging and patients with AD have a more profound reduction in this hormone. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning, and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from Abeta-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties: it not only inhibits Abeta generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with Abeta. Our recent studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood, a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting cholinergic neurons and in anti-inflammation. Here, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin and the underlying mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are reviewed. The capacity of melatonin to prevent or ameliorate tau and Abeta pathology further enhances its potential in the prevention or treatment of AD.

  5. Prevalence of Cerebral Amyloid Pathology in Persons Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Willemijn J.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Knol, Dirk L.; Tijms, Betty M.; Scheltens, Philip; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies. OBJECTIVE To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). DATA SOURCES Relevant biomarker studies identified by searching studies published before April 2015 using the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases and through personal communication with investigators. STUDY SELECTION Studies were included if they provided individual participant data for participants without dementia and used an a priori defined cutoff for amyloid positivity. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. RESULTS The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants with normal cognition; from 12% (95% CI, 8%-18%) to 43% (95% CI, 32%-55%) among patients with SCI; and from 27% (95% CI, 23%-32%) to 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) among patients with MCI. APOE-ε4 carriers had 2 to 3 times higher prevalence estimates than noncarriers. The age at which 15% of the participants with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOEε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and

  6. Neurodegeneration in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: from pathology to molecular signaling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Saraiva, Maria João

    2003-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder related to the systemic deposition of mutated transthyretin (TTR) amyloid fibrils, particularly in peripheral nervous system (PNS). TTR fibrils are diffusely distributed in the PNS of FAP patients, involving nerve trunks, plexuses and ganglia. In peripheral nerves, amyloid deposits are prominent in the endoneurium, near blood vessels, Schwann cells and collagen fibrils. Fiber degeneration is axonal, beginning in the unmyelinated and low diameter myelinated fibers. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain axonal and neuronal loss: (i) compression of the nervous tissue by amyloid; however, a cause-effect relationship between amyloid deposition, structural nerve changes and degeneration was never clearly made; (ii) role of nerve ischemia secondary to lesions caused by perivascular amyloid, which is also doubtful as compromised blood flow was never demonstrated; (iii) lesions in the dorsal root ganglia neurons or Schwann cells. Recently, evidence for the presence of toxic non-fibrillar TTR aggregates early in FAP nerves constituted a first step to unravel molecular signaling related to neurodegeneration in FAP. The toxic nature of TTR non-fibrillar aggregates, and not mature TTR fibrils, was evidenced by their ability to induce the expression of oxidative stress and inflammation-related molecules in neuronal cells, driving them into apoptotic pathways. How these TTR aggregates exert their effects is debatable; interaction with cellular receptors, namely, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), is a probable candidate mechanism. The pathology and the yet unknown molecular signaling mechanisms responsible for neurodegeneration in FAP are discussed.

  7. Subcutaneous liraglutide ameliorates methylglyoxal-induced Alzheimer-like tau pathology and cognitive impairment by modulating tau hyperphosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liqin; Chen, Zhou; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaohong; Ke, Linfang; Zheng, Zhongjie; Lin, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Lijuan; Liu, Libin

    2017-01-01

    Memory deterioration and synapse damage with accumulation of β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau are hallmark lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methylglyoxal (MG), a key intermediate of glucose metabolism, is elevated in AD brains and modifies Aβ42, increasing misfolding and leading to the accumulation of senile plaques. Liraglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is neurotrophic and neuroprotective. However, whether liraglutide can protect against AD-like memory-related deficits and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by MG in vivo is not known. Here, we report that MG induces tau hyperphosphorylation and causes ultrastructural hippocampal damage and cognitive impairment in C57BL/6J mice. Liraglutide reduced these effects via activation of the protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathways. Our data reveal that liraglutide may alleviate AD-like cognitive impairment by decreasing the phosphorylation of tau. PMID:28337257

  8. Neuronal activity and amyloid plaque pathology: an update.

    PubMed

    Ovsepian, Saak V; O'Leary, Valerie B

    2016-01-01

    A breakthrough in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research came with the discovery of the link between activity-dependent release of amyloid-β (Aβ) from neurons and formation of amyloid plaques. Along with elucidating the cellular basis of behavioral-dependent fluctuations in Aβ levels in the brain, insights have been gained toward understanding the mechanisms that warrant selective vulnerability of various forebrain circuits to amyloid pathology. The notion of elevated activity as a source of excessive Aβ production and plaque formation is, however, in conflict with ample electrophysiological data, which demonstrate exceedingly intense activity (both intrinsic and synaptic) of neurons in several brain regions that are spared or marginally affected by amyloid plaques of AD. Thus, the link between the functional load of brain circuits and their vulnerability to amyloidosis, while evident, is also complex and remains poorly understood. Here, we discuss emerging data suggestive of a major role for super-intense synchronous activity of cortical and limbic networks in excessive Aβ production and plaque formation. It is proposed that dense recurrent wiring of associative areas prone to epileptic seizures might be of critical relevance to their higher susceptibility to plaque pathology and related functional impairments.

  9. Cognitive reserve and β-amyloid pathology in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Carolyn; Campbell, Meghan C; Flores, Hubert; Maiti, Baijayanta; Perlmutter, Joel S; Foster, Erin R

    2015-08-01

    Dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) is associated with abnormal accumulation of proteins, including β-amyloid, in cortical regions. High cognitive reserve capacity may protect cognition from β-amyloid and delay the onset of dementia. We tested the cognitive reserve theory in PD by determining whether educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve, modifies the correlation between cortical β-amyloid accumulation and cognitive impairment. PD participants (N = 155) underwent MRI to quantify brain volume and [(11)C] PiB PET imaging to quantify fibrillar β-amyloid deposition. Mean cortical binding potentials (MCBP) were calculated for each participant, with higher scores indicating more fibrillar β-amyloid. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine whether education modified the relationship between MCBP and cognitive function after controlling for brain volume. MCBP interacted with educational attainment to predict scores on each of the cognitive outcome measures (ps ≤ 0.02). Post-hoc analysis revealed that the effect of MCBP on cognitive function changed once the level of education reached 16 years. For participants with less than 16 years of education (n = 68), higher MCBP correlated with worse cognitive function, with MCBP accounting for 8-30% of the variance in MMSE and CDR scores (ps ≤ 0.02). For participants with at least 16 years of education (n = 87), MCBP did not correlate with MMSE or CDR scores (R(2)s < 0.02, ps ≥ 0.17). These findings provide support for the cognitive reserve theory in PD and suggest that education may protect PD patients' cognition against cortical β-amyloid pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic deletion of TNFRII gene enhances the Alzheimer-like pathology in an APP transgenic mouse model via reduction of phosphorylated IκBα.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; He, Ping; Xie, Junxia; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Li, Rena; Shen, Yong

    2014-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII) is one of the TNF receptor superfamily members and our recent pathological studies show that TNFRII is deficient in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms of TNFRII in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. In the present study, by using the gene-targeting approach to delete TNFRII in AD transgenic mouse model, we found that, in the brain of APP23 mice with TNFRII deletion (APP23/TNFRII(-/-)), AD-like pathology, i.e. plaque formation and microglial activation, occurs as early as 6 months of age. To test whether the increased levels of Aβ plaques was due to elevated Aβ, we measured Aβ and found that Aβ levels indeed were significantly increased at this age. Because β-secretase, BACE1, is critical enzyme for Aβ production, we have examined BACE1 and found that BACE1 is increased in both protein levels and enzymatic activity as early as 6 months of age; Having shown that BACE1 promoter region contains NF-κB binding sites, we found that cytoplasmic NF-κB was elevated and SUMO1 binding to IκBα was decreased. To further verify these findings, we have overexpressed TNFRII and identified that overexpressing TNFRII can reverse the findings from APP23/TNFRII(-/-) mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate novel roles of TNFRII in the regulation of Aβ production, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for AD by up-regulating TNFRII levels and elevating phosphorylated IκBα by SUMOylation.

  11. The amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen F S; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Duff, Karen; Bennett, David A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-11-01

    Past studies using transgenic models of early-staged amyloid pathology, have suggested that the amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner where cholinergic terminals appear most vulnerable, followed by glutamatergic terminals and finally by somewhat more resistant GABAergic terminals. To determine whether this neurotransmitter-specific progression persists at later pathological stages, presynaptic bouton densities, and the areas of occupation and localization of plaque adjacent dystrophic neurites were quantified in 18-month-old APP(K670N, M671L)+PS1(M146L) doubly transgenic mice. Quantification revealed that transgenic animals had significantly lower cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic bouton densities. Cholinergic and glutamatergic dystrophic neurites appear to be heavily influenced by fibrillar Abeta as both types displayed a decreasing area of occupation with respect to increasing plaque size. Furthermore, cholinergic dystrophic neurites reside in closer proximity to plaques than glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, while GABAergic dystrophic neurites were minimal regardless of plaque size. To investigate whether similarities exist in the human AD pathology, a monoclonal antibody (McKA1) against the human vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) was developed. Subsequent staining in AD brain tissue revealed the novel presence of glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, to our knowledge the first evidence of a structural glutamatergic deficit in the AD pathology.

  12. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Pathology and Cognitive Domains in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E.; Wang, Zhenxin; Wilson, Robert S.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to cognitive domains in older community-dwelling persons with and without dementia. Methods Subjects were 404 persons in the Religious Orders Study, a cohort study of aging, who underwent annual clinical evaluations, including 19 neuropsychological tests from which 5 cognitive domain and global summary scores were derived, and brain autopsy at time-of-death (mean age-at-death 86). Using amyloid-β immunostaining, CAA severity was graded in 5 regions (midfrontal, inferior temporal, angular, calcarine, and hippocampal cortices), as 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe, and 4 = very severe. Because severity was related across regions (all rs > 0.63), and almost all persons had some CAA, we averaged regional CAA scores and created class variable predictors for no-to-minimal (<0.5), mild-to-moderate (0.5-2.5) and moderate-to-very severe CAA (>2.5). Results CAA was very common (84.9%; 94 had no-to-minimal, 233 mild-to-moderate, and 76 moderate-to-very severe disease) and was related to AD pathology (rs = 0.68). In linear regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, AD pathology, infarcts, and Lewy bodies, moderate-to-very severe CAA was associated with lower perceptual speed (p = 0.012) and episodic memory (p = 0.047), but not semantic memory, working memory, visuospatial skills, or a composite of all cognitive measures. No associations of mild-to-moderate CAA with cognition were found. Dementia did not modify these findings. Interpretation CAA pathology is very common in older community-dwelling persons and is associated with AD pathology. Moderate-to-very severe CAA, but not mild-to-moderate CAA, is associated with lower performance in specific cognitive domains, most notably perceptual speed, separately from the effect of AD pathology. PMID:21387377

  13. Mifepristone alters amyloid precursor protein processing to preclude amyloid beta and also reduces tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; LaFerla, Frank M; Green, Kim N

    2013-09-01

    Increased circulating glucocorticoids are features of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and increased glucocorticoids accelerate the accumulation of AD pathologies. Here, we analyzed the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU486) in the 3xTg-AD mouse model at an age where hippocampal damage leads to high circulating corticosterone levels. The effects of mifepristone were investigated in 3xTg-AD mice using a combination of biochemical, histological, and behavior analyses. Mifepristone treatment rescues the pathologically induced cognitive impairments and markedly reduces amyloid beta (Aβ)-load and levels, as well as tau pathologies. Analysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing revealed concomitant decreases in both APP C-terminal fragments C99 and C83 and the appearance of a larger 17-kDa C-terminal fragment. Hence, mifepristone induces a novel C-terminal cleavage of APP that prevents it being cleaved by α- or β-secretase, thereby precluding Aβ generation in the central nervous system; this cleavage and the production of the 17-kDa APP fragment was generated by a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. In addition, mifepristone treatment also reduced the phosphorylation and accumulation of tau, concomitant with reductions in p25. Notably, deficits in cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein signaling were restored with the treatment. These preclinical results point to a potential therapeutic role for mifepristone as an effective treatment for AD and further highlight the impact the glucocorticoid system has as a regulator of Aβ generation. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A subcutaneous cellular implant for passive immunization against amyloid-β reduces brain amyloid and tau pathologies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Astolfo, Alberto; Kopetzki, Erhard; Jacobsen, Helmut; Stampanoni, Marco; Bohrmann, Bernd; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Passive immunization against misfolded toxic proteins is a promising approach to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For effective immunotherapy against Alzheimer's disease, recent clinical data indicate that monoclonal antibodies directed against the amyloid-β peptide should be administered before the onset of symptoms associated with irreversible brain damage. It is therefore critical to develop technologies for continuous antibody delivery applicable to disease prevention. Here, we addressed this question using a bioactive cellular implant to deliver recombinant anti-amyloid-β antibodies in the subcutaneous tissue. An encapsulating device permeable to macromolecules supports the long-term survival of myogenic cells over more than 10 months in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients. The encapsulated cells are genetically engineered to secrete high levels of anti-amyloid-β antibodies. Peripheral implantation leads to continuous antibody delivery to reach plasma levels that exceed 50 µg/ml. In a proof-of-concept study, we show that the recombinant antibodies produced by this system penetrate the brain and bind amyloid plaques in two mouse models of the Alzheimer's pathology. When encapsulated cells are implanted before the onset of amyloid plaque deposition in TauPS2APP mice, chronic exposure to anti-amyloid-β antibodies dramatically reduces amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels in the brain, decreases amyloid plaque burden, and most notably, prevents phospho-tau pathology in the hippocampus. These results support the use of encapsulated cell implants for passive immunotherapy against the misfolded proteins, which accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Association of APOE with tau-tangle pathology with and without β-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Jose M; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) with paired helical filament tau (PHF-tau) tangle pathology differs in brains with and without β-amyloid. Participants were 1056 autopsied individuals from 2 clinical-pathologic cohort studies of aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), the Religious Orders Study, and the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Neuropathologic measures were obtained using immunohistochemistry targeting β-amyloid and PHF-tau tangles in 8 brain regions. Linear regression was used to compare the relation of APOE ε4 and ε2 to PHF-tau-tangle density in persons with β-amyloid relative to persons without β-amyloid. We found an interaction between APOE ε4 carriers and presence of β-amyloid (β = -0.968, p = 0.013) such that the association of APOE ε4 with PHF-tau tangles was much stronger in brains with β-amyloid. Stratified analysis shows that the association of APOE ε4 with PHF-tau tangles was considerably stronger among those with β-amyloid (β = 0.757, p = 1.1 × 10(-15)) compared to those without β-amyloid which was not significant (β = -0.201, p = 0.424). Separately, APOE ε2 was associated with fewer tangles in brains with β-amyloid (β = -0.425, p = 7.6 × 10(-4)) compared to those without β-amyloid which was not significant (β = -0.102, p = 0.506). Thus, the presence of APOE ε4 and ε2 alleles was not associated with PHF-tau tangles in the absence of β-amyloid. The data provide additional evidence that PHF-tau tangles in the absence of β-amyloid may reflect a pathologic process distinct from Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sudomotor innervation in transthyretin amyloid neuropathy: Pathology and functional correlates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cho‐Min; Chiang, Hao‐Hua; Luo, Kai‐Ren; Kan, Hung‐Wei; Yang, Naomi Chu‐Chiao; Chiang, Hao; Lin, Whei‐Min; Lai, Shu‐Mei; Lee, Ming‐Jen; Shun, Chia‐Tung; Hsieh, Sung‐Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autonomic neuropathy is a major component of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) due to mutated transthyretin, with sudomotor failure as a common manifestation. This study aimed to investigate the pathology and clinical significance of sudomotor denervation. Methods Skin biopsies were performed on the distal leg of FAP patients with a follow‐up duration of 3.8 ± 1.6 years. Sudomotor innervation was stained with 2 markers: protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), a general neuronal marker, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a sudomotor nerve functional marker, followed by quantitation according to sweat gland innervation index (SGII) for PGP 9.5 (SGIIPGP 9.5) and VIP (SGIIVIP). Results There were 28 patients (25 men) with Ala97Ser transthyretin and late onset (59.9 ± 6.0 years) disabling neuropathy. Autonomic symptoms were present in 22 patients (78.6%) at the time of skin biopsy. The SGIIPGP 9.5 and SGIIVIP of FAP patients were significantly lower than those of age‐ and gender‐matched controls. The reduction of SGIIVIP was more severe than that of SGIIPGP 9.5 (p = 0.002). Patients with orthostatic hypotension or absent sympathetic skin response at palms were associated with lower SGIIPGP 9.5 (p = 0.019 and 0.002, respectively). SGIIPGP 9.5 was negatively correlated with the disability grade at the time of skin biopsy (p = 0.004), and was positively correlated with the interval from the time of skin biopsy to the time of wheelchair usage (p = 0.029). Interpretation This study documented the pathological evidence of sudomotor denervation in FAP. SGIIPGP 9.5 was functionally correlated with autonomic symptoms, autonomic tests, ambulation status, and progression of disability. Ann Neurol 2015;78:272℃283 PMID:25973863

  17. Vascular and amyloid pathologies are independent predictors of cognitive decline in normal elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lesnick, Timothy G.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Knopman, David S.; Preboske, Greg M.; Kantarci, Kejal; Raman, Mekala R.; Machulda, Mary M.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Lowe, Val J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Rocca, Walter A.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    Our primary objective was to investigate a biomarker driven model for the interrelationships between vascular disease pathology, amyloid pathology, and longitudinal cognitive decline in cognitively normal elderly subjects between 70 and 90 years of age. Our secondary objective was to investigate the beneficial effect of cognitive reserve on these interrelationships. We used brain amyloid-β load measured using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography as a marker for amyloid pathology. White matter hyperintensities and brain infarcts were measured using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging as a marker for vascular pathology. We studied 393 cognitively normal elderly participants in the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who had a baseline 3 T fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging assessment, Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scan, baseline cognitive assessment, lifestyle measures, and at least one additional clinical follow-up. We classified subjects as being on the amyloid pathway if they had a global cortical amyloid-β load of ≥1.5 standard uptake value ratio and those on the vascular pathway if they had a brain infarct and/or white matter hyperintensities load ≥1.11% of total intracranial volume (which corresponds to the top 25% of white matter hyperintensities in an independent non-demented sample). We used a global cognitive z-score as a measure of cognition. We found no evidence that the presence or absence of vascular pathology influenced the presence or absence of amyloid pathology and vice versa, suggesting that the two processes seem to be independent. Baseline cognitive performance was lower in older individuals, in males, those with lower education/occupation, and those on the amyloid pathway. The rate of cognitive decline was higher in older individuals (P < 0.001) and those with amyloid (P = 0.0003) or vascular (P = 0.0037) pathologies. In those subjects with

  18. Prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology in persons without dementia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Willemijn J; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Knol, Dirk L; Tijms, Betty M; Scheltens, Philip; Verhey, Frans R J; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Aalten, Pauline; Aarsland, Dag; Alcolea, Daniel; Alexander, Myriam; Almdahl, Ina S; Arnold, Steven E; Baldeiras, Inês; Barthel, Henryk; van Berckel, Bart N M; Bibeau, Kristen; Blennow, Kaj; Brooks, David J; van Buchem, Mark A; Camus, Vincent; Cavedo, Enrica; Chen, Kewei; Chetelat, Gael; Cohen, Ann D; Drzezga, Alexander; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Fagan, Anne M; Fladby, Tormod; Fleisher, Adam S; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Ford, Lisa; Förster, Stefan; Fortea, Juan; Foskett, Nadia; Frederiksen, Kristian S; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Froelich, Lutz; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Gill, Kiran Dip; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Grimmer, Timo; Hampel, Harald; Hausner, Lucrezia; Hellwig, Sabine; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Ishihara, Lianna; Ivanoiu, Adrian; Jagust, William J; Johannsen, Peter; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Klunk, William E; Köhler, Sebastian; Koglin, Norman; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kramberger, Milica G; Van Laere, Koen; Landau, Susan M; Lee, Dong Young; de Leon, Mony; Lisetti, Viviana; Lleó, Alberto; Madsen, Karine; Maier, Wolfgang; Marcusson, Jan; Mattsson, Niklas; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Meulenbroek, Olga; Meyer, Philipp T; Mintun, Mark A; Mok, Vincent; Molinuevo, José Luis; Møllergård, Hanne M; Morris, John C; Mroczko, Barbara; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Na, Duk L; Newberg, Andrew; Nordberg, Agneta; Nordlund, Arto; Novak, Gerald P; Paraskevas, George P; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perera, Gayan; Peters, Oliver; Popp, Julius; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Rabinovici, Gil D; Ramakers, Inez H G B; Rami, Lorena; Resende de Oliveira, Catarina; Rinne, Juha O; Rodrigue, Karen M; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Eloy; Roe, Catherine M; Rot, Uros; Rowe, Christopher C; Rüther, Eckart; Sabri, Osama; Sanchez-Juan, Páscual; Santana, Isabel; Sarazin, Marie; Schröder, Johannes; Schütte, Christin; Seo, Sang W; Soetewey, Femke; Soininen, Hilkka; Spiru, Luiza; Struyfs, Hanne; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Tsolaki, Magda; Vandenberghe, Rik; Verbeek, Marcel M; Villemagne, Victor L; Vos, Stephanie J B; van Waalwijk van Doorn, Linda J C; Waldemar, Gunhild; Wallin, Anders; Wallin, Åsa K; Wiltfang, Jens; Wolk, David A; Zboch, Marzena; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies. To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Relevant biomarker studies identified by searching studies published before April 2015 using the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases and through personal communication with investigators. Studies were included if they provided individual participant data for participants without dementia and used an a priori defined cutoff for amyloid positivity. Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants with normal cognition; from 12% (95% CI, 8%-18%) to 43% (95% CI, 32%-55%) among patients with SCI; and from 27% (95% CI, 23%-32%) to 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) among patients with MCI. APOE-ε4 carriers had 2 to 3 times higher prevalence estimates than noncarriers. The age at which 15% of the participants with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOE ε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and 95 years for ε2ε3 carriers. Amyloid positivity was more common in highly educated participants but not associated

  19. Progression of amyloid pathology to Alzheimer's pathology in an APP transgenic mouse model by removal of NOS2

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, Donna M.; Lewis, Matthew R.; Van Nostrand, William E.; Davis, Judianne; Previti, Mary Lou; Gharkholonarehe, Nastaran; Vitek, Michael P.; Colton, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by three primary pathologies in the brain; amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuron loss. Mouse models have been useful for studying components of AD but are limited in their ability to fully recapitulate all pathologies. We crossed the APPSwDI transgenic mouse, which develops amyloid ß-(Aß) protein deposits only, with a NOS2 knockout mouse, which develops no AD-like pathology. APPSwDI/NOS2−/− mice displayed impaired spatial memory compared to the APPSwDI mice, yet have the unaltered levels of Aß. APPSwDI mice do not show tau pathology while APPSwDI/NOS2−/− mice displayed extensive tau pathology associated with regions of dense microvascular amyloid deposition. Also, APPSwDI mice do not have any neuron loss while the APPSwDI/NOS2−/− mice have significant neuron loss in the hippocampus and subiculum. Neuropeptide Y neurons have been shown to be particularly vulnerable in AD. These neurons appear to be particularly vulnerable in the APPSwDI/NOS2−/− mice as we observe a dramatic reduction in the number of NPY neurons in the hippocampus and subiculum. These data show that removal of NOS2 from an APP transgenic mouse results in development of full AD-like pathology and behavioral impairments. PMID:18272675

  20. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  1. Brain burdens of aluminum, iron, and copper and their relationships with amyloidpathology in 60 human brains.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Esiri, Margaret M

    2012-01-01

    The deposition in the brain of amyloid-β as beta sheet conformers associated with senile plaques and vasculature is frequently observed in Alzheimer’s disease. While metals, primarily aluminum, iron, zinc, and copper, have been implicated in amyloid-β deposition in vivo, there are few data specifically relating brain metal burden with extent of amyloid pathologies in human brains. Herein brain tissue content of aluminum, iron, and copper are compared with burdens of amyloid-β, as senile plaques and as congophilic amyloid angiopathy, in 60 aged human brains. Significant observations were strong negative correlations between brain copper burden and the degree of severity of both senile plaque and congophilic amyloid angiopathy pathologies with the relationship with the former reaching statistical significance. While we did not have access to the dementia status of the majority of the 60 brain donors, this knowledge for just 4 donors allowed us to speculate that diagnosis of dementia might be predicted by a combination of amyloid pathology and a ratio of the brain burden of copper to the brain burden of aluminum. Taking into account only those donor brains with either senile plaque scores ≥4 and/or congophilic amyloid angiopathy scores ≥12, a Cu:Al ratio of <20 would predict that at least 39 of the 60 donors would have been diagnosed as suffering from dementia. Future research should test the hypothesis that, in individuals with moderate to severe amyloid pathology, low brain copper is a predisposition to developing dementia.

  2. Studying the Progression of Amyloid Pathology and Its Therapy Using Translational Longitudinal Model of Accumulation and Distribution of Amyloid Beta.

    PubMed

    Karelina, Tatiana; Demin, Oleg; Demin, Oleg; Duvvuri, Sridhar; Nicholas, Timothy

    2017-09-15

    Long-term effects of amyloid targeted therapy can be studied using a mechanistic translational model of amyloid beta (Aβ) distribution and aggregation calibrated on published data in mouse and human species. Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology is modeled utilizing age-dependent pathological evolution for rate constants and several variants of explicit functions for Aβ toxicity influencing cognitive outcomes (Adas-cog). Preventive Aβ targeted therapies were simulated to minimize the Aβ difference from healthy physiological levels. Therapeutic targeted simulations provided similar predictions for mouse and human studies. Our model predicts that: (1) at least 1 year (2 years for preclinical AD) of treatment is needed to observe cognitive effects; (2) under the hypothesis with functional importance of Aβ, a 15% decrease in Aβ (using an imaging biomarker) is related to 15-20% cognition improvement by immunotherapy. Despite negative outcomes in clinical trials, Aβ continues to remain a prospective target demanding careful assessment of mechanistic effect and duration of trial design. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  3. Blocking the Apolipoprotein E/Amyloid β Interaction in Triple Transgenic Mice Ameliorates Alzheimer’s Disease Related Amyloid β and Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Breitbart, Ariel; Sun, Yanjie; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Boutajangout, Allal; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inheritance of the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) genotype has been identified as the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Studies have shown that the binding between apoE and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides occurs at residues 244–272 of apoE and residues 12–28 of Aβ. ApoE4 has been implicated in promoting Aβ deposition and impairing clearance of Aβ. We hypothesized that blocking the apoE/Aβ interaction would serve as an effective new approach to AD therapy. We have previously shown that treatment with Aβ12–28P can reduce amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice and vascular amyloid in TgSwDI mice with congophilic amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the present study, we investigated whether the Aβ12–28P elicits a therapeutic effect on tau-related pathology in addition to amyloid pathology using old triple transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mice (3xTg, with PS1M146V, APPSwe and tauP30IL transgenes) with established pathology from the ages of 21 to 26 months. We show that treatment with Aβ12–28P substantially reduces tau pathology both immunohistochemically and biochemically, as well as reducing the amyloid burden and suppressing the activation of astrocytes and microglia. These affects correlate with a behavioral amelioration in the treated Tg mice. PMID:24117759

  4. EFHD2 IS A NOVEL AMYLOID PROTEIN ASSOCIATED TO PATHOLOGICAL TAU IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N.; Orange, François; De Jesús-Cortés, Hector; Madera, Bismark; Vaquer-Alicea, Jaime; Ballester, Juan; Guinel, Maxime J-F.; Bloom, George S.; Vega, Irving E.

    2013-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein, abundant within the central nervous system. Previous studies identified EFhd2 associated with pathological forms of tau proteins in the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3, which expresses the human tauP301L mutant. This association was validated in human tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the role that EFhd2 may play in tauopathies is still unknown. Here, we show that EFhd2 formed amyloid structures in vitro, a capability that is reduced by calcium ions. Electron microscopy (EM) analyses demonstrated that recombinant EFhd2 formed filamentous structures. EM analyses of sarkosyl insoluble fractions derived from human AD brains also indicated that EFhd2 co-localizes with aggregated tau proteins and formed granular structures. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices demonstrated that EFhd2 co-localizes with pathological tau proteins in AD brains, confirming the co-aggregation of EFhd2 and pathological tau. Furthermore, EFhd2’s coiled-coil domain mediated its self-oligomerization in vitro and its association with tau proteins in JNPL3 mouse brain extracts. The results demonstrate that EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau proteins in AD brain and that calcium binding may regulate the formation of EFhd2’s amyloid structures. Hence, EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathobiology of tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23331044

  5. EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N; Orange, François; De Jesús-Cortés, Hector; Madera, Bismark; Vaquer-Alicea, Jaime; Ballester, Juan; Guinel, Maxime J-F; Bloom, George S; Vega, Irving E

    2013-06-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium-binding protein, abundant within the central nervous system. Previous studies identified EFhd2 associated with pathological forms of tau proteins in the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3, which expresses the human tau(P301L) mutant. This association was validated in human tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role that EFhd2 may play in tauopathies is still unknown. Here, we show that EFhd2 formed amyloid structures in vitro, a capability that is reduced by calcium ions. Electron microscopy (EM) analyses demonstrated that recombinant EFhd2 formed filamentous structures. EM analyses of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions derived from human AD brains also indicated that EFhd2 co-localizes with aggregated tau proteins and formed granular structures. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices demonstrated that EFhd2 co-localizes with pathological tau proteins in AD brains, confirming the co-aggregation of EFhd2 and pathological tau. Furthermore, EFhd2's coiled-coil domain mediated its self-oligomerization in vitro and its association with tau proteins in JNPL3 mouse brain extracts. The results demonstrate that EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau proteins in AD brain and that calcium binding may regulate the formation of EFhd2's amyloid structures. Hence, EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathobiology of tau-mediated neurodegeneration. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Accelerating rates of cognitive decline and imaging markers associated with β-amyloid pathology.

    PubMed

    Insel, Philip S; Mattsson, Niklas; Mackin, R Scott; Schöll, Michael; Nosheny, Rachel L; Tosun, Duygu; Donohue, Michael C; Aisen, Paul S; Jagust, William J; Weiner, Michael W

    2016-05-17

    To estimate points along the spectrum of β-amyloid pathology at which rates of change of several measures of neuronal injury and cognitive decline begin to accelerate. In 460 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), we estimated the points at which rates of florbetapir PET, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, MRI, and cognitive and functional decline begin to accelerate with respect to baseline CSF Aβ42. Points of initial acceleration in rates of decline were estimated using mixed-effects regression. Rates of neuronal injury and cognitive and even functional decline accelerate substantially before the conventional threshold for amyloid positivity, with rates of florbetapir PET and FDG PET accelerating early. Temporal lobe atrophy rates also accelerate prior to the threshold, but not before the acceleration of cognitive and functional decline. A considerable proportion of patients with MCI would not meet inclusion criteria for a trial using the current threshold for amyloid positivity, even though on average, they are experiencing cognitive/functional decline associated with prethreshold levels of CSF Aβ42. Future trials in early Alzheimer disease might consider revising the criteria regarding β-amyloid thresholds to include the range of amyloid associated with the first signs of accelerating rates of decline. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Accelerating rates of cognitive decline and imaging markers associated with β-amyloid pathology

    DOE PAGES

    Insel, Philip S.; Mattsson, Niklas; Mackin, R. Scott; ...

    2016-04-15

    Objective: Our objective is to estimate points along the spectrum of β-amyloid pathology at which rates of change of several measures of neuronal injury and cognitive decline begin to accelerate. Methods: In 460 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), we estimated the points at which rates of florbetapir PET, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, MRI, and cognitive and functional decline begin to accelerate with respect to baseline CSF Aβ42. Points of initial acceleration in rates of decline were estimated using mixed-effects regression. Results: Rates of neuronal injury and cognitive and even functional decline accelerate substantially before the conventional threshold for amyloid positivity,more » with rates of florbetapir PET and FDG PET accelerating early. Temporal lobe atrophy rates also accelerate prior to the threshold, but not before the acceleration of cognitive and functional decline. Conclusions: A considerable proportion of patients with MCI would not meet inclusion criteria for a trial using the current threshold for amyloid positivity, even though on average, they are experiencing cognitive/functional decline associated with prethreshold levels of CSF Aβ42. Lastly, future trials in early Alzheimer disease might consider revising the criteria regarding β-amyloid thresholds to include the range of amyloid associated with the first signs of accelerating rates of decline.« less

  8. Accelerating rates of cognitive decline and imaging markers associated with β-amyloid pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Insel, Philip S.; Mattsson, Niklas; Mackin, R. Scott; Schöll, Michael; Nosheny, Rachel L.; Tosun, Duygu; Donohue, Michael C.; Aisen, Paul S.; Jagust, William J.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2016-04-15

    Objective: Our objective is to estimate points along the spectrum of β-amyloid pathology at which rates of change of several measures of neuronal injury and cognitive decline begin to accelerate. Methods: In 460 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), we estimated the points at which rates of florbetapir PET, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, MRI, and cognitive and functional decline begin to accelerate with respect to baseline CSF Aβ42. Points of initial acceleration in rates of decline were estimated using mixed-effects regression. Results: Rates of neuronal injury and cognitive and even functional decline accelerate substantially before the conventional threshold for amyloid positivity, with rates of florbetapir PET and FDG PET accelerating early. Temporal lobe atrophy rates also accelerate prior to the threshold, but not before the acceleration of cognitive and functional decline. Conclusions: A considerable proportion of patients with MCI would not meet inclusion criteria for a trial using the current threshold for amyloid positivity, even though on average, they are experiencing cognitive/functional decline associated with prethreshold levels of CSF Aβ42. Lastly, future trials in early Alzheimer disease might consider revising the criteria regarding β-amyloid thresholds to include the range of amyloid associated with the first signs of accelerating rates of decline.

  9. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer’s mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloidpathology

    PubMed Central

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E.; Lee, Rafael J.; Najafi, Allison R.; Rice, Rachel A.; Elmore, Monica R. P.; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  10. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer's mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloidpathology.

    PubMed

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Rafael J; Najafi, Allison R; Rice, Rachel A; Elmore, Monica R P; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2016-04-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Amyloid accumulation is a late event in sporadic Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in nontransgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    Stefanova, Natalia A.; Muraleva, Natalia A.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Kiseleva, Elena; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi.; Kolosova, Nataliya G.

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a key event in the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nonetheless, it now seems increasingly unlikely that amyloid toxicity is the cause of sporadic AD, which leads to cognitive decline. Here, using accelerated-senescence nontransgenic OXYS rats, we confirmed that aggregation of Aβ is a later event in AD-like pathology. We showed that an age-dependent increase in the levels of Aβ1–42 and extracellular Aβ deposits in the brain of OXYS rats occur later than do synaptic losses, neuronal cell death, mitochondrial structural abnormalities, and hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein. We identified the variants of the genes that are strongly associated with the risk of either late-onset or early-onset AD, including App, Apoe4, Bace1, Psen1, Psen2, and Picalm. We found that in OXYS rats nonsynonymous SNPs were located only in the genes Casp3 and Sorl1. Thus, we present proof that OXYS rats may be a model of sporadic AD. It is possible that multiple age-associated pathological processes may precede the toxic amyloid accumulation, which in turn triggers the final stage of the sporadic form of AD and becomes a hallmark event of the disease. PMID:25595891

  12. Synaptic Amyloid-β Oligomers Precede p-Tau and Differentiate High Pathology Control Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bilousova, Tina; Miller, Carol A.; Poon, Wayne W.; Vinters, Harry V.; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Hayden, Eric Y.; Teplow, David B.; Glabe, Charles; Albay, Ricardo; Cole, Gregory M.; Teng, Edmond; Gylys, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) aggregates form the two discrete pathologies of Alzheimer disease (AD), and oligomeric assemblies of each protein are localized to synapses. To determine the sequence by which pathology appears in synapses, Aβ and p-tau were quantified across AD disease stages in parietal cortex. Nondemented cases with high levels of AD-related pathology were included to determine factors that confer protection from clinical symptoms. Flow cytometric analysis of synaptosome preparations was used to quantify Aβ and p-tau in large populations of individual synaptic terminals. Soluble Aβ oligomers were assayed by a single antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total in situ Aβ was elevated in patients with early- and late-stage AD dementia, but not in high pathology nondemented controls compared with age-matched normal controls. However, soluble Aβ oligomers were highest in early AD synapses, and this assay distinguished early AD cases from high pathology controls. Overall, synapse-associated p-tau did not increase until late-stage disease in human and transgenic rat cortex, and p-tau was elevated in individual Aβ-positive synaptosomes in early AD. These results suggest that soluble oligomers in surviving neocortical synaptic terminals are associated with dementia onset and suggest an amyloid cascade hypothesis in which oligomeric Aβ drives phosphorylated tau accumulation and synaptic spread. These results indicate that antiamyloid therapies will be less effective once p-tau pathology is developed. PMID:26718979

  13. Myo-inositol changes precede amyloid pathology and relate to APOE genotype in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Sundgren, Pia C.; Strandberg, Olof; Zetterberg, Henrik; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to test whether in vivo levels of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) metabolites myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and choline are abnormal already during preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD), relating these changes to amyloid or tau pathology, and functional connectivity. Methods: In this cross-sectional multicenter study (a subset of the prospective Swedish BioFINDER study), we included 4 groups, representing the different stages of predementia AD: (1) cognitively healthy elderly with normal CSF β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42), (2) cognitively healthy elderly with abnormal CSF Aβ42, (3) patients with subjective cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42, (4) patients with mild cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42 (Ntotal = 352). Spectroscopic markers measured in the posterior cingulate/precuneus were considered alongside known disease biomarkers: CSF Aβ42, phosphorylated tau, total tau, [18F]-flutemetamol PET, f-MRI, and the genetic risk factor APOE. Results: Amyloid-positive cognitively healthy participants showed a significant increase in mI/creatine and mI/NAA levels compared to amyloid-negative healthy elderly (p < 0.05). In amyloid-positive healthy elderly, mI/creatine and mI/NAA correlated with cortical retention of [18F] flutemetamol tracer ( = 0.44, p = 0.02 and = 0.51, p = 0.01, respectively). Healthy elderly APOE ε4 carriers with normal CSF Aβ42 levels had significantly higher mI/creatine levels (p < 0.001) than ε4 noncarriers. Finally, elevated mI/creatine was associated with decreased functional connectivity within the default mode network (rpearson = −0.16, p = 0.02), independently of amyloid pathology. Conclusions: mI levels are elevated already at asymptomatic stages of AD. Moreover, mI/creatine concentrations were increased in healthy APOE ε4 carriers with normal CSF Aβ42 levels, suggesting that mI levels may reveal regional brain consequences of APOE ε4 before detectable amyloid pathology. PMID:27164711

  14. Association of Amyloid Pathology With Myelin Alteration in Preclinical Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Dean, Douglas C; Hurley, Samuel A; Kecskemeti, Steven R; O'Grady, J Patrick; Canda, Cristybelle; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated β-amyloid and tau proteins into plaques and tangles is a central feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). While plaque and tangle accumulation likely contributes to neuron and synapse loss, disease-related changes to oligodendrocytes and myelin are also suspected of playing a role in development of AD dementia. Still, to our knowledge, little is known about AD-related myelin changes, and even when present, they are often regarded as secondary to concomitant arteriosclerosis or related to aging. To assess associations between hallmark AD pathology and novel quantitative neuroimaging markers while being sensitive to white matter myelin content. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at an academic research neuroimaging center on a cohort of 71 cognitively asymptomatic adults enriched for AD risk. Lumbar punctures were performed and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, including β-amyloid 42, total tau protein, phosphorylated tau 181, and soluble amyloid precursor protein. We measured whole-brain longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates as well as the myelin water fraction from each of these individuals. Automated brain mapping algorithms and statistical models were used to evaluate the relationships between age, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry measures, including the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the myelin water fraction. The mean (SD) age for the 19 male participants and 52 female participants in the study was 61.6 (6.4) years. Widespread age-related changes to myelin were observed across the brain, particularly in late myelinating brain regions such as frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum. Quantitative relaxometry measures were negatively associated with levels of CSF biomarkers across brain white matter and in areas preferentially affected in AD. Furthermore, significant age-by-biomarker interactions were

  15. Amyloid reduction by amyloid-β vaccination also reduces mouse tau pathology and protects from neuron loss in two mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, Donna M.; Gharkholonarehe, Nastaran; Van Nostrand, William E.; Davis, Judianne; Vitek, Michael P.; Colton, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Shown to lower amyloid deposits and improve cognition in APP transgenic mouse models, immunotherapy appears to be a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Due to limitations in available animal models, however, it has been unclear whether targeting amyloid is sufficient to reduce the other pathological hallmarks of AD—namely, accumulation of pathological, non-mutated tau and neuronal loss. We have now developed two transgenic mouse models (APPSw/NOS2−/− and APPSwDI/NOS2−/−) that more closely model AD. These mice show amyloid pathology, hyperphosphorylated and aggregated normal mouse tau, significant neuron loss, and cognitive deficits. Aβ1–42 or KLH vaccinations were started in these animals at 12 months, when disease progression and cognitive decline are well underway, and continued for 4 months. Vaccinated APPSwDI/NOS2−/− mice, which have predominantly vascular amyloid pathology, showed a 30% decrease in brain Aβ and a 35–45% reduction in hyperphosphorylated tau. Neuron loss and cognitive deficits were partially reduced. In APPSw/NOS2−/− vaccinated mice, brain Aβ was reduced by 65–85% and hyperphosphorylated tau by 50–60 percent. Furthermore, neurons were completely protected, and memory deficits were fully reversed. Microhemorrhage was observed in all vaccinated APPSw/NOS2−/− mice and remains a significant adverse event associated with immunotherapy. Nevertheless, by providing evidence that reducing amyloid pathology also reduces non-mutant tau pathology and blocks neuron loss, these data support the development of amyloid-lowering therapies for disease-modifying treatment of AD. PMID:19553436

  16. Mildronate improves cognition and reduces amyloidpathology in transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Beitnere, Ulrika; van Groen, Thomas; Kumar, Ashish; Jansone, Baiba; Klusa, Vija; Kadish, Inga

    2014-03-01

    Mildronate, a carnitine congener drug, previously has been shown to provide neuroprotection in an azidothymidine-induced mouse model of neurotoxicity and in a Parkinson's disease rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mildronate treatment on cognition and pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) model mice (APP(SweDI)). Mildronate was administered i.p. daily at 50 or 100 mg/kg for 28 days. At the end of treatment, the animals were behaviorally and cognitively tested, and brains were assessed for AD-related pathology, inflammation, synaptic markers, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The data show that mildronate treatment significantly improved animal performance in water maze and social recognition tests, lowered amyloid-β deposition in the hippocampus, increased expression of the microglia marker Iba-1, and decreased AChE staining, although it did not alter expression of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity (GAP-43, synaptophysin, and GAD67). Taken together, these findings indicate mildronate's ability to improve cognition and reduce amyloidpathology in a mouse model of AD and its possible therapeutic utility as a disease-modifying drug in AD patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Harach, T.; Marungruang, N.; Duthilleul, N.; Cheatham, V.; Mc Coy, K. D.; Frisoni, G.; Neher, J. J.; Fåk, F.; Jucker, M.; Lasser, T.; Bolmont, T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer’s disease is not known. To this end we sequenced bacterial 16S rRNA from fecal samples of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse model and found a remarkable shift in the gut microbiota as compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice. Subsequently we generated germ-free APP transgenic mice and found a drastic reduction of cerebral Aβ amyloid pathology when compared to control mice with intestinal microbiota. Importantly, colonization of germ-free APP transgenic mice with microbiota from conventionally-raised APP transgenic mice increased cerebral Aβ pathology, while colonization with microbiota from wild-type mice was less effective in increasing cerebral Aβ levels. Our results indicate a microbial involvement in the development of Abeta amyloid pathology, and suggest that microbiota may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28176819

  18. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Harach, T; Marungruang, N; Duthilleul, N; Cheatham, V; Mc Coy, K D; Frisoni, G; Neher, J J; Fåk, F; Jucker, M; Lasser, T; Bolmont, T

    2017-02-08

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer's disease is not known. To this end we sequenced bacterial 16S rRNA from fecal samples of Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse model and found a remarkable shift in the gut microbiota as compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice. Subsequently we generated germ-free APP transgenic mice and found a drastic reduction of cerebral Aβ amyloid pathology when compared to control mice with intestinal microbiota. Importantly, colonization of germ-free APP transgenic mice with microbiota from conventionally-raised APP transgenic mice increased cerebral Aβ pathology, while colonization with microbiota from wild-type mice was less effective in increasing cerebral Aβ levels. Our results indicate a microbial involvement in the development of Abeta amyloid pathology, and suggest that microbiota may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  20. Interleukin-2 improves amyloid pathology, synaptic failure and memory in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sandro; Churlaud, Guillaume; Audrain, Mickael; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Fol, Romain; Souchet, Benoit; Braudeau, Jérôme; Korte, Martin; Klatzmann, David; Cartier, Nathalie

    2016-12-20

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2)-deficient mice have cytoarchitectural hippocampal modifications and impaired learning and memory ability reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease. IL-2 stimulates regulatory T cells whose role is to control inflammation. As neuroinflammation contributes to neurodegeneration, we investigated IL-2 in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated IL-2 levels in hippocampal biopsies of patients with Alzheimer's disease relative to age-matched control individuals. We then treated APP/PS1ΔE9 mice having established Alzheimer's disease with IL-2 for 5 months using single administration of an AAV-IL-2 vector. We first found decreased IL-2 levels in hippocampal biopsies of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In mice, IL-2-induced systemic and brain regulatory T cells expansion and activation. In the hippocampus, IL-2 induced astrocytic activation and recruitment of astrocytes around amyloid plaques, decreased amyloid-β42/40 ratio and amyloid plaque load, improved synaptic plasticity and significantly rescued spine density. Of note, this tissue remodelling was associated with recovery of memory deficits, as assessed in the Morris water maze task. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IL-2 can alleviate Alzheimer's disease hallmarks in APP/PS1ΔE9 mice with established pathology. Therefore, this should prompt the investigation of low-dose IL-2 in Alzheimer's disease and other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. ABCA7 Genotypes Confer Alzheimer's Disease Risk by Modulating AmyloidPathology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Fei; Wan, Yu; Wang, Hui-Fu; Sun, Fu-Rong; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-21

    ABCA7 gene has been identified as a strong genetic locus for Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility in genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, the possible roles of ABCA7 variants in AD pathology were not specifically assessed. Using tagger methods, we extracted 15 targeted ABCA7 loci to investigate their associations with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging markers in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Finally, although we did not detect any significant associations of previously published GWAS SNPs (rs3764650 and rs78117248) with all the CSF (Aβ1 - 42, T-tau, and P-tau) and neuroimaging markers, three other variants (rs3752242, rs3752240, and rs4147912) at ABCA7 loci were detected to show significant associations with amyloid deposition on AV-45 PET in brain. Moreover, haplotype and subgroup analysis confirmed these significant findings. Furthermore, there were no remarkable correlations between ABCA7 variants and neuronal degeneration biomarkers (elevated CSF tau, brain structure atrophy, and hypometabolism on imaging) in this study. Thus, our study suggested that ABCA7 genotypes contribute to the AD risk through involvement in amyloid-β deposition on in vivo imaging, but not in tau pathology, brain atrophy, or decreased glucose metabolism.

  2. The inside-out amyloid hypothesis and synapse pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gouras, Gunnar K; Willén, Katarina; Faideau, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence in brains and cultured neurons of Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mouse models, as well as in human postmortem AD brains, highlights that age-related increases in β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), particularly in endosomes near synapses, are involved in early synapse dysfunction. Our immunoelectron microscopy and high-resolution immunofluorescence microscopy studies show that this early subcellular Aβ accumulation leads to progressive Aβ aggregation and pathology, particularly within dystrophic neurites and synapses. These studies confirm that neuritic/synaptic Aβ accumulation is the nidus of plaque formation. Aβ-dependent synapse pathology in AD models is modulated by synaptic activity and is plaque independent. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is normally transported down neurites and appears to be preferentially processed to Aβ at synapses. Synapses are sites of early Aβ accumulation and aberrant tau phosphorylation in AD, which alter the synaptic composition at early stages of the disease. Elucidating the normal role of APP, and potentially of Aβ, at synapses should provide important insights into the mechanism(s) of Aβ-induced synapse dysfunction in AD and how to therapeutically mitigate these dysfunctions.

  3. Amyloid Plaque and Neurofibrillary Tangle Pathology in a Regulatable Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Jennifer B.; Ramsden, Martin; Forster, Colleen; Sherman, Mathew A.; McGowan, Eileen; Ashe, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models that independently express mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau have proven useful for the study of the neurological consequences of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque and neurofibrillary tangle pathologies. Studies using these mice have yielded essential discoveries with regard to specific aspects of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration that characterize the brain during Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other age-dependent tauopathies. Most recent transgenic studies have focused on the creation of regulatable models that allow the temporal control of transgene expression. To study a more complete model of AD pathology, we designed a new regulatable transgenic mouse that harbors both APP and tau transgenes. Here, we present a novel transgenic mouse model, rTg3696AB, which expresses human APPNLI and tauP301L driven by the CaMKII promoter system. Subsequent generation of Aβ and 4R0N tau in the brain resulted in the development of three neuropathological features of AD: Aβ plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neurodegeneration. Importantly, transgene expression in these mice is regulatable, permitting temporal control of gene expression and the investigation of transgene suppression. PMID:18669616

  4. Disrupted Intrinsic Networks Link AmyloidPathology and Impaired Cognition in Prodromal Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kathrin; Myers, Nicholas E; Göttler, Jens; Pasquini, Lorenzo; Grimmer, Timo; Förster, Stefan; Manoliu, Andrei; Neitzel, Julia; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Riedl, Valentin; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Amyloidpathology (Aβ) and impaired cognition characterize Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, neural mechanisms that link Aβ-pathology with impaired cognition are incompletely understood. Large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) are potential candidates for this link: Aβ-pathology affects specific networks in early AD, these networks show disrupted connectivity, and they process specific cognitive functions impaired in AD, like memory or attention. We hypothesized that, in AD, regional changes of ICNs, which persist across rest- and cognitive task-states, might link Aβ-pathology with impaired cognition via impaired intrinsic connectivity. Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-positron emission tomography reflecting in vivo Aβ-pathology, resting-state fMRI, task-fMRI, and cognitive testing were used in patients with prodromal AD and healthy controls. In patients, default mode network's (DMN) functional connectivity (FC) was reduced in the medial parietal cortex during rest relative to healthy controls, relatively increased in the same region during an attention-demanding task, and associated with patients' cognitive impairment. Local PiB-uptake correlated negatively with DMN connectivity. Importantly, corresponding results were found for the right lateral parietal region of an attentional network. Finally, structural equation modeling confirmed a direct influence of DMN resting-state FC on the association between Aβ-pathology and cognitive impairment. Data provide evidence that disrupted intrinsic network connectivity links Aβ-pathology with cognitive impairment in early AD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of amyloid-β as biomarkers of brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Jee Hoon; Huang, Yafei; Bero, Adam W.; Kasten, Tom; Stewart, Floy R.; Bateman, Randall J.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain begins to occur years prior to the clinical onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prior to Aβ aggregation, levels of extracellular, soluble interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ, which are regulated by neuronal activity and the sleep-wake cycle, correlate with the amount of Aβ deposition in the brain seen later. The amount and quality of sleep declines with aging and to a greater extent in AD. How sleep quality amount as well as the diurnal fluctuation in Aβ change with age and Aβ aggregation are not well understood. We report that a normal sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ is present in the brain of APPswe/PS1δE9 mice before Aβ plaque formation. Following plaque formation, the sleep-wake cycle markedly deteriorated and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ dissipated. As in mice, diurnal fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ in young adult humans with presenilin mutations was also markedly attenuated with Aβ plaque formation. Virtual elimination of Aβ deposits in the mouse brain by active immunization with Aβ42 normalized the sleep-wake cycle and the diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ. These data suggest that Aβ aggregation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ. Sleep-wake behavior and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ in the central nervous system appear to be functional and biochemical markers respectively of Aβ-associated pathology that should be explored in humans diagnostically prior to and following symptom onset and in response to treatment. PMID:22956200

  6. Amyloid-beta and tau pathology following repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Edwards, George; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Soto, Claudio

    2017-02-19

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by distinctive neuropathological alterations, including the cerebral accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates, neuroinflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and neuronal loss, along with behavioral impairments. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is believed to be an important risk factor for certain neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). TBI represents a ubiquitous problem in the world and could play a major role in the pathogenesis and etiology of AD or CTE later in life. TBI events appear to trigger and exacerbate some of the pathological processes in these diseases, in particular, the formation and accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau. Here, we describe the relationship between repetitive mild TBI and the development of Aβ and tau pathology in patients affected by AD or CTE on the basis of epidemiological and pathological studies in human cases, and a thorough overview of data obtained in experimental animal models. We also discuss the possibility that TBI may contribute to initiate the formation of misfolded oligomeric species that may subsequently spread the pathology through a prion-like process of seeding of protein misfolding.

  7. Pathology associated memory deficits in Swedish mutant genome-based amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hock, Brian J; Lattal, K Matthew; Kulnane, Laura Shapiro; Abel, Ted; Lamb, Bruce T

    2009-12-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between pathological alterations and memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic animal models have been generated containing familial AD mutations. The most commonly utilized method involves a cDNA-based approach, utilizing heterologous promoters to drive expression of specific APP isoforms. As a result of the assumptions inherent in the design of each model, the different cDNA-based transgenic mouse models have revealed different relationships between the biochemical, pathological and behavioral alterations observed in these models. Here we provide further characterization of a genomic-based, amyloid precursor protein yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of AD, R1.40, that makes few assumptions regarding disease pathogenesis to study the relationship between brain pathology and altered behavior. Aged R1.40 transgenic and control mice were tested for learning and memory in the Morris water maze and for working memory in the Y maze. Results from the water maze demonstrated intact learning in the both control and R1.40 mice, but impairments in the long-term retention of this information in the transgenic mice, but not controls. Interestingly, however, long-term memory deficits did not correlate with the presence of Abeta deposits within the group of animals examined. By contrast, age-related working memory impairments were also observed in the Y maze in the R1.40 mice, and these deficits correlated with the presence of Abeta deposits. Our results demonstrate unique behavioral alterations in the R1.40 mouse model of AD that are likely both dependent and independent of Abeta deposition.

  8. An Amyloid-Like Pathological Conformation of TDP-43 Is Stabilized by Hypercooperative Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Mompeán, Miguel; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Laurents, Douglas V

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 is an essential RNA-binding protein forming aggregates in almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and many cases of frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43 consists of a folded N-terminal domain with a singular structure, two RRM RNA-binding domains, and a long disordered C-terminal region which plays roles in functional RNA regulatory assemblies as well as pernicious aggregation. Evidence from pathological mutations and seeding experiments strongly suggest that TDP-43 aggregates are pathologically relevant through toxic gain-of-harmful-function and/or harmful loss-of-native-function mechanisms. Recent, but not early, microscopy studies and the ability of TDP-43 aggregates to resist harsh treatment and to seed new pathological aggregates in vitro and in cells strongly suggest that TDP-43 aggregates have a self-templating, amyloid-like structure. Based on the importance of the Gln/Asn-rich 341-367 residue segment for efficient aggregation of endogenous TDP-43 when presented as a 12X-repeat and extensive spectroscopic and computational experiments, we recently proposed that this segment adopts a beta-hairpin structure that assembles in a parallel with a beta-turn configuration to form an amyloid-like structure. Here, we propose that this conformer is stabilized by an especially strong class of hypercooperative hydrogen bonding unique to Gln and Asn sidechains. The clinical existence of this conformer is supported by very recent LC-MS/MS characterization of TDP-43 from ex vivo aggregates, which show that residues 341-367 were protected in vivo from Ser phosphorylation, Gln/Asn deamidation and Met oxidation. Its distinct pattern of SDS-PAGE bands allows us to link this conformer to the exceptionally stable seed of the Type A TDP-43 proteinopathy.

  9. An Amyloid-Like Pathological Conformation of TDP-43 Is Stabilized by Hypercooperative Hydrogen Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Mompeán, Miguel; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Laurents, Douglas V.

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 is an essential RNA-binding protein forming aggregates in almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and many cases of frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43 consists of a folded N-terminal domain with a singular structure, two RRM RNA-binding domains, and a long disordered C-terminal region which plays roles in functional RNA regulatory assemblies as well as pernicious aggregation. Evidence from pathological mutations and seeding experiments strongly suggest that TDP-43 aggregates are pathologically relevant through toxic gain-of-harmful-function and/or harmful loss-of-native-function mechanisms. Recent, but not early, microscopy studies and the ability of TDP-43 aggregates to resist harsh treatment and to seed new pathological aggregates in vitro and in cells strongly suggest that TDP-43 aggregates have a self-templating, amyloid-like structure. Based on the importance of the Gln/Asn-rich 341–367 residue segment for efficient aggregation of endogenous TDP-43 when presented as a 12X-repeat and extensive spectroscopic and computational experiments, we recently proposed that this segment adopts a beta-hairpin structure that assembles in a parallel with a beta-turn configuration to form an amyloid-like structure. Here, we propose that this conformer is stabilized by an especially strong class of hypercooperative hydrogen bonding unique to Gln and Asn sidechains. The clinical existence of this conformer is supported by very recent LC-MS/MS characterization of TDP-43 from ex vivo aggregates, which show that residues 341–367 were protected in vivo from Ser phosphorylation, Gln/Asn deamidation and Met oxidation. Its distinct pattern of SDS-PAGE bands allows us to link this conformer to the exceptionally stable seed of the Type A TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:27909398

  10. Absence of Nitric Oxide Synthase 3 Increases Amyloid β-Protein Pathology in Tg-5xFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zishuo Ian; Kotarba, Ann Marie E.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The abnormal accumulation, assembly and deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are prominent pathological features of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders. A number of factors in the brain can influence Aβ accumulation and associated pathologies. The aim of the present study was to determine the consequences of deleting nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3, the endothelial form of NOS, in Tg-5xFAD mice, a model of parenchymal AD-like amyloid pathology. Methods Tg-5xFAD mice were bred with NOS3−/− mice. Cohorts of Tg-5xFAD mice and bigenic Tg-5xFAD/NOS3−/− mice were aged to six months followed by collection of the blood and brain tissues from the mice for biochemical and pathological analyses. Results ELISA analyses show that the absence of NOS3 results in elevated levels of cerebral and plasma Aβ peptides in Tg-5xFAD mice. Immunohistochemical analyses show that the absence of NOS3 increased the amount of parenchymal Aβ deposition and fibrillar amyloid accumulation in Tg-5xFAD mice. The elevated levels of Aβ were not due to changes in the expression levels of transgene encoded human amyloid precursor protein (APP), endogenous β-secretase, or increased proteolytic processing of APP. Conclusions The results from this study suggest that the loss of NOS3 activity enhances Aβ pathology in Tg-5xFAD mice. These findings are similar to previous studies of NOS2 deletion suggesting that reduced NOS activity and NO levels enhance amyloid-associated pathologies in human APP transgenic mice. PMID:24159423

  11. Suspected non Alzheimer's pathology - Is it non-Alzheimer's or non-amyloid?

    PubMed

    Dani, Melanie; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2017-02-21

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive loss of neurons, is a major process involved in dementia and age-related cognitive impairment. It can be detected clinically using currently available biomarker tests. Suspected Non Alzheimer Pathology (SNAP) is a biomarker-based concept that encompasses a group of individuals with neurodegeneration, but no evidence of amyloid deposition (thereby distinguishing it from Alzheimer's disease (AD)). These individuals may often have a clinical diagnosis of AD, but their clinical features, genetic susceptibility and progression can differ significantly, carrying crucial implications for precise diagnostics, clinical management, and efficacy of clinical drug trials. SNAP has caused wide interest in the dementia research community, because it is still unclear whether it represents distinct pathology separate from AD, or whether in some individuals, it could represent the earliest stage of AD. This debate has raised pertinent questions about the pathways to AD, the need for biomarkers, and the sensitivity of current biomarker tests. In this review, we discuss the biomarker and imaging trials that first recognised SNAP. We describe the pathological correlates of SNAP and comment on the different causes of neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss the debate around the concept of SNAP, and further unanswered questions that are emerging.

  12. Diabetes exacerbates amyloid and neurovascular pathology in aging-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Prior, Marguerite; Lo, David; Jolivalt, Corinne; Schubert, David; Maher, Pamela

    2012-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports a link between diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, and aging. However, the physiological mechanisms by which diabetes impacts brain function and cognition are not fully understood. To determine how diabetes contributes to cognitive dysfunction and age-associated pathology, we used streptozotocin to induce type 1 diabetes (T1D) in senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Contextual fear conditioning demonstrated that T1D resulted in the development of cognitive deficits in SAMR1 mice similar to those seen in age-matched, nondiabetic SAMP8 mice. No further cognitive deficits were observed when the SAMP8 mice were made diabetic. T1D dramatically increased Aβ and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice and to a lesser extent in age-matched SAMR1 mice. Further analysis revealed aggregated Aβ within astrocyte processes surrounding vessels. Western blot analyses from T1D SAMP8 mice showed elevated amyloid precursor protein processing and protein glycation along with increased inflammation. T1D elevated tau phosphorylation in the SAMR1 mice but did not further increase it in the SAMP8 mice where it was already significantly higher. These data suggest that aberrant glucose metabolism potentiates the aging phenotype in old mice and contributes to early stage central nervous system pathology in younger animals.

  13. Disrupted cross-laminar cortical processing in β amyloid pathology precedes cell death.

    PubMed

    Lison, H; Happel, M F K; Schneider, F; Baldauf, K; Kerbstat, S; Seelbinder, B; Schneeberg, J; Zappe, M; Goldschmidt, J; Budinger, E; Schröder, U H; Ohl, F W; Schilling, S; Demuth, H-U; Scheich, H; Reymann, K G; Rönicke, R

    2014-03-01

    Disruption of neuronal networks in the Alzheimer-afflicted brain is increasingly recognized as a key correlate of cognitive and memory decline in Alzheimer patients. We hypothesized that functional synaptic disconnections within cortical columnar microcircuits by pathological β-amyloid accumulation, rather than cell death, initially causes the cognitive impairments. During development of cortical β-amyloidosis with still few plaques in the transgenic 5xFAD mouse model single cell resolution mapping of neuronal thallium uptake revealed that electrical activity of pyramidal cells breaks down throughout infragranular cortical layer V long before cell death occurs. Treatment of 5xFAD mice with the glutaminyl cyclase inhibitor, PQ 529, partially prevented the decline of pyramidal cell activity, indicating pyroglutamate-modified forms, potentially mixed oligomers of Aβ are contributing to neuronal impairment. Laminar investigation of cortical circuit dysfunction with current source density analysis identified an early loss of excitatory synaptic input in infragranular layers, linked to pathological recurrent activations in supragranular layers. This specific disruption of normal cross-laminar cortical processing coincided with a decline of contextual fear learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracellular Aβ pathology and early cognitive impairments in a transgenic rat overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein: a multidimensional study.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Allard, Simon; Richter, Luise; Munter, Lisa-Marie; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Weise, Christoph; Do Carmo, Sonia; Klein, William L; Multhaup, Gerhard; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-06-05

    Numerous studies have implicated the abnormal accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) as an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, capable of triggering neuroinflammation, tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive deficits. However, the occurrence and pathological relevance of intracellular Aβ remain a matter of controversial debate. In this study, we have used a multidimensional approach including high-magnification and super-resolution microscopy, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) mass spectrometry analysis and ELISA to investigate the Aβ pathology and its associated cognitive impairments, in a novel transgenic rat model overexpressing human APP. Our microscopy studies with quantitative co-localization analysis revealed the presence of intraneuronal Aβ in transgenic rats, with an immunological signal that was clearly distinguished from that of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its C-terminal fragments (CTFs). The early intraneuronal pathology was accompanied by a significant elevation of soluble Aβ42 peptides that paralleled the presence and progression of early cognitive deficits, several months prior to amyloid plaque deposition. Aβ38, Aβ39, Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides were detected in the rat CSF by MALDI-MS analysis even at the plaque-free stages; suggesting that a combination of intracellular and soluble extracellular Aβ may be responsible for impairing cognition at early time points. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the intraneuronal development of AD-like amyloid pathology includes a mixture of molecular species (Aβ, APP and CTFs) of which a considerable component is Aβ; and that the early presence of these species within neurons has deleterious effects in the CNS, even before the development of full-blown AD-like pathology.

  15. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  16. Nigral Tau pathology and striatal amyloid-β deposition does not correlate with striatal dopamine deficit in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Tabea H; Lochner, Maximilian; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2012-12-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms may appear in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, using morphometric immunohistochemistry in 34 cases with AD-related pathology, we evaluated whether nigral burden of tau pathology or striatal burden of amyloid-β deposition correlates with dopamine transporter (DAT) expression in the striatum. Our observations show a lack of correlation between these variables and support the notion that lower striatal DAT expression in AD patients suggests concomitant nigral α-synuclein pathology. Extrapyramidal symptoms may have a complex background in AD.

  17. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Mediated Regulation of Ganglioside Homeostasis Linking Alzheimer's Disease Pathology with Ganglioside Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Zinser, Eva G.; Grösgen, Sven; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L.; Burg, Verena K.; Kaestner, Lars; Bayer, Thomas A.; Lipp, Peter; Müller, Ulrike; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Gangliosides are important players for controlling neuronal function and are directly involved in AD pathology. They are among the most potent stimulators of Aβ production, are enriched in amyloid plaques and bind amyloid beta (Aβ). However, the molecular mechanisms linking gangliosides with AD are unknown. Here we identified the previously unknown function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), specifically its cleavage products Aβ and the APP intracellular domain (AICD), of regulating GD3-synthase (GD3S). Since GD3S is the key enzyme converting a- to b-series gangliosides, it therefore plays a major role in controlling the levels of major brain gangliosides. This regulation occurs by two separate and additive mechanisms. The first mechanism directly targets the enzymatic activity of GD3S: Upon binding of Aβ to the ganglioside GM3, the immediate substrate of the GD3S, enzymatic turnover of GM3 by GD3S was strongly reduced. The second mechanism targets GD3S expression. APP cleavage results, in addition to Aβ release, in the release of AICD, a known candidate for gene transcriptional regulation. AICD strongly down regulated GD3S transcription and knock-in of an AICD deletion mutant of APP in vivo, or knock-down of Fe65 in neuroblastoma cells, was sufficient to abrogate normal GD3S functionality. Equally, knock-out of the presenilin genes, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, essential for Aβ and AICD production, or of APP itself, increased GD3S activity and expression and consequently resulted in a major shift of a- to b-series gangliosides. In addition to GD3S regulation by APP processing, gangliosides in turn altered APP cleavage. GM3 decreased, whereas the ganglioside GD3, the GD3S product, increased Aβ production, resulting in a regulatory feedback cycle, directly linking ganglioside metabolism with APP processing and Aβ generation. A central aspect of this homeostatic control is the reduction of GD3S activity via an Aβ-GM3 complex and AICD

  18. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mediated regulation of ganglioside homeostasis linking Alzheimer's disease pathology with ganglioside metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Zinser, Eva G; Grösgen, Sven; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L; Burg, Verena K; Kaestner, Lars; Bayer, Thomas A; Lipp, Peter; Müller, Ulrike; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Gangliosides are important players for controlling neuronal function and are directly involved in AD pathology. They are among the most potent stimulators of Aβ production, are enriched in amyloid plaques and bind amyloid beta (Aβ). However, the molecular mechanisms linking gangliosides with AD are unknown. Here we identified the previously unknown function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), specifically its cleavage products Aβ and the APP intracellular domain (AICD), of regulating GD3-synthase (GD3S). Since GD3S is the key enzyme converting a- to b-series gangliosides, it therefore plays a major role in controlling the levels of major brain gangliosides. This regulation occurs by two separate and additive mechanisms. The first mechanism directly targets the enzymatic activity of GD3S: Upon binding of Aβ to the ganglioside GM3, the immediate substrate of the GD3S, enzymatic turnover of GM3 by GD3S was strongly reduced. The second mechanism targets GD3S expression. APP cleavage results, in addition to Aβ release, in the release of AICD, a known candidate for gene transcriptional regulation. AICD strongly down regulated GD3S transcription and knock-in of an AICD deletion mutant of APP in vivo, or knock-down of Fe65 in neuroblastoma cells, was sufficient to abrogate normal GD3S functionality. Equally, knock-out of the presenilin genes, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, essential for Aβ and AICD production, or of APP itself, increased GD3S activity and expression and consequently resulted in a major shift of a- to b-series gangliosides. In addition to GD3S regulation by APP processing, gangliosides in turn altered APP cleavage. GM3 decreased, whereas the ganglioside GD3, the GD3S product, increased Aβ production, resulting in a regulatory feedback cycle, directly linking ganglioside metabolism with APP processing and Aβ generation. A central aspect of this homeostatic control is the reduction of GD3S activity via an Aβ-GM3 complex and AICD

  19. Opposing effects of Apoe/Apoa1 double deletion on amyloidpathology and cognitive performance in APP mice

    PubMed Central

    Fitz, Nicholas F.; Tapias, Victor; Cronican, Andrea A.; Castranio, Emilie L.; Saleem, Muzamil; Carter, Alexis Y.; Lefterova, Martina

    2015-01-01

    See Corona and Landreth (doi:10.1093/awv300) for a scientific commentary on this article. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (encoded by ABCA1) regulates cholesterol efflux from cells to apolipoproteins A-I and E (ApoA-I and APOE; encoded by APOA1 and APOE, respectively) and the generation of high density lipoproteins. In Abca1 knockout mice (Abca1ko), high density lipoproteins and ApoA-I are virtually lacking, and total APOE and APOE-containing lipoproteins in brain substantially decreased. As the ε4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, ABCA1 role as a modifier of APOE lipidation is of significance for this disease. Reportedly, Abca1 deficiency in mice expressing human APP accelerates amyloid deposition and behaviour deficits. We used APP/PS1dE9 mice crossed to Apoe and Apoa1 knockout mice to generate Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice. We hypothesized that Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice would mimic the phenotype of APP/Abca1ko mice in regards to amyloid plaques and cognitive deficits. Amyloid pathology, peripheral lipoprotein metabolism, cognitive deficits and dendritic morphology of Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice were compared to APP/Abca1ko, APP/PS1dE9, and single Apoa1 and Apoe knockouts. Contrary to our prediction, the results demonstrate that double deletion of Apoe and Apoa1 ameliorated the amyloid pathology, including amyloid plaques and soluble amyloid. In double knockout mice we show that 125I-amyloid-β microinjected into the central nervous system cleared at a rate twice faster compared to Abca1 knockout mice. We tested the effect of Apoe, Apoa1 or Abca1 deficiency on spreading of exogenous amyloid-β seeds injected into the brain of young pre-depositing APP mice. The results show that lack of Abca1 augments dissemination of exogenous amyloid significantly more than the lack of Apoe. In the periphery, Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice exhibited substantial atherosclerosis and very high levels of low

  20. Opposing effects of Apoe/Apoa1 double deletion on amyloidpathology and cognitive performance in APP mice.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Nicholas F; Tapias, Victor; Cronican, Andrea A; Castranio, Emilie L; Saleem, Muzamil; Carter, Alexis Y; Lefterova, Martina; Lefterov, Iliya; Koldamova, Radosveta

    2015-12-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (encoded by ABCA1) regulates cholesterol efflux from cells to apolipoproteins A-I and E (ApoA-I and APOE; encoded by APOA1 and APOE, respectively) and the generation of high density lipoproteins. In Abca1 knockout mice (Abca1(ko)), high density lipoproteins and ApoA-I are virtually lacking, and total APOE and APOE-containing lipoproteins in brain substantially decreased. As the ε4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease, ABCA1 role as a modifier of APOE lipidation is of significance for this disease. Reportedly, Abca1 deficiency in mice expressing human APP accelerates amyloid deposition and behaviour deficits. We used APP/PS1dE9 mice crossed to Apoe and Apoa1 knockout mice to generate Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice. We hypothesized that Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice would mimic the phenotype of APP/Abca1(ko) mice in regards to amyloid plaques and cognitive deficits. Amyloid pathology, peripheral lipoprotein metabolism, cognitive deficits and dendritic morphology of Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice were compared to APP/Abca1(ko), APP/PS1dE9, and single Apoa1 and Apoe knockouts. Contrary to our prediction, the results demonstrate that double deletion of Apoe and Apoa1 ameliorated the amyloid pathology, including amyloid plaques and soluble amyloid. In double knockout mice we show that (125)I-amyloid-β microinjected into the central nervous system cleared at a rate twice faster compared to Abca1 knockout mice. We tested the effect of Apoe, Apoa1 or Abca1 deficiency on spreading of exogenous amyloid-β seeds injected into the brain of young pre-depositing APP mice. The results show that lack of Abca1 augments dissemination of exogenous amyloid significantly more than the lack of Apoe. In the periphery, Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice exhibited substantial atherosclerosis and very high levels of low density lipoproteins compared to APP/PS1dE9 and APP/Abca1(ko). Plasma level of amyloid

  1. Early and progressive deficit of neuronal activity patterns in a model of local amyloid pathology in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Koukouli, Fani; Rooy, Marie; Maskos, Uwe

    2016-12-20

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The condition predominantly affects the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and is characterized by the spread of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). But soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers have also been identified to accumulate in the brains of AD patients and correlate with cognitive dysfunction more than the extent of plaque deposition. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the human mutated amyloid precursor protein (AAV-hAPP). Intracranial injection of the AAV into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) allowed the induction of AD-like deficits in adult mice, thereby modelling human pathology. AAV-hAPP expression caused accumulation of Aβ oligomers, microglial activation, astrocytosis and the gradual formation of amyloid plaques and NFTs. In vivo two-photon imaging revealed an increase in neuronal activity, a dysfunction characteristic of the pathology, already during the accumulation of soluble oligomers. Importantly, we found that Aβ disrupts the synchronous spontaneous activity of neurons in PFC that, as in humans, is characterized by ultraslow fluctuation patterns. Our work allowed us to track brain activity changes during disease progression and provides new insight into the early deficits of synchronous ongoing brain activity, the "default network", in the presence of Aβ peptide.

  2. Early and progressive deficit of neuronal activity patterns in a model of local amyloid pathology in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koukouli, Fani; Rooy, Marie; Maskos, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The condition predominantly affects the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and is characterized by the spread of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). But soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers have also been identified to accumulate in the brains of AD patients and correlate with cognitive dysfunction more than the extent of plaque deposition. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the human mutated amyloid precursor protein (AAV-hAPP). Intracranial injection of the AAV into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) allowed the induction of AD-like deficits in adult mice, thereby modelling human pathology. AAV-hAPP expression caused accumulation of Aβ oligomers, microglial activation, astrocytosis and the gradual formation of amyloid plaques and NFTs. In vivo two-photon imaging revealed an increase in neuronal activity, a dysfunction characteristic of the pathology, already during the accumulation of soluble oligomers. Importantly, we found that Aβ disrupts the synchronous spontaneous activity of neurons in PFC that, as in humans, is characterized by ultraslow fluctuation patterns. Our work allowed us to track brain activity changes during disease progression and provides new insight into the early deficits of synchronous ongoing brain activity, the “default network”, in the presence of Aβ peptide. PMID:27999185

  3. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  4. Biochemical stages of amyloid-β peptide aggregation and accumulation in the human brain and their association with symptomatic and pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Kosterin, Irina; Kumar, Sathish; von Arnim, Christine A F; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Fändrich, Marcus; Walter, Jochen; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β peptide in the brain. N-terminal truncation resulting in the formation of AβN3pE and phosphorylation at serine 8 have been reported to modify aggregation properties of amyloid-β. Biochemically, soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated, and insoluble, plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates have been distinguished. Soluble and dispersible amyloid-β aggregates are both in mixture with the extracellular or intracellular fluid but dispersible aggregates can be cleared from proteins in solution by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of phosphorylated amyloid-β and AβN3pE in soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated, and plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease we studied brains from 21 cases with symptomatic Alzheimer's disease, 33 pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease cases, and 20 control cases. Western blot analysis showed that soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated and plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates in the earliest preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease did not exhibit detectable amounts of AβN3pE and phosphorylated amyloid-β. This stage was referred to as biochemical stage 1 of amyloid-β aggregation and accumulation. In biochemical amyloid-β stage 2, AβN3pE was additionally found whereas phosphorylated amyloid-β was restricted to biochemical amyloid-β stage 3, the last stage of amyloid-β aggregation. Phosphorylated amyloid-β was seen in the dispersible, membrane-associated, and plaque-associated fraction. All cases with symptomatic Alzheimer's disease in our sample fulfilled biochemical amyloid-β stage 3 criteria, i.e. detection of phosphorylated amyloid-β. Most, but not all, cases with pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease had biochemical amyloid-β stages 1 or 2. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the hierarchical occurrence of amyloid-β, AβN3pE, and phosphorylated amyloid-β in amyloid plaques

  5. SEN1500, a novel oral amyloid-β aggregation inhibitor, attenuates brain pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brunner, D; Flunkert, S; Neddens, J; Duller, S; Scopes, D I C; Treherne, J M; Hutter-Paier, B

    2017-09-14

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation is thought to be a major pathogenic event underlying the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The development of new drugs inhibiting the Aβ aggregation process is, therefore, important. SEN1500, an orally bioavailable and CNS-penetrant Aβ aggregation inhibitor, has previously been shown to reduce spatial learning and memory deficits in an APP transgenic mouse model. To verify that the pharmacological properties of SEN1500 are not unique to this model, we investigated brain Aβ pathology, neuroinflammation, as well as memory in a different mouse model of AD expressing the human amyloid precursor protein with Swedish and London mutations (APPSL). APPSL transgenic mice and non-transgenic littermates were treated with SEN1500 via food pellets from three months of age for four months. At the end of the treatment, animals were tested for memory deficits using the contextual fear conditioning test and brain tissue was analyzed for soluble and insoluble amyloid-β1-38, -40, -42, β-amyloid plaques, β-sheet plaque cores, as well as for astrocytosis and activated microglia. SEN1500 treatment lowered insoluble Aβ levels and β-amyloid plaque load in the brain compared with control-treated APPSL mice. Activated microglia were significantly reduced in the cortex but not the hippocampus of SEN1500-treated APPSL mice. Memory deficits of APPSL mice could not be rescued by SEN1500. SEN1500 is not only able to reduce Aβ pathology and activated microglia but also to improve learning and memory as previously shown, making SEN1500 a potential candidate for human AD treatment. This Aβ aggregation inhibitor could be a promising therapeutic agent for the disease-modifying treatment of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reversal of autophagy dysfunction in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease ameliorates amyloid pathologies and memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S.; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Wesson, Daniel; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M.; Yang, Austin J.; Wilson, Donald A.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M.; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy, a major degradative pathway for proteins and organelles, is essential for survival of mature neurons. Extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer’s disease brain contributes to Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we identified and characterized marked intraneuronal amyloid-β peptide/amyloid and lysosomal system pathology in the Alzheimer’s disease mouse model TgCRND8 similar to that previously described in Alzheimer’s disease brains. We further establish that the basis for these pathologies involves defective proteolytic clearance of neuronal autophagic substrates including amyloid-β peptide. To establish the pathogenic significance of these abnormalities, we enhanced lysosomal cathepsin activities and rates of autophagic protein turnover in TgCRND8 mice by genetically deleting cystatin B, an endogenous inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Cystatin B deletion rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, reduced abnormal accumulations of amyloid-β peptide, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates within autolysosomes/lysosomes and reduced intraneuronal amyloid-β peptide. The amelioration of lysosomal function in TgCRND8 markedly decreased extracellular amyloid deposition and total brain amyloid-β peptide 40 and 42 levels, and prevented the development of deficits of learning and memory in fear conditioning and olfactory habituation tests. Our findings support the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease and indicate the potential value of restoring normal autophagy as an innovative therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:21186265

  7. Rescue of Early bace-1 and Global DNA Demethylation by S-Adenosylmethionine Reduces Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognition in an Alzheimer’s Model

    PubMed Central

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Hanzel, Cecilia E.; Jacobs, Marie L.; Machnes, Ziv; Iulita, M. Florencia; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Lei; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Danik, Marc; Breuillaud, Lionel S.; Bennett, David A.; Szyf, Moshe; Cuello, A. Claudio

    2016-01-01

    General DNA hypomethylation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but it is unclear when DNA hypomethylation starts or plays a role in AD pathology or whether DNA re-methylation would rescue early amyloid-related cognitive impairments. In an APP transgenic mouse model of AD-like amyloid pathology we found that early intraneuronal amyloid beta build-up is sufficient to unleash a global and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (bace-1) DNA demethylation in AD-vulnerable brain regions. S-adenosylmethionine administration at these early stages abolished this hypomethylation, diminished the amyloid pathology and restored cognitive capabilities. To assess a possible human significance of findings, we examined the methylation at 12 CpGs sites in the bace-1 promoter, using genome-wide DNA methylation data from 740 postmortem human brains. Thus, we found significant associations of bace-1 promoter methylation with β-amyloid load among persons with AD dementia, and PHFtau tangle density. Our results support a plausible causal role for the earliest amyloid beta accumulation to provoke DNA hypomethylation, influencing AD pathological outcomes. PMID:27681803

  8. Rescue of Early bace-1 and Global DNA Demethylation by S-Adenosylmethionine Reduces Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognition in an Alzheimer's Model.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Hanzel, Cecilia E; Jacobs, Marie L; Machnes, Ziv; Iulita, M Florencia; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Lei; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Danik, Marc; Breuillaud, Lionel S; Bennett, David A; Szyf, Moshe; Cuello, A Claudio

    2016-09-29

    General DNA hypomethylation is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it is unclear when DNA hypomethylation starts or plays a role in AD pathology or whether DNA re-methylation would rescue early amyloid-related cognitive impairments. In an APP transgenic mouse model of AD-like amyloid pathology we found that early intraneuronal amyloid beta build-up is sufficient to unleash a global and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (bace-1) DNA demethylation in AD-vulnerable brain regions. S-adenosylmethionine administration at these early stages abolished this hypomethylation, diminished the amyloid pathology and restored cognitive capabilities. To assess a possible human significance of findings, we examined the methylation at 12 CpGs sites in the bace-1 promoter, using genome-wide DNA methylation data from 740 postmortem human brains. Thus, we found significant associations of bace-1 promoter methylation with β-amyloid load among persons with AD dementia, and PHFtau tangle density. Our results support a plausible causal role for the earliest amyloid beta accumulation to provoke DNA hypomethylation, influencing AD pathological outcomes.

  9. Amyloidpathology is attenuated by tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment in APP/PS1 mice after disease onset.

    PubMed

    Dionísio, Pedro A; Amaral, Joana D; Ribeiro, Maria F; Lo, Adrian C; D'Hooge, Rudi; Rodrigues, Cecília M P

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder hallmarked by the accumulation of extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and intraneuronal hyperphosphorylated tau, as well as chronic neuroinflammation. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is an endogenous anti-apoptotic bile acid with potent neuroprotective properties in several experimental models of AD. We have previously reported the therapeutic efficacy of TUDCA treatment before amyloid plaque deposition in APP/PS1 double-transgenic mice. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of TUDCA when administrated after the onset of amyloid pathology. APP/PS1 transgenic mice with 7 months of age were injected intraperitoneally with TUDCA (500 mg/kg) every 3 days for 3 months. TUDCA treatment significantly attenuated Aβ deposition in the brain, with a concomitant decrease in Aβ₁₋₄₀ and Aβ₁₋₄₂ levels. The amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein was also reduced, indicating that TUDCA interferes with Aβ production. In addition, TUDCA abrogated GSK3β hyperactivity, which is highly implicated in tau hyperphosphorylation and glial activation. This effect was likely dependent on the specific activation of the upstream kinase, Akt. Finally, TUDCA treatment decreased glial activation and reduced proinflammatory cytokine messenger RNA expression, while partially rescuing synaptic loss. Overall, our results suggest that TUDCA is a promising therapeutic strategy not only for prevention but also for treatment of AD after disease onset. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Modulates Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognitive Function in AβPP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Durani, Lina Wati; Hamezah, Hamizah Shahirah; Damanhuri, Hanafi Ahmad; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Tsuji, Mayumi; Kiuchi, Yuji; Ono, Kenjiro; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The cardinal neuropathological characteristic of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) into extracellular plaques that ultimately disrupt neuronal function and lead to neurodegeneration. One possible therapeutic strategy therefore is to prevent Aβ aggregation. Previous studies have suggested that vitamin E analogs slow AD progression in humans. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), a mixture of vitamin E analogs from palm oil, on amyloid pathology in vitro and in vivo. TRF treatment dose-dependently inhibited the formation of Aβ fibrils and Aβ oligomers in vitro. Moreover, daily TRF supplementation to AβPPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice for 10 months attenuated Aβ immunoreactive depositions and thioflavin-S-positive fibrillar type plaques in the brain, and eventually improved cognitive function in the novel object recognition test compared with control AβPPswe/PS1dE9 mice. The present result indicates that TRF reduced amyloid pathology and improved cognitive functions, and suggests that TRF is a potential therapeutic agent for AD. PMID:27716672

  11. Impact of peripheral myeloid cells on amyloidpathology in Alzheimer’s disease–like mice

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R.; Drost, Natalia; Handrick, Susann; Mathur, Vidhu; Luo, Jian; Wegner, Anja; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Although central nervous system–resident microglia are believed to be ineffective at phagocytosing and clearing amyloid-β (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it has been suggested that peripheral myeloid cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population with greater Aβ-clearing capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the conditional ablation of resident microglia in CD11b-HSVTK (TK) mice is followed by a rapid repopulation of the brain by peripherally derived myeloid cells. We used this system to directly assess the ability of peripheral macrophages to reduce Aβ plaque pathology and therefore depleted and replaced the pool of resident microglia with peripherally derived myeloid cells in Aβ-carrying APPPS1 mice crossed to TK mice (APPPS1;TK). Despite a nearly complete exchange of resident microglia with peripheral myeloid cells, there was no significant change in Aβ burden or APP processing in APPPS1;TK mice. Importantly, however, newly recruited peripheral myeloid cells failed to cluster around Aβ deposits. Even additional anti-Aβ antibody treatment aimed at engaging myeloid cells with amyloid plaques neither directed peripherally derived myeloid cells to amyloid plaques nor altered Aβ burden. These data demonstrate that mere recruitment of peripheral myeloid cells to the brain is insufficient in substantially clearing Aβ burden and suggest that specific additional triggers appear to be required to exploit the full potential of myeloid cell–based therapies for AD. PMID:26458768

  12. Vascular and parenchymal amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer disease knock-in mouse model: interplay with cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) in the brain is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Besides the parenchymal pathology, Aβ is known to undergo active transport across the blood–brain barrier and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a prominent feature in the majority of AD. Although impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been implicated in faulty Aβ transport and clearance, and cerebral hypoperfusion can exist in the pre-clinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is still unclear whether it is one of the causal factors for AD pathogenesis, or an early consequence of a multi-factor condition that would lead to AD at late stage. To study the potential interaction between faulty CBF and amyloid accumulation in clinical-relevant situation, we generated a new amyloid precursor protein (APP) knock-in allele that expresses humanized Aβ and a Dutch mutation in addition to Swedish/London mutations and compared this line with an equivalent knock-in line but in the absence of the Dutch mutation, both crossed onto the PS1M146V knock-in background. Results Introduction of the Dutch mutation results in robust CAA and parenchymal Aβ pathology, age-dependent reduction of spatial learning and memory deficits, and CBF reduction as detected by fMRI. Direct manipulation of CBF by transverse aortic constriction surgery on the left common carotid artery caused differential changes in CBF in the anterior and middle region of the cortex, where it is reduced on the left side and increased on the right side. However these perturbations in CBF resulted in the same effect: both significantly exacerbate CAA and amyloid pathology. Conclusions Our study reveals a direct and positive link between vascular and parenchymal Aβ; both can be modulated by CBF. The new APP knock-in mouse model recapitulates many symptoms of AD including progressive vascular and parenchymal Aβ pathology and behavioral deficits in the absence

  13. Glutamate system, amyloid ß peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Revett, Timothy J; Baker, Glen B; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid ß peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid ß and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid ß production, but also amyloid ß can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness.

  14. Glutamate system, amyloid β peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Revett, Timothy J.; Baker, Glen B.; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid β and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid β production, but also amyloid β can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness. PMID:22894822

  15. Insulin Resistance as a Link between Amyloid-Beta and Tau Pathologies in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Roger J.; Diehl, Thomas C.; Chia, Chee W.; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Current hypotheses and theories regarding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) heavily implicate brain insulin resistance (IR) as a key factor. Despite the many well-validated metrics for systemic IR, the absence of biomarkers for brain-specific IR represents a translational gap that has hindered its study in living humans. In our lab, we have been working to develop biomarkers that reflect the common mechanisms of brain IR and AD that may be used to follow their engagement by experimental treatments. We present two promising biomarkers for brain IR in AD: insulin cascade mediators probed in extracellular vesicles (EVs) enriched for neuronal origin, and two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of brain glucose. As further evidence for a fundamental link between brain IR and AD, we provide a novel analysis demonstrating the close spatial correlation between brain expression of genes implicated in IR (using Allen Human Brain Atlas data) and tau and beta-amyloid pathologies. We proceed to propose the bold hypotheses that baseline differences in the metabolic reliance on glycolysis, and the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) and insulin signaling genes determine the vulnerability of different brain regions to Tau and/or Amyloid beta (Aβ) pathology, and that IR is a critical link between these two pathologies that define AD. Lastly, we provide an overview of ongoing clinical trials that target IR as an angle to treat AD, and suggest how biomarkers may be used to evaluate treatment efficacy and target engagement. PMID:28515688

  16. Amyloidpathology and APOE genotype modulate retinoid X receptor agonist activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tai, Leon M; Koster, Kevin P; Luo, Jia; Lee, Sue H; Wang, Yue-ting; Collins, Nicole C; Ben Aissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J; LaDu, Mary Jo

    2014-10-31

    Previous data demonstrate that bexarotene (Bex), retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, reduces soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer disease (AD)-transgenic mice either by increasing the levels of mouse apolipoprotein E (apoE) or increasing ABCA1/ABCG1-induced apoE lipoprotein association/lipidation. However, although the mechanism of action of RXR agonists remains unclear, a major concern for their use is human (h)-APOE4, the greatest AD genetic risk factor. If APOE4 imparts a toxic gain-of-function, then increasing apoE4 may increase soluble Aβ, likely the proximal AD neurotoxin. If the APOE4 loss-of-function is lipidation of apoE4, then induction of ABCA1/ABCG1 may be beneficial. In novel EFAD-Tg mice (overexpressing h-Aβ42 with h-APOE), levels of soluble Aβ (Aβ42 and oligomeric Aβ) are highest in E4FAD hippocampus (HP) > E3FAD-HP > E4FAD cortex (CX) > E3FAD-CX, whereas levels of lipoprotein-associated/lipidated apoE have the opposite pattern (6 months). In E4FAD-HP, short-term RXR agonist treatment (Bex or LG100268; 5.75-6 months) increased ABCA1, apoE4 lipoprotein-association/lipidation, and apoE4/Aβ complex, decreased soluble Aβ, and increased PSD95. In addition, hydrogel delivery, which mimics low sustained release, was equally effective as gavage for Bex and LG100268. RXR agonists induced no beneficial effects in the E4FAD-HP in a prevention protocol (5-6 months) and actually increased soluble Aβ levels in E3FAD-CX and E4FAD-CX with the short-term protocol, possibly the result of systemic hepatomegaly. Thus, RXR agonists address the loss-of-function associated with APOE4 and exacerbated by Aβ pathology, i.e. low levels of apoE4 lipoprotein association/lipidation. Further studies are vital to address whether RXR agonists are an APOE4-specific AD therapeutic and the systemic side effects that limit translational application. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. AmyloidPathology and APOE Genotype Modulate Retinoid X Receptor Agonist Activity in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Leon M.; Koster, Kevin P.; Luo, Jia; Lee, Sue H.; Wang, Yue-ting; Collins, Nicole C.; Ben Aissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; LaDu, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Previous data demonstrate that bexarotene (Bex), retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, reduces soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer disease (AD)-transgenic mice either by increasing the levels of mouse apolipoprotein E (apoE) or increasing ABCA1/ABCG1-induced apoE lipoprotein association/lipidation. However, although the mechanism of action of RXR agonists remains unclear, a major concern for their use is human (h)-APOE4, the greatest AD genetic risk factor. If APOE4 imparts a toxic gain-of-function, then increasing apoE4 may increase soluble Aβ, likely the proximal AD neurotoxin. If the APOE4 loss-of-function is lipidation of apoE4, then induction of ABCA1/ABCG1 may be beneficial. In novel EFAD-Tg mice (overexpressing h-Aβ42 with h-APOE), levels of soluble Aβ (Aβ42 and oligomeric Aβ) are highest in E4FAD hippocampus (HP) > E3FAD-HP > E4FAD cortex (CX) > E3FAD-CX, whereas levels of lipoprotein-associated/lipidated apoE have the opposite pattern (6 months). In E4FAD-HP, short-term RXR agonist treatment (Bex or LG100268; 5.75–6 months) increased ABCA1, apoE4 lipoprotein-association/lipidation, and apoE4/Aβ complex, decreased soluble Aβ, and increased PSD95. In addition, hydrogel delivery, which mimics low sustained release, was equally effective as gavage for Bex and LG100268. RXR agonists induced no beneficial effects in the E4FAD-HP in a prevention protocol (5–6 months) and actually increased soluble Aβ levels in E3FAD-CX and E4FAD-CX with the short-term protocol, possibly the result of systemic hepatomegaly. Thus, RXR agonists address the loss-of-function associated with APOE4 and exacerbated by Aβ pathology, i.e. low levels of apoE4 lipoprotein association/lipidation. Further studies are vital to address whether RXR agonists are an APOE4-specific AD therapeutic and the systemic side effects that limit translational application. PMID:25217640

  18. Is formaldehyde the missing link in AD pathology? The differential aggregation of amyloid-beta with APOE isoforms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rizak, Joshua D; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genetic variation and aging are the two most noted risk factors associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) related dementia. However, the relationship between these two pathological factors is not understood. Formaldehyde (FA) is an age related factor that has been found to be elevated in AD patients and is known to have protein cross-linking properties. FA forms cross-links with larger arginine, lysine and tryptophan residues but also has thiol reactivity. This study investigated the formation of protein aggregates between amyloid-beta (1-40) peptide (Aβ), the main component of amyloid plaques in AD, with APOE isoforms in vitro. APOE4 protein, the isoform with arginines at residue 112 and 158, was found to form aggregates with more Aβ (P < 0.001) and APOE (P < 0.05) protein content in 10 mM FA than aggregates formed with either APOE3 or APOE2 protein. This aggregation pattern reflected the trend of vulnerability conferred by the APOE genetic variation (APOE4 > APOE3 > APOE2) and suggested that FA may have a role in the differential pattern of amyloid plaque formation in people with differing APOE genetic backgrounds. All told, this finding adds to a growing body of evidence that FA has a role in AD progression as well as provides a novel link between aging and APOE risk factors; the cornerstones of one of the world's largest mental health concerns.

  19. Tenascin-C Is Associated with Cored Amyloid-β Plaques in Alzheimer Disease and Pathology Burdened Cognitively Normal Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zhiping; Halfter, Willi; Abrahamson, Eric E; Klunk, William E; Mathis, Chester A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ikonomovic, Milos D

    2016-09-01

    Tenascin-C (TN-C) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein linked to inflammatory processes in pathological conditions including Alzheimer disease (AD). We examined the distribution of TN-C immunoreactivity (ir) in relation to amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and vascular Aβ deposits in autopsy brain tissues from 14 patients with clinical and neuropathological AD and 10 aged-matched controls with no cognitive impairment; 5 of the controls had Aβ plaques and 5 did not. TN-C ir was abundant in cortical white matter and subpial cerebral gray matter in all cases, whereas TN-C ir was weak in blood vessels. In all cases with Aβ plaques but not in plaque-free controls, TN-C ir was detected as large (>100 µm in diameter) diffuse extracellular deposits in cortical grey matter. TN-C plaques completely overlapped and surrounded cored Aβ plaques labeled with X-34, a fluorescent derivative of Congo red, and they were associated with reactive astrocytes astrocytes, microglia and phosphorylated tau-containing dystrophic neurites. Diffuse Aβ plaques lacking amyloid cores, reactive glia or dystrophic neurites showed no TN-C ir. In cases with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, TN-C ir in vessel walls did not spread into the surrounding neuropil. These results suggest a role for TN-C in Aβ plaque pathogenesis and its potential as a biomarker and therapy target. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A genome-wide gene-expression analysis and database in transgenic mice during development of amyloid or tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Matarin, Mar; Salih, Dervis A; Yasvoina, Marina; Cummings, Damian M; Guelfi, Sebastian; Liu, Wenfei; Nahaboo Solim, Muzammil A; Moens, Thomas G; Paublete, Rocio Moreno; Ali, Shabinah S; Perona, Marina; Desai, Roshni; Smith, Kenneth J; Latcham, Judy; Fulleylove, Michael; Richardson, Jill C; Hardy, John; Edwards, Frances A

    2015-02-03

    We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of "amyloid" transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1) and "TAU" transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene). Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. Network analysis of immune gene modules revealed six hub genes in hippocampus of amyloid mice, four in common with cortex. The hippocampal network in TAU mice was similar except that Trem2 had hub status only in amyloid mice. The cortical network of TAU mice was entirely different with more hub genes and few in common with the other networks, suggesting reasons for specificity of cortical dysfunction in FTDP17. This Resource opens up many areas for investigation. All data are available and searchable at http://www.mouseac.org.

  1. Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alloza, M; Borrelli, L A; Rozkalne, A; Hyman, B T; Bacskai, B J

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and neurodegeneration although the neurotoxic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. It is clear that both oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in the illness. The compound curcumin, with a broad spectrum of anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrilogenic activities may represent a promising approach for preventing or treating AD. Curcumin is a small fluorescent compound that binds to amyloid deposits. In the present work we used in vivo multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to demonstrate that curcumin crosses the blood-brain barrier and labels senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with curcumin for 7 days clears and reduces existing plaques, as monitored with longitudinal imaging, suggesting a potent disaggregation effect. Curcumin also led to a limited, but significant reversal of structural changes in dystrophic dendrites, including abnormal curvature and dystrophy size. Together, these data suggest that curcumin reverses existing amyloid pathology and associated neurotoxicity in a mouse model of AD. This approach could lead to more effective clinical therapies for the prevention of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurotoxicity associated with AD.

  2. CB2 receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2014-03-14

    The endocannabinoid CB2 receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB2 receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB2 receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2(-/-) (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2(+/+) and J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2(+/+) mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2(-/-) mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to CNR2(+/+) mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to J20 CNR2(+/+) mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB2 receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB2 to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  3. Effects of human intravenous immunoglobulin on amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) preparation is indicated for treating primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with impaired humoral immunity. hIVIG is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and a decent safety profile. Therefore, by virtue of its constituent natural anti-amyloid beta antibodies and anti-inflammatory effects, hIVIG is deemed to mediate beneficial effects to patients of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we set out to explore the effects of hIVIG in a mouse model of AD. Methods We treated APP/PS1dE9 transgenic and wild-type mice with weekly injections of a high hIVIG dose (1 g/kg) or saline for 3 or 8 months. Treatment effect on brain amyloid pathology and microglial reactivity was assessed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and confocal microscopy. Results We found no evidence for reduction in Aβ pathology; instead 8 months of hIVIG treatment significantly increased soluble levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42. In addition, we noticed a significant reduction in CD45 and elevation of Iba-1 markers in specific sub-populations of microglial cells. Long-term hIVIG treatment also resulted in significant suppression of TNF-α and increase in doublecortin positive adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Conclusions Our data indicate limited ability of hIVIG to impact amyloid burden but shows changes in microglia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and neurogenic effects. Immunomodulation by hIVIG may account for its beneficial effect in AD patients. PMID:22642812

  4. Extracellular vesicles of the blood-brain barrier: Role in the HIV-1 associated amyloid beta pathology.

    PubMed

    András, Ibolya E; Leda, Ana; Contreras, Marta Garcia; Bertrand, Luc; Park, Minseon; Skowronska, Marta; Toborek, Michal

    2017-03-01

    HIV-infected brains are characterized by increased amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition. It is believed that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for Aβ homeostasis and contributes to Aβ accumulation in the brain. Extracellular vesicles (ECV), like exosomes, recently gained a lot of attention as potentially playing a significant role in Aβ pathology. In addition, HIV-1 hijacks the exosomal pathway for budding and release. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of BBB-derived ECV in the HIV-1-induced Aβ pathology in the brain. Our results indicate that HIV-1 increases ECV release from brain endothelial cells as well as elevates their Aβ cargo when compared to controls. Interestingly, brain endothelial cell-derived ECV transferred Aβ to astrocytes and pericytes. Infusion of brain endothelial ECV carrying fluorescent Aβ into the internal carotid artery of mice resulted in Aβ fluorescence associated with brain microvessels and in the brain parenchyma. These results suggest that ECV carrying Aβ can be successfully transferred across the BBB into the brain. Based on these observations, we conclude that HIV-1 facilitates the shedding of brain endothelial ECV carrying Aβ; a process that may increase Aβ exposure of cells of neurovascular unit, and contribute to amyloid deposition in HIV-infected brain.

  5. The ACAT inhibitor CP-113,818 markedly reduces amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Huttunen, Henri J; Puglielli, Luigi; Eckman, Christopher B; Kim, Doo Yeon; Hofmeister, Alexander; Moir, Robert D; Domnitz, Sarah B; Frosch, Matthew P; Windisch, Manfred; Kovacs, Dora M

    2004-10-14

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) accumulation in specific brain regions is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that a well-characterized acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, CP-113,818, inhibits Abeta production in cell-based experiments. Here, we assessed the efficacy of CP-113,818 in reducing AD-like pathology in the brains of transgenic mice expressing human APP(751) containing the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations. Two months of treatment with CP-113,818 reduced the accumulation of amyloid plaques by 88%-99% and membrane/insoluble Abeta levels by 83%-96%, while also decreasing brain cholesteryl-esters by 86%. Additionally, soluble Abeta(42) was reduced by 34% in brain homogenates. Spatial learning was slightly improved and correlated with decreased Abeta levels. In nontransgenic littermates, CP-113,818 also reduced ectodomain shedding of endogenous APP in the brain. Our results suggest that ACAT inhibition may be effective in the prevention and treatment of AD by inhibiting generation of the Abeta peptide.

  6. ABCA7 Deficiency Accelerates Amyloid-β Generation and Alzheimer's Neuronal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Nobutaka; Liu, Chia-Chen; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Ma, Li; Yamazaki, Yu; Tachibana, Masaya; Younkin, Linda; Kurti, Aishe; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Zou, Fanggeng; Sevlever, Daniel; Bisceglio, Gina; Gan, Ming; Fol, Romain; Knight, Patrick; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Fryer, John D; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Younkin, Steven G; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-30

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is a central event. Aβ is cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase mainly in neurons. Although mutations inAPP,PS1, orPS2cause early-onset familial AD,ABCA7encoding ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 is one of the susceptibility genes for late-onset AD (LOAD), in which itsloss-of-functionvariants increase the disease risk. ABCA7 is homologous to a major lipid transporter ABCA1 and is highly expressed in neurons and microglia in the brain. Here, we show that ABCA7 deficiency altered brain lipid profile and impaired memory in ABCA7 knock-out (Abca7(-/-)) mice. When bred to amyloid model APP/PS1 mice, plaque burden was exacerbated by ABCA7 deficit.In vivomicrodialysis studies indicated that the clearance rate of Aβ was unaltered. Interestingly, ABCA7 deletion facilitated the processing of APP to Aβ by increasing the levels of β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) in primary neurons and mouse brains. Knock-down of ABCA7 expression in neurons caused endoplasmic reticulum stress highlighted by increased level of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). In the brains of APP/PS1;Abca7(-/-)mice, the level of phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) was also significantly elevated. Together, our results reveal novel pathways underlying the association of ABCA7 dysfunction and LOAD pathogenesis. Gene variants inABCA7encoding ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 are associated with the increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Importantly, we found the altered brain lipid profile and impaired memory in ABCA7 knock-out mice. The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is a key event in AD pathogenesis and

  7. Longitudinal Assessment of Amyloid Pathology in Transgenic ArcAβ Mice Using Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Politano, Igna Wojtyna; Deistung, Andreas; Grandjean, Joanes; Drewek, Anna; Dominietto, Marco; Keist, Ruth; Schweser, Ferdinand; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Nitsch, Roger M; Knuesel, Irene; Rudin, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to monitor pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of this longitudinal study was to assess the effects of progressive amyloid-related pathology on multiple MRI parameters in transgenic arcAβ mice, a mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T1-mapping and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a novel MRI based technique, were applied to monitor structural alterations and changes in tissue composition imposed by the pathology over time. Vascular function and integrity was studied by assessing blood-brain barrier integrity with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and cerebral microbleed (CMB) load with susceptibility weighted imaging and QSM. A linear mixed effects model was built for each MRI parameter to incorporate effects within and between groups (i.e. genotype) and to account for changes unrelated to the disease pathology. Linear mixed effects modelling revealed a strong association of all investigated MRI parameters with age. DWI and QSM in addition revealed differences between arcAβ and wt mice over time. CMBs became apparent in arcAβ mice with 9 month of age; and the CMB load reflected disease stage. This study demonstrates the benefits of linear mixed effects modelling of longitudinal imaging data. Moreover, the diagnostic utility of QSM and assessment of CMB load should be exploited further in studies of AD.

  8. Getting a grip on prions: oligomers, amyloids and pathological membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, Byron; Baron, Gerald S.; Chesebro, Bruce; Jeffrey, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The prion (infectious protein) concept has evolved with the discovery of new self-propagating protein states in organisms as diverse as mammals and fungi. The infectious agent of the mammalian transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) has long been considered to be the prototypical prion, and recent cell-free propagation and biophysical analyses of TSE infectivity have now firmly established its prion credentials. Other disease-associated protein aggregates, such as some amyloids, can also have prion-like characteristics under certain experimental conditions. However, most amyloids appear to lack the natural transmissibility of TSE prions. One feature that distinguishes the latter from the former is the glycophosphatidylinositol membrane anchor on prion protein, the molecule that is corrupted in TSE diseases. The presence of this anchor profoundly affects TSE pathogenesis, which involves major membrane distortions in the brain, and may be a key reason for the greater neurovirulence of TSE prions relative to many other autocatalytic protein aggregates. PMID:19231987

  9. Amyloid and tau pathology of familial Alzheimer's disease APP/PS1 mouse model in a senescence phenotype background (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Porquet, D; Andrés-Benito, P; Griñán-Ferré, C; Camins, A; Ferrer, I; Canudas, A M; Del Valle, J; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    The amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of familial AD-like pattern at early ages, whereas senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) has a remarkable early senescence phenotype with pathological similarities to AD. The aim of this study was the investigation and characterization of cognitive and neuropathological AD markers in a novel mouse model that combines the characteristics of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model with a senescence-accelerated background of SAMP8 mice. Initially, significant differences were found regarding amyloid plaque formation and cognitive abnormalities. Bearing these facts in mind, we determined a general characterization of the main AD brain molecular markers, such as alterations in amyloid pathway, neuroinflammation, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in these mice along their lifetimes. Results from this analysis revealed that APP/PS1 in SAMP8 background mice showed alterations in the pathways studied in comparison with SAMP8 and APP/PS1, demonstrating that a senescence-accelerated background exacerbated the amyloid pathology and maintained the cognitive dysfunction present in APP/PS1 mice. Changes in tau pathology, including the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), differs, but not in a parallel manner, with amyloid disturbances.

  10. Astrocyte-Microglia Cross Talk through Complement Activation Modulates Amyloid Pathology in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Hong; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Chiang, Angie C.-A.; Aithmitti, Nadia; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we identified a neuron–glia signaling pathway whereby Aβ acts as an upstream activator of astroglial nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), leading to the release of complement C3, which acts on the neuronal C3a receptor (C3aR) to influence dendritic morphology and cognitive function. Here we report that astrocytic complement activation also regulates Aβ dynamics in vitro and amyloid pathology in AD mouse models through microglial C3aR. We show that in primary microglial cultures, acute C3 or C3a activation promotes, whereas chronic C3/C3a treatment attenuates, microglial phagocytosis and that the effect of chronic C3 exposure can be blocked by cotreatment with a C3aR antagonist and by genetic deletion of C3aR. We further demonstrate that Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice are worsened by astroglial NF-κB hyperactivation and resulting C3 elevation, whereas treatment with the C3aR antagonist (C3aRA) ameliorates plaque load and microgliosis. Our studies define a complement-dependent intercellular cross talk in which neuronal overproduction of Aβ activates astroglial NF-κB to elicit extracellular release of C3. This promotes a pathogenic cycle by which C3 in turn interacts with neuronal and microglial C3aR to alter cognitive function and impair Aβ phagocytosis. This feedforward loop can be effectively blocked by C3aR inhibition, supporting the therapeutic potential of C3aR antagonists under chronic neuroinflammation conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The complement pathway is activated in Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that the central complement factor C3 secreted from astrocytes interacts with microglial C3a receptor (C3aR) to mediate β-amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in AD mouse models. Our study provides support for targeting C3aR as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID

  11. Astrocyte-Microglia Cross Talk through Complement Activation Modulates Amyloid Pathology in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lian, Hong; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Chiang, Angie C-A; Aithmitti, Nadia; Jankowsky, Joanna L; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-13

    Increasing evidence supports a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we identified a neuron-glia signaling pathway whereby Aβ acts as an upstream activator of astroglial nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), leading to the release of complement C3, which acts on the neuronal C3a receptor (C3aR) to influence dendritic morphology and cognitive function. Here we report that astrocytic complement activation also regulates Aβ dynamics in vitro and amyloid pathology in AD mouse models through microglial C3aR. We show that in primary microglial cultures, acute C3 or C3a activation promotes, whereas chronic C3/C3a treatment attenuates, microglial phagocytosis and that the effect of chronic C3 exposure can be blocked by cotreatment with a C3aR antagonist and by genetic deletion of C3aR. We further demonstrate that Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice are worsened by astroglial NF-κB hyperactivation and resulting C3 elevation, whereas treatment with the C3aR antagonist (C3aRA) ameliorates plaque load and microgliosis. Our studies define a complement-dependent intercellular cross talk in which neuronal overproduction of Aβ activates astroglial NF-κB to elicit extracellular release of C3. This promotes a pathogenic cycle by which C3 in turn interacts with neuronal and microglial C3aR to alter cognitive function and impair Aβ phagocytosis. This feedforward loop can be effectively blocked by C3aR inhibition, supporting the therapeutic potential of C3aR antagonists under chronic neuroinflammation conditions. The complement pathway is activated in Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that the central complement factor C3 secreted from astrocytes interacts with microglial C3a receptor (C3aR) to mediate β-amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in AD mouse models. Our study provides support for targeting C3aR as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 the authors

  12. Early-life stress lastingly alters the neuroinflammatory response to amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Ruigrok, Silvie R; Amelianchik, Anna; Ivan, Daniela; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to stress during the sensitive period of early-life increases the risk to develop cognitive impairments and psychopathology later in life. In addition, early-life stress (ES) exposure, next to genetic causes, has been proposed to modulate the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however evidence for this hypothesis is currently lacking. We here tested whether ES modulates progression of AD-related neuropathology and assessed the possible contribution of neuroinflammatory factors in this. We subjected wild-type (WT) and transgenic APP/PS1 mice, as a model for amyloid neuropathology, to chronic ES from postnatal day (P)2 to P9. We next studied how ES exposure affected; 1) amyloid β (Aβ) pathology at an early (4month old) and at a more advanced pathological (10month old) stage, 2) neuroinflammatory mediators immediately after ES exposure as well as in adult WT mice, and 3) the neuroinflammatory response in relation to Aβ neuropathology. ES exposure resulted in a reduction of cell-associated amyloid in 4month old APP/PS1 mice, but in an exacerbation of Aβ plaque load at 10months of age, demonstrating that ES affects Aβ load in the hippocampus in an age-dependent manner. Interestingly, ES modulated various neuroinflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of WT mice as well as in response to Aβ neuropathology. In WT mice, immediately following ES exposure (P9), Iba1-immunopositive microglia exhibited reduced complexity and hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β expression was increased. In contrast, microglial Iba1 and CD68 were increased and hippocampal IL-6 expression was decreased at 4months, while these changes resolved by 10months of age. Finally, Aβ neuropathology triggered a neuroinflammatory response in APP/PS1 mice that was altered after ES exposure. APP/PS1 mice exhibited increased CD68 expression at 4months, which was further enhanced by ES, whereas the microglial response to Aβ neuropathology, as measured by Iba1 and CD11b, was

  13. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability is associated with dementia and diabetes but not amyloid pathology or APOE genotype.

    PubMed

    Janelidze, Shorena; Hertze, Joakim; Nägga, Katarina; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Wennström, Malin; van Westen, Danielle; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction might be an important component of many neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated its role in dementia using large clinical cohorts. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma albumin ratio (Qalb), an indicator of BBB (and blood-CSF barrier) permeability, was measured in a total of 1015 individuals. The ratio was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson's disease dementia, subcortical vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia compared with controls. However, this measure was not changed during preclinical or prodromal Alzheimer's disease and was not associated with amyloid positron emission tomography or APOE genotype. The Qalb was increased in diabetes mellitus and correlated positively with CSF biomarkers of angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction (vascular endothelial growth factor, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). In healthy elderly, high body mass index and waist-hip ratio predicted increased Qalb 20 years later. In summary, BBB permeability is increased in major dementia disorders but does not relate to amyloid pathology or APOE genotype. Instead, BBB impairment may be associated with diabetes and brain microvascular damage.

  14. CB₂ receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2013-11-08

    The endocannabinoid CB₂ receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB₂ receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB₂ receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB₂ receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2⁻/⁻ (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ and J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB₂ receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB₂ to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  15. In Alzheimer's disease, hypometabolism in low-amyloid brain regions may be a functional consequence of pathologies in connected brain regions.

    PubMed

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Förster, Stefan; Grimmer, Timo; Tahmasian, Masoud; Yakushev, Igor; Sorg, Christian; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Drzezga, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), prominent hypometabolism has been observed in brain regions with minor amyloid load. These hypometabolism-only (HO) areas cannot be explained merely as a consequence of local amyloid toxicity. The aim of this multimodal imaging study was to explore whether such HO phenomenon may be related to pathologies in functionally connected, remote brain regions. Nineteen AD patients and 15 matched controls underwent examinations with [(11)C]PiB-PET and [(18)F]FDG-PET. Voxel-based statistical group comparisons were performed to obtain maps of significantly elevated amyloid burden and reduced cerebral glucose metabolism, respectively, in patients. An HO area was identified by subtraction of equally thresholded result maps (hypometabolism minus amyloid burden). To identify the network typically functionally connected to this HO area, it was used as a seed region for a functional connectivity analysis in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 17 elderly healthy controls. The resulting intrinsic connectivity network (HO-ICN) was retransferred into the brains of AD patients to be able to analyze pathologies within this network in the positron emission tomography (PET) datasets. The most prominent HO area was detected in the left middle frontal gyrus of AD patients. The HO-ICN in healthy controls showed a major overlap with brain areas significantly affected by both amyloid deposition and hypometabolism in patients. This association was substantiated by the results of region-of-interest-based and voxel-wise correlation analyses, which revealed strong correlations between the degree of hypometabolism within the HO region and within the HO-ICN. These results support the notion that hypometabolism in brain regions not strongly affected by locoregional amyloid pathology may be related to ongoing pathologies in remote but functionally connected regions, that is, by reduced neuronal input from these regions.

  16. Vascular pathology in Alzheimer disease: correlation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis with cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Orantes, Mario; Wiestler, Otmar D

    2003-12-01

    Sporadic, late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) constitutes the most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly population. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis (AS/LH). The present study was carried out to examine the coincidence of these small vessel pathologies during the development of cognitive deficits, amyloid beta-protein (A beta) deposition, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in sporadic late-onset AD. We correlated the clinical dementia rating (CDR) score, the sequential extension of AD-related A beta deposition into different parts of the brain, and the extension of NFTs to involve more brain regions with the distribution of CAA and AS/LH in 52 human autopsy brains. The extension of CAA and AS/LH to involve different areas of the brain was associated with a rise of CDR scores and an increase in the extension of A beta deposition and NFT generation. AD cases showed a higher number of regions with CAA and AS/LH compared to nondemented patients with AD-related pathology and controls. Moreover, we demonstrated a hierarchical sequence in which the different regions of the brain exhibited CAA and AS/LH-affected vessels, allowing the distinction of 3 stages in the development of CAA and AS/LH. The first stage of CAA involved leptomeningeal and neocortical vessels. The second stage was characterized by additional A beta deposition in allocortical and midbrain vessels. Finally, in a third stage, CAA was observed in the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and in the lower brainstem. In contrast, AS/LH initially affected the basal ganglia in stage A. In stage B this pathology made inroads into the deep white matter, the leptomeningeal arteries of the cortex, the cerebellum, and into the thalamus. Stage C was characterized by AS/LH in brainstem vessels. Our results demonstrate widespread CAA and AS/LH to be associated with the

  17. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  18. Smoking exacerbates amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Estrada, Lisbell D; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Soto, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that cigarette smoking might alter the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. However, inconsistent results have been reported regarding the risk of Alzheimer's disease among smokers. Previous studies in experimental animal models have reported that administration of some cigarette components (for example, nicotine) alters amyloid-β aggregation, providing a possible link. However, extrapolation of these findings towards the in vivo scenario is not straightforward as smoke inhalation involves a number of other components. Here, we analysed the effect of smoking under more relevant conditions. We exposed transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease to cigarette smoke and analysed the neuropathological alterations in comparison with animals not subjected to smoke inhalation. Our results showed that smoking increases the severity of some abnormalities typical of Alzheimer's disease, including amyloidogenesis, neuroinflammation and tau phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that cigarette smoking may increase Alzheimer's disease onset and exacerbate its features and thus, may constitute an important environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Mitochondria: the common upstream driver of amyloid-β and tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, D F F; Esteves, A R; Oliveira, C R; Cardoso, S M

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence shows a mitochondrial-mediated impairment of autophagy that potentiates amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Accordingly, recent data obtained from AD models, in which mitochondrial alterations are a prominent feature, demonstrated abnormalities in microtubule network, involving tubulin and tau post-translational modifications. In this review we will discuss mitochondrial-regulated processes where mitochondrial malfunction is likely to start a sequence of events leading to sirtuin-2 activation, microtubule network breakdown, and impairment of the autophagic pathway. Because sirtuin-2 activity depends on cellular NAD+ availability, mitochondrial regulation of NAD+ levels may contribute to an increase in sirtuin-mediated tubulin deacetylation. A vicious cycle become installed which potentiates tau hyperphosphorylation, together with Aβ overproduction and deposition. Overall, targeting microtubule network constitutes a promising strategy for pharmacological therapy in AD.

  20. Innate Immunity Stimulation via Toll-Like Receptor 9 Ameliorates Vascular Amyloid Pathology in Tg-SwDI Mice with Associated Cognitive Benefits.

    PubMed

    Scholtzova, Henrieta; Do, Eileen; Dhakal, Shleshma; Sun, Yanjie; Liu, Shan; Mehta, Pankaj D; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and neurofibrillary tangles. Currently there are no effective treatments for AD. Immunotherapeutic approaches under development are hampered by complications related to ineffectual clearance of CAA. Genome-wide association studies have demonstrated the importance of microglia in AD pathogenesis. Microglia are the primary innate immune cells of the brain. Depending on their activation state and environment, microglia can be beneficial or detrimental. In our prior work, we showed that stimulation of innate immunity with Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, class B CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), can reduce amyloid and tau pathologies without causing toxicity in Tg2576 and 3xTg-AD mouse models. However, these transgenic mice have relatively little CAA. In the current study, we evaluated the therapeutic profile of CpG ODN in a triple transgenic mouse model, Tg-SwDI, with abundant vascular amyloid, in association with low levels of parenchymal amyloid deposits. Peripheral administration of CpG ODN, both before and after the development of CAA, negated short-term memory deficits, as assessed by object-recognition tests, and was effective at improving spatial and working memory evaluated using a radial arm maze. These findings were associated with significant reductions of CAA pathology lacking adverse effects. Together, our extensive evidence suggests that this innovative immunomodulation may be a safe approach to ameliorate all hallmarks of AD pathology, supporting the potential clinical applicability of CpG ODN. Recent genetic studies have underscored the emerging role of microglia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Microglia lose their amyloid-β-clearing capabilities with age and as AD progresses. Therefore, the ability to modulate microglia profiles offers a promising therapeutic avenue for reducing AD

  1. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Maria Teresa; Allard, Simon; Partridge, Vanessa; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-04-02

    A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  2. Analyzing and modeling the kinetics of amyloid beta pores associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    DOE PAGES

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; ...

    2015-09-08

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individualmore » pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. As a result, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.« less

  3. Smart Soup, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula, Ameliorates Amyloid Pathology and Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Ding, Jianqing; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Xianglu; Ling, Yun; Shen, Xiaoheng; Chen, Shengdi; Huang, Chenggang; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes substantial public health care burdens. Intensive efforts have been made to find effective and safe disease-modifying treatment and symptomatic intervention alternatives against AD. Smart Soup (SS), a Chinese medicine formula composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT), Poria cum Radix Pini (PRP) and Radix Polygalae (RP), is a typical prescription against memory deficits. Here, we assessed the efficacy of SS against AD. Oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD transgenic mice, with reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss in the brains of AD mice. Consistently, SS treatment reduced amyloid-related locomotor dysfunctions and premature death of AD transgenic Drosophila. Mechanistic studies showed that RP reduced Aβ generation, whereas AT and PRP exerted neuroprotective effects against Aβ. Taken together, our study indicates that SS could be effective against AD, providing a practical therapeutic strategy against the disease. PMID:25386946

  4. Reduced pathology and improved behavioral performance in Alzheimer’s disease mice vaccinated with HSV amplicons expressing amyloid-beta and interleukin-4

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Maria E.; Hughes, Jennifer E.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Tibbens, Jennifer L.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapeutics designed to dissolve existing amyloid plaques or to interrupt amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation may be feasible for treatment and/or prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). “Shaping” immune responses elicited against Aβ is requisite to generate an efficacious and safe outcome by minimizing the possibility of deleterious inflammatory reactions in the brain as observed in clinical testing of Aβ peptide/adjuvant-based modalities. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-based amplicons can co-express multiple antigens and/or immunomodulatory genes due to their large genetic size capacity, thereby facilitating antigen-specific immune response shaping. We have constructed an amplicon (HSVIEAβCMVIL-4) that co-delivers Aβ1-42 with interleukin-4, a cytokine that promotes the generation of Th2-like T cell responses, which are favored in the setting of AD immunotherapy. Triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which progressively develop both amyloid and neurofibrillary tangle pathology, were vaccinated thrice with HSVIEAβCMVIL-4, or a set of control amplicon vectors. Increased Th2-related, Aβ-specific antibodies, improved learning and memory functioning, and prevention of AD-related amyloid and tau pathological progression were observed in HSVIEAβCMVIL-4 vaccinated mice as compared to the other experimental groups. Our study underscores the potential of Aβ immunotherapy for AD and highlights the potency of amplicons to facilitate immune response modulation to a disease-relevant antigen. PMID:18388924

  5. The transitional association between β-amyloid pathology and regional brain atrophy.

    PubMed

    Insel, Philip S; Mattsson, Niklas; Donohue, Michael C; Mackin, R Scott; Aisen, Paul S; Jack, Clifford R; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. The functional form to model the association between Aβ and regional brain atrophy has not been well defined. To determine the relationship between Aβ and atrophy, we compared the performance of the usual dichotomization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ to identify subjects as Aβ+ and Aβ- with a trilinear spline model of CSF Aβ. One hundred and eighty-three subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 108 cognitively normal controls with baseline CSF Aβ and up to 4 years of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed using mixed-effects regression. Piecewise-linear splines were used to evaluate the nonlinear nature of the association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy and to identify points of acceleration of atrophy with respect to Aβ. Several parameterizations of CSF Aβ were compared using likelihood ratio tests and the Akaike information criterion. Periods of acceleration of atrophy in which subjects transition from CSF Aβ negativity to CSF Aβ positivity were estimated from the spline models and tested for significance. Spline models resulted in better fits for many temporal and parietal regions compared with the dichotomous models. The trilinear model showed that periods of acceleration of atrophy varied greatly by region with early changes seen in the insula, amygdala, precuneus, hippocampus, and other temporal regions, occurring before the clinical threshold for CSF Aβ positivity. The use of piecewise-linear splines provides an improved model of the nonlinear association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy in regions implicated in the progression of AD. The important biological finding of this work is that some brain regions show periods of accelerated volume loss well before the CSF Aβ42 threshold. This implies that signs of brain atrophy

  6. Analyzing and modeling the kinetics of amyloid beta pores associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E.; Xu, Shang -Zhong

    2015-09-08

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. As a result, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  7. Increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid JNK3 associated with amyloid pathology: links to cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Gourmaud, Sarah; Paquet, Claire; Dumurgier, Julien; Pace, Clarisse; Bouras, Constantin; Gray, Françoise; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Meurs, Eliane F.; Mouton-Liger, François; Hugon, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease is characterized by cognitive decline, senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated τ proteins and neuronal loss. Aβ and τ are useful markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). C-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases activated by phosphorylation and involved in neuronal death. Methods In this study, Western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and histological approaches were used to assess the concentrations of Aβ, τ and JNK isoforms in postmortem brain tissue samples (10 Alzheimer disease and 10 control) and in CSF samples from 30 living patients with Alzheimer disease and 27 controls with neurologic disease excluding Alzheimer disease. Patients with Alzheimer disease were followed for 1–3 years and assessed using Mini–Mental State Examination scores. Results The biochemical and morphological results showed a significant increase of JNK3 and phosphorylated JNK levels in patients with Alzheimer disease, and JNK3 levels correlated with Aβ42 levels. Confocal microscopy revealed that JNK3 was associated with Aβ in senile plaques. The JNK3 levels in the CSF were significantly elevated in patients with Alzheimer disease and correlated statistically with the rate of cognitive decline in a mixed linear model. Limitations The study involved different samples grouped into 3 small cohorts. Evaluation of JNK3 in CSF was possible only with immunoblot analysis. Conclusion We found that JNK3 levels are increased in brain tissue and CSF from patients with Alzheimer disease. The finding that increased JNK3 levels in CSF could reflect the rate of cognitive decline is new and merits further investigation. PMID:25455349

  8. Distinct inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages in Alzheimer's disease models: effects of aging and amyloid pathology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elodie; Boucher, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Delarasse, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, activated microglia, and neuronal cell death leading to progressive dementia. Recent data indicate that microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) are key players in the initiation and progression of AD, yet their respective roles remain to be clarified. As AD occurs mostly in the elderly and aging impairs myeloid functions, we addressed the inflammatory profile of microglia and MDM during aging in TgAPP/PS1 and TgAPP/PS1dE9, two transgenic AD mouse models, compared to WT littermates. We only found MDM infiltration in very aged mice. We determined that MDM highly expressed activation markers at basal state. In contrast, microglia exhibited an activated phenotype only with normal aging and Aβ pathology. Our study showed that CD14 and CD36, two receptors involved in phagocytosis, were upregulated during Aβ pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed, at the protein levels in AD models, higher production of pro-inflammatory mediators: IL-1β, p40, iNOS, CCL-3, CCL-4, and CXCL-1. Taken together, our data indicate that microglia and MDM display distinct phenotypes in AD models and highlight the specific effects of normal aging vs Aβ peptides on inflammatory processes that occur during the disease progression. These precise phenotypes of different subpopulations of myeloid cells in normal and pathologic conditions may allow the design of pertinent therapeutic strategy for AD. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gad67 haploinsufficiency reduces amyloid pathology and rescues olfactory memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Zheng; Bai, Yu-Ting; Wu, Gang-Yi; Chen, Gong

    2017-10-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Although dysfunction of multiple neurotransmitter systems including cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic systems has been associated with AD progression the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We and others have recently found that GABA content is elevated in AD brains and linked to cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. The glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) is the major enzyme converting glutamate into GABA and has been implied in a number of neurological disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. However, whether Gad67 is involved in AD pathology has not been well studied. Here, we investigate the functional role of GAD67 in an AD mouse model with Gad67 haploinsufficiency that is caused by replacing one allele of Gad67 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene during generation of GAD67-GFP mice. To genetically reduce GAD67 in AD mouse brains, we crossed the Gad67 haploinsufficient mice (GAD67-GFP(+/-)) with 5xFAD mice (harboring 5 human familial AD mutations in APP and PS1 genes) to generate a new line of bigenic mice. Immunostaining, ELISA, electrophysiology and behavior test were applied to compare the difference between groups. We found that reduction of GAD67 resulted in a significant decrease of amyloid β production in 5xFAD mice. Concurrently, the abnormal astrocytic GABA and tonic GABA currents, as well as the microglial reactivity were significantly reduced in the 5xFAD mice with Gad67 haploinsufficiency. Importantly, the olfactory memory deficit of 5xFAD mice was rescued by Gad67 haploinsufficiency. Our results demonstrate that GAD67 plays an important role in AD pathology, suggesting that GAD67 may be a potential drug target for modulating the progress of AD.

  10. Transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein exhibit early metabolic deficits and a pathologically low leptin state associated with hypothalamic dysfunction in arcuate neuropeptide Y neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P; Iadecola, Costantino

    2014-07-02

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349096-11$15.00/0.

  11. Propranolol reduces cognitive deficits, amyloid and tau pathology in Alzheimer's transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dobarro, Marta; Gerenu, Gorka; Ramírez, María J

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of antihypertensive agents in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial. It has been tested here whether some antihypertensive drugs might influence AD through mechanisms independent of blood pressure-lowering activity. The effects of treatment with the antihypertensive propranolol on cognition and AD-related markers have been studied in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Propranolol, at a lower dose than that used as antihypertensive (5 mg/kg, 6 wk), attenuated cognitive impairments shown by Tg2576 mice aged 9 months in the novel object recognition and fear conditioning tests. Propranolol was also able to counteract the increases in hippocampal levels of Aβ(42) present in Tg2576 mice. This effect was accompanied by an increased expression of insulin degrading enzyme. Changes in markers of synaptic pathology, as shown by decreases in phosphorylation of Akt and in the expression of BDNF in Tg2676 mice, were also counteracted by propranolol treatment. Tau hyperphosphorylation shown by Tg2576 mice was also decreased in the hippocampus of propranolol-treated mice, an effect probably related to an increase of GSK3β phosphorylation (inactive form) and a decreased JNK1 expression. Overall, these data further strengthen the potential of propranolol as a therapeutic agent for AD.

  12. Regional correlations between [(11)C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Ayakta, Nagehan; Grinberg, Lea T; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Lehmann, Manja; Reed, Bruce; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Boxer, Adam L; O'Neil, James P; Jin, Lee-Way; Seeley, William W; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2017-01-01

    Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1), and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2). In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [(11)C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years) were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36) and CERAD score (N = 54) versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42), PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs), diffuse plaques (DPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR (p = 0.186 and 0.230). In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414-0.804, p < 0.05), whereas DPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p = 0.010). CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222-0.355, p < 0.05). In conclusion, global PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  13. Preventing Effect of L-Type Calcium Channel Blockade on Electrophysiological Alterations in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Induced by Entorhinal Amyloid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG) with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1–42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin) accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days), almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25689857

  14. Amyloid Pathology Affects the Hearts of Patients With Alzheimer's Disease: Mind the Heart.

    PubMed

    Troncone, Luca; Luciani, Marco; Coggins, Matthew; Wilker, Elissa H; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Codispoti, Kari Elise; Frosch, Matthew P; Kayed, Rakez; Del Monte, Federica

    2016-12-06

    Individually, heart failure (HF) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are severe threats to population health, and their potential coexistence is an alarming prospect. In addition to sharing analogous epidemiological and genetic profiles, biochemical characteristics, and common triggers, the authors recently recognized common molecular and pathological features between the 2 conditions. Whereas cognitive impairment has been linked to HF through perfusion defects, angiopathy, and inflammation, whether patients with AD present with myocardial dysfunction, and if the 2 conditions bear a common pathogenesis as neglected siblings are unknown. Here, the authors investigated whether amyloid beta (Aβ) protein aggregates are present in the hearts of patients with a primary diagnosis of AD, affecting myocardial function. The authors examined myocardial function in a retrospective cross-sectional study from a cohort of AD patients and age-matched controls. Imaging and proteomics approaches were used to identify and quantify Aβ deposits in AD heart and brain specimens compared with controls. Cell shortening and calcium transients were measured on isolated adult cardiomyocytes. Echocardiographic measurements of myocardial function suggest that patients with AD present with an anticipated diastolic dysfunction. As in the brain, Aβ40 and Aβ42 are present in the heart, and their expression is increased in AD. Here, the authors provide the first report of the presence of compromised myocardial function and intramyocardial deposits of Aβ in AD patients. The findings depict a novel biological framework in which AD may be viewed either as a systemic disease or as a metastatic disorder leading to heart, and possibly multiorgan failure. AD and HF are both debilitating and life-threatening conditions, affecting enormous patient populations. Our findings underline a previously dismissed problem of a magnitude that will require new diagnostic approaches and treatments for brain and

  15. Propranolol restores cognitive deficits and improves amyloid and Tau pathologies in a senescence-accelerated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dobarro, Marta; Orejana, Lourdes; Aguirre, Norberto; Ramírez, María Javier

    2013-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a deterioration of cognitive performance and with increased risk of neurodegenerative disorders. Hypertension is the most-prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, and clinical data suggest that hypertension is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study we tested whether propranolol, a β-receptor antagonist commonly used as antihypertensive drug, could ameliorate the cognitive impairments and increases in AD-related markers shown by the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8). Propranolol administration (5 mg/kg for 3 weeks) to 6-month-old SAMP8 mice attenuated cognitive memory impairments shown by these mice in the novel object recognition test. In the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice it has been found increases in Aβ(42) levels, the principal constituent of amyloid plaques observed in AD, accompanied by both an increased expression of the cleaving enzyme BACE1 and a decreased expression of the degrading enzyme IDE. All these effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. Tau hyperphosphorylation (PHF-1 epitope) shown by SAMP8 mice at this age was also decreased in the hippocampus of propranolol-treated mice, an effect probably related to a decrease in JNK1 expression. Interestingly, propranolol also phosphorylated Akt in SAMP8 mice, which was associated with an increase of glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation, contributing therefore to the reductions in Tau hyperphosphorylation. Synaptic pathology in SAMP8 mice, as shown by decreases in synaptophysin and BDNF, was also counteracted by propranolol treatment. Overall, propranolol might be beneficial in age-related brain dysfunction and could be an emerging candidate for the treatment of other neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice exhibit region-specific abnormalities in brain myelination patterns prior to appearance of amyloid and tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Maya K.; Sudol, Kelly L.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Frazer, Maria E.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating brain disorder pathologically defined by extracellular amyloid plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic disintegrity. AD has not been widely considered a disease of white matter, but more recent evidence suggests the existence of abnormalities in myelination patterns and myelin attrition in AD-afflicted human brains. Herein, we demonstrate that triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which harbor the human amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutant transgene, presenilin knock-in mutation, and tau P301L mutant transgene, exhibit significant region-specific alterations in myelination patterns and in oligodendrocyte marker expression profiles at time points preceding the appearance of amyloid and tau pathology. These immunohistochemical signatures are coincident with age-related alterations in axonal and myelin sheath ultrastructure as visualized by comparative electron microscopic examination of 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mouse brain tissue. Overall, these findings indicate 3xTg-AD mice represent a viable model in which to examine mechanisms underlying AD-related myelination and neural transmission defects that occur early during pre-symptomatic stages of the disease process. PMID:18661556

  17. Knock-In of Human BACE1 Cleaves Murine APP and Reiterates Alzheimer-like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Plucińska, Kaja; Crouch, Barry; Koss, David; Robinson, Lianne; Siebrecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Key neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are elevated levels of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species generated via amyloid precursor protein (APP) endoproteolysis and cleavage by the rate-limiting β-site enzyme 1 (BACE1). Because rodents do not develop amyloid pathologies, we here investigated whether AD-like endophenotypes can be created in mice by expression of human bace1. To avoid pitfalls of existing models, we introduced hbace1 via knock-in under the control of the CaMKII α promoter into the safe HPRT locus. We report amyloidogenic processing of murine APP in the hBACE1 mice (termed PLB4), resulting in the formation of toxic APP metabolites that accumulate intra- and extraneuronally in hippocampus and cortex. Pronounced accumulation of Aβ*56 and Aβ hexamers in the absence of plaque deposition was detected in brain tissue from symptomatic PLB4 mice. Heightened levels of inflammation (gliosis) also appeared in several AD-related brain regions (dentate gyrus, hippocampal area CA1, piriform and parietal cortices) at 6 and 12 months of age. Behaviorally, deficits in habituation to a novel environment and semantic-like memory (social transmission of food preference) were detected from 3 to 4 months of age. Impairments in spatial learning strategies in long-term reference (water maze) and working memory (Y-maze) tasks presented at 6 months, and were distinct from reductions in locomotor activity and anxiety. Overall, our data indicate for the first time that targeted, subtle forebrain-specific expression through single gene knock-in of hBACE1 is sufficient to generate AD-relevant cognitive impairments amid corresponding histopathologies, confirming human BACE as the key parameter in amyloid pathogenesis. PMID:25100603

  18. Knock-in of human BACE1 cleaves murine APP and reiterates Alzheimer-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Plucińska, Kaja; Crouch, Barry; Koss, David; Robinson, Lianne; Siebrecht, Michael; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2014-08-06

    Key neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are elevated levels of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species generated via amyloid precursor protein (APP) endoproteolysis and cleavage by the rate-limiting β-site enzyme 1 (BACE1). Because rodents do not develop amyloid pathologies, we here investigated whether AD-like endophenotypes can be created in mice by expression of human bace1. To avoid pitfalls of existing models, we introduced hbace1 via knock-in under the control of the CaMKII α promoter into the safe HPRT locus. We report amyloidogenic processing of murine APP in the hBACE1 mice (termed PLB4), resulting in the formation of toxic APP metabolites that accumulate intra- and extraneuronally in hippocampus and cortex. Pronounced accumulation of Aβ*56 and Aβ hexamers in the absence of plaque deposition was detected in brain tissue from symptomatic PLB4 mice. Heightened levels of inflammation (gliosis) also appeared in several AD-related brain regions (dentate gyrus, hippocampal area CA1, piriform and parietal cortices) at 6 and 12 months of age. Behaviorally, deficits in habituation to a novel environment and semantic-like memory (social transmission of food preference) were detected from 3 to 4 months of age. Impairments in spatial learning strategies in long-term reference (water maze) and working memory (Y-maze) tasks presented at 6 months, and were distinct from reductions in locomotor activity and anxiety. Overall, our data indicate for the first time that targeted, subtle forebrain-specific expression through single gene knock-in of hBACE1 is sufficient to generate AD-relevant cognitive impairments amid corresponding histopathologies, confirming human BACE as the key parameter in amyloid pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410710-19$15.00/0.

  19. MT5-MMP is a new pro-amyloidogenic proteinase that promotes amyloid pathology and cognitive decline in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baranger, Kévin; Marchalant, Yannick; Bonnet, Amandine E; Crouzin, Nadine; Carrete, Alex; Paumier, Jean-Michel; Py, Nathalie A; Bernard, Anne; Bauer, Charlotte; Charrat, Eliane; Moschke, Katrin; Seiki, Mothoharu; Vignes, Michel; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Checler, Frédéric; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type 5-matrix metalloproteinase (MT5-MMP) is a proteinase mainly expressed in the nervous system with emerging roles in brain pathophysiology. The implication of MT5-MMP in Alzheimer's disease (AD), notably its interplay with the amyloidogenic process, remains elusive. Accordingly, we crossed the genetically engineered 5xFAD mouse model of AD with MT5-MMP-deficient mice and examined the impact of MT5-MMP deficiency in bigenic 5xFAD/MT5-MMP(-/-) mice. At early stages (4 months) of the pathology, the levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and its amyloid precursor protein (APP) C-terminal fragment C99 were largely reduced in the cortex and hippocampus of 5xFAD/MT5-MMP(-/-), compared to 5xFAD mice. Reduced amyloidosis in bigenic mice was concomitant with decreased glial reactivity and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, and the preservation of long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial learning, without changes in the activity of α-, β- and γ-secretases. The positive impact of MT5-MMP deficiency was still noticeable at 16 months of age, as illustrated by reduced amyloid burden and gliosis, and a better preservation of the cortical neuronal network and synaptophysin levels in bigenic mice. MT5-MMP expressed in HEKswe cells colocalized and co-immunoprecipitated with APP and significantly increased the levels of Aβ and C99. MT5-MMP also promoted the release of a soluble APP fragment of 95 kDa (sAPP95) in HEKswe cells. sAPP95 levels were significantly reduced in brain homogenates of 5xFAD/MT5-MMP(-/-) mice, supporting altogether the idea that MT5-MMP influences APP processing. MT5-MMP emerges as a new pro-amyloidogenic regulator of APP metabolism, whose deficiency alleviates amyloid pathology, neuroinflammation and cognitive decline.

  20. Curcumin derivative with the substitution at C-4 position, but not curcumin, is effective against amyloid pathology in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the amyloid cascade hypothesis that a pathological change of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain is an initiating event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, modulating the abnormal Aβ aggregation is considered a potential therapeutic target in AD. Curcumin, a low-molecular-weight polyphenol derived from the well-known curry spice turmeric, has shown favorable effects on preventing or treating AD pathology. The present study investigated the effects of curcumin and 2 novel curcumin derivatives, FMeC1 and FMeC2, on AD pathology in APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice. Mice fed a chow diet that contained FMeC1 for 6 months showed a reduction in insoluble Aβ deposits and glial cell activity together with reduced cognitive deficits, compared to animals receiving a control diet or with curcumin or FMeC2 in their diet. Both curcumin and FMeC1 modulated the formation of Aβ aggregates; however, only FMeC1 significantly attenuated the cell toxicity of Aβ. These results indicate that FMeC1 may have potential for preventing AD.

  1. Pyruvate prevents the development of age-dependent cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease without reducing amyloid and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Isopi, Elisa; Granzotto, Alberto; Corona, Carlo; Bomba, Manuela; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Curcio, Michele; Canzoniero, Lorella M T; Navarra, Riccardo; Lattanzio, Rossano; Piantelli, Mauro; Sensi, Stefano L

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and tau-dependent pathology are key features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, to date, approaches aimed at counteracting these two pathogenic factors have produced only modest therapeutic outcomes. More effective therapies should therefore consider additional pathogenic factors like energy production failure, hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, deregulation of metal ion homeostasis, and neuroinflammation. Pyruvate is an energy substrate associated with neuroprotective properties. In this study, we evaluated protective effects of long-term administration of pyruvate in 3xTg-AD mice, a preclinical AD model that develops amyloid-β- and tau-dependent pathology. Chronic (9 months) treatment with pyruvate inhibited short and long-term memory deficits in 6 and 12 months old 3xTg-AD mice as assessed with the Morris water maze test. Pyruvate had no effects on intraneuronal amyloid-β accumulation and, surprisingly, the molecule increased deposition of phosphorylated tau. Pyruvate did not change aerobic or anaerobic metabolisms but decreased lipid peroxidation, counteracted neuronal hyperexcitability, decreased baseline levels of oxidative stress, and also reduced reactive oxygen species-driven elevations of intraneuronal Zn(2+) as well as glutamate receptor-mediated deregulation of intraneuronal Ca(2+). Thus, pyruvate promotes beneficial cognitive effects without affecting Aβ and tau pathology. The molecule mainly promotes a reduction of hyperexcitability, oxidative stress while favors the regulation of intraneuronal Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) homeostasis rather than acting as energy substrate. Pyruvate can be therefore a valuable, safe, and affordable pharmacological tool to be associated with classical anti-Aβ and tau drugs to counteract the development and progression of AD-related cognitive deficits and neuronal loss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Seeding of Normal Tau by Pathological Tau Conformers Drives Pathogenesis of Alzheimer-like Tangles*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing L.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies are composed of insoluble hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, but the mechanisms underlying the conversion of highly soluble Tau into insoluble NFTs remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of minute quantities of misfolded preformed Tau fibrils (Tau pffs) into Tau-expressing cells rapidly recruit large amounts of soluble Tau into filamentous inclusions resembling NFTs with unprecedented efficiency, suggesting a “seeding”-recruitment process as a highly plausible mechanism underlying NFT formation in vivo. Consistent with the emerging concept of prion-like transmissibility of disease-causing amyloidogenic proteins, we found that spontaneous uptake of Tau pffs into cells is likely mediated by endocytosis, suggesting a potential mechanism for the propagation of Tau lesions in tauopathy brains. Furthermore, sequestration of soluble Tau by pff-induced Tau aggregates attenuates microtubule overstabilization in Tau-expressing cells, supporting the hypothesis of a Tau loss-of-function toxicity in cells harboring NFTs. In summary, our study establishes a cellular system that robustly develops authentic NFT-like Tau aggregates, which provides mechanistic insights into NFT pathogenesis and a potential tool for identifying Tau-based therapeutics. PMID:21372138

  3. Il10 deficiency re-balances innate immunity to mitigate Alzheimer-like pathology

    PubMed Central

    Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; Doty, Kevin Richard; Gate, David; Rodriguez, Javier; Yan Leung, Brian Pak; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Town, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The impact of inflammation suppressor pathways on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) evolution remains poorly understood. Human evidence suggests involvement of the cardinal anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (Il10). We crossed the APP/PS1 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis with a mouse deficient in Il10 (APP/PS1+Il10−/−). Quantitative in silico 3D modeling revealed activated Aβ phagocytic microglia in APP/PS1+Il10−/− mice that restricted cerebral amyloidosis. Genome-wide RNA sequencing of APP/PS1+Il10−/− brains showed selective modulation of innate immune genes that drive neuroinflammation. Il10 deficiency preserved synaptic integrity and mitigated cognitive disturbance in APP/PS1 mice. In vitro knock-down of microglial Il10-Stat3 signaling endorsed Aβ phagocytosis, while exogenous IL-10 had the converse effect. Il10 deficiency also partially overcame inhibition of microglial Aβ uptake by human Apolipoprotein E. Finally, the IL-10 signaling pathway was abnormally elevated in AD patient brains. Our results suggest that ‘re-balancing’ innate immunity by blocking the IL-10 anti-inflammatory response may be therapeutically relevant for AD. PMID:25619654

  4. Clinical predictors of severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy and influence of APOE genotype in persons with pathologically-verified Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ringman, John M.; Sachs, Michael C.; Zhou, Yan; Monsell, Sarah E.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Though cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) has important clinical implications, our understanding of it and ability to diagnose it is limited. Objective We sought to determine pathological correlates and clinical factors identifiable during life that predict the presence of severe CAA in persons with pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design We compared demographic and clinical variables at the earliest visit during life at which subjects were found to have cognitive impairment, and pathological variables between persons ultimately found to have no or severe CAA at autopsy using logistic regression. Analyses were repeated separately for carriers and non-carriers of the APOE ε4 allele. Setting Data were obtained from the Uniform Data Set that comprises longitudinal clinical assessments performed in the Alzheimer’s Disease Centers funded by the National Institute on Aging. Participants 193 persons with severe CAA and 232 persons with no CAA. All subjects had cognitive impairment and met NIA-Reagan neuropathological criteria for AD. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of demographic characteristics and the APOE ε4 allele and odds ratios of clinical variables for the prediction of severe CAA. Results Persons with severe CAA were more likely to carry an APOE ε4 allele (64.9% vs. 42.8%), to be Hispanic (6.8% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.003), to have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA, 12.5% vs. 6.1%, OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1 – 4.4), and had lower degrees of diffuse amyloid plaque pathology (mean CERAD scores 1.2 vs. 1.4, p = 0.01) than persons with no CAA. Intracerebral hemorrhage (9.3% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.01), cortical microinfarcts (20.7% vs. 12.9%, p = 0.03), and subcortical leukoencephalopathy (20.5% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.02) were more common in persons with CAA. A higher prevalence of stroke (11.1% vs. 3.9%, OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.0 – 14.6) and hypercholesterolemia (50% vs. 33.3%, OR = 2.3, CI 1.1 – 4.7) were found in non-carriers of the ε4 allele with

  5. BACE1 elevation is involved in amyloid plaque development in the triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: differential Aβ antibody labeling of early-onset axon terminal pathology.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Macklin, Lauren N; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Oddo, Salvatore; Laferla, Frank M; Struble, Robert G; Rose, Gregory M; Patrylo, Peter R; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins mutations cause early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Some FAD-based mouse models produce amyloid plaques, others do not. β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition can manifest as compact and diffuse plaques; it is unclear why the same Aβ molecules aggregate in different patterns. Is there a basic cellular process governing Aβ plaque pathogenesis? We showed in some FAD mouse models that compact plaque formation is associated with a progressive axonal pathology inherent with increased expression of β-secretase (BACE1), the enzyme initiating the amyloidogenic processing of APP. A monoclonal Aβ antibody, 3D6, visualized distinct axon terminal labeling before plaque onset. The present study was set to understand BACE1 and axonal changes relative to diffuse plaque development and to further characterize the novel axonal Aβ antibody immunoreactivity (IR), using triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice as experimental model. Diffuse-like plaques existed in the forebrain in aged transgenics and were regionally associated with increased BACE1 labeled swollen/sprouting axon terminals. Increased BACE1/3D6 IR at axon terminals occurred in young animals before plaque onset. These axonal elements were also co-labeled by other antibodies targeting the N-terminal and mid-region of Aβ domain and the C-terminal of APP, but not co-labeled by antibodies against the Aβ C-terminal and APP N-terminal. The results suggest that amyloidogenic axonal pathology precedes diffuse plaque formation in the 3xTg-AD mice, and that the early-onset axonal Aβ antibody IR in transgenic models of AD might relate to a cross-reactivity of putative APP β-carboxyl terminal fragments.

  6. Administrations of human adult ischemia-tolerant mesenchymal stem cells and factors reduce amyloid beta pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Harach, Taoufiq; Jammes, Fabien; Muller, Charles; Duthilleul, Nicolas; Cheatham, Victoria; Zufferey, Valentin; Cheatham, David; Lukasheva, Yelizaveta A; Lasser, Theo; Bolmont, Tristan

    2017-03-01

    The impact of human adult ischemia-tolerant mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and factors (stem cell factors) on cerebral amyloid beta (Aβ) pathology was investigated in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To this end, hMSCs were administered intravenously to APPPS1 transgenic mice that normally develop cerebral Aβ. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction biodistribution revealed that intravenously delivered hMSCs were readily detected in APPPS1 brains 1 hour following administration, and dropped to negligible levels after 1 week. Notably, intravenously injected hMSCs that migrated to the brain region were localized in the cerebrovasculature, but they also could be observed in the brain parenchyma particularly in the hippocampus, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. A single hMSC injection markedly reduced soluble cerebral Aβ levels in APPPS1 mice after 1 week, although increasing several Aβ-degrading enzymes and modulating a panel of cerebral cytokines, suggesting an amyloid-degrading and anti-inflammatory impact of hMSCs. Furthermore, 10 weeks of hMSC treatment significantly reduced cerebral Aβ plaques and neuroinflammation in APPPS1 mice, without increasing cerebral amyloid angiopathy or microhemorrhages. Notably, a repeated intranasal delivery of soluble factors secreted by hMSCs in culture, in the absence of intravenous hMSC injection, was also sufficient to diminish cerebral amyloidosis in the mice. In conclusion, this preclinical study strongly underlines that cerebral amyloidosis is amenable to therapeutic intervention based on peripheral applications of hMSC or hMSC factors, paving the way for a novel therapy for Aβ amyloidosis and associated pathologies observed in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  8. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  9. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  10. Cigarette smoking accelerated brain aging and induced pre-Alzheimer-like neuropathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yuen-Shan; Yang, Xifei; Yeung, Sze-Chun; Chiu, Kin; Lau, Chi-Fai; Tsang, Andrea Wing-Ting; Mak, Judith Choi-Wo; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been proposed as a major risk factor for aging-related pathological changes and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, little is known for how smoking can predispose our brains to dementia or cognitive impairment. This study aimed to investigate the cigarette smoke-induced pathological changes in brains. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to either sham air or 4% cigarette smoke 1 hour per day for 8 weeks in a ventilated smoking chamber to mimic the situation of chronic passive smoking. We found that the levels of oxidative stress were significantly increased in the hippocampus of the smoking group. Smoking also affected the synapse through reducing the expression of pre-synaptic proteins including synaptophysin and synapsin-1, while there were no changes in the expression of postsynaptic protein PSD95. Decreased levels of acetylated-tubulin and increased levels of phosphorylated-tau at 231, 205 and 404 epitopes were also observed in the hippocampus of the smoking rats. These results suggested that axonal transport machinery might be impaired, and the stability of cytoskeleton might be affected by smoking. Moreover, smoking affected amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by increasing the production of sAPPβ and accumulation of β-amyloid peptide in the CA3 and dentate gyrus region. In summary, our data suggested that chronic cigarette smoking could induce synaptic changes and other neuropathological alterations. These changes might serve as evidence of early phases of neurodegeneration and may explain why smoking can predispose brains to AD and dementia.

  11. The Significance of α-Synuclein, Amyloid-β and Tau Pathologies in Parkinson’s Disease Progression and Related Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Compta, Y.; Parkkinen, L.; Kempster, P.; Selikhova, M.; Lashley, T.; Holton, J.L.; Lees, A.J.; Revesz, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dementia is one of the milestones of advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), with its neuropathological substrate still being a matter of debate, particularly regarding its potential mechanistic implications. Objective The aim of this study was to review the relative importance of Lewy-related α-synuclein and Alzheimer’s tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) pathologies in disease progression and dementia in PD. Methods We reviewed studies conducted at the Queen Square Brain Bank, Institute of Neurology, University College London, using large PD cohorts. Results Cortical Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies are associated with milestones of poorer prognosis and with non-tremor predominance, which have been, in turn, linked to dementia. The combination of these pathologies is the most robust neuropathological substrate of PD-related dementia, with cortical Aβ burden determining a faster progression to dementia. Conclusion The shared relevance of these pathologies in PD progression and dementia is in line with experimental data suggesting synergism between α-synuclein, tau and Aβ and with studies testing these proteins as disease biomarkers, hence favouring the eventual testing of therapeutic strategies targeting these proteins in PD. PMID:24028925

  12. Long-Term Treatment of Thalidomide Ameliorates Amyloid-Like Pathology through Inhibition of β-Secretase in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Cheng, Xin; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Li, Rena; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide is a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitor which has been found to have abilities against tumor growth, angiogenesis and inflammation. Recently, it has been applied in clinic for the treatment of multiple myeloma as well as some inflammatory diseases. However, whether thalidomide has any therapeutic effects on neurodegenerative disorders, i.e. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not clear. AD is characterized by excessive amount of amyloid β peptides (Aβ), which results in a significant release of inflammatory factors, including TNFα in the brain. Studies have shown that inhibition of TNFα reduces amyloid-associated pathology, prevents neuron loss and improves cognition. Our recent report showed that genetic inhibition of TNFα/TNF receptor signal transduction down-regulates β amyloid cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1) activity, reduces Aβ generation and improves learning and memory deficits. However, the mechanism of thalidomide involving in the mitigation of AD neuropathological features remains unclear. Here, we chronically administrated thalidomide on human APPswedish mutation transgenic (APP23) mice from 9 months old (an onset of Aβ deposits and early stage of AD-like changes) to 12 months old. We found that, in addition of dramatic decrease in the activation of both astrocytes and microglia, thalidomide significantly reduces Aβ load and plaque formation. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in BACE1 level and activity with long-term thalidomide application. Interestingly, these findings cannot be observed in the brains of 12-month-old APP23 mice with short-term treatment of thalidomide (3 days). These results suggest that chronic thalidomide administration is an alternative approach for AD prevention and therapeutics. PMID:23405115

  13. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  14. Tetracyclic Truncated Analogue of the Marine Toxin Gambierol Modifies NMDA, Tau, and Amyloid β Expression in Mice Brains: Implications in AD Pathology.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Vieira, Andrés C; Rodriguez, Inés; Alvariño, Rebeca; Gegunde, Sandra; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Suga, Yuto; Sasaki, Makoto; Alfonso, Amparo; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Botana, Luis M

    2017-06-21

    Gambierol and its two, tetra- and heptacyclic, analogues have been previously proved as promising molecules for the modulation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in primary cortical neurons of 3xTg-AD fetuses. In this work, the effect of the tetracyclic analogue of gambierol was tested in vivo in 3xTg-AD mice (10 months old) after 1 month of weekly treatment with 50 μg/kg. Adverse effects were not reported throughout the whole treatment period and no pathological signs were observed for the analyzed organs. The compound was found in brain samples after intraperitoneal injection. The tetracyclic analogue of gambierol elicited a decrease of amyloid β1-42 levels and a dose-dependent inhibition of β-secretase enzyme-1 activity. Moreover, this compound also reduced the phosphorylation of tau at the 181 and 159/163 residues with an increase of the inactive isoform of the glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In accordance with our in vitro neuronal model, this compound produced a reduction in the N2A subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The combined effect of this compound on amyloid β1-42 and tau phosphorylation represents a multitarget therapeutic approach for AD which might be more effective for this multifactorial and complex neurodegenerative disease than the current treatments.

  15. Effects of Dietary Supplementation of Carnosine on Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Amyloid Pathology, and Cognitive Deficits in 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Carlo; Frazzini, Valerio; Silvestri, Elena; Lattanzio, Rossano; La Sorda, Rossana; Piantelli, Mauro; Canzoniero, Lorella M. T.; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenic road map leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still not completely understood; however, a large body of studies in the last few years supports the idea that beside the classic hallmarks of the disease, namely the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles, other factors significantly contribute to the initiation and the progression of the disease. Among them, mitochondria failure, an unbalanced neuronal redox state, and the dyshomeostasis of endogenous metals like copper, iron, and zinc have all been reported to play an important role in exacerbating AD pathology. Given these factors, the endogenous peptide carnosine may be potentially beneficial in the treatment of AD because of its free-radical scavenger and metal chelating properties. Methodology In this study, we explored the effect of L-carnosine supplementation in the 3xTg-AD mouse, an animal model of AD that shows both Aβ- and tau-dependent pathology. Principal Findings We found that carnosine supplementation in 3xTg-AD mice promotes a strong reduction in the hippocampal intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ and completely rescues AD and aging-related mitochondrial dysfunctions. No effects were found on tau pathology and we only observed a trend toward the amelioration of cognitive deficits. Conclusions and Significance Our data indicate that carnosine can be part of a combined therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. PMID:21423579

  16. Histamine H3 Inverse Agonist BF 2649 or Antagonist with Partial H4 Agonist Activity Clobenpropit Reduces Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Brain Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Skaper, Stephen D; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José Vicente; Castellani, Rudy J; Nozari, Ala; Sharma, Hari S

    2017-08-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the leading causes for disability and death affecting millions of people worldwide. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to reduce brain pathology associated with AD. In view of increasing awareness regarding involvement of histaminergic pathways in AD, we explored the role of one H3 receptor inverse agonist BF 2649 and one selective H3 receptor antagonist with partial H4 agonist activity in amyloid beta peptide (AβP) infusion-induced brain pathology in a rat model. AD-like pathology was produced by administering AβP (1-40) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) in the left lateral ventricle (250 ng/10 μl, once daily) for 4 weeks. Control rats received saline. In separate group of rats, either BF 2649 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or clobenpropit (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered once daily for 1 week after 3 weeks of AβP administration. After 30 days, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation, neuronal, glial injuries, and AβP deposits were examined in the brain. A significant reduction in AβP deposits along with marked reduction in neuronal or glial reactions was seen in the drug-treated group. The BBB breakdown to Evans blue albumin and radioiodine in the cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum was also significantly reduced in these drug-treated groups. Clobenpropit showed superior effects than the BF2649 in reducing brain pathology in AD. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that blockade of H3 and stimulation of H4 receptors are beneficial for the treatment of AD pathology, not reported earlier.

  17. Pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.; Farber, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 29 chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Systemic Diseases; Cell Injury; Inflammation; The Gastrointestinal o Tract; The Pancreas; Environmental and Nutritional Pathology; Infectious and Parasitic Diseases; and Blood Vessels.

  18. Genetic ablation of luteinizing hormone receptor improves the amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Li, Xian; Yuan, Fangping; Lin, Ling; Cook, Christine L; Rao, Ch V; Lei, Zhenmin

    2010-03-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) plays an essential pathophysiologic role in Alzheimer disease, and elevation of luteinizing hormone (LH) levels during aging has been implicated in its pathogenesis. To assess the effect of LH receptor deficiency on Abeta accumulation, we generated a bigenic mouse model, APPsw(+)/Lhr(-/-), which expresses human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) in the background of LH receptor (Lhr) knockout. Genetic ablation of Lhr resulted in a significant decrease in the number of Abeta plaques and protein content in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in both male and female mice. Accordingly, several Abeta deposition-related neuropathologic features and functionally relevant molecules were markedly improved, including decreased astrogliosis, reductions of elevated phosphorylated tau, c-fos, alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and restoration of the altered neuropeptide Y receptors Y1 and Y2. Diminution of Abeta accumulation in the absence of LH receptor supports the contention that dysregulation of LH may impact the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The APPsw(+)/Lhr(-/-) mouse may be a useful tool for advancing understanding of the role of LH-mediated events in Alzheimer disease and a model in which to test therapeutic interventions.

  19. Decreased rhythmic GABAergic septal activity and memory-associated theta oscillations after hippocampal amyloid-beta pathology in the rat.

    PubMed

    Villette, Vincent; Poindessous-Jazat, Frédérique; Simon, Axelle; Léna, Clément; Roullot, Elodie; Bellessort, Brice; Epelbaum, Jacques; Dutar, Patrick; Stéphan, Aline

    2010-08-18

    The memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease result to a great extent from hippocampal network dysfunction. The coordination of this network relies on theta (symbol) oscillations generated in the medial septum. Here, we investigated in rats the impact of hippocampal amyloid beta (Abeta) injections on the physiological and cognitive functions that depend on the septohippocampal system. Hippocampal Abeta injections progressively impaired behavioral performances, the associated hippocampal theta power, and theta frequency response in a visuospatial recognition test. These alterations were associated with a specific reduction in the firing of the identified rhythmic bursting GABAergic neurons responsible for the propagation of the theta rhythm to the hippocampus, but without loss of medial septal neurons. Such results indicate that hippocampal Abeta treatment leads to a specific functional depression of inhibitory projection neurons of the medial septum, resulting in the functional impairment of the temporal network.

  20. Alzheimer Disease Pathology in Middle Age Reveals a Spatial-Temporal Disconnect Between Amyloid-β and Phosphorylated Tau.

    PubMed

    Fornicola, Whitney; Pelcovits, Ari; Li, Bei-Xu; Heath, Jonathan; Perry, George; Castellani, Rudy J

    2014-01-01

    We studied the brain distribution of amyloid-β (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau (τ) in 20 consecutive autopsy cases between the ages of 51 and 65, with no history of neurologic disease during life. We note that early accumulations of Aβ and τ occur in distinct neuroanatomical distributions. In the locus ceruleus and medial temporal lobe allocortex τ often occurs in the absence of diffuse Aβ and that Aβ occurs in the neocortex in the absence of τ. In those cases with both Aβ and τ were present in the sections, there was no overlap at the microanatomical or cellular level. APOE genotype was also assessed, showing no specific relationship with the presence or distribution of Aβ and τ, although the numbers of cases were limited. These findings indicate that the early appearances of hallmark proteins of Alzheimer's disease are disconnected both in time and in space, suggesting that both are reactive phenomena with no mechanistic relationship in aging or preclinical disease.

  1. Combined administration of D-galactose and aluminium induces Alzheimer-like lesions in brain.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Li, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Hou, Jun-Dai; Lin, Lian-Feng; Gao, Qin; Luo, Huan-Min

    2011-06-01

    It has been reported that D-galactose (D-gal) can model subacute aging, and aluminum (Al) acts as a neurotoxin, but combined effects of them have not been reported. The present work aimed to reveal the effect of combined administration of D-gal and Al in mice and compare the effect of D-gal treatment with that of Al treatment. Al was intragastrically administered and D-gal was subcutaneously injected into Kunming mice for 10 consecutive weeks. Learning and memory, cholinergic systems, as well as protein levels of amyloid β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau were determined using Morri water maze test, biochemical assays and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The mice with combined treatment had obvious learning and memory deficits, and showed decreases in brain acetylcholine (ACh) level and in activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Formation of senile plaque (SP)-like and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-like structures was also observed. The behavioral and pathological changes persisted for at least 6 weeks after withdrawal of D-gal and Al. Combined use of D-gal and Al is an effective way to establish the non-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal model, and is useful for studies of AD pathogenesis and therapeutic evaluation.

  2. Red wine micronutrients as protective agents in Alzheimer-like induced insult.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Palumbo, M; Aliano, C; Lempereur, L; Scoto, G; Renis, M

    2003-04-11

    Plant extract micronutrients are commonly added to diets for health and prevention of degenerative disease. However, there are barriers to the introduction of these products as antioxidant therapies in counteracting chronic human diseases, probably because the molecular bases of their therapeutic potential are poorly clarified. The present study was designed to evaluate the possible protective effect of combined micronutrients present in black grape skin on toxicity induced by 25-35 beta-amyloid peptid or by serum of Alzheimer's disease patients, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The hypothesis was tested by examining the results of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release to estimate cytoplasmic membrane breakdown; activity of mitochondrial complexes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) levels as markers of oxidative stress induction and COMET assay to evaluate DNA fragmentation. The results demonstrate that black grape skin extract reduces the ROS production, protects the cellular membrane from oxidative damage, and consequently prevents DNA fragmentation. The experimental results suggest that this natural compound may be used to ameliorate the progression of pathology in AD disease therapy.

  3. Oxidative Stress during the Progression of β-Amyloid Pathology in the Neocortex of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Porcellotti, Sara; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracassi, Anna; Sepe, Sara; Cecconi, Francesco; Bernardi, Cinzia; Cimini, AnnaMaria; Cerù, Maria Paola; Moreno, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Pathogenetic mechanisms, triggered by β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, include oxidative stress, derived from energy homeostasis deregulation and involving mitochondria and peroxisomes. We here addressed the oxidative stress status and the elicited cellular response at the onset and during the progression of Aβ pathology, studying the neocortex of Tg2576 model of AD. Age-dependent changes of oxidative damage markers, antioxidant enzymes, and related transcription factors were analysed in relation to the distribution of Aβ peptide and oligomers, by a combined molecular/morphological approach. Nucleic acid oxidative damage, accompanied by defective antioxidant defences, and decreased PGC1α expression are already detected in 3-month-old Tg2576 neurons. Conversely, PPARα is increased in these cells, with its cytoplasmic localization suggesting nongenomic, anti-inflammatory actions. At 6 months, when intracellular Aβ accumulates, PMP70 is downregulated, indicating impairment of fatty acids peroxisomal translocation and their consequent harmful accumulation. In 9-month-old Tg2576 neocortex, Aβ oligomers and acrolein deposition correlate with GFAP, GPX1, and PMP70 increases, supporting a compensatory response, involving astroglial peroxisomes. At severe pathological stages, when senile plaques disrupt cortical cytoarchitecture, antioxidant capacity is gradually lost. Overall, our data suggest early therapeutic intervention in AD, also targeting peroxisomes.

  4. Oxidative Stress during the Progression of β-Amyloid Pathology in the Neocortex of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porcellotti, Sara; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracassi, Anna; Sepe, Sara; Cecconi, Francesco; Bernardi, Cinzia; Cimini, AnnaMaria; Cerù, Maria Paola; Moreno, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Pathogenetic mechanisms, triggered by β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, include oxidative stress, derived from energy homeostasis deregulation and involving mitochondria and peroxisomes. We here addressed the oxidative stress status and the elicited cellular response at the onset and during the progression of Aβ pathology, studying the neocortex of Tg2576 model of AD. Age-dependent changes of oxidative damage markers, antioxidant enzymes, and related transcription factors were analysed in relation to the distribution of Aβ peptide and oligomers, by a combined molecular/morphological approach. Nucleic acid oxidative damage, accompanied by defective antioxidant defences, and decreased PGC1α expression are already detected in 3-month-old Tg2576 neurons. Conversely, PPARα is increased in these cells, with its cytoplasmic localization suggesting nongenomic, anti-inflammatory actions. At 6 months, when intracellular Aβ accumulates, PMP70 is downregulated, indicating impairment of fatty acids peroxisomal translocation and their consequent harmful accumulation. In 9-month-old Tg2576 neocortex, Aβ oligomers and acrolein deposition correlate with GFAP, GPX1, and PMP70 increases, supporting a compensatory response, involving astroglial peroxisomes. At severe pathological stages, when senile plaques disrupt cortical cytoarchitecture, antioxidant capacity is gradually lost. Overall, our data suggest early therapeutic intervention in AD, also targeting peroxisomes. PMID:25973140

  5. The pathological cross talk between apolipoprotein E and amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease: emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Mangialasche, Francesca; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a key role in lipid transport in the plasma and in the central nervous system through its interaction with members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. The three common isoforms of ApoE (ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4) differ in their ability to perform neuronal maintenance and repair functions and differentially affect the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders. The ApoE4 isoform is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Up-to-date knowledge about the structural and biophysical features of ApoE4 shed light on the molecular basis underlying the isoform-specific pathogenic role of ApoE4 and its contribution to AD pathology through several different mechanisms. ApoE4 impacts on amyloid-beta (Abeta) production, Abeta clearance, Abeta fibrillation, and tangle formation as well as on mitochondrial functions leading to neuronal toxicity and synaptic damage. This review summarizes the pathological cross talk between ApoE and Abeta peptide in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we examine emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches encompassing the use of ApoE and their potential opportunities to preventing or treating Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Structures for amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Makin, O Sumner; Serpell, Louise C

    2005-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are the best-known examples of a group of diseases known as the amyloidoses. They are characterized by the extracellular deposition of toxic, insoluble amyloid fibrils. Knowledge of the structure of these fibrils is essential for understanding the process of pathology of the amyloidoses and for the rational design of drugs to inhibit or reverse amyloid formation. Structural models have been built using information from a wide variety of techniques, including X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, solid state NMR and EPR. Recent advances have been made in understanding the architecture of the amyloid fibril. Here, we describe and compare postulated structural models for the mature amyloid fibril and discuss how the ordered structure of amyloid contributes to its stability.

  7. Peripherally administered sera antibodies recognizing amyloid-β oligomers mitigate Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline in aged 3× Tg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Qing

    2016-04-04

    Active and passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be the most promising strategy to prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, immunization with the recombinant 6Aβ15-T antigen generated robust anti-Aβ serum antibodies that strongly recognized Aβ42 oligomers in different mice, markedly reduced the amyloid burden, and improved behavioral performance of immunized older AD mice. Here, we further determined that these anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies from different strains of mice displayed anti-Aβ antibody responses against the same epitopes in the Aβ1-15 region. Peripheral administration of anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies was also effective to mitigate AD-like pathology and cognitive decline in aged 3× Tg-AD mice. Specifically, the levels of Aβ and tau in the brains of 3× Tg-AD mice were significantly reduced after passive immunotherapy, which seemed necessary or beneficial to ameliorate memory impairment. In addition, our results showed that this immunotherapy also prevented presynaptic dynamin 1 degradation, which might help to further protect synaptic functions and allow functional recovery of cognition. Moreover, immunization with 6Aβ15-T in rabbits induced a similar antibody response as that in mice, and the rabbit serum antibodies reacted strongly with Aβ42 oligomers and inhibited oligomer-mediated neurotoxicity. We concluded that passive immunization with Aβ42 oligomer conformation-sensitive anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies is effective in providing potentially therapeutic effects in aged 3× Tg-AD mice by reducing Aβ and tau.

  8. Anti-11[E]-pyroglutamate-modified amyloid β antibodies cross-react with other pathological Aβ species: relevance for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-12-15

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on N-truncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides.

  9. ANTI-11[E]-PYROGLUTAMATE-MODIFIED AMYLOID β ANTIBODIES CROSS-REACT WITH OTHER PATHOLOGICAL Aβ SPECIES: RELEVANCE FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H.; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-01-01

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on Ntruncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides. PMID:20864186

  10. [Amyloid beta-related angiitis: brain lesions showing leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement on MRI and characteristic surgical pathologic features].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Ouchi, Haruka; Sato, Tomoe; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Sasaki, Osamu; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Igarashi, Shuichi

    2013-06-01

    Amyloid-β-related angiitis (ABRA) of the CNS occurs in association with vasculitis of small-and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of a 76-year-old man with ABRA. The patient suffered progressive truncal oscillation, aphasia, and recent memory disturbance with a subacute disease onset. His cerebrospinal fluid showed a mild increase in protein levels (101 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (8/mm(3)). High-intensity brain lesion were detected on T(2)-weighted and FLAIR MRI scans, and prominent spread of gadolinium enhancement spreading was observed through the sulci of the left occipital and temporal lobes and left cerebellar hemisphere. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed a granulomatous and angiodestructive inflammation with infiltration of many CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells and with fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial walls in the subarachnoid space. Immunolabeling for Aβ(1-40) revealed the abundant deposition of this protein in the affected arteries. On the basic of the diagnosis of ABRA, immunosuppressive therapy was conducted, and it ameliorated the clinical course.

  11. Amyloid-β and Alzheimer's disease type pathology differentially affects the calcium signalling toolkit in astrocytes from different brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, A A; Sim, J A; Lim, D; Rodriguez, J J; Genazzani, A A; Verkhratsky, A

    2013-01-01

    The entorhinal–hippocampal circuit is severely affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we demonstrate that amyloid-β (Aβ) differentially affects primary cultured astrocytes derived from the entorhinal cortex (EC) and from the hippocampus from non-transgenic controls and 3xTg-AD transgenic mice. Exposure to 100 nM of Aβ resulted in increased expression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) and its downstream InsP3 receptor type 1 (InsP3R1) in hippocampal but not in EC astrocytes. Amplitudes of Ca2+ responses to an mGluR5 agonist, DHPG, and to ATP, another metabotropic agonist coupled to InsP3Rs, were significantly increased in Aβ-treated hippocampal but not in EC astrocytes. Previously we demonstrated that senile plaque formation in 3xTg-AD mice triggers astrogliosis in hippocampal but not in EC astrocytes. The different sensitivities of the Ca2+ signalling toolkit of EC versus hippocampal astrocytes to Aβ may account for the lack of astrogliosis in the EC, which in turn can explain the higher vulnerability of this region to AD. PMID:23661001

  12. Multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C) with concomitant beta-amyloid and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Bujan, Bartosz; Hofer, Markus J; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Pagenstecher, Axel; Bürk, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rapidly progressive sporadic α-synucleinopathy with adult onset characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, basal ganglia symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and pyramidal tract signs. While full-blown dementia is considered an exclusion criterion according to Consensus Guidelines, mild cognitive deficits such as fronto-executive dysfunction have been reported in some MSA individuals. However, the underlying anatomic correlate still has to be elucidated. We here report a 74-year-old patient with a clinical diagnosis of "probable MSA of the cerebellar type (MSA-C)" who developed pronounced clinical symptoms of fronto-executive dysfunction. Neuropathologic investigations revealed (1) numerous glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCI) in the putamen, mesencephalon and cerebellum, (2) pronounced betaamyloid pathology in the frontal lobe and (3) mild hippocampal τ-pathology. In this patient, fronto-executive dysfunction can easily be explained by frontal degeneration typical for AD. These findings challenge the concept of cognitive dysfunction as a core feature of MSA as long as concomitant pathology other than MSA has not been reliably excluded by post mortem analysis.

  13. Trehalose protects from aggravation of amyloid pathology induced by isoflurane anesthesia in APP(swe) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Perucho, Juan; Casarejos, Maria J; Gomez, Ana; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Mena, Maria A

    2012-03-01

    There is an open controversy about the role of surgery and anesthesia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies have shown a high prevalence of these procedures in subjects with AD but the interpretation of these studies is difficult because of the co-existence of multiple variables. Experimental studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that small molecular weight volatile anesthetics enhance amyloidogenesis in vitro and produce behavioral deficits and brain lesions similar to those found in patients with AD. We examined the effect of co-treatment with trehalose on isoflurane-induced amyloidogenesis in mice. WT and APP(swe) mice, of 11 months of age, were exposed to 1% isoflurane, 3 times, for 1.5 hours each time and sacrificed 24 hours after their last exposure to isoflurane. The right hemi-brain was used for histological analysis and the contra-lateral hemi-brain used for biochemical studies. In this study, we have shown that repetitive exposure to isoflurane in pre-symptomatic mature APP(swe) mice increases apoptosis in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, enhances astrogliosis and the expression of GFAP and that these effects are prevented by co-treatment with trehalose, a disaccharide with known effects as enhancer of autophagy. We have also confirmed that in our model the co-treatment with trehalose increases the expression of autophagic markers as well as the expression of chaperones. Cotreatment with trehalose reduces the levels of β amyloid peptide aggregates, tau plaques and levels of phospho-tau. Our study, therefore, provides new therapeutic avenues that could help to prevent the putative pro-amyloidogenic properties of small volatile anesthetics.

  14. Redox Proteomics Analysis to Decipher the Neurobiology of Alzheimer-like Neurodegeneration: Overlaps in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Swomley, Aaron M.; Head, Elizabeth; Perluigi, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage is a common feature of neurodegeneration that together with mitochondrial dysfunction point to the fact that reactive oxygen species are major contributors to loss of neuronal homeostasis and cell death. Among several targets of oxidative stress, free radical-mediated damage to proteins is particularly important in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In the majority of cases, oxidative stress mediated post-translational modifications cause non-reversible modifications of protein structure that consistently lead to impaired function. Redox proteomics methods are powerful tools to unravel the complexity of neurodegeneration, by identifying brain proteins with oxidative post-translational modifications that are detrimental for protein function. The present review discusses the current literature showing evidence of impaired pathways linked to oxidative stress possibly involved in the neurodegenerative process leading to the development of Alzheimer-like dementia. In particular, we focus attention on dysregulated pathways that underlie neurodegeneration in both aging adults with Down syndrome (DS) and AD. Since AD pathology is age-dependent in DS and shows similarities with AD, identification of common oxidized proteins by redox proteomics in both DS and AD can improve our understanding of the overlapping mechanisms that lead from normal aging to development of AD. The most relevant proteomics findings highlight that disturbance of protein homeostasis and energy production are central mechanisms of neurodegeneration and overlap in aging DS and AD. Protein oxidation impacts crucial intracellular functions and may be considered a “leitmotif” of degenerating neurons. Therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing/reducing multiple components of processes leading to accumulation of oxidative damage will be critical in future studies. PMID:25242166

  15. Redox proteomics analysis to decipher the neurobiology of Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration: overlaps in Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Swomley, Aaron M; Head, Elizabeth; Perluigi, Marzia

    2014-10-15

    Accumulation of oxidative damage is a common feature of neurodegeneration that, together with mitochondrial dysfunction, point to the fact that reactive oxygen species are major contributors to loss of neuronal homoeostasis and cell death. Among several targets of oxidative stress, free-radical-mediated damage to proteins is particularly important in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In the majority of cases, oxidative-stress-mediated post-translational modifications cause non-reversible modifications of protein structure that consistently lead to impaired function. Redox proteomics methods are powerful tools to unravel the complexity of neurodegeneration, by identifying brain proteins with oxidative post-translational modifications that are detrimental for protein function. The present review discusses the current literature showing evidence of impaired pathways linked to oxidative stress possibly involved in the neurodegenerative process leading to the development of Alzheimer-like dementia. In particular, we focus attention on dysregulated pathways that underlie neurodegeneration in both aging adults with DS (Down's syndrome) and AD (Alzheimer's disease). Since AD pathology is age-dependent in DS and shows similarities with AD, identification of common oxidized proteins by redox proteomics in both DS and AD can improve our understanding of the overlapping mechanisms that lead from normal aging to development of AD. The most relevant proteomics findings highlight that disturbance of protein homoeostasis and energy production are central mechanisms of neurodegeneration and overlap in aging DS and AD. Protein oxidation affects crucial intracellular functions and may be considered a 'leitmotif' of degenerating neurons. Therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing/reducing multiple components of processes leading to accumulation of oxidative damage will be critical in future studies.

  16. Neural stem cell transplants improve cognitive function without altering amyloid pathology in an APP/PS1 double transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Pei-Jun; Sha, Hong-ying; Ni, Jiong; Li, Ming-hua; Gu, Guo-jun

    2014-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewal and are multipotent. Transplantation of NSCs may represent a promising approach for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, such as Alzheimer disease (AD) characterized by extensive loss of neurons. In this study, we investigated the effect of NSC transplantation on cognitive function in the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mouse, an AD mouse model with age-dependent cognitive deficits. We found that NSCs bilaterally transplanted into hippocampal regions improved spatial learning and memory function in these mice, but did not alter Aβ pathology. Immunohistochemical analyses determined that NSCs proliferated, migrated, and differentiated into three neuronal cell types. The improvement in cognitive function was correlated with enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) and an increase in the neuron expression of proteins related to cognitive function: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) 2B unit, synaptophysin (SYP), protein kinase C ζ subtypes (PKCζ), tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Taken together, our data indicated that injected NSCs can rescue cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by replacing neuronal cell types expressing multiple cognition-related proteins that enhance LTP.

  17. Neurofilament light gene deletion exacerbates amyloid, dystrophic neurite, and synaptic pathology in the APP/PS1 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carmen M; King, Anna E; Atkinson, Rachel A K; Woodhouse, Adele; Vickers, James C

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with the loss of cognitive function. Neurofilament (NF) triplet proteins, the major structural (intermediate filament) proteins of neurons, are expressed in a subset of pyramidal cells that show a high degree of vulnerability to degeneration in AD. Alterations in the NF triplet proteins in amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaque-associated dystrophic neurites (DNs) represent the first cytoskeletal aberration to occur in the neocortex in the earliest stages of AD. We generated transgenic APP/PS1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mice on the neurofilament light knockout (NFL KO) background to explore the role of NFL deletion in the context of DN formation, synaptic changes, and other neuropathologic features. Our analysis demonstrated that NFL deficiency significantly increased neocortical DN pathology, Aβ deposition, synapse vulnerability, and microgliosis in APP/PS1 mice. Thus, NFs may have a role in protecting neurites from dystrophy and in regulating cellular pathways related to the generation of Aβ plaques.

  18. Potential role of PCTAIRE-2, PCTAIRE-3 and P-Histone H4 in amyloid precursor protein-dependent Alzheimer pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Dale; Kirouac, Lisa; Stevens, Stanley M.; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is regulated in a mitosis-specific manner and plays a role in proliferative signaling in cells. Though APP-derived Aβ generation has a well-established role in neurodegeneration, the mechanistic role of APP in this process is not fully understood. Here, we performed an unbiased, comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteome signature in APP-null neuroblastoma cells (B103) compared to those expressing APP-695 isoform (B103-695) to determine if APP expression affects protein phosphorylation. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis with PolyMAC identified a total of 2,478 phosphopeptides in the B103 and B103-695 cell culture model system. We observed that phosphorylation of PCTAIRE-2 (CDK17), PCTAIRE-3 (CDK18), and Histone H4 are significantly elevated in B103-695 cells; western blot analysis confirmed overexpression of PCTAIREs and increased phosphorylation of Histone H4. More importantly, analysis of primary neurons treated with Aβ, as well as brain samples from MCI (mild cognitive impaired) and AD patients recapitulated these results, showing increased levels of PCTAIREs and P-Histone H4. These novel findings identify a hitherto uncharacterized mechanism by which APP and/or Aβ may promote AD neurodegeneration, and raises the possibility that their inhibition may protect against pathology development in AD. PMID:26885753

  19. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester-based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model.

  20. A ketone ester diet exhibits anxiolytic and cognition-sparing properties, and lessens amyloid and tau pathologies in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Bergman, Christian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Wan, Ruiqian; King, M. Todd; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Okun, Eitan; Clarke, Kieran; Mattson, Mark P.; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary pathologies, and glucose hypometabolism in brain regions critical for memory. The 3xTgAD mouse model was used to test the hypothesis that a ketone ester–based diet can ameliorate AD pathogenesis. Beginning at a presymptomatic age, 2 groups of male 3xTgAD mice were fed a diet containing a physiological enantiomeric precursor of ketone bodies (KET) or an isocaloric carbohydrate diet. The results of behavioral tests performed at 4 and 7 months after diet initiation revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited significantly less anxiety in 2 different tests. 3xTgAD mice on the KET diet also exhibited significant, albeit relatively subtle, improvements in performance on learning and memory tests. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that KET-fed mice exhibited decreased Aβ deposition in the subiculum, CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, and the amygdala. KET-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated tau deposition in the same regions of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. Thus, a novel ketone ester can ameliorate proteopathic and behavioral deficits in a mouse AD model. PMID:23276384

  1. Structural Similarities and Differences between Amyloidogenic and Non-Amyloidogenic Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) Sequences and Implications for the Dual Physiological and Pathological Activities of These Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2013-01-01

    IAPP, a 37 amino-acid peptide hormone belonging to the calcitonin family, is an intrinsically disordered protein that is coexpressed and cosecreted along with insulin by pancreatic islet β-cells in response to meals. IAPP plays a physiological role in glucose regulation; however, in certain species, IAPP can aggregate and this process is linked to β-cell death and Type II Diabetes. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics with extensive sampling (16 replicas per sequence and 600 ns per replica), we investigate the structure of the monomeric state of two species of aggregating peptides (human and cat IAPP) and two species of non-aggregating peptides (pig and rat IAPP). Our simulations reveal that the pig and rat conformations are very similar, and consist of helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations. The aggregating sequences, on the other hand, populate the same helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations as the non-aggregating sequence, but, in addition, populate a hairpin structure. Our exhaustive simulations, coupled with available peptide-activity data, leads us to a structure-activity relationship (SAR) in which we propose that the functional role of IAPP is carried out by the helix-coil conformation, a structure common to both aggregating and non-aggregating species. The pathological role of this peptide may have multiple origins, including the interaction of the helical elements with membranes. Nonetheless, our simulations suggest that the hairpin structure, only observed in the aggregating species, might be linked to the pathological role of this peptide, either as a direct precursor to amyloid fibrils, or as part of a cylindrin type of toxic oligomer. We further propose that the helix-hairpin fold is also a possible aggregation prone conformation that would lead normally non-aggregating variants of IAPP to form fibrils under conditions where an external perturbation is applied. The SAR relationship is used to suggest the rational design of therapeutics

  2. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  3. Pediatric respiratory and systemic effects of chronic air pollution exposure: nose, lung, heart, and brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Henriquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Exposures to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants have been associated with respiratory tract inflammation, disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers, systemic inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain and systemic circulation of particulate matter. Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to significant amounts of ozone, particulate matter and associated lipopolysaccharides. MC dogs exhibit brain inflammation and an acceleration of Alzheimer's-like pathology, suggesting that the brain is adversely affected by air pollutants. MC children, adolescents and adults have a significant upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in olfactory bulb and frontal cortex, as well as neuronal and astrocytic accumulation of the 42 amino acid form of beta -amyloid peptide (Abeta 42), including diffuse amyloid plaques in frontal cortex. The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain inflammation and the accumulation of Abeta 42, which precede the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the pathological hallmarks of AD. Our findings of nasal barrier disruption, systemic inflammation, and the upregulation of COX2 and IL-1beta expression and Abeta 42 accumulation in brain suggests that sustained exposures to significant concentrations of air pollutants such as particulate matter could be a risk factor for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Origins of amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyloid-β plaques are a defining characteristic of Alzheimer Disease. However, Amyloid-β deposition is also found in other forms of dementia and in non-pathological contexts. Amyloid-β deposition is variable among vertebrate species and the evolutionary emergence of the amyloidogenic property is currently unknown. Evolutionary persistence of a pathological peptide sequence may depend on the functions of the precursor gene, conservation or mutation of nucleotides or peptide domains within the precursor gene, or a species-specific physiological environment. Results In this study, we asked when amyloidogenic Amyloid-β first arose using phylogenetic trees constructed for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene family and by modeling the potential for Amyloid-β aggregation across species in silico. We collected the most comprehensive set of sequences for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein family using an automated, iterative meta-database search and constructed a highly resolved phylogeny. The analysis revealed that the ancestral gene for invertebrate and vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene families arose around metazoic speciation during the Ediacaran period. Synapomorphic frequencies found domain-specific conservation of sequence. Analyses of aggregation potential showed that potentially amyloidogenic sequences are a ubiquitous feature of vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein but are also found in echinoderm, nematode, and cephalochordate, and hymenoptera species homologues. Conclusions The Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene is ancient and highly conserved. The amyloid forming Amyloid-β domains may have been present in early deuterostomes, but more recent mutations appear to have resulted in potentially unrelated amyoid forming sequences. Our results further highlight that the species-specific physiological environment is as critical to Amyloid-β formation as the peptide sequence. PMID:23627794

  5. Total Magnetic Resonance Imaging Burden of Small Vessel Disease in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: An Imaging-Pathologic Study of Concept Validation.

    PubMed

    Charidimou, Andreas; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Reijmer, Yael D; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Lauer, Arne; Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Frosch, Matthew; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Ayres, Alison; Rosand, Jonathan; Gurol, Mahmut Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characteristically associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of small vessel brain injury, including strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. Although these neuroimaging markers reflect distinct pathophysiologic aspects in CAA, no studies to date have combined these structural imaging features to gauge total brain small vessel disease burden in CAA. To investigate whether a composite score can be developed to capture the total brain MRI burden of small vessel disease in CAA and to explore whether this score contributes independent and complementary information about CAA severity, defined as intracerebral hemorrhage during life or bleeding-related neuropathologic changes. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined a single-center neuropathologic CAA cohort of eligible patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from January 2, 2015, to January 9, 2016. Patients with pathologic evidence of CAA (ie, any presence of CAA from routinely collected brain biopsy specimen, biopsy specimen at hematoma evacuation, or autopsy) and available brain MRI sequences of adequate quality, including T2-weighted, T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo, and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, were considered for the study. Brain MRIs were rated for lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. All 4 MRI lesions were incorporated into a prespecified ordinal total small vessel disease score, ranging from 0 to 6 points. Associations with severity of CAA-associated vasculopathic changes (fibrinoid necrosis and concentric splitting of the wall), clinical presentation, number of intracerebral hemorrhages, and other

  6. A novel DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: effect on Tau and amyloid pathologies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coutadeur, Séverine; Benyamine, Hélène; Delalonde, Laurence; de Oliveira, Catherine; Leblond, Bertrand; Foucourt, Alicia; Besson, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Taverne, Thierry; Girard, Angélique; Pando, Matthew P; Désiré, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene is located within the Down Syndrome (DS) critical region on chromosome 21 and is implicated in the generation of Tau and amyloid pathologies that are associated with the early onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD) observed in DS. DYRK1A is also found associated with neurofibrillary tangles in sporadic AD and phosphorylates key AD players (Tau, amyloid precursor, protein, etc). Thus, DYRK1A may be an important therapeutic target to modify the course of Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ) pathologies. Here, we describe EHT 5372 (methyl 9-(2,4-dichlorophenylamino) thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline-2-carbimidate), a novel, highly potent (IC50 = 0.22 nM) DYRK1A inhibitor with a high degree of selectivity over 339 kinases. Models in which inhibition of DYRK1A by siRNA reduced and DYRK1A over-expression induced Tau phosphorylation or Aβ production were used. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation at multiple AD-relevant sites in biochemical and cellular assays. EHT 5372 also normalizes both Aβ-induced Tau phosphorylation and DYRK1A-stimulated Aβ production. DYRK1A is thus as a key element of Aβ-mediated Tau hyperphosphorylation, which links Tau and amyloid pathologies. EHT 5372 and other compounds in its class warrant in vivo investigation as a novel, high-potential therapy for AD and other Tau opathies. Inhibition of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a new high-potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease. Here we describe EHT 5372, a novel potent and selective DYRK1A inhibitor. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation, Aβ production and Aβ effects on phospho-Tau, including Tau aggregation.

  7. Dickkopf 3 (Dkk3) Improves AmyloidPathology, Cognitive Dysfunction, and Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Sun, Caixian; Jin, Yaxi; Gao, Kai; Shi, Xudong; Qiu, Wenying; Ma, Chao; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2017-09-08

    Dysfunctional Wnt signaling is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway inhibits AD development. Dickkopf 3 (Dkk3) is a modulator of the Wnt signaling pathway and is physiologically expressed in the brain. The role of Dkk3 in the pathogenesis of AD has not been evaluated. In the present study, we determined that Dkk3 expression was significantly decreased in brain tissue from AD patients and the AD transgenic mouse model APPswe/PS1dE9 (AD mice). Transgenic mice with brain tissue-specific Dkk3 expression were generated or crossed with AD mice to study the effects of Dkk3 on AD. In AD mice, transgenic expression of Dkk3 improved abnormalities in learning, memory, and locomotor activity, reduced the accumulation of amyloid-β, and ameliorated glucose uptake deficits. Furthermore, we determined that Dkk3 downregulated GSK-3β, a central negative regulator in canonical Wnt signaling, and upregulated PKCβ1, a factor implicated in noncanonical Wnt signaling. This indicates that increased activation of GSK-3β and the inhibition of PKCβ1 in AD patients may be responsible for the dysfunctional Wnt signaling in AD. In summary, our data suggest that Dkk3 is an agonist of Wnt signaling, and the ability of transgenic expression of Dkk3 to compensate for the decrease in Dkk3 expression in AD mice, reverse dysfunctional Wnt signaling, and partially inhibit the pathological development of AD suggests that Dkk3 could serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  8. The yin and yang of amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, S Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Intra- and extra-cellular amyloid protein fibers are traditionally coupled to a series of devastating and incurable neurodegenerative disorders. Since the discovery of physiologically useful amyloids, our attention has been shifting from pure pathology to function, as amyloid aggregation seems to constitute a basis for the functional and dynamic assembly of biological structures. The following article summarizes how the cell profits from such an unconventional high-risk aggregation at the rim of physiologic utility and pathologic catastrophe. PMID:28031869

  9. Early AD pathology in a [C-11]PiB-negative case: a PiB-amyloid imaging, biochemical, and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Ikonomovic, Milos D; Abrahamson, Eric E; Price, Julie C; Hamilton, Ronald L; Mathis, Chester A; Paljug, William R; Debnath, Manik L; Cohen, Anne D; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; DeKosky, Steven T; Lopez, Oscar L; Klunk, William E

    2012-03-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are detectable in the brain in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) and [C-11]-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B ([C-11]PiB); however, the sensitivity of this technique is not well understood. In this study, we examined Aβ pathology in an individual who had clinical diagnoses of probable dementia with Lewy bodies and possible Alzheimer's disease (AD) but with no detectable [C-11]PiB PET retention ([C-11]PiB(-)) when imaged 17 months prior to death. Brain samples were processed in parallel with region-matched samples from an individual with a clinical diagnosis of probable AD and a positive [C-11]PiB PET scan ([C-11]PiB(+)) when imaged 10 months prior to death. In the [C-11]PiB(-) case, Aβ plaques were sparse, occupying less than 2% cortical area, and were weakly labeled with 6-CN-PiB, a highly fluorescent derivative of PiB. In contrast, Aβ plaques occupied up to 12% cortical area in the [C-11]PiB(+) case, and were intensely labeled with 6-CN-PIB. The [C-11]PiB(-) case had low levels of [H-3]PiB binding (< 100 pmol/g) and Aβ1-42 (< 500 pmol/g) concentration except in the frontal cortex where Aβ1-42 values (788 pmol/g) approached cortical values in the [C-11]PiB(+) case (800-1, 700 pmol/g). In several cortical regions of the [C-11]PiB(-) case, Aβ1-40 levels were within the range of cortical Aβ1-40 values in the [C-11]PiB(+) case. Antemortem [C-11]PiB DVR values correlated well with region-matched postmortem measures of Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the [C-11]PiB(+), and with Aβ1-42 only in the [C-11]PiB(-) case. The low ratios of [H-3]PiB binding levels to Aβ concentrations and 6-CN-PiB to Aβ plaque loads in the [C-11]PiB(-) case indicate that Aβ pathology in the brain may be associated with low or undetectable levels of [C-11]PiB retention. Studies in greater numbers of [C-11]PiB PET autopsy cases are needed to define the Aβ concentration and [H-3]PiB binding levels required to produce a positive [C-11]PiB PET signal.

  10. Early AD pathology in a [C-11]PiB-negative case: a PiB-amyloid imaging, biochemical, and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, Eric E.; Price, Julie C.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Mathis, Chester A.; Paljug, William R.; Debnath, Manik L.; Cohen, Anne D.; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; DeKosky, Steven T.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are detectable in the brain in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) and [C-11]-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B ([C-11]PiB); however, the sensitivity of this technique is not well understood. In this study, we examined Aβ pathology in an individual who had clinical diagnoses of probable dementia with Lewy bodies and possible Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but with no detectable [C-11]PiB PET retention ([C-11]PiB(−)) when imaged 17 months prior to death. Brain samples were processed in parallel with region-matched samples from an individual with a clinical diagnosis of probable AD and a positive [C-11]PiB PET scan ([C-11]PiB(+)) when imaged 10 months prior to death. In the [C-11]PiB(−) case, Aβ plaques were sparse, occupying less than 2% cortical area, and were weakly labeled with 6-CN-PiB, a highly fluorescent derivative of PiB. In contrast, Aβ plaques occupied up to 12% cortical area in the [C-11]PiB(+) case, and were intensely labeled with 6-CN-PIB. The [C-11]PiB(−) case had low levels of [H-3]PiB binding (<100 pmol/g) and Aβ1–42 (<500 pmol/g) concentration except in the frontal cortex where Aβ1–42 values (788 pmol/g) approached cortical values in the [C-11]PiB(+) case (800–1,700 pmol/g). In several cortical regions of the [C-11]PiB(−) case, Aβ1–40 levels were within the range of cortical Aβ1–40 values in the [C-11]PiB(+) case. Antemortem [C-11]PiB DVR values correlated well with region-matched postmortem measures of Aβ1–42 and Aβ1–40 in the [C-11]PiB(+), and with Aβ1–42 only in the [C-11]PiB(−) case. The low ratios of [H-3]PiB binding levels to Aβ concentrations and 6-CN-PiB to Aβ plaque loads in the [C-11]PiB(−) case indicate that Aβ pathology in the brain may be associated with low or undetectable levels of [C-11]PiB retention. Studies in greater numbers of [C-11]PiB PET autopsy cases are needed to define the Aβ concentration and [H-3]PiB binding levels required to produce a positive [C-11

  11. [Cerebral amyloid angiopathy].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Yamada, Masahito

    2014-07-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder characterized by the accumulation of amyloid proteins in the small and medium-sized blood vessels of the leptomeninges and central nervous system. Amyloid β protein (Aβ), immunoglobulin light chains, cystatin C, prion protein (PrP), ABri/ADan, transthyretin, and gelsoline, are all associated with CAA. While most CAA patients demonstrated sporadic Aβ-type amyloid deposition, a small number of patients present with familial forms, e.g. Dutch-type hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (HCHWA-D), Icelandic-type HCHWA (HCHWA-I), familial British dementia (FBD), familial Danish dementia (FDD), and PrP-CAA. Deposited amyloid proteins damage smooth muscle cells in blood vessel walls leading to pathological appearances calling 'double-barreled' changes, fibrinoid necrosis, and microaneurysms. These structural abnormalities result in microinfarcts and hemorrhages in the central nervous system. Recurrent hemorrhage is a common clinical manifestation in patients with CAA; however, small multiple infarctions, progressive dementia, transient neurological symptoms, and CAA-related inflammation can also occur. The pathomechanisms of CAA remain unknown. Although improvements in imaging techniques have allowed us to identify patients with CAA more readily, pathological examination is still essential for a definite diagnosis. There have been no curative treatments for CAA so far.

  12. Chronic neuron- and age-selective down-regulation of TNF receptor expression in triple-transgenic Alzheimer disease mice leads to significant modulation of amyloid- and Tau-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Sara L; Narrow, Wade C; Mastrangelo, Michael A; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry; Bowers, William J

    2013-06-01

    Neuroinflammation, through production of proinflammatory molecules and activated glial cells, is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. One such proinflammatory mediator is tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a multifunctional cytokine produced in excess and associated with amyloid β-driven inflammation and cognitive decline. Long-term global inhibition of TNF receptor type I (TNF-RI) and TNF-RII signaling without cell or stage specificity in triple-transgenic AD mice exacerbates hallmark amyloid and neurofibrillary tangle pathology. These observations revealed that long-term pan anti-TNF-α inhibition accelerates disease, cautions against long-term use of anti-TNF-α therapeutics for AD, and urges more selective regulation of TNF signaling. We used adeno-associated virus vector-delivered siRNAs to selectively knock down neuronal TNF-R signaling. We demonstrate divergent roles for neuronal TNF-RI and TNF-RII where loss of opposing TNF-RII leads to TNF-RI-mediated exacerbation of amyloid β and Tau pathology in aged triple-transgenic AD mice. Dampening of TNF-RII or TNF-RI+RII leads to a stage-independent increase in Iba-1-positive microglial staining, implying that neuronal TNF-RII may act nonautonomously on the microglial cell population. These results reveal that TNF-R signaling is complex, and it is unlikely that all cells and both receptors will respond positively to broad anti-TNF-α treatments at various stages of disease. In aggregate, these data further support the development of cell-, stage-, and/or receptor-specific anti-TNF-α therapeutics for AD. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the Expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein and the Ratio of Secreted Amyloid Beta 42 to Amyloid Beta 40 in SH-SY5Y Cells Stably Transfected with Wild-Type, Single-Mutant and Double-Mutant Forms of the APP Gene for the Study of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    PubMed

    Pahrudin Arrozi, Aslina; Shukri, Siti Nur Syazwani; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ahmad Damanhuri, Mohd Hanafi; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-04-17

    Neuroblastoma cell lines such as SH-SY5Y are the most frequently utilized models in neurodegenerative research, and their use has advanced the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration over the past few decades. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), several pathogenic mutations have been described, all of which cause elevated levels of pathological hallmarks such as amyloid-beta (Aβ). Although the genetics of Alzheimer's disease is well known, familial AD only accounts for a small number of cases in the population, with the rest being sporadic AD, which contains no known mutations. Currently, most of the in vitro models used to study AD pathogenesis only examine the level of Aβ42 as a confirmation of successful model generation and only perform comparisons between wild-type APP and single mutants of the APP gene. Recent findings have shown that the Aβ42/40 ratio in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a better diagnostic indicator for AD patients than is Aβ42 alone and that more extensive Aβ formation, such as accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ, Aβ plaques, soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ), and insoluble fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) occurs in TgCRND8 mice expressing a double-mutant form (Swedish and Indiana) of APP, later leading to greater progressive impairment of the brain. In this study, we generated SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected separately with wild-type APP, the Swedish mutation of APP, and the Swedish and Indiana mutations of APP and evaluated the APP expression as well as the Aβ42/40 ratio in those cells. The double-mutant form of APP (Swedish/Indiana) expressed markedly high levels of APP protein and showed a high Aβ2/40 ratio compared to wild-type and single-mutant cells.

  14. Cortical PIB binding in Lewy body disease is associated with Alzheimer-like characteristics.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Liepelt, Inga; Reimold, Matthias; Reischl, Gerald; Solbach, Christoph; Becker, Clemens; Schulte, Claudia; Leyhe, Thomas; Keller, Stefanie; Melms, Arthur; Gasser, Thomas; Berg, Daniela

    2009-04-01

    About one fourth of Lewy body disease (LBD) patients show cortical beta-amyloid load, basically a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Using [11C]PIB-PET, we tested whether LBD patients with beta-amyloid burden differ from those without with respect to demographic, clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters. Thirty-five LBD subjects (9 patients with Lewy body dementia, DLB; 12 demented Parkinson patients, PDD; 14 non-demented PD, PDND) underwent [11C]PIB-PET, and were classified as either PIB(+) or PIB(-) according to cortical PIB uptake. PIB+ and PIB(-) patients were then compared according to demographic, clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters. None of the PDND, but four PDD and four DLB subjects were PIB+. In PIB+ subjects, ApoE4 prevalence was higher, CSF Abeta42 levels were lower and, among demented patients, PIB-binding was associated with a lower MMSE score. Motor symptoms were not associated with PIB binding. Thus, LBD patients with cortical beta-amyloid show characteristics usually observed in AD.

  15. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Douglas M; Koulov, Atanas V; Alory-Jost, Christelle; Marks, Michael S; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin) may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  16. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  17. Alzheimer's disease like pathology induced six weeks after aggregated amyloid-beta injection in rats: increased oxidative stress and impaired long-term memory with anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sheetal; Verma, Sonia; Kapoor, Monika; Saini, Avneet; Nehru, Bimla

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide deposition into insoluble plaques is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but soluble oligomeric Aβ is considered to be more potent and has been hypothesized to directly impair learning and memory. Also, evidences from some clinical studies indicated that Aβ oligomer formation is the major cause for early AD onset. However, the biochemical mechanism involved in the oligomer-induced toxicity is not very well addressed. So, thise present study was undertaken to study the effects of single intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 on the behavioral and biochemical profile in rats. Rats were divided into two groups (n = 8 per group): (1) sham control group and (2) Aβ 1-42 injected group. A single dose of protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 (5 ul) through icv injection was bilaterally administered into the dorsal hippocampus, while sham control animals were administered with 5 µl of vehicle. The results demonstrated that the protofibrillar Aβ significantly inhibited long-term memory retention and increased anxiety levels as shown by the behavioral studies. The amyloid deposits were present inside the brain even six weeks after injection as confirmed by thioflavin-T staining and the neurodegeneration induced by these deposits was confirmed by Nissl's staining in hippocampal and cortical regions. The amyloid aggregates induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, acetylcholinesterase activity, nitrite levels, lipid peroxidation, and inhibited antioxidant enzyme activity in hippocampus, cortex, and striatum regions of rat brain after six weeks. The present study indicated that protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 injection altered long term memory, induced anxiety-like behavior and also developed Alzheimer's disease like pathology in rats.

  18. Novel Levetiracetam Derivatives That Are Effective against the Alzheimer-like Phenotype in Mice: Synthesis, in Vitro, ex Vivo, and in Vivo Efficacy Studies.

    PubMed

    Sola, Irene; Aso, Ester; Frattini, Daniela; López-González, Irene; Espargaró, Alba; Sabaté, Raimon; Di Pietro, Ornella; Luque, F Javier; Clos, M Victòria; Ferrer, Isidro; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2015-08-13

    We have synthesized a series of heptamethylene-linked levetiracetam-huprine and levetiracetam-(6-chloro)tacrine hybrids to hit amyloid, tau, and cholinergic pathologies as well as β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced epileptiform activity, some of the mechanisms that eventually lead to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease patients. These hybrids are potent inhibitors of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in vitro and moderately potent Aβ42 and tau antiaggregating agents in a simple E. coli model of amyloid aggregation. Ex vivo determination of the brain acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of these compounds after intraperitoneal injection to C57BL6J mice has demonstrated their ability to enter the brain. The levetiracetam-huprine hybrid 10 significantly reduced the incidence of epileptic seizures, cortical amyloid burden, and neuroinflammation in APP/PS1 mice after a 4-week treatment with a 5 mg/kg dose. Moreover, the hybrid 10 rescued transgenic mice from cognitive deficits, thereby emerging as an interesting disease-modifying anti-Alzheimer drug candidate.

  19. Intracerebroventricular streptozotocin exacerbates Alzheimer-like changes of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Tian, Zhu; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Chalbot, Sonia; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves several possible molecular mechanisms, including impaired brain insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. To investigate the role of metabolic insults in AD, we injected streptozotocin (STZ), a diabetogenic compound if used in the periphery, into the lateral ventricle of the 6-month-old 3xTg-AD mice and studied the cognitive function as well as AD-like brain abnormalities, such as tau phosphorylation and Aβ accumulation, 3-6 weeks later. We found that STZ exacerbated impairment of short-term and spatial reference memory in 3xTg-AD mice. We also observed an increase in tau hyperphosphorylation and neuroinflammation, a disturbance of brain insulin signaling, and a decrease in synaptic plasticity and amyloid β peptides in the brain after STZ treatment. The expression of 20 AD-related genes, including those involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein, cytoskeleton, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, synaptic function, protein kinases, and apoptosis, was altered, suggesting that STZ disturbs multiple metabolic and cell signaling pathways in the brain. These findings provide experimental evidence of the role of metabolic insult in AD.

  20. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Kaufman, Randal J; Osten, Pavel; Vassar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ), the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1) a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV) system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2) a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3) a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and APP elevation

  1. A novel approach to the identification and quantitative elemental analysis of amyloid deposits-Insights into the pathology of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Minqin, Ren; Ynsa, Maria Dolores; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Halliwell, Barry; Watt, Frank

    2009-04-24

    There is considerable interest in the role of metals such as iron, copper, and zinc in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. However to convincingly establish their presence in plaques in vivo, a sensitive technique is required that is both quantitatively accurate and avoids isolation of plaques or staining/fixing brain tissue, since these processes introduce contaminants and redistribute elements within the tissue. Combining the three ion beam techniques of scanning transmission ion microscopy, Rutherford back scattering spectrometry and particle induced X-ray emission in conjunction with a high energy (MeV) proton microprobe we have imaged plaques in freeze-dried unstained brain sections from CRND-8 mice, and simultaneously quantified iron, copper, and zinc. Our results show increased metal concentrations within the amyloid plaques compared with the surrounding tissue: iron (85 ppm compared with 42 ppm), copper (16 ppm compared to 6 ppm), and zinc (87 ppm compared to 34 ppm).

  2. Regulation of astrocyte pathology by fluoxetine prevents the deterioration of Alzheimer phenotypes in an APP/PS1 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jinping; Wang, Junhui; Wang, Hongxing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhu, Shenghua; Adilijiang, Abulimiti; Guo, Huining; Zhang, Ruiguo; Guo, Wei; Luo, Gang; Qiu, Yiqing; Xu, Haiyun; Kong, Jiming; Huang, Qingjun; Li, Xin-Min

    2016-02-01

    Studies have implicated astrocytic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of astrocytes in the pathophysiology and treatment of the disease is poorly characterized. Here, we identified astrocytes as independent key factors involved in several Alzheimer-like phenotypes in an APP/PS1 mouse model, including amyloid pathology, altered neuronal and synaptic properties, and impaired cognition. In vitro astrocytes from APP/PS1 mice induced synaptotoxicity as well as reduced dendritic complexity and axonal branching of hippocampal neurons. These astrocytes produced high levels of soluble β-amyloid (Aβ) which could be significantly inhibited by fluoxetine (FLX) via activating serotonin 5-HT2 receptors. FLX could also protect hippocampal neurons against astrocyte-induced neuronal damage in vitro. In the same APP/PS1 mice, FLX inhibited activation of astrocytes, lowered Aβ products, ameliorated neurotoxicity, and improved behavioral performance. These findings may provide a basis for the clinical application of FLX in patients, and may also lay the groundwork for exploration of other novel astrocyte-based therapies of AD.

  3. Amyloid neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, David; Lozeron, Pierre; Lacroix, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    As amyloid neuropathies have benefited from recent major progress, this review is timely and relevant. The main recent articles on amyloid neuropathy cover its description, methods for diagnosis and therapies. Varied clinical presentations are described in transthyretin (TTR)-familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy (FAP) and light chain amyloid neuropathy. Mass spectrometry is able to identify the biochemical nature of amyloidogenic protein in nerve biopsy and skin biopsy samples for diagnosis of small fiber polyneuropathy. Both nerve biopsy and TTR gene sequencing are important to identify sporadic cases of amyloid neuropathy. Nerve biopsy is useful in demonstrating the amyloid origin of neuropathies developing after domino liver transplant recipients. Liver transplantation improves long-term survival in Met30 TTR-FAP. Factors recognized as leading to cardiomyopathy progression or heart involvement after liver transplantation are late disease onset and fibril composition. Combined heart and liver transplantation is recommended in severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. Antiamyloid drugs are emerging: tafamidis, a TTR stabilizer, showed in a phase III controlled study its ability to slow stage 1 FAP progression. Other strategies are emerging for TTR-FAP (combination doxycycline-tauroursodeoxycholic acid, small interfering RNA, antisense oligonucleotide, monoclonal antibody antiserum amyloid P component). For light chain neuropathy, intensive chemotherapy may be helpful. There is better recognition of amyloid neuropathies, and hope for enrolling patients with FAP in future clinical trials testing new antiamyloid drugs.

  4. The polyphenol oleuropein aglycone protects TgCRND8 mice against Aß plaque pathology.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Cristina; Rigacci, Stefania; Ambrosini, Stefano; Ed Dami, Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Traini, Chiara; Failli, Paola; Berti, Andrea; Casamenti, Fiorella; Stefani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The claimed beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet include prevention of several age-related dysfunctions including neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer-like pathology. These effects have been related to the protection against cognitive decline associated with aging and disease by a number of polyphenols found in red wine and extra virgin olive oil. The double transgenic TgCRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein), aged 1.5 and 4, and age-matched wild type control mice were used to examine in vivo the effects of 8 weeks dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone (50 mg/kg of diet), the main polyphenol found in extra virgin olive oil. We report here that dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone strongly improves the cognitive performance of young/middle-aged TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-ß deposition, respect to age-matched littermates with un-supplemented diet. Immunofluorescence analysis of cerebral tissue in oleuropein aglycone-fed transgenic mice showed remarkably reduced ß-amyloid levels and plaque deposits, which appeared less compact and "fluffy"; moreover, microglia migration to the plaques for phagocytosis and a remarkable reduction of the astrocyte reaction were evident. Finally, oleuropein aglycone-fed mice brain displayed an astonishingly intense autophagic reaction, as shown by the increase of autophagic markers expression and of lysosomal activity. Data obtained with cultured cells confirmed the latter evidence, suggesting mTOR regulation by oleuropein aglycone. Our results support, and provide mechanistic insights into, the beneficial effects against Alzheimer-associated neurodegeneration of a polyphenol enriched in the extra virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet.

  5. The Polyphenol Oleuropein Aglycone Protects TgCRND8 Mice against Aß Plaque Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Cristina; Rigacci, Stefania; Ambrosini, Stefano; Ed Dami, Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Traini, Chiara; Failli, Paola; Berti, Andrea; Casamenti, Fiorella; Stefani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The claimed beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet include prevention of several age-related dysfunctions including neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer-like pathology. These effects have been related to the protection against cognitive decline associated with aging and disease by a number of polyphenols found in red wine and extra virgin olive oil. The double transgenic TgCRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein), aged 1.5 and 4, and age-matched wild type control mice were used to examine in vivo the effects of 8 weeks dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone (50 mg/kg of diet), the main polyphenol found in extra virgin olive oil. We report here that dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone strongly improves the cognitive performance of young/middle-aged TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-ß deposition, respect to age-matched littermates with un-supplemented diet. Immunofluorescence analysis of cerebral tissue in oleuropein aglycone-fed transgenic mice showed remarkably reduced ß-amyloid levels and plaque deposits, which appeared less compact and “fluffy”; moreover, microglia migration to the plaques for phagocytosis and a remarkable reduction of the astrocyte reaction were evident. Finally, oleuropein aglycone-fed mice brain displayed an astonishingly intense autophagic reaction, as shown by the increase of autophagic markers expression and of lysosomal activity. Data obtained with cultured cells confirmed the latter evidence, suggesting mTOR regulation by oleuropein aglycone. Our results support, and provide mechanistic insights into, the beneficial effects against Alzheimer-associated neurodegeneration of a polyphenol enriched in the extra virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet. PMID:23951225

  6. Amyloid imaging: the court of public opinion.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alan J

    2013-09-24

    Human amyloid imaging is one of the great recent translational medicine stories. Beginning with the recognition that Thioflavin T derivatives could be used as PET tracers, through development of Pittsburgh compound B, to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Florbetapir in 2012, human amyloid imaging has held great promise to allow in vivo inclusive diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), even though the first principle of amyloid PET is that it functions as a surrogate for β-amyloid pathology, and not necessarily as a surrogate for the diagnosis of AD.(1,2.)

  7. APOE and A-betaPP Gene Variation in Cortical and Cerebrovascular Amyloid-beta Pathology and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peuralinna, Terhi; Tanskanen, Maarit; Mäkelä, Mira; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Paetau, Anders; Kalimo, Hannu; Sulkava, Raimo; Hardy, John; Lai, Shiao-Lin; Arepalli, Sampath; Hernandez, Dena; Traynor, Bryan J.; Singleton, Andrew; Tienari, Pentti J.; Myllykangas, Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Cortical and cerebrovascular amyloid-beta (A-beta) deposition is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but also occurs in elderly people not affected by dementia. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 is a major genetic modulator of A-beta deposition and AD risk. Variants of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A-betaPP) gene have been reported to contribute to AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We analyzed the role of APOE and A-beta PP variants in cortical and cerebrovascular A-beta deposition, and neuropathologically verified AD (based on modified NIA-RI criteria) in a population-based autopsy sample of Finns aged ≥85 years (Vantaa85 + Study; n = 282). Our updated analysis of APOE showed strong associations of the epsilon4 allele with cortical (p = 4.91×10−17) and cerebrovascular (p = 9.87×10−11) A-beta deposition as well as with NIA-RI AD (p = 1.62×10−8). We also analyzed 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the A-betaPP locus. In single SNP or haplotype analyses there were no statistically significant A-betaPP locus associations with cortical or cerebrovascular A-beta deposition or with NIA-RI AD. We sequenced the promoter of the A-betaPP gene in 40 subjects with very high A-beta deposition, but none of these subjects had any of the previously reported or novel AD-associated mutations. These results suggest that cortical and cerebrovascular A-beta depositions are useful quantitative traits for genetic studies, as highlighted by the strong associations with the APOE epsilon4 variant. Promoter mutations or common allelic variation in the A-betaPP gene do not have a major contribution to cortical or cerebrovascular A-beta deposition, or very late-onset AD in this Finnish population based study. PMID:21654062

  8. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  9. Deficiency of Neuronal p38α MAPK Attenuates Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Mouse and Cell Models through Facilitating Lysosomal Degradation of BACE1.

    PubMed

    Schnöder, Laura; Hao, Wenlin; Qin, Yiren; Liu, Shirong; Tomic, Inge; Liu, Xu; Fassbender, Klaus; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-29

    Amyloid β (Aβ) damages neurons and triggers microglial inflammatory activation in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. BACE1 is the primary enzyme in Aβ generation. Neuroinflammation potentially up-regulates BACE1 expression and increases Aβ production. In Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y cell models, we specifically knocked out or knocked down gene expression of mapk14, which encodes p38α MAPK, a kinase sensitive to inflammatory and oxidative stimuli. Using immunological and biochemical methods, we observed that reduction of p38α MAPK expression facilitated the lysosomal degradation of BACE1, decreased BACE1 protein and activity, and subsequently attenuated Aβ generation in the AD mouse brain. Inhibition of p38α MAPK also enhanced autophagy. Blocking autophagy by treating cells with 3-methyladenine or overexpressing dominant-negative ATG5 abolished the deficiency of the p38α MAPK-induced BACE1 protein reduction in cultured cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that p38α MAPK plays a critical role in the regulation of BACE1 degradation and Aβ generation in AD pathogenesis.

  10. Effects of the superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-207 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: protection against and interruption of progression of amyloid and tau pathology and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Aaron; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive deficits, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal death. Additionally, mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical damage are hallmarks of AD brain. Here we set out to define the role of oxidative stress in AD pathogenesis and progression by chronically treating 3xTg-AD mice with the superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic, EUK-207. Treatment started at 4 months before onset of pathology and cognitive deficits, and continued until 9 months, when the AD phenotype was established. Cognitive performance was assessed using fear conditioning, and brain oxidative stress, Aβ, and tau pathology were analyzed. At 9 months, 3xTg-AD mice exhibited a decline in performance in both contextual and cued fear conditioning, as compared to wild-type mice. EUK-207-treated 3xTg-AD mice did not display any deficit in fear conditioning and exhibited reduced Aβ, tau, and phosphorylated tau accumulation in amygdala and hippocampus, as well as brain levels of Aβ42, oxidized nucleic acids, and lipid peroxidation. The effects of a 3-month treatment after pathology onset at 9 months on cognitive performance, brain oxidative stress, Aβ, and tau pathology were also evaluated. EUK-207-treated 3xTg-AD mice did not display any deficit in fear conditioning and were protected against increases in brain levels of oxidized nucleic acids and lipid peroxidation; they also had reduced Aβ, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau accumulation in amygdala and hippocampus. Our results confirm a critical role for oxidative stress in AD pathogenesis and progression and suggest the potential usefulness of EUK-207 in AD treatment.

  11. Is L-methionine a trigger factor for Alzheimer's-like neurodegeneration?: Changes in Aβ oligomers, tau phosphorylation, synaptic proteins, Wnt signaling and behavioral impairment in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Lindsay, Carolina B; Montecinos-Oliva, Carla; Arrazola, Macarena S; Retamales, Rocio M; Bunout, Daniel; Hirsch, Sandra; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-11-21

    L-methionine, the principal sulfur-containing amino acid in proteins, plays critical roles in cell physiology as an antioxidant and in the breakdown of fats and heavy metals. Previous studies suggesting the use of L-methionine as a treatment for depression and other diseases indicate that it might also improve memory and propose a role in brain function. However, some evidence indicates that an excess of methionine can be harmful and can increase the risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, heart diseases, certain types of cancer, brain alterations such as schizophrenia, and memory impairment. Here, we report the effects of an L-methionine-enriched diet in wild-type mice and emphasize changes in brain structure and function. The animals in our study presented 1) higher levels of phosphorylated tau protein, 2) increased levels of amyloid-β (Aβ)-peptides, including the formation of Aβ oligomers, 3) increased levels of inflammatory response,4) increased oxidative stress, 5) decreased level of synaptic proteins, and 6) memory impairment and loss. We also observed dysfunction of the Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that an L-methionine-enriched diet causes neurotoxic effects in vivo and might contribute to the appearance of Alzheimer's-like neurodegeneration.

  12. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP): a second amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fawver, Janelle N; Ghiwot, Yonatan; Koola, Catherine; Carrera, Wesley; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jennifer; Hernandez, Caterina; Dineley, Kelly T; Kong, Yu; Li, Jianrong; Jhamandas, Jack; Perry, George; Murray, Ian V J

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid formation is the pathological hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). These diseases are marked by extracellular amyloid deposits of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in the pancreas and amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Since IAPP may enter the brain and disparate amyloids can cross-seed each other to augment amyloid formation, we hypothesized that pancreatic derived IAPP may enter the brain to augment misfolding of Aβ in AD. The corollaries for validity of this hypothesis are that IAPP [1] enters the brain, [2] augments Aβ misfolding, [3] associates with Aβ plaques, and most importantly [4] plasma levels correlate with AD diagnosis. We demonstrate the first 3 corollaries that: (1) IAPP is present in the brain in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), (2) synthetic IAPP promoted oligomerization of Aβ in vitro, and (3) endogenous IAPP localized to Aβ oligomers and plaques. For the 4th corollary, we did not observe correlation of peripheral IAPP levels with AD pathology in either an African American cohort or AD transgenic mice. In the African American cohort, with increased risk for both T2D and AD, peripheral IAPP levels were not significantly different in samples with no disease, T2D, AD, or both T2D and AD. In the Tg2576 AD mouse model, IAPP plasma levels were not significantly elevated at an age where the mice exhibit the glucose intolerance of pre-diabetes. Based on this negative data, it appears unlikely that peripheral IAPP cross-seeds or "infects" Aβ pathology in AD brain. However, we provide novel and additional data which demonstrate that IAPP protein is present in astrocytes in murine brain and secreted from primary cultured astrocytes. This preliminary report suggests a potential and novel association between brain derived IAPP and AD, however whether astrocytic derived IAPP cross-seeds Aβ in the brain requires further research.

  13. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  14. Tau aggregation influences cognition and hippocampal atrophy in the absence of beta-amyloid: a clinico-imaging-pathological study of primary age-related tauopathy (PART).

    PubMed

    Josephs, Keith A; Murray, Melissa E; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Knopman, David S; Machulda, Mary M; Weigand, Stephen D; Boeve, Bradley F; Kantarci, Kejal; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W

    2017-02-03

    We investigate whether there is any association between the Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) stage and clinical and MRI features in definite primary age-related tauopathy (PART). We analysed 52 cases with a Braak NFT tangle stage >0 and ≤IV, and a Thal phase of 0 (no beta-amyloid present). Twenty-nine (56%) were female. Median age at death was 88 years (IQR 82-92 years). Fifteen (29%) were TDP-positive (75% TDP stage I), 16 (31%) had argyrophilic grain disease and three (6%) had alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies. TDP-43 inclusion when present were rare and predominantly perivascular. Of the 15 with TDP-43, three showed a moderate number of inclusions and also had hippocampal sclerosis, neuronal intranuclear inclusions and fine neurites of the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Four cases (8%) had an apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE4) allele. There was a significant correlation between age at death and Braak NFT stage (r = 0.32, p = 0.02). After accounting for age at clinical examination, there were significant associations between Braak NFT stage, and WAIS-R Block Design and Trail Making Tests A and B, with higher Braak stage associated with poorer performances. Thirty of the 52 cases had completed an antemortem volumetric head MRI. Two separate MRI analyses revealed an association between higher Braak NFT stage and grey matter atrophy in the head of the left hippocampus. There were no significant clinical or radiologic associations with TDP-43. Findings from this study demonstrate that aggregated tau distribution is associated with poorer cognitive performance, as well as atrophy, in the absence of beta-amyloid. These findings support the parcellation of definite PART as a useful construct. The relatively low frequencies of APOE4, TDP-43, Lewy bodies, and hippocampal sclerosis, and the rarity and morphology of TDP-43 lesions are noted contrasts to what is typically observed in Alzheimer's disease of the old.

  15. Postmortem 3-D brain hemisphere cortical tau and amyloidpathology mapping and quantification as a validation method of neuropathology imaging.

    PubMed

    Smid, Lojze M; Kepe, Vladimir; Vinters, Harry V; Bresjanac, Mara; Toyokuni, Tatsushi; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Silverman, Daniel H S; Miller, Karen; Small, Gary W; Barrio, Jorge R

    2013-01-01

    This work is aimed at correlating pre-mortem [18F]FDDNP positron emission tomography (PET) scan results in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), with cortical neuropathology distribution determined postmortem in three physical dimensions in whole brain coronal sections. Analysis of total amyloid-β (Aβ) distribution in frontal cortex and posterior cingulate gyrus confirmed its statistically significant correlation with cortical [18F]FDDNP PET binding values (distribution volume ratios, DVR) (p < 0.001, R = 0.97, R2 = 0.94). Neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) distribution correlated significantly with cortical [18F]FDDNP PET DVR in the temporal lobe (p < 0.001, R = 0.87, R2 = 0.76). Linear combination of Aβ and NFT densities was highly predictive of [18F]FDDNP PET DVR through all analyzed regions of interest (p < 0.0001, R = 0.92, R2 = 0.85), and both densities contributed significantly to the model. Lewy bodies were present at a much lower level than either Aβ or NFTs and did not significantly contribute to the in vivo signal. [18F]FDG PET scan results in this patient were consistent with the distinctive DLB pattern of hypometabolism. This work offers a mapping brain model applicable to all imaging probes for verification of imaging results with Aβ and/or tau neuropathology brain distribution using immunohistochemistry, fluorescence microscopy, and autoradiography.

  16. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqun; Yu, Jingyi; Li, Li; Zhang, Bao; Liu, Lingjuan; Wu, Chun-Hua; Jong, Ambrose; Mao, Ding-An; Huang, Sheng-He

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). Both in vitro (human BMEC) (HBMEC) and in vivo (mice) models of BBB were used to dissect the role of α7 nAChR in up-regulation of Aβ induced by gp120, METH and NT. Aβ release from and transport across HBMEC were significantly increased by these factors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), an antagonist of α7 nAChR, could efficiently block these pathogenic effects. Furthermore, our animal data showed that these factors could significantly increase the levels of Aβ, Tau and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) in mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Aβ in the mouse brains. These pathogenicities were significantly reduced by MLA, suggesting that α7 nAChR may play an important role in neuropathology caused by gp120, METH and NT, which are the major pathogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of HAND. PMID:28074940

  17. Oral TNFα Modulation Alters Neutrophil Infiltration, Improves Cognition and Diminishes Tau and Amyloid Pathology in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbita, S. Prasad; Johnson, Ming F.; Kobritz, Naomi; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Turman, John; Zemlan, Frank; Harris-White, Marni E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines such as TNFα can polarize microglia/macrophages into different neuroinflammatory types. Skewing of the phenotype towards a cytotoxic state is thought to impair phagocytosis and has been described in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Neuroinflammation can be perpetuated by a cycle of increasing cytokine production and maintenance of a polarized activation state that contributes to AD progression. In this study, 3xTgAD mice, age 6 months, were treated orally with 3 doses of the TNFα modulating compound isoindolin-1,3 dithione (IDT) for 10 months. We demonstrate that IDT is a TNFα modulating compound both in vitro and in vivo. Following long-term IDT administration, mice were assessed for learning & memory and tissue and serum were collected for analysis. Results demonstrate that IDT is safe for long-term treatment and significantly improves learning and memory in the 3xTgAD mouse model. IDT significantly reduced paired helical filament tau and fibrillar amyloid accumulation. Flow cytometry of brain cell populations revealed that IDT increased the infiltrating neutrophil population while reducing TNFα expression in this population. IDT is a safe and effective TNFα and innate immune system modulator. Thus small molecule, orally bioavailable modulators are promising therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26436670

  18. The Protective Role of microRNA-200c in Alzheimer's Disease Pathologies Is Induced by Beta Amyloid-Triggered Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Ye, Xiaoyang; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Haili; Miao, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that repress the expression of their target proteins. The roles of microRNAs in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not clear. In this study we show that miR-200c represses the expression of PTEN protein. PTEN downregulation by miR-200c supports the survival and differentiation of cultured neurons. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease signified by beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregation and deposition. In a mouse model of AD that is induced by APPswe and PS1ΔE9 double transgenes, we found Aβ deposition results in neuronal ER stress that induces miR200c. Pharmacological blockade of ER stress inhibited Aβ-induced miR-200c overexpression in AD brains. MiR-200c was detected in the serum of both AD mice and human AD patients. These findings suggest that miR-200c functions as part of the neuronal cell-intrinsic adaptive machinery, and supports neuronal survival and differentiation in response to Aβ induced ER-stress by downregulating PTEN. PMID:28008308

  19. Peripheral insulin-sensitizer drug metformin ameliorates neuronal insulin resistance and Alzheimer's-like changes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Bisht, Bharti; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2011-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Pharmacological treatments presently available can slow down the progression of symptoms but can not cure the disease. Currently there is widening recognition that AD is closely associated with impaired insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in brain, suggesting it to be a brain-specific form of diabetes and so also termed as "type 3 diabetes". Hence investigating the role of pharmacological agents that could ameliorate neuronal insulin resistance merit attention in AD therapeutics, however the therapeutics for pathophysiological condition like neuronal insulin resistance itself is largely unknown. In the present study we have determined the effect of metformin on neuronal insulin resistance and AD-associated characteristics in an in vitro model of "type 3 diabetes" by differentiating neuronal cell line Neuro-2a under prolonged presence of insulin. We observed that prolonged hyperinsulinemic conditions in addition to generating insulin resistance also led to development of hallmark AD-associated neuropathological changes. Treatment with metformin sensitized the impaired insulin actions and also prevented appearance of molecular and pathological characteristics observed in AD. The results thus demonstrate possible therapeutic efficacy of peripheral insulin-sensitizer drug metformin in AD by its ability to sensitize neuronal insulin resistance. These findings also provide direct evidences linking hyperinsulinemia and AD and suggest a unique opportunity for prevention and treatment of "type 3 diabetes".

  20. Magnetic Fluids Have Ability to Decrease Amyloid Aggregation Associated with Amyloid-Related Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosova, Andrea; Koneracka, Martina; Siposova, Katarina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Vavra, Ivo; Fabian, Martin; Kopcansky, Peter; Gazova, Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    At least twenty human proteins can fold abnormally to form pathological deposits that are associated with several amyloid-related diseases. We have investigated the effect of four magnetic fluids (MFs)—electrostatically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MF1) and sterically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by sodium oleate (MF2, MF3 and MF4) with adsorbed BSA (MF2) or dextran (MF4)—on amyloid aggregation of two proteins, human insulin and chicken egg lysozyme. The morphology, particle size and size distribution of the prepared magnetic fluids were characterized. We have found that MFs are able to decrease amyloid aggregation of both studied proteins and the extent of depolymerization depended on the MF properties. The most effective reduction was observed for MF4 as 90% decrease of amyloids was detected for insulin and lysozyme amyloid aggregates. Our findings indicate that MFs have potential to be used for treatment of amyloid diseases.

  1. Alterations in CA1 pyramidal neuronal intrinsic excitability mediated by Ih channel currents in a rat model of amyloid beta pathology.

    PubMed

    Eslamizade, M J; Saffarzadeh, F; Mousavi, S M M; Meftahi, G H; Hosseinmardi, N; Mehdizadeh, M; Janahmadi, M

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by changing the neuronal excitability. However, the cellular mechanisms by which accumulation of Aβ affects intrinsic neuronal properties are not well understood. The effect of bilateral intra-frontal cortex Aβ (1-42) peptide injection on the intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with particular focus on the contribution of hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) channel currents was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Passive avoidance memory impairment and morphological changes in rats receiving intra-frontal Aβ treatment were observed, which was associated with significant changes both in passive and active intrinsic electrical membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Electrophysiological recording showed a significant decrease in neuronal excitability associated with an augmentation in the first spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude. In addition, the depolarizing sag voltage was altered in neurons recorded from Aβ-treated group. In voltage-clamp condition, a hyperpolarizing activated inward current sensitive to ZD7288 and capsaicin was significantly increased in neurons from Aβ-treated rats. The Ih current density was increased and the activation curve was shifted toward less negative potential in the Aβ-treated group as compared to control group. The enhancing effect of Aβ treatment on Ih current was confirmed by showing upregulation of the mRNA of HCN1 channel in the CA1 pyramidal layer of hippocampi. These findings suggest the contribution of Ih and possibly TRPV1 channel currents to the changes induced by Aβ treatment in the intrinsic membrane properties, which, in turn, may provide therapeutic targets for treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects.

  3. Tannoid principles of Emblica officinalis renovate cognitive deficits and attenuate amyloid pathologies against aluminum chloride induced rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Dhivyabharathi, Mathiyazahan; William Raja, Tharsius Raja; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Emblica officinalis is mentioned as a maharasayana in many Ayurvedic texts and promotes intelligence, memory, freedom from disease, longevity, and strength of the senses. The present study has been designed to explore the memory-enhancing effect of the tannoid principles of E. officinalis (EoT) at the biochemical, anatomical, behavioral, and molecular levels against aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rats. Aluminum is reported to have an important role in the etiology, pathogenesis, and development of AD. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, AlCl3 treated, AlCl3 and EoT (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg bw) co-treated, and EoT (200 mg/kg bw) alone treated groups. In control and experimental rats, behavior tests including water maze and open field test, estimation of aluminum, assay of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and expression of amyloidogenic proteins were performed. Intraperitonial injection of AlCl3 (100 mg/kg bw) for 60 days significantly elevated the concentration of aluminum (Al), activity of AChE and protein expressions of amyloid precursor protein, A-beta1-42, beta-, and gamma-secretases as compared to control group in hippocampus and cortex. Co-administration of EoT orally to AlCl3 rats for 60 days significantly revert back the Al concentration, AChE activity, and A-beta synthesis-related molecules in the studied brain regions. The spatial learning, memory, and locomotor impairments observed in AlCl3 treated rats were significantly attenuated by EoT. Therefore, EoT may be a promising therapy in ameliorating neurotoxicity of aluminum, however further studies are warranted to elucidate the exact mechanism of action of EoT.

  4. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  5. Brain amyloid-β oligomers in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lesné, Sylvain E; Sherman, Mathew A; Grant, Marianne; Kuskowski, Michael; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Ashe, Karen H

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease begins about two decades before the onset of symptoms or neuron death, and is believed to be caused by pathogenic amyloid-β aggregates that initiate a cascade of molecular events culminating in widespread neurodegeneration. The microtubule binding protein tau may mediate the effects of amyloid-β in this cascade. Amyloid plaques comprised of insoluble, fibrillar amyloid-β aggregates are the most characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease. However, the correspondence between the distribution of plaques and the pattern of neurodegeneration is tenuous. This discrepancy has stimulated the investigation of other amyloid-β aggregates, including soluble amyloid-β oligomers. Different soluble amyloid-β oligomers have been studied in several mouse models, but not systematically in humans. Here, we measured three amyloid-β oligomers previously described in mouse models-amyloid-β trimers, Aβ*56 and amyloid-β dimers-in brain tissue from 75 cognitively intact individuals, ranging from young children to the elderly, and 58 impaired subjects with mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer's disease. As in mouse models, where amyloid-β trimers appear to be the fundamental amyloid-β assembly unit of Aβ*56 and are present in young mice prior to memory decline, amyloid-β trimers in humans were present in children and adolescents; their levels rose gradually with age and were significantly above baseline in subjects in their 70s. Aβ*56 levels were negligible in children and young adults, rose significantly above baseline in subjects in their 40s and increased steadily thereafter. Amyloid-β dimers were undetectable until subjects were in their 60s; their levels then increased sharply and correlated with plaque load. Remarkably, in cognitively intact individuals we found strong positive correlations between Aβ*56 and two pathological forms of soluble tau (tau-CP13 and tau-Alz50), and negative correlations between Aβ*56 and two postsynaptic

  6. [Amyloid goiter].

    PubMed

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  7. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. APOE and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Community Dwelling Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Nag, Sukriti; Leurgans, Sue; Buchman, Aron S.; Wilson, Robert S.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Farfel, Jose M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Both cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer’s disease pathology involve abnormal β-amyloid processing. We aim to elucidate the relationship of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes with amyloid angiopathy in the presence of variable amounts of Alzheimer’s pathology. Data came from 1,062 autopsied subjects from two community-based studies of aging. Common neuropathologies including Alzheimer’s disease and amyloid angiopathy were assessed using uniform methods. APOE was genotyped by sequencing the two polymorphisms in codons 112 and 158 of exon 4. We examined the associations of APOE with amyloid angiopathy using ordinal logistic regression analyses, controlling for demographics and subsequently Alzheimer’s and other common pathologies. Moderate to severe amyloid angiopathy was identified in 35.2% (n=374) of the subjects. 15.3% (n=162) of the subjects were APOE ε2 carriers and 26.1% (n=277) ε4 carriers. Adjusting for demographics, the presence of ε4 allele, but not ε2, was associated with more severe amyloid angiopathy. After further adjustment for Alzheimer’s pathology, both ε2 (odds ratio 1.707, 95% confidence interval 1.236–2.358, p=0.001) and ε4 (odds ratio 2.284, 95% confidence interval 1.730–3.014, p<0.001) were independently associated with amyloid angiopathy. The results were confirmed by path analysis. Further, APOE ε4 carriers, but not ε2 carriers, were more likely to have capillary amyloid angiopathy. Accounting for capillary involvement did not alter the APOE associations with amyloid angiopathy. We conclude that both APOE ε2 and ε4 alleles are associated with more severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the direct effect of ε2 is masked by the allele’s negative association with comorbid Alzheimer’s pathology. APOE ε4, but not ε2, is associated with capillary amyloid angiopathy. PMID:26341746

  9. Intact blood-brain barrier transport of small molecular drugs in animal models of amyloid beta and alpha-synuclein pathology.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Sofia; Lindström, Veronica; Ingelsson, Martin; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Syvänen, Stina

    2017-08-05

    Pathophysiological impairment of the neurovascular unit, including the integrity and dynamics of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), has been denoted both a cause and consequence of neurodegenerative diseases. Pathological impact on BBB drug delivery has also been debated. The aim of the present study was to investigate BBB drug transport, by determining the unbound brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (Kp,uu,brain), in aged AβPP-transgenic mice, α-synuclein transgenic mice, and wild type mice. Mice were dosed with a cassette of five compounds, including digoxin, levofloxacin (1 mg/kg, s.c.), paliperidone, oxycodone, and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.). Brain and blood were collected at 0.5, 1, or 3 h after dosage. Drug concentrations were measured using LC-MS/MS. The total brain-to-plasma concentration ratio was calculated and equilibrium dialysis was used to determine the fraction of unbound drug in brain and plasma for all compounds. Together, these three measures were used to determine the Kp,uu,brain value. Despite Aβ or α-synuclein pathology in the current animal models, no difference was observed in the extent of drug transport across the BBB compared to wild type animals for any of the compounds investigated. Hence, the present study shows that the concept of a leaking barrier within neurodegenerative conditions has to be interpreted with caution when estimating drug transport into the brain. The capability of the highly dynamic BBB to regulate brain drug exposure still seems to be intact despite the presence of pathology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A new aspartyl protease on 21q22.3, BACE2, is highly similar to Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein beta-secretase.

    PubMed

    Solans, A; Estivill, X; de La Luna, S

    2000-01-01

    Down syndrome individuals develop abnormalities of most organs, including all the pathological and neurochemical features of Alzheimer's disease, by the early age of 30 yr. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of BACE2, a gene mapping on human chromosome 21q22.3, which is highly similar to a transmembrane aspartyl protease, BACE (for beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme), which is able to catalyze the beta-secretase cleavage of Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP). BACE2 is expressed in a wide variety of organs and tissues, with several transcripts due to alternative splicing and the use of two polyadenylation signals. The BACE2 gene product is a 518 amino acid protein with the signature of an aspartic protease, a 20-residue signal peptide, and two putative N-glycosylation sites. In addition, and similarly to BACE, BACE2 differs from the other members of the human aspartic protease family in the number and distribution of putative disulfide bonds and in the presence of an extended C-terminal region which contains a predicted transmembrane segment. BACE2 could be involved in the Alzheimer-like neuropathology of Down syndrome, as well as in Alzheimer's disease linked to chromosome 21 but not showing mutations in APP.

  11. Antibiotic-induced perturbations in microbial diversity during post-natal development alters amyloid pathology in an aged APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Minter, Myles R; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Meisel, Marlies; Zhang, Can; Leone, Vanessa; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Oyler-Castrillo, Paul; Zhang, Xulun; Musch, Mark W; Shen, Xunuo; Jabri, Bana; Chang, Eugene B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Sisodia, Sangram S

    2017-09-05

    Recent evidence suggests the commensal microbiome regulates host immunity and influences brain function; findings that have ramifications for neurodegenerative diseases. In the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we previously reported that perturbations in microbial diversity induced by life-long combinatorial antibiotic (ABX) selection pressure in the APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of amyloidosis is commensurate with reductions in amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque pathology and plaque-localised gliosis. Considering microbiota-host interactions, specifically during early post-natal development, are critical for immune- and neuro-development we now examine the impact of microbial community perturbations induced by acute ABX exposure exclusively during this period in APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. We show that early post-natal (P) ABX treatment (P14-P21) results in long-term alterations of gut microbial genera (predominantly Lachnospiraceae and S24-7) and reduction in brain Aβ deposition in aged APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. These mice exhibit elevated levels of blood- and brain-resident Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells and display an alteration in the inflammatory milieu of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Finally, we confirm that plaque-localised microglia and astrocytes are reduced in ABX-exposed mice. These findings suggest that ABX-induced microbial diversity perturbations during post-natal stages of development coincide with altered host immunity mechanisms and amyloidosis in a murine model of AD.

  12. Selenofuranoside Ameliorates Memory Loss in Alzheimer-Like Sporadic Dementia: AChE Activity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Chiapinotto Spiazzi, Cristiano; Bucco Soares, Melina; Pinto Izaguirry, Aryele; Musacchio Vargas, Laura; Zanchi, Mariane Magalhães; Frasson Pavin, Natasha; Ferreira Affeldt, Ricardo; Seibert Lüdtke, Diogo; Prigol, Marina; Santos, Francielli Weber

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming more common due to the increase in life expectancy. This study evaluated the effect of selenofuranoside (Se) in an Alzheimer-like sporadic dementia animal model. Male mice were divided into 4 groups: control, Aβ, Se, and Aβ + Se. Single administration of Aβ peptide (fragments 25–35; 3 nmol/3 μL) or distilled water was administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Selenofuranoside (5 mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) was administered orally 30 min before Aβ and for 7 subsequent days. Memory was tested through the Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down passive-avoidance (SDPA) tests. Antioxidant defenses along with reactive species (RS) were assessed. Inflammatory cytokines levels and AChE activity were measured. SOD activity was inhibited in the Aβ group whereas RS were increased. AChE activity, GSH, and IL-6 levels were increased in the Aβ group. These changes were reflected in impaired cognition and memory loss, observed in both behavioral tests. Se compound was able to protect against memory loss in mice in both behavioral tests. SOD and AChE activities as well as RS and IL-6 levels were also protected by Se administration. Therefore, Se is promising for further studies. PMID:26090073

  13. Selenofuranoside Ameliorates Memory Loss in Alzheimer-Like Sporadic Dementia: AChE Activity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation Involvement.

    PubMed

    Chiapinotto Spiazzi, Cristiano; Bucco Soares, Melina; Pinto Izaguirry, Aryele; Musacchio Vargas, Laura; Zanchi, Mariane Magalhães; Frasson Pavin, Natasha; Ferreira Affeldt, Ricardo; Seibert Lüdtke, Diogo; Prigol, Marina; Santos, Francielli Weber

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming more common due to the increase in life expectancy. This study evaluated the effect of selenofuranoside (Se) in an Alzheimer-like sporadic dementia animal model. Male mice were divided into 4 groups: control, Aβ, Se, and Aβ + Se. Single administration of Aβ peptide (fragments 25-35; 3 nmol/3 μL) or distilled water was administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Selenofuranoside (5 mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) was administered orally 30 min before Aβ and for 7 subsequent days. Memory was tested through the Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down passive-avoidance (SDPA) tests. Antioxidant defenses along with reactive species (RS) were assessed. Inflammatory cytokines levels and AChE activity were measured. SOD activity was inhibited in the Aβ group whereas RS were increased. AChE activity, GSH, and IL-6 levels were increased in the Aβ group. These changes were reflected in impaired cognition and memory loss, observed in both behavioral tests. Se compound was able to protect against memory loss in mice in both behavioral tests. SOD and AChE activities as well as RS and IL-6 levels were also protected by Se administration. Therefore, Se is promising for further studies.

  14. Green tea supplementation produces better neuroprotective effects than red and black tea in Alzheimer-like rat model.

    PubMed

    Schimidt, Helen L; Garcia, Alexandre; Martins, Alexandre; Mello-Carpes, Pamela B; Carpes, Felipe P

    2017-10-01

    Green tea from Camellia sinensis plays a neuroprotective role in different neurodegenerative conditions, such as memory deficits in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, whether other teas from Camellia sinensis present similar neuroprotective effect still is not clear. Here we investigate effects of green, red and black tea supplementation on memory and hippocampus oxidative status in a rat model of Alzheimer-like disease (AD-like). Wistar male rats were supplemented with green, red or black tea during 8weeks before Aβ intra-hippocampal injection (2μL of Aβ-25-35, CA1 region). AD and sham rats were submitted to memory tests. After euthanasia, oxidative status in the bilateral hippocampus was quantified. Green and red teas avoid memory deficits in AD rats, but only green tea also avoids oxidative stress and damage in the hippocampus. Green tea was more effective for neuroprotection than red and black teas from the Camellia sinensis in the AD rat model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metal-mediated formation of fibrillar ABri amyloid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Ashcroft, Alison E; Korchazhkina, Olga V; Exley, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    British amyloid (ABri) peptide is precipitated as amyloid fibrils in pathological lesions which are characteristic of familial British dementia. Unlike for other amyloidogenic peptides which have been implicated in neurodegenerative disease, for example, Abeta in Alzheimer's disease and alpha synuclein in Parkinson's disease, nothing is yet known as to whether metals mediate the formation of ABri amyloid fibrils. We show herein that a concentration of ABri, which had not previously been shown to spontaneously form amyloid, formed fibrils when incubated for 12 months at 37 degrees C. The additional presence of Al(III), in particular, or Fe(III) increased significantly both the number and the size of the fibrillar amyloid deposits which were very similar in appearance to amyloid described in hippocampal plaques in familial British dementia. Co-incubation of ABri with either Zn(II) or Cu(II) precipitated the peptide but did not result in the formation of amyloid fibrils.

  16. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of amyloid beta at the synapse. At physiological levels, amyloid beta is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric amyloid beta 40 and 42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of amyloid beta are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), mitochondrial amyloid-β alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and beta amyloid independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that amyloid beta, glutamate and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p

  17. Protein folding pathology in domestic animals*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Fibrillar proteins form structural elements of cells and the extracellular matrix. Pathological lesions of fibrillar microanatomical structures, or secondary fibrillar changes in globular proteins are well known. A special group concerns histologically amorphous deposits, amyloid. The major characteristics of amyloid are: apple green birefringence after Congo red staining of histological sections, and non-branching 7–10 nm thick fibrils on electron microscopy revealing a high content of cross beta pleated sheets. About 25 different types of amyloid have been characterised. In animals, AA-amyloid is the most frequent type. Other types of amyloid in animals represent: AIAPP (in cats), AApoAI, AApoAII, localised AL-amyloid, amyloid in odontogenic or mammary tumors and amyloid in the brain. In old dogs Aβ and in sheep APrPsc-amyloid can be encountered. AA-amyloidosis is a systemic disorder with a precursor in blood, acute phase serum amyloid A (SAA). In chronic inflammatory processes AA-amyloid can be deposited. A rapid crystallization of SAA to amyloid fibrils on small beta-sheeted fragments, the ‘amyloid enhancing factor’ (AEF), is known and the AEF has been shown to penetrate the enteric barrier. Amyloid fibrils can aggregate from various precursor proteins in vitro in particular at acidic pH and when proteolytic fragments are formed. Molecular chaperones influence this process. Tissue data point to amyloid fibrillogenesis in lysosomes and near cell surfaces. A comparison can be made of the fibrillogenesis in prion diseases and in enhanced AA-amyloidosis. In the reactive form, acute phase SAA is the supply of the precursor protein, whereas in the prion diseases, cell membrane proteins form a structural source. Aβ-amyloid in brain tissue of aged dogs showing signs of dementia forms a canine counterpart of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (ccSDAT) in man. Misfolded proteins remain potential food hazards. Developments concerning prevention of

  18. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  19. Amyloid neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Susan C; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This article reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  20. Amyloid imaging in mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wolk, David A; Price, Julie C; Saxton, Judy A; Snitz, Beth E; James, Jeffrey A; Lopez, Oscar L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Cohen, Ann D; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; De-Kosky, Steven T; DeKoskym, Steven T

    2009-05-01

    We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) to determine the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in different mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes and to relate increased PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Twenty-six patients with MCI (13 single-domain amnestic-MCI [a-MCI], 6 multidomain a-MCI, and 7 nonamnestic MCI) underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up (21.2 +/- 16.0 [standard deviation] months) subsequent to their PiB scan. Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, we found that 14 (54%) patients had increased levels of PiB retention and were considered "amyloid-positive." All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 single-domain a-MCI, 5/6 multidomain a-MCI, 3/7 nonamnestic MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the nonamnestic MCI group. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up demonstrated 5 of 13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0 of 10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3 of 10 amyloid-negative patients "reverted to normal." These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD, and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data are consistent with longitudinal studies that suggest a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop AD.

  1. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy and MD Simulations Reveal Pore-Like Structures of All-D-Enantiomer of Alzheimer’s β-Amyloid Peptide: Relevance to the Ion Channel Mechanism of AD Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Laura; Arce, Fernando Teran; Jang, Hyunbum; Capone, Ricardo; Kotler, Samuel A.; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L.; Nussinov, Ruth; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a protein misfolding disease characterized by a build-up of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide as senile plaques, uncontrolled neurodegeneration, and memory loss. AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis and involves Aβ peptide-plasma membrane interactions. In principle, there are two possible ways through which disturbance of the ionic homeostasis can take place: directly, where the Aβ peptide either inserts into the membrane and creates ion-conductive pores or destabilizes the membrane organization; or, indirectly, where the Aβ peptide interacts with existing cell membrane receptors. To distinguish between these two possible types of Aβ-membrane interactions, we took advantage of the biochemical tenet that ligand-receptor interactions are stereospecific; L-amino acid peptides, but not their D-counterparts, bind to cell membrane receptors. However, with respect to the ion channel-mediated mechanism, like L-amino acids, D-amino acid peptides will also form ion channel-like structures. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) we imaged the structures of both D- and L-enantiomers of the full length Aβ1-42 when reconstituted in lipid bilayers. AFM imaging shows that both L- and D-Aβ isomers form similar channel-like structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations support the AFM imaged 3D structures. Earlier we have shown that D-Aβ1-42 channels conduct ions similarly to their L-counter parts. Taken together, our results support the direct mechanism of Aβ ion channel-mediated destabilization of ionic homeostasis rather than the indirect mechanism through Aβ interaction with membrane receptors. PMID:22217000

  3. Amyloid in dementia associated with familial FTLD: Not an innocent bystander

    PubMed Central

    Naasan, Georges; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Ghosh, Pia; Elofson, Jonathan D.; Miller, Bruce L.; Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna; Fong, Jamie; Perry, David; Lee, Suzee E.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Seeley, William W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert; Jagust, William J.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Pribadi, Mochtar; Yang, Zhongan; Sears, Renee; Klein, Eric; Wojta, Kevin; Rosen, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can show superimposed amyloid pathology, though the impact of amyloid on the clinical presentation of FTLD is not well characterized. This cross-sectional case-control study compared clinical features, FDG-PET metabolism and gray matter volume loss in 30 patients with familial FTLD in whom amyloid status was confirmed with autopsy or PiB-PET. Compared to the amyloid negative patients, the amyloid positive patients performed significantly worse on several cognitive tests and showed hypometabolism and volume loss in more temporoparietal regions. Our results suggest that in FTLD, amyloid positivity is associated with a more AD-like pattern of neurodegeneration. PMID:26040468

  4. Influence of water quality on cholesterol induced systemic pathology.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D L; Martin, T; Stankovic, G; Wagoner, T; Van Andel, R

    2007-01-01

    Reduced systemic pathology was identified in cholesterol-fed rabbits administered distilled water compared to animals drinking local tap water; this included pathology of the liver and spleen. Studies directed at determining the effect of the trace metals aluminum, copper and zinc on cholesterol-induced systemic pathology were undertaken. As previously reported copper added to distilled drinking water (0.12 PPM) increased Alzheimer-like pathology in the brain, but did not augment pathology of the spleen or liver. Aluminum added to distilled water (0.36 PPM) administered to drink exacerbated cholesterol-induced hepatic pathology but not splenic pathology, and addition of 0.36 PPM zinc to the distilled drinking water failed to affect pathology of either the liver or spleen. The overall increase in both central and systemic pathology observed among cholesterol-fed rabbits administered tap water seems to be due to different trace metal contaminants occurring in tap water.

  5. Spatially controlled amyloid reactions using organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Hammarström, Per; Berggren, Magnus; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2010-10-04

    Abnormal protein aggregates, so called amyloid fibrils, are mainly known as pathological hallmarks of a wide range of diseases, but in addition these robust well-ordered self-assembled natural nanostructures can also be utilized for creating distinct nanomaterials for bioelectronic devices. However, current methods for producing amyloid fibrils in vitro offer no spatial control. Herein, we demonstrate a new way to produce and spatially control the assembly of amyloid-like structures using an organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) to pump distinct cations to a reservoir containing a negatively charged polypeptide. The morphology and kinetics of the created proteinaceous nanomaterials depends on the ion and current used, which we leveraged to create layers incorporating different conjugated thiophene derivatives, one fluorescent (p-FTAA) and one conducting (PEDOT-S). We anticipate that this new application for the OEIP will be useful for both biological studies of amyloid assembly and fibrillogenesis as well as for creating new bioelectronic nanomaterials and devices.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 reduces islet amyloid formation by degrading islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Aston-Mourney, Kathryn; Zraika, Sakeneh; Udayasankar, Jayalakshmi; Subramanian, Shoba L; Green, Pattie S; Kahn, Steven E; Hull, Rebecca L

    2013-02-01

    Deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) as amyloid is a pathological hallmark of the islet in type 2 diabetes, which is toxic to β-cells. We previously showed that the enzyme neprilysin reduces islet amyloid deposition and thereby reduces β-cell apoptosis, by inhibiting fibril formation. Two other enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, are extracellular gelatinases capable of degrading another amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, the constituent of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease. We therefore investigated whether MMP-2 and MMP-9 play a role in reducing islet amyloid deposition. MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were present in mouse islets but only MMP-9 activity was detectable. In an islet culture model where human IAPP (hIAPP) transgenic mouse islets develop amyloid but nontransgenic islets do not, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor (GM6001) and an MMP-2/9 inhibitor increased amyloid formation and the resultant β-cell apoptosis. In contrast, a specific MMP-2 inhibitor had no effect on either amyloid deposition or β-cell apoptosis. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that MMP-9 degraded amyloidogenic hIAPP but not nonamyloidogenic mouse IAPP. Thus, MMP-9 constitutes an endogenous islet protease that limits islet amyloid deposition and its toxic effects via degradation of hIAPP. Because islet MMP-9 mRNA levels are decreased in type 2 diabetic subjects, islet MMP-9 activity may also be decreased in human type 2 diabetes, thereby contributing to increased islet amyloid deposition and β-cell loss. Approaches to increase islet MMP-9 activity could reduce or prevent amyloid deposition and its toxic effects in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Imaging of amyloid burden and distribution in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keith A; Gregas, Matt; Becker, John A; Kinnecom, Catherine; Salat, David H; Moran, Erin K; Smith, Erin E; Rosand, Jonathan; Rentz, Dorene M; Klunk, William E; Mathis, Chester A; Price, Julie C; Dekosky, Steven T; Fischman, Alan J; Greenberg, Steven M

    2007-09-01

    Cerebrovascular deposition of beta-amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy [CAA]) is a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke and a likely contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. We evaluated positron emission tomographic imaging with the beta-amyloid-binding compound Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) as a potential noninvasive method for detection of CAA. We hypothesized that amyloid deposition would be observed with PiB in CAA, and based on the occipital predilection of CAA pathology and associated hemorrhages, that specific PiB retention would be disproportionately greater in occipital lobes. We compared specific cortical PiB retention in 6 nondemented subjects diagnosed with probable CAA with 15 healthy control subjects and 9 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). All CAA and AD subjects were PiB-positive, both by distribution volume ratio measurements and by visual inspection of positron emission tomographic images. Global cortical PiB retention was significantly increased in CAA (distribution volume ratio 1.18 +/- 0.06) relative to healthy control subjects (1.04 +/- 0.10; p = 0.0009), but was lower in CAA than in AD subjects (1.41 +/- 0.17; p = 0.002). The occipital-to-global PiB ratio, however, was significantly greater in CAA than in AD subjects (0.99 +/- 0.07 vs 0.86 +/- 0.05; p = 0.003). We conclude that PiB-positron emission tomography can detect cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and may serve as a method for identifying the extent of CAA in living subjects.

  8. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  9. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  10. Aerobic exercise combined with antioxidative treatment does not counteract moderate- or mid-stage Alzheimer-like pathophysiology of APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Lu-Qing; Wang, Qin; Marshall, Charles; Xiao, Na; Gao, Jun-Ying; Wu, Ting; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2013-10-01

    The present study evaluated the combined treatment effects of aerobic exercise and antioxidative stress on moderate-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ten-month-old APP/PS1 mice were given antioxidative treatment with acetylcysteine, along with aerobic exercise for 6 weeks. Spatial learning and memory were tested using the Morris water maze, and β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits in the forebrain were quantified by Thioflavin-S staining. Levels of soluble Aβ1-42, β-secretase enzyme, ү-secretase enzyme, oxidative and antioxidant stress markers nitrotyrosine and peroxiredoxin-1, glial markers glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1, and synaptic protein synaptophysin in the hippocampus were all measured by western blotting and/or immunohistochemistry. APP/PS1 mice showed severe declines in spatial learning and memory compared with their wild-type littermates, which were not attenuated by aerobic exercise combined with antioxidative treatment. The pathologic analysis revealed that Aβ deposition and production, oxidative stress, glial inflammation, and synaptic loss were not mitigated in the brain of exercised APP/PS1 mice, compared with the sedentary APP/PS1 animals. This study reveals that a combined treatment of aerobic exercise plus antioxidative stress does not counteract pathophysiology in the moderate- or mid-stages of AD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Neurovascular Specifications in the Alzheimer-Like Brain of Mice Affected by Focal Cerebral Ischemia: Implications for Future Therapies.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Dominik; Hofmann, Sarah; Pitsch, Roman; Grosche, Jens; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most frequent type of dementia, is a prototypical neurodegenerative disease, but shares with stroke certain common risk factors. Consequently, how vascular pathology may modulate AD pathogenesis has gained scientific attention. Therefore, aside from typical features of AD (e.g., amyloid-β, tau hyperphosphorylation, and cholinergic dysfunction), changes within the 'neurovascular unit' (NVU) are of particular interest. This study focused on cholinergic, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in association with the vasculature to explore the neurovascular complex of the AD brain affected by stroke. Wild-type and triple-transgenic (3xTg) mice of different ages underwent unilateral permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Histochemical analyses comprised diverse neuronal and vascular NVU components, and markers of AD. Immunofluorescence labeling confirmed the existence of Aβ deposits and phospho-tau together with glial reactions and morphologically altered endothelia, visualized by Solanum tuberosum lectin. Twenty-four hours after ischemia induction, immunoreactivities for ChAT and TH declined in the ischemia-affected striatum and, at least in part, in the ischemic border zone and ipsilateral neocortex. Correlation analyses indicated simultaneous degeneration of neuronal and vascular components. A trend for more severe affection of ChAT was observed in younger as compared with older mice. The present findings suggest complex interactions within the NVU of the AD-like brain affected by ischemia, comprising alterations of the cholinergic system in conjunction with vascular pathology. Hence, it may be worthwhile to explore the impact of a cellular stabilization approach on vascular and glial elements in AD in terms of a potential disease-alleviating strategy.

  12. Accelerated amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in double mutant APP/tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ribé, Elena M; Pérez, Mar; Puig, Berta; Gich, Ignasi; Lim, Filip; Cuadrado, Mar; Sesma, Teresa; Catena, Silvia; Sánchez, Belén; Nieto, María; Gómez-Ramos, Pilar; Morán, M Asunción; Cabodevilla, Felipe; Samaranch, Lluis; Ortiz, Lourdes; Pérez, Alberto; Ferrer, Isidro; Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2005-12-01

    Even though the idea that amyloid beta peptide accumulation is the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease has become the leading hypothesis, the causal link between aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing and tau alterations in this type of dementia remains controversial. We further investigated the role of beta-amyloid production/deposition in tau pathology and neuronal cell death in the mouse brain by crossing Tg2576 and VLW lines expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein and human mutant tau, respectively. The resulting double transgenic mice showed enhanced amyloid deposition accompanied by neurofibrillary degeneration and overt neuronal loss in selectively vulnerable brain limbic areas. These findings challenge the idea that tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease is merely a downstream effect of amyloid production/deposition and suggest that reciprocal interactions between beta-amyloid and tau alterations may take place in vivo.

  13. Synthetic tau fibrils mediate transmission of neurofibrillary tangles in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's-like tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Iba, Michiyo; Guo, Jing L; McBride, Jennifer D; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2013-01-16

    Tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau pathologies, are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) comprising filamentous tau protein. Although emerging evidence suggests that tau pathology may be transmitted, we demonstrate here that synthetic tau fibrils are sufficient to transmit tau inclusions in a mouse model. Specifically, intracerebral inoculation of young PS19 mice overexpressing mutant human tau (P301S) with synthetic preformed fibrils (pffs) assembled from recombinant full-length tau or truncated tau containing four microtubule binding repeats resulted in rapid induction of NFT-like inclusions that propagated from injected sites to connected brain regions in a time-dependent manner. Interestingly, injection of tau pffs into either hippocampus or striatum together with overlaying cortex gave rise to distinct pattern of spreading. Moreover, unlike tau pathology that spontaneously develops in old PS19 mice, the pff-induced tau inclusions more closely resembled AD NFTs because they were Thioflavin S positive, acetylated, and more resistant to proteinase K digestion. Together, our study demonstrates that synthetic tau pffs alone are capable of inducing authentic NFT-like tau aggregates and initiating spreading of tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model.

  14. Cerebral vascular amyloid seeds drive amyloid β-protein fibril assembly with a distinct anti-parallel structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fu, Ziao; Dass, Sharmila; Kotarba, AnnMarie E.; Davis, Judianne; Smith, Steven O.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Familial Aβ mutations, such as Dutch-E22Q and Iowa-D23N, can cause severe cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid that serves as a potent driver of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. The distinctive features of vascular amyloid that underlie its unique pathological properties remain unknown. Here, we use transgenic mouse models producing CAA mutants (Tg-SwDI) or overproducing human wild-type Aβ (Tg2576) to demonstrate that CAA-mutant vascular amyloid influences wild-type Aβ deposition in brain. We also show isolated microvascular amyloid seeds from Tg-SwDI mice drive assembly of human wild-type Aβ into distinct anti-parallel β-sheet fibrils. These findings indicate that cerebrovascular amyloid can serve as an effective scaffold to promote rapid assembly and strong deposition of Aβ into a unique structure that likely contributes to its distinctive pathology. PMID:27869115

  15. The amyloid cascade hypothesis for Alzheimer's disease: an appraisal for the development of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Karran, Eric; Mercken, Marc; De Strooper, Bart

    2011-08-19

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis, which posits that the deposition of the amyloid-β peptide in the brain is a central event in Alzheimer's disease pathology, has dominated research for the past twenty years. Several therapeutics that were purported to reduce amyloid-β production or aggregation have failed in Phase III clinical testing, and many others are in various stages of development. Therefore, it is timely to review the science underpinning the amyloid cascade hypothesis, consider what type of clinical trials will constitute a valid test of this hypothesis and explore whether amyloid-β-directed therapeutics will provide the medicines that are urgently needed by society for treating this devastating disease.

  16. Common structure and toxic function of amyloid oligomers implies a common mechanism of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glabe, Charles G; Kayed, Rakez

    2006-01-24

    Recent findings indicate that soluble amyloid oligomers may represent the primary pathologic species in degenerative diseases. These amyloid oligomers share common structural features and the ability to permeabilize membranes, suggesting that they also share a common primary mechanism of pathogenesis. Membrane permeabilization by amyloid oligomers may initiate a common group of downstream pathologic processes, including intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species, altered signaling pathways, and mitochondrial dysfunction that represent key effectors of cellular dysfunction and cell death in amyloid-associated degenerative disease, such as sporadic inclusion-body myositis.

  17. Determination of amyloid core structure using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are the pathological hallmark of a large variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The structural characterization of amyloid fibrils, however, is challenging due to their non-crystalline, heterogeneous, and often dynamic nature. Thus, the structure of amyloid fibrils of many proteins is still unknown. We here show that the structure calculation program CS-Rosetta can be used to obtain insight into the core structure of amyloid fibrils. Driven by experimental solid-state NMR chemical shifts and taking into account the polymeric nature of fibrils CS-Rosetta allows modeling of the core of amyloid fibrils. Application to the Y145X stop mutant of the human prion protein reveals a left-handed β-helix.

  18. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. Amyloid detection using a Peltier-based device.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Miguel A; Ferreyra, Martin G; Cortez, Leonardo; Grupalli, Silvina A; Alvarez, L Leguina; Chehin, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation of polypeptides is related to a growing number of pathologic states known as amyloid disorders. At present, it is clear that any proteins submitted to appropriate physicochemical environment can acquire fibrilar conformation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been a widely used technique to study temperature- induced amyloid-fibrils formation in vitro. In this way, strict changes and temperature controls are required to characterize the physicochemical basis of the amyloid-fibrils formation. In this article, the development of a highly efficient and accurate Peltier-based system to improve FTIR measurements is presented (see An Old Physics Phenomenon Applied to a Serious Biomedical Pathology. The accuracy of the thermostatic control was tested with biophysical parameters on biological samples probing its reproducibility. The design of the present device contributes to maintain the FTIR environment stable, which represents a real contribution to improve the spectral quality and thus, the reliability of the results.

  20. Amyloid Imaging in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, David A.; Price, Julie C.; Saxton, Judy A.; Snitz, Beth E.; James, Jeffrey A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Cohen, Ann D.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) to determine the presence of AD pathology in different MCI subtypes and to relate elevated PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Methods Twenty-six patients with MCI – 13 single domain amnestic-MCI (sd a-MCI), 6 multiple domain amnestic-MCI (md a-MCI), and 7 non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI) – underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up [21.2 ± 16.0 (SD) months] subsequent to their PiB scan. Results Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, 14 (54%) had elevated levels of PiB retention and were considered “amyloid-positive.” All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 sd a-MCI, 5/6 md a-MCI, 3/7 na-MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the na-MCI group despite their atypical early AD phenotype. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, increased age, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up revealed 5/13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0/10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3/10 amyloid-negative patients “reverted to normal” on follow-up. Interpretation These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data is consistent with longitudinal studies suggesting that a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop clinical AD. PMID:19475670

  1. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled.

  2. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, Christin; Rochin, Leila; van Niel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL). In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation. PMID:27589732

  3. An amyloid lung

    PubMed Central

    Zundel, W. E.; Prior, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 55-year-old housewife died from an illness characterized by progressive respiratory incapacity. Changes were confined to the lungs and consisted of a diffuse infiltration by amyloid. No adequate cause was found for this amyloid, and we suggest that this is a case of primary alveolar septal amyloidosis. Images PMID:5559913

  4. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M.; Jagust, William J.

    2015-01-01

    See Sorg and Grothe (doi:10.1093/brain/awv302) for a scientific commentary on this article. In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir (18F) positron emission tomography, 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake

  5. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  6. Nanophotonics of protein amyloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2014-04-01

    Technological breakthroughs in the super-resolution optical imaging techniques have enriched our current understanding of a range of biological systems and biomolecular processes at the nanoscopic spatial resolution. Protein amyloids are an important class of ordered protein assemblies consisting of misfolded proteins that are implicated in a wide range of devastating human diseases. In order to decipher the structural basis of the supramolecular protein assembly in amyloids and their detrimental interactions with the cell membranes, it is important to employ high-resolution optical imaging techniques. Additionally, amyloids could serve as novel biological nanomaterials for a variety of potential applications. In this review, we summarize a few examples of the utility of near-field scanning optical imaging methodologies to obtain a wealth of structural information into the nanoscale amyloid assembly. Although the near-field technologies were developed several decades ago, it is only recently that these methodologies are being applied and adapted for amyloid research to yield novel information pertaining to the exciting nanoscopic world of protein aggregates. We believe that the account on the nanophotonics of amyloids described in this review will be useful for the future studies on the biophysics of amyloids.

  7. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Nadishka; Kaur, Manmeet; Nair, Smitha; Malmstrom, Jenny; Goldstone, David; Negron, Leonardo; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Domigan, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C) and pHs (2–10), and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products. PMID:28398221

  8. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment.

  9. Activated ADF/cofilin sequesters phosphorylated microtubule-associated-protein during the assembly of Alzheimer-like neuritic cytoskeletal striations

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Ineka T.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Cullen, Karen M.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Jeong, Erica V.; Witting, Paul K.; Antao, Shane T.; Minamide, Laurie S.; Bamburg, James R.; Goldsbury, Claire

    2009-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), rod-like cofilin aggregates (cofilin-actin rods) and thread-like inclusions containing phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein (pMAP) tau form in the brain (neuropil threads) and the extent of their presence correlates with cognitive decline and disease progression. The assembly mechanism of these respective pathological lesions and the relationship between them is poorly understood, yet vital to understanding the causes of sporadic AD. We demonstrate that during mitochondrial inhibition, activated actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin assemble into rods along processes of cultured primary neurons that recruit pMAP/tau and mimic neuropil threads. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) analysis revealed co-localization of cofilin-GFP and pMAP in rods, suggesting their close proximity within a cytoskeletal inclusion complex. The relationship between pMAP and cofilin-actin rods was further investigated using actin-modifying drugs and siRNA knockdown of ADF/cofilin in primary neurons. The results suggest that activation of ADF/cofilin and generation of cofilin-actin rods is required for the subsequent recruitment of pMAP into the inclusions. Additionally we were able to induce the formation of pMAP-positive ADF/cofilin rods by exposing cells to exogenous Aβ peptides. These results reveal a common pathway for pMAP and cofilin accumulation in neuronal processes. The requirement of activated ADF/cofilin for the sequestration of pMAP suggests that neuropil thread structures in the AD brain may be initiated by elevated cofilin activation and F-actin bundling that can be caused by oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction or Aβ peptides, all suspected initiators of synaptic loss and neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:19828813

  10. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  11. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  12. Altered Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein in Cells Undergoing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Tina; Kirouac, Lisa; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Altered proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein is an important determinant of pathology development in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we describe the detection of two novel fragments of amyloid precursor protein in H4 neuroglioma cells undergoing apoptosis. Immunoreactivity of these 25–35 kDa fragments to two different amyloid precursor protein antibodies suggests that they contain the amyloid-β region and an epitope near the C-terminus of amyloid precursor protein. Generation of these fragments is associated with cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-7, suggesting activation of these caspases. Studies in neurons undergoing DNA damage-induced apoptosis also showed similar results. Inclusion of caspase inhibitors prevented the generation of these novel fragments, suggesting that they are generated by a caspase-dependent mechanism. Molecular weight prediction and immunoreactivity of the fragments generated suggested that such fragments could not be generated by cleavage at any previously identified caspase, secretase, or calpain site on amyloid precursor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid sequence of amyloid precursor protein revealed that fragments fitting the observed size and immunoreactivity could be generated by either cleavage at a novel, hitherto unidentified, caspase site or at a previously identified matrix metalloproteinase site in the extracellular domain. Proteolytic cleavage at any of these sites leads to a decrease in the generation of α-secretase cleaved secreted APP, which has both anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective properties, and thus may contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23469123

  13. When amyloids become prions.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid.

  14. When amyloids become prions

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The conformational diseases, linked to protein aggregation into amyloid conformations, range from non-infectious neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), to highly infectious ones, such as human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). They are commonly known as prion diseases. However, since all amyloids could be considered prions (from those involved in cell-to-cell transmission to those responsible for real neuronal invasion), it is necessary to find an underlying cause of the different capacity to infect that each of the proteins prone to form amyloids has. As proposed here, both the intrinsic cytotoxicity and the number of nuclei of aggregation per cell could be key factors in this transmission capacity of each amyloid. PMID:24831240

  15. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  16. Optical properties of large amyloid spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael; Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    Amyloid Spherulites, consisting of a central core surrounded by radially oriented birefringent fibres (known as amyloid fibrils), have been found to occur in certain pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease. Typically ˜5 30 m in diameter they can be observed by optical microscopy and easily distinguished by their characteristic maltese cross pattern, seen when viewed under crossed polarisers. Here we report the existence of much larger amyloid spherulites formed from bovine insulin, which grow under a particular set of conditions (10 mgml-1 BPI, pH ˜2.8, T ˜67^oC, 25mM NaCl) to diameters of up to ˜500 m. These huge spherulites when viewed under crossed polarisers in addition to the maltese cross feature beautiful coloured rings which change with the size and density of the spherulite. Such rings have been observed in other systems such as fish eye lenses and nematic liquid crystal drops and appear to be related to the rather unusual radially oriented birefringence of their internal structure. Using a ray tracing technique we model the optical path of rays through these spherulites. Taking into account refraction and the radially oriented birefringence of the amyloid fibrils, we elucidate the origin of these beautiful patterns.

  17. The amyloid interactome: Exploring protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mastrokalou, Chara V.; Hamodrakas, Stavros J.

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the quintessence of physiological activities, but also participate in pathological conditions. Amyloid formation, an abnormal protein-protein interaction process, is a widespread phenomenon in divergent proteins and peptides, resulting in a variety of aggregation disorders. The complexity of the mechanisms underlying amyloid formation/amyloidogenicity is a matter of great scientific interest, since their revelation will provide important insight on principles governing protein misfolding, self-assembly and aggregation. The implication of more than one protein in the progression of different aggregation disorders, together with the cited synergistic occurrence between amyloidogenic proteins, highlights the necessity for a more universal approach, during the study of these proteins. In an attempt to address this pivotal need we constructed and analyzed the human amyloid interactome, a protein-protein interaction network of amyloidogenic proteins and their experimentally verified interactors. This network assembled known interconnections between well-characterized amyloidogenic proteins and proteins related to amyloid fibril formation. The consecutive extended computational analysis revealed significant topological characteristics and unraveled the functional roles of all constituent elements. This study introduces a detailed protein map of amyloidogenicity that will aid immensely towards separate intervention strategies, specifically targeting sub-networks of significant nodes, in an attempt to design possible novel therapeutics for aggregation disorders. PMID:28249044

  18. Bacterial enzymes effectively digest Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Yuliya Vasilyevna; Shagimardanova, Elena Ilyasovna; Margulis, Anna Borisovna; Toymentseva, Anna Aleksandrovna; Balaban, Nelly Pavlovna; Rudakova, Nataliya Leonidovna; Rizvanov, Albert Anatolyevich; Sharipova, Margarita Rashidovna; Palotás, András

    2014-09-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid peptides play key roles in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and recent evidence suggests that microbial particles, among others, can facilitate their polymerization. Bacterial enzymes, however, have been proved to be beneficial in degrading pathological fibrillar structures in clinical settings, such as strepto-kinases in resolving blood-clots. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of bacterial substances to effectively hydrolyze β-amyloid peptides. Degrading products of several proteinases from Bacillus pumilus were evaluated using MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, and their toxicity was assessed in vitro using cell-culture assays and morphological studies. These enzymes have proved to be non-toxic and were demonstrated to cleave through the functional domains of β-amyloid peptide. By yielding inactive fragments, proteinases of Bacillus pumilus may be used as candidate anti-amyloid agents.

  19. Alzheimer's Disease and the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, the amyloid cascade hypothesis has played the prominent role in explaining the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs) and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuronal cell death, and ultimately dementia. While there is substantial evidence supporting the hypothesis, there are also limitations: (1) SP and NFT may develop independently, and (2) SPs and NFTs may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. In addition, randomized clinical trials that tested drugs or antibodies targeting components of the amyloid pathway have been inconclusive. This paper provides a critical overview of the evidence for and against the amyloid cascade hypothesis in AD and provides suggestions for future directions. PMID:22506132

  20. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis: pathophysiology and treatments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies targeting specific inflammatory mediators revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Targeting key components of the immune system allows efficient suppression of the pathological inflammatory cascade that leads to RA symptoms and subsequent joint destruction. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, one of the most severe complications of RA, is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder caused by deposition of AA amyloid fibrils in multiple organs. These AA amyloid fibrils derive from the circulatory acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and may be controlled by treatment. New biologics may permit AA amyloidosis secondary to RA to become a treatable, manageable disease. Rheumatologists, when diagnosing and treating patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to RA, must understand the pathophysiology and clinical factors related to development and progression of the disease, including genetic predisposition and biological versatility of SAA.

  1. Berberine protects against memory impairment and anxiogenic-like behavior in rats submitted to sporadic Alzheimer's-like dementia: Involvement of acetylcholinesterase and cell death.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Juliana Sorraila; Abdalla, Fátima Husein; Dornelles, Guilherme Lopes; Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Palma, Taís Vidal; Signor, Cristiane; da Silva Bernardi, Jamile; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Lenz, Luana Suéling; Magni, Luana Pereira; Rubin, Maribel Antonello; Pillat, Micheli Mainardi; de Andrade, Cinthia Melazzo

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine (BRB) on spatial and learning memory, anxiety, acetylcholinesterase activity and cell death in an experimental model of intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) induced sporadic Alzheimer's-like dementia. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: control (CTR), BRB 50mg/kg (BRB 50), BRB 100mg/kg (BRB 100), streptozotocin (STZ), streptozotocin plus BRB 50mg/kg (STZ+BRB 50), and streptozotocin plus BRB 100mg/kg (STZ+BRB 100). Rats were injected with ICV-STZ (3mg/kg) or saline, and daily oral BRB treatment began on day 4 for a period of 21days. Behavioral tests were carried out on day 17, and rats were euthanized on day 24. Cell death analysis and determination of acetylcholinesterase activity was performed on the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Administration of BRB prevented the memory loss, anxiogenic behavior, increased acetylcholinesterase activity and cell death induced by ICV-STZ. This may be explained, in part, by a protective effect of BRB on ameliorating the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, and the results of this study provide a better understanding of the effect of BRB on the brain. Thus, BRB may act as a potential neuroprotective agent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Human cyclophilin 40 unravels neurotoxic amyloids.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jeremy D; Shelton, Lindsey B; Zheng, Dali; Favretto, Filippo; Nordhues, Bryce A; Darling, April; Sullivan, Leia E; Sun, Zheying; Solanki, Parth K; Martin, Mackenzie D; Suntharalingam, Amirthaa; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Becker, Stefan; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zweckstetter, Markus; Dickey, Chad A; Koren, John; Blair, Laura J

    2017-06-01

    The accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders. The aberrant accumulation of the microtubule associating protein tau (MAPT, tau) into toxic oligomers and amyloid deposits is a primary pathology in tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intrinsically disordered proteins, like tau, are enriched with proline residues that regulate both secondary structure and aggregation propensity. The orientation of proline residues is regulated by cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases). Here we show that cyclophilin 40 (CyP40), a PPIase, dissolves tau amyloids in vitro. Additionally, CyP40 ameliorated silver-positive and oligomeric tau species in a mouse model of tau accumulation, preserving neuronal health and cognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that CyP40 interacts with tau at sites rich in proline residues. CyP40 was also able to interact with and disaggregate other aggregating proteins that contain prolines. Moreover, CyP40 lacking PPIase activity prevented its capacity for disaggregation in vitro. Finally, we describe a unique structural property of CyP40 that may permit disaggregation to occur in an energy-independent manner. This study identifies a novel human protein disaggregase and, for the first time, demonstrates its capacity to dissolve intracellular amyloids.

  3. Human cyclophilin 40 unravels neurotoxic amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Favretto, Filippo; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Darling, April; Sullivan, Leia E.; Sun, Zheying; Solanki, Parth K.; Martin, Mackenzie D.; Suntharalingam, Amirthaa; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Becker, Stefan; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Zweckstetter, Markus; Dickey, Chad A.; Koren, John; Blair, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders. The aberrant accumulation of the microtubule associating protein tau (MAPT, tau) into toxic oligomers and amyloid deposits is a primary pathology in tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Intrinsically disordered proteins, like tau, are enriched with proline residues that regulate both secondary structure and aggregation propensity. The orientation of proline residues is regulated by cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases). Here we show that cyclophilin 40 (CyP40), a PPIase, dissolves tau amyloids in vitro. Additionally, CyP40 ameliorated silver-positive and oligomeric tau species in a mouse model of tau accumulation, preserving neuronal health and cognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that CyP40 interacts with tau at sites rich in proline residues. CyP40 was also able to interact with and disaggregate other aggregating proteins that contain prolines. Moreover, CyP40 lacking PPIase activity prevented its capacity for disaggregation in vitro. Finally, we describe a unique structural property of CyP40 that may permit disaggregation to occur in an energy-independent manner. This study identifies a novel human protein disaggregase and, for the first time, demonstrates its capacity to dissolve intracellular amyloids. PMID:28654636

  4. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Yazan S.; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M.; Al Rihani, Sweilem B.; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  5. Amyloid imaging in dementias with atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Wolk, David A; Price, Julie C; Madeira, Charles; Saxton, Judy A; Snitz, Beth E; Lopez, Oscar L; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; DeKosky, Steven T

    2012-09-01

    With the potential emergence of disease specific therapies, an accurate biomarker of Alzheimer's Disease pathology is needed in cases in which the underlying etiology is uncertain. We explored the potential value of amyloid imaging in patients with atypical presentations of dementia. Twenty-eight patients with atypical dementia underwent positron emission tomography imaging with the amyloid imaging tracer Pittsburgh compound B (PiB). Twenty-six had [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans. After extensive clinical evaluation, this group of patients generated considerable diagnostic uncertainty and received working diagnoses that included possible Alzheimer's disease (AD), focal dementias (e.g., posterior cortical atrophy [PCA]), or cases in which no clear diagnostic category could be determined (dementia of uncertain etiology). Patients were classified as PiB-positive, PiB-negative, or PiB-intermediate, based on objective criteria. Anterior-posterior and left-right indices of PiB and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake were calculated to examine differences in distribution of amyloid pathology and metabolic changes associated with clinical phenotype. Eleven patients (39%) were PiB positive, 16 were PiB negative (57%), and one (4%) was PiB intermediate. By diagnostic category, three of 10 patients (30%) with dementia of uncertain etiology, one of five (20%) with primary progressive aphasia, three of five (60%) with PCA, and four of seven (57%) with possible AD were PiB positive. Brain metabolism of both PiB-positive and PiB-negative patients was generally similar by phenotype, but appeared to differ from typical AD. PCA patients also appeared to differ in their relative distribution of PiB compared with typical AD, consistent with their atypical phenotype. AD pathology is frequently present in atypical presentations of dementia and can be identified by amyloid imaging. Clinical phenotype is more related to the pattern of cerebral

  6. Amyloid in dementia associated with familial FTLD: not an innocent bystander

    SciTech Connect

    Naasan, Georges; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Ghosh, Pia; Elofson, Jonathan D.; Miller, Bruce L.; Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna; Fong, Jamie; Perry, David; Lee, Suzee E.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Seeley, William W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert; Jagust, William J.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Pribadi, Mochtar; Yang, Zhongan; Sears, Renee; Klein, Eric; Wojta, Kevin; Rosen, Howard J.

    2015-06-04

    We present that patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can show superimposed amyloid pathology, though the impact of amyloid on the clinical presentation of FTLD is not well characterized. This cross-sectional case–control study compared clinical features, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography metabolism and gray matter volume loss in 30 patients with familial FTLD in whom amyloid status was confirmed with autopsy or Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Compared to the amyloid-negative patients, the amyloid-positive patients performed significantly worse on several cognitive tests and showed hypometabolism and volume loss in more temporoparietal regions. Finally, our results suggest that in FTLD amyloid positivity is associated with a more Alzheimer’s disease-like pattern of neurodegeneration.

  7. Amyloid in dementia associated with familial FTLD: not an innocent bystander

    DOE PAGES

    Naasan, Georges; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Ghosh, Pia; ...

    2015-06-04

    We present that patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can show superimposed amyloid pathology, though the impact of amyloid on the clinical presentation of FTLD is not well characterized. This cross-sectional case–control study compared clinical features, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography metabolism and gray matter volume loss in 30 patients with familial FTLD in whom amyloid status was confirmed with autopsy or Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Compared to the amyloid-negative patients, the amyloid-positive patients performed significantly worse on several cognitive tests and showed hypometabolism and volume loss in more temporoparietal regions. Finally, our results suggest that in FTLD amyloid positivity is associated withmore » a more Alzheimer’s disease-like pattern of neurodegeneration.« less

  8. Monitoring and targeting the initial dimerization stage of amyloid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bram, Yaron; Lampel, Ayala; Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Ezer, Anat; Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-02-09

    Amyloid deposits are pathological hallmark of a large group of human degenerative disorders of unrelated etiologies. While accumulating evidence suggests that early oligomers may account for tissue degeneration, most detection tools do not allow the monitoring of early association events. Here we exploit bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis to detect and quantify the dimerization of three major amyloidogenic polypeptides; islet amyloid polypeptide, β-amyloid and α-synuclein. The constructed systems provided direct visualization of protein-protein interactions in which only assembled dimers display strong fluorescent signal. Potential inhibitors that interfere with the initial intermolecular interactions of islet amyloid polypeptide were further identified using this system. Moreover, the identified compounds were able to inhibit the aggregation and cytotoxicity of islet amyloid polypeptide, demonstrating the importance of targeting amyloid dimer formation for future drug development. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Amyloid fibrils enhance transport of metal nanoparticles in living cells and induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Handschin, Stephan; Chaitanya, Krishna; Adamcik, Jozef; Saito, Yasuyuki; Manz, Markus G; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-07-14

    Amyloid protein fibrils occur in vivo as pathological agents, in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, or as functional amyloids, when playing biologically vital roles. Here we show how amyloid fibrils generated from a food protein, β-lactoglobulin, can be used as nanoreactors for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles and demonstrate that the resulting hybrids can play a central role in the internalization of nanoparticles into living cells, with up to 3-fold-enhanced transport properties over pristine nanoparticles. We conjugate gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles onto amyloid fibrils by chemical reduction, and we study their effect on dendritic and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Transmission electron microscopy indicates localization of nanoparticles inside vesicles of the cells. Flow cytometry reveals that silver nanoparticle-amyloid hybrids are cytotoxic, while gold and palladium nanoparticle-amyloid hybrids produce no notable effect on cell viability and activation status.

  10. Pre-amyloid oligomers budding:a metastatic mechanism of proteotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernini, Fabrizio; Malferrari, Daniele; Pignataro, Marcello; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; di Rocco, Giulia; Lancellotti, Lidia; Brigatti, Maria Franca; Kayed, Rakez; Borsari, Marco; Del Monte, Federica; Castellini, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The pathological hallmark of misfolded protein diseases and aging is the accumulation of proteotoxic aggregates. However, the mechanisms of proteotoxicity and the dynamic changes in fiber formation and dissemination remain unclear, preventing a cure. Here we adopted a reductionist approach and used atomic force microscopy to define the temporal and spatial changes of amyloid aggregates, their modes of dissemination and the biochemical changes that may influence their growth. We show that pre-amyloid oligomers (PAO) mature to form linear and circular protofibrils, and amyloid fibers, and those can break reforming PAO that can migrate invading neighbor structures. Simulating the effect of immunotherapy modifies the dynamics of PAO formation. Anti-fibers as well as anti-PAO antibodies fragment the amyloid fibers, however the fragmentation using anti-fibers antibodies favored the migration of PAO. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the mechanisms of misfolded protein maturation and propagation and the effects of interventions on the resolution and dissemination of amyloid pathology.

  11. β-sheet interfering molecules acting against β-amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francioso, Antonio; Punzi, Pasqualina; Boffi, Alberto; Lori, Clorinda; Martire, Sara; Giordano, Cesare; D'Erme, Maria; Mosca, Luciana

    2015-04-15

    β-Sheet aggregates and amyloid fibrils rising from conformational changes of proteins are observed in several pathological human conditions. These structures are organized in β-strands that can reciprocally interact by hydrophobic and π-π interactions. The amyloid aggregates can give rise to pathological conditions through complex biochemical mechanisms whose physico-chemical nature has been understood in recent times. This review focuses on the various classes of natural and synthetic small molecules able to act against β-amyloid fibrillogenesis and toxicity that may represent new pharmacological tools in Alzheimer's diseases. Some peptides, named 'β-sheet breaker peptides', are able to hamper amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis by interfering with and destabilizing the non native β-sheet structures. Other natural compounds, like polyphenols or indolic molecules such as melatonin, can interfere with β-amyloid peptide pathogenicity by inhibiting aggregation and counteracting oxidative stress that is a key hallmark in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ankarcrona, M.; Winblad, B.; Monteiro, C.; Fearns, C.; Powers, E. T.; Johansson, J.; Westermark, G. T.; Presto, J.; Ericzon, B-G.; Kelly, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with vaccines and small molecules to target Aβ formation and aggregation and also enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However the disease is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide and oligomers of this peptide are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases involving multiple organ systems and caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, non-amyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as treatment. PMID:27165517

  13. Effects of age and amyloid deposition on Aβ dynamics in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Potter, Rachel; Sigurdson, Wendy; Santacruz, Anna; Shih, Shirley; Ju, Yo-El; Kasten, Tom; Morris, John C; Mintun, Mark; Duntley, Stephen; Bateman, Randall J

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis predicts that increased production or decreased clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) leads to amyloidosis, which ultimately culminates in Alzheimer disease (AD). To investigate whether dynamic changes in Aβ levels in the human central nervous system may be altered by aging or by the pathology of AD and thus contribute to the risk of AD. Repeated-measures case-control study. Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri. Participants with amyloid deposition, participants without amyloid deposition, and younger normal control participants. In this study, hourly cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ concentrations were compared with age, status of amyloid deposition, electroencephalography, and video recording data. Linear increases were observed over time in the Aβ levels in CSF samples obtained from the younger normal control participants and the older participants without amyloid deposition, but not from the older participants with amyloid deposition. Significant circadian patterns were observed in the Aβ levels in CSF samples obtained from the younger control participants; however, circadian amplitudes decreased in both older participants without amyloid deposition and older participants with amyloid deposition. Aβ diurnal concentrations were correlated with the amount of sleep but not with the various activities that the participants participated in while awake. A reduction in the linear increase in the Aβ levels in CSF samples that is associated with amyloid deposition and a decreased CSF Aβ diurnal pattern associated with increasing age disrupt the normal physiology of Aβ dynamics and may contribute to AD.

  14. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Decline of microtubule-associated protein tau after experimental stroke in differently aged wild-type and 3xTg mice with Alzheimer-like alterations.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Dominik; Preißler, Hartmut; Hofmann, Sarah; Kacza, Johannes; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2016-08-25

    Stroke therapies are still limited to a minority of patients. Considering time-dependent aspects of stroke, the penumbra concept describes the transition from functional to permanent tissue damage. Thereby, the role of cytoskeletal elements, as for instance microtubules with associated tau remains poorly understood and is therefore not yet considered for therapeutic approaches. This study explored the expression of microtubule-associated protein tau related to neuronal damage in stroke-affected brain regions. Wild-type and triple-transgenic mice of 3, 7 and 12months of age and with an Alzheimer-like background underwent experimental stroke. After 24h, brain sections were used for immunofluorescence labeling of tau and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN). Potential functional consequences of cellular alterations were explored by statistical relationships to the general health condition, i.e. neurobehavioral deficits and loss of body weight. Immunoreactivity for whole tau decreased significantly in ischemic areas, while the decline at the border zone was more drastic for tau-immunoreactivity compared with the diminished NeuN labeling. Quantitative analyses confirmed pronounced sensitivity for tau-immunoreactivity in the ischemic border zone. Decline of tau- as well as NeuN-immunoreactivity correlated with body weight loss during the 24-h observation period. In conclusion, microtubule-associated protein tau was robustly identified as a highly sensitive cytoskeletal constitute under ischemic conditions, suggesting a pivotal role during the transition process toward long-lasting tissue damage. Consequently, cytoskeletal elements appear as promising targets for novel therapeutic approaches with the objective to impede ischemia-induced irreversible cellular degradation. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The pathology of paraphrenia.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Manuel F

    2010-06-01

    The term paraphrenia refers to a condition characterized by a strong delusional component with preservation of thought and personality. Most affected patients are women. Although a late age at onset (> 60 years) has been proposed in the literature, evidence for this assertion remains debatable. Deterioration of cognitive functions occurs very slowly but may lead to mild dementia over a period of years. Pathological studies indicate the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), primarily within the entorhinal cortex. Compared with the severity of neuritic changes, amyloid deposition remains scant. Pyramidal cells affected by NFTs appear to be preserved. Both the clinical history and neuropathology of paraphrenia are similar to those aspects described for NFT-predominant senile dementia. Risk factors, including organic lesions, may precipitate an earlier onset of symptomatology in patients exhibiting this pathology. Many of the symptoms in paraphrenia can be explained by involvement of the entorhinal cortex.

  17. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    PubMed

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  18. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  19. β-amyloid disrupts human NREM slow waves and related hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Bryce A.; Marks, Shawn M.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Independent evidence associates β-amyloid pathology with both NREM sleep disruption and memory impairment in older adults. However, whether the influence of β-amyloid pathology on hippocampus-dependent memory is, in part, driven by impairments of NREM slow wave activity (SWA) and associated overnight memory consolidation is unknown. Here, we show that β-amyloid burden within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is significantly correlated with the severity of impairment in NREM SWA generation. Moreover, reduced NREM SWA generation was further associated with impaired overnight memory consolidation and impoverished hippocampal-neocortical memory transformation. Furthermore, structural equation models revealed that the association between mPFC β-amyloid pathology and impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation is not direct, but instead, statistically depends on the intermediary factor of diminished NREM SWA. By linking β-amyloid pathology with impaired NREM SWA, these data implicate sleep disruption as a novel mechanistic pathway through which β-amyloid pathology may contribute to hippocampus-dependent cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:26030850

  20. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-03

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders.

  1. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun; Johnson, Sara; Quabili, Trina; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Solares, Santiago De Jesus; Hwang, Wonmuk; Seog, Joonil

    2013-09-24

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with both functional biological and pathological processes such as those in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, the stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate a molecular mechanism for the key amyloid nucleation event. Here we investigated nucleation of the silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) amyloid using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning of a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed a sudden stepwise height increase. This corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber, which subsequently grew perpendicular to the scanning direction. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction. The probability of nucleation correlated with the maximum stretching force and extension, implying that stretching of SELP molecules is a key molecular event for amyloid nucleation. The mechanically induced nucleation allows for positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro, which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  2. Will PET amyloid imaging lead to overdiagnosis of Alzheimer dementia?

    PubMed

    Dubroff, Jacob G; Nasrallah, Ilya M

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes dementia, affects millions of elderly Americans and represents a growing problem with the aging of the population. There has been an increasing effort for improved and earlier diagnosis for AD. Several newly developed radiolabeled compounds targeting β-amyloid plaques, one of the major pathologic biomarkers of AD, have recently become available for clinical use. These radiopharmaceuticals allow for in vivo noninvasive visualization of abnormal β-amyloid deposits in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET). Amyloid PET imaging has demonstrated high sensitivity for pathologic cerebral amyloid deposition in multiple studies. Principal drawbacks to this new diagnostic test are declining specificity in older age groups and uncertain clinical role given lack of disease-modifying therapy for AD. Although there is strong evidence for the utility of amyloid PET in certain situations, detailed in a set of guidelines for appropriate use from the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the question of overdiagnosis, the diagnosis of a disease that would result in neither symptoms nor deaths, using this new medical tool needs to be carefully considered in light of efforts to secure reimbursement for the new technology that is already widely available for use as a clinical tool. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  4. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-06-29

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein.

  5. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  6. Recent advances in the development of amyloid imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Furumoto, Shozo; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2007-01-01

    Excessive amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the brain is one of the most crucial events in the early pathological stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, Abeta deposits have enough potential to become a useful biomarker for not only an early diagnosis of AD, but also for the assessment of the clinical efficacy of anti-Abeta therapies, if they can be measured non-invasively and reliably in living patients. As a potent candidate technique to measure this biomarker, PET amyloid imaging using a radioligand for Abeta deposits has received much attention. A large number of Abeta ligands have been synthesized and evaluated as candidates for amyloid imaging agents. These can be classified into six categories of derivatives: Congo-red, Thioflavine T, stilbene, vinylbenzoxazole, DDNP, and miscellaneous. Many of these derivatives exhibit high binding affinities to Abeta fibrils (below 20 nM) and some of them also show excellent brain pharmacokinetic profiles. The concept of amyloid imaging is currently being tested in human PET studies using optimized amyloid imaging agents. Despite the small number of subjects, these studies have demonstrated sufficiently promising results. This review article provides an overview of recent advances in the development of amyloid imaging agents, and includes: a summary of the fundamental basis and clinical significance of amyloid imaging; lists of binding affinity data for 135 compounds classified into 12 molecular frameworks; a comprehensive discussion of the in vitro and in vivo features of representative Abeta ligands; and a discussion of the current state of clinical evaluation of these amyloid imaging agents (PIB, SB-13, BF-227, and FDDNP).

  7. Centella asiatica extract selectively decreases amyloid beta levels in hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Holcomb, Leigh A; Hitt, Angie R; Tharakan, Binu; Porter, Jami W; Young, Keith A; Manyam, Bala V

    2009-01-01

    PSAPP mice expressing the 'Swedish' amyloid precursor protein and the M146L presenilin 1 mutations are a well-characterized model for spontaneous amyloid beta plaque formation. Centella asiatica has a long history of use in India as a memory enhancing drug in Ayurvedic literature. The study investigated whether Centella asiatica extract (CaE) can alter the amyloid pathology in PSAPP mice by administering CaE (2.5 or 5.0 g/kg/day) starting at 2 months of age prior to the onset of detectable amyloid deposition and continued for either 2 months or 8 months. A significant decrease in amyloid beta 1-40 and 1-42 was detectable by ELISA following an 8 month treatment with 2.5 mg/kg of CaE. A reduction in Congo Red stained fibrillar amyloid plaques was detected with the 5.0 mg/kg CaE dose and long-term treatment regimen. It was also confirmed that CaE functions as an antioxidant in vitro, scavenging free radicals, reducing lipid peroxidation and protecting against DNA damage. The data indicate that CaE can impact the amyloid cascade altering amyloid beta pathology in the brains of PSAPP mice and modulating components of the oxidative stress response that has been implicated in the neurodegenerative changes that occur with Alzheimer's disease. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Mammalian prion protein (PrP) forms conformationally different amyloid intracellular aggregates in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Bruno; Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Navarro, Susanna; Cordeiro, Yraima; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-11-04

    An increasing number of proteins are being shown to assemble into amyloid structures that lead to pathological states. Among them, mammalian prions outstand due to their ability to transmit the pathogenic conformation, becoming thus infectious. The structural conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), into its misfolded pathogenic form (PrP(Sc)) is the central event of prion-driven pathologies. The study of the structural properties of intracellular amyloid aggregates in general and of prion-like ones in particular is a challenging task. In this context, the evidence that the inclusion bodies formed by amyloid proteins in bacteria display amyloid-like structural and functional properties make them a privileged system to model intracellular amyloid aggregation. Here we provide the first demonstration that recombinant murine PrP and its C-terminal domain (90-231) attain amyloid conformations inside bacteria. Moreover, the inclusions formed by these two PrP proteins display conformational diversity, since they differ in fibril morphology, binding affinity to amyloid dyes, stability, resistance to proteinase K digestion and neurotoxicity. Overall, our results suggest that modelling PrP amyloid formation in microbial cell factories might open an avenue for a better understanding of the structural features modulating the pathogenic impact of this intriguing protein.

  9. Post-mortem histopathology underlying β-amyloid PET imaging following flutemetamol F 18 injection.

    PubMed

    Ikonomovic, Milos D; Buckley, Chris J; Heurling, Kerstin; Sherwin, Paul; Jones, Paul A; Zanette, Michelle; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Ironside, James; Ismail, Azzam; Smith, Colin; Thal, Dietmar R; Beach, Thomas G; Farrar, Gill; Smith, Adrian P L

    2016-12-12

    In vivo imaging of fibrillar β-amyloid deposits may assist clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), aid treatment selection for patients, assist clinical trials of therapeutic drugs through subject selection, and be used as an outcome measure. A recent phase III trial of [(18)F]flutemetamol positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in 106 end-of-life subjects demonstrated the ability to identify fibrillar β-amyloid by comparing in vivo PET to post-mortem histopathology. Post-mortem analyses demonstrated a broad and continuous spectrum of β-amyloid pathology in AD and other dementing and non-dementing disease groups. The GE067-026 trial demonstrated 91% sensitivity and 90% specificity of [(18)F]flutemetamol PET by majority read for the presence of moderate or frequent plaques. The probability of an abnormal [(18)F]flutemetamol scan increased with neocortical plaque density and AD diagnosis. All dementia cases with non-AD neurodegenerative diseases and those without histopathological features of β-amyloid deposits were [(18)F]flutemetamol negative. Majority PET assessments accurately reflected the amyloid plaque burden in 90% of cases. However, ten cases demonstrated a mismatch between PET image interpretations and post-mortem findings. Although tracer retention was best associated with amyloid in neuritic plaques, amyloid in diffuse plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy best explain three [(18)F]flutemetamol positive cases with mismatched (sparse) neuritic plaque burden. Advanced cortical atrophy was associated with the seven false negative [(18)F]flutemetamol images. The interpretation of images from pathologically equivocal cases was associated with low reader confidence and inter-reader agreement. Our results support that amyloid in neuritic plaque burden is the primary form of β-amyloid pathology detectable with [(18)F]flutemetamol PET imaging. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01165554. Registered June 21, 2010; NCT02090855. Registered March 11, 2014.

  10. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is cerebrovascular amyloid deposition. It is classified into several types according to the cerebrovascular amyloid proteins involved [amyloid β-protein (Aβ), cystatin C (ACys), prion protein (APrP), transthyretin (ATTR), gelsolin (AGel), ABri/ADan, and AL]. Sporadic Aβ-type CAA is commonly found in elderly individuals and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). CAA-related disorders include hemorrhagic and ischemic brain lesions and dementia. It has been proposed that cerebrovascular Aβ originates mainly from the brain and is transported to the vascular wall through a perivascular drainage pathway, where it polymerizes into fibrils on vascular basement membrane through interactions with extracellular components. CAA would be promoted by overproduction of Aβ40 (a major molecular species of cerebrovascular Aβ), a decrease of Aβ degradation, or reduction of Aβ clearance due to impairment of perivascular drainage pathway. Further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CAA would lead to development of disease-modifying therapies for CAA and CAA-related disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. BACE2 processes PMEL to form the melanosome amyloid matrix in pigment cells.

    PubMed

    Rochin, Leila; Hurbain, Ilse; Serneels, Lutgarde; Fort, Cecile; Watt, Brenda; Leblanc, Pascal; Marks, Michael S; De Strooper, Bart; Raposo, Graça; van Niel, Guillaume

    2013-06-25

    Amyloids are often associated with pathologic processes such as in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but can also underlie physiological processes such as pigmentation. Formation of pathological and functional amyloidogenic substrates can require precursor processing by proteases, as exemplified by the generation of Aβ peptide from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 and γ-secretase. Proteolytic processing of the pigment cell-specific Melanocyte Protein (PMEL) is also required to form functional amyloid fibrils during melanogenesis, but the enzymes involved are incompletely characterized. Here we show that the BACE1 homologue BACE2 processes PMEL to generate functional amyloids. BACE2 is highly expressed in pigment cells and Bace2(-/-) but not Bace1(-/-) mice display coat color defects, implying a specific role for BACE2 during melanogenesis. By using biochemical and morphological analyses, combined with RNA silencing, pharmacologic inhibition, and BACE2 overexpression in a human melanocytic cell line, we show that BACE2 cleaves the integral membrane form of PMEL within the juxtamembrane domain, releasing the PMEL luminal domain into endosomal precursors for the formation of amyloid fibrils and downstream melanosome morphogenesis. These studies identify an amyloidogenic substrate of BACE2, reveal an important physiological role for BACE2 in pigmentation, and highlight analogies in the generation of PMEL-derived functional amyloids and APP-derived pathological amyloids.

  12. Within-patient correspondence of amyloid-β and intrinsic network connectivity in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Göttler, Jens; Grimmer, Timo; Koch, Kathrin; Ortner, Marion; Neitzel, Julia; Mühlau, Mark; Förster, Stefan; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Riedl, Valentin; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    There is striking overlap between the spatial distribution of amyloidpathology in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and the spatial distribution of high intrinsic functional connectivity in healthy persons. This overlap suggests a mechanistic link between amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity, and indeed there is evidence in patients for the detrimental effects of amyloid-β plaque accumulation on intrinsic connectivity in areas of high connectivity in heteromodal hubs, and particularly in the default mode network. However, the observed spatial extent of amyloid-β exceeds these tightly circumscribed areas, suggesting that previous studies may have underestimated the negative impact of amyloid-β on intrinsic connectivity. We hypothesized that the known positive baseline correlation between patterns of amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity may mask the larger extent of the negative effects of amyloid-β on connectivity. Crucially, a test of this hypothesis requires the within-patient comparison of intrinsic connectivity and amyloid-β distributions. Here we compared spatial patterns of amyloid-β-plaques (measured by Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography) and intrinsic functional connectivity (measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging) in patients with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease via spatial correlations in intrinsic networks covering fronto-parietal heteromodal cortices. At the global network level, we found that amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity patterns were positively correlated in the default mode and several fronto-parietal attention networks, confirming that amyloid-β aggregates in areas of high intrinsic connectivity on a within-network basis. Further, we saw an internetwork gradient of the magnitude of correlation that depended on network plaque-load. After accounting for this globally positive correlation, local amyloid-β-plaque concentration in regions of high connectivity co-varied negatively with

  13. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2016-01-13

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360632-10$15.00/0.

  14. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:26758850

  15. Identification of Inhibitors of CD36-Amyloid Beta Binding as Potential Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Doens, Deborah; Valiente, Pedro A; Mfuh, Adelphe M; X T Vo, Anh; Tristan, Adilia; Carreño, Lizmar; Quijada, Mario; Nguyen, Vu T; Perry, George; Larionov, Oleg V; Lleonart, Ricardo; Fernández, Patricia L

    2017-06-21

    Neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid β has a central role in microglia activation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory mediators that are associated with neuronal toxicity. The recognition of amyloid β by microglia depends on the expression of several receptors implicated in the clearance of amyloid and in cell activation. CD36 receptor expressed on microglia interacts with fibrils of amyloid inducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and amyloid internalization. The interruption of the interaction CD36-amyloid β compromises the activation of microglia cells. We have developed and validated a new colorimetric assay to identify potential inhibitors of the binding of amyloid β to CD36. We have found seven molecules, structural analogues of the Trichodermamide family of natural products that interfere with the interaction CD36-amyloid β. By combining molecular docking and dynamics simulations, we suggested the second fatty acids binding site within the large luminal hydrophobic tunnel, present in the extracellular domain of CD36, as the binding pocket of these compounds. Free energy calculations predicted the nonpolar component as the driving force for the binding of these inhibitors. These molecules also inhibited the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with fibrils of amyloid β. This work serves as a platform for the identification of new potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Melanosomal formation of PMEL core amyloid is driven by aromatic residues

    PubMed Central

    Hee, Jia Shee; Mitchell, Susan M.; Liu, Xinran; Leonhardt, Ralf M.

    2017-01-01

    PMEL is a pigment cell protein that forms physiological amyloid in melanosomes. Many amyloids and/or their oligomeric precursors are toxic, causing or contributing to severe, incurable diseases including Alzheimer’s and prion diseases. Striking similarities in intracellular formation pathways between PMEL and various pathological amyloids including Aβ and PrPSc suggest PMEL is an excellent model system to study endocytic amyloid. Learning how PMEL fibrils assemble without apparent toxicity may help developing novel therapies for amyloid diseases. Here we identify the critical PMEL domain that forms the melanosomal amyloid core (CAF). An unbiased alanine-scanning screen covering the entire region combined with quantitative electron microscopy analysis of the full set of mutants uncovers numerous essential residues. Many of these rely on aromaticity for function suggesting a role for π-stacking in melanosomal amyloid assembly. Various mutants are defective in amyloid nucleation. This extensive data set informs the first structural model of the CAF and provides insights into how the melanosomal amyloid core forms. PMID:28272432

  17. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  18. Amyloid myopathy: characteristic features of a still underdiagnosed disease.

    PubMed

    Chapin, John E; Kornfeld, Mario; Harris, Alexis

    2005-02-01

    A 62-year-old man with progressive proximal weakness underwent extensive evaluation including muscle biopsy without a clear diagnosis being established. A repeat muscle biopsy including Congo red-stained sections revealed infiltration of blood-vessel walls and endomysium with amyloid protein, as well as an unusual pattern of pathologic changes to muscle fibers. From a review of 79 cases of amyloid myopathy reported in the English-language literature, the characteristic features of this disorder are described. Congo red-stained sections of muscle biopsy viewed under fluorescent or polarized optics, and serum or urine protein immunoelectrophoresis, play an important role in the evaluation of myopathy. Amyloid myopathy should be a consideration in adults with progressive neuromuscular weakness of uncertain cause.

  19. Amyloid Fibrils as Building Blocks for Natural and Artificial Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Tuomas P J; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Proteinaceous materials based on the amyloid core structure have recently been discovered at the origin of biological functionality in a remarkably diverse set of roles, and attention is increasingly turning towards such structures as the basis of artificial self-assembling materials. These roles contrast markedly with the original picture of amyloid fibrils as inherently pathological structures. Here we outline the salient features of this class of functional materials, both in the context of the functional roles that have been revealed for amyloid fibrils in nature, as well as in relation to their potential as artificial materials. We discuss how amyloid materials exemplify the emergence of function from protein self-assembly at multiple length scales. We focus on the connections between mesoscale structure and material function, and demonstrate how the natural examples of functional amyloids illuminate the potential applications for future artificial protein based materials.

  20. Imaging amyloid in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2009-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease with later dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are pathologically characterized by the presence of intraneuronal Lewy inclusion bodies, amyloid deposition is also associated to varying degrees with both these disorders. Fibrillar amyloid load can now be quantitated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) using imaging biomarkers. Here the reported findings of 11C-PIB PET studies concerning the amyloid load associated with PD and its influence on dementia are reviewed. It is concluded that the presence of amyloid acts to accelerate the dementia process in Lewy body disorders, though has little influence on its nature. Anti-amyloid strategies could be a relevant approach for slowing dementia in a number of DLB and PDD cases.

  1. 18F-AV-1451 PET Imaging in Three Patients with Probable Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Hanna; Werring, David J; Jang, Young Kyoung; Kim, Yeo Jin; Lee, Jin San; Lee, Juyoun; Jun, Soomin; Park, Seongbeom; Ryu, Young Hoon; Choi, Jae Yong; Cho, Young Seok; Moon, Seung Hwan; Na, Duk L; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Seo, Sang Won

    2017-03-06

    Cerebrovascular deposition of amyloid-β, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is associated with MRI findings of lobar hemorrhage, cerebral microbleeds, and cortical superficial siderosis. Although pathological studies suggest that tau may co-localize with vascular amyloid, this has not yet been investigated in CAA in vivo. Three patients with probable CAA underwent 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET or 18F-florbetaben PET to evaluate amyloid burden, and 18F-AV-1451 PET to evaluate paired helical filament tau burden. Regions that had cerebral microbleeds or cortical superficial siderosis largely overlapped with those showing increased 18F-AV-1451 and increased 11C-PiB uptake. Our preliminary study raised the possibility that lobar cerebral microbleeds, and cortical superficial siderosis, which are characteristic markers of vascular amyloid, may be associated with local production of paired helical filament tau.

  2. Technical Considerations on Scanning and Image Analysis for Amyloid PET in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Go; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Yasuji; Senda, Michio

    Brain imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), can provide essential and objective information for the early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Amyloid PET is especially useful to evaluate the amyloidpathological process as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews critical points about technical considerations on the scanning and image analysis methods for amyloid PET. Each amyloid PET agent has its own proper administration instructions and recommended uptake time, scan duration, and the method of image display and interpretation. In addition, we have introduced general scanning information, including subject positioning, reconstruction parameters, and quantitative and statistical image analysis. We believe that this article could make amyloid PET a more reliable tool in clinical study and practice.

  3. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  4. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  5. Amyloids: from Pathogenesis to Function.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, A A; Antonets, K S; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    2015-09-01

    The term "amyloids" refers to fibrillar protein aggregates with cross-β structure. They have been a subject of intense scrutiny since the middle of the previous century. First, this interest is due to association of amyloids with dozens of incurable human diseases called amyloidoses, which affect hundreds of millions of people. However, during the last decade the paradigm of amyloids as pathogens has changed due to an increase in understanding of their role as a specific variant of quaternary protein structure essential for the living cell. Thus, functional amyloids are found in all domains of the living world, and they fulfill a variety of roles ranging from biofilm formation in bacteria to long-term memory regulation in higher eukaryotes. Prions, which are proteins capable of existing under the same conditions in two or more conformations at least one of which having infective properties, also typically have amyloid features. There are weighty reasons to believe that the currently known amyloids are only a minority of their real number. This review provides a retrospective analysis of stages in the development of amyloid biology that during the last decade resulted, on one hand, in reinterpretation of the biological role of amyloids, and on the other hand, in the development of systems biology of amyloids, or amyloidomics.

  6. Antimicrobial Properties of Amyloid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Jang, Hyunbum; Capone, Ricardo; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    More than two dozen clinical syndromes known as amyloid diseases are characterized by the buildup of extended insoluble fibrillar deposits in tissues. These amorphous Congo red staining deposits known as amyloids exhibit a characteristic green birefringence and cross-β structure. Substantial evidence implicates oligomeric intermediates of amyloids as toxic species in the pathogenesis of these chronic disease states. A growing body of data has suggested that these toxic species form ion channels in cellular membranes causing disruption of calcium homeostasis, membrane depolarization, energy drainage, and in some cases apoptosis. Amyloid peptide channels exhibit a number of common biological properties including the universal U-shape β-strand-turn-β-strand structure, irreversible and spontaneous insertion into membranes, production of large heterogeneous single-channel conductances, relatively poor ion selectivity, inhibition by Congo red, and channel blockade by zinc. Recent evidence has suggested that increased amounts of amyloids are not only toxic to its host target cells but also possess antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, at least one human antimicrobial peptide, protegrin-1, which kills microbes by a channel-forming mechanism, has been shown to possess the ability to form extended amyloid fibrils very similar to those of classic disease-forming amyloids. In this paper, we will review the reported antimicrobial properties of amyloids and the implications of these discoveries for our understanding of amyloid structure and function. PMID:22081976

  7. Accumulation of amyloid in cognitive impairment after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Tai; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Kun-Ju; Hu, Chaur-Jong

    2015-02-15

    Recent epidemiology studies have indicated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are pathological indicators of AD. The accumulation of Aβ is considered the first step of AD pathophysiology. Compelling studies have supported the hypothesis that TBI accelerates the formation and accumulation of Aβ. These findings could link TBI with AD, although the research that reported these findings had limitations, particularly regarding mild TBI (mTBI) patients. The effects of mTBI on Aβ accumulation remain uncertain because of a lack of mTBI pathology data. Using amyloid-positron emission tomography (amyloid-PET), researchers can help to determine whether mTBI increases the accumulation of Aβ, which might be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of mTBI in AD, and could be a target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases associated with TBI. In this study, we recruited 27 mTBI patients with mTBI in mean 6years before this study (21 mTBI patients without cognitive impairment, 6 mTBI patients with cognitive impairment,) and 10 controls. All of them underwent mini-mental state examination, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping, and amyloid-PET. The results show an increase of amyloid accumulation and allele frequency of APOE4 in the mTBI patients with cognitive impairment. These findings indicate that amyloid accumulation is an important indicator of cognitive impairment, and amyloid-PET should be a safe and useful tool for diagnosing amyloid-related cognitive impairment. APOE allele might play a role in the occurrence of cognitive impairment after mTBI. The contribution of mTBI to the amyloid accumulation requires further study, and mTBI patients should be recruited for longitudinal research with repeated amyloid-PET studies.

  8. Brain amyloid and cognition in Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Stephen N; Locascio, Joseph J; Marquie, Marta; Santarlasci, Andrea L; Rentz, Dorene M; Maye, Jacqueline; Johnson, Keith A; Growdon, John H

    2012-07-01

    Many patients with PD develop PD with dementia (PDD), a syndrome that overlaps clinically and pathologically with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB); PDD and DLB differ chiefly in the relative timing of dementia and parkinsonism. Brain amyloid deposition is an early feature of DLB and may account, in part, for its early dementia. We sought to confirm this hypothesis and also to determine whether amyloid accumulation contributes to cognitive impairment and dementia in the broad range of parkinsonian diseases. Twenty-nine cognitively healthy PD, 14 PD subjects with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), 18 with DLB, 12 with PDD, and 85 healthy control subjects (HCS) underwent standardized neurologic and neuropsychological examinations and Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) imaging with PET. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotypes were obtained in many patients. PiB retention was expressed as the distribution volume ratio using a cerebellar tissue reference. PiB retention was significantly higher in DLB than in any of the other diagnostic groups. PiB retention did not differ across PDD, PD-MCI, PD, and HCS. Amyloid burden increased with age and with the presence of the ApoE ε4 allele in all patient groups. Only in the DLB group was amyloid deposition associated with impaired cognition. DLB subjects have higher amyloid burden than subjects with PDD, PD-MCI, PD, or HCS; amyloid deposits are linked to cognitive impairment only in DLB. Early amyloid deposits in DLB relative to PDD may account for their difference in the timing of dementia and parkinsonism.

  9. The role of β-amyloid peptide in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, A V; Bystryak, S; Galzitskaya, O V

    2011-09-01

    Studies of neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs) are drawing more attention of researchers worldwide due to the high incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathophysiology of such disorders is, in part, characterized by the transition of a wild-type peptide from its native conformation into a very stable pathological isoform. Subsequently, these abnormal proteins form aggregates of amyloid fibrils that continuously increase in size. Changes in the metabolic processes of neurons (e.g. oxidative stress, hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein, and resulting secondary changes in the cell metabolism) ultimately lead to cell death. We hypothesize that extracellular deposition of β-amyloid peptide fibrils and neurofibrillary tangles represents the body's adaptation mechanism, aimed at preservation of autonomic functioning; while the cognitive decline is severe, the rest of the organ systems remain unaffected and continue to function. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that destruction of pathological plaques, fibrils, and tangles and the use of vaccines targeting β-amyloid result in undesirable side effects. To gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and to develop novel therapies, continued studies of the sporadic form of disease and the mechanisms triggering conformational changes in β-amyloid peptide fragments are essential. This review is focused on studies investigating the formation of amyloid fibrils and their role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss a related disorder--amyloidosis--where formation of fibrils, tangles, and plaques leads to neuronal death which may occur as a result of a failed adaptation process. Further in-depth investigation and comprehensive analysis of alterations in the metabolism of APP, β-amyloid, and tau protein, which have a pathological effect on cell membrane, alter phosphate exchange, and impair other key metabolic functions of the cell long before the

  10. Bacterial Inclusion Bodies Contain Amyloid-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Maji, Samir K; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David; Riek, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a process in which identical proteins self-associate into imperfectly ordered macroscopic entities. Such aggregates are generally classified as amorphous, lacking any long-range order, or highly ordered fibrils. Protein fibrils can be composed of native globular molecules, such as the hemoglobin molecules in sickle-cell fibrils, or can be reorganized β-sheet–rich aggregates, termed amyloid-like fibrils. Amyloid fibrils are associated with several pathological conditions in humans, including Alzheimer disease and diabetes type II. We studied the structure of bacterial inclusion bodies, which have been believed to belong to the amorphous class of aggregates. We demonstrate that all three in vivo-derived inclusion bodies studied are amyloid-like and comprised of amino-acid sequence-specific cross-β structure. These findings suggest that inclusion bodies are structured, that amyloid formation is an omnipresent process both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and that amino acid sequences evolve to avoid the amyloid conformation. PMID:18684013

  11. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  12. CD33 Alzheimer's disease locus: altered monocyte function and amyloid biology.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Chibnik, Lori B; Keenan, Brendan T; Ottoboni, Linda; Raj, Towfique; Tang, Anna; Rosenkrantz, Laura L; Imboywa, Selina; Lee, Michelle; Von Korff, Alina; Morris, Martha C; Evans, Denis A; Johnson, Keith; Sperling, Reisa A; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2013-07-01

    In our functional dissection of the CD33 Alzheimer's disease susceptibility locus, we found that the rs3865444(C) risk allele was associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in the monocytes (t50 = 10.06, P(joint) = 1.3 × 10(-13)) of young and older individuals. It was also associated with diminished internalization of amyloid-β 42 peptide, accumulation of neuritic amyloid pathology and fibrillar amyloid on in vivo imaging, and increased numbers of activated human microglia.

  13. Familial British dementia: colocalization of furin and ABri amyloid.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Claudia; Hosokawa, Masato; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McGeer, Patrick L

    2003-09-01

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by a point mutation in the stop codon of the BRI gene. This mutation extends the normal precursor protein (PP) of 266 amino acids to the next stop codon, which is at amino acid 277. Kim and colleagues demonstrated in vitro that furin can process both the normal protein BriPP and the extended protein ABriPP to produce C-terminal fragments of 23 and 34 amino acids. The abnormal C-terminal fragment, ABri, accumulates in FBD in the form of extracellular amyloid deposits. The objective of our study was to determine if furin is associated with ABri in FBD. Brain tissue of one case of FBD, four cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and two controls were studied by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against furin, beta-amyloid protein and ABri. In FBD, furin was found to be colocalized with ABri deposits and amyloid angiopathy in all areas examined. In contrast beta-amyloid deposits in AD were not immunostained by the furin antibody. In normal as well as pathological cases, clusters of neurons in the hippocampus and neocortex showed light to moderate furin immunostaining, while peptidergic neurons of the hypothalamus showed intense furin-immunostaining. These data suggest that furin may be involved in producing the pathological fragment of ABriPP in vivo and that inhibition of furin might be a method of treating this disorder.

  14. Morin hydrate inhibits amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide and disaggregates amyloid fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Harris; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    The polypeptide hormone Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP, amylin) is responsible for islet amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes and in islet cell transplants, where it may contribute to graft failure. Human IAPP is extremely amyloidogenic and fewer inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation have been reported than for the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide or for α-synuclein. The ability of a set of hydroxyflavones to inhibit IAPP amyloid formation was tested. Fluorescence detected thioflavin-T-binding assays are the most popular methods for measuring the kinetics of amyloid formation and for screening potential inhibitors; however, we show that they can lead to false positives with hydroxyflavones. Several of the compounds inhibit thioflavin-T fluorescence, but not amyloid formation; a result which highlights the hazards of relying solely on thioflavin-T assays to screen potential inhibitors. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and right-angle light scattering show that Morin hydrate (2′,3,4′,5,7-Pentahydroxyflavone) inhibits amyloid formation by human IAPP and disaggregates preformed IAPP amyloid fibers. In contrast, Myricetin, Kaempferol, and Quercetin, which differ only in hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, are not effective inhibitors. Morin hydrate represents a new type of IAPP amyloid inhibitor and the results with the other compounds highlight the importance of the substitution pattern on the B-ring. PMID:22238175

  15. Cytosolic proteins lose solubility as amyloid deposits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer-type amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guilian; Stevens, Stanley M.; Moore, Brenda D.; McClung, Scott; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular accumulation of β-amyloid peptide is a key trigger in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In humans, amyloid deposition precedes the appearance of intracellular inclusion pathology formed by cytosolic proteins such as Tau, α-synuclein and TDP-43. These secondary pathologies have not been observed in mice that model Alzheimer-type amyloidosis by expressing mutant amyloid precursor protein, with or without mutant presenilin 1. The lack of secondary pathology in these models has made it difficult to establish how amyloid deposition initiates the cascade of events that leads to secondary intracellular pathology that characterizes human AD. In transgenic mice that model Alzheimer-type amyloidosis, we sought to determine whether there is evidence of altered cytosolic protein folding by assessing whether amyloid deposition causes normally soluble proteins to misfold. Using a method that involved detergent extraction and sedimentation coupled with proteomic approaches, we identified numerous cytosolic proteins that show specific losses in solubility as amyloid accumulates. The proteins identified included glycolytic enzymes and members of the 14-3-3 chaperone family. A substantial accumulation of lysine 48-linked polyubiquitin was also detected. Overall, the data demonstrate that the accumulation of amyloid by some manner causes the loss of solubility intracellular cytosolic proteins. PMID:23512986

  16. Amyloid pore-channel hypothesis: effect of ethanol on aggregation state using frog oocytes for an Alzheimer's disease study.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge; Ormeño, David; Ochoa-de la Paz, Lenin D

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease severely compromises cognitive function. One of the mechanisms to explain the pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been the hypotheses of amyloid-pore/channel formation by complex Aβ-aggregates. Clinical studies suggested the moderate alcohol consumption can reduces probability developing neurodegenerative pathologies. A recent report explored the ability of ethanol to disrupt the generation of complex Aβ in vitro and reduce the toxicity in two cell lines. Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to understand how ethanol blocks the aggregation of amyloid. On the other hand, the in silico modeling showed ethanol effect over the dynamics assembling for complex Aβ-aggregates mediated by break the hydrosaline bridges between Asp 23 and Lys 28, was are key element for amyloid dimerization. The amyloid pore/channel hypothesis has been explored only in neuronal models, however recently experiments suggested the frog oocytes such an excellent model to explore the mechanism of the amyloid pore/channel hypothesis. So, the used of frog oocytes to explored the mechanism of amyloid aggregates is new, mainly for amyloid/pore hypothesis. Therefore, this experimental model is a powerful tool to explore the mechanism implicates in the Alzheimer's disease pathology and also suggests a model to prevent the Alzheimer's disease pathology.

  17. Effects of injected Alzheimer beta-amyloid cores in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Frautschy, S A; Baird, A; Cole, G M

    1991-01-01

    Although amyloid deposits have long been known to accumulate in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, their origin and significance remain speculative. Because of the lack of an in vivo model where amyloid deposits can be induced, the relationship of the extracellular beta-amyloid deposits to other AD pathology has never been directly investigated. Therefore, we injected SDS-isolated amyloid cores into rat cortex and hippocampus. Similarly isolated lipofuscin fractions from control human brains were injected on the contralateral side. Rats were perfused and brains were examined immunohistochemically at 2 days, 7 days, and 1 month after injection. Alz-50, a monoclonal antibody against abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins, stained neurons along the cortical needle track at 2 but not 7 days after injection of either amyloid or lipofuscin. At 1 month, however, ubiquitin, Alz-50 antigen, and silver-positive structures were observed only in response to amyloid. In 7 of 10 animals, there was considerable neuronal loss in the hippocampal layers. In each instance, these effects were in the immediate vicinity of beta-protein immunoreactive material. Marked neuronal loss was never observed at any time after lipofuscin injection. These results indicate a neuronal response to amyloid. When preparations of mature plaque amyloid isolated from the AD brain are injected into the rat brain, they exert neurotoxic effects and induce antigens found in the AD brain. Images PMID:1924295

  18. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Betaine suppressed Aβ generation by altering amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Ping; Qian, Xiang; Xie, Yue; Qi, Yan; Peng, Min-Feng; Zhan, Bi-Cui; Lou, Zheng-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Betaine was an endogenous catabolite of choline, which could be isolated from vegetables and marine products. Betaine could promote the metabolism of homocysteine in healthy subjects and was used for hyperlipidemia, coronary atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in clinic. Recent findings shown that Betaine rescued neuronal damage due to homocysteine induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathological cascade, including tau hyperphosphorylation and amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Aβ was derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and was a triggering factor for AD pathological onset. Here, we demonstrated that Betaine reduced Aβ levels by altering APP processing in N2a cells stably expressing Swedish mutant of APP. Betaine increased α-secretase activity, but decreased β-secretase activity. Our data indicate that Betaine might play a protective role in Aβ production.

  20. Dynamics of the formation of a hydrogel by a pathogenic amyloid peptide: islet amyloid polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Létitia; Lee, Chiu Fan; Hodder, Peter; Hawkins, Nick; Vaux, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic degenerative diseases result from aggregation of misfolded polypeptides to form amyloids. Many amyloidogenic polypeptides are surfactants and their assembly can be catalysed by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (an air-water interface in-vitro or membranes in-vivo). We recently demonstrated the specificity of surface-induced amyloidogenesis but the mechanisms of amyloidogenesis and more specifically of adsorption at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces remain poorly understood. Thus, it is critical to determine how amyloidogenic polypeptides behave at interfaces. Here we used surface tensiometry, rheology and electron microscopy to demonstrate the complex dynamics of gelation by full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide (involved in type II diabetes) both in the bulk solution and at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (air-water interface and phospholipids). We show that the hydrogel consists of a 3D supramolecular network of fibrils. We also assessed the role of solvation and dissected the evolution over time of the assembly processes. Amyloid gelation could have important pathological consequences for membrane integrity and cellular functions. PMID:27535008

  1. Alzheimer's abeta(1-40) amyloid fibrils feature size-dependent mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiping; Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-05-19

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates that are associated with several pathological processes, including prion propagation and Alzheimer's disease. A key issue in amyloid science is the need to understand the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and fibers to quantify biomechanical interactions with surrounding tissues, and to identify mechanobiological mechanisms associated with changes of material properties as amyloid fibrils grow from nanoscale to microscale structures. Here we report a series of computational studies in which atomistic simulation, elastic network modeling, and finite element simulation are utilized to elucidate the mechanical properties of Alzheimer's Abeta(1-40) amyloid fibrils as a function of the length of the protein filament for both twofold and threefold symmetric amyloid fibrils. We calculate the elastic constants associated with torsional, bending, and tensile deformation as a function of the size of the amyloid fibril, covering fibril lengths ranging from nanometers to micrometers. The resulting Young's moduli are found to be consistent with available experimental measurements obtained from long amyloid fibrils, and predicted to be in the range of 20-31 GPa. Our results show that Abeta(1-40) amyloid fibrils feature a remarkable structural stability and mechanical rigidity for fibrils longer than approximately 100 nm. However, local instabilities that emerge at the ends of short fibrils (on the order of tens of nanometers) reduce their stability and contribute to their disassociation under extreme mechanical or chemical conditions, suggesting that longer amyloid fibrils are more stable. Moreover, we find that amyloids with lengths shorter than the periodicity of their helical pitch, typically between 90 and 130 nm, feature significant size effects of their bending stiffness due the anisotropy in the fibril's cross section. At even smaller lengths (50 nm), shear effects dominate lateral deformation of amyloid fibrils

  2. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a cocktail of compounds

  3. Apoptosis induced by islet amyloid polypeptide soluble oligomers is neutralized by diabetes-associated specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bram, Yaron; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Yanai, Inbal; Gilead, Sharon; Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Amdursky, Nadav; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    Soluble oligomeric assemblies of amyloidal proteins appear to act as major pathological agents in several degenerative disorders. Isolation and characterization of these oligomers is a pivotal step towards determination of their pathological relevance. Here we describe the isolation of Type 2 diabetes-associated islet amyloid polypeptide soluble cytotoxic oligomers; these oligomers induced apoptosis in cultured pancreatic cells, permeated model lipid vesicles and interacted with cell membranes following complete internalization. Moreover, antibodies which specifically recognized these assemblies, but not monomers or amyloid fibrils, were exclusively identified in diabetic patients and were shown to neutralize the apoptotic effect induced by these oligomers. Our findings support the notion that human IAPP peptide can form highly toxic oligomers. The presence of antibodies identified in the serum of diabetic patients confirms the pathological relevance of the oligomers. In addition, the newly identified structural epitopes may also provide new mechanistic insights and a molecular target for future therapy. PMID:24589570

  4. Apoptosis induced by islet amyloid polypeptide soluble oligomers is neutralized by diabetes-associated specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bram, Yaron; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Yanai, Inbal; Gilead, Sharon; Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Amdursky, Nadav; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-03-04

    Soluble oligomeric assemblies of amyloidal proteins appear to act as major pathological agents in several degenerative disorders. Isolation and characterization of these oligomers is a pivotal step towards determination of their pathological relevance. Here we describe the isolation of Type 2 diabetes-associated islet amyloid polypeptide soluble cytotoxic oligomers; these oligomers induced apoptosis in cultured pancreatic cells, permeated model lipid vesicles and interacted with cell membranes following complete internalization. Moreover, antibodies which specifically recognized these assemblies, but not monomers or amyloid fibrils, were exclusively identified in diabetic patients and were shown to neutralize the apoptotic effect induced by these oligomers. Our findings support the notion that human IAPP peptide can form highly toxic oligomers. The presence of antibodies identified in the serum of diabetic patients confirms the pathological relevance of the oligomers. In addition, the newly identified structural epitopes may also provide new mechanistic insights and a molecular target for future therapy.

  5. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  6. A pilot study to assess effects of long-term inhalation of airborne particulate matter on early Alzheimer-like changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Dhaval P; Puig, Kendra L; Gorr, Matthew W; Wold, Loren E; Combs, Colin K

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollutants, including particulate matter, results in activation of the brain inflammatory response and Alzheimer disease (AD)-like pathology in dogs and humans. However, the length of time required for inhalation of ambient particulate matter to influence brain inflammation and AD pathology is less clear. Here, we studied the effect of 3 and 9 months of air particulate matter (<2.5 μm diameter, PM2.5) exposure on brain inflammatory phenotype and pathological hallmarks of AD in C57BL/6 mice. Using western blot, ELISA, and cytokine array analysis we quantified brain APP, beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE), oligomeric protein, total Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 levels, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, HNE-Michael adducts, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), glial markers (GFAP, Iba-1), pre- and post- synaptic markers (synaptophysin and PSD-95), cyclooxygenase (COX-1, COX-2) levels, and the cytokine profile in PM2.5 exposed and filtered air control mice. Only 9 month PM2.5 exposure increased BACE protein levels, APP processing, and Aβ 1-40 levels. This correlated with a concomitant increase in COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels and a modest alteration in the cytokine profile. These data support the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to airborne particulate matter has the potential to alter brain inflammatory phenotype and promote development of early AD-like pathology.

  7. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  8. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  9. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  10. Structural origin of polymorphism of Alzheimer's amyloid β-fibrils.

    PubMed

    Agopian, Audrey; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-10-01

    Formation of senile plaques containing amyloid fibrils of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Unlike globular proteins, which fold into unique structures, the fibrils of Aβ and other amyloid proteins often contain multiple polymorphs. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils leads to different toxicity in amyloid diseases and may be the basis for prion strains, but the structural origin for fibril polymorphism is still elusive. In the present study we investigate the structural origin of two major fibril polymorphs of Aβ40: an untwisted polymorph formed under agitated conditions and a twisted polymorph formed under quiescent conditions. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we studied the inter-strand side-chain interactions at 14 spin-labelled positions in the Aβ40 sequence. The results of the present study show that the agitated fibrils have stronger inter-strand spin-spin interactions at most of the residue positions investigated. The two hydrophobic regions at residues 17-20 and 31-36 have the strongest interactions in agitated fibrils. Distance estimates on the basis of the spin exchange frequencies suggest that inter-strand distances at residues 17, 20, 32, 34 and 36 in agitated fibrils are approximately 0.2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer than in quiescent fibrils. We propose that the strength of inter-strand side-chain interactions determines the degree of β-sheet twist, which then leads to the different association patterns between different cross β-units and thus distinct fibril morphologies. Therefore the inter-strand side-chain interaction may be a structural origin for fibril polymorphism in Aβ and other amyloid proteins.

  11. [Carpal tunnel syndrome, amyloid tenosynovitis and periodic hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Clanet, M; Mansat, M; Durroux, R; Testut, M F; Guiraud, B; Rascol, A; Conte, J

    1981-01-01

    Since 1975, various entrapment neuropathies have been reported in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis, the most frequent being the carpal tunnel syndrome. Ten patients on chronic haemodialysis developing 15 carpal tunnel syndromes (5 unilateral and 5 bilateral) are reported. Various causes for the renal failure were present and clinical signs of the carpal tunnel syndrome developed at a late stage. The arteriovenous fistula required for extrarenal epuration was antebrachial and of the laterolateral type, except in one case when it was lateroterminal. The carpal tunnel syndrome was always on the same side as the fistula, developing at a later stage on th contralateral side in the 5 cases of bilateral disorders. Lesions were severe, in 11 of the 15 cases. Some patients noted fluctuations in pain symptoms during haemodialysis, either improving or becoming worse. Gross pathological findings during operation (13 cases) were tenosynovitis with epineural hypervascularisation on the opposite side. In 9 cases, however, atypical hypertrophic tenosynovitis was observed. Histological examination in 12 cases demonstrated typical tenosynovitis in 3 patients, but granulomatous tenosynovitis with amyloid deposits was reported in 9 patients. Lesions were bilateral in 2 cases thus present, on the side opposite to the fistula. Ultrastructural study confirmed the amyloid nature of the deposits in 3 cases, the microfibrillary appearance (80 to 100 A) being characteristic of amyloid substance. This rare complication does not represent a common carpal tunnel syndrome, and three mechanisms may be involved in its induction : peripheral uraemic neuropathy, haemodynamic modifications resulting from the antebrachial arteriovenous shunt, and amyloid formation in the flexor synovial sheaths. In the latter case, the type of amyloid disease may be a primary systemic amyloidosis not previously detected, or an elective amyloid process localised to the tenosynovial and periarticular tissues.

  12. The biochemical aftermath of anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Active and passive immunotherapy in both amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients have resulted in remarkable reductions in amyloid plaque accumulation, although the degree of amyloid regression has been highly variable. Nine individuals with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia were actively immunized with the Aβ peptide 1-42 (AN-1792) and subjected to detailed postmortem biochemical analyses. These patients were compared to 6 non-immunized AD cases and 5 non-demented control (NDC) cases. Results All patients were assessed for the presence of AD pathology including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and vascular amyloidosis. This effort revealed that two immunotherapy recipients had dementia as a consequence of diseases other than AD. Direct neuropathological examination consistently demonstrated small to extensive areas in which amyloid plaques apparently were disrupted. Characterization of Aβ species remnants by ELISA suggested that total Aβ levels may have been reduced, although because the amounts of Aβ peptides among treated individuals were extremely variable, those data must be regarded as tentative. Chromatographic analysis and Western blots revealed abundant dimeric Aβ peptides. SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated a substantive number of Aβ-related peptides, some of them with elongated C-terminal sequences. Pro-inflammatory TNF-α levels were significantly increased in the gray matter of immunized AD cases compared to the NDC and non-immunized AD groups. Conclusions Immunotherapy responses were characterized by extreme variability. Considering the broad range of biological variation that characterizes aging and complicates the recognition of reliable AD biomarkers, such disparities will make the interpretation of outcomes derived from epidemiologic and therapeutic investigations challenging. Although in some cases the apparent removal of amyloid plaques by AN-1792 was impressive

  13. Pyroglutamate formation influences solubility and amyloidogenicity of amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Schlenzig, Dagmar; Manhart, Susanne; Cinar, Yeliz; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Hause, Gerd; Willbold, Dieter; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-07-28

    N-Terminally truncated and pyroglutamate (pGlu) modified amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides are major constituents of amyloid deposits in sporadic and inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of pGlu at the N-terminus confers resistance against cleavage by most aminopeptidases, increases toxicity of the peptides, and may seed Abeta aggregate formation. Similarly, the deposited amyloid peptides ABri and ADan, which cause a very similar histopathology in familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are N-terminally blocked by pGlu. Triggered by the coincidence of pGlu-modified amyloid peptides and similar pathology in AD, FBD, and FDD, we investigated the impact of N-terminal pGlu on biochemical and biophysical properties of Abeta, ABri, and ADan. N-Terminal pGlu increases the hydrophobicity and changes the pH-dependent solubility profile, rendering the pGlu-modified peptides less soluble in the basic pH range. The pGlu residue increases the aggregation propensity of all amyloid peptides as evidenced by ThT fluorescence assays and dynamic light scattering. The far-UV CD spectroscopic analysis points toward an enhanced beta-sheet structure of the pGlu-Abeta. Importantly, changes in fibril morphology are clearly caused by the N-terminal pGlu, resulting in the formation of short fibers, which are frequently arranged in bundles. The effect of pGlu on the morphology is virtually indistinguishable between ABri, ADan, and Abeta. The data provide evidence for a comparable influence of the pGlu modification on the aggregation process of structurally different amyloid peptides, thus likely contributing to the molecularly distinct neurodegenerative diseases AD, FBD, and FDD. The main driving force for the aggregation is apparently an increase in the hydrophobicity and thus an accelerated seed formation.

  14. Age-Dependent Protein Aggregation Initiates Amyloid-β Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Nicole; Bühler, Anika; Huang, Chaolie; Li, Ka Wan; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B.; Fändrich, Marcus; Baumann, Frank; David, Della C.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological protein aggregation such as Alzheimer’s disease. Although aging is an important player, it remains unknown which molecular changes are relevant for disease initiation. Recently, it has become apparent that widespread protein aggregation is a common feature of aging. Indeed, several studies demonstrate that 100s of proteins become highly insoluble with age, in the absence of obvious disease processes. Yet it remains unclear how these misfolded proteins aggregating with age affect neurodegenerative diseases. Importantly, several of these aggregation-prone proteins are found as minor components in disease-associated hallmark aggregates such as amyloid-β plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. This co-localization raises the possibility that age-dependent protein aggregation directly contributes to pathological aggregation. Here, we show for the first time that highly insoluble proteins from aged Caenorhabditis elegans or aged mouse brains, but not from young individuals, can initiate amyloid-β aggregation in vitro. We tested the seeding potential at four different ages across the adult lifespan of C. elegans. Significantly, protein aggregates formed during the early stages of aging did not act as seeds for amyloid-β aggregation. Instead, we found that changes in protein aggregation occurring during middle-age initiated amyloid-β aggregation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed several late-aggregating proteins that were previously identified as minor components of amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles such as 14-3-3, Ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 1 and Lamin A/C, highlighting these as strong candidates for cross-seeding. Overall, we demonstrate that widespread protein misfolding and aggregation with age could be critical for the initiation of pathogenesis, and thus should be targeted by therapeutic strategies to alleviate neurodegenerative

  15. β-cell loss and β-cell apoptosis in human type 2 diabetes are related to islet amyloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Catherine A; Toukatly, Mirna N; Fligner, Corinne L; Udayasankar, Jayalakshmi; Subramanian, Shoba L; Zraika, Sakeneh; Aston-Mourney, Kathryn; Carr, Darcy B; Westermark, Per; Westermark, Gunilla T; Kahn, Steven E; Hull, Rebecca L

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid deposition and reduced β-cell mass are pathological hallmarks of the pancreatic islet in type 2 diabetes; however, whether the extent of amyloid deposition is associated with decreased β-cell mass is debated. We investigated the possible relationship and, for the first time, determined whether increased islet amyloid and/or decreased β-cell area quantified on histological sections is correlated with increased β-cell apoptosis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human pancreas sections from subjects with (n = 29) and without (n = 39) diabetes were obtained at autopsy (64 ± 2 and 70 ± 4 islets/subject, respectively). Amyloid and β cells were visualized by thioflavin S and insulin immunolabeling. Apoptotic β cells were detected by colabeling for insulin and by TUNEL. Diabetes was associated with increased amyloid deposition, decreased β-cell area, and increased β-cell apoptosis, as expected. There was a strong inverse correlation between β-cell area and amyloid deposition (r = -0.42, P < 0.001). β-Cell area was selectively reduced in individual amyloid-containing islets from diabetic subjects, compared with control subjects, but amyloid-free islets had β-cell area equivalent to islets from control subjects. Increased amyloid deposition was associated with β-cell apoptosis (r = 0.56, P < 0.01). Thus, islet amyloid is associated with decreased β-cell area and increased β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that islet amyloid deposition contributes to the decreased β-cell mass that characterizes type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel effects of FCCP [carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone] on amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Connop, B P; Thies, R L; Beyreuther, K; Ida, N; Reiner, P B

    1999-04-01

    Amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Because it has been suggested that catabolic processing of the APP holoprotein occurs in acidic intracellular compartments, we studied the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the H+-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 on APP catabolism in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either wild-type or "Swedish" mutant APP. Unlike bafilomycin A1, which inhibits beta-amyloid production in cells expressing mutant but not wild-type APP, FCCP inhibited beta-amyloid production in both cell types. Moreover, the effects of FCCP were independent of alterations in total cellular APP levels or APP maturation, and the concentrations used did not alter either cellular ATP levels or cell viability. Bafilomycin A1, which had no effect on beta-amyloid production in wild-type cells, inhibited endocytosis of fluorescent transferrin, whereas concentrations of FCCP that inhibited beta-amyloid production in these cells had no effect on endosomal function. Thus, in wild-type-expressing cells it appears that the beta-amyloid peptide is not produced in the classically defined endosome. Although bafilomycin A1 decreased beta-amyloid release from cells expressing mutant APP but not wild-type APP, it altered lysosomal function in both cell types, suggesting that in normal cells beta-amyloid is not produced in the lysosome. Although inhibition of beta-amyloid production by bafilomycin A1 in mutant cells may occur via changes in endosomal/lysosomal pH, our data suggest that FCCP inhibits wild-type beta-amyloid production by acting on a bafilomycin A1-insensitive acidic compartment that is distinct from either the endosome or the lysosome.

  17. Amyloid deposits derived from transthyretin in the ligamentum flavum as related to lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Akihiro; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Sueyoshi, Takanao; Okada, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Toru; Ogi, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Keisuke; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Misumi, Yohei; Oshima, Toshinori; Jono, Hirofumi; Obayashi, Konen; Hirakawa, Kei; Uchida, Hitoshi; Westermark, Per; Ando, Yukio; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Amyloidosis is a protein conformational disorder with the distinctive feature of extracellular accumulation of amyloid fibrils that come from different proteins. In the ligamentum flavum of the lumbar spine, amyloid deposits were frequently found in elderly patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and were at least partially formed by wild-type transthyretin. However, how amyloid deposits in the ligamentum flavum affect lumbar spinal canal stenosis has remained unclear. In this study, we analyzed clinical, pathologic, and radiologic findings of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who had amyloid deposits in the ligamentum flavum. We studied 95 ligamentum flavum specimens obtained from 56 patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and 21 ligamentum flavum specimens obtained from 19 patients with lumbar disk herniation. We evaluated histopathologic findings and clinicoradiologic manifestations, such as thickness of the ligamentum flavum and lumbar spinal segmental instability. We found that all 95 ligamentum flavum specimens resected from patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis had amyloid deposits, which we classified into two types, transthyretin-positive and transthyretin-negative, and that transthyretin amyloid formation in the ligamentum flavum of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis was an age-associated phenomenon. The amount of amyloid in the ligamentum flavum was related to clinical manifestations of lumbar spinal canal stenosis, such as thickness of the ligamentum flavum and lumbar spinal segmental instability, in the patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis with transthyretin-positive amyloid deposits. To our knowledge, this report is the first to show clinicopathologic correlations in transthyretin amyloid deposits of the ligamentum flavum. In conclusion, transthyretin amyloid deposits in the ligamentum flavum may be related to the pathogenesis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis in elderly patients.

  18. Large Proteins Have a Great Tendency to Aggregate but a Low Propensity to Form Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Hassan; Parrini, Claudia; Relini, Annalisa; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Mannini, Benedetta; Pesce, Alessandra; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB) to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i) low pH with salts, (ii) pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein. PMID:21249193

  19. Mammalian prion amyloid formation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Bruno; Cordeiro, Yraima; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prion proteins (PrPs) that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are misfolded conformations of the host cellular PrP. The misfolded form, the scrapie PrP (PrPSc), can aggregate into amyloid fibrils that progressively accumulate in the brain, evolving to a pathological phenotype. A particular characteristic of PrPSc is to be found as different strains, related to the diversity of conformational states it can adopt. Prion strains are responsible for the multiple phenotypes observed in prion diseases, presenting different incubation times and diverse deposition profiles in the brain. PrP biochemical properties are also strain-dependent, such as different digestion pattern after proteolysis and different stability. Although they have long been studied, strain formation is still a major unsolved issue in prion biology. The recreation of strain-specific conformational features is of fundamental importance to study this unique pathogenic phenomenon. In our recent paper, we described that murine PrP, when expressed in bacteria, forms amyloid inclusion bodies that possess different strain-like characteristics, depending on the PrP construct. Here, we present an extra-view of these data and propose that bacteria might become a successful model to generate preparative amounts of prion strain-specific assemblies for high-resolution structural analysis as well as for addressing the determinants of infectivity and transmissibility. PMID:26910379

  20. CD36 upregulation mediated by intranasal LV-NRF2 treatment mitigates hypoxia-induced progression of Alzheimer's-like pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Zhan-You; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu; An, Li

    2014-12-01

    There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression.

  1. Amyloid imaging in the differential diagnosis of dementia: review and potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, positron emission tomography (PET) with carbon-11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) has revolutionized the neuroimaging of aging and dementia by enabling in vivo detection of amyloid plaques, a core pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Studies suggest that PIB-PET is sensitive for AD pathology, can distinguish AD from non-AD dementia (for example, frontotemporal lobar degeneration), and can help determine whether mild cognitive impairment is due to AD. Although the short half-life of the carbon-11 radiolabel has thus far limited the use of PIB to research, a second generation of tracers labeled with fluorine-18 has made it possible for amyloid PET to enter the clinical era. In the present review, we summarize the literature on amyloid imaging in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. We focus on potential clinical applications of amyloid PET and its role in the differential diagnosis of dementia. We suggest that amyloid imaging will be particularly useful in the evaluation of mildly affected, clinically atypical or early age-at-onset patients, and illustrate this with case vignettes from our practice. We emphasize that amyloid imaging should supplement (not replace) a detailed clinical evaluation. We caution against screening asymptomatic individuals, and discuss the limited positive predictive value in older populations. Finally, we review limitations and unresolved questions related to this exciting new technique. PMID:22071129

  2. APP processing and amyloid deposition in mice haplo-insufficient for presenilin 1.

    PubMed

    Jankowsky, Joanna L; Slunt, Hilda H; Gonzales, Victoria; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Borchelt, David R

    2004-08-01

    More than 70 different mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1) have been associated with inherited early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). How all these different mutations cause disease has not been clearly delineated. Our laboratory has previously shown that co-expression of mutant PS1 in mice transgenic for amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) dramatically accelerates the rate of amyloid deposition in the brain. In our original animals mutant PS1 was substantially over-expressed, and the stabilized pool of mouse PS1 fragments was largely replaced by the human protein. In this setting the accelerated amyloid pathology in the double transgenic mice could have been due, in part, to decreased endogenous PS1 activity. To investigate this possibility, we generated APP transgenic mice with reduced levels of endogenous PS1. We find that mice harboring only one functional PS1 allele and co-expressing Mo/HuAPPswe do not develop amyloid deposits at ages comparable to mice expressing mutant PS1. We next tested whether hypo-expression of mutant PS1 could accelerate the rate of amyloid deposition using an unusual line of transgenic mice expressing PS1dE9 at low levels, finding no significant acceleration. Our findings demonstrate that the accelerated amyloid pathology, caused by so many different mutations in PS1, is clearly not a result of haplo-insufficiency that might result from inactivating mutations. Instead, our data are consistent with a gain of property mechanism.

  3. Automatic segmentation of amyloid plaques in MR images using unsupervised support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Wyrwicz, Alice M

    2012-06-01

    Deposition of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is an important pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, reliable quantification of amyloid plaques in both human and animal brains remains a challenge. We present here a novel automatic plaque segmentation algorithm based on the intrinsic MR signal characteristics of plaques. This algorithm identifies plaque candidates in MR data by using watershed transform, which extracts regions with low intensities completely surrounded by higher intensity neighbors. These candidates are classified as plaque or nonplaque by an unsupervised learning method using features derived from the MR data intensity. The algorithm performance is validated by comparison with histology. We also demonstrate the algorithm's ability to detect age-related changes in plaque load ex vivo in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice that coexpress five familial AD mutations (5xFAD mice). To our knowledge, this study represents the first quantitative method for characterizing amyloid plaques in MRI data. The proposed method can be used to describe the spatiotemporal progression of amyloid deposition, which is necessary for understanding the evolution of plaque pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and to evaluate the efficacy of emergent amyloid-targeting therapies in preclinical trials.

  4. Detection of AA-type amyloid protein in labial salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sacsaquispe, Sonia-Julia; Antúnez-de Mayolo, Eleazar-Antonio; Vicetti, Rodolfo; Delgado, Wilson-Alejandro

    2011-03-01

    Among the diverse forms of amyloidosis, secondary type is the most frequent one. Diagnosis of amyloid deposition is based on the identification of the fibrillary protein amyloid by means of Congo Red (CR) or crystal violet (CV) stains, but these techniques do not differentiate between the different types of amyloid fibrils. The aim of this study was to identify by immunofluorescence (IF) AA amyloid a pathological fibrillar low-molecular-weight protein formed by cleavage of serum amyloid A (SAA) protein in labial salivary gland (LSG) biopsies from patients with secondary amyloidosis. 98 LSG were studied, 65 were from patients with secondary amyloidosis and 33 from subjects with chronic inflammatory diseases without evidence of this anomaly. All sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H &E), CV, CR and IF using anti-AA antibodies. Positive and negative controls were used for all techniques. CV and CR demonstrated that the amyloid substance was found mainly distributed periductally (93.8%), followed by periacinar and perivascular locations (p <0.001); however, the IF demonstrated that amyloid AA substance predominates in the periacinar area (73.8%), followed by periductal and perivascular locations (p <0.001). IF has a sensitivity of 83%, 100% of specificity, 100% of predictive positive value and 75% of predictive negative value. The results of this study confirm the efficacy of the LSG biopsy as a highly reliable method for diagnosis of secondary amyloidosis.

  5. A molecular model for self-assembly of amyloid fibrils: Immunoglobulin light chains

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.; Westholm, F.A.

    1995-08-29

    The formation and pathological deposition of amyloid fibrils are defining features of many acquired and inherited disorders, including primary or light-chain-associated amyloidosis, Alzheimer`s disease, and adult-onset diabetes. No pharmacological methods exist to block this process or to effect the removal of fibrils from tissue, and thus, little can be done to prevent organ failure and ultimate death that result from deposition of amyloid. Knowledge of the pathogenesis, treatment, or prevention of these presently incurable diseases is limited due to the relative paucity of information regarding the biophysical basis of amyloid formation. Antibody light chains of different amino acid sequence show differential amyloid-forming tendencies and, as such, can provide insight into the structural organization of amyloid fibrils as well as into basic mechanisms of protein self-assembly. We have compared primary structures of 180 human monoclonal light chains and have identified particular residues and positions within the variable domain that differentiate amyloid-from nonamyloid-associated proteins. We propose a molecular model that accounts for amyloid formation by antibody light chains and might also have implications for other forms of amyloidosis. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Self-assembling peptide and protein amyloids: from structure to tailored function in nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gang; Su, Zhiqiang; Reynolds, Nicholas P; Arosio, Paolo; Hamley, Ian W; Gazit, Ehud; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2017-07-31

    Self-assembled peptide and protein amyloid nanostructures have traditionally been considered only as pathological aggregates implicated in human neurodegenerative diseases. In more recent times, these nanostructures have found interesting applications as advanced materials in biomedicine, tissue engineering, renewable energy, environmental science, nanotechnology and material science, to name only a few fields. In all these applications, the final function depends on: (i) the specific mechanisms of protein aggregation, (ii) the hierarchical structure of the protein and peptide amyloids from the atomistic to mesoscopic length scales and (iii) the physical properties of the amyloids in the context of their surrounding environment (biological or artificial). In this review, we will discuss recent progress made in the field of functional and artificial amyloids and highlight connections between protein/peptide folding, unfolding and aggregation mechanisms, with the resulting amyloid structure and functionality. We also highlight current advances in the design and synthesis of amyloid-based biological and functional materials and identify new potential fields in which amyloid-based structures promise new breakthroughs.

  7. Memory deficits correlating with acetylcholinesterase splice shift and amyloid burden in doubly transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tina M; Berson, Amit; Sklan, Ella H; Younkin, Linda; Younkin, Steven; Brimijoin, Stephen; Soreq, Hermona

    2005-07-01

    Current mouse models of Alzheimer's disease show brain pathology that correlates to a degree with memory impairment, but underlying molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we report studies with three lines of transgenic mice: animals that doubly express mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) and human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE); and animals transgenic for only the APPswe or the hAChE. Among these genotypes, variations were observed in expression of mRNA for presenilin-1, which was highest in singly transgenic hAChE mice, and the stress-inducible form of AChE, which was elevated when both transgenes were present. At the age of nine months, both double and single transgenic mice displayed working memory impairment in a radial arm water maze. However, as compared with mice expressing amyloid alone, the double transgenic animals exhibited more numerous plaques and greater amyloid burden in brain (both by histochemistry and by ELISA of amyloid protein). Moreover, the amyloid burden in double transgenics was tightly correlated with memory impairment as measured by total maze errors (r2= 0.78, p = .002). This correlation was markedly stronger than observed in mice with amyloid alone. These new findings support the notion of cholinergic-amyloid interrelationships and highlight the double transgenic mice as a promising alternative for testing Alzheimer's therapies.

  8. Cellular Regulation of Amyloid Formation in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stroo, Esther; Koopman, Mandy; Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    As the population is aging, the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, is growing. The pathology of neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the presence of protein aggregates of disease specific proteins in the brain of patients. Under certain conditions these disease proteins can undergo structural rearrangements resulting in misfolded proteins that can lead to the formation of aggregates with a fibrillar amyloid-like structure. Cells have different mechanisms to deal with this protein aggregation, where the molecular chaperone machinery constitutes the first line of defense against misfolded proteins. Proteins that cannot be refolded are subjected to degradation and compartmentalization processes. Amyloid formation has traditionally been described as responsible for the proteotoxicity associated with different neurodegenerative disorders. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain such toxicity, including the sequestration of key proteins and the overload of the protein quality control system. Here, we review different aspects of the involvement of amyloid-forming proteins in disease, mechanisms of toxicity, structural features, and biological functions of amyloids, as well as the cellular mechanisms that modulate and regulate protein aggregation, including the presence of enhancers and suppressors of aggregation, and how aging impacts the functioning of these mechanisms, with special attention to the molecular chaperones. PMID:28261044

  9. Amyloid β-protein oligomers and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The oligomer cascade hypothesis, which states that oligomers are the initiating pathologic agents in Alzheimer’s disease, has all but supplanted the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which suggested that fibers were the key etiologic agents in Alzheimer’s disease. We review here the results of in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies of amyloid β-protein oligomers, and discuss important caveats that should be considered in the evaluation of these results. This article is divided into four sections that mirror the main approaches used in the field to better understand oligomers: (1) attempts to locate and examine oligomers in vivo in situ; that is, without removing these species from their environment; (2) studies involving oligomers extracted from human or animal tissues and the subsequent characterization of their properties ex vivo; (3) studies of oligomers that have been produced synthetically and studied using a reductionist approach in relatively simple in vitro biophysical systems; and (4) computational studies of oligomers in silico. These multiple orthogonal approaches have revealed much about the molecular and cell biology of amyloid β-protein. However, as informative as these approaches have been, the amyloid β-protein oligomer system remains enigmatic. PMID:24289820

  10. On the origin of Alzheimer's disease. Trials and tribulations of the amyloid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Castello, Michael A; Soriano, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis, which implicates the amyloid Aβ peptide as the pathological initiator of both familial and sporadic, late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), continues to guide the majority of research. We believe that current evidence does not support the amyloid cascade hypothesis for late onset AD. Instead, we propose that Aβ is a key regulator of brain homeostasis. During AD, while Aβ accumulation may occur in the long term in parallel with disease progression, it does not contribute to primary pathogenesis. This view predicts that amyloid-centric therapies will continue to fail, and that progress in developing successful alternative therapies for AD will be slow until closer attention is paid to understanding the physiological function of Aβ and its precursor protein.

  11. Clinical Utility of Amyloid Imaging in a Complex Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Presenting with Psychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bensaïdane, MR; M-P, Fortin; Damasse, G; Chenard, M; Dionne, C; Duclos, M; Bouchard, RW; Laforce, R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical indications of amyloid imaging in atypical dementia remain unclear. We report a 68-year-old female without past psychiatric history who was hospitalized for auditory hallucinations and persecutory delusions associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Although psychotic symptoms resolved with antipsychotic treatment, cognitive and motor impairments remained. She further showed severe visuoconstructive and executive deficits, ideomotor apraxia, elements of Gerstmann’s syndrome, bilateral agraphesthesia and discrete asymmetric motor deficits. Blood tests were unremarkable. Structural brain imaging revealed diffuse fronto-temporo-parietal atrophy, which was most severe in the parietal regions. Meanwhile, FDG-PET suggested asymmetrical fronto-temporo-parietal hypometabolism, with sparing of the posterior cingulate gyrus. A diagnosis of possible corticobasal syndrome (CBS) was made. Amyloid-PET using the novel tracer NAV4694 was ordered, and revealed significant deposition of fibrillar amyloid (SUVR 2.05). The primary diagnosis was CBS with underlying Alzheimer pathology and treatment with a cholinesterase inhibitor was initiated. Determination of underlying pathological CBS subtype is not simple even when based on extensive investigation including clinical presentation, atrophy patterns on MRI, and regional hypometabolism on FDG-PET. By contrast, amyloid imaging quickly confirmed Alzheimer pathology, and allowed rapid initiation of treatment in this complex case with early psychiatric symptoms. This case study illustrates the clinical utility of amyloid imaging in the setting of atypical cases seen in a tertiary memory clinic. PMID:26225355

  12. Clinical Utility of Amyloid Imaging in a Complex Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Presenting with Psychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bensaïdane, M R; M-P, Fortin; Damasse, G; Chenard, M; Dionne, C; Duclos, M; Bouchard, R W; Laforce, R

    2014-11-26

    Clinical indications of amyloid imaging in atypical dementia remain unclear. We report a 68-year-old female without past psychiatric history who was hospitalized for auditory hallucinations and persecutory delusions associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Although psychotic symptoms resolved with antipsychotic treatment, cognitive and motor impairments remained. She further showed severe visuoconstructive and executive deficits, ideomotor apraxia, elements of Gerstmann's syndrome, bilateral agraphesthesia and discrete asymmetric motor deficits. Blood tests were unremarkable. Structural brain imaging revealed diffuse fronto-temporo-parietal atrophy, which was most severe in the parietal regions. Meanwhile, FDG-PET suggested asymmetrical fronto-temporo-parietal hypometabolism, with sparing of the posterior cingulate gyrus. A diagnosis of possible corticobasal syndrome (CBS) was made. Amyloid-PET using the novel tracer NAV4694 was ordered, and revealed significant deposition of fibrillar amyloid (SUVR 2.05). The primary diagnosis was CBS with underlying Alzheimer pathology and treatment with a cholinesterase inhibitor was initiated. Determination of underlying pathological CBS subtype is not simple even when based on extensive investigation including clinical presentation, atrophy patterns on MRI, and regional hypometabolism on FDG-PET. By contrast, amyloid imaging quickly confirmed Alzheimer pathology, and allowed rapid initiation of treatment in this complex case with early psychiatric symptoms. This case study illustrates the clinical utility of amyloid imaging in the setting of atypical cases seen in a tertiary memory clinic.

  13. secHsp70 as a tool to approach amyloid-β42 and other extracellular amyloids.

    PubMed

    de Mena, Lorena; Chhangani, Deepak; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2017-02-06

    Self-association of amyloidogenic proteins is the main pathological trigger in a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders. These aggregates are deposited inside or outside the cell due to hereditary mutations, environmental exposures or even normal aging. Cumulative evidence indicates that the heat shock chaperone Hsp70 possesses robust neuroprotection against various intracellular amyloids in Drosophila and mouse models. However, its protective role against extracellular amyloids was largely unknown as its presence outside the cells is very limited. Our recent manuscript in PNAS revealed that an engineered form of secreted Hsp70 (secHsp70) is highly protective against toxicity induced by extracellular deposition of the amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide. In this Extra View article, we extend our analysis to other members of the heat shock protein family. We created PhiC31-based transgenic lines for human Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60 and Hsp70 and compared their activities in parallel against extracellular Aβ42. Strikingly, only secreted Hsp70 exhibits robust protection against Aβ42-triggered toxicity in the extracellular milieu. These observations indicate that the ability of secHsp70 to suppress Aβ42 insults is quite unique and suggest that targeted secretion of Hsp70 may represent a new therapeutic approach against Aβ42 and other extracellular amyloids. The potential applications of this engineered chaperone are discussed.

  14. Altered cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid β and amyloid precursor-like protein 1 peptides in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Hölttä, Mikko; Soininen, Hilkka; Bjerke, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik; Westerlund, Anni; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Blennow, Kaj; Mattsson, Niklas

    2014-06-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) patients develop early Alzheimer's disease pathology with abundant cortical amyloid plaques, likely due to overproduction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently leads to amyloid β (Aβ) aggregation. This is reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the 42-amino acid long Aβ peptide (Aβ1-42), which are increased in young DS patients and decreases with age. However, it is unclear whether DS also affects other aspects of Aβ metabolism, including production of shorter C- and N-terminal truncated Aβ peptides, and production of peptides from the amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1), which is related to APP, and cleaved by the same enzymatic processing machinery. APLP1-derived peptides may be surrogate markers for Aβ1-42 production in the brain. Here, we used hybrid immunoaffinity-mass spectrometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to monitor several Aβ and APLP1 peptides in CSF from DS patients (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 20). CSF levels of Aβ1-42 and three endogenous peptides derived from APLP1 (APL1β25, APL1β27 and APL1β28) were decreased in DS compared with controls, while a specific Aβ peptide, Aβ1-28, was increased in a majority of the DS individuals. This study indicates that DS causes previously unknown specific alterations of APP and APLP1 metabolism.

  15. The effects of normal aging on amyloid-β deposition in nondemented adults with Down syndrome as imaged by carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B.

    PubMed

    Lao, Patrick J; Betthauser, Tobey J; Hillmer, Ansel T; Price, Julie C; Klunk, William E; Mihaila, Iulia; Higgins, Andrew T; Bulova, Peter D; Hartley, Sigan L; Hardison, Regina; Tumuluru, Rameshwari V; Murali, Dhanabalan; Mathis, Chester A; Cohen, Annie D; Barnhart, Todd E; Devenny, Darlynne A; Mailick, Marsha R; Johnson, Sterling C; Handen, Benjamin L; Christian, Bradley T

    2016-04-01

    In Down syndrome (DS), the overproduction of amyloid precursor protein is hypothesized to predispose young adults to early expression of Alzheimer-like neuropathology. PET imaging with carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B examined the pattern of amyloid-β deposition in 68 nondemented adults with DS (30-53 years) to determine the relationship between deposition and normal aging. Standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) images were created with cerebellar gray matter as the reference region. Multiple linear regression revealed slight but highly significant (corrected P < .05) positive correlations between SUVR and age. The striatum showed the strongest correlation, followed by precuneus, parietal cortex, anterior cingulate, frontal cortex, and temporal cortex. There is an age-related amyloid-β deposition in the DS population, but as a pattern of elevated cortical retention becomes apparent, the correlation of SUVR with age ceases to be significant. Factors unrelated to aging may drive an increase in deposition during early Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of normal aging on amyloid-β deposition in nondemented adults with Down syndrome as imaged by [11C]PiB

    PubMed Central

    Lao, PJ; Betthauser, TJ; Hillmer, AT; Price, JC; Klunk, WE; Mihaila, I; Higgins, AT; Bulova, PD; Hartley, SL; Hardison, R; Tumuluru, RV; Murali, D; Mathis, CA; Cohen, AD; Barnhart, TE; Devenny, DA; Mailick, MR; Johnson, SC; Handen, BL; Christian, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Down syndrome (DS), the overproduction of amyloid precursor protein is hypothesized to predispose young adults to early expression of Alzheimer-like neuropathology. Methods PET imaging with [11C]PiB examined the pattern of amyloid-β deposition in 68 nondemented adults with DS (30-53 years) to determine the relationship between deposition and normal aging. Standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) images were created with cerebellum as the reference region. Results Multiple linear regression revealed slight but highly significant (corrected p<0.05) positive correlations between SUVR and age. The striatum showed the strongest correlation, followed by precuneus, parietal cortex, anterior cingulate, frontal cortex, and temporal cortex. Conclusion There is an age-related amyloid-β deposition in the DS population, but as a pattern of elevated cortical retention becomes apparent, the correlation of SUVR with age ceases to be significant. Factors unrelated to aging may drive an increase in deposition during early Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. PMID:26079411

  17. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  18. Intraneuronal beta-amyloid aggregates, neurodegeneration, and neuron loss in transgenic mice with five familial Alzheimer's disease mutations: potential factors in amyloid plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Holly; Cole, Sarah L; Logan, Sreemathi; Maus, Erika; Shao, Pei; Craft, Jeffery; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela; Ohno, Masuo; Disterhoft, John; Van Eldik, Linda; Berry, Robert; Vassar, Robert

    2006-10-04

    Mutations in the genes for amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins (PS1, PS2) increase production of beta-amyloid 42 (Abeta42) and cause familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Transgenic mice that express FAD mutant APP and PS1 overproduce Abeta42 and exhibit amyloid plaque pathology similar to that found in AD, but most transgenic models develop plaques slowly. To accelerate plaque development and investigate the effects of very high cerebral Abeta42 levels, we generated APP/PS1 double transgenic mice that coexpress five FAD mutations (5XFAD mice) and additively increase Abeta42 production. 5XFAD mice generate Abeta42 almost exclusively and rapidly accumulate massive cerebral Abeta42 levels. Amyloid deposition (and gliosis) begins at 2 months and reaches a very large burden, especially in subiculum and deep cortical layers. Intraneuronal Abeta42 accumulates in 5XFAD brain starting at 1.5 months of age (before plaques form), is aggregated (as determined by thioflavin S staining), and occurs within neuron soma and neurites. Some amyloid deposits originate within morphologically abnormal neuron soma that contain intraneuronal Abeta. Synaptic markers synaptophysin, syntaxin, and postsynaptic density-95 decrease with age in 5XFAD brain, and large pyramidal neurons in cortical layer 5 and subiculum are lost. In addition, levels of the activation subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 5, p25, are elevated significantly at 9 months in 5XFAD brain, although an upward trend is observed by 3 months of age, before significant neurodegeneration or neuron loss. Finally, 5XFAD mice have impaired memory in the Y-maze. Thus, 5XFAD mice rapidly recapitulate major features of AD amyloid pathology and may be useful models of intraneuronal Abeta42-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid plaque formation.

  19. Multimodal characterization of older APOE2 carriers reveals selective reduction of amyloid load.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Michel J; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Dyrba, Martin; Bartrés-Faz, David; Wirth, Miranka

    2017-02-07

    To comprehensively assess neurobiological effects of the protective APOE2 allele in the aged brain using a cross-sectional multimodal neuroimaging approach. Multimodal neuroimaging data were obtained from a total of 572 older individuals without dementia (cognitively normal and mild cognitive impairment) enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and included assessments of regional amyloid load with AV45-PET, glucose metabolism with fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and gray matter volume with structural MRI. Imaging indexes of APOE2 carriers were contrasted to risk-neutral APOE3 homozygotes, and analyses were controlled for age, sex, education, and clinical diagnosis. Additional models examined genotype-specific effects of age on the imaging markers. In region-of-interest-based analyses, APOE2 carriers had significantly less precuneal amyloid pathology and did not show the typical age-related increase in amyloid load, although the age × genotype interaction was only trend-level significant. In contrast, parietal metabolism and hippocampal volume did not differ between APOE2 and APOE3 genotypes, and both groups showed comparable negative effects of age on these markers. The amyloid specificity of APOE2-related brain changes was corroborated in 2 complementary analyses: spatially unbiased voxel-wise analyses showing widespread reductions in amyloid deposition but no differences in gray matter volume or metabolism and an analysis of CSF-based biomarkers showing a significant effect on amyloid but not on tau pathology. Regarding the range of Alzheimer disease biomarkers considered in the present study, the APOE2 allele appears to have a relatively selective effect on reduced accumulation of amyloid pathology in the aged brain. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Glycation in Demetalated Superoxide Dismutase 1 Prevents Amyloid Aggregation and Produces Cytotoxic Ages Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Sirangelo, Ivana; Vella, Filomena M.; Irace, Gaetano; Manco, Giuseppe; Iannuzzi, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) has been implicated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) through accumulation of protein amyloid aggregates in motor neurons of patients. Amyloid aggregates and protein inclusions are a common pathological feature of many neurological disorders in which protein aggregation seems to be directly related to neurotoxicity. Although, extensive studies performed on the aggregation process of several amyloidogenic proteins in vitro allowed the identification of many physiological factors involved, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of amyloid aggregates in vivo and in pathological conditions are still poorly understood. Post-translational modifications are known to affect protein structure and function and, recently, much attention has been devoted to the role played by non-enzymatic glycation in stimulating amyloid aggregation and cellular toxicity. In particular, glycation seems to have a determining role both in sporadic and familial forms of ALS and SOD1 has been shown to be glycated in vivo The aim of this study was to investigate the role of glycation on the amyloid aggregation process of both wild-type SOD1 and its ALS-related mutant G93A. To this aim, the glycation kinetics of both native and demetalated SOD have been followed using two different glycating agents, i.e., D-ribose and methylglyoxal. The effect of glycation on the structure and the amyloid aggregation propensity of native and ApoSOD has been also investigated using a combination of biophysical and biochemical techniques. In addition, the effect of SOD glycated species on cellular toxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has been evaluated in different cellular models. The results provided by this study contribute to clarify the role of glycation in amyloid aggregation and suggest a direct implication of glycation in the pathology of fALS. PMID:27695694

  1. Stereotaxic Infusion of Oligomeric Amyloid-beta into the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Ying Y.; Baleriola, Jimena; Fà, Mauro; Hengst, Ulrich; Troy, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease affecting the aging population. A key neuropathological feature of the disease is the over-production of amyloid-beta and the deposition of amyloid-beta plaques in brain regions of the afflicted individuals. Throughout the years scientists have generated numerous Alzheimer’s disease mouse models that attempt to replicate the amyloid-beta pathology. Unfortunately, the mouse models only selectively mimic the disease features. Neuronal death, a prominent effect in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients, is noticeably lacking in these mice. Hence, we and others have employed a method of directly infusing soluble oligomeric species of amyloid-beta - forms of amyloid-beta that have been proven to be most toxic to neurons - stereotaxically into the brain. In this report we utilize male C57BL/6J mice to document this surgical technique of increasing amyloid-beta levels in a select brain region. The infusion target is the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus because this brain structure, along with the basal forebrain that is connected by the cholinergic circuit, represents one of the areas of degeneration in the disease. The results of elevating amyloid-beta in the dentate gyrus via stereotaxic infusion reveal increases in neuron loss in the dentate gyrus within 1 week, while there is a concomitant increase in cell death and cholinergic neuron loss in the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain. These effects are observed up to 2 weeks. Our data suggests that the current amyloid-beta infusion model provides an alternative mouse model to address region specific neuron death in a short-term basis. The advantage of this model is that amyloid-beta can be elevated in a spatial and temporal manner. PMID:26132278

  2. Key Points Concerning Amyloid Infectivity and Prion-Like Neuronal Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD) to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Commonly, only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. However, recent publications have shown that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein (α-syn) and tau protein, also propagate in a “prion-like” manner. Meanwhile, no link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has been demonstrated. The extremely low infectivity under natural conditions of most non-prion amyloids is far below the capacity to spread exhibited by prions. Nonetheless, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids to become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in our understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions) have yielded essential information that can shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidence suggests that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could all be key factors affecting their spread. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would effectively prevent infectivity. PMID:27147962

  3. Polyphenols as therapeutic molecules in Alzheimer's disease through modulating amyloid pathways.

    PubMed

    Lakey-Beitia, Johant; Berrocal, Ruben; Rao, K S; Durant, Armando A

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and multifactorial neurodegenerative condition. The complex pathology of this disease includes oxidative stress, metal deposition, formation of aggregates of amyloid and tau, enhanced immune responses, and disturbances in cholinesterase. Drugs targeted toward reduction of amyloidal load have been discovered, but there is no effective pharmacological treatment for combating the disease so far. Natural products have become an important avenue for drug discovery research. Polyphenols are natural products that have been shown to be effective in the modulation of the type of neurodegenerative changes seen in AD, suggesting a possible therapeutic role. The present review focuses on the chemistry of polyphenols and their role in modulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. We also provide new hypotheses on how these therapeutic molecules may modulate APP processing, prevent Aβ aggregation, and favor disruption of preformed fibrils. Finally, the role of polyphenols in modulating Alzheimer's pathology is discussed.

  4. Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury-Induced Alzheimer’s Pathology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    extracellular deposition of the beta -amyloid peptide in senile plaques and intracellular aggregation of hyperphosphorylated, microtubule- associated protein...pathological events are not well characterized; however, they are often associated with neuroinflammation. Postinjury neuroinflammation is characterized by...aggregation of microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT). 2. Keywords Traumatic brain injury; Alzheimer’s disease; beta-amyloid; microtubule

  5. Regional distribution of amyloid-Bri deposition and its association with neurofibrillary degeneration in familial British dementia.

    PubMed

    Holton, J L; Ghiso, J; Lashley, T; Rostagno, A; Guerin, C J; Gibb, G; Houlden, H; Ayling, H; Martinian, L; Anderton, B H; Wood, N W; Vidal, R; Plant, G; Frangione, B; Revesz, T

    2001-02-01

    Familial British dementia (FBD), pathologically characterized by cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary degeneration, is associated with a stop codon mutation in the BRI gene resulting in the production of an amyloidogenic fragment, amyloid-Bri (ABri). The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of ABri fibrillar and nonfibrillar lesions and their relationship to neurofibrillary pathology, astroglial and microglial response using immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy in five cases of FBD. Abnormal tau was studied with immunoblotting. We present evidence that ABri is deposited throughout the central nervous system in blood vessels and parenchyma where both amyloid (fibrillar) and pre-amyloid (nonfibrillar) lesions are formed. Ultrastructurally amyloid lesions appear as bundles of fibrils recognized by an antibody raised against ABri, whereas Thioflavin S-negative diffuse deposits consist of amorphous electron-dense material with sparse, dispersed fibrils. In contrast to nonfibrillar lesions, fibrillar ABri is associated with a marked astrocytic and microglial response. Neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads occurring mainly in limbic structures, are found in areas affected by all types of ABri lesions whereas abnormal neurites are present around amyloid lesions. Immunoblotting for tau revealed a triplet electrophoretic migration pattern. Our observations confirm a close link between ABri deposition and neurodegeneration in FBD.

  6. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloidpathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloidpathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  7. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  8. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  9. Amyloid pore-channel hypothesis: effect of ethanol on aggregation state using frog oocytes for an Alzheimer’s disease study

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Jorge; Ormeño, David; la Paz, Lenin D. Ochoa-de

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease severely compromises cognitive function. One of the mechanisms to explain the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease has been the hypotheses of amyloid-pore/channel formation by complex Aβ-aggregates. Clinical studies suggested the moderate alcohol consumption can reduces probability developing neurodegenerative pathologies. A recent report explored the ability of ethanol to disrupt the generation of complex Aβ in vitro and reduce the toxicity in two cell lines. Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to understand how ethanol blocks the aggregation of amyloid. On the other hand, the in silico modeling showed ethanol effect over the dynamics assembling for complex Aβ-aggregates mediated by break the hydrosaline bridges between Asp 23 and Lys 28, was are key element for amyloid dimerization. The amyloid pore/channel hypothesis has been explored only in neuronal models, however recently experiments suggested the frog oocytes such an excellent model to explore the mechanism of the amyloid pore/channel hypothesis. So, the used of frog oocytes to explored the mechanism of amyloid aggregates is new, mainly for amyloid/pore hypothesis. Therefore, this experimental model is a powerful tool to explore the mechanism implicates in the Alzheimer’s disease pathology and also suggests a model to prevent the Alzheimer’s disease pathology. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(1): 13-18] PMID:25047445

  10. Abundant Expression of Zinc Transporters in the Amyloid Plaques of Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathological key features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are ß-amyloid peptide (Aß)-containing senile plaques (SP) and neurofibrillary tangles. Previous studies have suggested that an extracellular elevation of zinc concentrations can initiate the deposition of Aß and lead to the formation of SP. I...

  11. Study of amyloids using yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  12. Homeotic Gene teashirt (tsh) has a neuroprotective function in amyloid-beta 42 mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael T; Tare, Meghana; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s) responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. We have generated a transgenic Drosophila eye model where high levels of human Aβ42 is misexpressed in the differentiating photoreceptor neurons of the developing eye, which phenocopy Alzheimer's like neuropathology in the neural retina. We have utilized this model for a gain of function screen using members of various signaling pathways involved in the development of the fly eye to identify downstream targets or modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. We have identified the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) as a suppressor of the Aβ42 mediated neurodegenerative phenotype. Targeted misexpression of tsh with Aβ42 in the differentiating retina can significantly rescue neurodegeneration by blocking cell death. We found that Tsh protein is absent/ downregulated in the neural retina at this stage. The structure function analysis revealed that the PLDLS domain of Tsh acts as an inhibitor of the neuroprotective function of tsh in the Drosophila eye model. Lastly, we found that the tsh paralog, tiptop (tio) can also rescue Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. We have identified tsh and tio as new genetic modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. Our studies demonstrate a novel neuroprotective function of tsh and its paralog tio in Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. The neuroprotective function of tsh is independent of its role in retinal determination.

  13. No Association of Lower Hippocampal Volume With Alzheimer's Disease Pathology in Late-Life Depression.

    PubMed

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Emsell, Louise; Bouckaert, Filip; Claes, Lene; Jain, Saurabh; Farrar, Gill; Billiet, Thibo; Evers, Stephan; Van den Stock, Jan; Sienaert, Pascal; Obbels, Jasmien; Sunaert, Stefan; Adamczuk, Katarzyna; Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2017-03-01

    Hippocampal volume is commonly decreased in late-life depression. According to the depression-as-late-life-neuropsychiatric-disorder model, lower hippocampal volume in late-life depression is associated with neurodegenerative changes. The purpose of this prospective study was to examine whether lower hippocampal volume in late-life depression is associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Of 108 subjects who participated, complete, good-quality data sets were available for 100: 48 currently depressed older adults and 52 age- and gender-matched healthy comparison subjects who underwent structural MRI, [(18)F]flutemetamol amyloid positron emission tomography imaging, apolipoprotein E genotyping, and neuropsychological assessment. Hippocampal volumes were defined manually and normalized for total intracranial volume. Amyloid binding was quantified using the standardized uptake value ratio in one cortical composite volume of interest. The authors investigated group differences in hippocampal volume (both including and excluding amyloid-positive participants), group differences in amyloid uptake and in the proportion of positive amyloid scans, and the association between hippocampal volume and cortical amyloid uptake. A significant difference was observed in mean normalized total hippocampal volume between patients and comparison subjects, but there were no group differences in cortical amyloid uptake or proportion of amyloid-positive subjects. The difference in hippocampal volume remained significant after the amyloid-positive subjects were excluded. There was no association between hippocampal volume and amyloid uptake in either patients or comparison subjects. Lower hippocampal volume was not related to amyloid pathology in this sample of patients with late-life depression. These data counter the common belief that changes in hippocampal volume in late-life depression are due to prodromal Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Enhanced Antigen Retrieval of Amyloid β Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Hideaki; Ogino, Koichi; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Senile plaques, extracellular deposits of amyloid β peptide (Aβ), are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). As the standard immunohistochemical detection method for Aβ deposits, anti-Aβ immunohistochemistry combined with antigen retrieval (AR) by formic acid (FA) has been generally used. Here, we present a more efficient AR for Aβ antigen. On brain sections of AD and its mouse model, a double combination of either autoclave heating in EDTA buffer or digestion with proteinase K plus FA treatment reinforced Aβ immunoreactivity. A further triple combination of digestion with proteinase K (P), autoclave heating in EDTA buffer (A), and FA treatment (F), when employed in this order, gave a more enhanced immunoreactivity. Our PAF method prominently visualized various forms of Aβ deposits in AD that have not been clearly detected previously and revealed numerous minute-sized plaques both in AD and the mouse model. Quantification of Aβ loads showed that the AR effect by the PAF method was 1.86-fold (in the aged human brain) and 4.64-fold (in the mouse brain) higher than that by the FA method. Thus, the PAF method could have the potential to be the most sensitive tool so far to study Aβ pathology in AD and its mouse model. PMID:22821668

  15. Inguinoscrotal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Luis; Leonard, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents with inguinoscrotal pathology comprise a significant proportion of emergency department and outpatient visits. Visits to the emergency department primarily comprise individuals presenting with scrotal pain due to testicular torsion or torsion of the testicular appendages. At such time, immediate urological consultation is sought. Outpatient visits comprise those individuals with undescended testes, hydroceles, and varicoceles. Rare, but important problems, such as pediatric testicular tumours, may also present in the office setting. Many of these outpatient visits are to primary care physicians, who should have an appreciation of the timing and need for referral. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the general urologist and primary care physician with these varied pathologies and give insight into their assessment and management. Some of these same conditions are seen in adult patients, but there are some significant differences in their management in the pediatric group. In addition, the utility of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, are discussed within each pathological entity. It is hoped that this overview will assist our general urology and primary care colleagues in patient management for diverse inguinoscrotal pathologies. PMID:28265317

  16. Cytoplasmic retention of protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A) induces Alzheimer-like abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Wei, Jianshe; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fei; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-10-03

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), and related tauopathies. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which in turn is modulated by endogenous inhibitor 2 (I2 (PP2A)). In AD brain, I2 (PP2A) is translocated from neuronal nucleus to cytoplasm, where it inhibits PP2A activity and promotes abnormal phosphorylation of Tau. Here we describe the identification of a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal region of I2 (PP2A) containing a conserved basic motif, (179)RKR(181), which is sufficient for directing its nuclear localization. The current study further presents an inducible cell model (Tet-Off system) of AD-type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau by expressing I2 (PP2A) in which the NLS was inactivated by (179)RKR(181) → AAA along with (168)KR(169) → AA mutations. In this model, the mutant NLS (mNLS)-I2 (PP2A) (I2 (PP2A)AA-AAA) was retained in the cell cytoplasm, where it physically interacted with PP2A and inhibited its activity. Inhibition of PP2A was associated with the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau, which resulted in microtubule network instability and neurite outgrowth impairment. Expression of mNLS-I2 (PP2A) activated CAMKII and GSK-3β, which are Tau kinases regulated by PP2A. The immunoprecipitation experiments showed the direct interaction of I2 (PP2A) with PP2A and GSK-3β but not with CAMKII. Thus, the cell model provides insights into the nature of the potential NLS and the mechanistic relationship between I2 (PP2A)-induced inhibition of PP2A and hyperphosphorylation of Tau that can be utilized to develop drugs preventing Tau pathology. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Cytoplasmic Retention of Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A) Induces Alzheimer-like Abnormal Hyperphosphorylation of Tau*

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Wei, Jianshe; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fei; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), and related tauopathies. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which in turn is modulated by endogenous inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A). In AD brain, I2PP2A is translocated from neuronal nucleus to cytoplasm, where it inhibits PP2A activity and promotes abnormal phosphorylation of Tau. Here we describe the identification of a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal region of I2PP2A containing a conserved basic motif, 179RKR181, which is sufficient for directing its nuclear localization. The current study further presents an inducible cell model (Tet-Off system) of AD-type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau by expressing I2PP2A in which the NLS was inactivated by 179RKR181 → AAA along with 168KR169 → AA mutations. In this model, the mutant NLS (mNLS)-I2PP2A (I2PP2AAA-AAA) was retained in the cell cytoplasm, where it physically interacted with PP2A and inhibited its activity. Inhibition of PP2A was associated with the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau, which resulted in microtubule network instability and neurite outgrowth impairment. Expression of mNLS-I2PP2A activated CAMKII and GSK-3β, which are Tau kinases regulated by PP2A. The immunoprecipitation experiments showed the direct interaction of I2PP2A with PP2A and GSK-3β but not with CAMKII. Thus, the cell model provides insights into the nature of the potential NLS and the mechanistic relationship between I2PP2A-induced inhibition of PP2A and hyperphosphorylation of Tau that can be utilized to develop drugs preventing Tau pathology. PMID:25128526

  18. Correlation of Cerebral Microbleed Distribution to Amyloid Burden in Patients with Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Hsi; Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Ya-Fang; Tang, Sung-Chun; Lee, Bo-Ching; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2017-01-01

    The underlying pathology of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) with mixed lobar and deep distribution remains contentious. The aim of this study was to correlate CMBs distribution to β-amyloid burden in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Fourty-seven ICH patients underwent magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging and 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography. The amyloid burden was expressed as standardized uptake value ratio with reference to cerebellum, and presented as median (interquartile range). Patients were categorized into the lobar, mixed (both lobar and deep regions), and deep types of CMB. Comparing the lobar (17%), mixed (59.6%) and deep (23.4%) CMB types, the global amyloid burden was significantly higher in the mixed type than the deep type (1.10 [1.03–1.25] vs 1.00 [0.97–1.09], p = 0.011), but lower than in the lobar type (1.48 [1.18–1.50], p = 0.048). On multivariable analysis, the ratio of lobar to deep CMB number was positively correlated with global (p = 0.028) and occipital (p = 0.031) amyloid burden. In primary ICH, patients with lobar and mixed CMB types are associated with increased amyloid burden than patients with deep type. The ratio of lobar to deep CMB number is an independent indicator of cerebral β-amyloid deposition. PMID:28303922

  19. Platelets in the Alzheimer's disease brain: do they play a role in cerebral amyloid angiopathy?

    PubMed

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Ehrlich, Daniela; Kiefer, Andreas; Marksteiner, Josef; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques and intracellular tau tangles. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis. Platelets circulate along the vessel wall responding immediately to vascular injury. The aim of the present study was to explore the presence and migration of platelets (thrombocytes) to sites of small vascular bleedings and/or to beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. We infused fluorescently labeled red PKH26 mouse platelets into transgenic Alzheimer mice overexpressing APP with Swedish/Dutch/Iowa mutations (APP_SDI) and explored if platelets migrate into the brain. Further we studied whether platelets accumulate in the vicinity of β-amyloid plaques. Our animal data shows that infused platelets are found in the liver and partly in the lung, while in the brain platelets were visible to a minor degree. In mice, we did not observe a significant association of platelets with beta-amyloid plaques or vessels. In the brain of Alzheimer postmortem patients platelets could be detected by immunohistochemistry for CD41 and CD62P, but the majority was found in vessels with or without beta-amyloid load, and only a few single platelets migrated deeper into the brain. Our findings suggest that platelets do not migrate into the brains of Alzheimer disease but are concentrated in brain vessels.

  20. Habitual exercise levels are associated with cerebral amyloid load in presymptomatic autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Belinda M; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Taddei, Kevin; Gardener, Samantha L; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Xiong, Chengjie; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie; Buckles, Virginia; Erickson, Kirk I; Clarnette, Roger; Shah, Tejal; Masters, Colin L; Weiner, Michael; Cairns, Nigel; Rossor, Martin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Salloway, Stephen; Vöglein, Jonathan; Laske, Christoph; Noble, James; Schofield, Peter R; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Martins, Ralph N

    2017-05-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported exercise levels and Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, in a cohort of autosomal dominant AD mutation carriers. In 139 presymptomatic mutation carriers from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, the relationship between self-reported exercise levels and brain amyloid load, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42, and CSF tau levels was evaluated using linear regression. No differences in brain amyloid load, CSF Aβ42, or CSF tau were observed between low and high exercise groups. Nevertheless, when examining only those already accumulating AD pathology (i.e., amyloid positive), low exercisers had higher mean levels of brain amyloid than high exercisers. Furthermore, the interaction between exercise and estimated years from expected symptom onset was a significant predictor of brain amyloid levels. Our findings indicate a relationship exists between self-reported exercise levels and brain amyloid in autosomal dominant AD mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    PubMed

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  2. Pre-amyloid oligomers budding:a metastatic mechanism of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bernini, Fabrizio; Malferrari, Daniele; Pignataro, Marcello; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Di Rocco, Giulia; Lancellotti, Lidia; Brigatti, Maria Franca; Kayed, Rakez; Borsari, Marco; del Monte, Federica; Castellini, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of misfolded protein diseases and aging is the accumulation of proteotoxic aggregates. However, the mechanisms of proteotoxicity and the dynamic changes in fiber formation and dissemination remain unclear, preventing a cure. Here we adopted a reductionist approach and used atomic force microscopy to define the temporal and spatial changes of amyloid aggregates, their modes of dissemination and the biochemical changes that may influence their growth. We show that pre-amyloid oligomers (PAO) mature to form linear and circular protofibrils, and amyloid fibers, and those can break reforming PAO that can migrate invading neighbor structures. Simulating the effect of immunotherapy modifies the dynamics of PAO formation. Anti-fibers as well as anti-PAO antibodies fragment the amyloid fibers, however the fragmentation using anti-fibers antibodies favored the migration of PAO. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the mechanisms of misfolded protein maturation and propagation and the effects of interventions on the resolution and dissemination of amyloid pathology. PMID:27775057

  3. Small Heat Shock Proteins Potentiate Amyloid Dissolution by Protein Disaggregases from Yeast and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Duennwald, Martin L.; Echeverria, AnaLisa; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    How small heat shock proteins (sHsps) might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI +] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22723742

  4. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein/Ceramide Transporter Binds to Human Serum Amyloid P-Component and Is Present in Brain Amyloid Plaques*

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Bode, Gerard H.; Losen, Mario; Kulharia, Mahesh; Molenaar, Peter C.; Veerhuis, Robert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; De Baets, Marc H.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a non-fibrillar glycoprotein belonging to the pentraxin family of the innate immune system. SAP is present in plasma, basement membranes, and amyloid deposits. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) binds to human SAP. GPBP is a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for basement membrane type IV collagen. Also GPBP is found in plasma and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study, we demonstrate that GPBP specifically binds SAP in its physiological conformations, pentamers and decamers. The START domain in GPBP is important for this interaction. SAP and GPBP form complexes in blood and partly colocalize in amyloid plaques from Alzheimer disease patients. These data suggest the existence of complexes of SAP and GPBP under physiological and pathological conditions. These complexes are important for understanding basement membrane, blood physiology, and plaque formation in Alzheimer disease. PMID:22396542

  5. Prefrontal hypometabolism in Alzheimer disease is related to longitudinal amyloid accumulation in remote brain regions.

    PubMed

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Grimmer, Timo; Tahmasian, Masoud; Sorg, Christian; Yakushev, Igor; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Drzezga, Alexander; Förster, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    In PET studies of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), prominent hypometabolism can occur in brain regions without major amyloid load. These hypometabolism-only (HO) areas may not be explained easily as a consequence of local amyloid toxicity. The aim of this longitudinal multimodal imaging study was the investigation of locoregional and remote relationships between metabolism in HO areas and longitudinal amyloid increase in functionally connected brain areas, with a particular focus on intrinsic functional connectivity as a relevant linking mechanism between pathology and dysfunction. Fifteen AD patients underwent longitudinal examinations with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB) and (18)F-FDG PET (mean follow-up period, 2 y). The peak HO region was identified by the subtraction of equally thresholded statistical T maps (hypometabolism minus amyloid burden), resulting from voxel-based statistical parametric mapping group comparisons between the AD patients and 15 healthy controls. Then functionally connected and nonconnected brain networks were identified by means of seed-based intrinsic functional connectivity analysis of the resting-state functional MRI data of healthy controls. Finally, network-based, region-of-interest-based, and voxel-based correlations were calculated between longitudinal changes of normalized (11)C-PiB binding and (18)F-FDG metabolism. Positive voxel-based and region-of-interest-based correlations were demonstrated between longitudinal (11)C-PiB increases in the HO-connected network, encompassing bilateral temporoparietal and frontal brain regions, and metabolic changes in the peak HO region as well as locoregionally within several AD-typical brain regions. Our results indicate that in AD amyloid accumulation in remote but functionally connected brain regions may significantly contribute to longitudinally evolving hypometabolism in brain regions not strongly affected by local amyloid pathology, supporting the amyloid- and network

  6. Association of plasma clusterin concentration with severity, pathology, and progression in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Simmons, Andrew; Velayudhan, Latha; Hye, Abdul; Campbell, James; Zhang, Yi; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric; Kinsey, Anna; Güentert, Andreas; Proitsi, Petra; Powell, John; Causevic, Mirsada; Killick, Richard; Lunnon, Katie; Lynham, Steven; Broadstock, Martin; Choudhry, Fahd; Howlett, David R.; Williams, Robert J.; Sharp, Sally I.; Mitchelmore, Cathy; Tunnard, Catherine; Leung, Rufina; Foy, Catherine; O'Brien, Darragh; Breen, Gerome; Furney, Simon; Ward, Malcolm; Kloszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Soininen, Hilkka; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Hodges, Angela; Murphy, Declan; Parkins, Sue; Richardson, Jill; Resnick, Susan M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Wong, Dean F.; Zhou, Yun; Muehlboeck, Sebastian; Evans, Alan; Francis, Paul T.; Spenger, Christian; Lovestone, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Context Blood-based analytes as indicators of pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective Combined proteomic and neuroimaging approach to identify plasma proteins associated with AD pathology. Design Discovery-phase proteomic experiments to identify plasma proteins associated with correlates of AD pathology including evidence of atrophy using neuroimaging and more rapid clinical progression, followed by replication using quantitative immunoassay. Extension studies in older non-demented humans using 11C-PiB amyloid imaging and transgenic mice with amyloid pathology. Setting Multi-center European study, AddNeuroMed, and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) in United States. Participants AD patients, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects and healthy controls with standardized clinical assessments and structural neuroimaging. Plasma samples from non-demented older BLSA participants with brain amyloid imaging by PET. Main outcome measures Association of plasma proteins with brain atrophy, disease severity and rate of clinical progression. Extension studies in man and transgenic mice tested association between plasma proteins and brain amyloid. Results Clusterin/apolipoprotein-J was associated with atrophy of the entorhinal cortex, baseline disease severity and rapid clinical progression in AD. Increased plasma concentration of clusterin was predictive of greater beta amyloid (Aβ) burden in the medial temporal lobe. Subjects with AD had increased clusterin mRNA in blood but there was no effect of SNPs in the gene encoding clusterin (CLU) with gene or protein expression. Finally, APP/PS1 transgenic mice showed increased plasma clusterin, age-dependent increase in brain clusterin and amyloid and clusterin co-localisation in plaques. Conclusions Clusterin/apolipoprotein-J is a known amyloid chaperone associated with Alzheimer's disease severity, pathology and progression. Increased plasma concentration of clusterin is also associated with

  7. In vivo imaging reveals sigmoidal growth kinetic of β-amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is the deposition of amyloid plaques in the brains of affected individuals. Amyloid plaques mainly consist of fibrillar β-amyloid, which is a cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein. The amyloid-cascade-hypothesis postulates Aβ accumulation as the central event in initiating a toxic cascade leading to Alzheimer’s disease pathology and, ultimately, loss of cognitive function. We studied the kinetics of β-amyloid deposition in Tg2576 mice, which overexpress human amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish mutation. Utilizing long-term two-photon imaging we were able to observe the entire kinetics of plaque growth in vivo. Essentially, we observed that plaque growth follows a sigmoid-shaped curve comprising a cubic growth phase, followed by saturation. In contrast, plaque density kinetics exhibited an asymptotic progression. Taking into account the fact that a critical concentration of Aβ is required to seed new plaques, we can propose the following kinetic model of β-amyloid deposition in vivo. In the early cubic phase, plaque growth is not limited by Aβ concentration and plaque density increases very fast. During the transition phase, plaque density stabilizes whereas plaque volume increases strongly reflecting a robust growth of the plaques. In the late asymptotic phase, Aβ peptide production becomes rate-limiting for plaque growth. In conclusion, the present study offers a direct link between in vitro and in vivo studies facilitating the translation of Aβ-lowering strategies from laboratory models to patients. PMID:24678659

  8. Microbial Manipulation of the Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are encased in a protein, DNA and polysaccharide matrix that protects the community, promotes interactions with the environment, and helps cells to adhere together. The protein component of these matrices is often a remarkably stable, β-sheet-rich polymer called amyloid. Amyloids form ordered, self-templating fibers that are highly aggregative, making them a valuable biofilm component. Some eukaryotic proteins inappropriately adopt the amyloid fold and these misfolded protein aggregates disrupt normal cellular proteostasis, which can cause significant cytotoxicity. Indeed, until recently amyloids were considered solely the result of protein misfolding. However, research over the past decade has revealed how various organisms have capitalized on the amyloid fold by developing sophisticated biogenesis pathways that coordinate gene expression, protein folding, and secretion so that amyloid-related toxicities are minimized. How microbes manipulate amyloids, by augmenting their advantageous properties and by reducing their undesirable properties, will be the subject of this review. PMID:23108148

  9. Role of phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) in intracellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-06-15

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism.

  10. Role of Phosphatidylinositol Clathrin Assembly Lymphoid-Myeloid Leukemia (PICALM) in Intracellular Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R.; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-01-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism. PMID:22539346

  11. Biophysical insight reveals tannic acid as amyloid inducer and conformation transformer from amorphous to amyloid aggregates in Concanavalin A (ConA).

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohsin Vahid; Ishtikhar, Mohd; Siddiqui, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Chandel, Tajalli Ilm; Majid, Nabeela; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Shahein, Yasser E; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-04-27

    The aggregation phenomenon (amyloid and amorphous) is associated with several pathological complications in human, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington, Cataract diseases, and Diabetes mellitus type 2. In the present study we are offering evidence and breaking the general belief with regard to the polyphenols action as protein aggregate inhibitors. Herein we confirm that tannic acid (TA) is not only an amyloid inducer, but also it switches one type of conformation, ultimately morphology, into another. We ascertain based on our findings that aggregates are not rigid structures and the stability can be challenged under certain conditions. This study also confirms that unfolded and amorphous aggregates can serve as precursors of amyloids and TA interactions with unordered aggregates (amorphous) bringing orderliness in the conformation via amyloidosis. The shifting of unordered conformation toward orderliness is governed by the modulation in surface hydrophobic patches in Concanavalin A (ConA). Hence, a degree of exposed hydrophobic cluster can be claimed as a strong parameter to detect and distinguish the native, amorphous and both types of amyloids. Turbidity and Rayleigh light scattering measurements followed similar pattern while Thioflavin T and 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence assays of the binding with amorphous and amyloid followed an inverse relation. Electron microscopic studies revealed the morphological variation in the ConA at 65°C as amorphous while the ConA treated with TA followed by heat treatment at 65°C was defined as amyloid in nature. Interestingly for the first time we are reporting the slight agglutination activity by the ConA amyloids.

  12. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 levels become elevated in neurons around amyloid plaques: implications for Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Fu, Yifan; Yasvoina, Marina; Shao, Peizhen; Hitt, Brian; O'Connor, Tracy; Logan, Sreemathi; Maus, Erika; Citron, Martin; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester; Vassar, Robert

    2007-04-04

    Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) (beta-secretase) initiates generation of beta-amyloid (Abeta), which plays an early role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 levels are increased in postmortem AD brain, suggesting BACE1 elevation promotes Abeta production and AD. Alternatively, the BACE1 increase may be an epiphenomenon of late-stage AD. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed BACE1 elevation using a highly specific BACE1 antibody, BACE-Cat1, made in BACE1-/- mice, which mount a robust anti-BACE1 immune response. Previous BACE1 immunohistochemical studies lack consistent results because typical BACE1 antibodies produce nonspecific background, but BACE-Cat1 immunolabels BACE1 only. BACE1 elevation was recapitulated in two amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse lines. 5XFAD mice form amyloid plaques at young ages and exhibit neuron loss. In contrast, Tg2576 form plaques at a more advanced age and do not show cell death. These two mouse lines allow differentiation between early Abeta-induced events and late phenomena related to neuron death. BACE1 levels became elevated in parallel with amyloid burden in each APP transgenic, starting early in 5XFAD and late in Tg2576. The increase in BACE1 protein occurred without any change in BACE1 mRNA level, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism. In APP transgenic and AD brains, high BACE1 levels were observed in an annulus around Abeta42-positive plaque cores and colocalized with neuronal proteins. These results demonstrate that amyloid plaques induce BACE1 in surrounding neurons at early stages of pathology before neuron death occurs. We conclude that BACE1 elevation is most likely triggered by the amyloid pathway and may drive a positive-feedback loop in AD.

  13. Induction of murine AA amyloidosis by various homogeneous amyloid fibrils and amyloid-like synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cui, D; Hoshii, Y; Kawano, H; Une, Y; Gondo, T; Ishihara, T

    2007-11-01

    We investigated amyloid-enhancing factor (AEF) activity of amyloid fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden livers of mice, cow, cheetah, cat and swan. All amyloid fibrils were confirmed to be amyloid protein A (AA) by an immunohistochemical analysis. We found that these fibrils accelerated the deposition of amyloid in an experimental mouse model of AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, the degree of deposition was dependent on the concentration of fibrils. When we compared the minimal concentration of amyloid fibrils needed to induce deposition, we found that these fibrils showed different efficiencies. Murine amyloid fibril induced amyloid deposition more efficiently than cow, cat, cheetah or swan amyloid fibrils. These data suggest that amyloid deposition is preferentially induced by amyloid fibrils with the same primary sequence as the endogenous amyloid protein. We then analysed the AEF activity of synthetic peptides, synthesized corresponding to amino acids 1-15 of mouse SAA (mSAA), 2-15 of cow SAA (bSAA), 1-15 of cat SAA (cSAA), which was the same as cheetah, and the common amino acids 33-45 of these four SAA (aSAA). We found that mSAA, bSAA and cSAA formed amyloid-like fibrils in morphology and showed similar AEF properties to those of native amyloid fibrils. Although aSAA also formed highly ordered amyloid-like fibrils, it showed weaker AEF activity than the other synthetic fibrils. Our results indicate that amyloidosis is transmissible between species under certain conditions; however, the efficiency of amyloid deposition is species-specific and appears to be related to the primary amino acid sequence, especially the N-terminal segment of the amyloid protein.

  14. Molecular recycling within amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Carulla, Natàlia; Caddy, Gemma L; Hall, Damien R; Zurdo, Jesús; Gairí, Margarida; Feliz, Miguel; Giralt, Ernest; Robinson, Carol V; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-07-28

    Amyloid fibrils are thread-like protein aggregates with a core region formed from repetitive arrays of beta-sheets oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Such structures were first recognized in clinical disorders, but more recently have also been linked to a variety of non-pathogenic phenomena ranging from the transfer of genetic information to synaptic changes associated with memory. The observation that many proteins can convert into similar structures in vitro has suggested that this ability is a generic feature of polypeptide chains. Here we have probed the nature of the amyloid structure by monitoring hydrogen/deuterium exchange in fibrils formed from an SH3 domain using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results reveal that under the conditions used in this study, exchange is dominated by a mechanism of dissociation and re-association that results in the recycling of molecules within the fibril population. This insight into the dynamic nature of amyloid fibrils, and the ability to determine the parameters that define this behaviour, have important implications for the design of therapeutic strategies directed against amyloid disease.

  15. Atrophy, hypometabolism and clinical trajectories in patients with amyloid-negative Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Villemagne, Victor L; Perrotin, Audrey; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Jagust, William J; Dore, Vincent; Miller, Bruce L; Egret, Stéphanie; Seeley, William W; van der Flier, Wiesje M; La Joie, Renaud; Ames, David; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Rowe, Christopher C; Masters, Colin L; de La Sayette, Vincent; Bouwman, Femke; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-09-01

    -negative cases whose post-positon emission tomography diagnosis remained Alzheimer's disease. While the non-amnestic and non-specific amyloid-negative cases usually showed patterns of atrophy and hypometabolism suggestive of another degenerative disorder, the amnestic amyloid-negative cases had subtle atrophy and hypometabolism, restricted to the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortex. Patients with a negative amyloid positon emission tomography scan following an initial clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease have heterogeneous clinical presentations and neuroimaging profiles; a majority showed a clinical progression that was consistent with a neurodegenerative condition. In contrast, in the subgroup of amnestic amyloid-negative cases, the clinical presentation and follow-up usually remained consistent with Alzheimer's disease. An alternative diagnosis was not made in about half of the amnestic amyloid-negative cases, highlighting the need for a clinical framework and terminology to define these patients, who may have underlying limbic-predominant, non-amyloid-related pathologies.

  16. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  17. The Alzheimer's Amyloid-Degrading Peptidase, Neprilysin: Can We Control It?

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaeva, N. N.; Belyaev, N. D.; Zhuravin, I. A.; Turner, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) postulates that accumulation in the brain of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is the primary trigger for neuronal loss specific to this pathology. In healthy brain, Aβ levels are regulated by a dynamic equilibrium between Aβ release from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its removal by perivascular drainage or by amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs). During the last decade, the ADE family was fast growing, and currently it embraces more than 20 members. There are solid data supporting involvement of each of them in Aβ clearance but a zinc metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP) is considered as a major ADE. NEP plays an important role in brain function due to its role in terminating neuropeptide signalling and its decrease during ageing or after such pathologies as hypoxia or ischemia contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP by the APP intracellular domain (AICD) opens new avenues for its therapeutic manipulation and raises hope for developing preventive strategies in AD. However, consideration needs to be given to the diverse physiological roles of NEP. This paper critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of NEP and their therapeutic relevance. PMID:22900228

  18. Amyloid beta: structure, biology and structure-based therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo-Fang; Xu, Ting-Hai; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Yu-Ren; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-09-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is produced through the proteolytic processing of a transmembrane protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP), by β- and γ-secretases. Aβ accumulation in the brain is proposed to be an early toxic event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. Currently, it is unclear what the physiological and pathological forms of Aβ are and by what mechanism Aβ causes dementia. Moreover, there are no efficient drugs to stop or reverse the progression of Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we review the structures, biological functions, and neurotoxicity role of Aβ. We also discuss the potential receptors that interact with Aβ and mediate Aβ intake, clearance, and metabolism. Additionally, we summarize the therapeutic developments and recent advances of different strategies for treating Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we will report on the progress in searching for novel, potentially effective agents as well as selected promising strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These prospects include agents acting on Aβ, its receptors and tau protein, such as small molecules, vaccines and antibodies against Aβ; inhibitors or modulators of β- and γ-secretase; Aβ-degrading proteases; tau protein inhibitors and vaccines; amyloid dyes and microRNAs.

  19. Development of amyloid burden in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Sergey; Willard, Stephanie L.; Shively, Carol A; Kaplan, Jay R; Register, Tom; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Polak, Paul E; Rubinstein, Israel; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    The vervet is an old world monkey increasingly being used as a model for human diseases. In addition to plaques and tangles, an additional hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is damage to neurons that synthesize noradrenaline (NA). We characterized amyloid burden in the posterior temporal lobe of young and aged vervets, and compared that to changes in NA levels and astrocyte activation. Total Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were increased in the aged group, as were numbers of amyloid plaques detected using antibody 6E10. Low levels of Aβ42 were detected in 1 of 5 younger animals, although diffusely stained plaques were observed in 4 of these. Increased GFAP staining and mRNA levels were significantly correlated with increased age, as were cortical NA levels. Levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40, and the number of 6E10+ plaques, were correlated with NA levels. Interestingly mRNA levels of glial derived neurotrophic factor, important for noradrenergic neuronal survival, were reduced with age. These findings suggest that amyloid pathology in aged vervets is associated with astrocyte activation and higher NA levels. PMID:23601810

  20. [Physico-chemical methods for studing β-amyloid aggregation].

    PubMed

    Radko, S P; Khmeleva, S A; Suprun, E V; Kozin, S A; Bodoev, N V; Makarov, A A; Archakov, A I; Shumyantseva, V V

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent neurodegenerative pathology. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, a key event of the Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is a transition of the β-amyloid peptide (Аβ) from the monomeric form to the aggregated state. The mechanism of Аβ aggregation is intensively studied in vitro, by means of synthetic peptides and various physico-chemical methods allowing evaluation of size, molecular structure, and morphology of the formed aggregates. The paper reviews both the well-known and recently introduced physico-chemical methods for analysis of Аβ aggregation, including microscopу, optical and fluorescent methods, method of electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemical and electrophoretic methods, gel-filtration, and mass spectrometric methods. Merits and drawbacks of the methods are discussed. The unique possibility to simultaneously observe Аβ monomers as well oligomers and large aggregates by means of atomic force microscopy or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is emphasized. The high detection sensitivity of the latter method, monitoring the aggregation process in Аβ solutions at low peptide concentrations is underlined. Among mass spectrometric methods, the ion mobility mass spectrometry is marked out as a method enabling to obtain information about both the spectrum of Аβ oligomers and their structure. It is pointed out that the use of several methods giving the complementary data about Аβ aggregates is the best experimental approach to studying the process of b-amyloid peptide aggregation in vitro.

  1. AMYPdb: A database dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Sandrine; Le Béchec, Antony; Delamarche, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is associated with a number of severe pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease, prion diseases, and type II diabetes. The rapid accumulation of knowledge about the sequences and structures of these proteins allows using of in silico methods to investigate the molecular mechanisms of their abnormal conformational changes and assembly. However, such an approach requires the collection of accurate data, which are inconveniently dispersed among several generalist databases. Results We therefore created a free online knowledge database (AMYPdb) dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins and we have performed large scale sequence analysis of the included data. Currently, AMYPdb integrates data on 31 families, including 1,705 proteins from nearly 600 organisms. It displays links to more than 2,300 bibliographic references and 1,200 3D-structures. A Wiki system is available to insert data into the database, providing a sharing and collaboration environment. We generated and analyzed 3,621 amino acid sequence patterns, reporting highly specific patterns for each amyloid family, along with patterns likely to be involved in protein misfolding and aggregation. Conclusion AMYPdb is a comprehensive online database aiming at the centralization of bioinformatic data regarding all amyloid proteins and their precursors. Our sequence pattern discovery and analysis approach unveiled protein regions of significant interest. AMYPdb is freely accessible [1]. PMID:18544157