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Sample records for ambient high temperature

  1. Evaluating alternative refrigerants for high ambient temperature environments

    DOE PAGES

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Montreal Protocol, developing countries have started the phase out schedule of the ozone depleting substances, including HCFC refrigerants, in 2015 and expect them to reach 35% reduction in 2020. This commitment to the start the phase out of HCFC refrigerants, especially R-22, in developing countries is seen as an opportunity to introduce lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants. Furthermore, this paper summarizes an investigation into the performance of lower GWP refrigerants in high ambient temperature environments, experienced in some of the developed countries, in mini-split air conditioning units.

  2. Effects of caffeine and high ambient temperature on haemodynamic and body temperature responses to dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, C L; Daniels, J W; Lewis, W

    2001-09-01

    Caffeine can enhance mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and attenuate forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) during exercise in thermal neutral conditions without altering body temperature. During exercise at higher ambient temperatures, where a greater transfer of heat from the body core to skin would be expected, caffeine-induced attenuation of FBF (i.e. cutaneous blood flow) could attenuate heat dissipation and increase body temperature (T(re)). We hypothesized that during exercise at an ambient temperature of 38 degrees C, caffeine increases MAP, and attenuates FBF and FVC such that T(re) is increased. Eleven caffeine-naive, active men, were studied at rest and during exercise after ingestion of a placebo or 6 mg kg(-1) of caffeine. MAP, heart rate (HR), FBF, FVC, T(re) skin temperature (T(sk)) and venous lactate concentrations (lactate) were assessed sequentially during rest at room temperature, after 45 min of exposure to an ambient temperature of 38 degrees C, and during 35 min of submaximal cycling. Heat exposure caused increases in MAP, FBF, FVC and T(sk) that were not altered by caffeine. HR, T(re), and lactate were unaffected. During exercise, only MAP (95 +/- 2 vs. 102 +/- 2 mmHg), HR (155 +/- 10 vs. 165 +/- 10 beats min(-1)), and lactate (2.0 +/- 0.4 vs. 2.3 +/- 0.4 mmol l(-1)) were increased by caffeine. These data indicate that increases in cutaneous blood flow during exercise in the heat are not reduced by caffeine. This may be because of activation of thermal reflexes that cause cutaneous vasodilation capable of offsetting caffeine-induced reductions in blood flow. Caffeine-induced increases in lactate, MAP and HR during exercise suggest that this drug and high ambient temperatures increase production of muscle metabolites that cause reflex cardiovascular responses. PMID:11576153

  3. Effects of ethanol on body temperature of rats at high ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Berge, O G; Garcia-Cabrera, I

    1991-05-01

    Separately, ethanol and high ambient pressure cause hypothermia in laboratory animals. However, ethanol and high pressure have mutually antagonistic effects on several biological functions and the present experiments investigate their combined action on body temperature. Rats given saline, 1.5 g/kg ethanol or 3.5 g/kg ethanol were exposed to 1 bar air at 25-26 degrees C, 1 bar helium-oxygen at 30-31 degrees C, or 48 bar helium-oxygen at 33.5-34.5 degrees C. Ambient, colonic and tail-skin temperatures were monitored for 60 min. There were no significant differences in mean ambient or tail-skin temperatures between groups belonging to the same ambient condition. Colonic temperatures under the 1 bar conditions were 1.5-2 degrees C lower in the 3.5 g/kg ethanol group than in the saline and 1.5 g/kg ethanol groups, while no significant differences were observed between the groups at 48 bar. Comparisons of the colonic temperatures at the end of the observation period, i.e., 60 min after administration of ethanol, demonstrated that their values at 48 bar were significantly lower than at 1 bar after saline, significantly higher after 3.5 g/kg ethanol and identical across conditions in the 1.5 g/kg groups. The results suggest that high ambient pressure may counteract rather than potentiate the hypothermic effect of ethanol.

  4. Multi-spectral pyrometer for narrow space with high ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Xiao, Yihan; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-08-01

    A fiber-optic multi-spectral pyrometer with high spatial and temporal resolution has been applied to measure temperatures of the range from 700 to 1200 K. In a narrow space, the important problems in temperature measurement include the unknown emissivity on target surface and the thermal radiation from the high ambient temperature. This paper analyzed several critical issues affecting the multi-spectral pyrometer and calculated the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment result showed that this method has high accuracy and the measurement error is 0.44 %.

  5. Ferroelectric fluoro-terpolymers with high dielectric constant and large electromechanical response at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T. C.; Petchsuk, Atitsa

    2003-08-01

    This paper discusses a new family of ferroelectric polymorphs fluoro-terpolymers comprising vinylidene difluoride (VDF), trifluoroethylene (TrFE), and a chloro-containing third monomer, including vinyl chloride (VC), 1,1-chlorofluoroethylene (CFE), chlorodifluoroethylene (CDFE), chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), with narrow molecular weight and composition distributions. The slightly bulky chlorine atom serves as a kink in the polymer chain, which spontaneously alters the chain conformation and crystalline structure. Comparing with the corresponding VDF/TrFE copolymer, the slowly increasing chlorine content (< 8 mol% of ter-monomer) gradually changes the all-trans chain conformation to tttg+tttg- conformation, without significant reduction of overall crystallinity. Curie (F-P) phase transition temperature between the mixed ferroelectric phases and paraelectric phase (tg+tg- conformation) also gradually reduced to near ambient temperature, with very small activation energy. Consequently, the terpolymers show high dielectric constant (>80) and large electrostrictive response (>5%) at ambient temperature, and exhibiting common ferroelectric relaxor behaviors with a broad dielectric peak that shifted toward higher temperatures as the frequency increased, and a slim polarization hysteresis loop at ambient temperature.

  6. Ambient temperature nanoelectrospray ion mobility detector for high performance liquid chromatography in determining amines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuang; Hou, Keyong; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-09-01

    A nanoelectrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer (nanoESI-IMS) working at ambient pressure and ambient temperature was developed as a detector of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to achieve sensitive detection of amines with no derivatization and meanwhile provide another dimension of separation. The easier desolvation property of the charged droplets formed in nanoESI source enabled complete desolvation of the product ions of sixteen amines and drugs using the nanoESI-IMS at ambient temperature. Working at ambient temperature was good for suppressing the dissociation of thermal volatile ions, such as only the proton adducted molecular ions were observed for morphine in the nanoESI-IMS. Besides, the resolving power of the nanoESI-IMS also showed an increasing tendency as lowering the working temperature, an increment of 19 percent and 10 percent was observed for diethylamine and triethylamine as the temperature dropped from 92°C to 32°C. The resolving power of the nanoESI-IMS at 32°C for the 16 tested compounds was amid 33-44. With the nanoESI-IMS coupled to HPLC, a six-compound mixture including isomers was successfully separated and detected without any derivatization. And linear response ranges of 1 to 20, 0.5 to 20, and 0.8 to 20μgml(-1) and limits of detection of 0.25, 0.15, and 0.17μgml(-1) for triethylamine, diethylamine, and butylamine, respectively, were obtained with the hyphenated system. These results showed the excellent performance of the two-dimensional separation and detection method in direct qualitative and quantitative analyses of amines.

  7. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; Delbeke, Frans; Deventer, Koen; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-12-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p < 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature.

  8. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; Delbeke, Frans; Deventer, Koen; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-12-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p < 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature. PMID:21461761

  9. Higher inclusion rate of canola meal under high ambient temperature for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Aljuobori, A; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; Abdullah, N; Liang, J B; Mujahid, A

    2016-06-01

    Extruded canola meal (ECM) was included in diet of broiler chickens at 0, 10, 20, and 30% (wt/wt) from 1 to 35 days of age. A total of 240 day-old male chicks were assigned in groups of 5 to 48 battery cages in environmentally controlled chambers and diets were replicated with 12 cages/treatment. From d 29 to 35, birds from each dietary group were exposed to either thermoneutral (23 ± 1°C; unheated) or high (36 ± 1°C; heated) temperature conditions. High ambient temperature, irrespective of ECM inclusion, depressed the growth performance of birds. Inclusion of ECM increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) linearly in unheated birds during d 1 to 28 (P < 0.001) and d 29 to 35 (P = 0.001). However, no adverse effects of ECM inclusion were observed on the growth performance of heated birds. The absence of these detrimental effects could be associated with the lack of triiodothyronine (T3) elevation by ECM inclusion in heated birds. In conclusion, ECM can be fed, at least, up to 30%, without any adverse effect on growth performance of broiler chickens raised under chronic high ambient temperature. PMID:26944983

  10. Effects of high ambient temperatures on the metabolism of West African dwarf goats. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montsma, G.; Luiting, P.; Verstegen, M. W. A.; van der Hel, W.; Hofs, P.; Zijlker, J. W.

    1985-03-01

    32 West African dwarf goats were exposed in respiration chambers to temperature treatments of 20, 25, 30, 35, 35, 35, 30, 25, 20°C. Each treatment lasted three days. 16 goats were kept in individual pens (“I”); the others in two group pens of eight animals each (“G”). During each treatment, heat production and activity were recorded continuously over 48 hours. In addition, feed and water intake, rectal temperature, skin temperature and respiratory rate were measured during each treatment. Compared to 20°C, at 35°C rectal temperature increased from 39.0°C to 39.9°C, respiratory rate from 30 to 260 times. min-1 and skin temperature from 37.1°C to 39.5°C. Hay intake decreased by 40%; concentrates (30 g. kg-0.75. d-1) were always completely consumed. Heat production was higher for the “G” animals at 20°C and higher for the “I” animals at 35°C. These differences in heat production between the two groups were reflected in differences in rectal and skin temperature and in respiratory rate but only very slightly in differences in hay intake. Tissue insulation was 0.014 K. m2. W-1 at 30°C and 35°C and 0.022 K. m2. W-1 at 20°C. It is concluded that the reactions of these dwarf goats to high ambient temperatures are not different in principle from those of other domestic ruminants and that they do not exhibit a specific suitability or unsuitability for ambient temperatures as prevailing in West Africa.

  11. Effects of zinc sulfate pretreatment on heat tolerance of Bama miniature pig under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Cao, Y; Zhou, X; Wang, F; Shan, T; Li, Z; Xu, W; Li, C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the heat tolerance of Bama miniature pigs under high ambient temperature (40°C) and Zn interactive functions during heat treatment (HT). Bama miniature pigs (male; n = 24; 6-mo old; BW = 10.79 ± 0.06 kg) were randomly allotted to 4 groups and were fed a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with 1,500 mg of Zn (ZnSO4·H2O)/kg diet for 38 d. At 7 mo of age (d 30), the thermal neutral (TN) groups remained at 25°C, whereas the HT groups were exposed to ambient temperature at 40°C for 5 h daily for 8 consecutive days. Pigs in 4 groups were sacrificed on d 38. Individual rectal temperatures, skin temperatures, and breathing rates were recorded at 3 h after the onset of HT and the blood samples were collected immediately after HT on d 30, 34, and 38. Pigs fed diets with or without Zn doubled their breathing rates (P < 0.05) and increased body surface, scrotal, and rectal temperatures during HT on d 30, 34, and 38, respectively. Zinc supplementation increased BW gain (BWG; P < 0.05) during 38-d experiment period, and HT decreased BWG only from d 30 to 34 (P < 0.05). Heat treatment increased serum testosterone on d 30 (P < 0.05). Zinc supplementation decreased the heat-induced increase of testosterone in HT on d 30 and 34 (P < 0.05). The relative weight of liver increased in HT groups (P < 0.05). Zinc supplementation decreased the relative weights of spleen (P < 0.05) and testis (P < 0.01). The values of abnormal lymphocyte count and large unstained cell count declined approximately 5 times in groups of Zn supplementation, whereas Zn supplementation increased the values of red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Zinc concentrations increased in serum, liver, kidney, epididymis, longissimus, hair, and feces in groups fed with Zn (P < 0.01). However, additional Zn decreased Zn concentrations in lung, spleen, and testis (P < 0.01). Moreover, HT decreased serum Zn

  12. Split Spinach Aptamer for Highly Selective Recognition of DNA and RNA at Ambient Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Nanami; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-09-01

    Split spinach aptamer (SSA) probes for fluorescent analysis of nucleic acids were designed and tested. In SSA design, two RNA or RNA/DNA strands hybridized to a specific nucleic acid analyte and formed a binding site for low-fluorescent 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) dye, which resulted in up to a 270-fold increase in fluorescence. The major advantage of the SSA over state-of-the art fluorescent probes is high selectivity: it produces only background fluorescence in the presence of a single-base-mismatched analyte, even at room temperature. SSA is therefore a promising tool for label-free analysis of nucleic acids at ambient temperatures. PMID:27305425

  13. Light-induced catalyst and solvent-free high pressure synthesis of high density polyethylene at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The combined effect of high pressure and electronic photo-excitation has been proven to be very efficient in activating extremely selective polymerisations of small unsaturated hydrocarbons in diamond anvil cells (DAC). Here we report an ambient temperature, large volume synthesis of high density polyethylene based only on high pressure (0.4-0.5 GPa) and photo-excitation (~350 nm), without any solvent, catalyst or radical initiator. The reaction conditions are accessible to the current industrial technology and the laboratory scale pilot reactor can be scaled up to much larger dimensions for practical applications. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, indicate that the synthesised material is of comparable quality with respect to the outstanding crystalline material obtained in the DAC. The polydispersity index is comparable to that of IV generation Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Moreover the crystalline quality of the synthesised material can be further enhanced by a thermal annealing at 373 K and ambient pressure.

  14. Tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) hydration under high pressure at ambient and high temperature (200 deg. C)

    SciTech Connect

    Meducin, F.; Zanni, H.; Noik, C.; Hamel, G.; Bresson, B.

    2008-03-15

    The hydration of a tricalcium silicate paste at ambient temperature and at 200 deg. C under high pressure (up to 1000 bar) has been studied. Two high pressure cells have been used, one allows in-situ electrical conductivity measurements during hydration under high pressure. The hydration products were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements. The pressure has a large kinetic effect on the hydration of a C{sub 3}S paste at room temperature. The pressure was seen to affect drastically the hydration of a C{sub 3}S paste at 200 deg. C and this study evidences the competition between the different high temperature phases during the hydration.

  15. Impact of high ambient temperature on unintentional injuries in high-income countries: a narrative systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Otte im Kampe, Eveline; Kovats, Sari; Hajat, Shakoor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Given the likelihood of increased hot weather due to climate change, it is crucial to have prevention measures in place to reduce the health burden of high temperatures and heat waves. The aim of this review is to summarise and evaluate the evidence on the effects of summertime weather on unintentional injuries in high-income countries. Design 3 databases (Global Public Health, EMBASE and MEDLINE) were searched by using related keywords and their truncations in the title and abstract, and reference lists of key studies were scanned. Studies reporting heatstroke and intentional injuries were excluded. Results 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. 11 out of 13 studies showed that the risk of unintentional injuries increases with increasing ambient temperatures. On days with moderate temperatures, the increased risk varied between 0.4% and 5.3% for each 1°C increase in ambient temperature. On extreme temperature days, the risk of injuries decreased. 2 out of 3 studies on occupational accidents found an increase in work-related accidents during high temperatures. For trauma hospital admissions, 6 studies reported an increase during hot weather, whereas 1 study found no association. The evidence for impacts on injuries by subgroups such as children, the elderly and drug users was limited and inconsistent. Conclusions The present review describes a broader range of types of unintentional fatal and non-fatal injuries (occupational, trauma hospital admissions, traffic, fire entrapments, poisoning and drug overdose) than has previously been reported. Our review confirms that hot weather can increase the risk of unintentional injuries and accidents in high-income countries. The results are useful for injury prevention strategies. PMID:26868947

  16. Arsenic ambient conditions preventing surface degradation of GaAs during capless annealing at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C. H.; Kondo, K.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in surface morphology and composition caused by capless annealing of GaAs were studied as a function of annealing temperature, T(GaAs), and the ambient arsenic pressure controlled by the temperature, T(As), of an arsenic source in the annealing ampul. It was established that any degradation of the GaAs surface morphology could be completely prevented, providing that T(As) was more than about 0.315T(GaAs) + 227 C. This empirical relationship is valid up to the melting point temperature of GaAs (1238 C), and it may be useful in some device-processing steps.

  17. Male Weasels Decrease Activity and Energy Expenditure in Response to High Ambient Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zub, Karol; Fletcher, Quinn E.; Szafrańska, Paulina A.; Konarzewski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The heat dissipation limit (HDL) hypothesis suggests that the capacity of endotherms to dissipate body heat may impose constraints on their energy expenditure. Specifically, this hypothesis predicts that endotherms should avoid the detrimental consequences of hyperthermia by lowering their energy expenditure and reducing their activity in response to high ambient temperatures (Ta). We used an extensive data set on the daily energy expenditure (DEE, n = 27) and the daily activity time (AT, n = 48) of male weasels (Mustela nivalis) during the spring and summer breeding season to test these predictions. We found that Ta was related in a “hump-shaped” (i.e. convex) manner to AT, DEE, resting metabolic rate (RMR) and metabolic scope (the ratio of DEE to RMR). These results support the HDL hypothesis because in response to warm Tas male weasels reduced their AT, DEE, and RMR. Although the activity and energy expenditure of large endotherms are most likely to be constrained in response to warm Tas because they are less able to dissipate heat, our results suggest that small endotherms may also experience constraints consistent with the HDL hypothesis. PMID:23977336

  18. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition.

  19. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition. PMID:25155185

  20. High atmospheric temperatures and 'ambient incubation' drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Simon C; Mainwaring, Mark C; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo's develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to 'ambient incubation'. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  1. High atmospheric temperatures and 'ambient incubation' drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Simon C; Mainwaring, Mark C; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo's develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to 'ambient incubation'. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed.

  2. High atmospheric temperatures and ‘ambient incubation’ drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Simon C.; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo’s develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to ‘ambient incubation’. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  3. Mortality risk attributable to high and low ambient temperature: a multicountry observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gasparrini, Antonio; Guo, Yuming; Hashizume, Masahiro; Lavigne, Eric; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel; Tobias, Aurelio; Tong, Shilu; Rocklöv, Joacim; Forsberg, Bertil; Leone, Michela; De Sario, Manuela; Bell, Michelle L; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Wu, Chang-fu; Kan, Haidong; Yi, Seung-Muk; de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Honda, Yasushi; Kim, Ho; Armstrong, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Although studies have provided estimates of premature deaths attributable to either heat or cold in selected countries, none has so far offered a systematic assessment across the whole temperature range in populations exposed to different climates. We aimed to quantify the total mortality burden attributable to non-optimum ambient temperature, and the relative contributions from heat and cold and from moderate and extreme temperatures. Methods We collected data for 384 locations in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, and USA. We fitted a standard time-series Poisson model for each location, controlling for trends and day of the week. We estimated temperature–mortality associations with a distributed lag non-linear model with 21 days of lag, and then pooled them in a multivariate metaregression that included country indicators and temperature average and range. We calculated attributable deaths for heat and cold, defined as temperatures above and below the optimum temperature, which corresponded to the point of minimum mortality, and for moderate and extreme temperatures, defined using cutoffs at the 2·5th and 97·5th temperature percentiles. Findings We analysed 74 225 200 deaths in various periods between 1985 and 2012. In total, 7·71% (95% empirical CI 7·43–7·91) of mortality was attributable to non-optimum temperature in the selected countries within the study period, with substantial differences between countries, ranging from 3·37% (3·06 to 3·63) in Thailand to 11·00% (9·29 to 12·47) in China. The temperature percentile of minimum mortality varied from roughly the 60th percentile in tropical areas to about the 80–90th percentile in temperate regions. More temperature-attributable deaths were caused by cold (7·29%, 7·02–7·49) than by heat (0·42%, 0·39–0·44). Extreme cold and hot temperatures were responsible for 0·86% (0·84–0·87) of total

  4. Effects of Ambient High Temperature Exposure on Alumina-Titania High Emittance Surfaces for Solar Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.; Wheeler, Donald R.; MacLachlam, Brian J.

    1998-01-01

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr) at high temperatures (1457 F (827 C)) for an extended period (approximately 2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 F (316 C) to l500 F (816 C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples, were characterized prior to and after heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1,200 F (649 C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1,000 F (538 C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1,500 F (816 C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1,200 F (649 C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled with spalling off the substrate noticeable at several locations. Based

  5. Sow and litter response to supplemental dietary fat in lactation diets during high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rosero, D S; van Heugten, E; Odle, J; Cabrera, R; Arellano, C; Boyd, R D

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the impact of supplemental dietary fat on total lactation energy intake and sow and litter performance during high ambient temperatures (27 ± 3°C). Data were collected from 337 mixed-parity sows from July to September in a 2,600-sow commercial unit in Oklahoma. Diets were corn-soybean meal-based with 7.5% corn distillers dried grains with solubles and 6.0% wheat middlings and contained 3.24 g of standardized ileal digestible Lys/Mcal of ME. Animal-vegetable fat blend (A-V) was supplemented at 0, 2, 4, or 6%. Sows were balanced by parity, with 113, 109, and 115 sows representing parity 1, 2, and 3 to 7 (P3+), respectively. Feed disappearance (subset of 190 sows; 4.08, 4.18, 4.44, and 4.34 kg/d, for 0, 2, 4, and 6%, respectively; P < 0.05) and apparent caloric intake (12.83, 13.54, 14.78, and 14.89 Mcal of ME/d, respectively; P < 0.001) increased linearly with increasing dietary fat. Gain:feed (sow and litter BW gain relative to feed intake) was not affected (P = 0.56), but gain:Mcal ME declined linearly with the addition of A-V (0.16, 0.15, 0.15, and 0.14 for 0, 2, 4, and 6%, respectively; P < 0.01). Parity 1 sows (3.95 kg/d) had less (P < 0.05) feed disappearance than P2 (4.48 kg/d) and P3+ (4.34 kg/d) sows. Body weight change in P1 sows was greater (P < 0.01) than either P2 or P3+ sows (-0.32 vs. -0.07 and 0.12 kg/d), whereas backfat loss was less (P < 0.05) and loin depth gain was greater (P < 0.05) in P3+ sows compared with P1 and P2 sows. Dietary A-V improved litter ADG (P < 0.05; 1.95, 2.13, 2.07, and 2.31 kg/d for 0, 2, 4, and 6% fat, respectively) only in P3+ sows. Sows bred within 8 d after weaning (58.3, 72.0, 70.2, and 74.7% for 0, 2, 4, and 6%, respectively); conception rate (78.5, 89.5, 89.2, and 85.7%) and farrowing rate (71.4, 81.4, 85.5, and 78.6%) were improved (P < 0.01) by additional A-V, but weaning-to-breeding interval was not affected. Rectal and skin temperature and respiration rate of sows

  6. Distinct vasopressin content in the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus of rats exposed to low and high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jasnic, N; Dakic, T; Bataveljic, D; Vujovic, P; Lakic, I; Jevdjovic, T; Djurasevic, S; Djordjevic, J

    2015-08-01

    Both high and low ambient temperature represent thermal stressors that, among other physiological responses, induce activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and secretion of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). The exposure to heat also leads to disturbance of osmotic homeostasis. Since AVP, in addition to its well-known peripheral effects, has long been recognized as a hormone involved in the modulation of HPA axis activity, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the hypothalamic AVP amount in the acutely heat/cold exposed rats. Rats were exposed to high (+38°C) or low (+4°C) ambient temperature for 60min. Western blot was employed for determining hypothalamic AVP levels, and the difference in its content between supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was detected using immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that exposure to both high and low ambient temperature increased hypothalamic AVP levels, although the increment was higher under heat conditions. On the other hand, patterns of AVP level changes in PVN and SON were stressor-specific, given that exposure to cold increased the AVP level in both nuclei, while heat exposure affected the PVN AVP content alone. In conclusion, our results revealed that cold and heat stress influence hypothalamic AVP amount with different intensity. Moreover, different pattern of AVP amount changes in the PVN and SON indicates a role of this hormone not only in response to heat as an osmotic/physical threat, but to the non-osmotic stressors as well.

  7. Ambient temperature signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Wigge, Philip A

    2013-10-01

    Plants are exposed to daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature. Within the 'ambient' temperature range (about 12-27°C for Arabidopsis) temperature differences have large effects on plant growth and development, disease resistance pathways and the circadian clock without activating temperature stress pathways. It is this developmental sensing and response to non-stressful temperatures that will be covered in this review. Recent advances have revealed key players in mediating temperature signals. The bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) has been shown to be a hub for multiple responses to warmer temperature in Arabidopsis, including flowering and hypocotyl elongation. Changes in chromatin state are involved in transmitting temperature signals to the transcriptome. Determining the precise mechanisms of temperature perception represents an exciting goal for the field.

  8. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ∼10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  9. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Tao, Franklin; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ˜10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  10. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ~10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  11. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ∼10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified. PMID:23556828

  12. High-rate anaerobic treatment of domestic wastewater at ambient operating temperatures: A review on benefits and drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Gomec, Cigdem Yangin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on high-rate anaerobic sewage treatment at ambient operating temperatures while presenting the benefits and drawbacks. Since domestic sewage is reported as the main point-source pollutant on a global scale, its treatment deserves ample research. In most of the cities and towns of some developing countries, wastewater produced in households is still discharged into the nearest water body without subjected any treatment. Therefore, simple, affordable, and effective sewage treatment systems are required. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater is reported as a sustainable alternative as recovery of energy is provided while nutrients are preserved for reuse. Anaerobic sewage treatment is certainly not limited to regions of hot climates but it also offers treatment potential in sub-tropical and even in moderate climatic regions due to their favorable temperature conditions. Since many sewage-like dilute wastewaters are discharged at low ambient temperatures especially under moderate climate conditions (15 to 20 degrees C), heating the wastewater to maintain mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C) for anaerobic treatment necessitates high energy and certainly high operating costs. Thus, the development of anaerobic treatment systems operated at ambient temperatures without doubt will have a great ecological and economic impact. High-rate anaerobic treatment systems, especially upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, have been occupying a noticeable position for sewage treatment in several tropical countries where artificial heating can be eliminated. However, in spite of their undeniable advantages, there are certain drawbacks of anaerobic sewage treatment at low operating temperatures which should be clarified. Among them, the main concern for anaerobic treatment application is its producing effluents that barely comply with the standarts for reuse in agriculture or discharge to the environment. Therefore, the effluents from

  13. Raman scattering spectroscopic study of n-tetradecane under high pressure and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xing; Zheng, Haifei

    2009-02-01

    The Raman spectroscopy of n-tetradecane was investigated in a Moissanite anvil cell at pressure from 0.1 MPa to 1.4 GPa and ambient temperature. The result shows that the liquid-solid phase transition of n-tetradecane takes place at around 302.8 MPa and the corresponding Δ Vm obtained is about -9.6 cm -3/mol. Above 302.8 MPa, the frequencies of CH 2 and CH 3 symmetric stretching and asymmetric stretching vibration shift to higher wave numbers in a linear manner with increasing pressure, which can be expressed as: νs(CH 3) = 0.013 P + 2882.0; νas(CH 3) = 0.014 P + 2961.6; νs(CH 2) = 0.013 P + 2850.8; νas(CH 2) = 0.009 P + 2923.2. This relationship indicates that n-tetradecane can be a reliable pressure gauge for the experimental study within the pressure range of 0.3-1.4 GPa.

  14. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  15. High-performance solid polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries operational at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindemark, Jonas; Sun, Bing; Törmä, Erik; Brandell, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Incorporation of carbonate repeating units in a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) backbone used as a host material in solid polymer electrolytes is found to not only suppress crystallinity in the polyester material, but also give higher ionic conductivity in a wide temperature range exceeding the melting point of PCL crystallites. Combined with high cation transference numbers, this electrolyte material has sufficient lithium transport properties to be used in battery cells that are operational at temperatures down to below 23 °C, thus clearly demonstrating the potential of using non-polyether electrolytes in high-performance all-solid lithium polymer batteries.

  16. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-08-01

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g-1 at 10 mA g-1 (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step.

  17. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-01-01

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g−1 at 10 mA g−1 (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step. PMID:26293134

  18. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-08-21

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1) at 10 mA g(-1) (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step.

  19. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-01-01

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1) at 10 mA g(-1) (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step. PMID:26293134

  20. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  1. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Shrestha, Som S.; Linkous, Randall Lee; Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Kassuga, Theo

    2015-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High-Ambient Temperature Testing Program for Low-GWP Refrigerants aims to develop an understanding of the performance of low-Global Warming Potential (low-GWP) alternatives to Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in mini-split air conditioners under high ambient temperature conditions. This interim working paper describes the parties involved, the alternative refrigerants selection process, the test procedures, and the preliminary results.

  2. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Linkous, Randall Lee; Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Kassuga, Theo

    2015-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High-Ambient-Temperature Evaluation Program for low– global warming potential (Low-GWP) Refrigerants aims to develop an understanding of the performance of low-GWP alternative refrigerants to hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in mini-split air conditioners under high-ambient-temperature conditions. This final report describes the parties involved, the alternative refrigerant selection process, the test procedures, and the final results.

  3. Immune defence under extreme ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Jokela, Jukka

    2011-02-23

    Owing to global climate change, the extreme weather conditions are predicted to become more frequent, which is suggested to have an even greater impact on ecological interactions than the gradual increase in average temperatures. Here, we examined whether exposure to high ambient temperature affects immune function of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). We quantified the levels of several immune traits from snails maintained in a non-stressful temperature (15°C) and in an extreme temperature (30°C) that occurs in small ponds during hot summers. We found that snails exposed to high temperature had weaker immune defence, which potentially predisposes them to infections. However, while phenoloxidase and antibacterial activity of snail haemolymph were reduced at high temperature, haemocyte concentration was not affected. This suggests that the effect of high temperature on snail susceptibility to infections may vary across different pathogens because different components of invertebrate immune defence have different roles in resistance.

  4. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  5. Highly CO2/N2-switchable zwitterionic surfactant for pickering emulsions at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingwei; Lu, Weiqiang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Li, Bo-Geng; Zhu, Shiping

    2014-09-01

    Cross-linked polymer particles were prepared via surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and sodium methacrylate (SMA) using N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA) as a cross-linker. Generated particles are zwitterionic, possessing unique isoelectric points in the pH range of 7.5-8.0, which is readily tunable through CO2/N2 bubbling. The particles were found to be highly responsive to CO2/N2 switching, dissolving in water with CO2 bubbling and precipitating with N2 bubbling at room temperature. Pickering emulsions of n-dodecane were prepared using these particles as the sole emulsifier. These emulsions can be rapidly demulsified with CO2 bubbling, resulting in complete oil/water phase separations. Nitrogen bubbling efficiently re-emulsifies the oil with the aid of homogenization. The rapid emulsification/demulsification using CO2/N2 bubbling at room temperature provides these cross-linked zwitterionic particles with distinct advantages as functional Pickering surfactants.

  6. High Ambient Temperatures and Risk of Motor Vehicle Crashes in Catalonia, Spain (2000–2011): A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Escalera-Antezana, Juan Pablo; Dadvand, Payam; Llatje, Òscar; Barrera-Gómez, Jose; Cunillera, Jordi; Medina-Ramón, Mercedes; Pérez, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Experimental studies have shown a decrease in driving performance at high temperatures. The epidemiological evidence for the relationship between heat and motor vehicle crashes is not consistent. Objectives We estimated the impact of high ambient temperatures on the daily number of motor vehicle crashes and, in particular, on crashes involving driver performance factors (namely distractions, driver error, fatigue, or sleepiness). Methods We performed a time-series analysis linking daily counts of motor vehicle crashes and daily temperature or occurrence of heat waves while controlling for temporal trends. All motor vehicle crashes with victims that occurred during the warm period of the years 2000–2011 in Catalonia (Spain) were included. Temperature data were obtained from 66 weather stations covering the region. Poisson regression models adjusted for precipitation, day of the week, month, year, and holiday periods were fitted to quantify the associations. Results The study included 118,489 motor vehicle crashes (an average of 64.1 per day). The estimated risk of crashes significantly increased by 2.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7%, 5.1%] during heat wave days, and this association was stronger (7.7%, 95% CI: 1.2%, 14.6%) when restricted to crashes with driver performance–associated factors. The estimated risk of crashes with driver performance factors significantly increased by 1.1% (95% CI: 0.1%, 2.1%) for each 1°C increase in maximum temperature. Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes involving driver performance–associated factors were increased in association with heat waves and increasing temperature. These findings are relevant for designing preventive plans in a context of global warming. Citation Basagaña X, Escalera-Antezana JP, Dadvand P, Llatje Ò, Barrera-Gómez J, Cunillera J, Medina-Ramón M, Pérez K. 2015. High ambient temperatures and risk of motor vehicle crashes in Catalonia, Spain (2000–2011): a time-series analysis

  7. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-01

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  8. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-15

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  9. High ambient temperature and mortality in California: exploring the roles of age, disease, and mortality displacement.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rupa; Malig, Brian

    2011-11-01

    Investigators have consistently demonstrated associations between elevated temperatures and mortality worldwide. Few have recently focused on identifying vulnerable subgroups, and far fewer have determined whether at least some of the observed effect may be a manifestation of mortality displacement. We examined mean daily apparent temperature and mortality in 13 counties in California during the warm season from 1999 to 2006 to identify age and disease subgroups that are at increased risk, and to evaluate the potential effect of mortality displacement. The time-series method using the Poisson regression was applied for data analysis for single lag days of 0-20 days, and for cumulative average lag days of five and ten days. Significant associations were observed for the same-day (excess risk=4.3% per 5.6 °C increase in apparent temperature, 95% confidence interval: 3.4, 5.2) continuing up to a maximum of three days following apparent temperature exposure for non-accidental mortality. Similar risks were found for mortality from cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, and among children zero to 18 years of age, and adults and the elderly 50 years and older. Since no significant negative effects were observed in the following single or cumulative days, evidence of mortality displacement was not found. Thus, the effect of temperature on mortality appears to be an event that occurs within three days following exposure, and requires immediate attention for prevention. PMID:21981982

  10. Association Between High Ambient Temperature and Risk of Stillbirth in California.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rupa; Sarovar, Varada; Malig, Brian J

    2016-05-15

    Recent studies have linked elevated apparent temperatures with adverse birth outcomes, such as preterm delivery, but other birth outcomes have not been well studied. We examined 8,510 fetal deaths (≥20 weeks' gestation) to estimate their association with mean apparent temperature, a combination of temperature and humidity, during the warm season in California (May-October) from 1999 to 2009. Mothers whose residential zip codes were within 10 km of a meteorological monitor were included. Meteorological data were provided by the California Irrigation Management Information System, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Climatic Data Center, while the California Department of Public Health provided stillbirth data. Using a time-stratified case-crossover study design, we found a 10.4% change (95% confidence interval: 4.4, 16.8) in risk of stillbirth for every 10°F (5.6°C) increase in apparent temperature (cumulative average of lags 2-6 days). Risk varied by maternal race/ethnicity and was greater for younger mothers, less educated mothers, and male fetuses. The highest risks were observed during gestational weeks 20-25 and 31-33. No associations were found during the cold season (November-April), and the observed associations were independent of air pollutants. This study adds to the growing body of literature identifying pregnant women and their fetuses as subgroups vulnerable to heat exposure. PMID:27037268

  11. Selenium-enriched probiotics improve antioxidant status, immune function, and selenoprotein gene expression of piglets raised under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fang; Chen, Xingxiang; Liao, Shengfa F; Lv, Chenhui; Ren, Fei; Ye, Gengping; Pan, Cuiling; Huang, Da; Shi, Jun; Shi, Xiuli; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Kehe

    2014-05-21

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on growth performance, antioxidant status, immune function, and selenoprotein gene expression of piglets under natural high ambient temperature in summer. Forty-eight crossbred weanling piglets randomly allocated to four groups were fed for 42 days ad libitum a basal diet without (Con, 0.16 mg Se/kg) and with supplementation of probiotics (P, 0.16 mg Se/kg), sodium selenite (SS, 0.46 mg Se/kg), and SP (0.46 mg Se/kg). From each group, three piglets were randomly selected for blood collection on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 and tissue collection on day 42. The SP improved growth performance of piglets. Both SS and SP increased blood glutathione peroxidase activity and tissue thioredoxin reductase 1 mRNA expression, with SP being higher than SS. All P, SS, and SP supplementation increased the superoxide dismutase activity (40.1, 53.0, and 64.5%), glutathione content (84.6, 104, and 165%), TCR-induced T lymphocyte proliferation (20.8, 26.4, and 50.0%), and IL-2 concentration (24.9, 27.2, and 46.2%) and decreased malondialdehyde content (25.1, 26.3, and 49.3%), respectively. The greatest effects of SP supplementation suggest that SP may serve as a better feed additive than P or SS for piglets under high-temperature environments.

  12. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  13. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  14. Effect of Season and High Ambient Temperature on Activity Levels and Patterns of Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Michelle L.; McLellan, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4–27.3°C) and hot (27.9–40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  15. Torpor at high ambient temperature in a neotropical didelphid, the grey short-tailed opossum ( Monodelphis domestica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Sebastian; Lutter, Dominik; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Jastroch, Martin; Meyer, Carola W.

    2014-11-01

    The grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, has been an established research animal for more than five decades, but relatively, little is known about its thermophysiology. Here we studied core body temperature ( T b) and metabolic rate (MR) of female adult M. domestica housed in the laboratory at an ambient temperature ( T a) of 26 °C. In expanding previous reports, the average recorded core T b of M. domestica was 34.3 °C. The T b of an individual M. domestica can drop below 30 °C (minimal T b: 28.6 °C) accompanied by a reduction in MR of up to 52 % even while having ad libitum access to food. These findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of spontaneous torpor in M. domestica. Metabolic suppression at relatively high T a and T b furthermore broadens our perspective on the use of torpor as a metabolic strategy not just restricted to cold climates.

  16. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory.

  17. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  18. Tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) and port fuel injection (PFI) vehicles at both low and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Lai, Yitu; Zu, Lei; Li, Yufei; Su, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle emissions are greatly influenced by various factors that are related to engine technology and driving conditions. Only the fuel injection method and ambient temperature are investigated in this research. Regulated gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from two advanced gasoline-fueled vehicles, one with direct fuel injection (GDI) and the other with port fuel injection (PFI), are tested with conventional gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline (E10) at both -7 °C and 30 °C. The total particle number (PN) concentrations and size distributions are monitored with an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(+)). The solid PN concentrations are measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC) after removing volatile matters through the particle measurement program (PMP) system. The results indicate that decreasing the ambient temperature from 30 °C to -7 °C significantly increases the fuel consumption and all measured emissions except for NOx. The GDI vehicle exhibits lower fuel consumption than the PFI vehicle but emits more total hydrocarbons (THC), PM mass and solid PN emissions at 30 °C. The adaptability of GDI technology appears to be better than that of PFI technology at low ambient temperature. For example, the CO, THC and PM mass emission factors of the PFI vehicle are higher than those of the GDI vehicle and the solid PN emission factors are comparable in the cold-start tests at -7 °C. Specifically, during start-up the particulate matter emissions of the PFI are much higher than the GDI. In most cases, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the accumulation mode particles is 58-86 nm for both vehicles, and the GMD of the nucleation mode particles is 10-20 nm. The results suggest that the gaseous and particulate emissions from the PFI vehicle should not be neglected compared to those from the GDI vehicle especially in a cold environment. PMID:27267738

  19. Tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) and port fuel injection (PFI) vehicles at both low and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Lai, Yitu; Zu, Lei; Li, Yufei; Su, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle emissions are greatly influenced by various factors that are related to engine technology and driving conditions. Only the fuel injection method and ambient temperature are investigated in this research. Regulated gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from two advanced gasoline-fueled vehicles, one with direct fuel injection (GDI) and the other with port fuel injection (PFI), are tested with conventional gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline (E10) at both -7 °C and 30 °C. The total particle number (PN) concentrations and size distributions are monitored with an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(+)). The solid PN concentrations are measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC) after removing volatile matters through the particle measurement program (PMP) system. The results indicate that decreasing the ambient temperature from 30 °C to -7 °C significantly increases the fuel consumption and all measured emissions except for NOx. The GDI vehicle exhibits lower fuel consumption than the PFI vehicle but emits more total hydrocarbons (THC), PM mass and solid PN emissions at 30 °C. The adaptability of GDI technology appears to be better than that of PFI technology at low ambient temperature. For example, the CO, THC and PM mass emission factors of the PFI vehicle are higher than those of the GDI vehicle and the solid PN emission factors are comparable in the cold-start tests at -7 °C. Specifically, during start-up the particulate matter emissions of the PFI are much higher than the GDI. In most cases, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the accumulation mode particles is 58-86 nm for both vehicles, and the GMD of the nucleation mode particles is 10-20 nm. The results suggest that the gaseous and particulate emissions from the PFI vehicle should not be neglected compared to those from the GDI vehicle especially in a cold environment.

  20. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  1. A meta-analysis of the effects of high ambient temperature on growth performance of growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Gourdine, J L; St-Pierre, N R

    2011-07-01

    High ambient temperature (T) is one of the most important climatic factors influencing pig performance. Increased T occurs sporadically during summer heat waves in temperate climates and year round in tropical climates. Results of published experiments assessing the effects of high T on pig performance are surprisingly variable. Thus, a meta-analysis was performed to aggregate our knowledge and attempt to explain differences in the results across studies on the effect of increased T on ADFI and ADG in growing-finishing pigs. Data for ADFI and ADG were extracted from 86 and 80 trials, respectively, from articles published in scientific journals indexed in PubMed, Science Direct, and from proceedings of scientific meetings through November 2009. Data on ADFI and ADG were analyzed using a linear mixed model that included the linear and the quadratic effects of T and BW, and their interactions as continuous, fixed effects variables, and the trial as a random effect factor (i.e., block). In addition, the effects of housing type (2 levels: individual and group housing) and the year of publication (3 levels: 1970 to 1989, 1990 to 1999, and 2000 to 2009) on the intercept and the linear regression term for T (i.e., the slope) were also tested. Results showed that high T had a curvilinear effect on ADFI and ADG and that this effect was more pronounced in heavier pigs. Across T, ADFI was less when pigs were group-housed. The intercept and the regression coefficient (slope) for T were significantly affected by the year of publication. The effect of increased T was greater in more contemporary works, suggesting that modern genotypes could be more sensitive to heat stress than older genotypes of lesser growth potential. In conclusion, pig performance decreases at an accelerating rate as T is increased. The large between-study variability on the effects of high T on pig performance is partially explained by differences in pig BW and to a lesser extent by the year the study was

  2. Part 2. Association of daily mortality with ambient air pollution, and effect modification by extremely high temperature in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; He, Qingci; Lin, Hung-Mo; Kong, Lingli; Zhou, Dunjin; Liang, Shengwen; Zhu, Zhichao; Liao, Duanping; Liu, Wenshan; Bentley, Christy M; Dan, Jijun; Wang, Beiwei; Yang, Niannian; Xu, Shuangqing; Gong, Jie; Wei, Hongming; Sun, Huilin; Qin, Zudian

    2010-11-01

    Fewer studies have been published on the association between daily mortality and ambient air pollution in Asia than in the United States and Europe. This study was undertaken in Wuhan, China, to investigate the acute effects of air pollution on mortality with an emphasis on particulate matter (PM*). There were three primary aims: (1) to examine the associations of daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular [CVD], stroke, cardiac [CARD], respiratory [RD], cardiopulmonary [CP], and non-cardiopulmonary [non-CP] causes) with daily mean concentrations (microg/m3) of PM with an aerodynamic diameter--10 pm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), or ozone (O3); (2) to investigate the effect modification of extremely high temperature on the association between air pollution and daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality; and (3) to assess the uncertainty of effect estimates caused by the change in International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding of mortality data from Revision 9 (ICD-9) to Revision 10 (ICD-10) code. Wuhan is called an "oven city" in China because of its extremely hot summers (the average daily temperature in July is 37.2 degrees C and maximum daily temperature often exceeds 40 degrees C). Approximately 4.5 million residents live in the core city area of 201 km2, where air pollution levels are higher and ranges are wider than the levels in most cities studied in the published literature. We obtained daily mean levels of PM10, SO2, and NO2 concentrations from five fixed-site air monitoring stations operated by the Wuhan Environmental Monitoring Center (WEMC). O3 data were obtained from two stations, and 8-hour averages, from 10:00 to 18:00, were used. Daily mortality data were obtained from the Wuhan Centres for Disease Prevention and Control (WCDC) during the study period of July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2004. To achieve the first aim, we used a regression of

  3. Response of the modern lactating sow and progeny to source and level of supplemental dietary fat during high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rosero, D S; van Heugten, E; Odle, J; Arellano, C; Boyd, R D

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the response to increments of 2 sources of dietary fat on lactating sow and progeny performance during high ambient temperatures. Data were collected from 391 sows (PIC Camborough) from June to September in a 2,600-sow commercial unit in Oklahoma. Sows were randomly assigned to a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments and a control diet. Factors included 1) fat sources, animal-vegetable blend (A-V) and choice white grease (CWG), and 2) fat levels (2%, 4%, and 6%). The A-V blend contained 14.5% FFA with an iodine value of 89, peroxide value of 4.2 mEq/kg, and anisidine value of 23, whereas CWG contained 3.7% FFA with an iodine value of 62, peroxide value of 9.8 mEq/kg, and anisidine value of 5. Diets were corn-soybean meal based, with 8.0% distillers dried grains with solubles and 6.0% wheat middlings, and contained 3.56-g standardized ileal digestible Lys/Mcal ME. Sows were balanced by parity, with 192 and 199 sows representing parity 1 and parity 3 to 5, respectively. Feed refusal increased linearly (P < 0.001) with the addition of supplemental fat, but feed and energy intake increased linearly (P < 0.01) with increasing dietary fat. Sows fed CWG diets had reduced (linear, P < 0.05) BW loss during lactation. Litter growth rate was not affected by additional dietary fat. Addition of CWG to the diets improved G:F (sow and litter gain relative to feed intake) compared with the G:F of sows fed the control diet or the diets containing the A-V blend (0.50, 0.43, and 0.44, respectively; P < 0.05). Gain:ME (kg/Mcal ME) was greater (P < 0.05) for CWG (0.146) than A-V blend (0.129) but was not different from that of the control diet (0.131). Addition of A-V blend and CWG both improved (P < 0.05) conception and farrowing rates and subsequent litter size compared with the control diet. In conclusion, energy intake increased with the addition of fat. The A-V blend contained a greater amount of aldehydes (quantified by anisidine

  4. Part 2. Association of daily mortality with ambient air pollution, and effect modification by extremely high temperature in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; He, Qingci; Lin, Hung-Mo; Kong, Lingli; Zhou, Dunjin; Liang, Shengwen; Zhu, Zhichao; Liao, Duanping; Liu, Wenshan; Bentley, Christy M; Dan, Jijun; Wang, Beiwei; Yang, Niannian; Xu, Shuangqing; Gong, Jie; Wei, Hongming; Sun, Huilin; Qin, Zudian

    2010-11-01

    Fewer studies have been published on the association between daily mortality and ambient air pollution in Asia than in the United States and Europe. This study was undertaken in Wuhan, China, to investigate the acute effects of air pollution on mortality with an emphasis on particulate matter (PM*). There were three primary aims: (1) to examine the associations of daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular [CVD], stroke, cardiac [CARD], respiratory [RD], cardiopulmonary [CP], and non-cardiopulmonary [non-CP] causes) with daily mean concentrations (microg/m3) of PM with an aerodynamic diameter--10 pm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), or ozone (O3); (2) to investigate the effect modification of extremely high temperature on the association between air pollution and daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality; and (3) to assess the uncertainty of effect estimates caused by the change in International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding of mortality data from Revision 9 (ICD-9) to Revision 10 (ICD-10) code. Wuhan is called an "oven city" in China because of its extremely hot summers (the average daily temperature in July is 37.2 degrees C and maximum daily temperature often exceeds 40 degrees C). Approximately 4.5 million residents live in the core city area of 201 km2, where air pollution levels are higher and ranges are wider than the levels in most cities studied in the published literature. We obtained daily mean levels of PM10, SO2, and NO2 concentrations from five fixed-site air monitoring stations operated by the Wuhan Environmental Monitoring Center (WEMC). O3 data were obtained from two stations, and 8-hour averages, from 10:00 to 18:00, were used. Daily mortality data were obtained from the Wuhan Centres for Disease Prevention and Control (WCDC) during the study period of July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2004. To achieve the first aim, we used a regression of

  5. Near-ambient pressure XPS of high-temperature surface chemistry in Sr2Co2O5 thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Wesley T.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-02-11

    Transition metal perovskite oxides are promising electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, but a lack of fundamental understanding of oxide surfaces impedes the rational design of novel catalysts with improved device efficiencies. In particular, understanding the surface chemistry of oxides is essential for controlling both catalytic activity and long-term stability. Thus, elucidating the physical nature of species on perovskite surfaces and their catalytic enhancement would generate new insights in developing oxide electrocatalysts. In this article, we perform near-ambient pressure XPS of model brownmillerite Sr2Co2O5 (SCO) epitaxial thin films with different crystallographic orientations. Detailed analysis of themore » Co 2p spectra suggests that the films lose oxygen as a function of temperature. Moreover, deconvolution of the O 1s spectra shows distinct behavior for (114)-oriented SCO films compared to (001)-oriented SCO films, where an additional bulk oxygen species is observed. These findings indicate a change to a perovskite-like oxygen chemistry that occurs more easily in (114) SCO than (001) SCO, likely due to the orientation of oxygen vacancy channels out-of-plane with respect to the film surface. This difference in surface chemistry is responsible for the anisotropy of the oxygen surface exchange coefficient of SCO and may contribute to the enhanced ORR kinetics of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ thin films by SCO surface particles observed previously.« less

  6. Effects of high ambient temperature on fish sperm plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity - A flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szabolcs Tamás; Kakasi, Balázs; Pál, László; Havasi, Máté; Bercsényi, Miklós; Husvéth, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    Local extreme climatic conditions occurring as a result of global climate change may interfere with the reproduction of animals. In the present study fish spermatozoa were incubated at different temperatures (20, 25, 30 and 40 °C) for 10 and 30 minutes, respectively and plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were evaluated with flow cytometry using SYBR-14/PI and Mitotracker Deep Red FM fluorescent dyes. No significant differences were found in plasma membrane integrity at either incubation temperatures or time points. Mitotracker Deep Red FM histogram profiles indicating mitochondrial activity showed significant (p < 0.001) alterations in all cases of higher (25, 30 and 40 °C) temperature treatments as compared to the samples incubated at 20 °C. Our results indicate that fish spermatozoa exposed to high temperatures suffer sublethal damage that cannot be detected with conventional, vital staining techniques. PMID:27165524

  7. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  8. High-T(sub c) Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Junctions with Polyimide-Passivated Ambient Temperature Edge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barner, J. B.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Hunt, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to controllably fabricate High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) S-Normal-S (SNS) Josephson Juntions (JJ's) enhances the possibilities fro many applications, including digital circuits, SQUID's, and mixers. A wide variety of approaches to fabricating SNS-like junctions has been tried and analyzed in terms of proximity effect behavior.

  9. Advances in ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the NASA/OAST sponsored program on the development of ambient-temperature secondary lithium cells for future space applications is to develop cells with a 100 W h/kg specific energy and capable of 1000 cycles at 50-percent depth of discharge. This paper examines the performance potentials of Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, Li-V6O13, and Li-NbSe3 electrochemical systems at ambient temperature, together with cycle life and safety characteristics. Of these four, the Li-TiS2 system was found to be the most promising in terms of achievable specific energy and cycle life. Major advances made on the development of secondary lithium cells, which are in the areas of cathode processing technology, mixed solvent electrolytes, and cell assembly, are summarized.

  10. Ambient-temperature co-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation catalysts which operate at ambient temperature were developed for the recombination of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) dissociation products which are formed during carbon dioxide (CO2) laser operation. Recombination of these products to regenerate CO2 allows continuous operation of CO2 lasers in a closed cycle mode. Development of these catalyst materials provides enabling technology for the operation of such lasers from space platforms or in ground based facilities without constant gas consumption required for continuous open cycle operation. Such catalysts also have other applications in various areas outside the laser community for removal of CO from other closed environments such as indoor air and as an ambient temperature catalytic converter for control of auto emissions.

  11. Ambient and high-temperature stable fracture tests in ceramics: Applications to yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, J.Y.; Planas, J.; Elices, M. . Dept. de Ciencia de Materiales Ciudad Univ., Madrid . ETS de Ingenieros de Caminos)

    1993-11-01

    A new technique that provides stable fracture tests in brittle ceramic materials at room and at high temperature is presented. This technique uses the crack mouth opening displacement signal from a laser extensometer to feed the servo control of a hydraulic testing machine. In this way it is possible to obtain--in addition to the fracture toughness--the fracture energy and the R-curve, in a single test.

  12. Correlation of rectal temperature and peripheral temperature from implantable radio-frequency microchips in Holstein steers challenged with lipopolysaccharide under thermoneutral and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Reid, E D; Fried, K; Velasco, J M; Dahl, G E

    2012-12-01

    Early detection of disease can speed treatment, slow spread of disease in a herd, and improve health status of animals. Immune stimulation increases rectal temperature (RT). Injectable radio-frequency implants (RFI) can provide temperature at the site of implantation. The fidelity of peripheral site temperature, determined by RFI, relative to RT is unknown in cattle. We hypothesized that during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, temperature at 3 peripheral sites would be similar to RT in steers (n = 4; BW 77 ± 2.1 kg). The 3 sites were 1) subcutaneous (SC) at the base of the ear (ET); 2) SC posterior to the poll (PT); and 3) SC beneath the umbilical fold (UT). Steers were housed in controlled temperature (CT) rooms (between 18 and 21°C; n = 2/room). Rectal temperature, ET, PT, and UT were recorded every 8 h daily. On d 7, 21, 22, 36, and 37, RT and RFI were taken every 5 min for 6 h, every 15 min for 3 h, and every 30 min for 15 h. To test RFI during a simulated immune challenge, LPS (E. coli 055:B5) was injected intravenously (i.v.) at 1000 h on d 22 and 37. Basal temperatures (°C) were RT (38.7 ± 0.20), ET (37.1 ± 0.86), PT (36.7 ± 0.57), and UT (36.3 ± 0.97). Rectal temperature increased to 39.9 ± 0.30°C after LPS, but ET, PT, and UT decreased. Heat stress also increases RT, which makes it difficult to identify sick animals using RT. The second hypothesis tested was that ET positively correlates to RT and negatively correlates to RT during LPS under heat stress. Four steers (127 ± 7.3 kg) were housed in CT chambers (n = 2/chamber), implanted with a RFI, and allowed 2 wk to acclimate. One chamber remained at 20°C, the other was increased to 34°C starting at 0800 h for a period of 48 h. The LPS was administered i.v. to all steers at 1000 h on d 2. After a 2-wk recovery at 20°C, the temperature was increased in the other chamber, resulting in a crossover design with each steer serving as its own control. Pearson's correlation coefficients for ET and

  13. Alterations in sheep peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine release by polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in the diet under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ciliberti, Maria Giovanna; Albenzio, Marzia; Annicchiarico, Giovanni; Sevi, Agostino; Muscio, Antonio; Caroprese, Mariangela

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation from different sources in the diet of dairy sheep under high ambient temperatures on ex vivo lymphocyte proliferation and inflammatory responses. The experiment was carried out during summer: 32 Comisana ewes were divided into 4 groups of 8. The FS group was supplemented with whole flaxseed, the AG group was supplemented with Ascophyllum nodosum, the FS+AG group was supplemented with a combination of flaxseed and A. nodosum. The fourth group (CON group) was a control and received a diet containing no supplement. The average maximum temperature was around 33°C during wk 2 and 3, whereas the mean temperature never decreased below 26°C. Following 15 d of treatment with respective diets, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from sheep who received a diet supplemented with A. nodosum had impaired cell proliferation responses and IL-6 production after mitogen stimulation compared with PBMC from FS+AG sheep. In addition, PBMC from AG sheep displayed impaired cell proliferation compared with cells from the CON group. The FS+AG cells produced lower levels of IL-10 than CON cells, and higher IL-6 than AG and CON cells. Results demonstrated that the supplementation with PUFA from different sources in a sheep's diet can influence their immunological responses under high ambient temperatures depending on the composition of fatty acid supplementation. In particular, synergistic effects of different PUFA from flaxseed and A. nodosum, simultaneously administrated in the sheep diet, were observed on activation of inflammation response. PMID:25497814

  14. Selective O 2 Sorption at Ambient Temperatures via Node Distortions in Sc-MIL-100 (The structure-property relationship of Sc-MIL-100 for O2 selectivity at high temperatures)

    DOE PAGES

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Chapman, Karena W.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Parkes, Marie V.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2016-05-24

    In this study, oxygen selectivity in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) at exceptionally high temperatures originally predicted by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) modeling is now confirmed by synthesis, sorption metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Based on DFT M-O2 binding energies, we chose the large pored MIL-100 framework for metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Both resulted in preferential O2 and N2 gas uptake at temperatures ranging from 77 K to ambient temperatures (258 K, 298 K and 313 K).

  15. Relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori; Muraishi, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    We examined the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and daily mean ambient temperature on the day of the test in healthy men who had three annual checkups. We investigated 9,694 men who visited a hospital for routine health checkups in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Although the means and medians of ambient temperature for the three years were similar, the mode in 2008 (15.8 °C) was very different from those in 2007 and 2009 (22.4 °C and 23.2 °C). After controlling for age, body mass index, and hematocrit, a multiple regression analysis revealed a U-shaped relationship between ambient temperature and PSA in 2007 and 2009 ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in 2008 ( P = 0.779). In 2007, PSA was 13.5 % higher at 5 °C and 10.0 % higher at 30 °C than that at 18.4 °C (nadir). In 2009, PSA was 7.3 % higher at 5 °C and 6.8 % at 30 °C compared with the level at 17.7 °C (nadir). In logistic regression analysis, a U-shaped relationship was found for the prevalence of a higher PSA (> 2.5 ng/mL) by ambient temperature, with the lowest likelihood of having a high PSA at 17.8 °C in 2007 ( P = 0.038) and 15.5 °C in 2009 ( P = 0.033). When tested at 30 °C, there was a 57 % excess risk of having a high PSA in 2007 and a 61 % higher risk in 2009 compared with those at each nadir temperature. We found a U-shaped relationship between PSA and ambient temperature with the lowest level of PSA at 15-20 °C.

  16. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions. During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70 % (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions.

  17. Control of flowering by ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Capovilla, Giovanna; Schmid, Markus; Posé, David

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering is a crucial decision in the life cycle of plants since favourable conditions are needed to maximize reproductive success and, hence, the survival of the species. It is therefore not surprising that plants constantly monitor endogenous and environmental signals, such as day length (photoperiod) and temperature, to adjust the timing of the floral transition. Temperature in particular has been shown to have a tremendous effect on the timing of flowering: the effect of prolonged periods of cold, called the vernalization response, has been extensively studied and the underlying epigenetic mechanisms are reasonably well understood in Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast, the effect of moderate changes in ambient growth temperature on the progression of flowering, the thermosensory pathway, is only starting to be understood on the molecular level. Several genes and molecular mechanisms underlying the thermosensory pathway have already been identified and characterized in detail. At a time when global temperature is rising due to climate change, this knowledge will be pivotal to ensure crop production in the future. PMID:25326628

  18. Ambient temperature-independent dual-band mid-infrared radiation thermometry.

    PubMed

    Lü, You; He, Xin; Wei, Zhong-Hui; Sun, Zhi-Yuan; Chang, Song-Tao

    2016-03-20

    For temperature measurements of targets at low temperatures, dual-band radiation thermometry using mid-infrared detectors has been investigated extensively. However, the accuracy is greatly affected by the reflected ambient radiation and stray radiation, which depend on the ambient temperature. To ensure measurement accuracy, an improved dual-band measurement model is established by considering the reflected ambient radiation and the stray radiation. The effect of ambient temperature fluctuation on temperature measurement is then further analyzed in detail. Experimental results of measuring a gray-body confirm that the proposed method yields high accuracy at varying ambient temperatures. This method provides a practical approach to remove the effect of ambient temperature fluctuations on temperature measurements.

  19. In Situ Ptychography of Heterogeneous Catalysts using Hard X-Rays: High Resolution Imaging at Ambient Pressure and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Scholz, Maria; Benzi, Federico; Rochet, Amélie; Hoppe, Robert; Scherer, Torsten; Shi, Junjie; Wittstock, Arne; Weinhausen, Britta; Wagner, Jakob B; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-02-01

    A new closed cell is presented for in situ X-ray ptychography which allows studies under gas flow and at elevated temperature. In order to gain complementary information by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the cell makes use of a Protochips E-chipTM which contains a small, thin electron transparent window and allows heating. Two gold-based systems, 50 nm gold particles and nanoporous gold as a relevant catalyst sample, were used for studying the feasibility of the cell. Measurements showing a resolution around 40 nm have been achieved under a flow of synthetic air and during heating up to temperatures of 933 K. An elevated temperature exhibited little influence on image quality and resolution. With this study, the potential of in situ hard X-ray ptychography for investigating annealing processes of real catalyst samples is demonstrated. Furthermore, the possibility to use the same sample holder for ex situ electron microscopy before and after the in situ study underlines the unique possibilities available with this combination of electron microscopy and X-ray microscopy on the same sample.

  20. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

  1. CDKG1 protein kinase is essential for synapsis and male meiosis at high ambient temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tao; Nibau, Candida; Phillips, Dylan W; Jenkins, Glyn; Armstrong, Susan J; Doonan, John H

    2014-02-11

    The Arabidopsis cyclin-dependent kinase G (CDKG) gene defines a clade of cyclin-dependent protein kinases related to CDK10 and CDK11, as well as to the enigmatic Ph1-related kinases that are implicated in controlling homeologous chromosome pairing in wheat. Here we demonstrate that the CDKG1/CYCLINL complex is essential for synapsis and recombination during male meiosis. A transfer-DNA insertional mutation in the cdkg1 gene leads to a temperature-sensitive failure of meiosis in late Zygotene/Pachytene that is associated with defective formation of the synaptonemal complex, reduced bivalent formation and crossing over, and aneuploid gametes. An aphenotypic insertion in the cyclin L gene, a cognate cyclin for CDKG, strongly enhances the phenotype of cdkg1-1 mutants, indicating that this cdk-cyclin complex is essential for male meiosis. Since CYCLINL, CDKG, and their mammalian homologs have been previously shown to affect mRNA processing, particularly alternative splicing, our observations also suggest a mechanism to explain the widespread phenomenon of thermal sensitivity in male meiosis. PMID:24469829

  2. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  3. Measurement of the mechanical properties of car body sheet steels at high strain rates and non ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleck, W.; Larour, P.

    2003-09-01

    Crash behaviour and light weight have become the major design criteria for car bodies. Modem high strength steels offer appropriate solutions for these requirements. The prediction of the crash behaviour in simulation programs requires the information on materials behaviour during dynamic testing. The reduction of the signal waviness and the inertia effects at strain rates above 50s^{-1} are major issues in dynamic tensile testing. Damping techniques or load measurement on the sample itself are the common way to reduce oscillations. Strain measurement from the piston displacement or from optical devices on the specimen itself are also compared. Advantages and drawbacks of those various measurement techniques are presented.

  4. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  5. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  6. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  7. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  8. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  9. Highly efficient redox isomerization of allylic alcohols at ambient temperature catalyzed by novel ruthenium-cyclopentadienyl complexes--new insight into the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Martín-Matute, Belén; Bogár, Krisztián; Edin, Michaela; Kaynak, F Betül; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2005-10-01

    A range of ruthenium cyclopentadienyl (Cp) complexes have been prepared and used for isomerization of allylic alcohols to the corresponding saturated carbonyl compounds. Complexes bearing CO ligands show higher activity than those with PPh3 ligands. The isomerization rate is highly affected by the substituents on the Cp ring. Tetra(phenyl)methyl-substituted catalysts rapidly isomerize allylic alcohols under very mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature) with short reaction times. Substituted allylic alcohols have been isomerized by employing Ru-Cp complexes. A study of the isomerization catalyzed by [Ru(Ph5Cp)(CO)2H] (14) indicates that the isomerization catalyzed by ruthenium hydrides partly follows a different mechanism than that of ruthenium halides activated by KOtBu. Furthermore, the lack of ketone exchange when the isomerization was performed in the presence of an unsaturated ketone (1 equiv), different from that obtained by dehydrogenation of the starting allylic alcohol, supports a mechanism in which the isomerization takes place within the coordination sphere of the ruthenium catalyst. PMID:16028298

  10. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  11. Promoted Metals Combustion at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    Promoted combustion testing of materials, Test 17 of NASA STD-6001, has been used to assess metal propensity to burn in oxygen rich environments. An igniter is used at the bottom end of a rod to promote ignition, and if combustion is sustained, the burning progresses from the bottom to the top of the rod. The physical mechanisms are very similar to the upward flammability test, Test 1 of NASA STD-6001. The differences are in the normal environmental range of pressures, oxygen content, and sample geometry. Upward flammability testing of organic materials can exhibit a significant transitional region between no burning to complete quasi-state burning. In this transitional region, the burn process exhibits a probabilistic nature. This transitional region has been identified for metals using the promoted combustion testing method at ambient initial temperatures. The work given here is focused on examining the transitional region and the quasi-steady burning region both at conventional ambient testing conditions and at elevated temperatures. A new heated promoted combustion facility and equipment at Marshall Space Flight Center have just been completed to provide the basic data regarding the metals operating temperature limits in contact with oxygen rich atmospheres at high pressures. Initial data have been obtained for Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 321, Haynes 214, and Inconel 718 at elevated temperatures in 100-percent oxygen atmospheres. These data along with an extended data set at ambient initial temperature test conditions are examined. The pressure boundaries of acceptable, non-burning usage is found to be lowered at elevated temperature.

  12. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  13. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  14. Effect of ambient temperature on female endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Renberg, Julie; Sandsund, Mariann; Wiggen, Øystein Nordrum; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo

    2014-10-01

    Ambient temperature can affect physical performance, and an ambient temperature range of -4 °C to 11 °C is optimal for endurance performance in male athletes. The few similar studies of female athletes appear to have found differences in response to cold between the genders. This study investigated whether ambient temperature affects female endurance performance. Nine athletes performed six tests while running on a treadmill in a climatic chamber at different ambient temperatures: 20, 10, 1, -4, -9 and -14 °C and a wind speed of 5 m s(-1). The exercise protocol consisted of a 10-min warm-up, followed by four 5-min intervals at increasing intensities at 76%, 81%, 85%, and 89% of maximal oxygen consumption. This was followed by an incremental test to exhaustion. Although peak heart rate, body mass loss, and blood lactate concentration after the incremental test to exhaustion increased as the ambient temperature rose, no changes in time to exhaustion, running economy, running speed at lactate threshold or maximal oxygen consumption were found between the different ambient temperature conditions. Endurance performance during one hour of incremental exercise was not affected by ambient temperature in female endurance athletes. PMID:25436945

  15. Quantitative methods for stochastic high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear analysis: Assessing health effects of exposure to extreme ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Alexander

    regionalization method algorithmically forms eight climatically homogeneous regions for Conterminous US from satellite Remote Sensing inputs. The relative risk of hospitalizations due to extreme ambient temperature varied across climatic regions. Difference in regional hospitalization rates suggests presence of an adaptation effect to a prevailing climate. In various climatic regions the hospitalizations peaked earlier than the peak of exposure. This suggests disproportionally high impact of extreme weather events, such as cold spells or heat waves when they occur early in the season. These findings provide an insight into the use of high frequency disjoint data sets for the assessment of the magnitude, timing, synchronization and non-linear properties of adverse health consequences due to exposure to extreme weather events to the elderly in defined climatic regions. These findings assist in the creation of decision support frameworks targeting preventions and adaptation strategies such as improving infrastructure, providing energy assistance, education and early warning notifications for the vulnerable population. This dissertation offers a number of methodological innovations for the assessment of the high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear impacts of extreme weather events on human health. These innovations help to ensure an improved protection of the elderly population, aid policy makers in the development of efficient disaster prevention strategies, and facilitate more efficient allocation of scarce resources.

  16. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  17. Method to remove the effect of ambient temperature on radiometric calibration.

    PubMed

    Songtao, Chang; Yaoyu, Zhang; Zhiyuan, Sun; Min, Li

    2014-09-20

    High precision radiometric calibration is essential for infrared imaging systems, especially in scientific applications where an accurate quantitative analysis is required. Nevertheless, calibration and radiometry are usually not simultaneously performed. Hence the discrepancy of ambient temperature between calibration and actual measurement can generate significant measurement errors unless the calibration results have been properly corrected. To overcome the restriction, we studied the effect of ambient temperature on radiometric calibration, then derived the relationship between calibration results and ambient temperature considering the integration time. A novel method compensating for the impact of ambient temperature on the calibration of a cooled infrared system is proposed. Several experiments are performed, and the results indicate that the proposed method can not only ensure the accuracy of calibration but achieve calibration results under any ambient temperature and arbitrary integration time.

  18. High Temperature, High Ambient CO2 Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Del Toro, Francisco J.; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J.; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes. PMID:26313753

  19. High Temperature, High Ambient CO₂ Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes. PMID:26313753

  20. High Temperature, High Ambient CO₂ Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes.

  1. Ambient-Temperature Sputtering Of Composite Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1992-01-01

    Technique for deposition of homogeneous films of multicomponent oxides on substrates at ambient temperature based on sequential sputter deposition of individual metal components, as alternating ultra-thin layers, from multiple targets. Substrates rotated over sputtering targets of lead, zirconium, and titanium. Dc-magnetron sputtering of constituent metals in reactive ambient of argon and oxygen leads to formation of the respective metal oxides intermixed on extremely fine scale in desired composition. Compatible with low-temperature microelectronic processing.

  2. Ambient Temperature and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Eliot, Melissa N.; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Wellenius, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some prior studies have linked ambient temperature with risk of cerebrovascular events. If causal, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this putative association remain unknown. Temperature-related changes in cerebral vascular function may play a role, but this hypothesis has not been previously evaluated. Methods We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and cerebral vascular function among 432 participants ≥65 years old from the MOBILIZE Boston Study with data on cerebrovascular blood flow, cerebrovascular resistance, and cerebrovascular reactivity in the middle cerebral artery. We used linear regression models to assess the association of mean ambient temperature in the previous 1 to 28 days with cerebrovascular hemodynamics adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results A 10°C increase in the 21-day moving average of ambient temperature was associated with a 10.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2%, 17.3%) lower blood flow velocity, a 9.0% (95% CI, 0.7%, 18.0%) higher cerebrovascular resistance, and a 15.3% (95%CI, 2.7%, 26.4%) lower cerebral vasoreactivity. Further adjustment for ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) did not materially alter the results. However, we found statistically significant interactions between ambient temperature and PM2.5 such that the association between temperature and blood flow velocity was attenuated at higher levels of PM2.5. Conclusions In this elderly population, we found that ambient temperature was negatively associated with cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular vasoreactivity and positively associated with cerebrovascular resistance. Changes in vascular function may partly underlie the observed associations between ambient temperature and risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26258469

  3. Effects of dietary supplementation of selenium-enriched probiotics on production performance and intestinal microbiota of weanling piglets raised under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lv, C H; Wang, T; Regmi, N; Chen, X; Huang, K; Liao, S F

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of selenium-enriched probiotics (SeP) on production performance and intestinal microbiota of piglets raised under high ambient temperature. Forty-eight cross-bred weanling piglets (28 days old), randomly allotted into 12 pens (four piglets/pen) and four dietary treatments (three pens/treatment group), were fed ad libitum for 42 days a basal diet (Con) or the basal diet supplemented with probiotics (Pro), sodium selenite (ISe) or a SeP preparation. Blood and faecal samples were collected on days 0, 14, 28 and 42 post-treatment. The SeP group had higher final BW (p < 0.05), greater ADG (p < 0.05) and lower FCR (p < 0.01) than the Pro, ISe or Con group. The diarrhoea incidence rate of either SeP or Pro group was lower (p < 0.01) than the ISe or Con group. Blood Se concentration and GSH-Px activity were both higher (p < 0.01) in the SeP than in the Pro, ISe or Con group. On days 28 and 42, the serum concentrations of T3 were higher (p < 0.01) and T4 lower (p < 0.01) in the SeP than in the ISe group, and the T3 and T4 concentrations in the ISe group, in turn, were higher (p < 0.05) and lower (p < 0.01), respectively, than in the Pro or Con group. Also on days 28 and 42, the faecal counts of lactobacillus bacteria were higher (p < 0.01) while Escherichia coli lower (p < 0.01) in the SeP or Pro group as compared to the ISe or Con group. The results of RFLP showed that the faecal microbial flora in the SeP group changed the most (numerically) as compared to the Pro or ISe group. These results suggest that the SeP product may serve as a better alternative to antibiotics than the solo probiotics for using as a growth promoter for weanling piglets.

  4. Effect of high ambient temperature and naked neck genotype on performance of dwarf brown-egg layers selected for improved clutch length.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Bordas, A; Gourichon, D; Tixier-Boichard, M

    2004-06-01

    1. Two experimental lines of dwarf brown-egg layers selected on clutch length were reciprocally crossed. In total, 288 hens, from three genotypes: L1, purebred normally feathered (121 hens), F1, crossbred and heterozygous for the NA mutation (99 hens) or L2, purebred homozygous for NA (68 hens) were housed in three climatic rooms at 22 degrees C and three climatic rooms at 32 degrees C. 2. Body weight, daily egg production records, feed intake and some anatomical and physiological traits were recorded. Canonical discriminant analysis was used to examine the relationships among all measured traits and to compare the experimental groups as defined by genotype and temperature. 3. Heterosis effects were observed on body weight, feed intake, egg mass and some anatomical traits at 22 degrees C, but were negligible for most of the traits measured at 32 degrees C except for body weight at 34 weeks, clutch length and some anatomical traits. 4. Genotype by temperature interactions were observed for egg production, egg mass and feed intake. The temperature stress was severe, with a marked decrease in egg production. The naked neck gene could limit the negative effect of long-term heat stress. Egg weight was increased by the NA gene, as usually observed in layers. 5. The first three canonical variates explained altogether 97.4% of the variance. The first canonical variate was associated almost exclusively with ambient temperature. The second was associated with genotype. The third was associated with heterozygous genotype for NA mutation and genotype by temperature interaction. Stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that 12 traits out of 20 were effective at detecting the differences among the genotype and temperature combinations. PMID:15327121

  5. Effect of high ambient temperature and naked neck genotype on performance of dwarf brown-egg layers selected for improved clutch length.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Bordas, A; Gourichon, D; Tixier-Boichard, M

    2004-06-01

    1. Two experimental lines of dwarf brown-egg layers selected on clutch length were reciprocally crossed. In total, 288 hens, from three genotypes: L1, purebred normally feathered (121 hens), F1, crossbred and heterozygous for the NA mutation (99 hens) or L2, purebred homozygous for NA (68 hens) were housed in three climatic rooms at 22 degrees C and three climatic rooms at 32 degrees C. 2. Body weight, daily egg production records, feed intake and some anatomical and physiological traits were recorded. Canonical discriminant analysis was used to examine the relationships among all measured traits and to compare the experimental groups as defined by genotype and temperature. 3. Heterosis effects were observed on body weight, feed intake, egg mass and some anatomical traits at 22 degrees C, but were negligible for most of the traits measured at 32 degrees C except for body weight at 34 weeks, clutch length and some anatomical traits. 4. Genotype by temperature interactions were observed for egg production, egg mass and feed intake. The temperature stress was severe, with a marked decrease in egg production. The naked neck gene could limit the negative effect of long-term heat stress. Egg weight was increased by the NA gene, as usually observed in layers. 5. The first three canonical variates explained altogether 97.4% of the variance. The first canonical variate was associated almost exclusively with ambient temperature. The second was associated with genotype. The third was associated with heterozygous genotype for NA mutation and genotype by temperature interaction. Stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that 12 traits out of 20 were effective at detecting the differences among the genotype and temperature combinations.

  6. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  7. Formation of actinide hexafluorides at ambient temperatures with krypton difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Asprey, L.B.; Eller, P.G.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1986-02-27

    A second low-temperature agent, krypton difluoride, for generating volatile plutonium hexafluoride is reported (dioxygen difluoride is the only other reported agent). Plutonium hexafluoride is formed at ambient or lower temperature by the treatment of various solid substrates with krypton difluoride. Volatilization of uranium and neptunium from solid substrates using gaseous krypton difluoride is also reported for the first time. The formation of actinide hexafluorides has been confirmed for the reaction of krypton difluoride in anhydrous HF with UO/sub 2/ and with uranium and neptunium fluorides at ambient temperatures. Treatment of americium dioxide with krypton difluoride did not yield americium hexafluoride under the conditions studied. 15 references, 2 figures.

  8. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M. Denise

    2013-01-01

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals. PMID:24046878

  9. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters. PMID:8653553

  10. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  11. Effects of ambient temperature on mechanomyography of resting quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    McKay, William P; Vargo, Michael; Chilibeck, Philip D; Daku, Brian L

    2013-03-01

    It has been speculated that resting muscle mechanical activity, also known as minor tremor, microvibration, and thermoregulatory tonus, has evolved to maintain core temperature in homeotherms, and may play a role in nonshivering thermogenesis. This experiment was done to determine whether resting muscle mechanical activity increases with decreasing ambient temperature. We cooled 20 healthy, human, resting, supine subjects from an ambient temperature of 40° to 12 °C over 65 min. Core temperature, midquadriceps mechanomyography, surface electromyography, and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded. Resting muscle mechanical and electrical activity in the absence of shivering increased significantly at temperatures below 21.5 °C. Women defended core temperature more effectively than men, and showed increased resting muscle activity earlier than men. Metabolism measured by VO2 correlated with resting muscle mechanical activity (R = 0.65; p = 0.01). Resting muscle mechanical activity may have evolved, in part, to maintain core temperature in the face of mild cooling.

  12. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  13. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day. PMID:25428501

  14. Imaging hydrothermal systems associated with oceanic ridge: ambient noise and travel-time tomographies in the Reykjanes high-temperature area, SW-Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Ágústsson, Kristjan; Verdel, Arie; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Specht, Sebastian; Stefánsson, Stefán; Tryggvason, Hörður; Erbas, Kemal; Deon, Fiorenza; Erlendsson, Ögmundur; Guðnason, Egill; Hersir, Gylfi; Ryberg, Trond; Halldórsdóttir, Sæunn; Weemstra, Cornelius; Bruhn, David; Flovenz, Ólafur; Friðleifsson, Ómar

    2015-04-01

    Analogue outcrops of hydrothermal fossil systems and simulating pressure/temperature conditions in the laboratory are classical methods for assessing supercritical conditions in magmatic environments. Scientific drilling is used when Earth surface sampled rocks cannot sufficiently explain past geological processes and when geophysical imaging does not sufficiently explain observed phenomena. However, our understanding of structural and dynamic characteristics of geothermal systems can be improved through application of advanced and/or innovative exploration technologies. Unlike resistivity imaging, active and passive seismic techniques have rarely been used in volcanic geothermal areas, because processing techniques were not adapted to geothermal conditions. Recent advances in volcano-seismology have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present here preliminary analyses of seismic records around a geothermal reservoir located both on-land and offshore along the Reykjanes Ridge, SW-Iceland. We deployed 214 on-land stations and 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers since April 2014. We analyse more than 6 months of part of those records. We present first results of both travel-time tomography and ambient noise tomography and we discuss briefly implications for geothermal exploration in volcanic contexts.

  15. Ambient temperature influences birds' decisions to eat toxic prey☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, M.; Halpin, C.G.; Rowe, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aposematic prey warn predators of their toxicity using conspicuous signals. However, predators regularly include aposematic prey in their diets, particularly when they are in a poor energetic state and in need of nutrients. We investigated whether or not an environmental factor, ambient temperature, could change the energetic state of predators and lead to an increased intake of prey that they know to contain toxins. We found that European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, increased their consumption of mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, prey containing quinine (a mild toxin) when the ambient temperature was reduced below their thermoneutral zone from 20 °C to 6 °C. The birds differed in their sensitivity to changes in ambient temperature, with heavier birds increasing the number of toxic prey they ate more rapidly with decreasing temperature compared to birds with lower body mass. This could have been the result of their requiring more nutrients at lower temperatures or being better able to detoxify quinine. Taken together, our results suggest that conspicuous coloration may be more costly at lower temperatures, and that aposematic prey may need to invest more in chemical defences as temperatures decline. Our study also provides novel insights into what factors affect birds' decisions to eat toxic prey, and demonstrates that selection pressures acting on prey defences can vary with changing temperature across days, seasons, climes, and potentially in response to climate change. PMID:24109148

  16. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates ࣈ 5.7 L/min and ࣈ 11.3 L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range - 10(o) C ⩽ To ⩽50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory. PMID:24574201

  17. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates ࣈ 5.7 L/min and ࣈ 11.3 L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range - 10(o) C ⩽ To ⩽50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory.

  18. Ambient temperature perception in papaya for papaya ringspot virus interaction.

    PubMed

    Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Singh Shakya, Viplendra P; Jain, R K; Praveen, Shelly

    2009-06-01

    Temperature dramatically affects the host-virus interaction. Outbreaks of viral diseases are frequently associated with the ambient temperature required for host development. Using papaya as a host and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) as a pathogen, we studied the effect of temperature on the intensity of disease symptoms and virus accumulation. The phenotypic expression of symptoms and viral accumulation were found to be maximum at ambient temperature (26-31 degrees C) of papaya cultivation. However, there was a drastic difference, 10 degrees C above and below the ambient temperature. The underlying mechanism of these well-known observations are not yet understood completely; however, these observations might help find answers in RNA silencing mechanism of plants. Since viral-derived silencing suppressor proteins play a significant role in RNA silencing mechanism, here we show that PRSV-derived Helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) protein has an affinity for small RNAs in a temperature-dependent manner. This suggested the probable role of HC-Pro in the temperature-regulated host-virus relationship.

  19. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes. PMID:6679851

  20. Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, G. C.

    1987-09-01

    During this reporting period a number of novel solid polymer electrolytes formed by salts of multivalent cations and polyethylene oxide (PEO) have been prepared and characterized. These materials are of interest not only because of their potential ionic conductivities, but also because some of them may have electronic conductivity and oxidizing power which would be useful for novel electrode materials in all-solid-state batteries. Two broad classes of materials were investigated: PEO solutions of Zn(2), Cd(2), and Pb(2), all of which are potential electrolytes for solid-state batteries, and PEO solutions of transition metal salts, which are of interest as possible cathode materials. Mixed compositions containing both divalent cations and lithium ions were also prepared. Electrolytes formed with small, highly-polarizing ions, such as Mg(2) and Ca(2), are essentially pure anion conductors. Electrolytes containing Zn(2) behave similarly, unless they are hydrated, in which case the Zn(2) ions are quite mobile. Electrolytes formed with larger, more polarizable cations, such as Pb(2) and Cd(2), conduct both anions and cations. Solutions of salts of transition metal cations form a third group of electrolytes. Of the electrolytes investigated so far, those formed with Ni(++) salts are the most unusual. It appears as if the transport number of Ni(2) and the electrolyte conductivity can be greatly enhanced by controlling the hydration and dehydration of the polymer.

  1. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  2. Temperature Trapping: Energy-Free Maintenance of Constant Temperatures as Ambient Temperature Gradients Change.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-29

    It is crucial to maintain constant temperatures in an energy-efficient way. Here we establish a temperature-trapping theory for asymmetric phase-transition materials with thermally responsive thermal conductivities. Then we theoretically introduce and experimentally demonstrate a concept of an energy-free thermostat within ambient temperature gradients. The thermostat is capable of self-maintaining a desired constant temperature without the need of consuming energy even though the environmental temperature gradient varies in a large range. As a model application of the concept, we design and show a different type of thermal cloak that has a constant temperature inside its central region in spite of the changing ambient temperature gradient, which is in sharp contrast to all the existing thermal cloaks. This work has relevance to energy-saving heat preservation, and it provides guidance both for manipulating heat flow without energy consumption and for designing new metamaterials with temperature-responsive or field-responsive parameters in many disciplines such as thermotics, optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, mechanics, electrics, and magnetism. PMID:27517778

  3. Temperature Trapping: Energy-Free Maintenance of Constant Temperatures as Ambient Temperature Gradients Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    It is crucial to maintain constant temperatures in an energy-efficient way. Here we establish a temperature-trapping theory for asymmetric phase-transition materials with thermally responsive thermal conductivities. Then we theoretically introduce and experimentally demonstrate a concept of an energy-free thermostat within ambient temperature gradients. The thermostat is capable of self-maintaining a desired constant temperature without the need of consuming energy even though the environmental temperature gradient varies in a large range. As a model application of the concept, we design and show a different type of thermal cloak that has a constant temperature inside its central region in spite of the changing ambient temperature gradient, which is in sharp contrast to all the existing thermal cloaks. This work has relevance to energy-saving heat preservation, and it provides guidance both for manipulating heat flow without energy consumption and for designing new metamaterials with temperature-responsive or field-responsive parameters in many disciplines such as thermotics, optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, mechanics, electrics, and magnetism.

  4. Effect of ambient temperature on caffeine ergogenicity during endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Ganio, Matthew S; Johnson, Evan C; Klau, Jennifer F; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Casa, Douglas J; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2011-06-01

    It is well established that caffeine ingestion during exercise enhances endurance performance. Conversely, the physiological and psychological strain that accompanies increased ambient temperature decreases endurance performance. Little is known about the interaction between environmental temperature and the effects of caffeine on performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of ambient temperature (12 and 33°C) on caffeine ergogenicity during endurance cycling exercise. Eleven male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 25 ± 6 years; [Formula: see text] 58.7 ± 2.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed four exercise trials in a randomized, double blind experimental design. After cycling continuously for 90 min (average 65 ± 7% [Formula: see text]) in either a warm (33 ± 1°C, 41 ± 5%rh) or cool (12 ± 1°C, 60 ± 7%rh) environment, subjects completed a 15-min performance trial (PT; based on total work accumulated). Subjects ingested 3 mg kg(-1) of encapsulated caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) 60 min prior to and after 45 min of exercise. Throughout exercise, subjects ingested water so that at the end of exercise, independent of ambient temperature, their body mass was reduced 0.55 ± 0.67%. Two-way (temperature × treatment) repeated-measures ANOVA were conducted with alpha set at 0.05. Total work (kJ) during the PT was greater in 12°C than 33°C [P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.804, confidence interval (CI): 30.51-62.30]. When pooled, CAF increased performance versus PLA independent of temperature (P = 0.006, η(2) = 0.542 CI: 3.60-16.86). However, performance differences with CAF were not dependent on ambient temperature (i.e., non-significant interaction; P = 0.662). CAF versus PLA in 12 and 33°C resulted in few differences in other physiological variables. However, during exercise, rectal temperature (T (re)) increased in the warm environment (peak T (re); 33°C, 39.40 ± 0.45; 12°C, 38.79 ± 0.42°C; P < 0.05) but was not different in CAF versus PLA (P > 0

  5. Osmotic thirst suppression in dogs exposed to low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sobocińska, J; Kozłowski, S

    1987-01-01

    Body temperature, urine output, osmotic and free water clearances, plasma osmolality, sodium and potassium concentrations, blood lactate level, osmotic thirst and central blood volume were measured in dogs exposed to cold (+1 to -8 degrees C) for 1-3 hours and compared to those obtained under control conditions at ambient temperatures (18-20 degrees C). In some additional experiments osmotic thirst threshold and arterial blood pressure during intravenous infusion of norepinephrine were also examined. Exposure to low ambient temperature caused an increase in the osmotic thirst threshold and rise in central blood volume. Transient increase in the urine output and free water clearance accompanied by a decrease in the urine osmolality were also observed. No changes were found in rectal temperature, plasma osmolality and plasma sodium concentration. Infusion of norepinephrine elevated the osmotic thirst threshold in a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the cold-induced suppression of osmotic thirst may result from the increased central blood volume. A possible involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in the thirst inhibition in low ambient temperature is also considered.

  6. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  7. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  8. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  9. Composition for producing polyurethane resin at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatani, Y.; Nishino, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    1984-06-26

    Disclosed is a composition for polyurethane resins which is ordinarily of two-package type and curable at ambient temperature and which comprises an isocyanate component having oxadiazinetrione ring as a curing agent and a polyol component, having in the molecule, at least one of a tertiary amino group, a quaternary ammonium group and a salt-formed carboxyl group as a main component. The composition has excellent curability and provides cured products excellent in adhesiveness and physical properties.

  10. Incubation Temperature during Fetal Development Influences Morphophysiological Characteristics and Preferred Ambient Temperature of Chicken Hatchlings

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Viviane de Souza; de Almeida, Vitor Rosa; Matos, João Batista; Vicentini, Tamiris Iara; van den Brand, Henry; Boleli, Isabel Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Skin and feather characteristics, which play a critical role in body temperature maintenance, can be affected by incubation circumstances, such as incubation temperature. However, no study to date has assessed the influence of incubation temperature during the fetal stage on morphometric characteristics and vascular development of the skin, feather characteristics, and their relationship to hormone levels and preferred temperature in later life in chickens. Broiler breeder eggs were exposed to low (36°C), control (37.5°C), or high (39°C) temperatures (treatments LT, CK, and HT, respectively) from day 13 of incubation onward, because it is known that the endocrine axes are already established at this time. During this period, eggshell temperature of HT eggs (38.8±0.33°C) was higher than of LT (37.4±0.08°C) and CK eggs (37.8 ±0.15°C). The difference between eggshell and incubator air temperature diminished with the increasing incubation temperature, and was approximately zero for HT. HT hatchlings had higher surface temperature on the head, neck, and back, and thinner and more vascularized skin than did CK and LT hatchlings. No differences were found among treatments for body weight, total feather weight, number and length of barbs, barbule length, and plasma T4 concentration. LT hatchlings showed lower plasma T3 and GH, as well as lower T3/T4 ratio and decreased vascularity in the neck, back, and thigh skin compared to CK hatchlings. On the other hand, HT hatchlings had decreased skin thickness and increased vascularity, and preferred a higher ambient temperature compared to CK and HT hatchlings. In addition, for all treatments, surface temperature on the head was higher than of the other body regions. We conclude that changes in skin thickness and vascularity, as well as changes in thyroid and growth hormone levels, are the result of embryonic strategies to cope with higher or lower than normal incubation temperatures. Additionally exposure to increased

  11. Stable oxygen isotope reconstruction of ambient temperature during the collapse of a cod (Gadus morhua) fishery.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Brin; Campana, Steven E

    2009-09-01

    Changing environmental conditions set against a backdrop of high exploitation can result in severe consequences for commercially harvested stocks. The collapse of the Eastern Scotian Shelf cod (Gadus morhua L.) off eastern Canada was primarily due to overexploitation but may have been exacerbated by a widespread temperature decline. Recent studies have called for accurate determination of ambient temperature (the actual temperature exposure history of the fish) before discarding environmental conditions as a factor in the collapse. We used the stable oxygen isotope composition of otoliths (delta18O(oto)) to reconstruct the ambient temperature history of Eastern Scotian Shelf cod from 1970 to 2000 in order to determine whether the stock experienced the temperature decline or shifted their distribution to avoid it. To correct delta18O(oto) for seawater isotope content (deltaO(w)), we generated a new meta-equation for the relationship between delta18O(w) (per mil) and salinity (S, in psu) on the Eastern Scotian Shelf: delta18O(w) = 0.539 x S - 18.790. The ambient temperature series revealed that the large-scale geographic distribution of mature cod remained constant through the cooling period, although their ambient temperature was cooler than expected in warmer periods and warmer than expected in cooler periods, indicating small-scale thermoregulatory movement. Although the mean hydrographic temperature was 4 degrees C, mature cod usually inhabited the coldest available waters (mean ambient temperature = 3 degrees C), while the juveniles usually inhabited warmer waters (mean ambient temperature = 5.5 degrees C). Length-at-age was significantly related to ambient temperature, especially in the early years of growth, and therefore declining ambient temperatures were at least partially responsible for declines in asymptotic length (up to age 8 yr). The most active thermoregulatory movement occurred during a moderate warming period; therefore extreme warming events (such

  12. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, L; Hajat, S; Wilkinson, P; Armstrong, B; Anderson, H R; Monk, V; Harrison, R

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  13. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  14. Effect of ambient temperature on evaporative water loss in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum.

    PubMed

    Baldo, María Belén; Antenucci, C Daniel; Luna, Facundo

    2015-10-01

    Subterranean rodents face unique thermoregulatory challenges. Evaporative water loss (EWL) is a crucial mechanism for maintaining heat balance in endotherms subjected to heat stress but also leads to potential dehydration. EWL depends on gradients of temperature and humidity between the surface of the individual and the surrounding environment. Underground burrows generally provide a stable water vapor saturated atmosphere which may impede evaporative heat loss (EHL). This will mainly occur when ambient temperature exceeds the upper limit of individual's thermoneutral zone, or when body temperature rises as result of digging activities. Here we evaluate the effect of ambient temperature on EWL and energy metabolism in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (tuco-tucos), which inhabits sealed burrows, but makes an extensive use of the aboveground environment. We observed that EWL is increased when ambient temperature rises above thermoneutrality; below this point, evaporation remains stable. Though EWL contributes to total heat loss by increasing ∼1.3 times at 35°C, dry thermal conductance is raised four times. In tuco-tucos' burrows both non-evaporative and, to some extent, evaporative and behavioral mechanisms are essential for body temperature regulation, preventing overheating at high ambient temperatures in a water vapor-saturated atmosphere. PMID:26590463

  15. Physical factors in cataractogenesis: ambient ultraviolet radiation and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sliney, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    A number of environmental cofactors have been implicated in cataracto-genesis. Two have received the greatest attention: ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and ambient temperature. Unfortunately, both temperature and UVR levels vary similarly with geographical latitude. Careful attention to several more refined physical variables and the geometry of exposure may permit investigators to separate the contributory effects of these two physical agents. This paper briefly reviews the available data, estimates the variation of lenticular temperature with ambient temperature, and provides measurements of short-wavelength (UV-B) UVR exposure to the human eye with different meterological conditions. The study attempts to provide epidemiological investigators with more detailed information necessary to perform more accurate studies of cataract and other ocular pathologies that appear to be related to environmental factors. Ocular UV-B radiation exposure levels were measured at nine locations in the USA near 40 degrees latitude at elevations from sea level to 8000 ft. Terrain reflectance is shown to be much more important than terrain elevation; cloud cover and haze may actually increase ocular exposure; and the value of wearing brimmed hats and spectacles varies with the environment. Several avenues for future research are suggested.

  16. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2010-12-01

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. The 9 treatments consisted of 3 levels of temperatures (low = 15.6°C; moderate = 21.1°C; high = 26.7°C) from 21 to 56 d of age and 3 levels of light intensities (0.5, 3.0, 20 lx) from 8 to 56 d of age at 50% RH. A total of 540 Ross 708 chicks were randomly distributed into 9 environmentally controlled chambers (30 male and 30 female chicks/chamber) at 1 d of age. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21 (baseline), 28, 42, and 56. High ambient temperature significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced BW, partial pressure of CO(2), bicarbonate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, K(+), and Na(+) along with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) elevated pH level, Cl(-), glucose, osmolality, and anion gap concentrations. Partial pressure of O(2) was slightly increased in response to increased ambient temperature. There was no effect of light intensity on most of the blood variables examined. Acid-base regulation during high ambient temperature and light intensity exposure did not deteriorate despite a lower partial pressure of CO(2), which consequently increased blood pH because of a compensatory decrease in HCO(3)(-) concentration. Plasma corticosterone was not affected by temperature, light intensity, or their interaction. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to varying light intensities had a minor effect on physiological blood variables, whereas high ambient temperature markedly affected various blood variables without inducing stress in broilers.

  17. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2010-12-01

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. The 9 treatments consisted of 3 levels of temperatures (low = 15.6°C; moderate = 21.1°C; high = 26.7°C) from 21 to 56 d of age and 3 levels of light intensities (0.5, 3.0, 20 lx) from 8 to 56 d of age at 50% RH. A total of 540 Ross 708 chicks were randomly distributed into 9 environmentally controlled chambers (30 male and 30 female chicks/chamber) at 1 d of age. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21 (baseline), 28, 42, and 56. High ambient temperature significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced BW, partial pressure of CO(2), bicarbonate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, K(+), and Na(+) along with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) elevated pH level, Cl(-), glucose, osmolality, and anion gap concentrations. Partial pressure of O(2) was slightly increased in response to increased ambient temperature. There was no effect of light intensity on most of the blood variables examined. Acid-base regulation during high ambient temperature and light intensity exposure did not deteriorate despite a lower partial pressure of CO(2), which consequently increased blood pH because of a compensatory decrease in HCO(3)(-) concentration. Plasma corticosterone was not affected by temperature, light intensity, or their interaction. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to varying light intensities had a minor effect on physiological blood variables, whereas high ambient temperature markedly affected various blood variables without inducing stress in broilers. PMID:21076106

  18. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  3. Ambient temperature normalization for infrared face recognition based on the second-order polynomial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzi

    2015-08-01

    The influence of ambient temperature is a big challenge to robust infrared face recognition. This paper proposes a new ambient temperature normalization algorithm to improve the performance of infrared face recognition under variable ambient temperatures. Based on statistical regression theory, a second order polynomial model is learned to describe the ambient temperature's impact on infrared face image. Then, infrared image was normalized to reference ambient temperature by the second order polynomial model. Finally, this normalization method is applied to infrared face recognition to verify its efficiency. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed temperature normalization method is feasible and can significantly improve the robustness of infrared face recognition.

  4. Monitoring deep-ocean temperatures using acoustic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolfe, Katherine F.; Lani, Shane; Sabra, Karim G.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2015-04-01

    Measuring temperature changes of the deep oceans, important for determining the oceanic heat content and its impact on the Earth's climate evolution, is typically done using free-drifting profiling oceanographic floats with limited global coverage. Acoustic thermometry provides an alternative and complementary remote sensing methodology for monitoring fine temperature variations of the deep ocean over long distances between a few underwater sources and receivers. We demonstrate a simpler, totally passive (i.e., without deploying any active sources) modality for acoustic thermometry of the deep oceans (for depths of ~ 500-1500 m), using only ambient noise recorded by two existing hydroacoustic stations of the International Monitoring System. We suggest that passive acoustic thermometry could improve global monitoring of deep-ocean temperature variations through implementation using a global network of hydrophone arrays.

  5. Ambient temperature influences the neural benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Mark E; Chung, Chasity; Comer, Ashley; Nelson, Katharine; Tran, Jamie; Werries, Nadja; Barton, Emily A; Spinetta, Michael; Leasure, J Leigh

    2016-02-15

    Many of the neural benefits of exercise require weeks to manifest. It would be useful to accelerate onset of exercise-driven plastic changes, such as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise represents a significant challenge to the brain because it produces heat, but brain temperature does not rise during exercise in the cold. This study tested the hypothesis that exercise in cold ambient temperature would stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis more than exercise in room or hot conditions. Adult female rats had exercise access 2h per day for 5 days at either room (20 °C), cold (4.5 °C) or hot (37.5 °C) temperature. To label dividing hippocampal precursor cells, animals received daily injections of BrdU. Brains were immunohistochemically processed for dividing cells (Ki67+), surviving cells (BrdU+) and new neurons (doublecortin, DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Animals exercising at room temperature ran significantly farther than animals exercising in cold or hot conditions (room 1490 ± 400 m; cold 440 ± 102 m; hot 291 ± 56 m). We therefore analyzed the number of Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells normalized for shortest distance run. Contrary to our hypothesis, exercise in either cold or hot conditions generated significantly more Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells compared to exercise at room temperature. Thus, a limited amount of running in either cold or hot ambient conditions generates more new cells than a much greater distance run at room temperature. Taken together, our results suggest a simple means by which to augment exercise effects, yet minimize exercise time. PMID:26608539

  6. Ambient temperature influences the neural benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Mark E; Chung, Chasity; Comer, Ashley; Nelson, Katharine; Tran, Jamie; Werries, Nadja; Barton, Emily A; Spinetta, Michael; Leasure, J Leigh

    2016-02-15

    Many of the neural benefits of exercise require weeks to manifest. It would be useful to accelerate onset of exercise-driven plastic changes, such as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise represents a significant challenge to the brain because it produces heat, but brain temperature does not rise during exercise in the cold. This study tested the hypothesis that exercise in cold ambient temperature would stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis more than exercise in room or hot conditions. Adult female rats had exercise access 2h per day for 5 days at either room (20 °C), cold (4.5 °C) or hot (37.5 °C) temperature. To label dividing hippocampal precursor cells, animals received daily injections of BrdU. Brains were immunohistochemically processed for dividing cells (Ki67+), surviving cells (BrdU+) and new neurons (doublecortin, DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Animals exercising at room temperature ran significantly farther than animals exercising in cold or hot conditions (room 1490 ± 400 m; cold 440 ± 102 m; hot 291 ± 56 m). We therefore analyzed the number of Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells normalized for shortest distance run. Contrary to our hypothesis, exercise in either cold or hot conditions generated significantly more Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells compared to exercise at room temperature. Thus, a limited amount of running in either cold or hot ambient conditions generates more new cells than a much greater distance run at room temperature. Taken together, our results suggest a simple means by which to augment exercise effects, yet minimize exercise time.

  7. Overcharge and overdischarge protection of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A cathode additive is provided for protecting an ambient temperature secondary lithium cell from overcharging or overdischarging. The cathode additive is chosen to create an upper voltage plateau which is slightly higher than a characteristic charge cutoff voltage of the cathode of the cell. The cathode additive additionally creates a lower voltage plateau which is slightly lower than the characteristic discharge cutoff voltage of the cell. Preferably, the cathode additive is a transition metal oxide or a sulfide and may, for example, include a mixture of Li2Mn2O4 and Li(0.1)MoO2.

  8. Capacity decline of ambient temperature secondary lithium battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Nakamura, B. J.; Yen, S. P. S.; Bankston, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells is limited primarily because of the poor cycle life performance. Much of the cell capacity is irreversibly lost upon cycling. Studies have been undertaken to understand the problem of capacity decline. Experimental Li-TiS2 cells were fabricated and tested for their cycle life performance. Cells were disassembled at different stages of cycle life, and cell active components were analyzed by various analytical techniques. The results of this study indicate that all the cell's active components/materials are undergoing degradation. Details of the experiments carried out and the results obtained are described.

  9. Impact of Seasonal Variant Temperatures and Laboratory Room Ambient Temperature on Mortality of Rats with Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishanan, Sivakumar; Babu, Mg. Ramesh; Thangarajan, Rajesh; Punja, Dhiren; Jaganath, Vidyadhara Devarunda; Kanth, Akriti B.; Rao, Mohandas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A popular rat model for hypoperfusion ischemic brain injury is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). BCCAO surgery when performed in varying geographical locations and during different seasons of the year is reported to have variable mortality rates. Studies have also documented the diminishing influence of Ketamine-Xylazine (KT-XY) on thermoregulatory functions in rodents. Aim To explore the impact of seasonal variant temperatures and laboratory room ambient temperatures on mortality of rats following BCCAO surgery. Materials and Methods The study has two parts: 1 The first part is an analysis of a three year retrospective data to explore the association between the geographical season (hot summer and cold winter) induced laboratory room ambient temperature variations and the mortality rate in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO rats. 2. The second part investigated the effect of conditioned laboratory room ambient temperature (CAT) (23-250C) in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO group of rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups(n =8/group) as-Normal control, BCCAO and Sham BCCAO where they were all exposed to unconditioned ambient temperature (UCAT) during their surgery and postoperative care. And finally fourth group rats exposed to CAT during the BCCAO surgery and postoperative care. Results Pearson’s chi-square test indicates a significantly high association (p<0.006) between post-BCCAO mortality and hot season of the year. CAT during the hot season reduced the mortality rate (24% less) in post- BCCAO rats compared to the rats of UCAT. Conclusion Despite seasonal variations in temperature, conditioning the laboratory room ambient temperatures to 23–250C, induces hypothermia in KT-XY anaesthetized ischemic brain injured rodents and improves their survival rate. PMID:27190796

  10. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  11. Aluminum anodization in a basic ambient temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; Osteryoung, R.A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-05-01

    The authors describe aluminum anodization studied in the basic AlCl/sub 3/:1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (ImCl) ambient temperature molten salt (AlCl/sub 3/:ImCl molar ratio ..e..1.0). The anodization process was studied as a function of chloride anion concentration. Two different anodization processes are observed with onset potentials of approximately -1.1 and 0V. The more cathodic anodization involves formation of the tetrachloroaluminate anion and exhibits a limiting current controlled by diffusion of chloride to the electrode surface. The number of chlorides required for each Al anodized was determined to be 4.6 +- 0.4. The more anodic anodization shows no diffusion control. A value for the diffusion coefficient of chloride was obtained which is lower than previously reported; the difference involves using an n value of 1, rather than 2/3. No reduction of the tetrachloroaluminate anion was observed even at elevated temperatures.

  12. Implementation of an Ambient Temperature Observer-Prediction (ATOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, N. L.; Duff, W. S.

    An ATOP type control algorithm was developed and implemented on a programmable controller to set the rate of charge for a commercial off-peak electric furnace installed in CSU Solar House I. During a 15 day trial ATOP tracked ambient temperature to within 3.0 C rms and predicted following day average temperature to within 3.8 C rms. The ATOP based off-peak controller held peak demand to 9.5 kilowatts during the test period. For the same conditions the factory stock control hardware for the commercial off-peak furnace would have generated a peak demand of 18.8 kilowatts. However, the superior performance of the ATOP-based controller is due principally to the fact that it accounts for available energy in solar storage and in the off-peak furnace itself (which the factory control hardware does not).

  13. Effect of ambient temperature on the thermal profile of the human forearm, hand, and fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures were measured on the right and left sides of seven resting men. The purpose was to determine the bilateral symmetry of these segmental temperature profiles at ambient temperatures from 10 to 45 C. Thermistors placed on the right and left forearms, hands, and index fingers were used to monitor the subjects until equilibration was reached at each ambient temperature. Additionally, thermal profiles of both hands were measured with copper-constantan thermocouples. During one experimental condition (23 C ambient), rectal, ear canal, and 24 skin temperatures were measured on each subject. Average body and average skin temperatures are given for each subject at the 23 C ambient condition. Detailed thermal profiles are also presented for the dorsal, ventral, and circumferential left forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures at 23 C ambient. No significant differences were found between the mean skin temperatures of the right and left contralateral segments at any of the selected ambient temperatures.

  14. Genotype-by-environment interaction with broiler genotypes differing in growth rate. 3. Growth rate and water consumption of broiler progeny from weight-selected versus nonselected parents under normal and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Deeb, N; Cahaner, A

    2002-03-01

    One cycle of high-intensity selection on BW was conducted to study correlated effects on performance under high ambient temperature (AT). From a large flock of a commercial sire-line, 3 males and 15 females with the highest BW at 35 d of age were mated and produced a group of 120 BW-selected chicks. Three average-BW males and 15 average-BW females from the same flock were mated to produce a control group of 120 chicks. On Day 17, the two groups were equally divided between two temperature-controlled chambers and housed in individual cages. One chamber was set to a normal AT (NAT; constant 22 C) and the second chamber to high AT (HAT; constant 32 C). Under NAT, the relative advantage of the selected broilers over the controls did not change from 17 to 42 d of age, averaging about 15% for BW gain and 9.7% for feed consumption. These differences were halved under HAT from Days 17 to 28 and were reversed from 28 to 42 d of age, when the selected broilers consumed significantly less feed and gained less BW than the controls. Water-to-feed ratio was measured in each AT treatment. From 28 to 42 d of age, averaged over the two groups, birds under HAT consumed 2.5 g water/g of feed compared to only 1.5 g water/g feed under NAT. The diminished superiority of the selected broilers under HAT led to a substantial genotype-by-environment interaction involving high AT and within-stock genetic differences in growth rate. It appears that broilers selected for rapid growth under optimal conditions do not achieve their genetic potential under high AT. Thus, specific indicators of adaptation to heat, possibly water consumption or body temperature, should be added to commercial selection for rapid growth to improve broiler performance in hot climates.

  15. Chicken hatchlings prefer ambient temperatures lower than their thermoneutral zone.

    PubMed

    Toro-Velasquez, Paula Andrea; Bícego, Kênia C; Mortola, Jacopo P

    2014-10-01

    We investigated whether or not the preferred ambient temperature (Tapref) of the 1-day old chicken hatchling, a precocial neonate with excellent locomotory capacity, clearly identifiable thermogenesis and independence from maternal care, coincides with the lower critical temperature (LCT) of thermoneutrality and minimal oxygen consumption (V̇(O(2))). Tapref of single chicks measured in a thermocline (N=16) averaged 33.5±0.3 °C (mode, 33.3±0.4 °C). The same value was obtained in hatchlings studied in pairs. LCT was computed from the ambient temperature (Ta)-V̇(O(2)) relationship, constructed by slowly decreasing the Ta of a respirometer from 38 to 29 °C over 2.5h, while continuously measuring V̇(O(2)) by an open-flow methodology; LCT averaged 36.4 °C±0.3 or 36.8 °C±0.4, depending on the method of computation. In all hatchlings Tapref was lower than LCT (P<0.001), by a magnitude that depended on the method of computation of the two variables, 2.8 °C±0.3 (P<0.001) or 3.9 °C±0.5. The Tapref-LCT difference implied that, at Tapref, V̇(O(2)) was higher than at thermoneutrality. We conclude that in the chicken hatchling thermal preference does not coincide with thermoneutrality, probably because during development what seems optimal from a thermoregulatory viewpoint may not necessarily be so for other regulatory functions.

  16. Effect of ambient temperatures on disinfection efficiency of various sludge treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeld, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Sewage sludge produced during municipal wastewater treatment has to be treated efficiently in order to reduce impacts on the environment and on public health. In Germany and many countries, large quantities of sludge are reused in agriculture in order to recycle nutrients and organic material. In order to quantify the effect of different ambient temperatures on conventional and advanced sludge treatment technologies as well as on disinfection efficiency, a comprehensive research study was performed at Braunschweig Institute of Technology. The detailed results show that ambient temperature has a strong effect on biological liquid sludge stabilization and on natural dewatering and drying technologies, although microbiological quality of treated sludge, indicated by Escherichia coli concentration, does not meet the requirements for unrestricted reuse in agriculture. Composting and lime treatment of sludge are most efficient on reducing E. coli, as high temperatures and high pH values arise in the material respectively. PMID:24434963

  17. Effect of ambient temperatures on disinfection efficiency of various sludge treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeld, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Sewage sludge produced during municipal wastewater treatment has to be treated efficiently in order to reduce impacts on the environment and on public health. In Germany and many countries, large quantities of sludge are reused in agriculture in order to recycle nutrients and organic material. In order to quantify the effect of different ambient temperatures on conventional and advanced sludge treatment technologies as well as on disinfection efficiency, a comprehensive research study was performed at Braunschweig Institute of Technology. The detailed results show that ambient temperature has a strong effect on biological liquid sludge stabilization and on natural dewatering and drying technologies, although microbiological quality of treated sludge, indicated by Escherichia coli concentration, does not meet the requirements for unrestricted reuse in agriculture. Composting and lime treatment of sludge are most efficient on reducing E. coli, as high temperatures and high pH values arise in the material respectively.

  18. Thermoregulatory effects of intraventricular injection of noradrenaline in the mouse and the influence of ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Sheila L.; Spencer, P. S. J.

    1972-01-01

    1. At an ambient temperature of 20° C, intraventricular injection of noradrenaline in the mouse resulted in hypothermia accompanied by a fall in metabolic rate and by cutaneous vasodilatation. Subcutaneous injection of noradrenaline resulted in hyperthermia with raised metabolic rate and cutaneous vasodilatation. 2. The hypothermia and fall in oxygen consumption rate following intraventricular noradrenaline were prevented by pre-treatment with subcutaneous propranolol, while the cutaneous vasodilatation was un-affected. However, the effects of subcutaneously injected noradrenaline were completely abolished by subcutaneous propranolol. Intraventricular propranolol did not modify the hypothermic effect of intraventricular noradrenaline. 3. The direction of the effect on body temperature of intraventricular noradrenaline was dependent upon ambient temperature; hypothermia occurring at low (15° C) and hyperthermia at high (36° C) ambient temperatures. However, when the possibility of any peripheral action of noradrenaline escaping into the systemic circulation was prevented by prior subcutaneous injection of propranolol, significant hypothermia could be detected at temperatures as high as 32° C. 4. The possibility that the effects of intraventricular noradrenaline could be due to complete abolition of central temperature regulation was further excluded by the occurrence of thermal salivation in all animals during experiments performed at 36° C. 5. It is suggested that, in the mouse, the hypothermic actions of intraventricular noradrenaline are due to a central effect, while its hyperthermic effects at high ambient temperature are due to escape of noradrenaline into the peripheral circulation. The hypothermia could be the result of selective activation of central heat loss mechanisms. 6. Intraventricular noradrenaline was without effect on brain plasma-space although exposure to 100% oxygen caused a detectable fall. PMID:5045735

  19. The Importance of Ambient Temperature to Growth and the Induction of Flowering.

    PubMed

    McClung, C R; Lou, Ping; Hermand, Victor; Kim, Jin A

    2016-01-01

    Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod) have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population. PMID:27602044

  20. The Importance of Ambient Temperature to Growth and the Induction of Flowering

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. R.; Lou, Ping; Hermand, Victor; Kim, Jin A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod) have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population. PMID:27602044

  1. The Importance of Ambient Temperature to Growth and the Induction of Flowering

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. R.; Lou, Ping; Hermand, Victor; Kim, Jin A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod) have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population.

  2. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of ambient temperature uncertainty determined by dual-band pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António; Martins, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    The Monte Carlo technique for uncertainty propagation was used to estimate the uncertainty of ambient temperature measurements, obtained by dual-band pyrometry, of assumed grey surfaces. A large number of simulations were performed for a wide range of values from the following parameters: uncertainty of the detectors, emissivity of the target surface, background temperature of the surrounding surfaces, and spectral characteristics of the detectors (bandwidth, location of the bands, and distance between bands). Temperature measurement uncertainties from single-band pyrometry were also simulated for evaluation against dual-band uncertainties. It is concluded that the following parameters minimize dual-band temperature uncertainty: narrow wavelength bands, far apart from each other, positioned towards low wavelengths; low surface emissivity; high or low background temperature with respect to the target surface temperature (uncertainty grows very fast as the background and target temperatures converge, and tends to a constant minimum value as the background and target temperatures diverge).

  4. Performance characteristics of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, F.; Shen, D.; Subbarao, S.; Whitcanack, L.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    State of art ambient temperature secondary lithium cells were evaluated to determine their performance capability and limitations and to assess the present status of the technology of these cells. Li-MoS2, Li-NbSe3 and Li-TiS2 cells were evaluated for their charge/discharge characteristics, rate capability, and cycle life performance. The cells evaluated have a cycle life of 100-250 cycles at moderate discharge rates (C/5). The specific energy of these cells is between 50 and 100 Wh/Kg, depending upon the system. This paper describes the details of the cell designs, the test procedures, and the results of the evaluation studies.

  5. Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting from Transient Ambient Temperature Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, André; Erd, Metin; Kostic, Milos; Cobry, Keith; Kroener, Michael; Woias, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We examine a thermoelectric harvester that converts electrical energy from the naturally occurring temperature difference between ambient air and large thermal storage capacitors such as building walls or the soil. For maximum power output, the harvester design is implemented in two steps: source matching of the thermal and electrical interfaces to the energy source (system level) followed by load matching of the generator to these interfaces (subsystem level). Therefore, we measure thermal source properties such as the temperature difference, the air velocity, and the cutoff frequency in two application scenarios (road tunnel and office building). We extend a stationary model of the harvester into the time domain to account for transient behavior of the source. Based on the model and the source measurements, we perform the source and load matching. The resulting harvester consists of a pin fin heat sink with a thermal resistance of 6.2 K/W and a cutoff frequency 2.5 times greater than that of the source, a thermoelectric generator, and a DC/DC step-up converter starting at a total temperature difference of only Δ T = 1.2 K. In a final road tunnel field test, this optimized harvester converts 70 mJ of electrical energy per day without any direct solar irradiation. The energy provided by the harvester enables 415 data transmissions from a wireless sensor node per day.

  6. On-road evaluation of advanced hybrid electric vehicles over a wide range of ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.; Duoba, M. J.; Bocci, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV's) have become a production viable and effective mode of efficient transportation. HEV's can provide increased fuel economy over convention technology vehicle, but these advantages can be affected dramatically by wide variations in operating temperatures. The majority of data measured for benchmarking HEV technologies is generated from ambient test cell temperatures at 22 C. To investigate cold and hot temperature affects on HEV operation and efficiency, an on-road evaluation protocol is defined and conducted over a six month study at widely varying temperatures. Two test vehicles, the 2007 Toyota Camry HEV and 2005 Ford Escape HEV, were driven on a pre-defined urban driving route in ambient temperatures ranging from -14 C to 31 C. Results from the on-road evaluation were also compared and correlated to dynamometer testing of the same drive cycle. Results from this on-road evaluation show the battery power control limits and engine operation dramatically change with temperature. These changes decrease fuel economy by more than two times at -14 C as compared to 25 C. The two vehicles control battery temperature in different manners. The Escape HEV uses the air conditioning system to provide cool air to the batteries at high temperatures and is therefore able to maintain battery temperature to less than 33 C. The Camry HEV uses cabin air to cool the batteries. The observed maximum battery temperature was 44 C.

  7. High temperature acclimation through PIF4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Proveniers, Marcel C G; van Zanten, Martijn

    2013-02-01

    Ambient temperature has direct consequences for plant functioning. Many plant species are able to adjust reproductive timing and development to optimize fitness to changes in ambient temperatures. Understanding the molecular networks of how plants cope with high temperatures is essential to counteract the effects of global warming and to secure future crop productivity. Several recent papers reported that Arabidopsis thaliana responses to changing light conditions and high temperature, and their underlying signaling mechanisms are highly similar and involve the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). In this opinion article we discuss the mechanisms of PIF4-mediated acclimation to increased ambient temperature with focus on timing of flowering and morphological acclimation.

  8. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  9. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 regulates low ambient temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Jung; Kim, Joonki; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2012-10-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development, but little is known about its role in ambient temperature-responsive flowering. In addition to being regulated by daylength, the onset of flowering in many plants can also be delayed by low ambient temperatures. Here, we show that HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1), which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, controls flowering time in response to ambient temperatures (16 and 23°C) and intermittent cold. hos1 mutants flowered early, and were insensitive to ambient temperature, but responded normally to vernalization and gibberellic acid. Genetic analyses suggested that this ambient temperature-insensitive flowering was independent of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Also, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) expression was up-regulated in hos1 mutants at both temperatures. The ft tsf mutation almost completely suppressed the early flowering of hos1 mutants at different temperatures, suggesting that FT and TSF are downstream of HOS1 in the ambient temperature response. A lesion in CONSTANS (CO) did not affect the ambient temperature-insensitive flowering phenotype of hos1-3 mutants. In silico analysis showed that FVE was spatiotemporally co-expressed with HOS1. A HOS1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion co-localized with FVE-GFP in the nucleus at both 16 and 23°C. HOS1 physically interacted with FVE and FLK in yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, hos1 mutants were insensitive to intermittent cold. Collectively, our results suggest that HOS1 acts as a common regulator in the signaling pathways that control flowering time in response to low ambient temperature.

  10. Migration and sensory properties of plastics-based nets used as food-contacting materials under ambient and high temperature heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Kontominas, M G; Goulas, A E; Badeka, A V; Nerantzaki, A

    2006-06-01

    Overall migration from a wide range of commercial plastics-based netting materials destined to be used as either meat or vegetable packaging materials into the fatty food simulant isooctane or the aqueous simulant distilled water, respectively, was studied. In addition, sensory tests of representative netting materials were carried out in bottled water in order to investigate possible development of off-odour/taste and discoloration in this food simulant as a result of migration from the netting material. Sensory tests were supplemented by determination of the volatile compounds' profile in table water exposed to the netting materials using SPME-GC/MS. Test conditions for packaging material/food simulant contact and method of overall migration analysis were according to European Union Directives 90/128 (EEC, 1990) and 2002/72 (EEC, 2002). The results showed that for both PET and polyethylene-based netting materials, overall migration values into distilled water ranged between 11.5 and 48.5 mg l(-1), well below the upper limit (60 mg l(-1)) for overall migration values from plastics-packaging materials set by the European Union. The overall migration values from netting materials into isooctane ranged between 38.0 and 624.0 mg l(-1), both below and above the European Union upper limit for migration. Sensory tests involving contact of representative samples with table water under refluxing (100 degrees C/4 h) conditions showed a number of the netting materials produced both off-odour and/or taste as well as discoloration of the food simulant rendering such materials unfit for the packaging of foodstuffs in applications involving heating at elevated temperatures. GC/MS analysis showed the presence of numerous volatile compounds being produced after netting materials/water contact under refluxing conditions. Although it is extremely difficult to establish a clear correlation between sensory off-odour development and GC/MS volatile compounds' profile, it may be

  11. Effects of ambient temperature on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity test outcomes in normal and obese C57 male mice.

    PubMed

    Dudele, Anete; Rasmussen, Gitte Marie; Mayntz, David; Malte, Hans; Lund, Sten; Wang, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Mice are commonly used as animal models to study human metabolic diseases, but experiments are typically performed at room temperature, which is far below their thermoneutral zone and is associated with elevated heart rate, food intake, and energy expenditure. We set out to study how ambient temperature affects glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in control and obese male mice. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were housed at room temperature (23°C) for 6 weeks and fed either control or high fat diet. They were then fasted for 6 h before glucose or insulin tolerance tests were performed at 15, 20, 25, or 30°C. To ensure that behavioral thermoregulation did not counterbalance the afflicted ambient temperatures, oxygen consumption was determined on mice with the same thermoregulatory opportunities as during the tests. Decreasing ambient temperatures increased oxygen consumption and body mass loss during fasting in both groups. Mice fed high fat diet had improved glucose tolerance at 30°C and increased levels of fasting insulin followed by successive decrease of fasting glucose. However, differences between control and high-fat diet mice were present at all temperatures. Ambient temperature did not affect glucose tolerance in control group and insulin tolerance in either of the groups. Ambient temperature affects glucose metabolism in mice and this effect is phenotype specific.

  12. Towards ambient temperature-stable vaccines: the identification of thermally stabilizing liquid formulations for measles virus using an innovative high-throughput infectivity assay.

    PubMed

    Schlehuber, Lisa D; McFadyen, Iain J; Shu, Yu; Carignan, James; Duprex, W Paul; Forsyth, William R; Ho, Jason H; Kitsos, Christine M; Lee, George Y; Levinson, Douglas A; Lucier, Sarah C; Moore, Christopher B; Nguyen, Niem T; Ramos, Josephine; Weinstock, B André; Zhang, Junhong; Monagle, Julie A; Gardner, Colin R; Alvarez, Juan C

    2011-07-12

    As a result of thermal instability, some live attenuated viral (LAV) vaccines lose substantial potency from the time of manufacture to the point of administration. Developing regions lacking extensive, reliable refrigeration ("cold-chain") infrastructure are particularly vulnerable to vaccine failure, which in turn increases the burden of disease. Development of a robust, infectivity-based high throughput screening process for identifying thermostable vaccine formulations offers significant promise for vaccine development across a wide variety of LAV products. Here we describe a system that incorporates thermal stability screening into formulation design using heat labile measles virus as a prototype. The screening of >11,000 unique formulations resulted in the identification of liquid formulations with marked improvement over those used in commercial monovalent measles vaccines, with <1.0 log loss of activity after incubation for 8h at 40°C. The approach was shown to be transferable to a second unrelated virus, and therefore offers significant promise towards the optimization of formulation for LAV vaccine products. PMID:21616113

  13. Evidence for ambient-temperature reversible catalytic hydrogenation in Pt-doped carbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Ming; Tang, Youjian; Xu, En Shi; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C; Larsen, Gregory S; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Tseng, Huan-Hsiung; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Badding, John V; Crespi, Vincent H; Lueking, Angela D

    2013-01-01

    In situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy, with corroborating density functional calculations, is used to probe C-H chemical bonds formed when dissociated hydrogen diffuses from a platinum nanocatalyst to three distinct graphenic surfaces. At ambient temperature, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are reversible in the combined presence of an active catalyst and oxygen heteroatoms. Hydrogenation apparently occurs through surface diffusion in a chemisorbed state, while dehydrogenation requires diffusion of the chemisorbed species back to an active catalyst. PMID:23194179

  14. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F)....

  15. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F)....

  16. O-GlcNAc reports ambient temperature and confers heat resistance on ectotherm development.

    PubMed

    Radermacher, Pablo T; Myachina, Faina; Bosshardt, Fritz; Pandey, Rahul; Mariappa, Daniel; Müller, H-Arno J; Lehner, Christian F

    2014-04-15

    Effects of temperature on biological processes are complex. Diffusion is less affected than the diverse enzymatic reactions that have distinct individual temperature profiles. Hence thermal fluctuations pose a formidable challenge to ectothermic organisms in which body temperature is largely dictated by the ambient temperature. How cells in ectotherms cope with the myriad disruptive effects of temperature variation is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic posttranslational modification of proteins with O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) is closely correlated with ambient temperature during development of distantly related ectotherms ranging from the insect Drosophila melanogaster to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to the fish Danio rerio. Regulation seems to occur at the level of activity of the only two enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase, that add and remove, respectively, this posttranslational modification in nucleus and cytoplasm. With genetic approaches in D. melanogaster and C. elegans, we demonstrate the importance of high levels of this posttranslational modification for successful development at elevated temperatures. Because many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins in diverse pathways are O-GlcNAc targets, temperature-dependent regulation of this modification might contribute to an efficient coordinate adjustment of cellular processes in response to thermal change.

  17. O-GlcNAc reports ambient temperature and confers heat resistance on ectotherm development

    PubMed Central

    Radermacher, Pablo T.; Myachina, Faina; Bosshardt, Fritz; Pandey, Rahul; Mariappa, Daniel; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Lehner, Christian F.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of temperature on biological processes are complex. Diffusion is less affected than the diverse enzymatic reactions that have distinct individual temperature profiles. Hence thermal fluctuations pose a formidable challenge to ectothermic organisms in which body temperature is largely dictated by the ambient temperature. How cells in ectotherms cope with the myriad disruptive effects of temperature variation is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic posttranslational modification of proteins with O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) is closely correlated with ambient temperature during development of distantly related ectotherms ranging from the insect Drosophila melanogaster to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to the fish Danio rerio. Regulation seems to occur at the level of activity of the only two enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase, that add and remove, respectively, this posttranslational modification in nucleus and cytoplasm. With genetic approaches in D. melanogaster and C. elegans, we demonstrate the importance of high levels of this posttranslational modification for successful development at elevated temperatures. Because many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins in diverse pathways are O-GlcNAc targets, temperature-dependent regulation of this modification might contribute to an efficient coordinate adjustment of cellular processes in response to thermal change. PMID:24706800

  18. O-GlcNAc reports ambient temperature and confers heat resistance on ectotherm development.

    PubMed

    Radermacher, Pablo T; Myachina, Faina; Bosshardt, Fritz; Pandey, Rahul; Mariappa, Daniel; Müller, H-Arno J; Lehner, Christian F

    2014-04-15

    Effects of temperature on biological processes are complex. Diffusion is less affected than the diverse enzymatic reactions that have distinct individual temperature profiles. Hence thermal fluctuations pose a formidable challenge to ectothermic organisms in which body temperature is largely dictated by the ambient temperature. How cells in ectotherms cope with the myriad disruptive effects of temperature variation is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic posttranslational modification of proteins with O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) is closely correlated with ambient temperature during development of distantly related ectotherms ranging from the insect Drosophila melanogaster to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to the fish Danio rerio. Regulation seems to occur at the level of activity of the only two enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase, that add and remove, respectively, this posttranslational modification in nucleus and cytoplasm. With genetic approaches in D. melanogaster and C. elegans, we demonstrate the importance of high levels of this posttranslational modification for successful development at elevated temperatures. Because many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins in diverse pathways are O-GlcNAc targets, temperature-dependent regulation of this modification might contribute to an efficient coordinate adjustment of cellular processes in response to thermal change. PMID:24706800

  19. Raman Channel Temperature Measurement of SiC MESFET as a Function of Ambient Temperature and DC Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey J.; Krainsky, Isay L.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to measure the junction temperature of a Cree SiC MESFET as a function of the ambient temperature and DC power. The carrier temperature, which is approximately equal to the ambient temperature, is varied from 25 C to 450 C, and the transistor is biased with VDS=10V and IDS of 50 mA and 100 mA. It is shown that the junction temperature is approximately 52 and 100 C higher than the ambient temperature for the DC power of 500 and 1000 mW, respectively.

  20. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  1. Ambient temperature and risk of death from accidental drug overdose in New York City, 1990-2006

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Amy S.B.; Prescott, Marta; Vlahov, David; Tardiff, Kenneth J.; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mortality increases as ambient temperature increases. Because cocaine affects core body temperature, ambient temperature may play a role in cocaine-related mortality in particular. The present study examined the association between ambient temperature and fatal overdoses over time in New York City (NYC). Methods: Mortality data were obtained from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for 1990 through 2006, and temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. We used Generalized Additive Models to test the relationship between weekly average temperatures and counts of accidental overdose deaths in NYC, controlling for year and average length of daylight hours. Results: We found a significant relation between ambient temperature and accidental overdose fatality for all models where the overdoses were due in whole or in part to cocaine (all p < 0.05), but not for non-cocaine overdoses. Risk of accidental overdose deaths increased for weeks when the average temperature was above 24 degrees Celsius. Conclusions: These results suggest a strong relation between temperature and accidental overdose mortality that is driven by cocaine-related overdoses rising at temperatures above 24 degrees Celsius; this is a substantially lower temperature than prior estimates. To put this in perspective, approximately seven weeks a year between 1990 and 2006 had an average weekly temperature of 24 or above in NYC. Heat-related mortality presents a considerable public health concern, and cocaine users constitute a high-risk group. PMID:20219056

  2. Ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings: Theory and design equations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1997-12-30

    Research has been underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to build a theoretical and experimental base for the design of ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings for a variety of possible applications. in the approach taken the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s theorem with respect to the stability of passive magnetic bearing systems employing axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements are overcome by employing special combinations of elements, as follows: Levitating and restoring forces are provided by combinations of permanent-magnet-excited elements chosen to provide positive stiffnesses (negative force derivatives) for selected displacements (i.e., those involving translations or angular displacement of the axis of rotation). As dictated by Eamshaw`s theorem, any bearing system thus constructed will be statically unstable for at least one of the remaining possible displacements. Stabilization against this displacement is accomplished by using periodic arrays (`Halbach arrays`) of permanent magnets to induce currents in close-packed inductively loaded circuits, thereby producing negative force derivatives stabilizing the system while in rotation. Disengaging mechanical elements stabilize the system when at rest and when below a low critical speed. The paper discusses theory and equations needed for the design of such systems.

  3. Evaluation of a commercial, portable, ambient-temperature emissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Freddie J.; McElroy, David L.

    1990-05-01

    The Devices&Services Company model AE emissometer was evaluated by measurements at ambient temperature on materials with emittances, ɛ, from 0.03 to 0.95, including plates of copper and stainless steel, aluminum foil, adhesive tape, wood, paper, and oxide coatings on a metal pipe. A repeatability of ±0.008 units was observed for measurements of ɛ of working standards over a one-year period. The accuracy of the emissometer was established by measurements on specimens of known ɛ; an uncertainty of ±0.014 units was determined. These repeatability and accuracy values were confirmed by a round-robin investigation using two working standards whose ɛ's were measured by three independent laboratories using model AE emissometers and by four laboratories that used absolute methods. The instrument was shown to measure the total hemispherical ɛ, not the total normal ɛ. Experimental difficulties were encountered during measurements on a very anisotropic material and in determinations of ɛ's of materials with transparencies less than 0.1. Critical procedural steps are discussed.

  4. Comprehensive particle characterization of modern gasoline and diesel passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Urs; Mohr, Martin; Forss, Anna-Maria

    Particle measurements were performed in the exhaust of five light-duty vehicles (Euro-3) at +23, -7, and -20 °C ambient temperatures. The characterization included measurements of particle number, active surface area, number size distribution, and mass size distribution. We investigated two port-injection spark-ignition (PISI) vehicles, a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) vehicle, a compressed ignition (CI) vehicle with diesel particle filter (DPF), and a CI vehicle without DPF. To minimize sampling effects, particles were directly sampled from the tailpipe with a novel porous tube diluter at controlled sampling parameters. The diluted exhaust was split into two branches to measure either all or only non-volatile particles. Effect of ambient temperature was investigated on particle emission for cold and warmed-up engine. For the gasoline vehicles and the CI vehicle with DPF, the main portion of particle emission was found in the first minutes of the driving cycle at cold engine start. The particle emission of the CI vehicle without DPF was hardly affected by cold engine start. For the PISI vehicles, particle number emissions were superproportionally increased in the diameter size range from 0.1 to 0.3 μm during cold start at low ambient temperature. Based on the particle mass size distribution, the DPF removed smaller particles ( dp<0.5μm) more efficiently than larger particles ( dp>0.5μm). No significant effect of ambient temperature was observed when the engine was warmed up. Peak emission of volatile nanoparticles only took place at specific conditions and was poorly repeatable. Nucleation of particles was predominately observed during or after strong acceleration at high speed and during regeneration of the DPF.

  5. Role of SVP in the control of flowering time by ambient temperature in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Park, Soo Hyun; Hwang, Ildoo; Lee, Jong Seob; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Plants must perceive and rapidly respond to changes in ambient temperature for their successful reproduction. Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) plays an important role in the response of plants to ambient temperature changes. The loss of SVP function elicited insensitivity to ambient temperature changes. SVP mediates the temperature-dependent functions of FCA and FVE within the thermosensory pathway. SVP controls flowering time by negatively regulating the expression of a floral integrator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), via direct binding to the CArG motifs in the FT sequence. We propose that this is one of the molecular mechanisms that modulate flowering time under fluctuating temperature conditions. PMID:17322399

  6. Ambient temperature: a factor affecting performance and physiological response of broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkoh, A.

    1989-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to elucidate the influence of four constant ambient temperatures (20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C) on the performance and physiological reactions of male commercial broiler chicks from 3 to 7 weeks of age. A 12 h light-dark cycle was operated, while relative humidity and air circulation were not controlled. Exposure of broiler chickens to the 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C treatments showed highly significant ( P<0.0001) depression in growth rate, food intake and efficiency of food utilization, and a significant increase in water consumption for the 30° and 35°C groups. Mortality was, however, not affected by the temperature treatments. Changes in physiological status, such as increased rectal temperatures, decreased concentration of red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, and total plasma protein were observed in birds housed in the higher temperature (30° and 35°C) environments. Moreover, in these broiler chickens, there was an increased blood glucose concentration and a decreased thyroid gland weight. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to high ambient temperatures markedly affects their performance and physiological response.

  7. Association between the ambient temperature and the occurrence of human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Josef; Greiner, Matthias; Höller, Christiane; Messelhäusser, Ute; Rampp, Albert; Klein, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. and thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. are the most important causes of human bacterial diarrheal infections worldwide. These bacterial species are influenced by several factors like behaviour of the host, shedding, environment incl. directly or indirectly through ambient temperature, and the infections show seasonality. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the association between the occurrence of human campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis and the ambient temperature. The number of campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis cases in two German metropolises, Munich and Berlin, and three rural regions was analysed with simultaneous consideration of the ambient temperature over a period of four years (2001 to 2004) using regression, time series, and cross-correlation analysis. The statistical analysis showed that an increase in the ambient temperature correlated positively with an increase in human Salmonella and Campylobacter cases. The correlation occurred with a delay of approximately five weeks. The seasonal rise in ambient temperature correlated with increased incidence of bacterial diarrheal infections. PMID:27324200

  8. Association between the ambient temperature and the occurrence of human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections.

    PubMed

    Yun, Josef; Greiner, Matthias; Höller, Christiane; Messelhäusser, Ute; Rampp, Albert; Klein, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. and thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. are the most important causes of human bacterial diarrheal infections worldwide. These bacterial species are influenced by several factors like behaviour of the host, shedding, environment incl. directly or indirectly through ambient temperature, and the infections show seasonality. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the association between the occurrence of human campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis and the ambient temperature. The number of campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis cases in two German metropolises, Munich and Berlin, and three rural regions was analysed with simultaneous consideration of the ambient temperature over a period of four years (2001 to 2004) using regression, time series, and cross-correlation analysis. The statistical analysis showed that an increase in the ambient temperature correlated positively with an increase in human Salmonella and Campylobacter cases. The correlation occurred with a delay of approximately five weeks. The seasonal rise in ambient temperature correlated with increased incidence of bacterial diarrheal infections. PMID:27324200

  9. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  10. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  11. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  12. Changes of body temperature and thermoregulatory responses of freely moving rats during GABAergic pharmacological stimulation to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus in several ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Takayuki; Saito, Takehito; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yazawa, Toru; Kotani, Yasunori; Otokawa, Minoru; Aihara, Yasutsugu

    2005-06-28

    Action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH) has been implicated to regulate body temperature (T(b)). However, its precise role in thermoregulation remains unclear. Moreover, little is known about its release pattern in the PO/AH during active thermoregulation. Using microdialysis and telemetry techniques, we measured several parameters related to thermoregulation of freely moving rats during pharmacological stimulation of GABA in normal (23 degrees C), cold (5 degrees C), and hot (35 degrees C) ambient temperatures. We also measured extracellular GABA levels in the PO/AH during cold (5 degrees C) and heat (35 degrees C) exposure combined with microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Perfusion of GABA(A) agonist muscimol into the PO/AH increased T(b), which is associated with increased heart rate (HR), as an index of heat production in all ambient temperatures. Although tail skin temperature (T(tail)) as an index of heat loss increased only under normal ambient temperatures, its response was relatively delayed in comparison with HR and T(b), suggesting that the increase in T(tail) was a secondary response to increased HR and T(b). Locomotor activity also increased in all ambient temperatures, but its response was not extraordinary. Interestingly, thermoregulatory responses were different after perfusion of GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline at each ambient temperature. In normal ambient temperature conditions, perfusion of bicuculline had no effect on any parameter. However, under cold ambient temperature, the procedure induced significant hypothermia concomitant with a decrease in HR in spite of hyperactivity and increase of T(tail). It induced hyperthermia with the increase of HR but no additional change of T(tail) in hot ambient temperature conditions. Furthermore, the extracellular GABA level increased significantly during cold exposure. Its release was lower during heat exposure than in a

  13. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  14. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  15. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  16. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  17. Ambient temperature and the occurrence of collective violence: the "long, hot summer" revisited.

    PubMed

    Baron, R A; Ransberger, V M

    1978-04-01

    Archival data pertaining to 102 instances of serious collective violence were examined in order to study the relationship between ambient temperature and the occurrence of such events. Results indicated that the frequency of collective violence and ambient temperature were curvilinearly related. Specifically, ambient temperature was directly associated with the frequency of collective violence through the mid-80s (degrees Fahrenheit). Beyond this point, however, further increments in temperature were associated with a decreasing incidence of such events. Additional findings indicated that ambient temperature increased significantly during the 7 days preceding the outbreak of collective violence, remained stable during its occurrence, but then decreased significantly in the 3 days following its termination. Possible implications of these findings, as well as their relationship to the results of previous laboratory studies, are discussed.

  18. Ambient-temperature, rechargeable, all-solid lithium/polypyrrole polymer battery

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuda, Satoko; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya . Dept. of Applied Chemistry); Appetecchi, G.B.; Scrosati, B. . Dipt. di Chimica)

    1995-01-01

    An ambient-temperature, all-solid lithium battery was fabricated by combining a poly(acrylonitrile), PAN-based polymer electrolyte with a lithium metal anode and a polypyrrole, PPy, film cathode. The influence of the morphology of the PPy film cathode on the battery performance was investigated. The results show that the electrode morphology does not considerably influence the charge-discharge cycling response and that the solid-state, Li/PPy battery exhibits high coulombic efficiency, approaching 90%. However, at the present time, the battery has a poor shelf life, and work is in progress for overcoming this drawback.

  19. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  20. Transporting Cells in Semi-Solid Gel Condition and at Ambient Temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Chen, Peng; Xu, Jianzhen; Zou, June X; Wang, Haibin; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells including human cancer cells are usually transported in cryovials on dry ice or in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipping vessel between different places at long distance. The hazardous nature of dry ice and liquid nitrogen, and the associated high shipping cost strongly limit their routine use. In this study, we tested the viability and properties of cells after being preserved or shipped over long distance in Matrigel mixture for different days. Our results showed that cells mixed with Matrigel at suitable ratios maintained excellent viability (>90%) for one week at room temperature and preserved the properties such as morphology, drug sensitivity and metabolism well, which was comparable to cells cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. We also sent cells in the Matrigel mixture via FedEx service to different places at ambient temperature. Upon arrival, it was found that over 90% of the cells were viable and grew well after replating. These data collectively suggested that our Matrigel-based method was highly convenient for shipping live cells for long distances in semi-solid gel condition and at ambient temperature. PMID:26098554

  1. Single-phase ambient and cryogenic temperature heat transfer coefficients in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.; Bradley, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-scaling cryogenic refrigerators, in particular the Joule-Thomson (JT) variety require very good information about heat transfer characteristics of the refrigerants flowing in the microchannels for optimal design and performance. The extremely low Reynolds flow is present in a micro JT cryocooler, the heat transfer characteristics at these conditions require investigation. There are numerous studies regarding heat transfer coefficient measurements of liquid flow in microchannels at/near ambient temperature and high Reynolds flow (Re>2000), that agree well with the conventional correlations. However, results from previous studies of gaseous flow in microchannels at low Reynolds flow (Re<1000) disagree with conventional theory. Moreover, the studies performed at cryogenic temperatures are quite limited in number. In this paper, the single-phase heat transfer coefficients and friction factors for nitrogen are measured at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. The hydraulic diameters for this study are 60, 110 and 180 μm for circular microchannels. The Reynolds numbers varied from a very low value of 10 to 3000. The measured friction factors are comparable to those in macro-scale tubes. The experimental results of the heat transfer indicate that Nusselt numbers derived from measurements are significantly affected by axial conduction at low Reynolds flow (Re<500). The Nusselt numbers at high Reynolds flow (Re>1000) follow conventional theory. The detailed experiment, procedure, and measured results are presented in this paper and discussed regarding deviation from ideal theory at low Reynolds flow.

  2. Daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence in Guangzhou, China: a time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyuan; Chen, Xinyu; Chen, Renjie; Cai, Jing; Meng, Xia; Wan, Yue; Kan, Haidong

    2016-08-01

    Few previous studies have examined the association between temperature and renal colic in developing regions, especially in China, the largest developing country in the world. We collected daily emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for renal colic from Guangzhou Emergency Center from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012. We used a distributed-lag nonlinear model in addition to the over-dispersed generalized additive model to investigate the association between daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence after controlling for seasonality, humidity, public holidays, and day of the week. We identified 3158 EADs for renal colic during the study period. This exposure-response curve was almost flat when the temperature was low and moderate and elevated when the temperature increased over 21 °C. For heat-related effects, the significant risk occurred on the concurrent day and diminished until lag day 7. The cumulative relative risk of hot temperatures (90th percentile) and extremely hot temperatures (99th percentile) over lag days 0-7 was 1.92 (95 % confidence interval, 1.21, 3.05) and 2.45 (95 % confidence interval, 1.50, 3.99) compared with the reference temperature of 21 °C. This time-series analysis in Guangzhou, China, suggested a nonlinear and lagged association between high outdoor temperatures and daily EADs for renal colic. Our findings might have important public health significance to prevent renal colic.

  3. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems.

  4. Low activation energy dehydrogenation of aqueous formic acid on platinum-ruthenium-bismuth oxide at near ambient temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Ting, Siu-Wa; Cheng, Shaoan; Tsang, Kwok-Ying; van der Laak, Nicole; Chan, Kwong-Yu

    2009-12-21

    Highly selective dehydrogenation of formic acid in water was observed at near ambient temperature on a metal/metal oxide catalyst composed of platinum ruthenium and bismuth with a low activation energy of 37.3 kJ mol(-1). PMID:20024219

  5. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating). Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001). Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating) and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001). When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001). Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality). On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality). PMID:27128938

  6. Improved resolution of ambient flow through fractured rock with temperature logs.

    PubMed

    Pehme, P E; Parker, B L; Cherry, J A; Greenhouse, J P

    2010-01-01

    In contaminant hydrogeology, investigations at fractured rock sites are typically undertaken to improve understanding of the fracture networks and associated groundwater flow that govern past and/or future contaminant transport. Conventional hydrogeologic, geophysical, and hydrophysical techniques used to develop a conceptual model are often implemented in open boreholes under conditions of cross-connected flow. A new approach using high-resolution temperature (+/-0.001 degrees C) profiles measured within static water columns of boreholes sealed using continuous, water-inflated, flexible liners (FLUTe) identifies hydraulically active fractures under ambient (natural) groundwater flow conditions. The value of this approach is assessed by comparisons of temperature profiles from holes (100 to 200 m deep) with and without liners at four contaminated sites with distinctly different hydrogeologic conditions. The results from the lined holes consistently show many more hydraulically active fractures than the open-hole profiles, in which the influence of vertical flow through the borehole between a few fractures masks important intermediary flow zones. Temperature measurements in temporarily sealed boreholes not only improve the sensitivity and accuracy of identifying hydraulically active fractures under ambient conditions but also offer new insights regarding previously unresolvable flow distributions in fractured rock systems, while leaving the borehole available for other forms of testing and monitoring device installation. PMID:19840124

  7. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS).

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20-60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating). Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = -0.277; p < 0.001). Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating) and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001). When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = -0.153; p = 0.001). Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality). On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality). PMID:27128938

  8. Degradation of dimethyl phthalate in solutions and soil slurries by persulfate at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Deng, Dayi; Yang, Liling

    2014-04-30

    The degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) by persulfate at ambient temperature (T=20-40°C) was investigated in aqueous solutions and soil slurries to assess the feasibility of using persulfate to remediate DMP contaminated soil and groundwater. First, the effects of temperature, initial oxidant concentration, initial DMP concentration and initial solution pH on the removal of DMP and TOC were studied in aqueous solutions. The results show that persulfate at 40°C can effectively mineralize DMP. Furthermore, dimethyl 4-hydroxyl phthalate, maleic acid and oxalic acid were identified as the degradation intermediates, and degradation pathways were proposed. Lastly, persulfate at 40°C was applied to remediate soil spiked with DMP at ∼ 600 mg/kg. The results show that persulfate at 40°C is highly effective for the remediation of DMP contaminated soil. Overall, this study provides fundamental and practical knowledge for the treatment of emerging phthalate esters (PAEs) contaminated soil and groundwater, as well as PAEs contaminated industrial wastewater, with persulfate at ambient temperature.

  9. Effect of change in ambient temperature on core temperature during the daytime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitsuba, Naoshi; White, Matthew D.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the hypothesis is tested that continuous increases in ambient temperature (Ta) during daytime would give elevated core and skin temperatures, and consequently better thermal sensation and comfort. Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperatures and regional dry heat losses at 7 sites were continuously measured for 10 Japanese male subjects in three thermal conditions: cond. 1, stepwise increases in Ta from 26 °C at 9 h00 to 30 °C at 18 h00; cond. 2, steady Ta at 28 °C from 9 h00 to 18 h00 and cond. 3, stepwise decreases in Ta from 30 °C at 9 h00 to 26 °C at 18 h00. Oxygen consumption was measured and thermal sensation and comfort votes were monitored at 15 min intervals. Body weight loss was measured at 1 h intervals. While Tre increased continuously in the morning period in any condition, it increased to a significantly greater ( p < 0.05) 36.9 ± 0.3 °C at 18 h00 in cond. 1 relative to 36.7 ± 0.28 °C in Cond. 2 and 36.5 ± 0.37 °C in cond. 3. Better thermal comfort was observed in the afternoon and the evening in Cond.1 as compared with the other 2 conditions. Thus, a progressive and appropriate increase in Ta may induce optimal cycle in core temperature during daytime, particularly for a resting person.

  10. Effect of change in ambient temperature on core temperature during the daytime.

    PubMed

    Kakitsuba, Naoshi; White, Matthew D

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the hypothesis is tested that continuous increases in ambient temperature (Ta) during daytime would give elevated core and skin temperatures, and consequently better thermal sensation and comfort. Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperatures and regional dry heat losses at 7 sites were continuously measured for 10 Japanese male subjects in three thermal conditions: cond. 1, stepwise increases in Ta from 26 °C at 9 h00 to 30 °C at 18 h00; cond. 2, steady Ta at 28 °C from 9 h00 to 18 h00 and cond. 3, stepwise decreases in Ta from 30 °C at 9 h00 to 26 °C at 18 h00. Oxygen consumption was measured and thermal sensation and comfort votes were monitored at 15 min intervals. Body weight loss was measured at 1 h intervals. While Tre increased continuously in the morning period in any condition, it increased to a significantly greater (p<0.05) 36.9±0.3 °C at 18 h00 in cond. 1 relative to 36.7±0.28 °C in Cond. 2 and 36.5±0.37 °C in cond. 3. Better thermal comfort was observed in the afternoon and the evening in Cond.1 as compared with the other 2 conditions. Thus, a progressive and appropriate increase in Ta may induce optimal cycle in core temperature during daytime, particularly for a resting person.

  11. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  12. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  13. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  14. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Čaja, Alexander E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  15. Ambient air pollution, temperature and out-of-hospital coronary deaths in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinping; Chen, Renjie; Meng, Xia; Yang, Changyuan; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of ambient air pollution and temperature in triggering out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCDs) in China. We evaluated the associations of air pollution and temperature with daily OHCDs in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2011. We applied an over-dispersed generalized additive model and a distributed lag nonlinear model to analyze the effects of air pollution and temperature, respectively. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in the present-day PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO were associated with increases in OHCD mortality of 0.49%, 0.68%, 0.88%, 1.60% and 0.08%, respectively. A 1 °C decrease below the minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 3.81% increase in OHCD mortality on lags days 0-21, and a 1 °C increase above minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 4.61% increase over lag days 0-3. No effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. This analysis suggests that air pollution, low temperature and high temperature may increase the risk of OHCDs.

  16. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  17. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  18. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  19. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  20. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  1. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  2. Thermoregulatory responses to variations of photoperiod and ambient temperature in the male lesser mouse lemur: a primitive or an advanced adaptive character?

    PubMed

    Aujard, F; Perret, M; Vannier, G

    1998-10-01

    The lesser mouse lemur, a small Malagasy primate, is exposed to strong seasonal variations in ambient temperature and food availability in its natural habitat. To face these environmental constraints, this nocturnal primate exhibits biological seasonal rhythms that are photoperiodically driven. To determine the role of daylength on thermoregulatory responses to changes in ambient temperature, evaporative water loss (EWL), body temperature (Tb) and oxygen consumption, measured as resting metabolic rate (RMR), were measured in response to ambient temperatures ranging from 5 degrees C to 35 degrees C, in eight males exposed to either short (10L:14D) or long (14L:10D) daylengths in controlled captive conditions. In both photoperiods, EWL, Tb and RMR were significantly modified by ambient temperatures. Exposure to ambient temperatures below 25 degrees C was associated with a decrease in Tb and an increase in RMR, whereas EWL remained constant. Heat exposure caused an increase in Tb and heat loss through evaporative pathways. Thermoregulatory responses to changes in ambient temperature significantly differed according to daylength. Daily variations in Tb and EWL were characterized by high values during the night. During the diurnal rest, lower values were found and a phase of heterothermia occurred in the early morning followed by a spontaneous rewarming. The amplitude of Tb decrease with or without the occurrence of torpor (Tb < 33 degrees C) was dependent on both ambient temperature and photoperiod. This would support the hypothesis of advanced thermoregulatory processes in mouse lemurs in response to selective environmental pressure, the major external cue being photoperiodic variations.

  3. Influence of temperature changes on ambient air NOx chemiluminescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Miñarro, Marta Doval; Ferradás, Enrique González; Martínez, Francisco J Marzal

    2012-09-01

    Users of automatic air pollution monitors are largely unaware of how certain parameters, like temperature, can affect readings. The present work examines the influence of temperature changes on chemiluminescence NO(x) measurements made with a Thermo Scientific 42i analyzer, a model widely used in air monitoring networks and air pollution studies. These changes are grouped into two categories according to European Standard EN 14211: (1) changes in the air surrounding the analyzers and (2) changes in the sampled air. First, the sensitivity tests described in Standard EN 14211 were performed to determine whether the analyzer performance was adapted to the requirements of the standard. The analyzer met the performance criteria of both tests; however, some differences were detected in readings with temperature changes even though the temperature compensator was on. Sample temperature changes were studied more deeply as they were the most critical (they cannot be controlled and differences of several tens of degrees can be present in a single day). Significant differences in readings were obtained when changing sample temperature; however, maximum deviations were around 3% for temperature ranges of 15°C. If other possible uncertainty contributions are controlled and temperature variations with respect to the calibration temperature are not higher than 15°C, the effect of temperature changes could be acceptable and no data correction should have to be applied. PMID:21964932

  4. [Heat exchange of the rat in thermoneutral zone temperature and comparison with heat exchange in ambient temperature over and under it].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, G V

    2011-08-01

    With the help of thermonetry and general calorimetry body temperature and heat production in ambient temperatures 20 degrees C, 28 degrees C, 33 degrees C were recorded. The experiments showed, that at the temperature 20 degrees C the rectal temperature was changing very little. But in ambient temperature 33 degrees C the rectal temperature was 40.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C.

  5. Impact of ambient temperature on spring-based relative gravimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Chery, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of ambient temperature changes on the gravity reading of spring-based relative gravimeters. Controlled heating experiments using two Scintrex CG5 gravimeters allowed us to determine a linear correlation (R 2> 0.9) between ambient temperature and gravity variations. The relation is stable and constant for the two CG5 we used: -5 nm/s2/° C. A linear relation is also seen between gravity and residual sensor temperature variations (R 2> 0.75), but contrary to ambient temperature, this relation is neither constant over time nor similar between the two instruments. The linear correction of ambient temperature on the controlled heating time series reduced the standard deviation at least by a factor of 2, to less than 10 nm/s2 . The laboratory results allowed for reprocessing the data gathered on a field survey that originally aimed to characterize local hydrological heterogeneities on a karstic area. The correction of two years of monthly CG5 measurements from ambient temperature variations halved the standard deviation (from 62 to 32 nm/s2 ) and led us to a better hydrological interpretation. Although the origin of this effect is uncertain, we suggest that an imperfect control of the sensor temperature may be involved, as well as a change of the properties of an electronic component.

  6. Does temperature enhance acute mortality effects of ambient particle pollution in Tianjin City, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxing; Zhou, Maigeng; Cai, Yue; Zhang, Yajuan; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-04-15

    Only a few epidemiological studies have explored whether there were interactive effects between temperature and particulate matter <10μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) on mortality, especially in Asian countries. The present study used time-series analysis to explore the modification effects of temperature on the association between PM(10) and the cause-specific mortality for cardiovascular, respiratory, cardiopulmonary, stroke and ischemic heart diseases (IHD), as well as non-accidental mortality in Tianjin between 2007 and 2009. Results showed that the PM(10) effects were stronger on high temperature level days than that on low temperature level days. The interactions between PM(10) and temperature were statistically significant on cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, and IHD mortalities. The effect estimates per 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM(10) concentrations at the moving average of lags 0 and 1 day in high temperature level were 0.62% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.27, 0.97) for non-accidental, 0.92% (0.47, 1.36) for cardiovascular, 0.74% (-0.33, 1.82) for respiratory, 0.89% (0.47, 1.32) for cardiopulmonary, 0.65% (0.00, 1.31) for stroke and 1.20% (0.63, 1.78) for IHD mortalities. In addition, the PM(10) effects on high temperature level days were stronger on older (≥65 years) compared with younger subjects (<65 years). This suggests that the modifying effects of the temperature should be considered when analyzing health impacts of ambient PM(10).

  7. Enhancement of ANAMMOX activity by low-intensity ultrasound irradiation at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Jin; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jue; Ji, Yu-Xin; Liu, Qi-Zhen; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the enhancement effect of low intensity intermittent ultrasound irradiation on the efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process at ambient temperature. With intermittently irradiated (ultrasound intensity of 0.19 w/cm(2), exposure time of 0.2 min), the reactor (RU) had a nitrogen removal rate (NRR) of 5.49 kgTN/m(3)/d at 14.8°C, while the NRR was 1.53 kgTN/m(3)/d in the control reactor (RC). At the end of operation, the contents of polysaccharide, protein, TTC-dehydrogenase and VSS were 6.82 mg/mgVSS, 26.79 mg/mgVSS, 0.58 mgTF/L/H and 10.11 gVSS/L in RU, higher than the levels in the RC. These results demonstrated that it is possible to achieve stable and highly efficient operation in an ANAMMOX reactor at low ambient temperature by implementation of ultrasonication.

  8. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-05-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.

  9. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  10. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  11. Stable Calcium Nitrides at Ambient and High Pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuangshuang; Peng, Feng; Liu, Hanyu; Majumdar, Arnab; Gao, Tao; Yao, Yansun

    2016-08-01

    The knowledge of stoichiometries of alkaline-earth metal nitrides, where nitrogen can exist in polynitrogen forms, is of significant interest for understanding nitrogen bonding and its applications in energy storage. For calcium nitrides, there were three known crystalline forms, CaN2, Ca2N, and Ca3N2, at ambient conditions. In the present study, we demonstrated that there are more stable forms of calcium nitrides than what is already known to exist at ambient and high pressures. Using a global structure searching method, we theoretically explored the phase diagram of CaNx and discovered a series of new compounds in this family. In particular, we found a new CaN phase that is thermodynamically stable at ambient conditions, which may be synthesized using CaN2 and Ca2N. Four other stoichiometries, namely, Ca2N3, CaN3, CaN4, and CaN5, were shown to be stable under high pressure. The predicted CaNx compounds contain a rich variety of polynitrogen forms ranging from small molecules (N2, N4, N5, and N6) to extended chains (N∞). Because of the large energy difference between the single and triple nitrogen bonds, dissociation of the CaNx crystals with polynitrogens is expected to be highly exothermic, making them as potential high-energy-density materials. PMID:27428707

  12. Ambient Temperature Changes and the Impact to Time Measurement Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Gucevic, J.; Delcev, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements in Geodetic Astronomy are mainly outdoors and performed during a night, when the temperature often decreases very quickly. The time-keeping during a measuring session is provided by collecting UTC time ticks from a GPS receiver and transferring them to a laptop computer. An interrupt handler routine processes received UTC impulses in real-time and calculates the clock parameters. The characteristics of the computer quartz clock are influenced by temperature changes of the environment. We exposed the laptop to different environmental temperature conditions, and calculate the clock parameters for each environmental model. The results show that the laptop used for time-keeping in outdoor measurements should be kept in a stable temperature environment, at temperatures near 20° C.

  13. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  14. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  15. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  16. Relationships between ambient, cockpit, and pilot temperatures during routine air operations.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M H; Higenbottam, C; Rigby, R A

    1978-01-01

    Thermal data obtained from aircraft flying routine sorties from RAF Germany in summer have been reduced to a form suitable for statistical analysis by describing thermal stress in terms of a modified wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, and thermal strain in terms of mean body temperature (Tb). Ambient temperature could be related to cockpit temperature, and cockpit temperature to pilot Tb, by linear equations of positive slope. Relationships between Tb and sortie time could be represented by exponential equations. The relationships between cockpit temperature and sortie time could also, in fixed-wing aircraft, be described by exponential equations, although in helicopters the relationships were better described by linear equations of negative slope. Models capable of predicting cockpit thermal stress and aircrew thermal strain given ambient temperature and sortie time have been constructed. These provide a description of the temperature relationships within aircraft during flight.

  17. Effect of ambient temperature and humidity on emissions of an idling gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of inlet pressure, temperature, and humidity on the oxides of nitrogen produced by an engine operating at takeoff power setting were investigated and numerous correction factors were formulated. The effect of ambient relative humidity on gas turbine idle emissions was ascertained. Experimentally, a nonvitiating combustor rig was employed to simulate changing combustor inlet conditions as generated by changing ambient conditions. Emissions measurements were made at the combustor exit. For carbon monoxide, a reaction kinetic scheme was applied within each zone of the combustor where initial species concentrations reflected not only local combustor characteristics but also changing ambient conditions.

  18. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual.

  19. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual. PMID:26346020

  20. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100–300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900–2,500 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact. PMID:26658923

  1. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-12-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100-300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900-2,500 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact.

  2. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100-300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900-2,500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact. PMID:26658923

  3. Rice LTG1 is involved in adaptive growth and fitness under low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangwen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Wu, Weixun; Wang, Hong-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yunhui; Chen, Xiuling; Zhou, Kunneng; Jin, Mingna; Cheng, Zhijun; Li, Xueyong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most prevalent factors limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the effect of LT on seed germination and reproductive development in rice, the genetic component affecting vegetative growth under LT remains poorly understood. Here, we report that rice cultivars harboring the dominant LTG1 (Low Temperature Growth 1) allele are more tolerant to LT (15-25°C, a temperature range prevalent in high-altitude, temperate zones and high-latitude areas), than those with the ltg1 allele. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we show that LTG1 encodes a casein kinase I. A functional nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the coding region of LTG1, causing a single amino acid substitution (I357K) that is associated with the growth rate, heading date and yield of rice plants grown at LT. We present evidence that LTG1 affects rice growth at LT via an auxin-dependent process(es). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of this locus suggests that the ltg1 haplotype arose before the domestication of rice in tropical climates. Together, our data demonstrate that LTG1 plays an important role in the adaptive growth and fitness of rice cultivars under conditions of low ambient temperature. PMID:24635058

  4. Rice LTG1 is involved in adaptive growth and fitness under low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangwen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Wu, Weixun; Wang, Hong-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yunhui; Chen, Xiuling; Zhou, Kunneng; Jin, Mingna; Cheng, Zhijun; Li, Xueyong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most prevalent factors limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the effect of LT on seed germination and reproductive development in rice, the genetic component affecting vegetative growth under LT remains poorly understood. Here, we report that rice cultivars harboring the dominant LTG1 (Low Temperature Growth 1) allele are more tolerant to LT (15-25°C, a temperature range prevalent in high-altitude, temperate zones and high-latitude areas), than those with the ltg1 allele. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we show that LTG1 encodes a casein kinase I. A functional nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the coding region of LTG1, causing a single amino acid substitution (I357K) that is associated with the growth rate, heading date and yield of rice plants grown at LT. We present evidence that LTG1 affects rice growth at LT via an auxin-dependent process(es). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of this locus suggests that the ltg1 haplotype arose before the domestication of rice in tropical climates. Together, our data demonstrate that LTG1 plays an important role in the adaptive growth and fitness of rice cultivars under conditions of low ambient temperature.

  5. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  6. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at...

  7. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at...

  8. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at...

  9. Apparent Metabolizable Energy Needs of Broiler Chicks Subjected to Diverse Ambient Temperature Regimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early chick performance is adversely affected by inadequate ambient temperatures. Increasing AME may help alleviate poor performance with chicks subjected to low brooding temperatures. This study examined broiler chicks provided diets formulated to either 3,040 or 3,140 kcal AME/kg when subjected to...

  10. Influence of ambient temperatures on the production of restraint ulcers in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchel, L.; Gallaire, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the influence of ambient temperature on the production of restraint ulcers in the rat is described. It concludes that the production of restrain ulcers, is favored by the reduction of the environmental temperature, whether the rat has been subjected to a fast or not.

  11. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  12. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2016-07-12

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  13. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  14. Plasticity versus Adaptation of Ambient-Temperature Flowering Response.

    PubMed

    Pajoro, Alice; Verhage, Leonie; Immink, Richard G H

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to understand how plants adapt flowering time to novel environmental conditions, such as global warming, while maintaining plasticity in response to daily fluctuating temperatures. A recent study shows a role for transposons and highlights the need to investigate how these different responses evolved. PMID:26698930

  15. Plasticity versus Adaptation of Ambient-Temperature Flowering Response.

    PubMed

    Pajoro, Alice; Verhage, Leonie; Immink, Richard G H

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to understand how plants adapt flowering time to novel environmental conditions, such as global warming, while maintaining plasticity in response to daily fluctuating temperatures. A recent study shows a role for transposons and highlights the need to investigate how these different responses evolved.

  16. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  17. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  18. Experimental and casework validation of ambient temperature corrections in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aidan P; Wallman, James F; Archer, Melanie S

    2012-01-01

    This paper expands on Archer (J Forensic Sci 49, 2004, 553), examining additional factors affecting ambient temperature correction of weather station data in forensic entomology. Sixteen hypothetical body discovery sites (BDSs) in Victoria and New South Wales (Australia), both in autumn and in summer, were compared to test whether the accuracy of correlation was affected by (i) length of correlation period; (ii) distance between BDS and weather station; and (iii) periodicity of ambient temperature measurements. The accuracy of correlations in data sets from real Victorian and NSW forensic entomology cases was also examined. Correlations increased weather data accuracy in all experiments, but significant differences in accuracy were found only between periodicity treatments. We found that a >5°C difference between average values of body in situ and correlation period weather station data was predictive of correlations that decreased the accuracy of ambient temperatures estimated using correlation. Practitioners should inspect their weather data sets for such differences.

  19. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  20. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  1. Crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade 2 steel in hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic-load crack growth measurements were performed on ASME SA-105 Grade 2 steel specimens exposed to 10,000- and 15,000-psi hydrogen and to 5000-psi helium, all at ambient temperatures. The cyclic-load crack growth rate was found to be faster in high-pressure hydrogen than in helium. Cyclic-load crack growth rates in this steel were not reduced by preloading in air to a stress intensity of 1.5 times the cyclic K sub max in hydrogen. There are indications that holding under load in hydrogen, and loading and unloading in helium retards hydrogen-accelerated cyclic-load crack growth. Cyclic frequency and R (ratio of K sub min/k sub max) were important variables determining crack growth rate. The crack growth rate increased as a logarithm of the cycle duration and decreased with increasing R.

  2. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  3. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  4. Influence of volume working fluid and ambient temperature on cooling efficiency of loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, P.; Malcho, M.; Jandačka, J.; Matušov, J.

    2014-03-01

    Article deal with research of device for electrical component cooling used to heat transfer working fluid phase change. Amount of heat flux transferred by thermosyphon loop depend from amount working fluid and from ambient temperature where is heat removal too. In article is described proposal construction of thermosyphon loop, comparisons of his cooling efficiency if is filled 40 % and 50 % volume of working fluid and condenser (ambient) temperature from 20, 30 up to 40 °C at heat load from 40 to 360 W.

  5. The influence of food intake and ambient temperature on the rate of thyroxine utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, D L; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H

    1977-01-01

    Young growing pigs of both sexes were subjected to changes in (1) energy intake, (2) ambient temperature, and (3) bulk of food. The rate of disappearance of injected 125I-labelled thyroxine from the plasma (K) was measured. An analysis of variance revealed that the effect attributable to changes in the energy content of the food intake was statistically significant (P less 0-01). A change in ambient temperature had no statistically significant effect on K, nor did a change in the bulk of food when energy intake was constant (P less than 0-05). PMID:903901

  6. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  7. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  8. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  9. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: A nationwide United States cohort study.

    PubMed

    Michal Freedman, D; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Alexander, Bruce H; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark P; Cahoon, Elizabeth K

    2015-07-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.06-1.31, p-trend=0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR=1.54 (95% CI=1.35-1.75, p-trend=<0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR.

  10. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: a nationwide United States cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D. Michal; Kitahara, Cari M.; Linet, Martha S.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3,556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.31, p-trend =0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR = 1.54 (95% CI = 1.35–1.75, p-trend= <0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR. PMID:25996074

  11. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    measurement precision (i.e. earthquake location), while considering this extremely complex boundary condition. To solve this problem I have developed a high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe. The model is based on land-use data derived from satellite imagery by the EU-project CORINE in a resolution of 100x100m. The the CORINE data consists of several land-use classes, which, besides others, contain: industrial areas, mines, urban fabric, agricultural areas, permanent corps, forests and open spaces. Additionally, open GIS data for highways, and major and minor roads and railway lines were included from the OpenStreetMap project (www.openstreetmap.org). This data was divided into three classes that represent good, intermediate and bad ambient conditions of the corresponding land-use class based on expert judgment. To account for noise propagation away from its source a smoothing operator was applied to individual land-use noise-fields. Finally, the noise-fields were stacked to obtain an European map of ambient noise conditions. A calibration of this map with data of existing seismic stations Europe allowed me to estimate the expected noise level in actual ground motion units for the three ambient noise condition classes of the map. The result is a high-resolution ambient seismic noise map, that allows the network designer to make educated predictions on the expected noise level for arbitrary location in Europe. The ambient noise model was successfully tested in several network optimization projects in Switzerland and surrounding countries and will hopefully be a valuable contribution to improving the data quality of microseismic monitoring networks in Europe.

  12. Better high temperature sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acceptance of welded metal bellows designs, superior seal face materials and advancement of environmental control systems has extended the limits of mechanical seals to the operating limits of the process systems themselves. The nonpusher type welded metal bellows designs have overcome past seal hang-up problems. Material combinations such as silicon carbide versus silicon carbide and silicon carbide versus tungsten carbide have proven to be capable of handling the harsh abrasives encountered on high temperature sealing applications. Steam purges have done a good job of flushing away the deposits and sludges that form on the atmospheric side of the seal and cause seal hang-up. Today's field experience shows that hot water at temperatures up to 350/sup 0/F in the seal cavity can be handled with nothing more than a bypass flush per API piping plan 11 as long as adequate vapor pressure of the fluid is available. For temperatures above 350/sup 0/F, only moderate cooling is now required on hot water applications, where full cooling and a reduction of the seal cavity temperature to something below 180/sup 0/F were once necessary. Initially, the move towards high temperature seals was made for safety, long seal life and reliability reasons. Users wanted seals on their equipment that would avoid the danger of catastrophic seal failures in the event the environmental control systems failed. More recently, the economic advantages of running seals hot have been recognized. It is estimated that an annual savings of $1,000 per inch of shaft size can be realized for every 100/sup 0/F of cooling requirements that can be removed from the seal cavity. This cost savings is due to the elimination or reduction of energy sources used to cool the mechanical seal.

  13. The effect of ambient temperature on diabetes mortality in China: A multi-city time series study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Yin, Peng; Zhou, Maigeng; Ou, Chun-Quan; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Yunning; Gao, Jinghong; Chen, Bin; Liu, Jiangmei; Bai, Li; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-02-01

    Few multi-city studies have been conducted to investigate the acute health effects of low and high temperatures on diabetes mortality worldwide. We aimed to examine effects of ambient temperatures on city-/gender-/age-/education-specific diabetes mortality in nine Chinese cities using a two-stage analysis. Distributed lag non-linear model was first applied to estimate the city-specific non-linear and delayed effects of temperatures on diabetes mortality. Pooled effects of temperatures on diabetes mortality were then obtained using meta-analysis, based on restricted maximum likelihood. We found that heat effects were generally acute and followed by a period of mortality displacement, while cold effects could last for over two weeks. The pooled relative risks of extreme high (99th percentile of temperature) and high temperature (90th percentile of temperature) were 1.29 (95%CI: 1.11-1.47) and 1.11 (1.03-1.19) over lag 0-21 days, compared with the 75th percentile of temperature. In contrast, the pooled relative risks over lag 0-21 days were 1.44 (1.25-1.66) for extreme low (1st percentile of temperature) and 1.20 (1.12-1.30) for low temperature (10th percentile of temperature), compared to 25th percentile of temperature. The estimate of heat effects was relatively higher among females than that among males, with opposite trend for cold effects, and the estimates of heat and cold effects were particularly higher among the elderly and those with low education, although the differences between these subgroups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). These findings have important public health implications for protecting diabetes patients from adverse ambient temperatures.

  14. Pressure cycle rheology of nanofluids at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Yrac, Rommel; Amani, Mahmood

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of particles dispersed in a base fluid (or drilling fluid) are commonly used in oil industry to aid the drilling of oil well into the ground. Nanofluids, the colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a basefluid, have also shown potentials as cooling and abrasive fluids. Utilizing them along with drilling fluids under cyclic high-pressure loadings have not been investigated so far. In the present work, rheological characteristics of silicon oil based nanofluids (prepared with alumina nanoparticles) under pressures up to 1000 bar are investigated using a high-pressure viscometer. The rheological characteristics of nanofluids are measured and are compared with that of the basefluid under increasing and decreasing pressures. Relative viscosity variations of nanofluids were observed to have influenced by the shear rate. In addition, under cyclic high-pressure loading viscosity values of nanofluids are observed to have reduced. This reduction in viscosity at the second pressure cycle could have been caused by the de-agglomeration of particles in the first cycle while working a high-pressure and high-shear condition.

  15. Ambient temperature and dietary supplementation interact to shape mosquito vector competence for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Courtney C.; Blanford, Simon; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which environmental factors influence the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit malaria parasites remains poorly explored. Environmental variation, such as change in ambient temperature, will not necessarily influence the rates of host and parasite processes equivalently, potentially resulting in complex effects on infection outcomes. As proof of principle, we used Anopheles stephensi and the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, to examine the effects of a range of constant temperatures on one aspect of host defense (detected as alterations in expression of nitric oxide synthase gene – NOS) to parasite infection. We experimentally boosted mosquito midgut immunity to infection through dietary supplementation with the essential amino acid L-Arginine (L-Arg), which increases midgut NO levels by infection-induced NOS catalysis in A. stephensi. At intermediate temperatures, supplementation reduced oocyst prevalence, oocyst intensity, and sporozoite prevalence suggesting that the outcome of parasite infection was potentially dependent upon the rate of NOS-mediated midgut immunity. At low and high temperature extremes, however, infection was severely constrained irrespective of supplementation. The effects of L-Arg appeared to be mediated by NO-dependent negative feedback on NOS expression, as evidenced by depressed NOS expression in L-Arg treated groups at temperatures where supplementation decreased parasite infection. These results suggest the need to consider the direct (e.g. effects of mosquito body temperature on parasite physiology) and indirect effects (e.g. mediated through changes in mosquito physiology / immunity) of environmental factors on mosquito-malaria interactions in order to understand natural variation in vector competence. PMID:24911425

  16. Nitrous oxide causes a regulated hypothermia: rats select a cooler ambient temperature while becoming hypothermic.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Douglas S; Seaman, Jana; Kaiyala, Karl J

    2011-04-18

    An initial administration of 60% nitrous oxide (N(2)O) evokes hypothermia in rats and if the administration continues for more than 1-2h, acute tolerance typically develops such that the initial reduction in core temperature (Tc) reverses and Tc recovers toward control values. Calorimeter studies at normal ambient temperature indicate that hypothermia results from a transient reduction in heat production (HP) combined with an elevation in heat loss. Acute tolerance develops primarily due to progressive increases in HP. Our aim was to determine whether rats provided a choice of ambient temperatures would behaviorally facilitate or oppose N(2)O-induced hypothermia. A gas-tight thermally-graded alleyway (range, 6.7-37.0°C) enabled male Long-Evans rats (n=12) to select a preferred ambient temperature during a 5-hour steady-state administration of 60% N(2)O and a separate paired control gas exposure (order counterbalanced). Tc was measured telemetrically from a sensor surgically implanted into the peritoneal cavity >7days before testing. Internal LED lighting maintained the accustomed day:night cycle (light cycle 0700-1900h) during sessions lasting 45.5h. Rats entered the temperature gradient at 1100h, and the 5-h N(2)O or control gas period did not start until 23h later to provide a long habituation/training period. Food and water were provided ad libitum at the center of the alleyway. The maximum decrease of mean Tc during N(2)O administration occurred at 0.9h and was -2.05±0.25°C; this differed significantly (p<0.0001) from the corresponding Tc change at 0.9h during control gas administration (0.01±0.14°C). The maximum decrease of the mean selected ambient temperature during N(2)O administration occurred at 0.7h and was -13.58±1.61°C; this differed significantly (p<0.0001) from the corresponding mean change in the selected ambient temperature at 0.7h during control gas administration (0.30±1.49°C). N(2)O appears to induce a regulated hypothermia because the

  17. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  18. Ambient-temperature mechanical response of alumina-fluoromica laminates

    SciTech Connect

    King, T.T.; Cooper, R.F. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    Flexural delamination experiments were used to evaluate the mechanical performance of thermochemically stable alumina-fluoromica laminates. Hot-pressed, precracked laminate specimens, in which two MgAl[sub 2]O[sub 4]-spinel-coated alumina substrates were separated by a thin layer of fluorophlogopite (KMg[sub 3](AlSi[sub 3])O[sub 10]F[sub 2]), were tested in four-point flexure at room temperature. Two types of mechanical response were observed: steady-state delamination and brittle failure. Microstructural analysis showed that the delamination response was associated with fine ([le]5 [mu]m) grains of the mica; the brittle response occurred when the mica interphase consisted of large (> 30 [mu]m) grains that bridged the interphase. The steady-state strain-energy release rate (G[sub ss]) measured on the graceful, delaminating beams was 9.1 [+-] 0.4 J[center dot]m[sup [minus]2] for randomly oriented [approximately]5-[mu]m grains but only 2.8 [+-] 0.2 J[center dot]m[sup [minus]2] for [approximately]1-[mu]m grains that were aligned with easy-cleavage planes parallel to the laminate interfaces. The results suggested that debonding of the specimens occurred via cleavage of the mica grains. Observation of delamination cracks confirmed this point: propagation occurred within the fluoromica interphase rather than along the spinel/alumina or spinel/fluorophlogopite interfaces. The mechanical feasibility of laminate specimens without the protective spinel coating on the substrate containing the notch was also tested to address an issue related to the preparation of alumina fiber/mica interphase/alumina matrix composites. The delamination response again occurred for the case of a fine-grained mica interphase.

  19. Selective hydrogen purification through graphdiyne under ambient temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-08-01

    Graphdiyne, a recently synthesized one-atom-thick carbon allotrope, is atomistically porous - characterized by a regular "nanomesh"- and suggests application as a separation membrane for hydrogen purification. Here we report a full atomistic reactive molecular dynamics investigation to determine the selective diffusion properties of hydrogen (H(2)) amongst carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH(4)), a mixture otherwise known as syngas, a product of the gasification of renewable biomass (such as animal wastes). Under constant temperature simulations, we find the mass flux of hydrogen molecules through a graphdiyne membrane to be on the order of 7 to 10 g cm(-2) s(-1) (between 300 K and 500 K), with carbon monoxide and methane remaining isolated. Using a simple Arrhenius relation, we determine the energy required for permeation on the order of 0.11 ± 0.03 eV for single H(2) molecules. We find that addition of marginal applied force (approximately 1 to 2 pN per molecule, representing a controlled pressure gradient, ΔP, on the order of 100 to 500 kPa) can successfully enhance the separation of hydrogen gas. Addition of larger driving forces (50 to 100 pN per molecule) is required to selectively filter carbon monoxide or methane, suggesting that, under near-atmospheric conditions, only hydrogen gas will pass such a membrane. Graphdiyne provides a unique, chemically inert and mechanically stable platform facilitating selective gas separation at nominal pressures using a homogeneous material system, without a need for chemical functionalization or the explicit introduction of molecular pores.

  20. Polymer Electrolyte-Based Ambient Temperature Oxygen Microsensors for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2011-01-01

    An ambient temperature oxygen microsensor, based on a Nafion polymer electrolyte, has been developed and was microfabricated using thin-film technologies. A challenge in the operation of Nafion-based sensor systems is that the conductivity of Nafion film depends on the humidity in the film. Nafion film loses conductivity when the moisture content in the film is too low, which can affect sensor operation. The advancement here is the identification of a method to retain the operation of the Nafion films in lower humidity environments. Certain salts can hold water molecules in the Nafion film structure at room temperature. By mixing salts with the Nafion solution, water molecules can be homogeneously distributed in the Nafion film increasing the film s hydration to prevent Nafion film from being dried out in low-humidity environment. The presence of organics provides extra sites in the Nafion film to promote proton (H+) mobility and thus improving Nafion film conductivity and sensor performance. The fabrication of ambient temperature oxygen microsensors includes depositing basic electrodes using noble metals, and metal oxides layer on one of the electrode as a reference electrode. The use of noble metals for electrodes is due to their strong catalytic properties for oxygen reduction. A conducting polymer Nafion, doped with water-retaining components and extra sites facilitating proton movement, was used as the electrolyte material, making the design adequate for low humidity environment applications. The Nafion solution was coated on the electrodes and air-dried. The sensor operates at room temperature in potentiometric mode, which measures voltage differences between working and reference electrodes in different gases. Repeat able responses to 21-percent oxygen in nitrogen were achieved using nitrogen as a baseline gas. Detection of oxygen from 7 to 21 percent has also been demonstrated. The room-temperature oxygen micro sensor developed has extremely low power

  1. Nanoscale tubular vessels for storage of methane at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Solarz, Lech; Do, D D; Samborski, Adam; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-10-10

    Novel carbon nanostructures can serve as effective storage media for methane, a source of "clean energy" for the future. We have used Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation for the modeling of methane storage at 293 K and pressures up to 80 MPa in idealized bundles of (10,10) armchair-type single-walled carbon nanotubes and wormlike carbon pores. We have found that these carbon nanomaterials can be treated as the world's smallest high-capacity methane storage vessels. Our simulation results indicate that such novel carbon nanostructures can reach a high volumetric energy storage, exceeding the US FreedomCAR Partnership target of 2010 (5.4 MJ dm(-3)), at low to moderate pressures ranging from 1 to 7 MPa at 293 K. On the contrary, in the absence of these nanomaterials, methane needs to be compressed to approximately 13 MPa at 293 K to achieve the same target. The light carbon membranes composed of bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes or wormlike pores efficiently physisorb methane at low to moderate pressures at 293 K, which we believe should be particularly important for automobiles and stationary devices. However, above 15-20 MPa at 293 K, all investigated samples of novel carbon nanomaterials are not as effective when compared with compression alone since the stored volumetric energy and power saturate at values below those of the bulk, compressed fluid.

  2. Nanoscale tubular vessels for storage of methane at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Solarz, Lech; Do, D D; Samborski, Adam; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-10-10

    Novel carbon nanostructures can serve as effective storage media for methane, a source of "clean energy" for the future. We have used Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation for the modeling of methane storage at 293 K and pressures up to 80 MPa in idealized bundles of (10,10) armchair-type single-walled carbon nanotubes and wormlike carbon pores. We have found that these carbon nanomaterials can be treated as the world's smallest high-capacity methane storage vessels. Our simulation results indicate that such novel carbon nanostructures can reach a high volumetric energy storage, exceeding the US FreedomCAR Partnership target of 2010 (5.4 MJ dm(-3)), at low to moderate pressures ranging from 1 to 7 MPa at 293 K. On the contrary, in the absence of these nanomaterials, methane needs to be compressed to approximately 13 MPa at 293 K to achieve the same target. The light carbon membranes composed of bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes or wormlike pores efficiently physisorb methane at low to moderate pressures at 293 K, which we believe should be particularly important for automobiles and stationary devices. However, above 15-20 MPa at 293 K, all investigated samples of novel carbon nanomaterials are not as effective when compared with compression alone since the stored volumetric energy and power saturate at values below those of the bulk, compressed fluid. PMID:17014151

  3. Instabilities of High Temperature Superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Matthias, B. T.; Corenzwit, E.; Cooper, A. S.; Longinotti, L. D.

    1971-01-01

    We have observed the transition temperature of both the cubic and tetragonal phases of several high-temperature β-W superconductors. The instability of the cubic lattice appears to be characteristic of high-temperature superconductors. PMID:16591897

  4. Sorption Capacity of Europium for Media #1 and Media #2 from Solution at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-03-16

    This dataset shows the capacity for Europium of media #1 and media #2 in a shakertable experiment. The experimental conditions were 150mL of 500ppm Eu solution, 2g of media, pH of 3.2, at ambient temperature.

  5. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a r...

  6. Enhanced neuroendocrine response to insulin tolerance test performed under increased ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    The hypothesis that an increase in ambient temperature modulates neuroendocrine response in clinically used provocative pituitary function tests was verified. Healthy male volunteers were subjected to insulin tolerance tests in two randomized trials. In the first trial hypoglycemia was induced by a bolus injection of insulin (0.1 U per kg of BW, i.v.) at room temperature. In the second trial, the subjects were exposed to increased ambient temperature for 45 min before insulin injection and for 45 min thereafter. The environmental temperature was selected to increase body temperature less than 1C. Under conditions of increased temperature basal hormone levels as measured in antecubital venous blood samples failed to be modified and the hypoglycemia was less severe. Nevertheless, the responses of most (beta-endorphin, ACTH, prolactin, catecholamines), but not all (growth hormone, cortisol), hormones to hypoglycemia were exaggerated. The remarkable increase in ACTH and beta-endorphin release was not accompanied by concomitant increase of plasma cortisol response. The sympathetic-adrenomedullary system was significantly activated, which was manifested particularly by enhanced norepinephrine release. Growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was not modified, while that of prolactin was enhanced. Thus during evaluation of neuroendocrine function under clinical conditions, changes in ambient and body temperature should not be underestimated. PMID:9766253

  7. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  8. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  9. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  10. Electrical characteristics of multilayer MoS{sub 2} transistors at real operating temperatures with different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Jang, Jaewon Subramanian, Vivek; Kim, Sunkook

    2014-10-13

    Atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) materials with bandgaps have attracted increasing research interest due to their promising electronic properties. Here, we investigate carrier transport and the impact of the operating ambient conditions on back-gated multilayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors with a thickness of ∼50 nm at their realistic working temperatures and under different ambient conditions (in air and in a vacuum of ∼10{sup −5} Torr). Increases in temperature cause increases in I{sub min} (likely due to thermionic emission at defects), and result in decreased I{sub on} at high V{sub G} (likely due to increased phonon scattering). Thus, the I{sub on}/I{sub min} ratio decreases as the temperature increases. Moreover, the ambient effects with working temperatures on field effect mobilities were investigated. The adsorbed oxygen and water created more defect sites or impurities in the MoS{sub 2} channel, which can lead another scattering of the carriers. In air, the adsorbed molecules and phonon scattering caused a reduction of the field effect mobility, significantly. These channel mobility drop-off rates in air and in a vacuum reached 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s K and 0.07 cm{sup 2}/V s K, respectively; the rate of degradation is steeper in air than in a vacuum due to enhanced phonon mode by the adsorbed oxygen and water molecules.

  11. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  12. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter {times} 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  13. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M. . Science and Technology Center); Tressler, R.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter [times] 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  14. Enhancing photovoltaic efficiency through radiative cooling of solar cells below ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Taqiyyah; Munday, Jeremy

    Sunlight heats up solar cells and the resulting elevated solar cell temperature adversely effects the photovoltaic efficiency and the reliability of the cell. Currently, a variety of active and passive cooling strategies are used to lower the operating temperature of the solar cell. Passive radiative cooling requires no energy input, and is ideal for solar cells; however, previously demonstrated devices still operate above the ambient, leading to a lower efficiency as compared to the ideal Shockley-Queisser limit, which is defined for a cell in contact with an ideal heat sink at ambient temperature (300 K). In this talk, we will describe the use of radiative cooling techniques to lower the cell temperature below the ambient temperature. We show that by combining specifically designed radiative cooling structures with solar cells, efficiencies higher than the limiting efficiency achievable at 300 K can be obtained for solar cells in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. We show that these structures yield an efficiency 0.87% higher than a typical PV module at operating temperatures in a terrestrial application. We also demonstrate an efficiency advantage of 0.4-2.6% for cells in an extraterrestrial environment in near-earth orbit.

  15. Day-night difference in the preferred ambient temperature of human subjects.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J A; Refinetti, R

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the existence of a day-night difference in thermal preference, 32 college students (16 male, 16 female) were asked to indicate a threshold of discomfort in a climate-controlled environment. The experiment was performed at two distinct times of day that corresponded to the peaks and troughs of the subject's circadian rhythm of body temperature. Males, but not females, felt comfortable at a higher ambient temperature during the trough than during the peak of the body temperature rhythm. These data support the hypothesis (derived from animal studies) that behavioral thermoregulation opposes the circadian rhythm of body temperature.

  16. Ambient temperature and the occurrence of collective violence: a new analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlsmith, J M; Anderson, C A

    1979-03-01

    Prevalent folklore suggests that riots tend to occur during periods of very hot weather. Baron and Ransberger examined 102 major riots in the United States between 1967 and 1971 and concluded that the frequency of collective violence and ambient temperature are curvilinearly related. The present article points out that the Baron and Ransberger analysis did not take account of the different number of days in different temperature ranges. The artifact is eliminated, and the probability of a riot, conditional upon temperature, is estimated. When this is done, the evidence strongly suggests that the conditional probability of a riot increases monotonically with temperature. Some general implications of such data analyses are discussed.

  17. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  18. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  19. Non-contact skin emissivity: measurement from reflectance using step change in ambient radiation temperature.

    PubMed

    Togawa, T

    1989-02-01

    A method of estimating skin emissivity based on reflectance measurement upon transient stepwise change in the ambient radiation temperature was proposed. To effect this change, two shades at different temperatures were switched mechanically, and the change in radiation from the skin surface was recorded through an aperture for each shade by a high-resolution, fast-response radiometer having a sensitivity within the 8-14 microns range. Measurements were made on the forehead, forearm, palm and back of the hand in 10 male and 10 female subjects. No significant differences in emissivity were observed among sites and between sexes. The overall average of the skin emissivity obtained was 0.971 +/- 0.005 (SD). This result is inconsistent with most reported skin emissivity values. However, as the former studies had many inherent inadequacies, both theoretical and experimental, it is considered that most of these reported skin emissivities are unacceptable. The method proposed in this study has the following advantages: (1) relative calibration between instruments is unnecessary, (2) non-contact measurement can be achieved, and (3) each measurement can be made within one minute.

  20. Hibernation patterns of Turkish hamsters: influence of sex and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Batavia, Mariska; Nguyen, George; Harman, Kristine; Zucker, Irving

    2013-02-01

    Turkish hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti) are a model organism for studies of hibernation, yet a detailed account of their torpor characteristics has not been undertaken. This study employed continuous telemetric monitoring of body temperature (T(b)) in hibernating male and female Turkish hamsters at ambient temperatures (T(a)s) of 5 and 13 °C to precisely characterize torpor bout depth, duration, and frequency, as well as rates of entry into and arousal from torpor. Hamsters generated brief intervals of short (<12 h), shallow test bouts (T(b) > 20 °C), followed by deep torpor bouts lasting 4-6 days at T(a) = 5 °C and 2-3 days at T(a) = 13 °C. Females at T(a) = 5 °C had longer bouts than males, but maintained higher torpor T(b); there were no sex differences at T(a) = 13 °C. Neither body mass loss nor food intake differed between the two T(a)s. Hamsters entered torpor primarily during the scotophase (subjective night), but timing of arousals was highly variable. Hamsters at both T (a)s generated short, shallow torpor bouts between deep bouts, suggesting that this species may be capable of both hibernation and daily torpor.

  1. Effect of ambient temperature in neonate aspic vipers: growth, locomotor performance and defensive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Aïdam, Aurélie; Michel, Catherine Louise; Bonnet, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    The impact of temperature during incubation and gestation has been tested in various reptiles; the postnatal period has been rarely investigated however. Three groups of newborn aspic vipers (Vipera aspis) were placed under contrasted thermal regimes during 7 months: (1) a cool 23°C constant regime, (2) a warm 28°C constant regime, and (3) an optimal regime with free-access to a wide range of temperatures. Later, all the snakes were placed under hibernation conditions (6°C) during 3 months. Finally all the snakes were placed in the optimal thermal regime during 2 additional months. The total duration of the experiment was of 12 months. Body mass and feeding rates were recorded weekly, body size was measured monthly. We also assessed locomotor performance and recorded several behavioral traits (e.g., defensive and predatory behaviors). As expected, snakes raised under cool temperatures exhibited low feeding rate, growth rate, body condition, and they exhibited poor locomotor performance; they also displayed marked defensive behaviors (e.g., high number of defensive bites) whilst hesitating during longer periods to bite a prey. Such behavioral effects were detected at the end of the experiment (i.e., 5 months after exposure to contrasted thermal treatments [3 months of hibernation plus 2 months of optimal regime]), revealing long term effects. Surprisingly, growth rate and locomotor performance were not different between the two other groups, warm constant 28°C versus optimal regimes (albeit several behavioral traits differed), suggesting that the access to a wide range of ambient temperatures was not a crucial factor.

  2. Viscoelasticity of ambient-temperature nematic binary mixtures of bent-core and rodlike molecules.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayana, P; Jampani, V S R; Skarabot, M; Musevic, I; Le, K V; Takezoe, H; Dhara, S

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of the temperature variations of physical parameters in ambient-temperature nematic liquid crystal mixtures of bent-core (BC) and rodlike molecules (5CB): birefringence Δn; static dielectric constants ε(||) and ε(⊥); splay K(11) and bend K(33) elastic constants; rotational viscosity γ(1); and diffusion coefficients D(||) and D(⊥) of a microsphere. Both Δn and ε(||) decreases rapidly with increasing BC concentration, whereas ε(⊥) remains almost constant. At a shifted temperature (e.g., T-T(NI)=-10 °C), K(11) increases by ~50% and K(33) decreases by ~80% compared to pure 5CB when the BC concentration is increased to ~43 mol % in the mixture. Viscosities parallel and perpendicular to the director, η(||), η(⊥), which are nearly equal to the Miesowicz viscosities η(2) and η(3), respectively, were obtained by D(||) and D(⊥) using the Stokes-Einstein relation. Both the viscosities at room temperature increase by 60 and 50 times, respectively, whereas γ(1) increases by 180 times (at ~43 mol %) compared to the corresponding values of pure 5CB. The stiffening of K(11) and exorbitantly large enhancement in all the viscosities at a higher mol % of BC indicate that the viscoelastic properties are highly impacted by the presence of smectic clusters of BC molecules that results from the restricted free rotation of the molecules along the bow axis in the nematic phase. A possible attachment model of smectic type clusters of BC molecules surrounding the microparticle is presented.

  3. The monitoring and fatigue behavior of CFCCs at ambient temperature and 1000{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Miriyala, N.; Liaw, P.K.; McHargue, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Metallographically polished flexure bars of Nicalon/SiC and Nicalon/alumina composites were subjected to monotonic and cycle-fatigue loadings, with loading either parallel or normal to the fabric plies. The fabric orientation did not significantly affect the mechanical behavior of the Nicalon/SiC composite at ambient temperature. However, the mechanical behavior of the Nicalon/alumina composite was significantly affected by the fabric orientation at ambient temperature in air and at 1000{degrees}C in argon atmosphere. In addition, there was a significant degradation in the fatigue performance of the alumina matrix composite at the elevated temperature, owing to creep in the material and degradation in the fiber strength.

  4. Variation of forearm, hand, and finger blood flow indices with ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger blood flow (impedance) changes are measured by impedance rheography on seven healthy male subjects aged 20-35 yr during exposure to ambient temperatures ranging from 10 to 46 C. All observations are made in an environmental chamber at a dew point temperature of 13 + or - 0.25 C. It is shown that impedance rheography is suitable for quantifying peripheral circulatory responses to thermal stress. The measured blood flow indices are found to be consistent with previously reported values for the forearm, hand, and fingers obtained using air or water displacement plethysmography. In particular, the more distal body segments exhibit relatively larger vasomotor responses to changes in ambient temperature than do the more proximal body segments.

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Use of a respirometer to measure oxidation rates of polymeric materials at ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Harris, Douglas Jeffrey; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-06-01

    The use of a respirometer is introduced as a novel technique for measuring the oxidation rates of thermally degrading polymers. A dual channel respirometer with fuel cell detectors demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to measure the oxidation rates of low-density polymeric samples at ambient temperatures in a relatively short period of time. Samples of low-density polyurethane foam were aged for various lengths of time in sealed chambers at temperatures ranging from 23 to 110 C. The extent of oxygen depletion was measured by flushing the chamber with air and comparing the oxygen concentration in the chamber flow to that of a reference flow. Oxidation rates of the 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} polyurethane foam could be measured in less than 600 h of aging time at 23 C. This corresponds to approximately 2 ppm oxidation by weight. Oxidation rates of the foam were used to calculate acceleration factors over a wide temperature range, including ambient conditions. Acceleration factors for the compressive force of the polyurethane foam were determined at elevated temperatures. Assuming that the aging behavior of compressive force of the foam is correlated to its oxidation rate, it is possible to calculate acceleration factors for the compressive force and predict the performance of the foam at ambient temperatures.

  7. Ambient temperature effects on broadband UV-B measurements using fluorescent phosphor (MgWO4)-based detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichter, Bronislaw K.; Beaubien, David J.; Beaubien, Arthur F.

    1994-01-01

    Results of field tests on a group of broadband UV-B pyranometers are presented. A brief description of the instrument is given. The effects of ambient temperature on thermally unregulated fluorescent phosphor (Robertson type) meters are presented and compared with the performance of thermally stabilized instruments. Means for correcting data from thermally unregulated instruments, where the prevailing ambient temperatures are known, are outlined.

  8. Investigation of effective base transit time and current gain modulation of light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hao-Hsiang; Tu, Wen-Chung; Wang, Hsiao-Lun; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-11-03

    In this report, the modulation of current gain of InGaP/GaAs light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures are measured and analyzed using thermionic emission model of quantum well embedded in the transistor base region. Minority carriers captured by quantum wells gain more energy at high temperatures and escape from quantum wells resulting in an increase of current gain and lower optical output, resulting in different I-V characteristics from conventional heterojunction bipolar transistors. The effect of the smaller thermionic lifetime thus reduces the effective base transit time of transistors at high temperatures. The unique current gain enhancement of 27.61% is achieved when operation temperature increase from 28 to 85 °C.

  9. High temperature erosion of nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.

    1995-12-31

    High temperature erosion behavior was studied on three commercial nickel alloys, Inconel 718, Inconel 601 and Inconel X-750, using a vertical sand-blast type of erosion test rig. Effect of temperature on erosion was investigated by varying test temperature in six steps from ambient up to 800 C. Other erosion variables investigated included impingement angle, changed from 10{degree} to 90{degree}, and impingement velocity, covered a range of 40 to 90 m/s. Extensive studies on erosion surface morphological features were done on eroded or eroded-corroded specimen surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis and scratch test revealed corrosion rate, characteristics of oxide scale formed at high temperature, and some effects of corrosion on erosion. It was found that variation of erosion rate with temperature was directly related to temperature-dependent mechanical property changes of the materials. The mechanisms of the high-temperature erosion were analyzed based on test results. It was observed that erosion was dominant in temperature range up to 800 C, while corrosion played increased roles in upper portion of the temperature range tested.

  10. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  11. Ambient Temperature and Stroke Occurrence: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Cao, Yongjun; Hong, Daqing; Zheng, Danni; Richtering, Sarah; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Leong, Tzen Hugh; Arima, Hisatomi; Islam, Shariful; Salam, Abdul; Anderson, Craig; Robinson, Thompson; Hackett, Maree L

    2016-01-01

    Biologically plausible associations exist between climatic conditions and stroke risk, but study results are inconsistent. We aimed to summarize current evidence on ambient temperature and overall stroke occurrence, and by age, sex, and variation of temperature. We performed a systematic literature search across MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and GEOBASE, from inception to 16 October 2015 to identify all population-based observational studies. Where possible, data were pooled for meta-analysis with Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by means of the random effects meta-analysis. We included 21 studies with a total of 476,511 patients. The data were varied as indicated by significant heterogeneity across studies for both ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Pooled OR (95% CI) in every 1 degree Celsius increase in ambient temperature was significant for ICH 0.97 (0.94-1.00), but not for IS 1.00 (0.99-1.01) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) 1.00 (0.98-1.01). Meta-analysis was not possible for the pre-specified subgroup analyses by age, sex, and variation of temperature. Change in temperature over the previous 24 h appeared to be more important than absolute temperature in relation to the risk of stroke, especially in relation to the risk of ICH. Older age appeared to increase vulnerability to low temperature for both IS and ICH. To conclude, this review shows that lower mean ambient temperature is significantly associated with the risk of ICH, but not with IS and SAH. Larger temperature changes were associated with higher stroke rates in the elderly. PMID:27420077

  12. Ambient Temperature and Stroke Occurrence: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Cao, Yongjun; Hong, Daqing; Zheng, Danni; Richtering, Sarah; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Leong, Tzen Hugh; Arima, Hisatomi; Islam, Shariful; Salam, Abdul; Anderson, Craig; Robinson, Thompson; Hackett, Maree L.

    2016-01-01

    Biologically plausible associations exist between climatic conditions and stroke risk, but study results are inconsistent. We aimed to summarize current evidence on ambient temperature and overall stroke occurrence, and by age, sex, and variation of temperature. We performed a systematic literature search across MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and GEOBASE, from inception to 16 October 2015 to identify all population-based observational studies. Where possible, data were pooled for meta-analysis with Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by means of the random effects meta-analysis. We included 21 studies with a total of 476,511 patients. The data were varied as indicated by significant heterogeneity across studies for both ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Pooled OR (95% CI) in every 1 degree Celsius increase in ambient temperature was significant for ICH 0.97 (0.94–1.00), but not for IS 1.00 (0.99–1.01) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) 1.00 (0.98–1.01). Meta-analysis was not possible for the pre-specified subgroup analyses by age, sex, and variation of temperature. Change in temperature over the previous 24 h appeared to be more important than absolute temperature in relation to the risk of stroke, especially in relation to the risk of ICH. Older age appeared to increase vulnerability to low temperature for both IS and ICH. To conclude, this review shows that lower mean ambient temperature is significantly associated with the risk of ICH, but not with IS and SAH. Larger temperature changes were associated with higher stroke rates in the elderly. PMID:27420077

  13. The association between ambient temperature and children's lung function in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanshan; Guo, Yuming; Williams, Gail; Baker, Peter; Ye, Xiaofang; Madaniyazi, Lina; Kim, Dae-Seon; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between ambient temperature and children's lung function in Baotou, China. We recruited 315 children (8-12 years) from Baotou, China in the spring of 2004, 2005, and 2006. They performed three successive forced expiratory measurements three times daily (morning, noon, and evening) for about 5 weeks. The highest peak expiratory flow (PEF) was recorded for each session. Daily data on ambient temperature, relative humidity, and air pollution were monitored during the same period. Mixed models with a distributed lag structure were used to examine the effects of temperature on lung function while adjusting for individual characteristics and environmental factors. Low temperatures were significantly associated with decreases in PEF. The effects lasted for lag 0-2 days. For all participants, the cumulative effect estimates (lag 0-2 days) were -1.44 (-1.93, -0.94) L/min, -1.39 (-1.92, -0.86) L/min, -1.40 (-1.97, -0.82) L/min, and -1.28 (-1.69, -0.88) L/min for morning, noon, evening, and daily mean PEF, respectively, associated with 1 °C decrease in daily mean temperature. Generally, the effects of temperature were slightly stronger in boys than in girls for noon, evening, and daily mean PEF, while the effects were stronger in girls for morning PEF. PM2.5 had joint effects with temperature on children's PEF. Higher PM2.5 increased the impacts of low temperature. Low ambient temperatures are associated with lower lung function in children in Baotou, China. Preventive health policies will be required for protecting children from the cold weather.

  14. Direct Transformation of Amorphous Silicon Carbide into Graphene under Low Temperature and Ambient Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Lv, Haifeng; He, Daping; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale availability of the graphene is critical to the successful application of graphene-based electronic devices. The growth of epitaxial graphene (EG) on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces has opened a new promising route for large-scale high-quality graphene production. However, two key obstacles to epitaxial growth are extremely high requirements for almost perfectly ordered crystal SiC and harsh process conditions. Here, we report that the amorphous SiC (a-Si1−xCx) nano-shell (nano-film) can be directly transformed into graphene by using chlorination method under very mild reaction conditions of relative low temperature (800°C) and the ambient pressure in chlorine (Cl2) atmosphere. Therefore, our finding, the direct transformation of a-Si1−xCx into graphene under much milder condition, will open a door to apply this new method to the large-scale production of graphene at low costs. PMID:23359349

  15. Snow removal and ambient air temperature effects on forest soil temperatures in northern Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Decker, K. L.; Waite, C.; Scherbatskoy, T.

    2003-12-01

    We measured deciduous forest soil temperatures under control (unmanipulated) and snow-free (where snow is manually removed) conditions for four winters (at three soil depths) to determine effects of a snow cover reduction such as may occur as a result of climate change on Vermont forest soils. The four winters we studied were characterized as:`cold and snowy', `warm with low snow', `cold with low snow', and `cool with low snow'. Snow-free soils were colder than controls at 5 and 15 cm depth for all years, and at all depths in the two cold winters. Soil thermal variability generally decreased with both increased snow cover and soil depth. The effect of snow cover on soil freeze-thaw events was highly dependent on both the depth of snow and the soil temperature. Snow kept the soil warm and reduced soil temperature variability, but often this caused soil to remain near 0 deg C, resulting in more freeze-thaw events under snow at one or more soil depths. During the `cold snowy' winter, soils under snow had daily averages consistently >0 deg C, whereas snow-free soil temperatures commonly dropped below -3 deg C. During the `warm' year, temperatures of soil under snow were often lower than those of snow-free soils. The warmer winter resulted in less snow cover to insulate soil from freezing in the biologically active top 30 cm. The possible consequences of increased soil freezing include more root mortality and nutrient loss which would potentially alter ecosystem dynamics, decrease productivity of some tree species, and increase sugar maple mortality in northern hardwood forests.

  16. Analyzing the impact of ambient temperature indicators on transformer life in different regions of Chinese mainland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known.

  17. Live Pups from Evaporatively Dried Mouse Sperm Stored at Ambient Temperature for up to 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lee, Gloria Y.; Lawitts, Joel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a mouse sperm preservation method based on evaporative drying. Mouse sperm were evaporatively dried and stored at 4°C and ambient temperature for 3 months to 2 years. Upon rehydration, a single sperm was injected into a mature oocyte to develop into a blastocyst after culture or a live birth after embryo transfer to a recipient female. For the samples stored at 4°C for 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, the blastocyst formation rate was 61.5%, 49.1%, 31.5%, 32.2%, and 41.4%, respectively. The blastocyst rate for those stored at ambient temperature (∼22°C) for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months was 57.8%, 36.2%, 33.6%, and 34.4%, respectively. Fifteen, eight and three live pups were produced from sperm stored at room temperature for 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively. This is the first report of live offspring produced from dried mouse sperm stored at ambient temperature for up to 2 years. Based on these results, we suggest that evaporative drying is a potentially useful method for the routine preservation of mouse sperm. PMID:24924588

  18. Imidapril inhibits right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Shou-Yan; Cheng, Xiang-Chao; Li, Meng; Sun, Tong-Wen; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Guo, Wen; Li, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the effect of imidapril on the right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. Twenty-four broiler chickens were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 8), including the control group, low temperature group, and imidapril group. Chickens in the control group were raised at normal temperature, whereas chickens in the low temperature group and imidapril group were exposed to low ambient temperature (12 to 18°C) from 14 d of age until 45 d of age. At the same time, chickens in the imidapril group were gavaged with imidapril at 3 mg/kg once daily for 30 d. The thickness of the right ventricular wall was observed with echocardiography. The BW and wet lung weight as well as weight of right and left ventricles and ventricular septum were measured. Both wet lung weight index and right ventricular hypertrophy index were calculated. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure was assessed according to echocardiography. The expression of ACE and ACE2 mRNA in the right ventricular myocardial tissue was quantified by real-time PCR. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells were detected by immunohistostaining. The concentration of angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang (1-7) in the right ventricular myocardial tissue was measured with ELISA. The results showed that right ventricular hypertrophy index, wet lung weight index, pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, expression of ACE mRNA in the right ventricular tissue, Ang II concentration, and the thickness of the right ventricular wall in the low temperature group increased significantly compared with those in the control group and imidapril group. The ACE2 mRNA expression increased 36%, whereas Ang (1-7) concentration decreased significantly in the low temperature group compared with that in the control group and imidapril group. In conclusion, imidapril inhibits right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

  19. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  20. Apoptotic responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) after exposure with microcystin-LR under different ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Liang, Hualei; Zhou, Wenshan; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2013-08-01

    Microcystins (MCs) can cause evident hepatic apoptosis. In vitro studies indicated that uptake of MC by isolated hepatocytes was dramatically reduced as ambient temperature dropped, and some studies presented a hypothesis that differences in core body temperatures in animals result in diverse uptake of MC, as well as different toxic effects. Thus far, however, few in vivo studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on MC-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in fish, a typical poikilotherm. In the present study, zebrafish were treated with MC-LR, an MC metabolite, at three water temperatures (12, 22 and 32 °C), and evident differences in apoptotic profiles were observed. Damage to liver ultrastructures revealed temperature-dependent early-stage patterns of apoptosis. Flow-cytometric analysis indicated that hepatocyte apoptotic rates varied with a temperature-dependent effect. The transcription levels of some apoptosis-related genes were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and significantly elevated gene expressions of P53, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 were found in the 12 and 32 °C groups. Results of the present study indicate that different ambient temperatures can lead to various toxic effects of MCs on hepatic apoptosis in fish.

  1. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  2. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A. A.; Rull, M.; Martin-Gonzalez, M.; Moure, A.; Jacquot, A.; Niarchos, D.

    2014-07-01

    The use of microwave energy for materials processing has a major potential and real advantages over conventional heating such as (1) time and energy savings, (2) rapid heating rates (volumetric heating vs. conduction), (3) considerably reduced processing time and temperature, (4) fine microstructures and hence improved mechanical properties and better product performance, and (5) finally lower environmental impact. In this study, we investigated the use of microwave-assisted synthesis to synthesize a series of Co1- x Fe x Sb3 using this novel approach, which gave high quality materials with little or no impurities in a fraction of the time needed for conventional synthesis. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine the structure and the lattice parameters of the samples, while scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to study the morphology of the compounds. The samples were sintered by spark plasma sintering, and the highest ZT of 0.33 was obtained for x = 0.2 at 700 K.

  3. Depicting the Dependency of Isoprene in Ambient Air and from Plants on Temperature and Solar Radiation by Using Regression Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Pallavi; Ghosh, Chirashree

    2016-07-01

    Among all sources of volatile organic compounds, isoprene emission from plants is an important part of the atmospheric hydrocarbon budget. In the present study, isoprene emission capacity at the bottom of the canopies of plant species viz. Dalbergia sissoo and Nerium oleander and in ambient air at different sites selected on the basis of land use pattern viz. near to traffic intersection with dense vegetation, away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under floodplain area (Site I) and away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under hilly ridge area (Site II) during three different seasons (monsoon, winter and summer) in Delhi were measured. In order to find out the dependence of isoprene emission rate on temperature and solar radiation, regression analysis has been performed. In case of dependency of isoprene in ambient air on temperature and solar radiation in selected seasons it has been found that high isoprene was found during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar rdaiation and isoprene during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. On the other hand, in case of isoprene emission from selected plant species, it has been found that high temperature and solar radiation promotes high isoprene emission rates during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons in D. sissoo. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene emission rate during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. In contrast, in case of Nerium oleander, no such appropriate relationship was obtained. The study concludes that in ambient air, isoprene concentration was found to be high during summer season as compared to other seasons and gives best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene. In case of plants, Dalbergia sissoo comes under high isoprene emission category

  4. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure and Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320degF. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  5. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable the designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320 F. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  6. Interactions between cold ambient temperature and older age on haptic acuity and manual performance.

    PubMed

    Tajmir, Panteha; Grierson, Lawrence E M; Carnahan, Heather

    2013-06-01

    The impact of exposure to cold on individuals' motor skills demands a deeper understanding of the ways in which cold weather influences psychomotor and haptic performance. In this study, various facets of psychomotor performance were evaluated in order to determine the impacts of ambient cold exposure on older persons. Healthy younger and older persons performed a battery of haptic psychomotor tests at room (23° C) and cold (1° C) ambient temperatures. The results indicate that older individuals do not perform as well as younger persons across the battery of tests, with cold temperature further degrading their performance in dexterity tasks (in, for example, Minnesota Manual Dexterity test placing: F [1, 16] = 10.23, p < .01) and peak precision grip force generation (F [1, 16] = 18.97, p < .01). The results suggest that cold weather may have an impact on the occupations older persons are able to perform during the winter months.

  7. Global variation in the effects of ambient temperature on mortality: a systematic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuming; Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben; Li, Shanshan; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tobias, Aurelio; Lavigne, Eric; de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline; Leone, Michela; Pan, Xiaochuan; Tong, Shilu; Tian, Linwei; Kim, Ho; Hashizume, Masahiro; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Wu, Chang-Fu; Punnasiri, Kornwipa; Yi, Seung-Muk; Michelozzi, Paola; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Williams, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have examined the effects of temperature on mortality in a single city, country or region. However, less evidence is available on the variation in the associations between temperature and mortality in multiple countries, analyzed simultaneously. Methods We obtained daily data on temperature and mortality in 306 communities from 12 countries/regions (Australia, Brazil, Thailand, China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, United States and Canada). Two-stage analyses were used to assess the non-linear and delayed relationship between temperature and mortality. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing over-dispersion with distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the community-specific temperature-mortality relationship. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was used to pool the non-linear and delayed effects of ambient temperature at the national level, in each country. Results The temperatures associated with the lowest mortality were around the 75th percentile of temperature in all the countries/regions, ranging from 66th (Taiwan) to 80th (UK) percentiles. The estimated effects of cold and hot temperatures on mortality varied by community and country. Meta-analysis results show that both cold and hot temperatures increased the risk of mortality in all the countries/regions. Cold effects were delayed and lasted for many days, while hot effects appeared quickly and did not last long. Conclusions People have some ability to adapt to their local climate type, but both cold and hot temperatures are still associated with the risk of mortality. Public health strategies to alleviate the impact of ambient temperatures are important, in particular in the context of climate change. PMID:25166878

  8. Time relationship between ambient temperature change and antigen stimulation on immune responses of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, O.; Kikuchi, M.

    1989-03-01

    We investigated the time relationship between ambient temperature change and antigen stimulation on immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in mice. In the case of a shift from comfortable (25°C) to cold (8°C) temperatures, suppression in the number of splenic plaque-forming cells (PFC) took place mainly when the shift was done between 1 day before and 2 to 4 days after immunization. The suppression of the PVP response lasted for up to a maximum of 6 days when mice were transferred 1 day before immunization. In the case of a temperature shift from 25° to 36.5°C, the suppressive effect was found when the temperature shift was done between 4 days before and 2 days after immunization. The effect lasted longer than that of the temperature shift to cold, i.e., at least 9 days after the temperature shift. Blood corticosterone levels after the temperature shifts corresponded to changes in the immune responses: elevation of the blood corticosterone levels was observed for only the first 3 days after a temperature shift to 8°C but for 10 days after a temperature shift to 36.5°C during the period time of the experiment. These result suggested that blood corticosterone level contributes to the duration of the effects of temperature shifts on immune responses of mice. Furthermore, it appeared that the early stage of the immune response is more susceptible to temperature shifts than the later stage. To explain these results, the terms “effective period” in the course of physiological adaptation to changed ambient temperature and “susceptible period” in the course of the immune response, were proposed.

  9. Dynamical prediction of flu seasonality driven by ambient temperature: influenza vs. common cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of Influenzanet data for influenza itself and common cold in the Netherlands during the last 5 years, from the point of view of modelling by linearised SIRS equations parametrically driven by the ambient temperature. It is argued that this approach allows for the forecast of common cold, but not of influenza in a strict sense. The difference in their kinetic models is discussed with reference to the clinical background.

  10. Modulation of ozone toxicity with changes in ambient temperature in the unanesthetized, unrestrained rat

    SciTech Connect

    Watkinson, W.P.; Wiester, M.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated an attenuating effect of moderate decreases in body core temperature (T{sub co}) on the toxic response to xenobiotic agents. This study examined an additional modulating effect induced by changes in ambient temperature (T{sub a}). Male Fischer 344 rats were implanted with radiometry transmitters that permitted continuous monitoring of T{sub co}, activity, and electrocardiogram (ECG); heart rate (HR) was derived from the ECG signal. Animals were divided into nine treatment groups and continuously exposed to one of three concentrations of O{sub 3} for 48 hrs while maintained at one of three T{sub a}'s. O{sub 3} exposure led to hypothermia and bradycardia at all three T{sub a}'s. Decreases in T{sub co} and HR ranged from 1.5C and 75 bpm in the high T{sub a} group to 6.1C and 250 bpm in the low T{sub a} group. The only lethalities occurred in the high O{sub 3}-low T{sub a} group. Following O{sub 3} exposure, rats were anesthetized with urethane, intubated, and their lungs were lavaged with warm saline. The number of cells/ml in lavage fluid increased proportionally with decreases in T{sub a} and increases in O{sub 3} concentration. Cellular debris and the ratio of white cells/alveolar macrophages increased with increases in O{sub 3}. These results demonstrate the profound impact of T{sub a} on T{sub co} and the subsequent toxic response in the conscious, unrestrained rat exposed to O{sub 3}.

  11. Strength and Density of Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature for Use as Repair Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warid Wazien, A. Z.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Abd. Razak, Rafiza; Mohd Remy Rozainy, M. A. Z.; Faheem Mohd Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymers produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promised an excellent properties akin to the existing construction material. This study focused on the effect of various binder to sand ratio on geopolymer mortar properties. Mix design of geopolymer mortar was produced using NaOH concentration of 12 molars, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and ratio Na2SiO3/NaOH of 2.0 and 2.5 respectively. Samples subsequently ware cured at ambient temperature. The properties of geopolymer mortar were analysed in term of compressive strength and density at different period which are on the 3rd and 7th day of curing. Experimental results revealed that the addition of sand slightly increase the compressive strength of geopolymer. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 31.39 MPa on the 7th day. The density of geopolymer mortar was in the range between 2.0 g/cm3 to 2.23 g/cm3. Based on this findings, the special properties promoted by geopolymer mortar display high potential to be implemented in the field of concrete patch repair.

  12. Preparation of fly ash monoliths consolidated with a sodium silicate binder at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, K.

    1997-05-01

    Sodium silicate binder prepared by diluting a commercially available sodium silicate having 2.1 SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O molar ratio with water has been applied for the consolidation of fly ash. Two kinds of fly ash, ordinary and ultrafine, were mixed to enrich fine particles of 1--2 {micro}m in diameter. Granulated blast furnace slag was added as a hardener as much as 10% of the solid. The fly ash monoliths were prepared by casting slurries having 0.50 binder-liquor to solid ratio. After demolding at 1 d samples were kept in air for 28 d with subsequent water soaking for 3 d and finally air-dried for 7 d. This successive process was all carried out at ambient temperature and humidity. Strength tests revealed that blending the ultrafine fly ash and the slag are effective to obtain high strength materials in addition to the soak-dry process. A monolith, for instance, having flexural and compressive strengths of 9.6 and 25.1, respectively, was obtained.

  13. Catalytic oxidation of low-concentration CO at ambient temperature over supported Pd-Cu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fagen; Zhang, Haojie; He, Dannong

    2014-01-01

    The CO catalytic oxidation at ambient temperature and high space velocity was studied over the Pd-Cu/MOx (MOx = TiO2 and AI203) catalysts. The higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller area surface of the A1203 support facilitates the dispersion of Pd2+ species, and the presence of Cu2Cl(OH)3 accelerates the re-oxidation of Pd0 to Pd2+ over the Pd-Cu/Al203 catalyst, which contributed to better performance of CO catalytic oxidation. The poorer activity of the Pd-Cu/TiO2 catalyst was attributed to the lower dispersion of Pd2+ species because of the less surface area and the non-formation of Cu2CI(OH)3 species. The presence of saturated moisture showed a negative effect on CO conversion over the two catalysts. This might be because of the competitive adsorption, the formation of carbonate species and the transformation of Cu2CI(OH)3 to inactive CuCI over the Pd-Cu/AI2O3 catalyst, which facilitates the aggregation of PdO species over the Pd-Cu/TiO2 catalyst under the moisture condition. PMID:24600874

  14. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J. B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D. J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Wooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 C are studied. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits were successfully operated in 5000 C environments for extended periods. It is suggested that ITC's may become an important technology for high temperature instrumentation and control systems in geothermal and other high temperature environments.

  15. Ambient temperature effects on photo induced gonadal cycles and hormonal secretion patterns in Great Tits from three different breeding latitudes.

    PubMed

    Silverin, Bengt; Wingfield, John; Stokkan, Karl-Arne; Massa, Renato; Järvinen, Antero; Andersson, Nils-Ake; Lambrechts, Marcel; Sorace, Alberto; Blomqvist, Donald

    2008-06-01

    The present study determines how populations of Great Tits (Parus major) breeding in southern, mid and northern European latitudes have adjusted their reproductive endocrinology to differences in the ambient temperature during the gonadal cycle. A study based on long-term breeding data, using the Colwell predictability model, showed that the start of the breeding season has a high predictability ( approximately 0.8-0.9) at all latitudes, and that the environmental information factor (I(e)) progressively decreased from mid Italy (I(e)>4) to northern Finland (I(e)<1). The results indicate that integration of supplementary information, such as ambient temperature, with photoperiodic initial predictive information (day length), becomes progressively more important in maintaining the predictability of the breeding season with decreasing latitude. This hypothesis was verified by exposing photosensitive Great Tits from northern Norway, southern Sweden and northern Italy to sub-maximal photo-stimulatory day lengths (13L:11D) under two different ambient temperature regimes (+4 degrees C and +20 degrees C). Changes in testicular size, plasma levels of LH and testosterone were measured. The main results were: (1) Initial testicular growth rate, as well as LH secretion, was affected by temperature in the Italian, but not in birds from the two Scandinavian populations. (2) Maximum testicular size, maximum LH and testosterone levels were maintained for a progressively shorter period of time with increasing latitude, regardless of whether the birds were kept on a low or a high ambient temperature. (3) In birds from all latitudes, the development of photorefractoriness, as indicated by testicular regression and a decrease in plasma levels of LH and testosterone, started much earlier (with the exception for LH Great Tits from northern Scandinavia) when kept on +20 degrees C than when kept on +4 degrees C. The prolonging effects of a low temperature was more pronounced in

  16. Effect of ambient temperature on endurance performance while wearing cross-country skiing clothing.

    PubMed

    Sandsund, Mariann; Saursaunet, Vegard; Wiggen, Øystein; Renberg, Julie; Færevik, Hilde; van Beekvelt, Mireille C P

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the effects of exposure to cold (-14 and -9 °C), cool (-4 and 1 °C) and moderate warm (10 and 20 °C) environments on aerobic endurance performance-related variables: maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), running time to exhaustion (TTE), running economy and running speed at lactate threshold (LT). Nine male endurance athletes wearing cross-country ski racing suit performed a standard running test at six ambient temperatures in a climatic chamber with a wind speed of 5 m s(-1). The exercise protocol consisted of a 10-min warm-up period followed by four submaximal periods of 5 min at increasing intensities between 67 and 91 % of VO(2max) and finally a maximal test to exhaustion. During the time course mean skin temperature decreased significantly with reduced ambient temperatures whereas T (re) increased during all conditions. T (re) was lower at -14 °C than at -9 and 20 °C. Running economy was significantly reduced in warm compared to cool environments and was also reduced at 20 °C compared to -9 °C. Running speed at LT was significantly higher at -4 °C than at -9, 10 and 20 °C. TTE was significantly longer at -4 and 1 °C than at -14, 10 and 20 °C. No significant differences in VO(2max) were found between the various ambient conditions. The optimal aerobic endurance performance wearing a cross-country ski racing suit was found to be -4 and 1 °C, while performance was reduced under moderate warm (10 and 20 °C) and cold (-14 and -9 °C) ambient conditions.

  17. Ambient temperature influences tolerance to plant secondary compounds in a mammalian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kurnath, P; Merz, N D; Dearing, M D

    2016-01-13

    Growing evidence suggests that plant secondary compounds (PSCs) ingested by mammals become more toxic at elevated ambient temperatures, a phenomenon known as temperature-dependent toxicity. We investigated temperature-dependent toxicity in the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), a herbivorous rodent that naturally encounters PSCs in creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), which is a major component of its diet. First, we determined the maximum dose of creosote resin ingested by woodrats at warm (28-29°C) or cool (21-22°C) temperatures. Second, we controlled the daily dose of creosote resin ingested at warm, cool and room (25°C) temperatures, and measured persistence in feeding trials. At the warm temperature, woodrats ingested significantly less creosote resin; their maximum dose was two-thirds that of animals at the cool temperature. Moreover, woodrats at warm and room temperatures could not persist on the same dose of creosote resin as woodrats at the cool temperature. Our findings demonstrate that warmer temperatures reduce PSC intake and tolerance in herbivorous rodents, highlighting the potentially adverse consequences of temperature-dependent toxicity. These results will advance the field of herbivore ecology and may hone predictions of mammalian responses to climate change.

  18. Increasing testicular temperature by exposure to elevated ambient temperatures restores spermatogenesis in adult Utp14b (jsd) mutant (jsd) mice.

    PubMed

    Comish, P B; Liang, L Y; Yamauchi, Y; Weng, C C; Shetty, G; Naff, K A; Ward, M A; Meistrich, M L

    2015-03-01

    Because mutations in the human UTP14C gene are associated with male infertility, we sought to develop a method for fertility restoration in azoospermic mice with a mutation in the orthologous Utp14b(jsd) (jsd) gene that have spermatogonial arrest. The method is based on our observation that elevation of testicular temperatures restores spermatogonial differentiation in jsd mutant mice. To non-surgically raise intrascrotal temperatures we placed these mice in incubators at different elevated ambient temperatures. Exposure of jsd/jsd mice to ambient temperatures of 34.5 °C or 35.5 °C for 24 days increased the proportion of tubules with spermatocytes from 0% in untreated controls to over 80%. As those higher temperatures interfere with spermatid differentiation, the mice were then transferred to incubators at 32-32.5 °C for the next 24 days. These environments allowed differentiation to progress, resulting in up to 42% of tubules having late spermatids and about half of the mutant mice having spermatozoa in testicular suspensions. When these spermatozoa were used in intracytoplasmic sperm injection, all gave rise to viable healthy offspring with normal weight gain and fertility. The successful restoration of fertility in Utp14b mutant mice suggests that transient testicular warming might also be useful for spermatogenesis recovery in infertile men with UTP14C gene mutations.

  19. Thermal responses and perceptions under distinct ambient temperature and wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Wind conditions are widely recognized to influence the thermal states of humans. In this study, we investigated the relationship between wind conditions and thermal perception and energy balance in humans. The study participants were exposed for 20 min to 3 distinct ambient temperatures, wind speeds, and wind angles. During the exposure, the skin temperatures as a physiological reaction and mental reactions of the human body were measured and the energy balance was calculated based on the human thermal-load method. The results indicate that the human thermal load is an accurate indicator of human thermal states under all wind conditions. Furthermore, wind speed and direction by themselves do not account for the human thermal experience. Because of the thermoregulation that occurs to prevent heat loss and protect the core of the body, a low skin temperature was maintained and regional differences in skin temperature were detected under cool ambient conditions. Thus, the human thermal load, which represents physiological parameters such as skin-temperature change, adequately describes the mixed sensation of the human thermal experience.

  20. Influence of ambient temperature on prolactin concentrations in serum of Holstein and Brahman x Hereford heifers.

    PubMed

    Wettermann, R P; Tucker, H A; Beck, T W; Meyerhoeffer, D C

    1982-08-01

    Four Holstein and four Brahman x Hereford heifers about 8 mo of age were used in a study to determine whether breed influences the effects of ambient temperature on concentrations' of prolactin in serum. Two heifers of each breed were stanchioned in each of two environmental chambers at 21 C for 7 d, after which chamber temperatures were changed to 7 or 31 C during 6 h. After 5 d at 7, 21 or 31 C, heifers were injected with 60 micrograms thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). A switch-back design was used and each heifer was exposed to all treatments. Concentrations of prolactin in serum of heifers during exposure to 7, 21 or 31 C for 5 d were related to ambient temperature (9.0, 20.9 and 29.5 ng/ml, respectively; P less than .001), but the response was not influenced by breed. Heifers of both breeds responded similarly to treatment with TRH, and prolactin in serum increased (P less than .001) within 5 min from 7.0 +/- 3.2 to 45.7 +/- 8.2 ng/ml in heifers at 7 C, from 13.1 +/- 1.6 to 97.2 +/- 9.6 ng/ml in heifers at 21 C and from 18.2 +/- 3.5 to 96.2 +/- 11.3 ng/ml in heifers at 31 C. We conclude that concentrations of prolactin in serum of heifers are positively associated with ambient temperature and that the effects of temperature on basal and TRH-stimulated concentrations of prolactin do not differ significantly between Holstein and Brahman x Hereford heifers. Thus, differences in tolerance to heat were not related to differences in prolactin secretion. PMID:6815150

  1. Responses of wheat and rice to factorial combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and temperature in FACE experiments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuang; Yin, Xinyou; He, Shuaiqi; Jiang, Wenyu; Si, Chuanfei; Struik, Paul C; Luo, Weihong; Li, Gang; Xie, Yingtian; Xiong, Yan; Pan, Genxing

    2016-02-01

    Elevated CO2 and temperature strongly affect crop production, but understanding of the crop response to combined CO2 and temperature increases under field conditions is still limited while data are scarce. We grew wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two levels of CO2 (ambient and enriched up to 500 μmol mol(-1) ) and two levels of canopy temperature (ambient and increased by 1.5-2.0 °C) in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) systems and carried out a detailed growth and yield component analysis during two growing seasons for both crops. An increase in CO2 resulted in higher grain yield, whereas an increase in temperature reduced grain yield, in both crops. An increase in CO2 was unable to compensate for the negative impact of an increase in temperature on biomass and yield of wheat and rice. Yields of wheat and rice were decreased by 10-12% and 17-35%, respectively, under the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature. The number of filled grains per unit area was the most important yield component accounting for the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature in wheat and rice. Our data showed complex treatment effects on the interplay between preheading duration, nitrogen uptake, tillering, leaf area index, and radiation-use efficiency, and thus on yield components and yield. Nitrogen uptake before heading was crucial in minimizing yield loss due to climate change in both crops. For rice, however, a breeding strategy to increase grain number per m(2) and % filled grains (or to reduce spikelet sterility) at high temperature is also required to prevent yield reduction under conditions of global change.

  2. High-temperature piezoelectric sensing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  3. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  4. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.

  5. Interaction of ambient temperature and microwave power density on schedule-controlled behavior in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, M.I.; Guyer, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Most guidelines of microwave exposure do not explicitly address effects of ambient temperature. This experiment revealed that ambient temperature potentiates the behavioral effects of intensity of irradiation. Sixty-four adult male Long-Evans rats were trained to insert their heads into a food cup to obtain food pellets on a 1-min variable-interval schedule of reinforcement. Two groups of four rats each were then exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves for 15.5 hours under one of the following eight combinations of power density and air temperature: 8 or 14 m/cm. sq. at 22 C; 0, 8, or 14 mW/cm. sq. at 26 C; and 0, 8, or 14 mW/cm. sq. at 30 C (relative humidity was 50% in all cases). Response rate of each rat following exposure was compared with its control rate at 0 mW/cm. sq. and 22 C. After exposure at 8 mW/cm. sq., response rates were reduced by a mean of 13.8% at 22 C, 27.5% at 26 C, and 77.5% at 30 C. After exposure at 14 mW/cm. sq., rates were reduced by a mean of 21.1% at 22 C, 43.7% at 26 C, and 80.0% at 30 C. In the absence of microwaves the higher temperatures caused only slight decreases in response rate.

  6. Ambient temperature shapes reproductive output during pregnancy and lactation in the common vole (Microtus arvalis): a test of the heat dissipation limit theory.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mirre J P; Reimert, Inonge; van der Vinne, Vincent; Hambly, Catherine; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Speakman, John R; Gerkema, Menno P

    2011-01-01

    The heat dissipation limit theory suggests that heat generated during metabolism limits energy intake and, thus, reproductive output. Experiments in laboratory strains of mice and rats, and also domestic livestock generally support this theory. Selection for many generations in the laboratory and in livestock has increased litter size or productivity in these animals. To test the wider validity of the heat dissipation limit theory, we studied common voles (Microtus arvalis), which have small litter sizes by comparison with mice and rats, and regular addition of wild-caught individuals of this species to our laboratory colony ensures a natural genetic background. A crossover design of ambient temperatures (21 and 30°C) during pregnancy and lactation was used. High ambient temperature during lactation decreased milk production, slowing pup growth. The effect on pup growth was amplified when ambient temperature was also high during pregnancy. Shaving fur off dams at 30°C resulted in faster growth of pups; however, no significant increase in food intake and or milk production was detected. With increasing litter size (natural and enlarged), asymptotic food intake during lactation levelled off in the largest litters at both 21 and 30°C. Interestingly, the effects of lactation temperature on pup growth where also observed at smaller litter sizes. This suggests that vole dams trade-off costs associated with hyperthermia during lactation with the yield from investment in pup growth. Moreover, pup survival was higher at 30°C, despite lower growth, probably owing to thermoregulatory benefits. It remains to be seen how the balance is established between the negative effect of high ambient temperature on maternal milk production and pup growth (and/or future reproduction of the dam) and the positive effect of high temperatures on pup survival. This balance ultimately determines the effect of different ambient temperatures on reproductive success. PMID:21147967

  7. Effects of social interaction and warm ambient temperature on brain hyperthermia induced by the designer drugs methylone and MDPV.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) are new drugs of abuse that have gained worldwide popularity. These drugs are structurally similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and share many of its physiological and behavioral effects in humans, including the development of hyperthermia during acute intoxication. Here, we examined the effects of methylone (1-9 mg/kg, s.c.) or MDPV (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on brain temperature homeostasis in rats maintained in a standard laboratory environment (single-housed in a quiet rest at 22 °C) and under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and 29 °C ambient temperature). By simultaneously monitoring temperatures in the nucleus accumbens, temporal muscle, and facial skin, we assessed the effects of methylone and MDPV on intra-brain heat production and cutaneous vascular tone, two critical factors that control brain temperature responses. Both methylone and MDPV dose-dependently increased brain temperature, but even at high doses that induced robust locomotor activation, hyperthermia was modest in magnitude (up to ∼2 °C). Both drugs also induced dose-dependent peripheral vasoconstriction, which appears to be a primary mechanism determining the brain hyperthermic responses. In contrast to the powerful potentiation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia by social interaction and warm ambient temperature, such potentiation was absent for methylone and minimal for MDPV. Taken together, despite structural similarities to MDMA, exposure to methylone or MDPV under conditions commonly associated with human drug use does not lead to profound elevations in brain temperature and sustained vasoconstriction, two critical factors associated with MDMA toxicity.

  8. Effects of social interaction and warm ambient temperature on brain hyperthermia induced by the designer drugs methylone and MDPV.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) are new drugs of abuse that have gained worldwide popularity. These drugs are structurally similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and share many of its physiological and behavioral effects in humans, including the development of hyperthermia during acute intoxication. Here, we examined the effects of methylone (1-9 mg/kg, s.c.) or MDPV (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on brain temperature homeostasis in rats maintained in a standard laboratory environment (single-housed in a quiet rest at 22 °C) and under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and 29 °C ambient temperature). By simultaneously monitoring temperatures in the nucleus accumbens, temporal muscle, and facial skin, we assessed the effects of methylone and MDPV on intra-brain heat production and cutaneous vascular tone, two critical factors that control brain temperature responses. Both methylone and MDPV dose-dependently increased brain temperature, but even at high doses that induced robust locomotor activation, hyperthermia was modest in magnitude (up to ∼2 °C). Both drugs also induced dose-dependent peripheral vasoconstriction, which appears to be a primary mechanism determining the brain hyperthermic responses. In contrast to the powerful potentiation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia by social interaction and warm ambient temperature, such potentiation was absent for methylone and minimal for MDPV. Taken together, despite structural similarities to MDMA, exposure to methylone or MDPV under conditions commonly associated with human drug use does not lead to profound elevations in brain temperature and sustained vasoconstriction, two critical factors associated with MDMA toxicity. PMID:25074640

  9. Ambient temperature enhanced acute cardiovascular-respiratory mortality effects of PM2.5 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Canjun; Shang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown that temperature could modify the effect of ambient fine particles on mortality risk. In assessing air pollution effects, temperature is usually considered as a confounder. However, ambient temperature can alter people's physiological response to air pollution and might "modify" the impact of air pollution on health outcomes. This study investigated the interaction between daily PM2.5 and daily mean temperature in Beijing, China, using data for the period 2005-2009. Bivariate PM2.5-temperature response surfaces and temperature-stratified generalized additive model (GAM) were applied to study the effect of PM2.5 on cardiovascular, respiratory mortality, and total non-accidental mortality across different temperature levels. We found that low temperature could significantly enhance the effect of PM2.5 on cardiovascular mortality. For an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5 concentration in the lowest temperature range (-9.7˜2.6 °C), the relative risk (RR) of cardiovascular mortality increased 1.27 % (95 % CI 0.38˜2.17 %), which was higher than that of the whole temperature range (0.59 %, 95 % CI 0.22-1.16 %). The largest effect of PM2.5 on respiratory mortality appeared in the high temperature range. For an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5 concentration, RR of respiratory mortality increased 1.70 % (95 % CI 0.92˜3.33 %) in the highest level (23.50˜31.80 °C). For the total non-accidental mortality, significant associations appeared only in low temperature levels (-9.7˜2.6 °C): for an increase of 10 μg/m3 in current day PM2.5 concentration, RR increased 1.27 % (95 % CI 0.46˜2.00 %) in the lowest temperature level. No lag effect was observed. The results suggest that in air pollution mortality time series studies, the possibility of an interaction between air pollution and temperature should be considered.

  10. Ambient temperature enhanced acute cardiovascular-respiratory mortality effects of PM2.5 in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Canjun; Shang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown that temperature could modify the effect of ambient fine particles on mortality risk. In assessing air pollution effects, temperature is usually considered as a confounder. However, ambient temperature can alter people's physiological response to air pollution and might "modify" the impact of air pollution on health outcomes. This study investigated the interaction between daily PM2.5 and daily mean temperature in Beijing, China, using data for the period 2005-2009. Bivariate PM2.5-temperature response surfaces and temperature-stratified generalized additive model (GAM) were applied to study the effect of PM2.5 on cardiovascular, respiratory mortality, and total non-accidental mortality across different temperature levels. We found that low temperature could significantly enhance the effect of PM2.5 on cardiovascular mortality. For an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 concentration in the lowest temperature range (-9.7∼2.6 °C), the relative risk (RR) of cardiovascular mortality increased 1.27 % (95 % CI 0.38∼2.17 %), which was higher than that of the whole temperature range (0.59 %, 95 % CI 0.22-1.16 %). The largest effect of PM2.5 on respiratory mortality appeared in the high temperature range. For an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 concentration, RR of respiratory mortality increased 1.70 % (95 % CI 0.92∼3.33 %) in the highest level (23.50∼31.80 °C). For the total non-accidental mortality, significant associations appeared only in low temperature levels (-9.7∼2.6 °C): for an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in current day PM2.5 concentration, RR increased 1.27 % (95 % CI 0.46∼2.00 %) in the lowest temperature level. No lag effect was observed. The results suggest that in air pollution mortality time series studies, the possibility of an interaction between air pollution and temperature should be considered.

  11. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  12. The effect of naked neck gene and ambient temperature and their interaction on reproductive traits of heavy broiler dams.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, A R; Horst, P; Simianer, H

    2010-07-01

    High ambient temperature is a major factor for diminishing reproductive performance of broiler parent stocks. Homozygous naked neck (NaNa) broilers, which possess a higher adaptation to heat due to a reduction of feather coverage, exhibited higher growth rates and meat yield. This study was conducted to investigate the influence of genotype x temperature interactions on the reproduction traits of heavy broiler dams caused by different feathering genotypes induced by naked neck gene (Na). In an additional experiment, the effect of Na gene on embryonic activity using oxygen uptake was examined. Normal-feathered (nana) and NaNa hens were maintained in separate cages under high (30 degrees C) and moderate (19 degrees C) temperatures, with RH of 55% from the 18th to 72nd week of age. Egg production, fertility, hatchability, and the time of embryonic mortality were recorded. In comparison with the NaNa genotype, the nana hens showed clear performance depressions under thermal stress with respect to egg production (63%), fertility (20%), hatchability, and number of chicks (72%). Under temperate ambient temperature, there were no differences in laying performance and fertility between both genotypes, with the exception of hatchability due to an increase in embryonic mortality as a result of the Na gene and consequently in the complex trait number of chicks. The early embryonic mortality of eggs laid by nana hens exposed to heat stress is clearly higher than of eggs by nana hens kept under temperate ambient temperature. In contrast, there were no significant differences in early embryonic mortality of eggs of NaNa birds kept under high and temperate environmental temperatures, demonstrating that heat stress leads to reduced early embryonic livability. Embryonic mortality in the late developing stage is significantly increased, and the homozygous genotype is much more affected than the heterozygous embryo. The possible reason for the Na gene-induced embryonic mortality is

  13. Preservation of Biospecimens at Ambient Temperature: Special Focus on Nucleic Acids and Opportunities for the Biobanking Community.

    PubMed

    Muller, Rolf; Betsou, Fay; Barnes, Michael G; Harding, Keith; Bonnet, Jacques; Kofanova, Olga; Crowe, John H

    2016-04-01

    Several approaches to the preservation of biological materials at ambient temperature and the relative impact on sample stability and degradation are reviewed, with a focus on nucleic acids. This appraisal is undertaken within the framework of biobank risk, quality management systems, and accreditation, with a view to assessing how best to apply ambient temperature sample storage to ensure stability, reduce costs, improve handling logistics, and increase the efficiency of biobank procedures. PMID:26886348

  14. Crystal reduction in TA-23 glass-to-metal seals. [For lithium ambient-temperature batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacic, L.; Watkins, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    TA-23 glass is used in the fabrication of headers for lithium ambient-temperature batteries. The glass was observed to crystallize during processing at the sealing temperature originally specified. Thermal expansion characteristics of the crystal phase suggested potential problems from residual stresses in the glass seal. Two methods are presented to reduce or eliminate the crystallization: improvement of the glass preform surface finish and lower temperature sealing. Both methods were successful in reducing crystallization in the glass during sealing. Sealed headers were characterized for seal integrity by acoustic emission pressure testing and pin-pull testing. Seals without the crystals were found to be stronger than those with the crystals present. Details of the process development and mechanical testing are presented.

  15. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  16. Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, D.; Post, R.

    2000-05-26

    Based on prior work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings are being adapted for use in high-power flywheel energy storage systems developed at the Trinity Flywheel Power company. En route to this goal specialized test stands have been built and computer codes have been written to aid in the development of the component parts of these bearing systems. The Livermore passive magnetic bearing system involves three types of elements, as follows: (1) Axially symmetric levitation elements, energized by permanent magnets., (2) electrodynamic ''stabilizers'' employing axially symmetric arrays of permanent magnet bars (''Halbach arrays'') on the rotating system, interacting with specially wound electrically shorted stator circuits, and, (3) eddy-current-type vibration dampers, employing axially symmetric rotating pole assemblies interacting with stationary metallic discs. The theory of the Livermore passive magnetic bearing concept describes specific quantitative stability criteria. The satisfaction of these criteria will insure that, when rotating above a low critical speed, a bearing system made up of the three elements described above will be dynamically stable. That is, it will not only be stable for small displacements from equilibrium (''Earnshaw-stable''), but will also be stable against whirl-type instabilities of the types that can arise from displacement-dependent drag forces, or from mechanical-hysteritic losses that may occur in the rotor. Our design problem thus becomes one of calculating and/or measuring the relevant stiffnesses and drag coefficients of the various elements and comparing our results with the theory so as to assure that the cited stability criteria are satisfied.

  17. Effect of Ambient and Oxygen Temperature on Flow Field Characteristics of Coherent Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuhai; Zhu, Rong; Dong, Kai; Hu, Shaoyan

    2016-02-01

    The coherent jets are now used widely in electric arc furnace steelmaking process to increase the stirring ability, reaction rates, and energy efficiency. However, there has been limited research on the basic physics of the coherent jets. In the present study, the characteristics of flow field of supersonic coherent jet in hot and cold condition were studied. The total temperature and axial velocity were measured by combustion experiment. Flow field characteristics of supersonic coherent jet were simulated by Fluent software. The detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is presently used for the modeling of reactions. It consists of 53 species, plus Ar and N2, for a total of 325 reversible reactions. The present study showed that the shrouding flame decreases the entrainment of the ambient gas to the central supersonic jet, which results in a low expansion rate for the coherent supersonic jet. The higher ambient temperature can prolong the potential core of coherent jet and conventional jet. However, the potential core of coherent jet reduces with oxygen temperature increasing, which is opposite to conventional jet.

  18. Ambient temperature and mortality: an international study in four capital cities of East Asia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joo-Youn; Honda, Yasushi; Hong, Yun-Chul; Pan, Xiao-Chuan; Guo, Yue-Leon; Kim, Ho

    2009-12-20

    Extreme ambient temperature has been associated with increased daily mortality across the world. We describe the ambient temperature-mortality association for four capital cities in East Asia, Seoul, Beijing, Tokyo, and Taipei, and identify a threshold temperature for each city and the percent increase in mortality. We adapted generalized linear modeling with natural cubic splines (GLM+NS) to examine the association between daily mean apparent temperature (AT) and total mortality, as well as mortality due to respiratory (RD) and cardiovascular (CVD) causes in a threshold model. We conducted a time-series analysis adjusting for day of the week and long-term time trend. The study period differed by city. The threshold temperature for all seasons was estimated to be 30.1-33.5 degrees C, 31.3-32.3 degrees C, 29.4-30.8 degrees C, and 25.2 degrees -31.5 degrees C for Seoul, Beijing, Tokyo, and Taipei, respectively, on the same day. For the mean daily AT increase of 1 degrees C above the thresholds in Seoul, Tokyo, and Taipei, estimated percentage increases in daily total mortality were 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.2-3.1), 1.7 (95% CI=1.5-2.0), and 4.3 (95% CI=2.9-5.7), respectively. Beijing provided no total mortality counts. Estimated percentage increases were 2.7-10.5 for RD mortality, 1.1-9.3 for CVD mortality in 4 cities. This study identified increased mortality due to exposure to elevated AT. The importance of effects of AT and city-specific threshold temperatures suggests that analyses of the impact of climate change should take regional differences into consideration.

  19. Daily variations in the influence of noradrenaline on preferred ambient temperature of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał; Tegowska, Eugenia

    2003-04-01

    Daily variations in sensitivity to noradrenaline (NA) and the activation of nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) are important for survival under a potentially wide range of environmental conditions. However, little is known regarding the ability of the Siberian hamster and other species to activate NST in the day and night when they may be subjected to marked variations in environmental temperature. In this study, the effects of acclimation temperature and time of day on the behavioral thermoregulatory response to NA injections in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) was investigated. Hamsters were acclimated for 4 weeks to 23 degrees C and a L:D 12:12 h photoperiod. After acclimation, preferred ambient temperatures (PT(a)) in saline- and NA-injected animals were measured continuously in the temperature gradient system. NA (0.6 mg/kg; s.c.) was given every 4 h while PT(a) was monitored. After NA injections there was a rapid drop in PT(a), decreasing to approximately 15 degrees C within 10-20 min after each NA injection. Following 4 weeks of acclimation to 10 degrees C and a L:D 8:16 h photoperiod, the same hamsters were re-tested in the temperature gradient system. Cold acclimation led to an accentuation in the behavioral response with a decrease in PT(a) of approximately 10 degrees C. The maximal decrease in preferred ambient temperatures was recorded during the light phase of the day and during the second part of the night. Lowering of PT(a) after NA allows for rapid dissipation of the heat from NST. Overall, the behavioral response reflects the daily changes in brown adipose tissue sensitivity to NA and thus capacity for NST.

  20. Measurements and Predictions of High Frequency Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Andrew

    2004-11-01

    A great deal has been published on ambient noise. Most of this has covered (a) omni directional levels, and (b) the vertical and horizontal directivity of shipping noise at low frequencies. There is some published material on the vertical directivity of wind generated noise at lower frequencies, but very little at higher frequencies. In order to study wind generated ambient noise at higher frequencies, work has recently started using a small planar array from QinetiQ Bincleaves. As well as measurements, a model called CANARY has been written to predict ambient noise vertical directivity and array responses to this noise. This paper contains some comparisons between CANARY predictions and (a) previous measured vertical directivity data at 4.5 kHz, (b) measured omni-directional data, and (c) initial analysis of the planar array measurements. The paper shows the nature of the ambient noise vertical structure at higher frequencies and that the CANARY predictions are in good agreement with the measurements.

  1. Evaluation of mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Dawson, S.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    The ethylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran (EC/2-MeTHF) mixed-solvent electrolyte has been experimentally found to possess many desirable electrolyte characteristics for ambient-temperature secondary Li-TiS2 cell applications. As many as 300 cycles have been demonstrated, and a cycling efficiency figure-of-merit of 38.5 percent, for 10-percent EC/90-percent MeTHF mixed-solvent electrolyte in experimental Li-TiS2 cells. The improved performance of this electrolyte is attributable to the formation of a beneficial passivating film on the Li electrode by interaction with the EC.

  2. Effects of ambient and preceding temperatures and metabolic genes on flight metabolism in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Wong, Swee Chong; Oksanen, Alma; Mattila, Anniina L K; Lehtonen, Rainer; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-02-01

    Flight is essential for foraging, mate searching and dispersal in many insects, but flight metabolism in ectotherms is strongly constrained by temperature. Thermal conditions vary greatly in natural populations and may hence restrict fitness-related activities. Working on the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), we studied the effects of temperature experienced during the first 2 days of adult life on flight metabolism, genetic associations between flight metabolic rate and variation in candidate metabolic genes, and genotype-temperature interactions. The maximal flight performance was reduced by 17% by 2 days of low ambient temperature (15 °C) prior to the flight trial, mimicking conditions that butterflies commonly encounter in nature. A SNP in phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) had a significant association on flight metabolic rate in males and a SNP in triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi) was significantly associated with flight metabolic rate in females. In the Pgi SNP, AC heterozygotes had higher flight metabolic rate than AA homozygotes following low preceding temperature, but the trend was reversed following high preceding temperature, consistent with previous results on genotype-temperature interaction for this SNP. We suggest that these results on 2-day old butterflies reflect thermal effect on the maturation of flight muscles. These results highlight the consequences of variation in thermal conditions on the time scale of days, and they contribute to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of flight metabolism and flight-related activities under conditions that are relevant for natural populations living under variable thermal conditions.

  3. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  4. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  5. A positive association between cryptosporidiosis notifications and ambient temperature, Victoria, Australia, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Kent, Lillian; McPherson, Michelle; Higgins, Nasra

    2015-12-01

    Increased temperatures provide optimal conditions for pathogen survival, virulence and replication as well as increased opportunities for human-pathogen interaction. This paper examined the relationship between notifications of cryptosporidiosis and temperature in metropolitan and rural areas of Victoria, Australia between 2001 and 2009. A negative binomial regression model was used to analyse monthly average maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall and the monthly count of cryptosporidiosis notifications. In the metropolitan area, a 1 °C increase in monthly average minimum temperature of the current month was associated with a 22% increase in cryptosporidiosis notifications (incident rate ratio (IRR) 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.31). In the rural area, a 1 °C increase in monthly average minimum temperature, lagged by 3 months, was associated with a 9% decrease in cryptosporidiosis notifications (IRR 0.91; 95% CI 0.86-0.97). Rainfall was not associated with notifications in either area. These relationships should be considered when planning public health response to ecological risks as well as when developing policies involving climate change. Rising ambient temperature may be an early warning signal for intensifying prevention efforts, including appropriate education for pool users about cryptosporidiosis infection and management, which might become more important as temperatures are projected to increase as a result of climate change.

  6. Effect of ambient temperature and attachment method on surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Niedermann, Reto; Rossi, René M.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate measurement of skin surface temperature is essential in both thermo-physiological and clinical applications. However, a literature review of the last two decades of physiological or clinical research revealed an inconsistency or a lack of information on how temperature sensors were attached to the skin surface. The purpose of this study was to systematically compare and quantify the performance of different commercially available temperature sensors and their typical attachment methods, and, secondly, to provide a time-efficient and reliable method for testing any sensor-tape combination. In conclusion, both the sensor type and the attachment method influenced the results of temperature measurements (both its absolute and relative dimensions). The sensor shape and the contact of its sensing area to the surface, as well as the conductance of the tape were the most important parameters to minimise the influence of environmental conditions on surface temperature measurement. These results suggest that temperature sensors and attachment methods for human subject and manikin trials should be selected carefully, with a systematic evaluation of the sensor-tape system under conditions of use, and emphasise the need to report these parameters in publications.

  7. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  8. The Influence of Ambient Temperature on Green Roof R-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Bryce Kevin

    Green roofs can be an effective and appealing way to increase the energy efficiency of buildings by providing active insulation. As plants in the green roof transpire, there is a reduction in heat flux that is conducted through the green roof. The R-value, or thermal resistance, of a green roof is an effective measurement of thermal performance because it can be easily included in building energy calculations applicable to many different buildings and situations. The purpose of this study was to determine if an increase in ambient temperature would cause an increase in the R-value of green roofs. Test trays containing green roof materials were tested in a low speed wind tunnel equipped to determine the R-value of the trays. Three different plant species were tested in this study, ryegrass (Lolium perenne), sedum (Sedum hispanicum), and vinca (Vinca minor ). For each test in this study the relative humidity was maintained at 45% and the soil was saturated with water. The trays were tested at four different ambient temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 120ºF. The resulting R-values for sedum ranged from 1.37 to 3.28 ft2hºF/BTU, for ryegrass the R-values ranged from 2.15 to 3.62 ft2hºF/BTU, and for vinca the R-values ranged from 3.15 to 5.19 ft2hºF/BTU. The average R-value for all the tests in this study was 3.20 ft2hºF/BTU. The results showed an increase in R-value with increasing temperature. Applying an ANOVA analysis to the data, the relationship between temperature and R-value for all three plant species was found to be statistically significant.

  9. Research Update: Direct conversion of h-BN into pure c-BN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2016-02-01

    We report a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) by nanosecond laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa. Using nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to formation of super undercooled BN (Q-BN). The c-BN phase is nucleated from Q-BN depending upon the time allowed for nucleation and growth.

  10. Do circadian genes and ambient temperature affect substrate-borne signalling during Drosophila courtship?

    PubMed

    Medina, Izarne; Casal, José; Fabre, Caroline C G

    2015-01-01

    Courtship vibratory signals can be air-borne or substrate-borne. They convey distinct and species-specific information from one individual to its prospective partner. Here, we study the substrate-borne vibratory signals generated by the abdominal quivers of the Drosophila male during courtship; these vibrations travel through the ground towards courted females and coincide with female immobility. It is not known which physical parameters of the vibrations encode the information that is received by the females and induces them to pause. We examined the intervals between each vibratory pulse, a feature that was reported to carry information for animal communication. We were unable to find evidence of periodic variations in the lengths of these intervals, as has been reported for fly acoustical signals. Because it was suggested that the genes involved in the circadian clock may also regulate shorter rhythms, we search for effects of period on the interval lengths. Males that are mutant for the period gene produced vibrations with significantly altered interpulse intervals; also, treating wild type males with constant light results in similar alterations to the interpulse intervals. Our results suggest that both the clock and light/dark cycles have input into the interpulse intervals of these vibrations. We wondered if we could alter the interpulse intervals by other means, and found that ambient temperature also had a strong effect. However, behavioural analysis suggests that only extreme ambient temperatures can affect the strong correlation between female immobility and substrate-borne vibrations. PMID:26519517

  11. Do circadian genes and ambient temperature affect substrate-borne signalling during Drosophila courtship?

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Izarne; Casal, José; Fabre, Caroline C. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Courtship vibratory signals can be air-borne or substrate-borne. They convey distinct and species-specific information from one individual to its prospective partner. Here, we study the substrate-borne vibratory signals generated by the abdominal quivers of the Drosophila male during courtship; these vibrations travel through the ground towards courted females and coincide with female immobility. It is not known which physical parameters of the vibrations encode the information that is received by the females and induces them to pause. We examined the intervals between each vibratory pulse, a feature that was reported to carry information for animal communication. We were unable to find evidence of periodic variations in the lengths of these intervals, as has been reported for fly acoustical signals. Because it was suggested that the genes involved in the circadian clock may also regulate shorter rhythms, we search for effects of period on the interval lengths. Males that are mutant for the period gene produced vibrations with significantly altered interpulse intervals; also, treating wild type males with constant light results in similar alterations to the interpulse intervals. Our results suggest that both the clock and light/dark cycles have input into the interpulse intervals of these vibrations. We wondered if we could alter the interpulse intervals by other means, and found that ambient temperature also had a strong effect. However, behavioural analysis suggests that only extreme ambient temperatures can affect the strong correlation between female immobility and substrate-borne vibrations. PMID:26519517

  12. Do circadian genes and ambient temperature affect substrate-borne signalling during Drosophila courtship?

    PubMed

    Medina, Izarne; Casal, José; Fabre, Caroline C G

    2015-01-01

    Courtship vibratory signals can be air-borne or substrate-borne. They convey distinct and species-specific information from one individual to its prospective partner. Here, we study the substrate-borne vibratory signals generated by the abdominal quivers of the Drosophila male during courtship; these vibrations travel through the ground towards courted females and coincide with female immobility. It is not known which physical parameters of the vibrations encode the information that is received by the females and induces them to pause. We examined the intervals between each vibratory pulse, a feature that was reported to carry information for animal communication. We were unable to find evidence of periodic variations in the lengths of these intervals, as has been reported for fly acoustical signals. Because it was suggested that the genes involved in the circadian clock may also regulate shorter rhythms, we search for effects of period on the interval lengths. Males that are mutant for the period gene produced vibrations with significantly altered interpulse intervals; also, treating wild type males with constant light results in similar alterations to the interpulse intervals. Our results suggest that both the clock and light/dark cycles have input into the interpulse intervals of these vibrations. We wondered if we could alter the interpulse intervals by other means, and found that ambient temperature also had a strong effect. However, behavioural analysis suggests that only extreme ambient temperatures can affect the strong correlation between female immobility and substrate-borne vibrations.

  13. Detritiation of type 316 stainless steel by treatment with liquids at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Torikai, Y.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-07-01

    The detritiation efficiency of type 316 stainless steel (SS316) using liquids reagents (distilled deionized water, concentrated aqueous ammonia or a diluted hydrochloric acid/nitric acid mixture) was investigated at ambient temperature by means of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and β-ray-induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS). After a fast initial removal of tritium trapped on the outermost surface of SS316 with a rate in the order water < ammonia < acid mixture a slow chronic liberation of tritium into all three liquids sets in. First results indicate that chronic release occurs with a rate of approx. 0.2% per day. The long-term release was found to be largely independent from the kind of liquid agent into which the metal is submerged and from the initial loading of the SS316 specimen. From a practical point of view, the release rate of tritium into liquids is too slow for conditioning applications. Complementary evidence for the occurrence of a chronic liberation of tritium from SS316 into air at ambient temperature was obtained from tritium depth profiling of aged specimens by acid etching.

  14. CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation of steel slags under ambient temperature: parameters influence, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghacham, Alia Ben; Pasquier, Louis-César; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the influence of different parameters on the efficiency of steel slag carbonation in slurry phase under ambient temperature. In the first part, a response surface methodology was used to identify the effect and the interactions of the gas pressure, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, gas/liquid ratio (G/L), and reaction time on the CO2 removed/sample and to optimize the parameters. In the second part, the parameters' effect on the dissolution of CO2 and its conversion into carbonates were studied more in detail. The results show that the pressure and the G/L ratio have a positive effect on both the dissolution and the conversion of CO2. These results have been correlated with the higher CO2 mass introduced in the reactor. On the other hand, an important effect of the L/S ratio on the overall CO2 removal and more specifically on the carbonate precipitation has been identified. The best results were obtained L/S ratios of 4:1 and 10:1 with respectively 0.046 and 0.052 gCO2 carbonated/g sample. These yields were achieved after 10 min reaction, at ambient temperature, and 10.68 bar of total gas pressure following direct gas treatment.

  15. CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation of steel slags under ambient temperature: parameters influence, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghacham, Alia Ben; Pasquier, Louis-César; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the influence of different parameters on the efficiency of steel slag carbonation in slurry phase under ambient temperature. In the first part, a response surface methodology was used to identify the effect and the interactions of the gas pressure, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, gas/liquid ratio (G/L), and reaction time on the CO2 removed/sample and to optimize the parameters. In the second part, the parameters' effect on the dissolution of CO2 and its conversion into carbonates were studied more in detail. The results show that the pressure and the G/L ratio have a positive effect on both the dissolution and the conversion of CO2. These results have been correlated with the higher CO2 mass introduced in the reactor. On the other hand, an important effect of the L/S ratio on the overall CO2 removal and more specifically on the carbonate precipitation has been identified. The best results were obtained L/S ratios of 4:1 and 10:1 with respectively 0.046 and 0.052 gCO2 carbonated/g sample. These yields were achieved after 10 min reaction, at ambient temperature, and 10.68 bar of total gas pressure following direct gas treatment. PMID:27236443

  16. The Use of Chlorhexidine/n-Propyl Gallate (CPG) as an Ambient-Temperature Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nillen, Jeannie L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    A safe, effective ambient temperature urine preservative, chlorhexidine/n-propyl gallate (CPG), has been formulated for use during spacefli ght that reduces the effects of oxidation and bacterial contamination on sample integrity while maintaining urine pH. The ability of this preservative to maintain stability of nine key analytes was evaluated for a period of one year. CPG effectively maintained stability of a mmonia, total nitrogen, 3-methylhistidine, chloride, sodium, potassiu m, and urea; however, creatinine and osmolality were not preserved by CPG. These data indicate that CPG offers prolonged room-temperature storage for multiple urine analytes, reducing the requirements for f rozen urine storage on future spaceflights. Iii medical applications on Earth, this technology can allow urine samples to be collected in remote settings and eliminate the need to ship frozen samples.

  17. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-06-21

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

  18. The effect of ambient temperature upon the secretion of thyroxine in the young pig.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S E; Ingram, D L

    1977-01-01

    1. Fluctuations in the rate of secretion and metabolism of thyroxine in the pig were observed whilst the ambient temperature was reduced from 32 to 8 degrees C. The quantity of food supplied was either maintained constant or doubled when the animals were exposed to the lower temperature. 2. It was found that the rate of disappearance of [125I]thyroxine did not change when the animal was exposed to the cold, unless the animal's food intake was altered. 3. The secretion of thyroxine increased temporarily after exposure to the cold. This was shown by a rise in the concentration of thyroxine in the plasma and a simultaneously increased loss of 131I from the thyroid gland. The increase in secretion of thyroxine was not maintained throughout the exposure to cold when the food intake of the animal was kept constant. PMID:839465

  19. Static and dynamic fatigue behavior of glass filament-wound pressure vessels at ambient and cryogenic temperatures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the pressure load carrying capacity and fatigue strength of filament-wound glass-reinforced plastic pressure vessels subjected to static and cyclic loading at ambient and cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature environments. The results indicate that the static fatigue problem is not critical at cryogenic temperatures. Under static loading at liquid nitrogen temperature, a reinforced plastic cylinder sustained pressurization for 88 days without failure at about 90% of the single cycle burst strength. At ambient temperature, the static life at 90% of the burst strength was about 7 min. Under cyclic loading in liquid nitrogen, no failure resulted after 1509 cycles at 55% of the single cycle burst strength. Under the same cyclic loading at ambient temperature, the test results would predict failure in the reinforced plastic. The results of similar tests upon adhesively bonded polyimide aluminum-foil lined cylinders are also reviewed.-

  20. Effect of ambient temperature and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on water and electrolyte balances in dry and lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Khelil-Arfa, H; Faverdin, P; Boudon, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the interaction between 2 constant ambient temperatures [thermoneutrality (TN; 15°C) and high temperature (HT; 28°C)] and 2 levels of Na bicarbonate supplementation [calculated to provide diet Na contents of 0.20%DM (Na-) and 0.50%DM (Na+)] on water partitioning in dairy cows. Treatments were compared on 4 dry and 4mid-lactation Holstein cows according to 2 Latin squares (1 for each physiological stage) over the course of 4 periods of 15d. Diets consisted of a total mixed ration based on maize silage. Dry cows were restricted to their protein and energy requirements, whereas lactating cows were fed ad libitum. The daily average temperature-humidity index was 59.4 for TN and 73.2 for HT. Lactating and dry cows had higher vaginal temperatures at HT than at TN, but the increase was more pronounced in lactating cows (+1.05 vs. +0.12°C for vaginal temperature, respectively). Dry matter intake (DMI) of lactating cows decreased by 2.3kg/d at HT. Free water intake (FWI) and estimated volume of water lost to evaporation increased at HT in both lactating and dry cows; no interactions were observed between temperature and physiological stage. When expressed as a proportion of DMI, the increase in evaporation that occurred with increasing temperature was completely compensated for by an increase in FWI for both physiological stages. The urinary water excretion increased slightly at HT in lactating cows but not in dry cows, which may be related to the low chloride content of the offered diet. High Na supplementation increased DMI slightly in lactating cows, but milk yield was not affected. Sodium supplementation did not limit the decrease in DMI observed in lactating cows at HT; this observation is likely due to the high diet electrolyte balance of the offered diets. Sodium supplementation increased FWI in lactating cows and urinary flow in both physiological states. The interaction between ambient temperature and Na

  1. Effect of ambient temperature and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on water and electrolyte balances in dry and lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Khelil-Arfa, H; Faverdin, P; Boudon, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the interaction between 2 constant ambient temperatures [thermoneutrality (TN; 15°C) and high temperature (HT; 28°C)] and 2 levels of Na bicarbonate supplementation [calculated to provide diet Na contents of 0.20%DM (Na-) and 0.50%DM (Na+)] on water partitioning in dairy cows. Treatments were compared on 4 dry and 4mid-lactation Holstein cows according to 2 Latin squares (1 for each physiological stage) over the course of 4 periods of 15d. Diets consisted of a total mixed ration based on maize silage. Dry cows were restricted to their protein and energy requirements, whereas lactating cows were fed ad libitum. The daily average temperature-humidity index was 59.4 for TN and 73.2 for HT. Lactating and dry cows had higher vaginal temperatures at HT than at TN, but the increase was more pronounced in lactating cows (+1.05 vs. +0.12°C for vaginal temperature, respectively). Dry matter intake (DMI) of lactating cows decreased by 2.3kg/d at HT. Free water intake (FWI) and estimated volume of water lost to evaporation increased at HT in both lactating and dry cows; no interactions were observed between temperature and physiological stage. When expressed as a proportion of DMI, the increase in evaporation that occurred with increasing temperature was completely compensated for by an increase in FWI for both physiological stages. The urinary water excretion increased slightly at HT in lactating cows but not in dry cows, which may be related to the low chloride content of the offered diet. High Na supplementation increased DMI slightly in lactating cows, but milk yield was not affected. Sodium supplementation did not limit the decrease in DMI observed in lactating cows at HT; this observation is likely due to the high diet electrolyte balance of the offered diets. Sodium supplementation increased FWI in lactating cows and urinary flow in both physiological states. The interaction between ambient temperature and Na

  2. Ambient temperature ligation of diene functional polymer and peptide strands onto cellulose via photochemical and thermal protocols.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Thomas; Claus, Tanja K; Oehlenschlaeger, Kim K; Trouillet, Vanessa; Bruns, Michael; Welle, Alexander; Linkert, Katharina; Goldmann, Anja S; Börner, Hans G; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    In the present contribution, two novel ambient temperature avenues are introduced to functionalize solid cellulose substrates in a modular fashion with synthetic polymer strands (poly(trifluoro ethyl methacrylate), PTFEMA, Mn = 4400 g mol(-1) , Đ = 1.18) and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) containing peptide sequence. Both protocols rely on a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an activated thiocarbonyl functionality and a diene species. In the first-thermally activated-protocol, the cellulose features surface-expressed thiocarbonylthio compounds, which readily react with diene terminal macromolecules at ambient temperature. In the second protocol, the reactive ene species are photochemically generated based on a phenacyl sulfide-decorated cellulose surface, which upon irradiation expresses highly reactive thioaldehyde species. The generated functional hybrid surfaces are characterized in-depth via ToF-SIMS and XPS analysis, revealing the successful covalent attachment of the grafted materials, including the spatially resolved patterning of both synthetic polymers and peptide strands using the photochemical protocol. The study thus provides a versatile platform technology for solid cellulose substrate modification via efficient thermal and photochemical ligation strategies. PMID:24706565

  3. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  4. Interaction of ambient temperature and microwave power density on schedule-controlled behavior in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Michael I.; Mark Guyer, W.

    1982-01-01

    Most guidelines of microwave exposure do not explicitly address effects of ambient temperature. Our experiment revealed that ambient temperature potentiates the behavioral effects of intensity of irradiation. Sixty-four adult male Long-Evans rats were trained to insert their heads into a food cup to obtain food pellets on a 1-min variable-interval schedule of reinforcement. Two groups of four rats each were then exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves for 15.5 hours under one of the following eight combinations of power density and air temperature: 8 or 14 mW/cm2 at 22°C 0, 8, or 14 mW/cm2 at 26°C and 0, 8, or 14 mW/cm2 at 30°C (relative humidity was 50% in all cases). Response rate of each rat following exposure was compared with its control rate at 0 mW/cm2 and 22°C. After exposure at 8 mW/cm2, response rates were reduced by a mean of 13.8% at 22°C, 27.5Percnt; at 26°C, and 77.5% at 30°C. After exposure at 14 mW/cm2, rates were reduced by a mean of 21.1% at 22°C, 43.7% at 26°C, and 80.0% at 30°C. In the absence of microwaves the higher temperatures caused only slight decreases in response rate.

  5. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  6. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  7. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  8. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2005-04-01

    The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the ultrasonic vibration application for cleaning method were completed in this reporting period. Within the systematic tests on the ultrasonic vibration application, the ambient temperature and high temperature status condition were tested separately. The sticky dirt on the thermocouple tip was simulated by the cement-covered layer on the thermocouple tip. At the ambient temperature status, four (4) factors were considered as the input factors affecting the response variable of peeling off rate. The input factors include the shape of the cement-covered layer (thickness and length), the ultrasonic vibration output power, and application time. At the high temperature tests, four (4) different environments were considered as the experimental parameters including air flow supply, water and air supply environment, water/air/fine dust particle supply, and air/water/ammonia/fine dust particle supply environment. The factorial design method was used in the experiment design with twelve (12) data sets of readings. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results from systematic tests. The ANOVA results show that the thickness and length of the cement-covered layer have the significant impact on the peeling off rate of ultrasonic vibration application at the ambient temperature environment. For the high temperature tests, the different environments do not seem to have significant impact on the temperature changes. These results may indicate that the ultrasonic vibration is one of best cleaning methods for the thermocouple tip.

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  10. The effect of ambient temperature and humidity on the carbon monoxide emissions of an idling gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, C. W.; Subramaniam, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in ambient temperature and humidity affect the exhaust emissions of a gas turbine engine. The results of a test program employing a JT8D combustor are presented which quantize the effect of these changes on carbon monoxide emissions at simulated idle operating conditions. Analytical results generated by a kinetic model of the combustion process and reflecting changing ambient conditions are given. It is shown that for a complete range of possible ambient variations, significant changes do occur in the amount of carbon monoxide emitted by a gas turbine engine.

  11. Deception of ambient and body core temperature improves self paced cycling in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul C; Maxwell, Neil; Allchorn, Alan; Mauger, Alexis R; White, Danny K

    2012-01-01

    We used incorrect visual feedback of ambient and core temperature in the heat to test the hypothesis that deception would alleviate the decrement in cycling performance compared to a no deception trial. Seven males completed three 30 min cycling time trials in a randomised order on a Kingcycle ergometer. One time trial was in temperate, control conditions (CON: 21.8 ± 0.6°C; 43.3 ± 4.3%rh), the others in hot, humid conditions (HOT: 31.4 ± 0.3°C; 63.9 ± 4.5%rh). In one of the hot, humid conditions (31.6 ± 0.5°C; 65.4 ± 4.3%rh), participants were deceived (DEC) into thinking the ambient conditions were 26.0°C; 60.0%rh and their core temperature was 0.3°C lower than it really was. Compared to CON (16.63 ± 2.43 km) distance covered was lower in HOT (15.88 ± 2.75 km; P < 0.05), but DEC ameliorated this (16.74 ± 2.87 km; P < 0.05). Mean power output was greater in DEC (184.4 ± 60.4 W) than HOT (168.1 ± 54.1 W; P < 0.05) and no difference was observed between CON and DEC. Rectal temperature and iEMG of the vastus lateralis were not different, but RPE in the third minute was lower in DEC than HOT (P < 0.05). Deception improved performance in the heat by creating a lower RPE, evidence of a subtle mismatch between the subconscious expectation and conscious perception of the task demands.

  12. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chabowska-Kita, Agnieszka; Trabczynska, Anna; Korytko, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Monika M.; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2015-01-01

    The brown adipocyte phenotype (BAP) in white adipose tissue (WAT) is transiently induced in adult mammals in response to reduced ambient temperature. Since it is unknown whether a cold challenge can permanently induce brown adipocytes (BAs), we reared C57BL/6J (B6) and AxB8/PgJ (AxB8) mice at 17 or 29°C from birth to weaning, to assess the BAP in young and adult mice. Energy balance measurements showed that 17°C reduced fat mass in the preweaning mice by increasing energy expenditure and suppressed diet-induced obesity in adults. Microarray analysis of global gene expression of inguinal fat (ING) from 10-day-old (D) mice indicates that expression at 17°C vs. 29°C was not different. Between 10 and 21 days of age, the BAP was induced coincident with morphologic remodeling of ING and marked changes in expression of neural development genes (e.g., Akap 12 and Ngfr). Analyses of Ucp1 mRNA and protein showed that 17°C transiently increased the BAP in ING from 21D mice; however, BAs were unexpectedly present in mice reared at 29°C. The involution of the BAP in WAT occurred after weaning in mice reared at 23°C. Therefore, the capacity to stimulate thermogenically competent BAs in WAT is set by a temperature-independent, genetically controlled program between birth and weaning.—Chabowska-Kita, A., Trabczynska, A., Korytko, A., Kaczmarek, M. M., Kozak, L. P. Low ambient temperature during early postnatal development fails to cause a permanent induction of brown adipocytes. PMID:25896784

  13. Optimal probe length and target location for electrochemical detection of selected uropathogens at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Mastali, Mitra; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M; Gau, Vincent; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2008-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated the clinical validity of the rapid detection of uropathogens by use of a DNA biosensor. This assay involves the hybridization of capture and detector probe pairs with bacterial 16S rRNA target molecules to form a DNA-RNA sandwich on the sensor surface. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody binds to the detector probe to enzymatically amplify the hybridization signal. These previous studies involved the hybridization of bacterial 16S rRNA target sequences with 35-mer oligonucleotide probe pairs at 65 degrees C. Achievement of point-of-care technology will be greatly facilitated by ambient-temperature detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of probe length and target location on signal intensity using hybridization temperatures of 20 to 25 degrees C. Signal intensity was found to vary dramatically with hybridization location in the species-specific bulge region of 16S rRNA helix 18. Probe pairs of as short as 10 nucleotides in length were able to produce a significant electrochemical signal, and signal intensity was correlated with probe length for probes of 10 to 20 nucleotides in length. The sensitivity of the Escherichia coli-specific 15-mer probe pairs was approximately 330 cells. These shorter probes allowed differentiation of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Proteus mirabilis 16S rRNA target sequences differing by a single nucleotide. A panel of oligonucleotide probe pairs ranging from 11 to 23 nucleotides in length was able to distinguish among seven groups of urinary tract pathogens. In conclusion, we have developed short oligonucleotide probe pairs for the species-specific identification of uropathogens at ambient temperature by use of an electrochemical sensor.

  14. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  15. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  16. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  17. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  18. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  19. High-temperature structural intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Ito, K.

    2000-01-01

    In the last one and a half decades, a great deal of fundamental and developmental research has been made on high-temperature structural intermetallics aiming at the implementation of these intermetallics in aerospace, automotive and land-based applications. These intermetallics include aluminides formed with either titanium, nickel or iron and silicides formed with transition metals. Of these high-temperature intermetallics, TiAl-based alloys with great potential in both aerospace and automotive applications have been attracting particular attention. Recently TiAl turbocharger wheels have finally started being used for turbochargers for commercial passenger cars of a special type. The current status of the research and development of these high-temperature intermetallics is summarized and a perspective on what directions future research and development of high-temperature intermetallics should take is provided.

  20. Short-term respiratory effects of polluted ambient air: a laboratory study of volunteers in a high-oxidant community.

    PubMed

    Linn, W S; Jones, M P; Bachmayer, E A; Spier, C E; Mazur, S F; Avol, E L; Hackney, J D

    1980-02-01

    To investigate short-term health effects of community air pollution directly, we developed a mobile laboratory allowing "blind" exposures of volunteers to polluted ambient air and to purified air at similar temperature and humidity. Subjects (30 asthmatic, 34 normal) from the surrounding area were studied at Duarte, California, a Los Angeles suburb subject to frequent photochemical oxidant pollution. Each was exposed to a close approximation of outdoor ambient air for 2 h with intermittent light exercise. Lung function and symptoms were evaluated pre- and post-exposure. A control (purified air) study took place several weeks later. Mean ambient air exposure concentrations were near 0.22 ppm for ozone and 200 micrograms/m3 for total suspended particulate. Ambient air exposures were associated with small significant losses in forced expiratory performance and total lung capacity. The responses of asthmatic and normal subjects were generally not significantly different, possibly because many normal subjects had a history of allergy and appeared atypically reactive to respiratory insults. In the normal subjects, a small significant increase in reported symptoms was seen with ambient air exposures compared with the control. In the asthmatics, the increase was not significant. Over-all, only slight effects attributable to exposure were found, even though a severely polluted area and a presumed high-risk population were chosen for study. PMID:7362133

  1. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  2. A hybrid downscaling procedure for estimating the vertical distribution of ambient temperature in local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiannikopoulou, I.; Philippopoulos, K.; Deligiorgi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere is defined by a combination of dynamic and radiation transfer processes and plays an important role in describing the meteorological conditions at local scales. The scope of this work is to develop and quantify the predictive ability of a hybrid dynamic-statistical downscaling procedure to estimate the vertical profile of ambient temperature at finer spatial scales. The study focuses on the warm period of the year (June - August) and the method is applied to an urban coastal site (Hellinikon), located in eastern Mediterranean. The two-step methodology initially involves the dynamic downscaling of coarse resolution climate data via the RegCM4.0 regional climate model and subsequently the statistical downscaling of the modeled outputs by developing and training site-specific artificial neural networks (ANN). The 2.5ox2.5o gridded NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 dataset is used as initial and boundary conditions for the dynamic downscaling element of the methodology, which enhances the regional representivity of the dataset to 20km and provides modeled fields in 18 vertical levels. The regional climate modeling results are compared versus the upper-air Hellinikon radiosonde observations and the mean absolute error (MAE) is calculated between the four grid point values nearest to the station and the ambient temperature at the standard and significant pressure levels. The statistical downscaling element of the methodology consists of an ensemble of ANN models, one for each pressure level, which are trained separately and employ the regional scale RegCM4.0 output. The ANN models are theoretically capable of estimating any measurable input-output function to any desired degree of accuracy. In this study they are used as non-linear function approximators for identifying the relationship between a number of predictor variables and the ambient temperature at the various vertical levels. An insight of the statistically derived input

  3. Influence of Ambient Temperature on the CO2 Emitted With Exhaust Gases of Gasoline Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainikov, D.; Chikishev, E.; Anisimov, I.; Gavaev, A.

    2016-08-01

    This article focuses on the regulation of CO2 emitted in the exhaust gases of gasoline vehicles. Based on comparing the world practices of restrictive measures on greenhouse gas emissions with Russian legislation, we conclude that there is a need to adjust the limits of CO2 emission taking into account the negative impact of ambient temperature on CO2 emission. The climatic conditions of many countries stipulate the use of vehicles in temperatures below zero. At the same time, the existing regulations fully take into account the temperature features of the various countries, which casts doubt on the existence of uniform emission standards for all countries. Here, we conduct an experiment on one of the most popular cars in Russia: the Mitsubishi Lancer 9. We establish that lower temperatures are correlated with larger concentrations of CO2 in the exhaust gases. We draw a conclusion about the need to account for the actual operating conditions when establishing limit values on CO2 emissions of vehicles.

  4. Preferred ambient temperature for old and young men in summer and winter.

    PubMed

    Natsume, K; Ogawa, T; Sugenoya, J; Ohnishi, N; Imai, K

    1992-03-01

    To investigate the effects of age on thermal sensitivity, preferred ambient temperature (Tpref) was compared between old (71-76 years) and young (21-30 years) groups, each consisting of six male subjects in summer and winter. The air temperature (Ta) was set at either 20 degrees C or 40 degrees C at commencement. The subject was directed to adjust the Ta for 45 min by manipulating a remote control switch to the level at which he felt most comfortable. In the older group, the Tpref was significantly lower in trails starting at 20 degrees C than that starting at 40 degrees C in summer. The fluctuation of Tpref (temperature difference between maximum and minimum Ta during the last 10 min) was significantly wider in the older group in both summer and winter. Repetition of the same experiment on each subject showed a poorer reproducibility of Tpref in the older group than in the younger group in summer. Tympanic and esophageal temperatures of the older group kept falling throughout the trial starting at 20 degrees C in summer. These results suggest that thermal sensitivity is decreased with advancing age and that thermal perception in the elderly, especially to cold, is less sensitive in summer.

  5. Thermal Diffusivity of Sintered Steels with Flash Method at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchini, G. F.; Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Corasaniti, S.; Montanari, R.; Varone, A.

    2016-04-01

    Due to lack of reliable thermal diffusivity data of sintered steels in literature, experimental investigations were conducted on samples made of different powder types (based on prealloyed, or diffusion-bonded, or admixed powders) and under different process conditions. So the influence of pressing pressure and sintering temperature on thermal diffusivity was established. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the "flash method": a sample in the shape of a slab is irradiated with a light pulse on one of the two surfaces, and temperature of the other surface is detected by an ambient temperature pyrometer. The value of the thermal diffusivity is obtained by a least squares regression on the entire trend of the temperature vs. time using the analytical solution of the heat conduction as regression model. Results show the increase of the thermal diffusivity with increasing density. This outcome can be explained from the mutual effect of thermal conductivity and density on thermal diffusivity in porous media. The experimental results have also permitted to verify the influence of the composition of the sintered materials and carbon contents on thermal diffusivity.

  6. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the "gradient effect". This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the "substrate effect". This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG sensor

  7. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the “gradient effect”. This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the “substrate effect”. This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG

  8. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the "gradient effect". This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the "substrate effect". This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG sensor

  9. The Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

    2011-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

  10. A Passive Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Gas Sensor With Self-Correction Against Fluctuations of Ambient Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Surman, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled fluctuations of ambient temperature in the field typically greatly reduce accuracy of gas sensors. In this study, we developed an approach for the self-correction against fluctuations of ambient temperature of individual gas and vapor sensors. The main innovation of our work is in the temperature correction which is accomplished without the need for a separate uncoated reference sensor or a separate temperature sensor. Our sensors are resonant inductor-capacitor-resistor (LCR) transducers coated with sensing materials and operated as multivariable passive (battery-free) radio-frequency identification (RFID) sensors. Using our developed approach, we performed quantitation of an exemplary vapor over the temperature range from 25 to 40 °C. This technical solution will be attractive in numerous applications where temperature stabilization of a gas sensor or addition of auxiliary temperature or uncoated reference sensors is prohibitive. PMID:23956496

  11. Synthesis of ammonia directly from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Lan, Rong; Irvine, John T S; Tao, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    The N≡N bond (225 kcal mol⁻¹) in dinitrogen is one of the strongest bonds in chemistry therefore artificial synthesis of ammonia under mild conditions is a significant challenge. Based on current knowledge, only bacteria and some plants can synthesise ammonia from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure. Here, for the first time, we report artificial ammonia synthesis bypassing N₂ separation and H₂ production stages. A maximum ammonia production rate of 1.14 × 10⁻⁵ mol m⁻² s⁻¹ has been achieved when a voltage of 1.6 V was applied. Potentially this can provide an alternative route for the mass production of the basic chemical ammonia under mild conditions. Considering climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels used for synthesis of ammonia by conventional methods, this is a renewable and sustainable chemical synthesis process for future.

  12. Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. F.; Bender, D. A.

    2002-05-01

    Based on prior work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings are being adapted for use in highpower flywheel energy storage systems developed at the Trinity Flywheel Power company. En route to this goal specialized test stands have been built and computer codes have been written to aid in the development of the component parts of these bearing systems. The Livermore passive magnetic bearing system involves three types of elements, as follows: (1) axially symmetric levitation elements, energized by permanent magnets, (2) electrodynamic stabilizers employing axially symmetric arrays of permanent magnet bars (Halbach arrays) on the rotating system, interacting with specially wound electrically shorted stator circuits, and, (3) eddy-current-type vibration dampers, employing axially symmetric rotating pole assemblies interacting with stationary metallic discs. The theory of the Livermore passive magnetic bearing concept describes specific quantitative stability criteria.

  13. The influence of ambient temperature and thermal acclimation on hearing in a eurythermal and a stenothermal otophysan fish.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Lidia Eva; Montey, Karen; Popper, Arthur N

    2009-10-01

    Being ectothermic, fish body temperature generally depends on ambient water temperature. Thus, ambient temperature might affect various sensory systems, including hearing, as a result of metabolic and physiological processes. However, the maintenance of sensory functions in a changing environment may be crucial for an animal's survival. Many fish species rely on hearing for acoustic orientation and communication. In order to investigate the influence of temperature on the auditory system, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was chosen as a model for a eurytherm species and the tropical catfish Pimelodus pictus as a model for a stenotherm fish. Hearing sensitivity was measured with animals acclimated or unacclimated to different water temperatures. Ambient water temperature significantly influenced hearing thresholds and the shape of auditory evoked potentials, especially at higher frequencies in I. punctatus. Hearing sensitivity of I. punctatus was lowest at 10 degrees C and increased by up to 36 dB between 10 degrees C and 26 degrees C. Significant differences were also revealed between acclimated and unacclimated animals after an increase in water temperature but not a decrease. By contrast, differences in hearing thresholds were smaller in P. pictus, even if a similar temperature difference (8 degrees C) was considered. However, P. pictus showed a similar trend as I. punctatus in exhibiting higher hearing sensitivity at the highest tested temperature, especially at the highest frequency tested. The results therefore suggest that the functional temperature dependence of sensory systems may differ depending upon whether a species is physiologically adapted to tolerate a wide or narrow temperature range.

  14. The Influence of Ambient Temperature on the Susceptibility of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to the Pyrethroid Insecticide Permethrin.

    PubMed

    Whiten, Shavonn R; Peterson, Robert K D

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are the most common strategy used for the management of mosquitoes. Changes in ambient temperature can alter the toxicity of insecticides to ectothermic organisms. Studies show organophosphate insecticides exhibit a positive correlation between ambient temperature and mortality for many insect species, and carbamate insecticides exhibit a slightly negative correlation between ambient temperature and mortality. Pyrethroid insecticides exhibit a distinctly negative correlation between increasing ambient temperature and mortality for insects. However, this relationship has not been systematically studied for adult mosquitoes. Therefore, we examined the influence of temperature on the susceptibility of adult Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) when exposed to permethrin. The median lethal concentration, LC50, was estimated for adult Ae. aegypti when exposed to eight concentrations of permethrin (ranging from 0.06–0.58 ng/cm2) at each of the following temperatures—16, 23, 26, 30, 32, and 34C—for 24 h in bottle assays. The estimated LC50 for each temperature was 0.26, 0.36, 0.36, 0.45, 0.27, and 0.31 ng/cm2, respectively. Results indicated a negative correlation between temperature and mortality from 16 to 30C, a positive correlation between temperature and mortality from 30 to 32C, and a negative correlation between temperature and mortality from 32 to 34C. If mosquito populations are expanding in space and time because of increased ambient temperatures and cannot be managed as effectively with pyrethroids, the spread of mosquito-borne diseases may pose considerable additional risk to public health. PMID:26477050

  15. The Influence of Ambient Temperature on the Susceptibility of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to the Pyrethroid Insecticide Permethrin.

    PubMed

    Whiten, Shavonn R; Peterson, Robert K D

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are the most common strategy used for the management of mosquitoes. Changes in ambient temperature can alter the toxicity of insecticides to ectothermic organisms. Studies show organophosphate insecticides exhibit a positive correlation between ambient temperature and mortality for many insect species, and carbamate insecticides exhibit a slightly negative correlation between ambient temperature and mortality. Pyrethroid insecticides exhibit a distinctly negative correlation between increasing ambient temperature and mortality for insects. However, this relationship has not been systematically studied for adult mosquitoes. Therefore, we examined the influence of temperature on the susceptibility of adult Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) when exposed to permethrin. The median lethal concentration, LC50, was estimated for adult Ae. aegypti when exposed to eight concentrations of permethrin (ranging from 0.06–0.58 ng/cm2) at each of the following temperatures—16, 23, 26, 30, 32, and 34C—for 24 h in bottle assays. The estimated LC50 for each temperature was 0.26, 0.36, 0.36, 0.45, 0.27, and 0.31 ng/cm2, respectively. Results indicated a negative correlation between temperature and mortality from 16 to 30C, a positive correlation between temperature and mortality from 30 to 32C, and a negative correlation between temperature and mortality from 32 to 34C. If mosquito populations are expanding in space and time because of increased ambient temperatures and cannot be managed as effectively with pyrethroids, the spread of mosquito-borne diseases may pose considerable additional risk to public health.

  16. High-temperature metal-organic magnets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajsapan; Kabir, Khayrul; Gilroy, Joe B; Mitchell, Keith A R; Wong, Kin-chung; Hicks, Robin G

    2007-01-18

    For over two decades there have been intense efforts aimed at the development of alternatives to conventional magnets, particularly materials comprised in part or wholly of molecular components. Such alternatives offer the prospect of realizing magnets fabricated through controlled, low-temperature, solution-based chemistry, as opposed to high-temperature metallurgical routes, and also the possibility of tuning magnetic properties through synthesis. However, examples of magnetically ordered molecular materials at or near room temperature are extremely rare, and the properties of these materials are often capricious and difficult to reproduce. Here we present a versatile solution-based route to a new class of metal-organic materials exhibiting magnetic order well above room temperature. Reactions of the metal (M) precursor complex bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene)nickel with three different organics A-TCNE (tetracyanoethylene), TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) or DDQ (2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone)--proceed via electron transfer from nickel to A and lead to materials containing Ni(II) ions and reduced forms of A in a 2:1 Ni:A ratio--that is, opposite to that of conventional (low Curie temperature) MA(2)-type magnets. These materials also contain oxygen-based species within their architectures. Magnetic characterization of the three compounds reveals spontaneous field-dependent magnetization and hysteresis at room temperature, with ordering temperatures well above ambient. The unusual stoichiometry and striking magnetic properties highlight these three compounds as members of a class of stable magnets that are at the interface between conventional inorganic magnets and genuine molecule-based magnets.

  17. Effects of temperature, algae biomass and ambient nutrient on the absorption of dissolved nitrogen and phosphate by Rhodophyte Gracilaria asiatica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rongbin; Liu, Liming; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-03-01

    Gracilaria asiatica, being highly efficient in nutrient absorption, is cultivated in sea cucumber ponds to remove nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphate. It was cultured in a laboratory simulating field conditions, and its nutrient absorption was measured to evaluate effects of environmental conditions. Ammonia nitrogen (AN), nitrate nitrogen (NN), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) uptake rate and removal efficiency were determined in a 4×2 factorial design experiment in water temperatures ( T) at 15°C and 25°C, algae biomass (AB) at 0.5 g/L and 1.0 g/L, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) at 30 μmol/L and 60 μmol/L, and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) at 3 and 6 μmol/L. AB and ambient TIN or SRP levels significantly affected uptake rate and removal efficiency of AN, NN, TIN, and SRP ( P< 0.001). G. asiatica in AB of 0.5 g/L showed higher uptake rate and lower removal efficiency relative to that with AB of 1.0 g/L. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rate rose with increasing ambient nutrient concentrations; nutrient removal efficiency decreased at higher environmental nutrient concentrations. The algae preferred to absorb AN to NN. Uptake rates of AN, NN, and SRP were significantly affected by temperature ( P < 0.001); uptake rate was higher for the 25°C group than for the 15°C group at the initial experiment stage. Only the removal efficiency of AN and SRP showed a significant difference between the two temperature groups ( P< 0.01). The four factors had significant interactive effects on absorption of N and P, implying that G. asiatica has great bioremedial potential in sea cucumber culture ponds.

  18. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOEpatents

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J.; Schulze, Gerald K.

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  19. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  20. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  1. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  2. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  3. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, R. J.; Dawson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature (300 C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications were developed. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs, and GaP was made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to 500 C. A Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers were cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below ten to the -9th power A/sq cm at 400 C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  4. Twenty-four hour rhythms of selected ambient temperature in rat and hamster.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of time of day on the behavioral thermoregulatory patterns of nocturnal rodents, the Long-Evans (LE) rat, Fischer 344 (F344) rat, and the golden hamster. Individual animals were placed in a temperature gradient for 4 days while selected ambient temperature (STa) and motor activity (MA) were monitored. Food was provided at the cold and warm ends of the gradient and water was provided ad lib. All animals eventually showed a 24-h rhythm of STa and MA characterized by a preference for cooler TaS during the dark period which coincided with an increase in MA. Both rat strains had STaS of approximately 28 degrees C during the light period that decreased to 22-24 degrees C during the dark period. The F344 rat developed a STa rhythm by the second day in the gradient, whereas the LE strain required 4 days. The hamster exhibited relatively warm STaS of 32-33 degrees C during the light period that decreased to 26-28 degrees C during the dark period. The nocturnal preference for cooler STaS contradicts a current concept of an elevation in set point of the thermoregulatory system. However, the data also suggest that behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory effectors may operate independently in the control of night time elevations in body temperature.

  5. Temperature optimization of high con

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  6. Micromechanics of ambient temperature cyclic fatigue loading in a composite of CAS glass ceramic reinforced with Nicalon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, C.Q.; Davidson, D.L.; Campbell, J.B. )

    1994-04-01

    The behavior of a Nicalon fiber reinforced glass ceramic composite cyclicly loaded has been evaluated at ambient temperature using high-resolution micromechanical test methods. On this basis, the events leading to fracture have been found to be similar to those accompanying fracture in unidirectional tension tests. Matrix strains were determined locally at the point of matrix fracture. Crack opening displacements (CODs) were measured as a function of loading cycles, and fiber strains were determined, in some cases. It is concluded that debonding of fibers begins at the point of matrix cracking and rapidly increases. Most of the cyclic lifetime of the material is spent with fibers debonded over large distances (fractions of a millimeter); these fibers are pulled out of the matrix on each loading cycle. Final debond length, as determined by fractography, is a function of the number of cycles to fracture, and of the applied stress level. 23 refs.

  7. Cold-start emissions of modern passenger cars at different low ambient temperatures and their evolution over vehicle legislation categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Favez, Jean-Yves; Alvarez, Robert

    The emissions of modern gasoline and diesel passenger cars are reduced by catalysts except in cold-starting. Since catalysts require a certain temperature (typically above 300 °C) to work to full efficiency, emissions are significantly higher during the warm-up phase of the car. The duration of this period and the emissions produced depend on the ambient temperature as well as on the initial temperature of the car's propulsion systems. The additional emissions during a warm-up phase, known as "cold-start extra emissions" (CSEEs) for emission inventory modelling, are mostly assessed by emission measurements at an ambient temperature of 23 °C. However, in many European countries average ambient temperatures are below 23 °C. This necessitates emission measurements at lower temperatures in order to model and assess cold-start emissions for real-world temperature conditions. This paper investigates the influence of regulated pollutants and CO 2 emissions of recent gasoline and diesel car models (Euro-4 legislation) at different ambient temperatures, 23, -7 and -20 °C. We present a survey and model of the evolution of cold-start emissions as a function of different car generations (pre-Euro-1 to Euro-4 legislations). In addition the contribution of CSEEs to total fleet running emissions is shown to highlight their increasing importance. For gasoline cars, it turns out that in average real-world driving the majority of the CO (carbon monoxide) and HC (hydrocarbon) total emissions are due to cold-start extra emissions. Moreover, the cold-start emissions increase considerably at lower ambient temperatures. In contrast, cold-start emissions of diesel cars are significantly lower than those of gasoline cars. Furthermore, the transition from Euro-3 to Euro-4 gasoline vehicles shows a trend for a smaller decline for cold-start extra emissions than for legislative limits. Particle and NO x emission of cold-starts are less significant.

  8. Containerless high-temperature calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Robinson, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Samples are heated by electron bombardment in high-temperature calorimeter that operates from 1,000 to 3,600 C yet consumes less that 100 watts at temperatures less than 2,500 C. Contamination of samples is kept to minimum by suspending them from wire in vacuum chamber. Various sample slopes such as wires, dishs, spheres, rods, or irregular bodies can be accommodated and only about 100 nq of samples are needed for accurate measurements.

  9. Bellows high temperature cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Broyles, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    In most cases, the bellows elements in an expansion joint are separated or insulated from the hot flow stream and have an actual bellows metal temperature (ABMT) that is much lower than the flow stream temperature. However, when the bellows are externally insulated or when the expansion joint is located inside a hot vessel, the ABMT can be very high. For these situations, the effects of temperature on bellows cycle life should be carefully considered. The design equations presented in the Standards of the expansion Joint Manufacturers Association (EJMA), ASME Section 8, Division 1, and ASME B31.3 do not currently provide cycle life equations or temperature correction factors for bellows operating in the creep temperature range. Therefore, a method is proposed which is specifically tailored to bellows for the estimation of high temperature cycle life based upon available test results. Data is also presented which demonstrates the effect of temperatures above and below 800 F on the cycle life of various bellows materials.

  10. Ambient-processable high capacitance hafnia-organic self-assembled nanodielectrics.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, Ken; Emery, Jonathan D; Jariwala, Deep; Karmel, Hunter J; Sangwan, Vinod K; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Bedzyk, Michael J; Facchetti, Antonio; Hersam, Mark C; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-06-19

    Ambient and solution-processable, low-leakage, high capacitance gate dielectrics are of great interest for advances in low-cost, flexible, thin-film transistor circuitry. Here we report a new hafnium oxide-organic self-assembled nanodielectric (Hf-SAND) material consisting of regular, alternating π-electron layers of 4-[[4-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]phenyl]diazenyl]-1-[4-(diethoxyphosphoryl) benzyl]pyridinium bromide) (PAE) and HfO2 nanolayers. These Hf-SAND multilayers are grown from solution in ambient with processing temperatures ≤150 °C and are characterized by AFM, XPS, X-ray reflectivity (2.3 nm repeat spacing), X-ray fluorescence, cross-sectional TEM, and capacitance measurements. The latter yield the largest capacitance to date (1.1 μF/cm(2)) for a solid-state solution-processed hybrid inorganic-organic gate dielectric, with effective oxide thickness values as low as 3.1 nm and have gate leakage <10(-7) A/cm(2) at ±2 MV/cm using photolithographically patterned contacts (0.04 mm(2)). The sizable Hf-SAND capacitances are attributed to relatively large PAE coverages on the HfO2 layers, confirmed by X-ray reflectivity and X-ray fluorescence. Random network semiconductor-enriched single-walled carbon nanotube transistors were used to test Hf-SAND utility in electronics and afforded record on-state transconductances (5.5 mS) at large on:off current ratios (I(ON):I(OFF)) of ~10(5) with steep 150 mV/dec subthreshold swings and intrinsic field-effect mobilities up to 137 cm(2)/(V s). Large-area devices (>0.2 mm(2)) on Hf-SAND (6.5 nm thick) achieve mA on currents at ultralow gate voltages (<1 V) with low gate leakage (<2 nA), highlighting the defect-free and conformal nature of this nanodielectric. High-temperature annealing in ambient (400 °C) has limited impact on Hf-SAND leakage densities (<10(-6) A/cm(2) at ±2 V) and enhances Hf-SAND multilayer capacitance densities to nearly 1 μF/cm(2), demonstrating excellent compatibility with device postprocessing

  11. Effects of ambient and preceding temperatures and metabolic genes on flight metabolism in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Swee Chong; Oksanen, Alma; Mattila, Anniina L.K.; Lehtonen, Rainer; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Flight is essential for foraging, mate searching and dispersal in many insects, but flight metabolism in ectotherms is strongly constrained by temperature. Thermal conditions vary greatly in natural populations and may hence restrict fitness-related activities. Working on the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), we studied the effects of temperature experienced during the first 2 days of adult life on flight metabolism, genetic associations between flight metabolic rate and variation in candidate metabolic genes, and genotype–temperature interactions. The maximal flight performance was reduced by 17% by 2 days of low ambient temperature (15 °C) prior to the flight trial, mimicking conditions that butterflies commonly encounter in nature. A SNP in phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) had a significant association on flight metabolic rate in males and a SNP in triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi) was significantly associated with flight metabolic rate in females. In the Pgi SNP, AC heterozygotes had higher flight metabolic rate than AA homozygotes following low preceding temperature, but the trend was reversed following high preceding temperature, consistent with previous results on genotype–temperature interaction for this SNP. We suggest that these results on 2-day old butterflies reflect thermal effect on the maturation of flight muscles. These results highlight the consequences of variation in thermal conditions on the time scale of days, and they contribute to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of flight metabolism and flight-related activities under conditions that are relevant for natural populations living under variable thermal conditions. PMID:26658138

  12. A time series investigation of the stability of nitramine and nitroaromatic explosives in surface water samples at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Thomas A; Johnson, Laura; Walsh, Marianne; Collins, Charles

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the fate of nitramine and nitroaromatic explosives compounds in surface water to determine how surface water biogeochemistry affects the stability of explosives compounds. Five river water samples and 18.2 MOmega deionized water were spiked with 10 explosives compounds and the samples were held at ambient temperatures (20 degrees C) for 85 d. Surface water represented three rivers with a range of total organic carbon concentrations and two rivers draining glacial watersheds with minimal organic carbon but high suspended solids. 18.2 MOmega deionized water exhibited no explosives transformation. Nitroaromatic compound loss from solution was generally: tetryl>1,3,5-TNB>TNT>1,3-DNB>2,4-DNT. The HMX, RDX, 2,6-DNT, 2ADNT, and 4ADNT concentrations remained somewhat stable over time. The surface water with the highest total organic carbon concentration exhibited the most dramatic nitroaromatic loss from solution with tetryl, 1,3,5-TNB and TNT concentrations decreasing to below detection within 10d. The two water samples with high suspended solid loads exhibited substantial nitroaromatic explosives loss which could be attributable to adsorption onto fresh mineral surfaces and/or enhanced microbiologic biotransformation on mineral surfaces. An identical set of six water samples was spiked with explosives and acidified with sodium bisulfate to a pH of 2. Acidification maintained stable explosives concentrations in most of the water samples for the entire 85 d. Our results suggest sampling campaigns for explosives in surface water must account for biogeochemical characteristics. Acidification of samples with sodium bisulfate immediately following collection is a robust way to preserve nitroaromatic compound concentrations even at ambient temperature for up to three months.

  13. Influence of ambient temperature and AC magnetic field on damping behavior of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-gang; Li, Ning; Shen, Bao-luo; Hua, Hong-xing

    2007-07-01

    The damping behaviors of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy at ambient temperatures and the AC magnetic field are tested with the improved reversal torsion machine. The precipitations distributing in the annealed alloy are also observed with SEM. The results show that because the defections decrease during the annealing treatment, causing a higher damping capacity of this alloy. This damping drops linearly to 63% when the ambient temperature changes from 23 °C to 500 °C, resulting from the gradual decrease of ferromagnetism. On the other hand, the AC magnetic field causes the damping capacity to drop sharply, and finally it reaches a much lower level.

  14. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  15. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  16. Energy budget during four successive bouts of lactation in striped hamsters exposed to decreases in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2011-10-01

    A prediction of the seasonal investment hypothesis is that overall energy investment needs to be greater for young being produced at colder temperatures. Then, that energy cost is lower as temperature becomes warmer. To evaluate this assumption, I performed a series of measures of food intake and reproductive output throughout four successive bouts of lactation in striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) exposed to a constant warm temperature (Warm, 21°C) or exposed to consecutive decreases in ambient temperatures from warm to cold (Warm-Cold, 30-0°C). Warm hamsters showed similar asymptotic food intake, litter size and mass over the course of four successive bouts of lactation. Warm-Cold females consumed more food, but raised lighter litters during the third bout than first bout of lactation. Ambient temperatures had significant effects on energy budget and reproductive output, by which resting metabolic rate, nonshivering thermogenesis and activity of cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) of brown adipose tissue were increased, but reproductive output was decreased with declines of temperatures. These findings suggest that a trade-off occurs between different components of energy expenditure during the successive course of four bouts of lactation. Seasonal hamsters decrease their reproductive output, but increase the energy spent on thermogenesis as the ambient temperature becomes colder. It may also indicate that temperature has a direct effect on metabolism, leading to an increase in overall energy expenditure at lower temperatures.

  17. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  18. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  19. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  20. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  1. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  2. High-precision analysis of SF6 at ambient level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. S.; Moon, D. M.; Kim, J. S.; Yun, W.-T.; Lee, J.

    2013-09-01

    This work reports on the development of a technique for the precise analysis of ambient SF6. This technique, which involves a gas chromatograph/electron capture detector (GC-ECD) coupled with an Activated Alumina-F1 (AA-F1) column, performed well in the measurements, particularly in terms of accuracy, which complies with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)-recommended compatibility of 0.02 ppt. Compared to the Porapak Q technique, we observed a sharper peak shape for the SF6 stream, which substantiates the improvement in the analytical precision. The traceability to the WMO scale was tested by calibrating the GC-ECD/AA-F1 analyser using five SF6 standards provided by the WMO/Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Central Calibration Laboratory (CCL) for SF6 (NOAA, United States of America). After calibration by various methods, the GC-ECD/AA-F1 accurately estimated the mole fraction of SF6 in the working standard prepared by the World Calibration Centre for SF6 operated by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA)/Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). Among the calibration methods, the two-point calibration method emerged to be the most economical procedure in terms of the data quality and measurement time. It was found that the KRISS scale of SF6/N2 was biased by 0.13 ppt when compared to the WMO scale of SF6/air; this bias is probably due to a different matrix.

  3. Acute effects of ozone on heart rate and body temperature in the unanesthetized, unrestrained rat maintained at different ambient temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Watkinson, W.P.; Aileru, A.A.; Dowd, S.M.; Doerfler, D.L.; Tepper, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The present studies were conducted to investigate the concentration-response characteristics of acute ozone (O3) exposure on the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory function of the unanesthetized, unrestrained rat, and to examine the modulating effects produced by changes in ambient temperature (T[sub a]) on the induced toxic response. For all studies, groups of male Fischer 344 rats (n=4-6/group) were implanted with radiotelemetry transmitters and allowed to recover overnight. The transmitters permitted continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) and body core temperature (T[sub co]); heart rate (HR) was derived from the ECG signal. Frequency of breathing (f) was obtained in selected experiments by means of a Fenn box. All animals were monitored according to the following protocol: control (filtered air; 0.25 h); exposure (O3; 2 h); recovery (filtered air; 3-18 h). For the concentration-response experiments, O3 concentration was varied from 0.25-1.0 ppm and all exposures were conducted at an T[sub a] of 18-20 C. Significant decreases in HR and T[sub co] were demonstrated at O3 concentrations as low as 0.37 ppm.

  4. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    DOE PAGES

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devicesmore » with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.« less

  5. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devices with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.

  6. Test Standard Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1998-01-01

    The service life of structural ceramic components is often limited by the process of slow crack growth. Therefore, it is important to develop an appropriate testing methodology for accurately determining the slow crack growth design parameters necessary for component life prediction. In addition, an appropriate test methodology can be used to determine the influences of component processing variables and composition on the slow crack growth and strength behavior of newly developed materials, thus allowing the component process to be tailored and optimized to specific needs. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, work to develop a standard test method to determine the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics was initiated by the authors in early 1994 in the C 28 (Advanced Ceramics) committee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). After about 2 years of required balloting, the draft written by the authors was approved and established as a new ASTM test standard: ASTM C 1368-97, Standard Test Method for Determination of Slow Crack Growth Parameters of Advanced Ceramics by Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing at Ambient Temperature. Briefly, the test method uses constant stress-rate testing to determine strengths as a function of stress rate at ambient temperature. Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying constant displacement or loading rates. The slow crack growth parameters required for design are then estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. This new standard will be published in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 15.01, in 1998. Currently, a companion draft ASTM standard for determination of the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures is being prepared by the authors and will be presented to the committee by the middle of 1998. Consequently, Lewis will maintain an active leadership role in advanced ceramics standardization within ASTM

  7. Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

    2008-11-24

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is a convenient hydrogen carrier in fuel cells designed for portable use. Recent studies have shown that HCOOH decomposition is catalyzed with Ru-based complexes in the aqueous phase at near-ambient temperatures. HCOOH decomposition reactions are used frequently to probe the effects of alloying and cluster size and of geometric and electronic factors in catalysis. These studies have concluded that Pt is the most active metal for HCOOH decomposition, at least as large crystallites and extended surfaces. The identity and oxidation state of surface metal atoms influence the relative rates of dehydrogenation (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) and dehydration (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + CO) routes, a selectivity requirement for the synthesis of CO-free H{sub 2} streams for low-temperature fuel cells. Group Ib and Group VIII noble metals catalyze dehydrogenation selectively, while base metals and metal oxides catalyze both routes, either directly or indirectly via subsequent water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.

  8. Reaction of phosphorylated and O-glycosylated peptides by chemically targeted identification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rusnak, Felicia; Zhou, Jie; Hathaway, Gary M

    2004-12-01

    Conditions for carrying out chemically targeted identification of peptides containing phosphorylated or glycosylated serine residues have been investigated. Ba(OH)2 was used at ambient temperature to catalyze the beta-elimination reaction at 25 degrees C. Nucleophilic addition of 2-aminoethanethiol was performed in both parallel and tandem experiments. The method was demonstrated by the reaction of beta-casein tryptic digest phosphopeptides and an O-glycosylated peptide. Contrary to an earlier report by others, the glycopeptide was found to react with essentially the same kinetics as phosphopeptides. Conversion of four phosphoserines in residues 15, 17, 18, and 19 from bovine beta-casein N-terminal tryptic phosphopeptides were followed by monitoring the time course of the addition reaction. The chemistry proceeded rapidly at room temperature with a half-reaction time of 15 min. No side-reaction products were observed; however, care was taken to minimize all counter ions that either precipitate barium or neutralize the base. Digestion of the converted peptides with lysine endopeptidase identified all five phosphoserines in the beta-casein tryptic digest. Alternatively, preincubation with base followed by nucleophilic addition of the thiol was found to work satisfactorily. The use of the water-soluble hydrochloride of 2-aminoethanethiol allowed beta-elimination, nucleophilic addition, and desalting to be carried out on a micro C18 reverse phase pipette tip. PMID:15585826

  9. Effect of a cold ambient temperature on the rat's food hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Fantino, M; Cabanac, M

    1984-02-01

    In a first experiment, the amount of food hoarded in three hour sessions (HB) by eight food deprived rats, was measured at three ambient temperatures: 30, 17.5 and 5 degrees C. At the three temperatures, the mass of food pellets hoarded by the rats was linearly related to the rats' body weight (BW) with a negative slope. The slope of the regression lines was significantly higher at 5 and 17.5 degrees C than at 30 degrees C. In a second experiment, BW and HB of ten non-deprived rats were measured every day, first at 30, then at 10 degrees C, then at 30 degrees C again (70 days). In the cold environment, HB immediately increased without BW loss. This effect was immediately reversible by the adjunction of an insulating styrofoam mattress. HB of non deprived rats in the cold was therefore more a thermoregulatory behavior than an alimentary response. In a third experiment, ad lib fed or deprived rats could hoard either food pellets or styrofoam lumps at 30 degrees C or at 5 degrees C. In the cold environment, when non-deprived, the rats hoarded styrofoam rather than food. However, as soon as they were food deprived, they reversed their choice and hoarded food rather than styrofoam. It is concluded that food can be hoarded as a thermal insulator in a cold environment but HB is mainly an alimentary response increased by a cold stress.

  10. Structural transition in sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by aging at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films prepared by sputter-deposition and the effects of aging at ambient temperature and pressure were studied by pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis from electron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The PDFs of the as-deposited and aged samples for 3-13 months showed that the major peaks for Ge-Ge bonds decrease in intensity and broaden with aging for up to 7 months. In the PDFs of a-Ge of molecular dynamics simulation obtained by quenching liquid at different rates, the major peak intensities of a slowly cooled model are higher than those of a rapidly cooled model. Analyses on short- and medium-range configurations show that the slowly cooled model includes a certain amount of medium-range ordered (MRO) clusters, while the rapidly cooled model includes liquid-like configurations rather than MRO clusters. The similarity between experimental and computational PDFs implies that as-deposited films are similar in structure to the slowly cooled model, whereas the fully aged films are similar to the rapidly cooled model. It is assumed that as they undergo room-temperature aging, the MRO clusters disintegrate and transform into liquid-like regions in the same matrix. This transition in local configurations is discussed in terms of instability and the non-equilibrium of nanoclusters produced by a vapor-deposition process.

  11. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essinger-Hileman, T.; Kusaka, A.; Appel, J. W.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K.; Ho, S. P.; Jarosik, N.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ˜0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be <0.07% (95% confidence), limited by statistical uncertainty in our measurement. Dipole and quadrupole leakage at this level lead to systematic error on r ≲ 0.01 before any mitigation due to scan cross-linking or boresight rotation. The measured scalar leakage and the theoretical level of dipole and quadrupole leakage produce systematic error of r < 0.001 for the ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  12. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  13. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  14. Influence of the Refractivity and Temperature of the Ambient Medium on the Eigenfrequencies of Quasioptical Cylindrical Dielectric Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontov, A. V.; Prokopenko, Yu. V.

    2013-11-01

    We attempt for the first time to separate the influences of the temperature and refractivity of the ambient air space on the spectral and energy characteristics of cylindrical Teflon and leucosapphire resonators with the whispering gallery modes in the millimeter-wave range. It is found that under conditions of natural fluctuations of the above-mentioned factors of the studied ambient medium, the degree of temperature influence on the resonator eigenfrequencies is more significant. We demonstrate that quasioptical cylindrical dielectric resonators can be used as sensors of the temperature of the ambient air medium and ensure an accuracy of 10-4°C when their resonant frequencies are measured with an accuracy of 100 Hz. A method for determination of the air refractivity has been developed, which uses the considered resonator as a temperature sensor and a measuring cell of the microwave resonator refractometer. A refractometer sensor has been developed on the basis of two identical resonators with whispering gallery modes. The differential two-resonator refractometer compensates for the influence of changes in the temperature of the ambient medium on the measured difference of the eigenfrequencies of resonators with identical modes. It is found that the accuracy of determination of the air refractivity is ensured at a level of 10-2 if the frequency difference is measured with an accuracy of 10 Hz.

  15. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  16. A solar high temperature kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettenhoelscher, N.; Bergmann, K.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using solar energy in developing countries for baking ceramic construction materials was investigated. The solar high temperature kiln is described. It uses two parabolic concentrators which direct available radiation into the baking chamber. The Sun tracker has only one axis. Preliminary test results with the prototype kiln were satisfactory.

  17. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  18. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  19. LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

    2006-10-23

    We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

  20. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  1. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  2. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  3. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  4. High-temperature containerless calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.; Lacy, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A high-temperature (greater than 1500 K) containerless calorimeter is described and its usefulness demonstrated. The calorimeter uses the technique of omnidirectional electron bombardment of pendant drops to achieve an isothermal test environment. The small heat input into the sample (i.e., 15-50 W) can be controlled and measured. The apparatus can be used to determine the total hemispherical emissivity, specific heat, heat of fusion, surface tension, and equilibrium melting temperature of small molten drops in the temperature range of 1500 to 3500 K. The total hemispherical emissivity and specific heat of pure niobium and two alloys of niobium-germanium have been measured in the temperature range of 1700 to 2400 K. As reported in the literature, the total hemispherical emissivity varied as a function of temperature. However, specific heat values for both the pure metal and alloys seem to be independent of temperature. Specific heat for the liquid alloy phase was also measured and compared to the solid phase.

  5. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2<τ /{τy0}≤slant 0.5 and then transitions to a power-law form at even lower stresses τ /{τy0}<0.03 . Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and {τy0} remains as the reference energy and stress scales over the entire range of stresses. The model is applied to literature data on solution strengthening in Cu alloys and captures the experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively. Most importantly, the model accurately captures the transition in strength from the low-temperature to intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  6. Effect of Sodium Bicarbonate Supplementation on Carcass Characteristics of Lambs Fed Concentrate Diets at Different Ambient Temperature Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jallow, Demba B.; Hsia, Liang Chou

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of ambient temperatures on carcass characteristics of lambs fed concentrate diets with or without NaHCO3 supplementation. A slaughter study was carried on 12 male Black Belly Barbados lambs randomly drawn from a growth trial (35 weeks). The lambs were divided into four equal groups and allotted in a 2×2 factorial design. The lambs were allotted at random to two dietary treatments of a basal diet (35:65 roughage:concentrate) or basal diet supplemented with 4% NaHCO3 at different ambient temperatures (20°C and 30°C) in an environment controlled chamber for 10 days. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation at about 262 days of age (245 days of growth trial, 7 days adaptation and 10 days of experimental period). Ambient temperature had significant (p<0.05, p<0.05, p<0.01, and p<0.001) effects on meat color from the ribeye area (REA), fat, leg and longissimus dorsi muscles with higher values recorded for lambs in the lower temperature group than those from the higher ambient temperature group. Significant differences (p<0.05) in shear force value (kg/cm2) recorded on the leg muscles showed higher values (5.32 vs 4.16) in lambs under the lower ambient temperature group compared to the other group. Dietary treatments had significant (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.05) effects on meat color from the REA, fat, and REA fat depth (cm2) with higher values recorded for lambs in the NaHCO3 supplementation group than the non supplemented group. Similarly, dietary treatments had significant differences (p<0.05) in shear force value (kg/cm2) of the leg muscles with the NaHCO3 groups recording higher (5.30 vs 4.60) values than those from the other group. Neither ambient temperature nor dietary treatments had any significant (p>0.05) effects on pH, and water holding capacity on both muscles. These results indicated that NaHCO3 supplementation at low ambient temperatures had caused an increase in carcass characteristics

  7. Effect of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on carcass characteristics of lambs fed concentrate diets at different ambient temperature levels.

    PubMed

    Jallow, Demba B; Hsia, Liang Chou

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of ambient temperatures on carcass characteristics of lambs fed concentrate diets with or without NaHCO3 supplementation. A slaughter study was carried on 12 male Black Belly Barbados lambs randomly drawn from a growth trial (35 weeks). The lambs were divided into four equal groups and allotted in a 2×2 factorial design. The lambs were allotted at random to two dietary treatments of a basal diet (35:65 roughage:concentrate) or basal diet supplemented with 4% NaHCO3 at different ambient temperatures (20°C and 30°C) in an environment controlled chamber for 10 days. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation at about 262 days of age (245 days of growth trial, 7 days adaptation and 10 days of experimental period). Ambient temperature had significant (p<0.05, p<0.05, p<0.01, and p<0.001) effects on meat color from the ribeye area (REA), fat, leg and longissimus dorsi muscles with higher values recorded for lambs in the lower temperature group than those from the higher ambient temperature group. Significant differences (p<0.05) in shear force value (kg/cm(2)) recorded on the leg muscles showed higher values (5.32 vs 4.16) in lambs under the lower ambient temperature group compared to the other group. Dietary treatments had significant (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.05) effects on meat color from the REA, fat, and REA fat depth (cm(2)) with higher values recorded for lambs in the NaHCO3 supplementation group than the non supplemented group. Similarly, dietary treatments had significant differences (p<0.05) in shear force value (kg/cm(2)) of the leg muscles with the NaHCO3 groups recording higher (5.30 vs 4.60) values than those from the other group. Neither ambient temperature nor dietary treatments had any significant (p>0.05) effects on pH, and water holding capacity on both muscles. These results indicated that NaHCO3 supplementation at low ambient temperatures had caused an increase in carcass

  8. High ambient contrast ratio OLED and QLED without a circular polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guanjun; Zhu, Ruidong; Tsai, Yi-Shou; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Luo, Zhenyue; Lee, Yuh-Zheng; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2016-08-01

    A high ambient contrast ratio display device using a transparent organic light emitting diode (OLED) or transparent quantum-dot light-emitting diode (QLED) with embedded multilayered structure and absorber is proposed and its performance is simulated. With the help of multilayered structure, the device structure allows almost all ambient light to get through the display device and be absorbed by the absorber. Because the reflected ambient light is greatly reduced, the ambient contrast ratio of the display system is improved significantly. Meanwhile, the multilayered structure helps to lower the effective refractive index, which in turn improves the out-coupling efficiency of the display system. Potential applications for sunlight readable flexible and rollable displays are emphasized.

  9. An artificial neural network approach for the forecast of ambient air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippopoulos, Kostas; Deligiorgi, Despina; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Ambient air temperature forecasting is one of the most significant aspects of environmental and climate research. Accurate temperature forecasts are important in the energy and tourism industry, in agriculture for estimating potential hazards, and within an urban context, in studies for assessing the risk of adverse health effects in the general population. The scope of this study is to propose an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach for the one-day ahead maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) air temperature forecasting. The ANNs are signal processing systems consisted by an assembly of simple interconnected processing elements (neurons) and in geosciences are mainly used in pattern recognition problems. In this study the feed-forward ANN models are selected, which are theoretically capable of estimating a measurable input-output function to any desired degree of accuracy. The method is implemented at a single site (Souda Airport) located at the island of Crete in southeastern Mediterranean and employs the hourly, Tmax and Tmin temperature observations over a ten-yearly period (January 2000 to December 2009). Separate ANN models are trained and tested for the forecast of Tmax and Tmin, which are based on the 24 previous day's hourly temperature records. The first six years are used for training the ANNs, the subsequent two for validating the models and the last two (January 2008 to December 2009) for testing the ANN's overall predicting accuracy. The model architecture consists of a single hidden layer and multiple experiments with varying number of neurons are performed (from 1 to 80 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer functions). The selection of the optimum number of neurons in the hidden layer is based on a trial and error procedure and the performance is measured using the mean absolute error (MAE) on the validation set. A comprehensive set of model output statistics is used for examining the ability of the models to estimate both Tmax and Tmin

  10. Fasting triggers hypothermia, and ambient temperature modulates its depth in Japanese quail Coturnix japonica.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Pinshow, Berry; McCue, Marshall D; McWilliams, Scott R; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2010-05-01

    We tested three hypotheses regarding the cues that elicit facultative hypothermia in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica): H(1)) Ambient temperature (T(a)), alone, influences the onset and depth of hypothermia; H(2)) Fasting, alone, influences the onset and depth of hypothermia; H(3)) T(a) acts synergistically with fasting to shape the use of hypothermia. Eight quail were maintained within their thermoneutral zone (TNZ) at 32.6+/-0.2 degrees C, and eight below their lower critical temperature (T(lc)) at 12.7+/-3.0 degrees C. All quail entered hypothermia upon food deprivation, even quail kept within their TNZ. Body temperature (T(b)) decreased more (38.36+/-0.53 degrees C vs. 39.57+/-0.57 degrees C), body mass (m(b)) loss was greater (21.0+/-7.20 g vs.12.8+/-2.62g), and the energy saved by using hypothermia was greater (25.18-45.01% vs. 7.98-28.06%) in low the T(a) treatment than in TNZ treatment. Interestingly, the depth of hypothermia was positively correlated with m(b) loss in the low T(a) treatment, but not in TNZ treatment. Our data support H(3), that both thermoregulatory costs and body energy reserves are proximate cues for entry into hypothermia in quail. This outcome is not surprising below the T(lc). However, the quail kept at their TNZ also responded to food deprivation by entering hypothermia with no apparent dependence on m(b) loss. Therefore inputs, other than thermoregulatory costs and body condition, must serve as cues to enter hypothermia. Consequently, we address the role that tissue sparing may play in the physiological 'decision' to employ hypothermia.

  11. Staying cool in a changing landscape: the influence of maximum daily ambient temperature on grizzly bear habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Karine E; Cardinal, Etienne; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Côté, Steeve D

    2016-08-01

    To fulfill their needs, animals are constantly making trade-offs among limiting factors. Although there is growing evidence about the impact of ambient temperature on habitat selection in mammals, the role of environmental conditions and thermoregulation on apex predators is poorly understood. Our objective was to investigate the influence of ambient temperature on habitat selection patterns of grizzly bears in the managed landscape of Alberta, Canada. Grizzly bear habitat selection followed a daily and seasonal pattern that was influenced by ambient temperature, with adult males showing stronger responses than females to warm temperatures. Cutblocks aged 0-20 years provided an abundance of forage but were on average 6 °C warmer than mature conifer stands and 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks. When ambient temperatures increased, the relative change (odds ratio) in the probability of selection for 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks decreased during the hottest part of the day and increased during cooler periods, especially for males. Concurrently, the probability of selection for 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks increased on warmer days. Following plant phenology, the odds of selecting 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks also increased from early to late summer while the odds of selecting 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks decreased. Our results demonstrate that ambient temperatures, and therefore thermal requirements, play a significant role in habitat selection patterns and behaviour of grizzly bears. In a changing climate, large mammals may increasingly need to adjust spatial and temporal selection patterns in response to thermal constraints.

  12. Staying cool in a changing landscape: the influence of maximum daily ambient temperature on grizzly bear habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Karine E; Cardinal, Etienne; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Côté, Steeve D

    2016-08-01

    To fulfill their needs, animals are constantly making trade-offs among limiting factors. Although there is growing evidence about the impact of ambient temperature on habitat selection in mammals, the role of environmental conditions and thermoregulation on apex predators is poorly understood. Our objective was to investigate the influence of ambient temperature on habitat selection patterns of grizzly bears in the managed landscape of Alberta, Canada. Grizzly bear habitat selection followed a daily and seasonal pattern that was influenced by ambient temperature, with adult males showing stronger responses than females to warm temperatures. Cutblocks aged 0-20 years provided an abundance of forage but were on average 6 °C warmer than mature conifer stands and 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks. When ambient temperatures increased, the relative change (odds ratio) in the probability of selection for 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks decreased during the hottest part of the day and increased during cooler periods, especially for males. Concurrently, the probability of selection for 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks increased on warmer days. Following plant phenology, the odds of selecting 0- to 20-year-old cutblocks also increased from early to late summer while the odds of selecting 21- to 40-year-old cutblocks decreased. Our results demonstrate that ambient temperatures, and therefore thermal requirements, play a significant role in habitat selection patterns and behaviour of grizzly bears. In a changing climate, large mammals may increasingly need to adjust spatial and temporal selection patterns in response to thermal constraints. PMID:27085998

  13. High temperature strain gage evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The structural thermal test of an advanced ramjet missile section required strain measurements as high as 922 K (1200 F). Since there is relatively little experience in the use of strain gages above the 700-755 K (800-900 F) level, a program was initiated to select and evaluate the best available gage. Candidate gages suitable for measurements up to 922 K (1200 F) were selected. This involved the determination of their operating characteristics, availability, cost, installation aspects, etc. The evaluation involved the following tests: strain as a function of load at room temperature and apparent strain as a function of temperature.

  14. High temperature sorbents for oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C comprising a porous alumina silicate support, such as zeolite, containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal, such as copper or cobalt ions, and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum is described. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption, and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  15. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  16. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The theory and current status of materials research for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion are reviewed. Semiconductors are shown to be the preferred class of materials for this application. Optimization of the figure of merit of both broadband and narrow-band semiconductors is discussed as a function of temperature. Phonon scattering mechanisms are discussed, and basic material guidelines are given for reduction of thermal conductivity. Two general classes of materials show promise for high temperature figure of merit (Z) values, namely the rare earth chalcogenides and the boron-rich borides. The electronic transport properties of the rare earth chalcogenides are explicable on the basis of degenerate or partially degenerate n-type semiconductors. Boron and boron-rich borides exhibit p-type hopping conductivity, with detailed explanations proposed for the transport differing from compound to compound. Some discussion is presented on the reasons for the low thermal conductivities in these materials. Also, ZTs greater than one appear to have been realized at high temperature in many of these compounds.

  17. Analysis of multi-band pyrometry for emissivity and temperature measurements of gray surfaces at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2016-05-01

    A multi-band pyrometry model is developed to evaluate the potential of measuring temperature and emissivity of assumably gray target surfaces at 300 K. Twelve wavelength bands between 2 and 60 μm are selected to define the spectral characteristics of the pyrometers. The pyrometers are surrounded by an enclosure with known background temperature. Multi-band pyrometry modeling results in an overdetermined system of equations, in which the solution for temperature and emissivity is obtained through an optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of the squared residuals of each system equation. The Monte Carlo technique is applied to estimate the uncertainties of temperature and emissivity, resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties of the pyrometers. Maximum reduction in temperature uncertainty is obtained from dual-band to tri-band systems, a small reduction is obtained from tri-band to quad-band, with a negligible reduction above quad-band systems (a reduction between 6.5% and 12.9% is obtained from dual-band to quad-band systems). However, increasing the number of bands does not always reduce uncertainty, and uncertainty reduction depends on the specific band arrangement, indicating the importance of choosing the most appropriate multi-band spectral arrangement if uncertainty is to be reduced. A reduction in emissivity uncertainty is achieved when the number of spectral bands is increased (a reduction between 6.3% and 12.1% is obtained from dual-band to penta-band systems). Besides, emissivity uncertainty increases for pyrometers with high wavelength spectral arrangements. Temperature and emissivity uncertainties are strongly dependent on the difference between target and background temperatures: uncertainties are low when the background temperature is far from the target temperature, tending to very high values as the background temperature approaches the target temperature.

  18. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or equivalent adaptor to facilitate measurement... specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d) Calibration of test measurement... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment...

  19. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or equivalent adaptor to facilitate measurement... specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d) Calibration of test measurement... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment...

  20. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to exceed 5 minutes. (6) Flow measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or.... (9) Teflon sample filter, as specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment...

  1. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to exceed 5 minutes. (6) Flow measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or.... (9) Teflon sample filter, as specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment...

  2. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or equivalent adaptor to facilitate measurement... specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d) Calibration of test measurement... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment...

  3. Tandem olefin metathesis/hydrogenation at ambient temperature: activation of ruthenium carbene complexes by addition of hydrides.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bernd; Pohler, Michael

    2003-07-21

    Sodium hydride activates ruthenium carbene complexes to catalyze hydrogenation reactions subsequent to ring closing olefin metathesis. Under these conditions, hydrogenation of cyclopentenols proceeds smoothly at ambient temperature and under 1 atm of hydrogen in toluene. An alternative protocol was developed that involves the formation of hydrogen in situ by reaction of excess sodium hydride with protic functional groups and water. PMID:12956069

  4. Sloths like it hot: ambient temperature modulates food intake in the brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Rebecca N; Haupt, Ryan J; Avey-Arroyo, Judy A; Wilson, Rory P

    2015-01-01

    Sloths are considered to have one of the lowest mass-specific metabolic rates of any mammal and, in tandem with a slow digestive rate, have been theorized to have correspondingly low rates of ingestion. Here, we show in a study conducted over five months, that three captive Bradypus variegatus (Brown-throated sloths) had a remarkably low mean food intake of 17 g kg(-1)day(-1) (SD 4.2). Food consumption was significantly affected by ambient temperature, with increased intake at higher temperatures. We suggest that the known fluctuation of sloth core body temperature with ambient temperature affects the rate at which gut fauna process digesta, allowing for increased rates of fermentation at higher temperatures. Since Bradypus sloths maintain a constantly full stomach, faster rates of fermentation should enhance digestive throughput, increasing the capacity for higher levels of food intake, thereby allowing increased energy acquisition at higher ambient temperatures. This contrasts with other mammals, which tend to show increased levels of food intake in colder conditions, and points to the importance of temperature in regulating all aspects of energy use in sloths.

  5. Sloths like it hot: ambient temperature modulates food intake in the brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus)

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Ryan J.; Avey-Arroyo, Judy A.; Wilson, Rory P.

    2015-01-01

    Sloths are considered to have one of the lowest mass-specific metabolic rates of any mammal and, in tandem with a slow digestive rate, have been theorized to have correspondingly low rates of ingestion. Here, we show in a study conducted over five months, that three captive Bradypus variegatus (Brown-throated sloths) had a remarkably low mean food intake of 17 g kg−1day−1 (SD 4.2). Food consumption was significantly affected by ambient temperature, with increased intake at higher temperatures. We suggest that the known fluctuation of sloth core body temperature with ambient temperature affects the rate at which gut fauna process digesta, allowing for increased rates of fermentation at higher temperatures. Since Bradypus sloths maintain a constantly full stomach, faster rates of fermentation should enhance digestive throughput, increasing the capacity for higher levels of food intake, thereby allowing increased energy acquisition at higher ambient temperatures. This contrasts with other mammals, which tend to show increased levels of food intake in colder conditions, and points to the importance of temperature in regulating all aspects of energy use in sloths. PMID:25861559

  6. Sloths like it hot: ambient temperature modulates food intake in the brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Rebecca N; Haupt, Ryan J; Avey-Arroyo, Judy A; Wilson, Rory P

    2015-01-01

    Sloths are considered to have one of the lowest mass-specific metabolic rates of any mammal and, in tandem with a slow digestive rate, have been theorized to have correspondingly low rates of ingestion. Here, we show in a study conducted over five months, that three captive Bradypus variegatus (Brown-throated sloths) had a remarkably low mean food intake of 17 g kg(-1)day(-1) (SD 4.2). Food consumption was significantly affected by ambient temperature, with increased intake at higher temperatures. We suggest that the known fluctuation of sloth core body temperature with ambient temperature affects the rate at which gut fauna process digesta, allowing for increased rates of fermentation at higher temperatures. Since Bradypus sloths maintain a constantly full stomach, faster rates of fermentation should enhance digestive throughput, increasing the capacity for higher levels of food intake, thereby allowing increased energy acquisition at higher ambient temperatures. This contrasts with other mammals, which tend to show increased levels of food intake in colder conditions, and points to the importance of temperature in regulating all aspects of energy use in sloths. PMID:25861559

  7. High-Pressure High-Temperature Phase Diagram of the Organic Crystal Paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Spencer; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Vohra, Yogesh

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) Raman spectroscopy studies have been performed on the organic crystal paracetamol in a diamond anvil cell utilizing boron-doped diamond as heating anvil. The HPHT data obtained from boron-doped diamond heater is cross-checked with data obtained using a standard block heater diamond anvil cell. Isobaric measurements were conducted at pressures up to 8.5 GPa and temperature up to 520 K in a number of different experiments. Solid state phase transitions from monoclinic Form I --> orthorhombic Form II were observed at various pressures and temperatures as well as transitions from Form II --> unknown Form IV. The melting temperature for paracetamol was observed to increase with increasing pressures to 8.5 GPa. Our previous angle dispersive x-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source has confirmed the existence of two unknown crystal structures Form IV and Form V of paracetamol at high pressure and ambient temperature. The phase transformation from Form II to Form IV occurs at ~8.5 GPa and from Form IV to Form V occurs at ~11 GPa at ambient temperature. Our new data is combined with the previous ambient temperature high-pressure Raman and X- ray diffraction data to create the first HPHT phase diagram of paracetamol. Doe-NNSA Carnegie DOE Alliance Center (CDAC) under Grant Number DE-NA0002006.

  8. Pressure-induced collapsed-tetragonal phase in SrCo2As2 at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasekara, W. T.; Kaluarachchi, U. S.; Ueland, B. G.; Pandey, A.; Lee, Y. B.; Taufour, V.; Sapkota, A.; Kothapalli, K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Harmon, B. N.; Canfield, P. C.; Johnston, D. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; Fabbris, G.; Feng, Y.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Dos Santos, A. M.

    Our recent high-energy (HE) high-pressure (HP) x-ray powder diffraction measurements on tetragonal (T) SrCo2As2 have revealed a first-order pressure-induced structural phase transition to a collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase with a reduction in c by -7.9% and the c / a ratio by -9.9%. The T and cT phases coexist for applied pressures 6 GPa to 18 GPa at 7 K. Resistance measurements up to 5.9 GPa and down to 1.8 K signatures likely associated with the cT phase above 5.5 GPa and found no evidence for superconductivity. Neutron diffraction data show no evidence of magnetic order up to 1.1 GPa. Here, we show that the T to cT transition occurs around 6.8 GPa at ambient temperature, and that the transition is nearly temperature-independent from 300 K down to 7 K, which indicates a steep p - T phase line. Work at Ames Lab. was supported by US DOE, BES, DMSE under DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources at the APS and ORNL, US DOE, SC, User Facilities.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Chromium(III)-Activated Yttrium Aluminum Borate: A New Thermographic Phosphor for Optical Sensing and Imaging at Ambient Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new thermographic phosphor based on chromium(III)-doped yttrium aluminum borate (YAB) is obtained as single crystals by high temperature flux growth and as a microcrystalline powder via solution combustion synthesis. The phosphor is excitable both in the blue (λmax 422 nm) and in the red part of the spectrum (λmax 600 nm) and shows bright NIR emission. The brightness of the phosphor is comparable to that of a well-known lamp phosphor Mn(IV)-doped magnesium fluorogermanate. At ambient temperatures, the Cr(III)-doped YAB shows high temperature dependence of the luminescence decay time, which approaches 1% per deg. The material shows no decrease in luminescence intensity at higher temperatures. The new phosphor is particularly promising for applications in temperature-compensated optical chemosensors (including those based on NIR-emitting indicators) and in pressure-sensitive paints. PMID:20473368

  10. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  11. High temperature seal test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The High Temperature Seals Test Rig Program at NASA's Lewis Research Center is a joint effort involving three separate federal government agencies. Testing has been underway at Lewis in this test rig since April, 1993. The rig was designed to run tests at temperatures to 800 F at pressures to 200 psia or at temperatures to 1300 to 1500 F at pressures to 65 psia. It was designed to run at speeds of up to 50,000 rpm which, for a 5.1 inch diameter disk, is a surface speed of about 1100 ft./sec. The rig was designed to allow easy replacement of the disks as well as the seals such that different disk materials and coatings may be tested.

  12. High-temperature battery calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.D.; Hart, R.H.; Chen, D.M.; Gibbard, H.F.

    1982-04-01

    A battery calorimeter was built for the measurement of thermal energy generation of high-temperature lithium--aluminum/iron sulfide battery cells, which are under development for electric vehicle propulsion and other energy storage applications. The calorimeter was designed with a temperature range of 400 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C, a detection limit of 1 mW, and an upper limit of heat flow of 50 W. The results of measurements on 200-Ah LiAl/FeS cells were in excellent agreement with the predictions of thermodynamic calculations based on precise measurements of the total cell polarization and the temperature coefficient of the emf. Details of the construction and operation principles of this calorimeter are given.

  13. Ultrasonic vocalizations by rat pups: the primary importance of ambient temperature and the thermal significance of contact comfort.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, M S; Efimova, I V; Alberts, J R

    1992-05-01

    We investigated the effects of isolation, huddling, and air temperature on ultrasound production by rat pups. Experiment 1 showed that ultrasound production by 8- to 9-day-olds was minimal at thermoneutrality and increased in response to small deviations of air temperature on either side of the thermoneutral zone. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that suppression of ultrasound production by contact with littermates is consistent with the thermal consequences of huddling. Experiment 4 showed that, contrary to previous conclusions, ultrasound production is not independent of ambient temperature in pups older than 10 days of age. Taken as a whole, these experiments emphasize (1) the importance of ambient temperature for the elicitation of ultrasound by rat pups of all ages studied, (2) the importance of thermal factors in the suppression of ultrasound by littermate contact, and (3) the manner in which different methods can change interpretations of the behavior and physiology of infant rats.

  14. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  15. Processing of extraterrestrial materials by high temperature vacuum vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimley, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that problems associated with the extraction and concentration of elements and commpounds important for the construction and operation of space habitats have received little attention. High temperature vacuum vaporization is considered a promising approach; this is a technique for which the space environment offers advantages in the form of low ambient pressures and temperatures and the possibility of sustained high temperatures via solar thermal energy. To establish and refine this new technology, experimental determinations must be made of the material release profiles as a function of temperature, of the release kinetics and chemical forms of material being transported, and of the various means of altering release kinetics. Trace element data determined by neutron activation analysis of meteorites heated to 1400 C in vacuum is summarized. The principal tool, high temperature spectrometry, is used to examine the vaporization thermodynamics and kinetics of major and minor elements from complex multicomponent extraterrestrial materials.

  16. Equation of State of CAS Phase to Pressure of the Uppermost Lower Mantle at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    X Liu; Q He; L Deng; S Zhai; X Hu; B Li; L Zhang; Z Chen; L Qiong

    2011-12-31

    The CAS phase is a major constituent phase for the continental crust and basaltic compositions at the P-T conditions of the Earth's mantle, and potentially plays an important role in the geodynamic processes related to slab subduction. Its equation of state has been investigated here at ambient temperature up to about 25 GPa by using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray radiation. Its P-V data, fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation, yield an isothermal bulk modulus (K'{sub T}) of 185 (9) GPa and first pressure derivative (K'{sub T} ) of 7.2 (12). If K'{sub T} is fixed at 4, the derived K{sub T} is 212 (4) GPa. Additionally, the CAS phase is strongly elastically anisotropic, with its a-axis direction much less compressible than c-axis direction: K{sub T-a}:K{sub T-c} = 2.19.

  17. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ericka L; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J Craig; Nelson, Karen E; Jones, Marcus B

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  18. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  19. Ambient temperature as a contributor to kidney stone formation: implications of global warming.

    PubMed

    Fakheri, Robert J; Goldfarb, David S

    2011-06-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease across the world that is becoming more prevalent. Although the underlying cause for most stones is not known, a body of literature suggests a role of heat and climate as significant risk factors for lithogenesis. Recently, estimates from computer models predicted up to a 10% increase in the prevalence rate in the next half century secondary to the effects of global warming, with a coinciding 25% increase in health-care expenditures. Our aim here is to critically review the medical literature relating stones to ambient temperature. We have categorized the body of evidence by methodology, consisting of comparisons between geographic regions, comparisons over time, and comparisons between people in specialized environments. Although most studies are confounded by other factors like sunlight exposure and regional variation in diet that share some contribution, it appears that heat does play a role in pathogenesis in certain populations. Notably, the role of heat is much greater in men than in women. We also hypothesize that the role of a significant human migration (from rural areas to warmer, urban locales beginning in the last century and projected to continue) may have a greater impact than global warming on the observed worldwide increasing prevalence rate of nephrolithiasis. At this time the limited data available cannot substantiate this proposed mechanism but further studies to investigate this effect are warranted.

  20. Effects of ambient temperature and restricted feeding on the growth of feathers in growing turkeys.

    PubMed

    Wylie, L M; Robertson, G W; Macleod, M G; Hocking, P M

    2001-09-01

    1. Male turkeys were reared to 6 weeks of age at 15 degrees C and 26 degrees C and fed ad libitum or restricted to 0.5 of the body weight of birds fed ad libitum. Basal metabolic rate was determined by indirect calorimetry at an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C. 2. Turkeys at 15 degrees C were lighter than those kept at 26 degrees C. Feather lengths and weight were similar in both groups. Fasting heat production corrected for both metabolic body size and activity was greater in turkeys reared at 15 degrees C than those at 26 degrees C. 3. Cranial breast feathers were significantly longer in restricted birds than in those fed ad libitum in contrast to a proportional decrease in the lengths of other feathers of 0.1 to 0.3. Feather weight as a proportion of body weight was 0.072 in restricted turkeys compared with 0.046 in birds fed ad libitum. There was no difference in basal metabolic rate between ad libitum and restricted turkeys. 4. It was concluded that feather growth was maintained in preference to body and muscle growth and that rearing birds at 15 degrees C did not improve breast feather cover. It is suggested that the growth of breast feathers in turkeys fed ad libitum is impaired.