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Sample records for ambient high temperature

  1. Evaluating alternative refrigerants for high ambient temperature environments

    DOE PAGES

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Montreal Protocol, developing countries have started the phase out schedule of the ozone depleting substances, including HCFC refrigerants, in 2015 and expect them to reach 35% reduction in 2020. This commitment to the start the phase out of HCFC refrigerants, especially R-22, in developing countries is seen as an opportunity to introduce lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants. Furthermore, this paper summarizes an investigation into the performance of lower GWP refrigerants in high ambient temperature environments, experienced in some of the developed countries, in mini-split air conditioning units.

  2. Exposure to high ambient temperatures alters embryology in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M. L.; Argente, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    High ambient temperatures are a determining factor in the deterioration of embryo quality and survival in mammals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on embryo development, embryonic size and size of the embryonic coats in rabbits. A total of 310 embryos from 33 females in thermal comfort zone and 264 embryos of 28 females in heat stress conditions were used in the experiment. The traits studied were ovulation rate, percentage of total embryos, percentage of normal embryos, embryo area, zona pellucida thickness and mucin coat thickness. Traits were measured at 24 and 48 h post-coitum (hpc); mucin coat thickness was only measured at 48 hpc. The embryos were classified as zygotes or two-cell embryos at 24 hpc, and 16-cells or early morulae at 48 hpc. The ovulation rate was one oocyte lower in heat stress conditions than in thermal comfort. Percentage of normal embryos was lower in heat stress conditions at 24 hpc (17.2%) and 48 hpc (13.2%). No differences in percentage of zygotes or two-cell embryos were found at 24 hpc. The embryo development and area was affected by heat stress at 48 hpc (10% higher percentage of 16-cells and 883 μm2 smaller, respectively). Zona pellucida was thicker under thermal stress at 24 hpc (1.2 μm) and 48 hpc (1.5 μm). No differences in mucin coat thickness were found. In conclusion, heat stress appears to alter embryology in rabbits.

  3. Exposure to high ambient temperatures alters embryology in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M. L.; Argente, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    High ambient temperatures are a determining factor in the deterioration of embryo quality and survival in mammals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on embryo development, embryonic size and size of the embryonic coats in rabbits. A total of 310 embryos from 33 females in thermal comfort zone and 264 embryos of 28 females in heat stress conditions were used in the experiment. The traits studied were ovulation rate, percentage of total embryos, percentage of normal embryos, embryo area, zona pellucida thickness and mucin coat thickness. Traits were measured at 24 and 48 h post-coitum (hpc); mucin coat thickness was only measured at 48 hpc. The embryos were classified as zygotes or two-cell embryos at 24 hpc, and 16-cells or early morulae at 48 hpc. The ovulation rate was one oocyte lower in heat stress conditions than in thermal comfort. Percentage of normal embryos was lower in heat stress conditions at 24 hpc (17.2%) and 48 hpc (13.2%). No differences in percentage of zygotes or two-cell embryos were found at 24 hpc. The embryo development and area was affected by heat stress at 48 hpc (10% higher percentage of 16-cells and 883 μm2 smaller, respectively). Zona pellucida was thicker under thermal stress at 24 hpc (1.2 μm) and 48 hpc (1.5 μm). No differences in mucin coat thickness were found. In conclusion, heat stress appears to alter embryology in rabbits.

  4. Exposure to high ambient temperatures alters embryology in rabbits.

    PubMed

    García, M L; Argente, M J

    2017-03-22

    High ambient temperatures are a determining factor in the deterioration of embryo quality and survival in mammals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on embryo development, embryonic size and size of the embryonic coats in rabbits. A total of 310 embryos from 33 females in thermal comfort zone and 264 embryos of 28 females in heat stress conditions were used in the experiment. The traits studied were ovulation rate, percentage of total embryos, percentage of normal embryos, embryo area, zona pellucida thickness and mucin coat thickness. Traits were measured at 24 and 48 h post-coitum (hpc); mucin coat thickness was only measured at 48 hpc. The embryos were classified as zygotes or two-cell embryos at 24 hpc, and 16-cells or early morulae at 48 hpc. The ovulation rate was one oocyte lower in heat stress conditions than in thermal comfort. Percentage of normal embryos was lower in heat stress conditions at 24 hpc (17.2%) and 48 hpc (13.2%). No differences in percentage of zygotes or two-cell embryos were found at 24 hpc. The embryo development and area was affected by heat stress at 48 hpc (10% higher percentage of 16-cells and 883 μm(2) smaller, respectively). Zona pellucida was thicker under thermal stress at 24 hpc (1.2 μm) and 48 hpc (1.5 μm). No differences in mucin coat thickness were found. In conclusion, heat stress appears to alter embryology in rabbits.

  5. Effect of high ambient temperature on feed digestibility in broilers.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, S; Geraert, P A; Lessire, M; Carre, B; Guillaumin, S

    1997-06-01

    The effect of chronic heat exposure on feed digestibility of broilers was investigated. Eighty 4-wk-old male chickens were brooded in individual battery cages in two controlled-environment rooms at a constant ambient temperature (22 or 32 C) until 6 wk of age. They were equally distributed into three treatments: 22 C, ad libitum feed consumption (22AL); 32 C, ad libitum feed consumption (32AL), and 22 C, pair-feeding on the daily feed intake of heat-exposed chickens (22PF). Broilers were fed either a standard corn-soybean meal diet (control diet) or a practical seasonal diet containing several ingredients including wheat, spring pea, and animal fat (summer diet). Digestibility of energy, dry matter, protein, fat, starch, and nitrogen, and total mineral balances were measured between 38 and 42 d of age. Apparent metabolizable energy content of summer diet was significantly decreased in 32AL compared to 22AL, whereas AME of the control diet did not change. Nitrogen retention was significantly reduced in 32AL birds compared to 22AL and 22PF birds, irrespective of the diet. Taking into account these differences in nitrogen balance, AMEn was reduced under hot exposure: -72 and -155 kcal for control and summer diets respectively, in 32AL compared to 22PF chickens. This reduction could be explained by a significant decrease of nutrient digestibility:protein: -4.2 percentage units irrespective of the diet, fat: -1.7 and -5.2 percentage units for control and summer diets respectively, and starch: -4.2 percentage units for summer diet. It thus appears worthwhile to take into account such reduction in digestibility to formulate practical diets for brooding under hot conditions. High quality oil and protein sources should also be used instead of low quality feedstuffs, like animal sources, in such conditions.

  6. Effects of High Ambient Temperature on Various Stages of Rabies Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. F.; Moore, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Effects of high ambient temperatures on various stages of rabies virus infection have been studied. Ambient temperature increased within the tolerated range was found to have little effect upon body temperature of normal mice, but caused marked elevation of temperature during illness. Temperatures at onset of patent illness in mice were lower than normal. Increased body temperature in the higher thermic ambience during the incubation period was associated with decreased mortality and frequent abortive infections. Exposure to high ambient temperature late in the incubation period delayed onset of illness, decreased mortality, and increased frequency of abortive infections, but exposure to high ambient temperature after onset of patent illness did not affect the course of the disease. PMID:4426698

  7. The Genetic Control of Reproductive Development under High Ambient Temperature1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ambient temperature has a large impact on reproductive development and grain yield in temperate cereals. However, little is known about the genetic control of development under different ambient temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that in barley (Hordeum vulgare), high ambient temperatures accelerate or delay reproductive development depending on the photoperiod response gene PHOTOPERIOD1 (Ppd-H1) and its upstream regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (HvELF3). A natural mutation in Ppd-H1 prevalent in spring barley delayed floral development and reduced the number of florets and seeds per spike, while the wild-type Ppd-H1 or a mutant Hvelf3 allele accelerated floral development and maintained the seed number under high ambient temperatures. High ambient temperature delayed the expression phase and reduced the amplitude of clock genes and repressed the floral integrator gene FLOWERING LOCUS T1 independently of the genotype. Ppd-H1-dependent variation in flowering time under different ambient temperatures correlated with relative expression levels of the BARLEY MADS-box genes VERNALIZATION1 (HvVRN1), HvBM3, and HvBM8 in the leaf. Finally, we show that Ppd-H1 interacts with regulatory variation at HvVRN1. Ppd-H1 only accelerated floral development in the background of a spring HvVRN1 allele with a deletion in the regulatory intron. The full-length winter Hvvrn1 allele was strongly down-regulated, and flowering was delayed by high temperatures irrespective of Ppd-H1. Our findings demonstrate that the photoperiodic and vernalization pathways interact to control flowering time and floret fertility in response to ambient temperature in barley. PMID:28049855

  8. Comparability of tympanic and oral mercury thermometers at high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chue, Amy L; Moore, Rachael L; Cavey, Andrew; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Stepniewska, Kasia; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2012-07-16

    Body temperature can be measured in seconds with tympanic thermometers as opposed to minutes with mercury ones. The aim of this study was to compare tympanic and oral mercury thermometer measurements under high ambient field temperatures. Tympanic temperature (measured thrice by 3 operators) was compared to oral temperature measured once with a mercury-in-glass thermometer in 201 patients (aged ≥5 years), on the Thai-Myanmar border. Ambient temperature was measured with an electronic thermo-hygrometer. Participants had a mean [min-max] age of 27 [5-60] years and 42% (84) were febrile by oral thermometer. The mean difference in the mercury and tympanic temperature measurement for all observers/devices was 0.09 (95%CI 0.07-0.12)°C and intra-class correlation for repeat tympanic measurements was high (≥0.97) for each observer. Deviations in tympanic temperatures were not related to ambient temperature. Clinically significant differences were not observed between oral and tympanic temperature measurements at high ambient temperatures in a rural tropical setting.

  9. Comparability of tympanic and oral mercury thermometers at high ambient temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Body temperature can be measured in seconds with tympanic thermometers as opposed to minutes with mercury ones. The aim of this study was to compare tympanic and oral mercury thermometer measurements under high ambient field temperatures. Results Tympanic temperature (measured thrice by 3 operators) was compared to oral temperature measured once with a mercury-in-glass thermometer in 201 patients (aged ≥5 years), on the Thai-Myanmar border. Ambient temperature was measured with an electronic thermo-hygrometer. Participants had a mean [min-max] age of 27 [5–60] years and 42% (84) were febrile by oral thermometer. The mean difference in the mercury and tympanic temperature measurement for all observers/devices was 0.09 (95%CI 0.07-0.12)°C and intra-class correlation for repeat tympanic measurements was high (≥0.97) for each observer. Deviations in tympanic temperatures were not related to ambient temperature. Conclusion Clinically significant differences were not observed between oral and tympanic temperature measurements at high ambient temperatures in a rural tropical setting. PMID:22800413

  10. Ambient Temperature and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Moellering, Douglas R.; Smith, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Homeotherms maintain an optimal body temperature that is most often above their environment or ambient temperature. As ambient temperature decreases, energy expenditure (and energy intake) must increase to maintain thermal homeostasis. With the wide spread adoption of climate control, humans in modern society are buffered from temperature extremes and spend an increasing amount of time in a thermally comfortable state where energetic demands are minimized. This is hypothesized to contribute to the contemporary increase in obesity rates. Studies reporting exposures of animals and humans to different ambient temperatures are discussed. Additional consideration is given to the potentially altered metabolic and physiologic responses in obese versus lean subjects at a given temperature. The data suggest that ambient temperature is a significant contributor to both energy intake and energy expenditure, and that this variable should be more thoroughly explored in future studies as a potential contributor to obesity susceptibility. PMID:24707450

  11. STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE ADAPTATION OF COMMON BEAN TO HIGH AMBIENT TEMPERATURE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High ambient temperatures are a significant constraint to low-land tropical and an intermittent constraint to temperate common bean production, while climate change promises a continued warming trend. To offset the effects of this trend, efforts are been made to understand the genetics and the physi...

  12. Ambient temperature recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature data recorder, designated the Ambient Temperature Recorder (ATR-4), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center to meet particular requirements for space life sciences experiments. The small, self-contained, four-channel, battery-powered device records 32 kilobytes of temperature data over a range of -40 to +60 C at four sampling intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. Data is stored in its internal electronic memory for later readout by a personal computer.

  13. Interrenal responses to high ambient temperature in soft-shelled turtle, Lissemys punctata punctata.

    PubMed

    Ray, Prajna Paramita; Maiti, B R

    2003-08-01

    An exposure to ambient temperature of 25 degrees C had no perceptible effect on interrenal function but further increase of temperature to 35 degrees C caused nuclear hypertrophy with increase of nuclear diameter, RNA concentration, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities, accompanied by quantitative depletions of cholesterol (free, esterified and total) and ascorbic acid levels in the interrenal gland of the soft-shelled turtle Lissemys p. punctata. Similar manifestations of stimulation, except in the nucleus, were marked after exposure to 38 degrees C, but the degree of response in respect of esterified and free cholesterol levels was higher at 38 degrees C than at 35 degrees C. Moreover, withdrawal of 38 degrees C temperature and subsequently maintaining at 25 degrees C for 15 days showed reverse manifestations to those of 35 degrees C/38 degrees C, leading to a tendency towards normalcy. It is suggested that high a ambient temperature of 35 degrees C significantly stimulates interrenal function of Lissemys turtles, but further increase of 38 degrees C does not cause further overall stimulation, and withdrawal of higher temperature (38 degrees C) shows a tendency towards normalcy. It is also suggested that (a) high ambient temperature causes thermal stress, (b) it is reversible and (c) it acts on interrenal activity presumably via CRF-ACTH-axis in turtles.

  14. High work output combined with high ambient temperatures caused heat exhaustion in a wildland firefighter despite high fluid intake.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this case study is to examine the physiological/behavioral factors leading up to heat exhaustion in a male wildland firefighter during wildland fire suppression. The participant (24 years old, 173 cm, 70 kg, and 3 years firefighting experience) experienced heat exhaustion following 7 hours of high ambient temperatures and arduous work on the fire line during the month of August. At the time of the heat-related incident (HRI), core temperature was 40.1 °C (104.2 °F) and skin temperature was 34.4 °C (93.9 °F). His work output averaged 1067 counts·min(-1) (arbitrary units for measuring activity) for the 7 hours prior to the HRI, a very high rate of work over an extended time period during wildfire suppression. In the 2.5 hours leading up to the heat incident, he was exposed to a mean ambient temperature of 44.6 °C (112.3 °F), with a maximum temperature of 59.7 °C (139.5 °F). He consumed an average of 840 mL·h(-1) in the 7 hours leading up to the incident and took an average of 24 ± 11 drinks·h(-1) (total of 170 drinks). The combined effects of a high work rate and high ambient temperatures resulted in an elevated core temperature and a higher volume and frequency of drinking than typically seen in this population, ultimately ending in heat exhaustion and removal from the fire line. The data demonstrate that heat-related incidents can occur even with aggressive fluid intake during wildland fire suppression.

  15. Deformation at ambient and high temperature of in situ Laves phases-ferrite composites.

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, Patricia; Pohlmann, Carsten; Scudino, Sergio; Blandin, Jean-Jacques; Babu Surreddi, Kumar; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy has been studied at ambient and high temperature. This Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy, whoose microstructure is formed by alternate lamellae of Laves phase and ferrite, constitutes a very simple example of an in situ CMA phase composite. The role of the Laves phase type was investigated in a previous study while the present work focuses on the influence of the microstructure length scale owing to a series of alloys cast at different cooling rates that display microstructures with Laves phase lamellae width ranging from ∼50 nm to ∼150 nm. Room temperature compression tests have revealed a very high strength (up to 2 GPa) combined with a very high ductility (up to 35%). Both strength and ductility increase with reduction of the lamella width. High temperature compression tests have shown that a high strength (900 MPa) is maintained up to 873 K. Microstructural study of the deformed samples suggests that the confinement of dislocations in the ferrite lamellae is responsible for strengthening at both ambient and high temperature. The microstructure scale in addition to CMA phase structural features stands then as a key parameter for optimization of mechanical properties of CMA in situ composites.

  16. Deformation at ambient and high temperature of in situ Laves phases-ferrite composites

    PubMed Central

    Donnadieu, Patricia; Pohlmann, Carsten; Scudino, Sergio; Blandin, Jean-Jacques; Babu Surreddi, Kumar; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy has been studied at ambient and high temperature. This Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy, whoose microstructure is formed by alternate lamellae of Laves phase and ferrite, constitutes a very simple example of an in situ CMA phase composite. The role of the Laves phase type was investigated in a previous study while the present work focuses on the influence of the microstructure length scale owing to a series of alloys cast at different cooling rates that display microstructures with Laves phase lamellae width ranging from ∼50 nm to ∼150 nm. Room temperature compression tests have revealed a very high strength (up to 2 GPa) combined with a very high ductility (up to 35%). Both strength and ductility increase with reduction of the lamella width. High temperature compression tests have shown that a high strength (900 MPa) is maintained up to 873 K. Microstructural study of the deformed samples suggests that the confinement of dislocations in the ferrite lamellae is responsible for strengthening at both ambient and high temperature. The microstructure scale in addition to CMA phase structural features stands then as a key parameter for optimization of mechanical properties of CMA in situ composites. PMID:27877672

  17. MOVPE growth of laser structures for high-power applications at different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Knigge, S.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2016-10-01

    Laser structures for different operating temperatures were developed. Higher temperatures need an increase in barrier height to reduce carrier leakage. Best results for an emission wavelength of ≈800 nm were obtained using an asymmetric structure containing an n-InGaP and a p-Al0.5Ga0.5As waveguide. Such structures show 10 W output power for a single laser diode and >100 W for a laser bar at 50 °C ambient temperature and also a good aging behavior. Lower operating temperatures permit lower barrier heights which results in a lower series resistance and therefore higher conversion efficiency at high power. Carrier concentration and mobility for different AlxGa1-xAs compositions were estimated in dependence on temperature. An optimized structure reached 20 W for a single laser diode and 2 kW for a laser bar in QCW mode at -70 °C.

  18. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; Delbeke, Frans; Deventer, Koen; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-12-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p < 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature.

  19. Abrasive wear of ceramic wear protection at ambient and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Adam, K.; Tumma, M.; Alessio, K. O.

    2017-05-01

    Ceramic wear protection is often applied in abrasive conditions due to their excellent wear resistance. This is especially necessary in heavy industries conveying large amounts of raw materials, e.g. in steel industry. Some plants also require material transport at high temperatures and velocities, making the need of temperature stable and abrasion resistant wear protection necessary. Various types and wear behaviour of ceramic protection are known. Hence, the goal of this study is to identify the best suitable ceramic materials for abrasive conditions in harsh environments at temperatures up to 950°C and severe thermal gradients. Chamottes, known for their excellent thermal shock resistance are compared to high abrasion resistant ceramic wear tiles and a cost efficient cement-bounded hard compound. Testing was done under high-stress three-body abrasion regime with a modified ASTM G65 apparatus enabling for investigations up to ~950°C. Thereto heated abrasive is introduced into the wear track and also preheated ceramic samples were used and compared to ambient temperature experiments. Results indicate a significant temperature influence on chamottes and the hard compound. While the chamottes benefit from temperature increase, the cement-bounded hard compound showed its limitation at abrasive temperatures of 950°C. The high abrasion resistant wear tiles represented the materials with the best wear resistance and less temperature influence in the investigated range.

  20. Effect of high ambient temperature on behavior of sheep under semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Kalyan; Kumar, Davendra; Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Thirumurugan, Palanisamy; Naqvi, Syed Mohammed Khursheed

    2017-01-01

    High environmental temperature is a major constraint in sheep production under semi-arid tropical environment. Behavior is the earliest indicator of animal's adaptation and responses to the environmental alteration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of high ambient temperature on the behavior of sheep under a semi-arid tropical environment. The experiment was conducted for 6 weeks on 16 Malpura cross (Garole × Malpura × Malpura (GMM)) rams. The rams were divided equally into two groups, designated as C and T. The rams of C were kept in comfortable environmental conditions served as control. The rams of T were exposed to a different temperature at different hours of the day in a climatic chamber, to simulate a high environmental temperature of summer in semi-arid tropic. The behavioral observations were taken by direct instantaneous observation at 15-min intervals for each animal individually. The feeding, ruminating, standing, and lying behaviors were recorded twice a week from morning (0800 hours) to afternoon (1700 hours) for 6 weeks. Exposure of rams to high temperature (T) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the proportion of time spent in feeding during the observation period in most of the hours of the day as compared to the C. The proportion of time spent in rumination and lying was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the T group compared to the C. The animals of T spent significantly (P < 0.05) more time in rumination in standing position as compared to the C. The overall proportion of time spent in standing, panting in each hour, and total panting time was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the T as compared to the C. The result of the study indicates that the exposure of sheep to high ambient temperature severely modulates the behavior of sheep which is directed to circumvent the effect of the stressor.

  1. Effect of high ambient temperature on behavior of sheep under semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Kalyan; Kumar, Davendra; Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Thirumurugan, Palanisamy; Naqvi, Syed Mohammed Khursheed

    2017-07-01

    High environmental temperature is a major constraint in sheep production under semi-arid tropical environment. Behavior is the earliest indicator of animal's adaptation and responses to the environmental alteration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of high ambient temperature on the behavior of sheep under a semi-arid tropical environment. The experiment was conducted for 6 weeks on 16 Malpura cross (Garole × Malpura × Malpura (GMM)) rams. The rams were divided equally into two groups, designated as C and T. The rams of C were kept in comfortable environmental conditions served as control. The rams of T were exposed to a different temperature at different hours of the day in a climatic chamber, to simulate a high environmental temperature of summer in semi-arid tropic. The behavioral observations were taken by direct instantaneous observation at 15-min intervals for each animal individually. The feeding, ruminating, standing, and lying behaviors were recorded twice a week from morning (0800 hours) to afternoon (1700 hours) for 6 weeks. Exposure of rams to high temperature (T) significantly ( P < 0.05) decreased the proportion of time spent in feeding during the observation period in most of the hours of the day as compared to the C. The proportion of time spent in rumination and lying was significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in the T group compared to the C. The animals of T spent significantly ( P < 0.05) more time in rumination in standing position as compared to the C. The overall proportion of time spent in standing, panting in each hour, and total panting time was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the T as compared to the C. The result of the study indicates that the exposure of sheep to high ambient temperature severely modulates the behavior of sheep which is directed to circumvent the effect of the stressor.

  2. Higher inclusion rate of canola meal under high ambient temperature for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Aljuobori, A; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; Abdullah, N; Liang, J B; Mujahid, A

    2016-06-01

    Extruded canola meal (ECM) was included in diet of broiler chickens at 0, 10, 20, and 30% (wt/wt) from 1 to 35 days of age. A total of 240 day-old male chicks were assigned in groups of 5 to 48 battery cages in environmentally controlled chambers and diets were replicated with 12 cages/treatment. From d 29 to 35, birds from each dietary group were exposed to either thermoneutral (23 ± 1°C; unheated) or high (36 ± 1°C; heated) temperature conditions. High ambient temperature, irrespective of ECM inclusion, depressed the growth performance of birds. Inclusion of ECM increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) linearly in unheated birds during d 1 to 28 (P < 0.001) and d 29 to 35 (P = 0.001). However, no adverse effects of ECM inclusion were observed on the growth performance of heated birds. The absence of these detrimental effects could be associated with the lack of triiodothyronine (T3) elevation by ECM inclusion in heated birds. In conclusion, ECM can be fed, at least, up to 30%, without any adverse effect on growth performance of broiler chickens raised under chronic high ambient temperature. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. Effects of high ambient temperatures on the metabolism of West African dwarf goats. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montsma, G.; Luiting, P.; Verstegen, M. W. A.; van der Hel, W.; Hofs, P.; Zijlker, J. W.

    1985-03-01

    32 West African dwarf goats were exposed in respiration chambers to temperature treatments of 20, 25, 30, 35, 35, 35, 30, 25, 20°C. Each treatment lasted three days. 16 goats were kept in individual pens (“I”); the others in two group pens of eight animals each (“G”). During each treatment, heat production and activity were recorded continuously over 48 hours. In addition, feed and water intake, rectal temperature, skin temperature and respiratory rate were measured during each treatment. Compared to 20°C, at 35°C rectal temperature increased from 39.0°C to 39.9°C, respiratory rate from 30 to 260 times. min-1 and skin temperature from 37.1°C to 39.5°C. Hay intake decreased by 40%; concentrates (30 g. kg-0.75. d-1) were always completely consumed. Heat production was higher for the “G” animals at 20°C and higher for the “I” animals at 35°C. These differences in heat production between the two groups were reflected in differences in rectal and skin temperature and in respiratory rate but only very slightly in differences in hay intake. Tissue insulation was 0.014 K. m2. W-1 at 30°C and 35°C and 0.022 K. m2. W-1 at 20°C. It is concluded that the reactions of these dwarf goats to high ambient temperatures are not different in principle from those of other domestic ruminants and that they do not exhibit a specific suitability or unsuitability for ambient temperatures as prevailing in West Africa.

  4. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Rooftop Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.; Shen, Bo; Linkous, Randall Lee; Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Bargach, Youssef

    2016-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High-Ambient-Temperature Evaluation Program for Low-Global Warming Potential (Low-GWP) Refrigerants aims to develop an understanding of the performance of low-GWP alternative refrigerants relative to hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in packaged or Rooftop Unit (RTU) air conditioners under high-ambient-temperature conditions. This final report describes the parties involved, the alternative refrigerants selection process, the test procedures, and the final results.

  5. Ventilation plays an important role in hens' egg production at high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ruzal, M; Shinder, D; Malka, I; Yahav, S

    2011-04-01

    Birds dissipate considerable heat through respiratory-evaporative and cutaneous-evaporative mechanisms and sensible heat loss (SHL) via radiation, convection, and conduction. The significance of SHL in laying hens is still to be confirmed. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of ventilation on egg production and quality during exposure to high ambient temperature. Lohman laying hens were raised outdoors up to age 35 wk, and 300 hens with similar egg production were divided among 5 treatments each comprising 4 replicates of 15 hens. Birds in 4 treatments were kept in computerized controlled-environment rooms acclimated to 35°C and 50% RH, with ventilation flow rates of 0.5, 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 m/s, respectively, and those in the control were kept outdoors. Hens were acclimated to the controlled environment rooms for 1 wk and to the targeted environmental conditions for another week, and then were subjected to measurements for 2 wk. Egg production, mass, and shell density, and feed and water consumption were monitored. Body temperature, SHL, and plasma thyroid hormone concentrations were measured at the end of the experiment. The high environmental temperature impaired egg production and quality: whereas exposure of hens to ventilation flows of 2.0 and 3.0 m/s elicited significant recovery of these parameters with time, exposure to a rate of 0.5 m/s negatively affected these parameters throughout the experimental period. The highest feed intake and water consumption were observed in hens exposed to 2.0 and 3.0 m/s, respectively, and the highest SHL was observed in those exposed to 3.0 m/s. It can be concluded that ventilation rate significantly affected hens exposed to high ambient temperature: high ventilation (3.0 m/s) improved egg production whereas low ventilation (0.5 m/s) negatively affected production and quality.

  6. Effects of zinc sulfate pretreatment on heat tolerance of Bama miniature pig under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Cao, Y; Zhou, X; Wang, F; Shan, T; Li, Z; Xu, W; Li, C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the heat tolerance of Bama miniature pigs under high ambient temperature (40°C) and Zn interactive functions during heat treatment (HT). Bama miniature pigs (male; n = 24; 6-mo old; BW = 10.79 ± 0.06 kg) were randomly allotted to 4 groups and were fed a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with 1,500 mg of Zn (ZnSO4·H2O)/kg diet for 38 d. At 7 mo of age (d 30), the thermal neutral (TN) groups remained at 25°C, whereas the HT groups were exposed to ambient temperature at 40°C for 5 h daily for 8 consecutive days. Pigs in 4 groups were sacrificed on d 38. Individual rectal temperatures, skin temperatures, and breathing rates were recorded at 3 h after the onset of HT and the blood samples were collected immediately after HT on d 30, 34, and 38. Pigs fed diets with or without Zn doubled their breathing rates (P < 0.05) and increased body surface, scrotal, and rectal temperatures during HT on d 30, 34, and 38, respectively. Zinc supplementation increased BW gain (BWG; P < 0.05) during 38-d experiment period, and HT decreased BWG only from d 30 to 34 (P < 0.05). Heat treatment increased serum testosterone on d 30 (P < 0.05). Zinc supplementation decreased the heat-induced increase of testosterone in HT on d 30 and 34 (P < 0.05). The relative weight of liver increased in HT groups (P < 0.05). Zinc supplementation decreased the relative weights of spleen (P < 0.05) and testis (P < 0.01). The values of abnormal lymphocyte count and large unstained cell count declined approximately 5 times in groups of Zn supplementation, whereas Zn supplementation increased the values of red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Zinc concentrations increased in serum, liver, kidney, epididymis, longissimus, hair, and feces in groups fed with Zn (P < 0.01). However, additional Zn decreased Zn concentrations in lung, spleen, and testis (P < 0.01). Moreover, HT decreased serum Zn

  7. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  8. Cast-in-place, ambiently-dried, silica-based, high-temperature insulation

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Eric Jianfeng; Thompson, Travis; Salvador, James R.; ...

    2017-02-03

    A novel sol-gel chemistry approach was developed to enable the simple integration of a cast-in-place, ambiently-dried insulation into high temperature applications. The insulation was silica based, synthesized using methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as the precursor. MTMS created a unique silica microstructure that was mechanically robust, macroporous, and superhydrophobic. To allow for casting into and around small, orthogonal features, zirconia fibers were added to increase stiffness and minimize contraction that could otherwise cause cracking during drying. Radiative heat transport was reduced by adding titania powder as an opacifier. To assess relevance to high temperature thermoelectric generator technology, a comprehensive set of materials characterizationsmore » were conducted. The silica gel was thermally stable, retained superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle > 150° , and showed a high electrical resistance > 1 GΩ, regardless of heating temperature (up to 600 °C in Ar for 4 h). In addition, it exhibited a Young's modulus ~3.7 MPa in room temperature and a low thermal conductivity < 0.08 W/m.K before and after heat treatment. Thus, based on the simplicity of the manufacturing process and optimized material properties, we believe this technology can act as an effective cast-in-place thermal insulation (CTI) for thermoelectric generators and myriad other applications requiring improved thermal efficiency.« less

  9. Study on the High Cycle Fatigue Property of Ti-600 Alloy at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liying; Yang, Guanjun; Hong, Quan; Zhao, Yongqing

    2011-06-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) property of one kind of near alpha titanium alloy named after Ti-600 was investigated at a frequency of 120~130Hz and with a load ratio R of 0.1. The HCF strength for the alloy at ambient temperature was found to be 475MPa. The observed high HCF strength was attributed to its overlapping plate like α+β phase microstructure. At the same stress of 600MPa, the distance between two fatigue stripes for the sample fractured at 8.61×105 cycles was wider than that of the sample failured at 1.78×106 cycles, which indicated that their propagation resistance for fatigue cracks was smaller.

  10. Properties of low-energy electron precipitation in the cleft during periods of unusually high ambient electron temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontheim, Ernest G.; Brace, Larry H.; Winningham, J. David

    1987-01-01

    A recently developed automated fitting procedure for Dynamics Explorer 2 electron energy spectra represents each auroral electron spectrum as a superposition of several Maxwellian and several Gaussian components. The fitting parameters give a digital representation which uniquely describes each spectrum. It is shown that unusually high ambient electron temperatures (of the order of 10,000 K) in the cleft are strongly correlated with the intensity parameters of the lowest-temperature Maxwellian components of the precipitation. The collisional heat input into the ambient electrons by these Maxwellian components of the precipitation fluxes is shown to be more than an order of magnitude higher in the high-temperature storm time cases than it is in a control set of 'normal temperature' quiet time cases. The heating effect of the solar flux is shown to be nearly the same for both sets of cases. As a result it is concluded that electron precipitation is the chief mechanism responsible for those high ambient temperatures.

  11. High ambient temperature and mortality: a review of epidemiologic studies from 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This review examines recent evidence on mortality from elevated ambient temperature for studies published from January 2001 to December 2008. Methods PubMed was used to search for the following keywords: temperature, apparent temperature, heat, heat index, and mortality. The search was limited to the English language and epidemiologic studies. Studies that reported mortality counts or excess deaths following heat waves were excluded so that the focus remained on general ambient temperature and mortality in a variety of locations. Studies focusing on cold temperature effects were also excluded. Results Thirty-six total studies were presented in three tables: 1) elevated ambient temperature and mortality; 2) air pollutants as confounders and/or effect modifiers of the elevated ambient temperature and mortality association; and 3) vulnerable subgroups of the elevated ambient temperature-mortality association. The evidence suggests that particulate matter with less than 10 um in aerodynamic diameter and ozone may confound the association, while ozone was an effect modifier in the warmer months in some locations. Nonetheless, the independent effect of temperature and mortality was withheld. Elevated temperature was associated with increased risk for those dying from cardiovascular, respiratory, cerebrovascular, and some specific cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Vulnerable subgroups also included: Black racial/ethnic group, women, those with lower socioeconomic status, and several age groups, particularly the elderly over 65 years of age as well as infants and young children. Conclusion Many of these outcomes and vulnerable subgroups have only been identified in recent studies and varied by location and study population. Thus, region-specific policies, especially in urban areas, are vital to the mitigation of heat-related deaths. PMID:19758453

  12. The Effect of High Ambient Temperature on the Elderly Population in Three Regions of Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rocklöv, Joacim; Forsberg, Bertil

    2010-01-01

    The short-term effects of high temperatures are a serious concern in the context of climate change. In areas that today have mild climates the research activity has been rather limited, despite the fact that differences in temperature susceptibility will play a fundamental role in understanding the exposure, acclimatization, adaptation and health risks of a changing climate. In addition, many studies employ biometeorological indexes without careful investigation of the regional heterogeneity in the impact of relative humidity. We aimed to investigate the effects of summer temperature and relative humidity and regional differences in three regions of Sweden allowing for heterogeneity of the effect over the scale of summer temperature. To do so, we collected mortality data for ages 65+ from Stockholm, Göteborg and Skåne from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute for the years 1998 through 2005. In Stockholm and Skåne on average 22 deaths per day occurred, while in Göteborg the mean frequency of daily deaths was 10. We fitted time-series regression models to estimate relative risks of high ambient temperatures on daily mortality using smooth functions to control for confounders, and estimated non-linear effects of exposure while allowing for auto-regressive correlation of observations within summers. The effect of temperature on mortality was found distributed over the same or following day, with statistically significant cumulative combined relative risk of about 5.1% (CI = 0.3, 10.1) per °C above the 90th percentile of summer temperature. The effect of high relative humidity was statistically significant in only one of the regions, as was the effect of relative humidity (above 80th percentile) and temperature (above 90th percentile). In the southernmost region studied there appeared to be a significant increase in mortality with decreasing low summer temperatures that was not apparent in the

  13. Light-induced catalyst and solvent-free high pressure synthesis of high density polyethylene at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The combined effect of high pressure and electronic photo-excitation has been proven to be very efficient in activating extremely selective polymerisations of small unsaturated hydrocarbons in diamond anvil cells (DAC). Here we report an ambient temperature, large volume synthesis of high density polyethylene based only on high pressure (0.4-0.5 GPa) and photo-excitation (~350 nm), without any solvent, catalyst or radical initiator. The reaction conditions are accessible to the current industrial technology and the laboratory scale pilot reactor can be scaled up to much larger dimensions for practical applications. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, indicate that the synthesised material is of comparable quality with respect to the outstanding crystalline material obtained in the DAC. The polydispersity index is comparable to that of IV generation Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Moreover the crystalline quality of the synthesised material can be further enhanced by a thermal annealing at 373 K and ambient pressure.

  14. Adrenomedullary hormonal and glycemic responses to high ambient temperature in the soft-shelled turtle, Lissemys punctata punctata.

    PubMed

    Ray, P P; Maiti, B R

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study the influence of high ambient temperature on adrenomedullary activity and blood glucose levels in adult female soft-shelled turtles (Lissemys punctata punctata). Experiments were carried out at 25 degrees, 35 degrees, and 38 degrees, and one group was exposed to 38 degrees for 15 days and then maintained at 25 degrees for another 15 days. Exposure to a low ambient temperature of 25 degrees had no clear effect on adrenomedullary function with respect to histology (nuclear diameter), epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations, and blood glucose level of turtles, but higher temperatures of 35 degrees and 38 degrees stimulated adrenomedullary activity as well as blood glucose level in turtles compared with controls (30 degrees ). The extent of these changes was greater at 38 degrees than that at 35 degrees, and withdrawal from high ambient temperature reversed the effect in turtles. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) hydration under high pressure at ambient and high temperature (200 deg. C)

    SciTech Connect

    Meducin, F.; Zanni, H.; Noik, C.; Hamel, G.; Bresson, B.

    2008-03-15

    The hydration of a tricalcium silicate paste at ambient temperature and at 200 deg. C under high pressure (up to 1000 bar) has been studied. Two high pressure cells have been used, one allows in-situ electrical conductivity measurements during hydration under high pressure. The hydration products were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements. The pressure has a large kinetic effect on the hydration of a C{sub 3}S paste at room temperature. The pressure was seen to affect drastically the hydration of a C{sub 3}S paste at 200 deg. C and this study evidences the competition between the different high temperature phases during the hydration.

  16. Effects of shade on welfare and meat quality of grazing sheep under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, H W; Cao, Y; Zhou, D W

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of providing shade on growth performance, welfare, and meat quality of grazing sheep under high ambient temperature. A total of 120 healthy male Ujumqin wool sheep (a local breed; BW = 18.7 ± 1.27 kg; 14 wk old) were randomly and equally divided into shaded and unshaded treatments with 3 pens per treatment. Sheep were grazed on an unshaded pastureland from 0600 to 1000 h and 1400 to 1800 h. During other times, sheep were confined in shaded or unshaded pens. Body weight was recorded on d 1 and 42 of the experiment. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were recorded on d 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. At end of the trial, sheep were blood sampled and slaughtered to collect meat samples. Respiration rate was greater (P < 0.05) in the unshaded sheep than shaded sheep on d 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 of the trial whereas no significant differences were found on d 7. Moreover, no differences were observed in final BW, ADG, or rectal temperature throughout the trial. The pH at 24 h postmortem (pH(24)) and cooking loss were greater (P < 0.01) in unshaded than shaded sheep. On the contrary, lightness (L*), redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) values at 24 h postmortem were lower (P < 0.05) in unshaded versus shaded sheep. The sheep in the unshaded group had a greater (P < 0.05) cortisol concentration compared with the shaded group. Sheep in the shaded group had lower creatine kinase activity (P < 0.01) as well as observed for glucose (P < 0.05), triiodothyronine (P < 0.01), and thyroxine (P < 0.05) concentrations and white blood cell count (P < 0.05). Compared with the unshaded group, sheep in the shaded group had a greater lymphocytes (LYM) count (P < 0.05). In contrast, the opposite was true for neutrophils (NEU) count (P < 0.01) and NEU:LYM ratio (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the shade cloth, although not enhancing ADG, improved meat quality traits and certain stress parameters in grazing sheep reared under high ambient temperature.

  17. The effect of high ambient temperature and hypercapnia on postprandial intestinal hyperemia in domestic cockerels.

    PubMed

    Bottje, W G; Harrison, P C

    1986-08-01

    Hubbard cockerels (2.8 to 3.6 kg) with chronically implanted electromagnetic blood flow probes placed on the celiac artery were used to determine the effect of elevated ambient temperature on postprandial intestinal hyperemia. Celiac mean blood flow (MBF) increased (P less than .05) from approximately 25 to 50 ml/min in response to feeding. When a thermoneutral temperature of 25 C was maintained, celiac MBF remained above 40 ml/min up to 210 min but fell below 25 ml/min by 300 min postprandial. In response to an acute heat exposure of 37 C, postprandial celiac MBF was reduced by approximately 50% in comparison to thermoneutral control values. Changes in celiac MBF during heat exposure were significantly (P less than .05) correlated (.60) with blood CO2 partial pressure (PCO2). To determine if flood PCO2 affected postprandial celiac MBF, cockerels were subjected to successive elevated ambient temperature and ambient CO2 treatments. Although cockerels exposed to 2.8% CO2 exhibited an increase in blood PCO2 regardless of temperature treatment, postprandial celiac MBF changes in these ambient CO2 experiments were only moderately correlated (P less than .05) with blood PCO2 (.34) but inversely correlated (-.83) with celiac vascular resistance (P less than .001). This study indicates that acute heat exposure reduces postprandial intestinal hyperemia and that this hemodynamic alteration was coincident with, but not necessarily dependent upon, changes in blood PCO2.

  18. The effect of glycerol hyperhydration on olympic distance triathlon performance in high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Aaron; Reaburn, Peter; Mummery, Kerry; Holmes, Mark

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of prior glycerol loading on competitive Olympic distance triathlon performance (ODT) in high ambient temperatures. Ten (3 female and 7 male) well-trained triathletes (VO2max = 58.4 +/- 2.4ml kg(-1) min(-1); bestODTtime = 131.5 +/- 2.6 min) completed 2 ODTs (1.5-km swim, 40-km bicycle, 10-km run) in a randomly assigned (placebo/ glycerol) double-blind study conducted 2 weeks apart. The wet-bulb globe temperature (outdoors) was 30.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C (relative humidity: 46.3 +/- 1.1%; hot) and 25.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C (relative humidity: 51.7 +/- 2.4%; warm) for day 1 and day 2, respectively. The glycerol solution consisted of 1.2 g of glycerol per kilogram of body mass (BM) and 25 ml of a 0.75 g x kg(-1) BM carbohydrate solution (Gatorade) and was consumed over a 60-min period, 2 hours prior to each ODT. Measures of performance (ODT time), fluid retention, urine output, blood plasma volume changes, and sweat loss were obtained prior to and during the ODT in both the glycerol and placebo conditions. Following glycerol loading, the increase in ODT completion time between the hot and warm conditions was significantly less than the placebo group (placebo 11:40 min vs. glycerol 1:47 min; p < .05). The majority of the performance improvement occurred during the final 10-km run leg of ODT on the hot day. Hyperhydration occurred as a consequence of a reduced diuresis (p < .05) and a subsequent increase in fluid retention (p < .05). No significant differences were observed in sweat loss between the glycerol and placebo conditions. Plasma volume expansion during the loading period was significantly greater (p < .05) on the hot day when glycerol appeared to attenuate the performance decrement in the heat. The present results suggest that glycerol hyperhydration prior to ODT in high ambient temperatures may provide some protection against the negative performance effects of competing in the heat.

  19. Performance comparison of laying hens segregating for the frizzle gene under thermoneutral and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zerjal, T; Gourichon, D; Rivet, B; Bordas, A

    2013-06-01

    The effect on thermotolerance of the incompletely dominant frizzle (F) gene, which causes feather curling and feather mass reduction, was investigated in 281 laying hens that were homozygous for the frizzle mutation (FF), heterozygous (FN), or normally feathered (NN). One-half of the birds were kept under standard conditions (22°C) and half were exposed to high ambient temperatures (32°C) between 24 and 46 wk of age. Egg production, egg quality, feed efficiency, and dissection traits were recorded and compared. At standard conditions, egg production and quality traits did not differ among the 3 genotypes, whereas feed efficiency was lower for the homozygous birds. Under heat stress conditions, the superiority of the FF hens was evident for all egg quantity and quality traits. No significant difference was measured between heterozygous carriers and normally feathered hens, indicating that the incomplete dominant frizzle mutation behaved as a recessive mutation regarding heat tolerance. From this study, we deduced that the F mutation in its homozygous state has a beneficial effect in decreasing heat stress in poultry production, and it could be particularly advantageous in tropical countries where average temperatures are never too low to negatively affect feed efficiency.

  20. Growth and antioxidant status of broilers fed supplemental lysine and pyridoxine under high ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khakpour Irani, Farzaneh; Daneshyar, Mohsen; Najafi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Three levels of lysine (90, 100 and 110% of Ross requirement) and of pyridoxine (3, 6 and 9 mg kg-1) were used in a 3 × 3 factorial experiment to investigate the growth and blood antioxidant ability of broilers under high ambient temperature. None of the dietary supplements affected the weight gain during the starter and grower periods. Although no significant differences were detected between the treatments during the entire period, high lysine level fed birds had a lower weight gain. At any levels of pyridoxine, high lysine fed birds were lighter than others. Neither the lysine nor pyridoxine changed the feed intake or feed conversion ratio during the starter, grower and entire period. However there was no significant difference between the treatments for blood malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, medium lysine fed birds had lower blood MDA than other ones. No significant effects on blood triglyceride, total protein and blood superoxide dismutase activity were indicated with addition of any lysine or pyridoxine level. Medium lysine fed birds had decreased blood glutathione peroxidase activity compared to the birds of other treatments. It was concluded that providing the proposed dietary lysine requirement of Ross strain during heat stress ensuring the best body weight gain and body antioxidant ability. Higher lysine level causes the retarded weight gain due to higher excretion of arginine from the body and consequently higher lipid peroxidation. PMID:26261713

  1. Impact of high ambient temperature on unintentional injuries in high-income countries: a narrative systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Otte im Kampe, Eveline; Kovats, Sari; Hajat, Shakoor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Given the likelihood of increased hot weather due to climate change, it is crucial to have prevention measures in place to reduce the health burden of high temperatures and heat waves. The aim of this review is to summarise and evaluate the evidence on the effects of summertime weather on unintentional injuries in high-income countries. Design 3 databases (Global Public Health, EMBASE and MEDLINE) were searched by using related keywords and their truncations in the title and abstract, and reference lists of key studies were scanned. Studies reporting heatstroke and intentional injuries were excluded. Results 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. 11 out of 13 studies showed that the risk of unintentional injuries increases with increasing ambient temperatures. On days with moderate temperatures, the increased risk varied between 0.4% and 5.3% for each 1°C increase in ambient temperature. On extreme temperature days, the risk of injuries decreased. 2 out of 3 studies on occupational accidents found an increase in work-related accidents during high temperatures. For trauma hospital admissions, 6 studies reported an increase during hot weather, whereas 1 study found no association. The evidence for impacts on injuries by subgroups such as children, the elderly and drug users was limited and inconsistent. Conclusions The present review describes a broader range of types of unintentional fatal and non-fatal injuries (occupational, trauma hospital admissions, traffic, fire entrapments, poisoning and drug overdose) than has previously been reported. Our review confirms that hot weather can increase the risk of unintentional injuries and accidents in high-income countries. The results are useful for injury prevention strategies. PMID:26868947

  2. Impact of high ambient temperature on unintentional injuries in high-income countries: a narrative systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Otte im Kampe, Eveline; Kovats, Sari; Hajat, Shakoor

    2016-02-11

    Given the likelihood of increased hot weather due to climate change, it is crucial to have prevention measures in place to reduce the health burden of high temperatures and heat waves. The aim of this review is to summarise and evaluate the evidence on the effects of summertime weather on unintentional injuries in high-income countries. 3 databases (Global Public Health, EMBASE and MEDLINE) were searched by using related keywords and their truncations in the title and abstract, and reference lists of key studies were scanned. Studies reporting heatstroke and intentional injuries were excluded. 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. 11 out of 13 studies showed that the risk of unintentional injuries increases with increasing ambient temperatures. On days with moderate temperatures, the increased risk varied between 0.4% and 5.3% for each 1 °C increase in ambient temperature. On extreme temperature days, the risk of injuries decreased. 2 out of 3 studies on occupational accidents found an increase in work-related accidents during high temperatures. For trauma hospital admissions, 6 studies reported an increase during hot weather, whereas 1 study found no association. The evidence for impacts on injuries by subgroups such as children, the elderly and drug users was limited and inconsistent. The present review describes a broader range of types of unintentional fatal and non-fatal injuries (occupational, trauma hospital admissions, traffic, fire entrapments, poisoning and drug overdose) than has previously been reported. Our review confirms that hot weather can increase the risk of unintentional injuries and accidents in high-income countries. The results are useful for injury prevention strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Arsenic ambient conditions preventing surface degradation of GaAs during capless annealing at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C. H.; Kondo, K.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in surface morphology and composition caused by capless annealing of GaAs were studied as a function of annealing temperature, T(GaAs), and the ambient arsenic pressure controlled by the temperature, T(As), of an arsenic source in the annealing ampul. It was established that any degradation of the GaAs surface morphology could be completely prevented, providing that T(As) was more than about 0.315T(GaAs) + 227 C. This empirical relationship is valid up to the melting point temperature of GaAs (1238 C), and it may be useful in some device-processing steps.

  4. Arsenic ambient conditions preventing surface degradation of GaAs during capless annealing at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C. H.; Kondo, K.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in surface morphology and composition caused by capless annealing of GaAs were studied as a function of annealing temperature, T(GaAs), and the ambient arsenic pressure controlled by the temperature, T(As), of an arsenic source in the annealing ampul. It was established that any degradation of the GaAs surface morphology could be completely prevented, providing that T(As) was more than about 0.315T(GaAs) + 227 C. This empirical relationship is valid up to the melting point temperature of GaAs (1238 C), and it may be useful in some device-processing steps.

  5. Male weasels decrease activity and energy expenditure in response to high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zub, Karol; Fletcher, Quinn E; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Konarzewski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The heat dissipation limit (HDL) hypothesis suggests that the capacity of endotherms to dissipate body heat may impose constraints on their energy expenditure. Specifically, this hypothesis predicts that endotherms should avoid the detrimental consequences of hyperthermia by lowering their energy expenditure and reducing their activity in response to high ambient temperatures (T(a)). We used an extensive data set on the daily energy expenditure (DEE, n = 27) and the daily activity time (AT, n = 48) of male weasels (Mustela nivalis) during the spring and summer breeding season to test these predictions. We found that T(a) was related in a "hump-shaped" (i.e. convex) manner to AT, DEE, resting metabolic rate (RMR) and metabolic scope (the ratio of DEE to RMR). These results support the HDL hypothesis because in response to warm Tas male weasels reduced their AT, DEE, and RMR. Although the activity and energy expenditure of large endotherms are most likely to be constrained in response to warm Tas because they are less able to dissipate heat, our results suggest that small endotherms may also experience constraints consistent with the HDL hypothesis.

  6. Lack of response of laying hens to relative humidity at high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Yahav, S; Shinder, D; Razpakovski, V; Rusal, M; Bar, A

    2000-12-01

    1. The effects of relative humidity (rh=40% to 70%) at high ambient temperature (Ta) on the performance of laying hens at different ages (8 to 10 months, Trial 1; and 16 to 18 months, Trial 2) was evaluated. Laying hens were exposed to 25 degrees C (control) for 3 weeks and thereafter acclimated for 1 week to 35 degrees C and 4 different rh. 2. Body weight declined significantly in young and older hens exposed to 60% or 70% and 70% rh, respectively: Food intake declined with increasing Ta, except in the case of older hens exposed to 60% rh, for which it remained relatively constant. Water consumption, however, increased with increasing Ta but the increase was significant in young hens exposed to 70% rh only. 3. Egg production was not affected by the changes in Ta. However, a decrease in egg production was observed in older hens exposed to 60% rh. 4. Egg weight (EW), shell weight (SW) and shell thickness (ST) were significantly reduced by exposure to elevated Ta, whereas % breakage significantly increased. In young hens, a response to rh was exhibited in ST which was significantly higher in hens exposed to the low rh (40% to 45%) than in those exposed to the highest rh (70% to 75%). 5. It can be concluded that Ta is the main environmental factor affecting young and older laying hens while the effect of rh is minor.

  7. High ambient temperature increases 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy")-induced Fos expression in a region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, G A; Hunt, G E; Cornish, J L; McGregor, I S

    2007-03-16

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a popular drug that is often taken under hot conditions at dance clubs. High ambient temperature increases MDMA-induced hyperthermia and recent studies suggest that high temperatures may also enhance the rewarding and prosocial effects of MDMA in rats. The present study investigated whether ambient temperature influences MDMA-induced expression of Fos, a marker of neural activation. Male Wistar rats received either MDMA (10 mg/kg i.p.) or saline, and were placed in test chambers for 2 h at either 19 or 30 degrees C. MDMA caused significant hyperthermia at 30 degrees C and a modest hypothermia at 19 degrees C. The 30 degrees C ambient temperature had little effect on Fos expression in vehicle-treated rats. However MDMA-induced Fos expression was augmented in 15 of 30 brain regions at the high temperature. These regions included (1) sites associated with thermoregulation such as the median preoptic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and raphe pallidus, (2) the supraoptic nucleus, a region important for osmoregulation and a key mediator of oxytocin and vasopressin release, (3) the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala, important in the regulation of social and emotional behaviors, and (4) the shell of the nucleus accumbens and (anterior) ventral tegmental area, regions associated with the reinforcing effects of MDMA. MDMA-induced Fos expression was unaffected by ambient temperature at many other sites, and was diminished at high temperature at one site (the islands of Calleja), suggesting that the effect of temperature on MDMA-induced Fos expression was not a general pharmacokinetic effect. Overall, these results indicate that high temperatures accentuate key neural effects of MDMA and this may help explain the widespread use of the drug under hot conditions at dance parties as well as the more hazardous nature of MDMA taken under such conditions.

  8. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition.

  9. High ambient temperature reverses hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in an animal model of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, E; Churruca, I; Zárate, J; Carrera, O; Portillo, M P; Cerrato, M; Vázquez, R; Echevarría, E

    2009-04-01

    The potential involvement of the melanocortin system in the beneficial effects of heat application in rats submitted to activity-based anorexia (ABA), an analogous model of anorexia nervosa (AN), was studied. Once ABA rats had lost 20% of body weight, half of the animals were exposed to a high ambient temperature (HAT) of 32 degrees C, whereas the rest were maintained at 21 degrees C. Control sedentary rats yoked to ABA animals received the same treatment. ABA rats (21 degrees C) showed increased Melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor and Agouti gene Related Peptide (AgRP) expression, and decreased pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels (Real Time PCR), with respect to controls. Heat application increased weight gain and food intake, and reduced running rate in ABA rats, when compared with ABA rats at 21 degrees C. However, no changes in body weight and food intake were observed in sedentary rats exposed to heat. Moreover, heat application reduced MC4 receptor, AgRP and POMC expression in ABA rats, but no changes were observed in control rats. These results indicate that hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression could occur on the basis of the characteristic hyperactivity, weight loss, and self-starvation of ABA rats, and suggest the involvement of hypothalamic melanocortin neural circuits in behavioural changes shown by AN patients. Changes in AgRP and POMC expression could represent an adaptative response to equilibrate energy balance. Moreover, the fact that HAT reversed hypothalamic MC4 receptor overexpression in ABA rats indicates the involvement of brain melanocortin system in the reported beneficial effects of heat application in AN. A combination of MC4 receptor antagonists and heat application could improve the clinical management of AN.

  10. Effect of transportation during periods of high ambient temperature on physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Miles E; White, Brad J; Anderson, David E; Miesner, Matt D; Mosier, Derek A; Coetzee, Johann F; Amrine, David E

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of transportation during periods of high ambient temperature on physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers. 20 heifers (mean body weight, 217.8 kg). Ten heifers were transported 518 km when the maximum ambient temperature was ≥ 32.2°C while the other 10 heifers served as untransported controls. Blood samples were collected from transported heifers at predetermined intervals during the transportation period. For all heifers, body weights, nasal and rectal temperatures, and behavioral indices were measured at predetermined intervals for 3 days after transportation. A week later, the entire process was repeated such that each group was transported twice and served as the control twice. Transported heifers spent more time near the hay feeder on the day of transportation, had lower nasal and rectal temperatures for 24 hours after transportation, and spent more time lying down for 2 days after transportation, compared with those indices for control heifers. Eight hours after transportation, the weight of transported heifers decreased 6%, whereas that of control heifers increased 0.6%. At 48 hours after initiation of transportation, weight, rectal temperature, and time spent at various pen locations did not differ between transported and control heifers. Cortisol concentrations were higher 4 hours after initiation of transportation, compared with those determined just prior to transportation. Results indicated transportation during periods of high ambient temperatures caused transient changes in physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers.

  11. High atmospheric temperatures and 'ambient incubation' drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Simon C; Mainwaring, Mark C; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo's develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to 'ambient incubation'. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed.

  12. High atmospheric temperatures and ‘ambient incubation’ drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Simon C.; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo’s develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to ‘ambient incubation’. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  13. Mortality risk attributable to high and low ambient temperature: a multicountry observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gasparrini, Antonio; Guo, Yuming; Hashizume, Masahiro; Lavigne, Eric; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel; Tobias, Aurelio; Tong, Shilu; Rocklöv, Joacim; Forsberg, Bertil; Leone, Michela; De Sario, Manuela; Bell, Michelle L; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Wu, Chang-fu; Kan, Haidong; Yi, Seung-Muk; de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Honda, Yasushi; Kim, Ho; Armstrong, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Although studies have provided estimates of premature deaths attributable to either heat or cold in selected countries, none has so far offered a systematic assessment across the whole temperature range in populations exposed to different climates. We aimed to quantify the total mortality burden attributable to non-optimum ambient temperature, and the relative contributions from heat and cold and from moderate and extreme temperatures. Methods We collected data for 384 locations in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, and USA. We fitted a standard time-series Poisson model for each location, controlling for trends and day of the week. We estimated temperature–mortality associations with a distributed lag non-linear model with 21 days of lag, and then pooled them in a multivariate metaregression that included country indicators and temperature average and range. We calculated attributable deaths for heat and cold, defined as temperatures above and below the optimum temperature, which corresponded to the point of minimum mortality, and for moderate and extreme temperatures, defined using cutoffs at the 2·5th and 97·5th temperature percentiles. Findings We analysed 74 225 200 deaths in various periods between 1985 and 2012. In total, 7·71% (95% empirical CI 7·43–7·91) of mortality was attributable to non-optimum temperature in the selected countries within the study period, with substantial differences between countries, ranging from 3·37% (3·06 to 3·63) in Thailand to 11·00% (9·29 to 12·47) in China. The temperature percentile of minimum mortality varied from roughly the 60th percentile in tropical areas to about the 80–90th percentile in temperate regions. More temperature-attributable deaths were caused by cold (7·29%, 7·02–7·49) than by heat (0·42%, 0·39–0·44). Extreme cold and hot temperatures were responsible for 0·86% (0·84–0·87) of total

  14. Effects of Ambient High Temperature Exposure on Alumina-Titania High Emittance Surfaces for Solar Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.; Wheeler, Donald R.; MacLachlam, Brian J.

    1998-01-01

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr) at high temperatures (1457 F (827 C)) for an extended period (approximately 2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 F (316 C) to l500 F (816 C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples, were characterized prior to and after heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1,200 F (649 C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1,000 F (538 C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1,500 F (816 C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1,200 F (649 C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled with spalling off the substrate noticeable at several locations. Based

  15. Effects of ambient high temperature exposure on alumina-titania high emittance surfaces for solar dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, Kim K. de; Wheeler, Donald R.; Smith, Daniela C.; MacLachlan, Brian J.

    1999-01-22

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum ({<=}10{sup -6} torr) at high temperatures (1457 deg. F (827 deg. C)) for an extended period ({approx_equal}2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR, require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 deg. F (316 deg. C) to 1500 deg. F (816 deg. C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples were characterized prior to, and after, heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1200 deg. F (649 deg. C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1000 deg. F (538 deg. C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1500 deg. F (816 deg. C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1200 deg. F (649 deg. C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled, with spalling off

  16. Distinct vasopressin content in the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus of rats exposed to low and high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jasnic, N; Dakic, T; Bataveljic, D; Vujovic, P; Lakic, I; Jevdjovic, T; Djurasevic, S; Djordjevic, J

    2015-08-01

    Both high and low ambient temperature represent thermal stressors that, among other physiological responses, induce activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and secretion of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). The exposure to heat also leads to disturbance of osmotic homeostasis. Since AVP, in addition to its well-known peripheral effects, has long been recognized as a hormone involved in the modulation of HPA axis activity, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the hypothalamic AVP amount in the acutely heat/cold exposed rats. Rats were exposed to high (+38°C) or low (+4°C) ambient temperature for 60min. Western blot was employed for determining hypothalamic AVP levels, and the difference in its content between supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was detected using immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that exposure to both high and low ambient temperature increased hypothalamic AVP levels, although the increment was higher under heat conditions. On the other hand, patterns of AVP level changes in PVN and SON were stressor-specific, given that exposure to cold increased the AVP level in both nuclei, while heat exposure affected the PVN AVP content alone. In conclusion, our results revealed that cold and heat stress influence hypothalamic AVP amount with different intensity. Moreover, different pattern of AVP amount changes in the PVN and SON indicates a role of this hormone not only in response to heat as an osmotic/physical threat, but to the non-osmotic stressors as well.

  17. High on/off current ratio in ballistic CNTFETs based on tuning the gate insulator parameters for different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Shaahin G.; Mirzakuchaki, Sattar

    2013-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented on the on/off current ratio limits for a ballistic coaxially-gated carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) with highly doped source/drain regions. Based on changes in gate insulator dielectric constant and thickness, the current ratio has been estimated at different ambient temperatures. Decreasing the gate insulator thickness after a certain value around 3 nm causes the current ratio to degrade drastically. Although the higher dielectric constant values have a fair effect on current ratio, this effect could be suppressed when the device with a low gate insulator thickness works at a low ambient temperature. The simulation results also show that the temperature drastically degrades the current ratio value; whereas in a certain range of ambient temperature, tuning the values of gate insulator thickness and dielectric constant could be very helpful. In this way, the optimum values of gate insulator thickness and dielectric constant are identified to offer the highest on/off current ratio of the device.

  18. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ~10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  19. High-rate anaerobic treatment of domestic wastewater at ambient operating temperatures: A review on benefits and drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Gomec, Cigdem Yangin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on high-rate anaerobic sewage treatment at ambient operating temperatures while presenting the benefits and drawbacks. Since domestic sewage is reported as the main point-source pollutant on a global scale, its treatment deserves ample research. In most of the cities and towns of some developing countries, wastewater produced in households is still discharged into the nearest water body without subjected any treatment. Therefore, simple, affordable, and effective sewage treatment systems are required. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater is reported as a sustainable alternative as recovery of energy is provided while nutrients are preserved for reuse. Anaerobic sewage treatment is certainly not limited to regions of hot climates but it also offers treatment potential in sub-tropical and even in moderate climatic regions due to their favorable temperature conditions. Since many sewage-like dilute wastewaters are discharged at low ambient temperatures especially under moderate climate conditions (15 to 20 degrees C), heating the wastewater to maintain mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C) for anaerobic treatment necessitates high energy and certainly high operating costs. Thus, the development of anaerobic treatment systems operated at ambient temperatures without doubt will have a great ecological and economic impact. High-rate anaerobic treatment systems, especially upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, have been occupying a noticeable position for sewage treatment in several tropical countries where artificial heating can be eliminated. However, in spite of their undeniable advantages, there are certain drawbacks of anaerobic sewage treatment at low operating temperatures which should be clarified. Among them, the main concern for anaerobic treatment application is its producing effluents that barely comply with the standarts for reuse in agriculture or discharge to the environment. Therefore, the effluents from

  20. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  1. Ambient Temperature Rechargeable Lithium Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    AD-AI O297 EIC LA BS INC NEWTON MA F/6 10/3 AMB IENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERAU AG(MARHMU)L TI ARI AK IC07 UNCLASSIFIED C-655DEE TB6...036FL -T Research and Development Technical Report -N DELET-TR-81-0378-F AMBIENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERY K. M. Abraham D. L. Natwig...WORDS (Cenimne an revee filf Of ~"#amp Pu l41"lfr bg’ 61WA amober) Rechargeable lithium battery, CrO.5VO.5S2 positive electrode, 2Me-THF/LiAsF6, cell

  2. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-08-21

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1) at 10 mA g(-1) (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step.

  3. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  4. Particulate matter air pollution and ambient temperature: opposing effects on blood pressure in high-risk cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Das, Ritabrata; Gracik, Theresa; Wang, Lu; Morishita, Masako; Bard, Robert L; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Fitzner, Craig A; Ferri, Claudio; Brook, Robert D

    2015-10-01

    Fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) and extreme temperatures have both been associated with alterations in blood pressure (BP). However, few studies have evaluated their joint haemodynamic actions among individuals at high risk for cardiovascular events. We assessed the effects of short-term exposures during the prior week to ambient PM2.5 and outdoor temperature levels on resting seated BP among 2078 patients enrolling into a cardiac rehabilitation programme at the University of Michigan (from 2003 to 2011) using multiple linear regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, BMI, ozone and the same-day alternate environmental factor (i.e. PM2.5 or temperature). Mean PM2.5 and temperature levels were 12.6 ± 8.2 μg/m and 10.3 ± 10.4°C, respectively. Each standard deviation elevation in PM2.5 concentration during lag days 4-6 was associated with significant increases in SBP (2.1-3.5 mmHg) and DBP (1.7-1.8 mmHg). Conversely, higher temperature levels (per 10.4°C) during lag days 4-6 were associated with reductions in both SBP (-3.6 to -2.3 mmHg) and DBP (-2.5 to -1.8 mmHg). There was little evidence for consistent effect modification by other covariates (e.g. demographics, seasons, medication usage). Short-term exposures to PM2.5, even at low concentrations within current air quality standards, are associated with significant increases in BP. Contrarily, higher ambient temperatures prompt the opposite haemodynamic effect. These findings demonstrate that both ubiquitous environmental exposures have clinically meaningful effects on resting BP among high-risk cardiac patients.

  5. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Shrestha, Som S.; Linkous, Randall Lee; Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Kassuga, Theo

    2015-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High-Ambient Temperature Testing Program for Low-GWP Refrigerants aims to develop an understanding of the performance of low-Global Warming Potential (low-GWP) alternatives to Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in mini-split air conditioners under high ambient temperature conditions. This interim working paper describes the parties involved, the alternative refrigerants selection process, the test procedures, and the preliminary results.

  6. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Linkous, Randall Lee; Goetzler, William; Guernsey, Matt; Kassuga, Theo

    2015-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High-Ambient-Temperature Evaluation Program for low– global warming potential (Low-GWP) Refrigerants aims to develop an understanding of the performance of low-GWP alternative refrigerants to hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in mini-split air conditioners under high-ambient-temperature conditions. This final report describes the parties involved, the alternative refrigerant selection process, the test procedures, and the final results.

  7. Influence of chestnut tannins on welfare, carcass characteristics, meat quality, and lipid oxidation in rabbits under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huawei; Zhou, Daowei; Tong, Jianming; Vaddella, Venkata

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of chestnut tannins (CT) on welfare, carcass characteristics, meat quality, and lipid oxidation in rabbits under high ambient temperature. Rabbits in one group were raised at 20°C and fed with basal diet (N) and other three groups (33°C) were fed basal diet with 0 (C), 5 (CT5), and 10 g (CT10) of CT/kg of diet. Compared with the C group, rabbits in CT10 had higher pH(24) and lower cooking loss and thiobarbituric acid reacting substance values at 0, 30, and 60 min of forced oxidation. Rabbits in C group had higher cortisol levels, creatine kinase activities, white blood cell counts, neutrophil percentage, neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio and lower T(3), T(4) levels, lymphocyte percentage than N and CT10 groups. Supplementation of CT seemed to have a positive effect on growth performance, welfare, and meat quality of rabbits under high ambient temperature.

  8. Ambient high temperature and mortality in Jinan, China: A study of heat thresholds and vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Xin; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhidong; Xu, Lei; Gao, Jinghong; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Haixia; Wang, Jun; Yu, Jieqiong; Jiang, Baofa; Liu, Qiyong

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the health consequences of continuously rising temperatures-as is projected for China-is important in terms of developing heat-health adaptation and intervention programs. This study aimed to examine the association between mortality and daily maximum (Tmax), mean (Tmean), and minimum (Tmin) temperatures in warmer months; to explore threshold temperatures; and to identify optimal heat indicators and vulnerable populations. Daily data on temperature and mortality were obtained for the period 2007-2013. Heat thresholds for condition-specific mortality were estimated using an observed/expected analysis. We used a generalised additive model with a quasi-Poisson distribution to examine the association between mortality and Tmax/Tmin/Tmean values higher than the threshold values, after adjustment for covariates. Tmax/Tmean/Tmin thresholds were 32/28/24°C for non-accidental deaths; 32/28/24°C for cardiovascular deaths; 35/31/26°C for respiratory deaths; and 34/31/28°C for diabetes-related deaths. For each 1°C increase in Tmax/Tmean/Tmin above the threshold, the mortality risk of non-accidental-, cardiovascular-, respiratory, and diabetes-related death increased by 2.8/5.3/4.8%, 4.1/7.2/6.6%, 6.6/25.3/14.7%, and 13.3/30.5/47.6%, respectively. Thresholds for mortality differed according to health condition when stratified by sex, age, and education level. For non-accidental deaths, effects were significant in individuals aged ≥65 years (relative risk=1.038, 95% confidence interval: 1.026-1.050), but not for those ≤64 years. For most outcomes, women and people ≥65 years were more vulnerable. High temperature significantly increases the risk of mortality in the population of Jinan, China. Climate change with rising temperatures may bring about the situation worse. Public health programs should be improved and implemented to prevent and reduce health risks during hot days, especially for the identified vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  9. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  10. Highly CO2/N2-switchable zwitterionic surfactant for pickering emulsions at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingwei; Lu, Weiqiang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Li, Bo-Geng; Zhu, Shiping

    2014-09-02

    Cross-linked polymer particles were prepared via surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and sodium methacrylate (SMA) using N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA) as a cross-linker. Generated particles are zwitterionic, possessing unique isoelectric points in the pH range of 7.5-8.0, which is readily tunable through CO2/N2 bubbling. The particles were found to be highly responsive to CO2/N2 switching, dissolving in water with CO2 bubbling and precipitating with N2 bubbling at room temperature. Pickering emulsions of n-dodecane were prepared using these particles as the sole emulsifier. These emulsions can be rapidly demulsified with CO2 bubbling, resulting in complete oil/water phase separations. Nitrogen bubbling efficiently re-emulsifies the oil with the aid of homogenization. The rapid emulsification/demulsification using CO2/N2 bubbling at room temperature provides these cross-linked zwitterionic particles with distinct advantages as functional Pickering surfactants.

  11. High Ambient Temperatures and Risk of Motor Vehicle Crashes in Catalonia, Spain (2000–2011): A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Escalera-Antezana, Juan Pablo; Dadvand, Payam; Llatje, Òscar; Barrera-Gómez, Jose; Cunillera, Jordi; Medina-Ramón, Mercedes; Pérez, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Experimental studies have shown a decrease in driving performance at high temperatures. The epidemiological evidence for the relationship between heat and motor vehicle crashes is not consistent. Objectives We estimated the impact of high ambient temperatures on the daily number of motor vehicle crashes and, in particular, on crashes involving driver performance factors (namely distractions, driver error, fatigue, or sleepiness). Methods We performed a time-series analysis linking daily counts of motor vehicle crashes and daily temperature or occurrence of heat waves while controlling for temporal trends. All motor vehicle crashes with victims that occurred during the warm period of the years 2000–2011 in Catalonia (Spain) were included. Temperature data were obtained from 66 weather stations covering the region. Poisson regression models adjusted for precipitation, day of the week, month, year, and holiday periods were fitted to quantify the associations. Results The study included 118,489 motor vehicle crashes (an average of 64.1 per day). The estimated risk of crashes significantly increased by 2.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7%, 5.1%] during heat wave days, and this association was stronger (7.7%, 95% CI: 1.2%, 14.6%) when restricted to crashes with driver performance–associated factors. The estimated risk of crashes with driver performance factors significantly increased by 1.1% (95% CI: 0.1%, 2.1%) for each 1°C increase in maximum temperature. Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes involving driver performance–associated factors were increased in association with heat waves and increasing temperature. These findings are relevant for designing preventive plans in a context of global warming. Citation Basagaña X, Escalera-Antezana JP, Dadvand P, Llatje Ò, Barrera-Gómez J, Cunillera J, Medina-Ramón M, Pérez K. 2015. High ambient temperatures and risk of motor vehicle crashes in Catalonia, Spain (2000–2011): a time-series analysis

  12. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-15

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  13. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-01

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  14. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-01

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  15. Acute norepinephrine reuptake inhibition decreases performance in normal and high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; Goekint, Maaike; Heyman, Elsa; Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Watson, Philip; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; De Schutter, Guy; Meeusen, Romain

    2008-07-01

    Combined inhibition of dopamine (DA)/norepinephrine (NE) reuptake improves exercise performance and increases core temperature in the heat. A recent study demonstrated that this effect may primarily be related to increased DA activity. NE reuptake inhibition (NERI), however, has received little attention in humans, certainly in the heat, where central fatigue appears to be a main factor influencing performance. Therefore the present study examines the effect of NERI (reboxetine) on exercise capacity, thermoregulation, and hormonal response in normal and high temperature. Nine healthy well-trained male cyclists participated in this study. Subjects ingested either placebo (Pla; 2 x 8 mg) or reboxetine (Rebox; 2 x 8 mg). Subjects exercised in temperate (18 degrees C) or warm (30 degrees C) conditions and cycled for 60 min at 55% W(max) immediately followed by a time trial (TT; Pla18/Rebox18; Pla30/Rebox30) to measure exercise performance. Acute NERI decreased power output and consequently exercise performance in temperate (P = 0.018) and warm (P = 0.007) conditions. Resting heart rate was significantly elevated by NERI (18 degrees C: P = 0.02; 30 degrees C: P = 0.018). In Rebox18, heart rate was significantly higher than in the Pla18, while in the heat no effect of the drug treatment was reported during exercise. In Rebox30, all hormone concentrations increased during exercise, except for growth hormone (GH), which was significantly lower during exercise. In Rebox18, prolactin (PRL) concentrations were significantly elevated; GH was significantly higher at rest, but significantly lower during exercise. In conclusion, manipulation of the NE system decreases performance and modifies hormone concentrations, thereby indicating a central NE effect of the drug. These findings confirm results from previous studies that predominantly increased DA activity is important in improving performance.

  16. Development of ceramic lithium-electrolyte based carbon dioxide sensors for temperatures ranging from ambient to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inhee

    Solid-state electrochemical CO2 gas sensors composed of an electrolyte and two porous electrodes have been used extensively in the automobile and bio-chemical industry. Based on the field of application, the working temperature of the sensor ranges from room temperature to 600°C. Two potentiometric CO2 sensors that work at different temperature ranges were developed in this work. A potentiometric CO2 gas sensor with Li3PO 4 electrolyte and BaCO3 coated Li2CO3 sensing electrode was developed and the sensing electrode was characterized in order to understand its sensing mechanism under humid conditions. This potentiometric CO2 sensor showed humidity-interference-free sensing response for high CO2 concentrations (5˜25%) at high temperatures (T > 400°C). In addition, the sensor showed good reproducibility and long-term stability under humid conditions. In the sensing electrode, the BaCO 3 layer improved the resistance against humidity as a chemical barrier, while the inner Li2CO3 layer was responsible for the CO2 sensing. However, the sensor in which the eutectic layer covered the entire sensing electrode showed good sensing behavior under dry and humid conditions. Lately, low-temperature CO2 sensors have been attracting attention due to their low power consumption and easy sensor miniaturization, since a heater is unnecessary. We have developed a low-temperature CO2 sensor based on lithium lanthanum titanate (LLT) electrolyte in dry conditions that requires further improvement. Lithium lanthanum titanate (LLT) electrolytes were prepared by a conventional solid-state method. The impedance of the LLT electrolyte was measured over the temperature range of 300 to 473 K and the frequency range of 5 Hz and 13 MHz. Activation energies for the Li ionic conduction for grain boundary and grain were estimated to be 0.47 and 0.31 eV, respectively. It was found that LLT is a good ionic conductor at low temperatures and a good candidate as an electrolyte for low-temperature

  17. Lack of evolutionary adjustment to ambient temperature in highly specialized cave beetles.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Valeria; Sánchez-Fernández, David; Fresneda, Javier; Cieslak, Alexandra; Ribera, Ignacio

    2015-02-04

    A key question in evolutionary biology is the relationship between species traits and their habitats. Caves offer an ideal model to test the adjustment of species to their surrounding temperature, as they provide homogeneous and simple environments. We compared two species living under different thermal conditions within a lineage of Pyrenean beetles highly modified for the subterranean life since the Miocene. One, Troglocharinus fonti, is found in caves at 4-11°C in the ancestral Pyrenean range. The second, T. ferreri, inhabits the coastal area of Catalonia since the early Pliocene, and lives at 14-16°C. We found no differences in their short term upper thermal limit (ca. 50°C), similar to that of most organisms, or their lower thermal limit (ca. -2.5°C), higher than for most temperate insects and suggesting the absence of cryoprotectants. In longer term tests (7 days) survival between 6-20°C was almost 100% for both species plus two outgroups of the same lineage, but all four died between 23-25°C, without significant differences between them. Our results suggest that species in this lineage have lost some of the thermoregulatory mechanisms common in temperate insects, as their inferred default tolerance range is larger than the thermal variation experienced through their whole evolutionary history.

  18. Ileal endogenous amino acid flow of broiler chickens under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, A F; Kasim, A; Alimon, A R; Meimandipour, A; Zulkifli, I

    2010-10-01

    High environmental temperature has detrimental effects on the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of acute heat stress on endogenous amino acid (EAA) flow in broiler chickens. A total of 90, day-old broiler chicks were housed in battery cages in an environmentally controlled chamber. Chicks were fed a nitrogen-free diet on day 42 following either no heat exposure (no-heat) or 2 weeks exposure to 35 ± 1 °C for 3 h from days 28 to 42 (2-week heat) or 1 week exposure to 35 ± 1 °C for 3 h from days 35 to 42 (1 week heat). The most abundant amino acid in the ileal flow was glutamic acid, followed by aspartic acid, serine and threonine in non-heat stressed group. The EAA flow in 1-week heat and 2-week heat birds were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those under no heat exposure (14682, 11161 and 9597 mg/kg of dry matter intake respectively). Moreover, the EAA flow of 2-week heat group was less than 1-week heat group by approximately 36%. These observations suggest that the effect of heat stress on EAA flow is mostly quantitative; however, heat stress may also alter the content of EAA flow qualitatively. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Effect of Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia on behavior and physiologic responses of calves during high ambient environmental temperatures.

    PubMed

    Theurer, M E; Anderson, D E; White, B J; Miesner, M D; Mosier, D A; Coetzee, J F; Lakritz, J; Amrine, D E

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pneumonia during conditions of high (maximum ≥ 32°C) ambient temperatures on physiological and behavioral responses of calves. Eighteen black beef heifers averaging 240 kg were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: 1) pneumonia induced by bronchoselective endoscopic inoculation with Mannheimia haemolytica (MH; n = 10) and 2) noninoculated controls (CN; n = 8). Nasal passage and rectal temperatures were measured every 2 h for 24 h after challenge and then twice daily for 9 d. Accelerometers, pedometers, and positioning devices monitored cattle behavior within the pen for 9 d after challenge. Blood samples were collected on trial d 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 7, and 9 and were analyzed to determine the concentration of substance P, cortisol, haptoglobin, and metalloproteinase. All calves in the MH group were euthanized and necropsied on trial d 9. All MH calves became clinically ill postchallenge. A treatment × time interaction (P < 0.05) was evident for nasal and rectal temperatures, behavior, weight, and blood analysis. Rectal temperatures in MH were higher (P < 0.01) than CN during the period from 6 to 24 h after challenge. Conversely, nasal passage temperatures were less in MH calves compared with CN at 12 to 22 h after challenge. Calves in MH spent less time at the grain bunk, less time at the hay feeder, and more time lying down during the early pneumonia period compared with CN calves. Also, MH calves had significantly greater concentrations of blood biomarkers of pain (substance P) on d 0.5 (P < 0.01); stress (cortisol) on d 0.5 and 1 (P < 0.01); haptoglobin on d 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 7 (P < 0.01); and metalloproteinase on d 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.01) compared with CN calves. At necropsy, all MH calves had right cranioventral bronchopneumonia (median lung lesions = 6.8%). Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia caused significantly more changes in behavior and increased biomarkers during high (maximum

  20. Ambient-temperature high-pressure-induced ferroelectric phase transition in CaMnTi2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fuertes, J.; Bernert, T.; Zimmer, D.; Schrodt, N.; Koch-Müller, M.; Winkler, B.; Bayarjargal, L.; Popescu, C.; MacLeod, S.; Glazyrin, K.

    2017-09-01

    The ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition of multiferroic CaMnTi2O6 has been investigated at high pressures and ambient temperature by second-harmonic generation (SHG), Raman spectroscopy, and powder and single-crystal x-ray diffraction. We have found that CaMnTi2O6 undergoes a pressure-induced structural phase transition (P 42m c →P 42/n m c ) at ˜7 GPa to the same paraelectric structure found at ambient pressure and Tc=630 K . The continuous linear decrease of the SHG intensity that disappears at 7 GPa and the existence of a Raman active mode at 244 cm-1 that first softens up to 7 GPa and then hardens with pressure are used to discuss the nature of the phase transition of CaMnTi2O6 , for which a d Tc/d P =-48 K/GPa has been found. Neither a volume contraction nor a change in the normalized pressure on the Eulerian strain is observed across the phase transition with all the unit-cell volume data following a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a bulk modulus of B0=182.95 (2 ) GPa .

  1. Ambient temperature that induces maximum sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deependra; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2009-08-04

    Changes in sleep and body temperature in rats at ambient temperatures below and above the self-selected temperature zone, are lacking in literature. In this report, the temperature preferred by the rats was first assessed before studying the changes in their sleep and body temperature, when they were exposed to ambient temperatures ranging from 18 degrees C to 36 degrees C. The rats preferred to stay at 27 degrees C when they were allowed to select their own ambient temperature, but maximum sleep was recorded when the rats were maintained at 30 degrees C. The ambient temperature-related changes in rapid eye movement sleep and deep slow wave sleep followed a bell-shaped curve, with a maximum at 30 degrees C. Of all the sleep parameters, rapid eye movement sleep showed a more marked ambient temperature-related change. Ambient temperatures above 33 degrees C and below 24 degrees C produced a significant reduction in sleep. Increase in sleep at 30 degrees C was associated with a slight elevation in body temperature, but a steep increase in body temperature at very high ambient temperature was associated with a decrease in sleep. Decrease in sleep at ambient temperatures below 24 degrees C was not related to any significant decrease in body temperature. Though maximum sleep was recorded at 30 degrees C, the sleep regulatory and thermoregulatory systems were at a functional equilibrium at 27 degrees C.

  2. Comparison of waste heat driven and electrically driven cooling systems for a high ambient temperature, off-grid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Christopher P.

    Forward army bases in off-grid locations with high temperatures require power and cooling capacity. Each gallon of fuel providing electrical power passes through a complex network, introducing issues of safety and reliability if this network is interrupted. Instead of using an engine and an electrically powered cooling system, a more efficient combined heat and power (CHP) configuration with a smaller engine and LiBr/Water absorption system (AS) powered by waste heat could be used. These two configurations were simulated in both steady state and transient conditions, in ambient temperatures up to 52°C, providing up to 3 kW of non-cooling electricity, and 5.3 kW of cooling. Unlike conventional AS's which crystallize at high temperatures and use bulky cooling towers, the proposed AS's avoid crystallization and have air-cooled HXs for portability. For the hottest transient week, the results showed fuel savings of 34-37%, weight reduction of 11-19%, and a volumetric footprint 3-10% smaller.

  3. Nocturnal loss of body reserves reveals high survival risk for subordinate great tits wintering at extremely low ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Krams, Indrikis; Cīrule, Dina; Vrublevska, Jolanta; Nord, Andreas; Rantala, Markus J; Krama, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Winter acclimatization in birds is a complex of several strategies based on metabolic adjustment accompanied by long-term management of resources such as fattening. However, wintering birds often maintain fat reserves below their physiological capacity, suggesting a cost involved with excessive levels of reserves. We studied body reserves of roosting great tits in relation to their dominance status under two contrasting temperature regimes to see whether individuals are capable of optimizing their survival strategies under extreme environmental conditions. We predicted less pronounced loss of body mass and body condition and lower rates of overnight mortality in dominant great tits at both mild and extremely low ambient temperatures, when ambient temperature dropped down to -43 °C. The results showed that dominant great tits consistently maintained lower reserve levels than subordinates regardless of ambient temperature. However, dominants responded to the rising risk of starvation under low temperatures by increasing their body reserves, whereas subdominant birds decreased reserve levels in harsh conditions. Yet, their losses of body mass and body reserves were always lower than in subordinate birds. None of the dominant great tits were found dead, while five young females and one adult female were found dead in nest boxes during cold spells when ambient temperatures dropped down to -43 °C. The dead great tits lost up to 23.83 % of their evening body mass during cold nights while surviving individuals lost on average 12.78 % of their evening body mass. Our results show that fattening strategies of great tits reflect an adaptive role of winter fattening which is sensitive to changes in ambient temperatures and differs among individuals of different social ranks.

  4. Association Between High Ambient Temperature and Risk of Stillbirth in California.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rupa; Sarovar, Varada; Malig, Brian J

    2016-05-15

    Recent studies have linked elevated apparent temperatures with adverse birth outcomes, such as preterm delivery, but other birth outcomes have not been well studied. We examined 8,510 fetal deaths (≥20 weeks' gestation) to estimate their association with mean apparent temperature, a combination of temperature and humidity, during the warm season in California (May-October) from 1999 to 2009. Mothers whose residential zip codes were within 10 km of a meteorological monitor were included. Meteorological data were provided by the California Irrigation Management Information System, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Climatic Data Center, while the California Department of Public Health provided stillbirth data. Using a time-stratified case-crossover study design, we found a 10.4% change (95% confidence interval: 4.4, 16.8) in risk of stillbirth for every 10°F (5.6°C) increase in apparent temperature (cumulative average of lags 2-6 days). Risk varied by maternal race/ethnicity and was greater for younger mothers, less educated mothers, and male fetuses. The highest risks were observed during gestational weeks 20-25 and 31-33. No associations were found during the cold season (November-April), and the observed associations were independent of air pollutants. This study adds to the growing body of literature identifying pregnant women and their fetuses as subgroups vulnerable to heat exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Selenium-enriched probiotics improve antioxidant status, immune function, and selenoprotein gene expression of piglets raised under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fang; Chen, Xingxiang; Liao, Shengfa F; Lv, Chenhui; Ren, Fei; Ye, Gengping; Pan, Cuiling; Huang, Da; Shi, Jun; Shi, Xiuli; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Kehe

    2014-05-21

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on growth performance, antioxidant status, immune function, and selenoprotein gene expression of piglets under natural high ambient temperature in summer. Forty-eight crossbred weanling piglets randomly allocated to four groups were fed for 42 days ad libitum a basal diet without (Con, 0.16 mg Se/kg) and with supplementation of probiotics (P, 0.16 mg Se/kg), sodium selenite (SS, 0.46 mg Se/kg), and SP (0.46 mg Se/kg). From each group, three piglets were randomly selected for blood collection on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 and tissue collection on day 42. The SP improved growth performance of piglets. Both SS and SP increased blood glutathione peroxidase activity and tissue thioredoxin reductase 1 mRNA expression, with SP being higher than SS. All P, SS, and SP supplementation increased the superoxide dismutase activity (40.1, 53.0, and 64.5%), glutathione content (84.6, 104, and 165%), TCR-induced T lymphocyte proliferation (20.8, 26.4, and 50.0%), and IL-2 concentration (24.9, 27.2, and 46.2%) and decreased malondialdehyde content (25.1, 26.3, and 49.3%), respectively. The greatest effects of SP supplementation suggest that SP may serve as a better feed additive than P or SS for piglets under high-temperature environments.

  6. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  7. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  8. Electronic Ambient-Temperature Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Larry; Barrows, William

    1995-01-01

    Electronic temperature-recording unit stores data in internal memory for later readout. Records temperatures from minus 40 degrees to plus 60 degrees C at intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. With all four data channels operating at 1.875-minute intervals, recorder stores at least 10 days' data. For only one channel at 15-minute intervals, capacity extends to up to 342 days' data. Developed for recording temperatures of instruments and life-science experiments on satellites, space shuttle, and high-altitude aircraft. Adaptable to such terrestrial uses as recording temperatures of perishable goods during transportation and of other systems or processes over long times. Can be placed directly in environment to monitor.

  9. Effect of Season and High Ambient Temperature on Activity Levels and Patterns of Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Michelle L.; McLellan, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4–27.3°C) and hot (27.9–40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  10. Torpor at high ambient temperature in a neotropical didelphid, the grey short-tailed opossum ( Monodelphis domestica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Sebastian; Lutter, Dominik; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Jastroch, Martin; Meyer, Carola W.

    2014-11-01

    The grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, has been an established research animal for more than five decades, but relatively, little is known about its thermophysiology. Here we studied core body temperature ( T b) and metabolic rate (MR) of female adult M. domestica housed in the laboratory at an ambient temperature ( T a) of 26 °C. In expanding previous reports, the average recorded core T b of M. domestica was 34.3 °C. The T b of an individual M. domestica can drop below 30 °C (minimal T b: 28.6 °C) accompanied by a reduction in MR of up to 52 % even while having ad libitum access to food. These findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of spontaneous torpor in M. domestica. Metabolic suppression at relatively high T a and T b furthermore broadens our perspective on the use of torpor as a metabolic strategy not just restricted to cold climates.

  11. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory.

  12. Torpor at high ambient temperature in a neotropical didelphid, the grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Busse, Sebastian; Lutter, Dominik; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Jastroch, Martin; Meyer, Carola W

    2014-11-01

    The grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, has been an established research animal for more than five decades, but relatively, little is known about its thermophysiology. Here we studied core body temperature (T b) and metabolic rate (MR) of female adult M. domestica housed in the laboratory at an ambient temperature (T a) of 26 °C. In expanding previous reports, the average recorded core T b of M. domestica was 34.3 °C. The T b of an individual M. domestica can drop below 30 °C (minimal T b: 28.6 °C) accompanied by a reduction in MR of up to 52 % even while having ad libitum access to food. These findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of spontaneous torpor in M. domestica. Metabolic suppression at relatively high T a and T b furthermore broadens our perspective on the use of torpor as a metabolic strategy not just restricted to cold climates.

  13. Coordination chemistry of Ti(IV) in silicate glasses and melts: III. Glasses and melts from ambient to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, François; Brown, Gordon E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Gan, Hao; Rehr, John R.

    1996-08-01

    The local structural environment of Ti in five Na-, K-, and Ca-titanosilicate glass/melts with TiO 2 concentrations ranging from 2.7-30.5 wt% has been determined by in situ Ti K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 293-1650 K. In parallel, two Ti-model compounds (Ni 2.6Ti 0.7O 4 spinel and TiO 2 rutile) were studied under the same conditions to better understand the effects of temperature (anharmonicity) on the XAFS spectra. Temperature-induced anharmonicity was found to vary, largely as a function of the Ti-coordination, and increases significantly around Ti with increasing temperature when present as [6]Ti. In contrast, anharmonicity appears negligible around [4]Ti at temperatures below 1200 K. We predict that anharmonicity should be weak around [5]Ti as well. No clear evidence was found for a significant change in the average nearest-neighbor coordination environment of Ti in the Na- and K-titanosilicate glasses and melts that exhibit anomalous heat capacities variations just above their glass transition temperatures, Tg (860-930 K). The small (predicted and measured) linear thermal expansion of the ( [5]TiO 2+) sbnd O bond in these systems at high temperature is expected to have an insignificant effect on the local environment of [5]Ti during the glass-to-supercooled liquid transition. In the most dilute Ti-glass studied (KS1; 2.7 wt% TiO 2), the local environment around [4]Ti (especially the second-neighbor alkalis) is relatively ordered at ambient temperature, but this order decreases dramatically above Tg. Lower quench rates appear to favor [4]Ti over [5]Ti. The origin of the observed anomalous positive variations in heat capacities of these melts may be related to significant changes in the medium-range environment around Ti above Tg including the disappearance of percolation domains involving interfaces between alkali-rich and network-former rich regions during structural relaxation at Tg; these percolation

  14. High-Temperature Phase Transitions in CsH2PO4 Under Ambient and High-Pressure Conditions: A Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Botez,C.; Hermosillo, J.; Zhang, J.; Qian, J.; Zhao, Y.; Majzlan, J.; Chianelli, R.; Pantea, C.

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the microscopic origin of the temperature-induced three-order-of-magnitude jump in the proton conductivity of CsH2PO4 (superprotonic behavior), we have investigated its crystal structure modifications within the 25-300 C temperature range under both ambient- and high-pressure conditions using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Our high-pressure data show no indication of the thermal decomposition/polymerization at the crystal surface recently proposed as the origin of the enhanced proton conductivity. Instead, we found direct evidence that the superprotonic behavior of the title material is associated with a polymorphic structural transition to a high-temperature cubic phase. Our results are in excellent agreement with previous high-pressure ac impedance measurements.

  15. Patients presenting with miliaria while wearing flame resistant clothing in high ambient temperatures: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Clothing can be a cause of occupational dermatitis. Frequent causes of clothing-related dermatological problems can be the fabric itself and/or chemical additives used in the laundering process, friction from certain fabrics excessively rubbing the skin, or heat retention from perspiration-soaked clothing in hot working environments. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of miliaria rubra associated with prolonged use of flame resistant clothing in the medical literature. Case presentation We report 18 cases (14 men and 4 women, with an age range of 19 to 37 years) of moderate to severe skin irritation associated with wearing flame resistant clothing in hot arid environments (temperature range: 39 to 50°C, 5% to 25% relative humidity). We describe the medical history in detail of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman and a 31-year-old African-American man. A summary of the other 16 patients is also provided. Conclusions These cases illustrate the potential serious nature of miliaria with superimposed Staphylococcus infections. All 18 patients fully recovered with topical skin treatment and modifications to their dress ensemble. Clothing, in particular blend fabrics, must be thoroughly laundered to adequately remove detergent residue. While in hot environments, individuals with sensitive skin should take the necessary precautions such as regular changing of clothing and good personal hygiene to ensure that their skin remains as dry and clean as possible. It is also important that they report to their health care provider as soon as skin irritation or rash appears to initiate any necessary medical procedures. Miliaria rubra can take a week or longer to clear, so removal of exposure to certain fabric types may be necessary. PMID:21939537

  16. The effects of feed restriction and ambient temperature on growth and ascites mortality of broilers reared at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, S; Takma, C; Yahav, S; Sögüt, B; Türkmut, L; Erturun, H; Cahaner, A

    2010-05-01

    The development of ascites was investigated in broilers at low versus high altitudes, cold versus normal ambient temperatures (AT), and 3 feeding regimens. One-day-old chicks obtained at sea level were reared at high altitude (highA; 1,720 m; n = 576) with 2 AT treatments, low AT from 3 wk onward at highA (highA/cold) and normal AT from 3 wk onward at highA (highA/norm), or at sea level (normal AT from 3 wk onward at low altitude, lowA/norm; n = 540). Under highA/cold, AT ranged between 16 to 17 degrees C in the fourth week, 17 to 19 degrees C in the fifth week, and 19 to 21 degrees C thereafter. Under highA/norm and lowA/norm, AT was 24 degrees C in the fourth week and ranged between 22 to 24 degrees C thereafter. Broilers in each condition were divided into 3 groups: feed restriction (FR) from 7 to 14 d, FR from 7 to 21 d, and ad libitum (AL). Ascites mortality and related parameters were recorded. Low mortality (0.4%) occurred under lowA/norm conditions. Under highA/norm, mortality was lower in females (8.6%) than in males (13.8%) and was not affected by the feeding regimen. The highA/cold treatment resulted in higher mortality but only in males; it was 44.2% among highA/cold AL-fed males and only about 26% under the FR regimens, suggesting that FR helped some males to better acclimatize to the highA/cold environment and avoid ascites. However, mortality was only 13.3% in AL-fed males at highA/norm and FR did not further reduce the incidence of ascites under these conditions. Thus, avoiding low AT in the poultry house by slight heating was more effective than FR in reducing ascites mortality at highA. Compared with FR from 7 to 14 d, FR from 7 to 21 d did not further reduce mortality and reduced growth. At 47 d, the majority of surviving broilers at highA had high levels of hematocrit and right ventricle:total ventricle weight ratio (>0.29), but they were healthy and reached approximately the same BW as their counterparts at low altitude. This finding may

  17. Influence of fish meal and supplemental fat on performance of finishing steers exposed to moderate or high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    White, T W; Bunting, L D; Sticker, L S; Hembry, F G; Saxton, A M

    1992-11-01

    Ninety-six Hereford x Angus steers (mean initial BW = 295 kg) were used in two growth experiments conducted at moderate and high ambient temperatures (AT), 48 steers per AT. Within each AT, calves were assigned to six dietary treatments consisting of a basal diet (approximately 60% corn and 20% grass hay) supplemented with either 0, 2.5, or 5% fat and with either soybean meal (SBM) or Menhaden fish meal (FM) included at levels such that a ratio of 16.3 kcal of NEm per kilogram of CP was maintained. Blood and ruminal fluid were collected 40 d before slaughter. During the final 28 d of the moderate AT experiment, apparent digestibility of dietary components was measured in four individually fed steers from each dietary treatment. Steer ADG was not affected by fat, and DMI and efficiency of gain were not affected (P > .10) by treatment. Average daily gain was lower for steers fed FM than for those fed SBM at moderate AT but higher at high AT (CP source x AT interaction; P < .05). Ruminal ratio of acetate to propionate declined linearly with increasing fat at moderate AT but was not affected by fat at high AT (fat x AT interaction trend; P = .08). Plasma urea N concentration increased linearly (P < .05) with increasing fat and was higher (P < .05) in steers kept at high than in those kept at moderate AT. Although apparent digestibility was not altered in steers fed FM, DM and NDF (P < .05) and ADF (P = .07) digestibility decreased with increasing fat in steers fed SBM (CP source x fat interaction).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effects Investigated of Ambient High-Temperature Exposure on Alumina-Titania High-Emittance Surfaces for Solar Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-dynamic space power systems require durable, high-emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. An alumina-titania coating, which has been evaluated for solar-dynamic heat receiver canister applications, has been chosen for a PLR application (an electrical sink for excess power from the turboalternator/compressor) because of its demonstrated high emittance and high-temperature durability in vacuum. Under high vacuum conditions (+/- 10(exp -6) torr), the alumina-titania coating was found to be durable at temperatures of 1520 F (827 C) for approx. 2700 hours with no degradation in optical properties. This coating has been successfully applied to the 2-kW solar-dynamic ground test demonstrator at the NASA Lewis Research Center, to the 500 thermal-energy-storage containment canisters inside the heat receiver and to the PLR radiator. The solar-dynamic demonstrator has successfully operated for over 800 hours in Lewis large thermal/vacuum space environment facility, demonstrating the feasibility of solar-dynamic power generation for space applications.

  19. Vitamin E and organic selenium enhances the antioxidative status and quality of chicken semen under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, T A

    2012-01-01

    1. The effects of supplemental dietary vitamin E and organic selenium (Se), and their combination, on improving semen quality characteristics and antioxidative status were investigated in cockerels exposed to high ambient temperature. 2. A total of 36 Egyptian local cross males, 40 weeks old, were housed individually in cages in an open-sided building (average daily temperature ranged from 33 to 36°C and relative humidity from 60 to 70%). Birds were divided randomly into 4 experimental treatments (n=9 each): (1) control (basal diet without any supplementation with vitamin E or Se); (2) vitamin E (basal diet +200 mg α-tocopherol acetate/kg diet); (3) Se (basal diet +0.3 mg organic Se/kg diet); and (4) vitamin E+Se (basal diet +200 mg α-tocopherol acetate/kg diet +0.3 mg organic Se/kg diet). 3. Under heat stress conditions, inclusion of vitamin E and/or organic Se in the diets enhanced the semen quality traits, including the spermatozoa count and motility, and reduced the percentage of dead spermatozoa. 4. A combination of 200 mg/kg vitamin E with 0.3 mg/kg organic Se reduced the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentration in seminal plasma samples to about 28% of the controls; and also enhanced the seminal plasma glutathione peroxidase activity by two-fold compared with controls. 5. It was concluded that dietary vitamin E in combination with organic Se has a synergistic effect in minimising lipid peroxidation and improving the antioxidative status in seminal plasma of the domestic fowl, which probably translated into enhanced spermatozoa count, motility and reduced percentage of dead spermatozoa under heat stress conditions.

  20. Effects of solar radiation and feeding time on behavior, immune response and production of lactating ewes under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sevi, A; Annicchiarico, G; Albenzio, M; Taibi, L; Muscio, A; Dell'Aquila, S

    2001-03-01

    Pseudomonadaceae as well as the highest number of mastitis related pathogens in their milk. Results suggest that provision of shaded areas can play a major role in helping lactating ewes to minimize the adverse effects of high ambient temperatures on thermal balance and energy and mineral metabolism. Changing the time of feeding to late afternoon may be beneficial to exposed ewes in lowering their heat loads during the warmest hours of the day, thereby reducing the detrimental impact of thermal stress on immune function and udder health.

  1. Growth responses of male broilers subjected to increasing air velocities at high ambient temperatures and a high dew point.

    PubMed

    Dozier, W A; Lott, B D; Branton, S L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined live performance responses of male broilers to increasing air velocity of 120 and 180 m/min reared under high cyclic temperatures (25-35-25 degrees C) with a 23 degrees C dew point from 21 to 49 d. Birds were reared in an environmental facility containing 2 wind tunnels (4 pens/tunnel) and 6 floor pens (control). At 21 d, 53 birds were placed in each pen of the wind tunnels and control group, respectively, and growth performance was determined weekly. Increasing air velocity from 120 to 180 m/min improved BW and BW gain from 29 to 35, 36 to 42, and 43 to 49 d of age leading to a cumulative advantage of 287 g in BW gain and a 10-point difference in feed conversion from 21 to 49 d of age. Subjecting birds to air velocity improved growth rate, feed consumption, and feed conversion at each weekly interval from 28 to 49 d over the control birds. These results indicate that male broilers approximating 2.0 to 3.0 kg respond to an air velocity of 180 m/min when exposed to high cyclic temperatures.

  2. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  3. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature.

    PubMed

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  4. Effects of grouping unfamiliar cohorts, high ambient temperature and stocking density on live performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, C A; Giles, L R; Jones, M R; Reverter, A

    2005-04-01

    high-density counterparts (9.04 +/- 0.38 vs. 7.49 +/- 0.29 kg). In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, the grouping of unfamiliar cohorts and high ambient temperature treatments had a detrimental effect on pig performance, and these effects were reversible.

  5. Tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) and port fuel injection (PFI) vehicles at both low and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Lai, Yitu; Zu, Lei; Li, Yufei; Su, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Vehicle emissions are greatly influenced by various factors that are related to engine technology and driving conditions. Only the fuel injection method and ambient temperature are investigated in this research. Regulated gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from two advanced gasoline-fueled vehicles, one with direct fuel injection (GDI) and the other with port fuel injection (PFI), are tested with conventional gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline (E10) at both -7 °C and 30 °C. The total particle number (PN) concentrations and size distributions are monitored with an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(+)). The solid PN concentrations are measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC) after removing volatile matters through the particle measurement program (PMP) system. The results indicate that decreasing the ambient temperature from 30 °C to -7 °C significantly increases the fuel consumption and all measured emissions except for NOx. The GDI vehicle exhibits lower fuel consumption than the PFI vehicle but emits more total hydrocarbons (THC), PM mass and solid PN emissions at 30 °C. The adaptability of GDI technology appears to be better than that of PFI technology at low ambient temperature. For example, the CO, THC and PM mass emission factors of the PFI vehicle are higher than those of the GDI vehicle and the solid PN emission factors are comparable in the cold-start tests at -7 °C. Specifically, during start-up the particulate matter emissions of the PFI are much higher than the GDI. In most cases, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the accumulation mode particles is 58-86 nm for both vehicles, and the GMD of the nucleation mode particles is 10-20 nm. The results suggest that the gaseous and particulate emissions from the PFI vehicle should not be neglected compared to those from the GDI vehicle especially in a cold environment.

  6. Simple Fabrication of Mesoporous Silica with Remarkable High Temperature Stability at Neutral pH and Ambient Conditions from TEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, David; Vippagunta, Radha; Watkins, James

    2007-03-01

    Traditional silica synthesis processes can yield well ordered materials, but the synthesis conditions also lead to incomplete condensation of the silica network, which results in significant structural contraction upon calcination and limited thermal, hydrothermal and mechanical stability. Here we report the synthesis that, surprisingly, yields nearly complete condensation of the silica network (virtually all Q4 linkages) using cysteamine as the catalyst and polyoxyethylene surfactants as the structure directing agents in buffered solution at neutral pH and ambient temperature. Recently, small molecule bifunctional amines, including cysteamine, were evaluated by Morse and co-workers and found to produce silica from TEOS(JACS 2005, 127, 35). Our work combines the cysteamine catalyst system with structure-directing block copolymer surfactants at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce mesoporous silica. The addition of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a solution of containing cysteamine, citrate buffer (pH 7.2) and 5wt Brij amphiphilic block copolymer (polyethylene oxide-polyethylene) yields mesoporous silica. The resulting mesoporous silica powder was analyzed using XRD, TGA, FTIR, TEM, and NMR. The materials were found to exhibit stability under extreme temperature calcinations (up to 800 C) in the presence of water. SAXS shows that 1.0 shrinkage upon calcination up to 800C. 29Si NMR analysis indicates a fully condensed silica network, Q4 linkages, in accordance with this observation.

  7. The effect of decreased ambient temperature on the biological nitrification and denitrification of a high ammonia landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Ilies, P; Mavinic, D S

    2001-06-01

    This research investigated the nitrogen removal capabilities of a pre- and post-denitrification process, when treating sanitary landfill leachate containing an ammonia concentration of over 2200 mg N/L, at operating temperatures down to 10 degrees C. The treatment system employed is generally known as a 4-Stage Bardenpho process. Two parallel systems were operated throughout the study; each system had an aerobic solids retention time of 20 days and an external recycle ratio (return activated sludge) of about 3:1. During the entire experimental period, one system used an internal recycle ratio of about 4:1, while the other system used one of 3:1. Methanol was used as supplementary carbon source for denitrification. When operating temperature was decreased from 20 to 17 degrees C, an approximate 15% decrease in denitrification was immediately experienced within both systems, with no noticeable affect on nitrification. This was an unexpected result. Subsequently, the temperature was further decreased to 14 degrees C, and finally to 10 degrees C. With the temperature at 14 degrees C, aerobic wasting was also stopped and methanol loading was progressively decreased to match actual denitrification requirements. At 10 degrees C, both systems suffered major nitrification and denitrification inhibition. Changes in operating parameters, such as a decrease in influent ammonia and methanol loading, as well as an increase in ambient temperatures, from 10 to 15 degrees C, did not significantly improve overall system performance, within a reasonable time frame. Both denitrification and nitrification problems were mainly attributed to decreased ambient temperature, although other possible factors were noted; at project completion, about 50% of the incoming ammonia was being removed across the system.

  8. Dietary enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. supplementation alleviates liver oxidative injury of broilers reared under high ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jingfei; He, Jintian; Bai, Kaiwen; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2017-03-01

    Heat stress induced by high ambient temperature is a major concern in commercial broiler production. To evaluate the effects of dietary enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. (EA) supplementation on growth performance and liver oxidative injury of broilers reared under heat stress, a total of 320 22-day-old male broilers were randomly allotted into five groups with eight replicates of eight birds each. Broilers in the control group were housed at 22 ± 1 °C and fed the basal diet. Broilers in the HS, HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3 groups were fed basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 g/kg EA, respectively, and reared under cyclic high temperature (34 ± 1 °C for 8 h/day and 22 ± 1 °C for 16 h/day). Broilers fed EA diets had higher final body weight, average daily body weight gain, and average daily feed intake, as well as liver concentration of reduced glutathione, activities of antioxidant enzymes, abilities to inhibit hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical (HS-EA2 and HS-EA3), and lower liver concentrations of reactive oxygen metabolites, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3) than HS group (P < 0.05). EA treatment downregulated the mRNA levels of heat shock proteins 70 and 90, upregulated the mRNA levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3) and heme oxygenase 1 (HS-EA2 and HS-EA3) in liver of heat-treated broilers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, EA alleviated heat stress-induced growth depression and liver oxidative injury in broilers, possibly through improving the antioxidant capacity and regulating the pertinent mRNA expression. The appropriate inclusion level of EA in broiler diet is 1.00-1.25 g/kg.

  9. Dietary enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. supplementation alleviates liver oxidative injury of broilers reared under high ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jingfei; He, Jintian; Bai, Kaiwen; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2017-09-01

    Heat stress induced by high ambient temperature is a major concern in commercial broiler production. To evaluate the effects of dietary enzymatically treated Artemisia annua L. (EA) supplementation on growth performance and liver oxidative injury of broilers reared under heat stress, a total of 320 22-day-old male broilers were randomly allotted into five groups with eight replicates of eight birds each. Broilers in the control group were housed at 22 ± 1 °C and fed the basal diet. Broilers in the HS, HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3 groups were fed basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 g/kg EA, respectively, and reared under cyclic high temperature (34 ± 1 °C for 8 h/day and 22 ± 1 °C for 16 h/day). Broilers fed EA diets had higher final body weight, average daily body weight gain, and average daily feed intake, as well as liver concentration of reduced glutathione, activities of antioxidant enzymes, abilities to inhibit hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical (HS-EA2 and HS-EA3), and lower liver concentrations of reactive oxygen metabolites, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3) than HS group ( P < 0.05). EA treatment downregulated the mRNA levels of heat shock proteins 70 and 90, upregulated the mRNA levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (HS-EA1, HS-EA2, and HS-EA3) and heme oxygenase 1 (HS-EA2 and HS-EA3) in liver of heat-treated broilers ( P < 0.05). In conclusion, EA alleviated heat stress-induced growth depression and liver oxidative injury in broilers, possibly through improving the antioxidant capacity and regulating the pertinent mRNA expression. The appropriate inclusion level of EA in broiler diet is 1.00-1.25 g/kg.

  10. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik; Larsen, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature. The relation between corneal temperature and ambient temperature was examined in 11 human volunteers. Furthermore, corneal temperature was measured using a thermal camera during elevation of body core temperature in three human volunteers and four rats. A linear relationship between corneal temperature and body temperature was found in the rat. For humans there was an initial linear increase in corneal temperature with increasing body temperature, but corneal temperature seemed to plateau at 36.5°C to 37.0°C despite a continued increase of body core temperature. A linear relationship between ambient and corneal temperature was found in humans but with a less steep slope than that between corneal and body core temperature. Corneal temperature is estimated to reach the maximum of 36.5°C to 37.0°C at ambient temperatures between 32.0°C and 34.5°C. If there is a causal relationship between elevated eye temperature, cataract, and presbyopia, the incidence of these eye diseases is predicted to increase with global warming. Importantly, the strong association between corneal temperature and body core temperature indicates that frequent infections could also be considered a risk factor for age-related lens disorders.

  11. A meta-analysis of the effects of high ambient temperature on growth performance of growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Gourdine, J L; St-Pierre, N R

    2011-07-01

    High ambient temperature (T) is one of the most important climatic factors influencing pig performance. Increased T occurs sporadically during summer heat waves in temperate climates and year round in tropical climates. Results of published experiments assessing the effects of high T on pig performance are surprisingly variable. Thus, a meta-analysis was performed to aggregate our knowledge and attempt to explain differences in the results across studies on the effect of increased T on ADFI and ADG in growing-finishing pigs. Data for ADFI and ADG were extracted from 86 and 80 trials, respectively, from articles published in scientific journals indexed in PubMed, Science Direct, and from proceedings of scientific meetings through November 2009. Data on ADFI and ADG were analyzed using a linear mixed model that included the linear and the quadratic effects of T and BW, and their interactions as continuous, fixed effects variables, and the trial as a random effect factor (i.e., block). In addition, the effects of housing type (2 levels: individual and group housing) and the year of publication (3 levels: 1970 to 1989, 1990 to 1999, and 2000 to 2009) on the intercept and the linear regression term for T (i.e., the slope) were also tested. Results showed that high T had a curvilinear effect on ADFI and ADG and that this effect was more pronounced in heavier pigs. Across T, ADFI was less when pigs were group-housed. The intercept and the regression coefficient (slope) for T were significantly affected by the year of publication. The effect of increased T was greater in more contemporary works, suggesting that modern genotypes could be more sensitive to heat stress than older genotypes of lesser growth potential. In conclusion, pig performance decreases at an accelerating rate as T is increased. The large between-study variability on the effects of high T on pig performance is partially explained by differences in pig BW and to a lesser extent by the year the study was

  12. Part 2. Association of daily mortality with ambient air pollution, and effect modification by extremely high temperature in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; He, Qingci; Lin, Hung-Mo; Kong, Lingli; Zhou, Dunjin; Liang, Shengwen; Zhu, Zhichao; Liao, Duanping; Liu, Wenshan; Bentley, Christy M; Dan, Jijun; Wang, Beiwei; Yang, Niannian; Xu, Shuangqing; Gong, Jie; Wei, Hongming; Sun, Huilin; Qin, Zudian

    2010-11-01

    Fewer studies have been published on the association between daily mortality and ambient air pollution in Asia than in the United States and Europe. This study was undertaken in Wuhan, China, to investigate the acute effects of air pollution on mortality with an emphasis on particulate matter (PM*). There were three primary aims: (1) to examine the associations of daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular [CVD], stroke, cardiac [CARD], respiratory [RD], cardiopulmonary [CP], and non-cardiopulmonary [non-CP] causes) with daily mean concentrations (microg/m3) of PM with an aerodynamic diameter--10 pm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), or ozone (O3); (2) to investigate the effect modification of extremely high temperature on the association between air pollution and daily mortality due to all natural causes and daily cause-specific mortality; and (3) to assess the uncertainty of effect estimates caused by the change in International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding of mortality data from Revision 9 (ICD-9) to Revision 10 (ICD-10) code. Wuhan is called an "oven city" in China because of its extremely hot summers (the average daily temperature in July is 37.2 degrees C and maximum daily temperature often exceeds 40 degrees C). Approximately 4.5 million residents live in the core city area of 201 km2, where air pollution levels are higher and ranges are wider than the levels in most cities studied in the published literature. We obtained daily mean levels of PM10, SO2, and NO2 concentrations from five fixed-site air monitoring stations operated by the Wuhan Environmental Monitoring Center (WEMC). O3 data were obtained from two stations, and 8-hour averages, from 10:00 to 18:00, were used. Daily mortality data were obtained from the Wuhan Centres for Disease Prevention and Control (WCDC) during the study period of July 1, 2000, to June 30, 2004. To achieve the first aim, we used a regression of

  13. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum)is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four sugarcane cultivars were grown for three months in sunlit greenhouses under [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720(doubled) ppm and at temperatures (T) of 1.5 (near ambient) and 6.0C higher than outside ambient T. Leaf area, stem juice, plant biomass, leaf CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of PEP ...

  14. Ambient Temperature Phase Change Launcher

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    to keep the gas in a liquid state. Argon is a good candidate for use because argon is a noble gas (the Attorney Docket No. 100903 7 of 19 third...tank 12 which stores atmospheric gas such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, argon, neon , helium, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide or xenon at high pressure...atmospheric gas as a pressurized liquid; whereby, the release of the gas into the tube ejects the missile. A microwave emitter located within the tank

  15. All inorganic ambient temperature rechargeable lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Schlaikjer, C.; Foster, D.; Kallianidis, M.

    Research and development was carried out on ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium batteries with inorganic SO2 electrolytes. The following solutes in SO2 were studied: tetrachloroaluminates, LiAlCl4, Li2B10Cl10, and LiGaCl4. Copper chloride (CuCl2) was used as one of the electrode materials.

  16. High Temperatures Enhanced Acute Mortality Effects of Ambient Particle Pollution in the “Oven” City of Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengmin; He, Qingci; Lin, Hung-Mo; Kong, Lingli; Bentley, Christy M.; Liu, Wenshan; Zhou, Dunjin

    2008-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the effect of air pollution on daily mortality is enhanced by high temperatures in Wuhan, China, using data from 2001 to 2004. Wuhan has been called an “oven” city because of its hot summers. Approximately 4.5 million permanent residents live in the 201-km2 core area of the city. Method We used a generalized additive model to analyze pollution, mortality, and covariate data. The estimates of the interaction between high temperature and air pollution were obtained from the main effects and pollutant–temperature interaction models. Results We observed effects of consistently and statistically significant interactions between particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and temperature on daily nonaccidental (p = 0.014), cardiovascular (p = 0.007), and cardiopulmonary (p = 0.014) mortality. The PM10 effects were strongest on extremely high-temperature days (daily average temperature, 33.1°C), less strong on extremely low-temperature days (2.2°C), and weakest on normal-temperature days (18.0°C). The estimates of the mean percentage of change in daily mortality per 10-μg/m3 increase in PM10 concentrations at the average of lags 0 and 1 day during hot temperature were 2.20% (95% confidence interval), 0.74–3.68) for nonaccidental, 3.28% (1.24–5.37) for cardiovascular, 2.35% (−0.03 to 4.78) for stroke, 3.31% (−0.22 to 6.97) for cardiac, 1.15% (−3.54% to 6.07) for respiratory, and 3.02% (1.03–5.04) for cardiopulmonary mortality. Conclusions We found synergistic effects of PM10 and high temperatures on daily nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and cardiopulmonary mortality in Wuhan. PMID:18795159

  17. The effects of dietary chromium(III) picolinate on growth performance, blood measurements, and respiratory rate in pigs kept in high and low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, B G; Lindemann, M D; Cromwell, G L

    2009-05-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of thermal stress and dietary Cr on growth performance and physiological variables in weanling pigs. In Exp. 1, a total of 54 pigs (BW of 5.95 +/- 0.84 kg) were allotted to a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement using 2 ambient temperatures (23.7 or 40.5 degrees C during d 14 to 28 postweaning) and 3 dietary concentrations of Cr (0, 1,000, or 2,000 microg/kg) as Cr(III) picolinate. In Exp. 2, a total of 54 pigs (BW of 5.94 +/- 1.29 kg) were allotted in the same treatment arrangement but with different ambient temperatures (26.5 or 16.0 degrees C during d 14 to 26 postweaning). In Exp. 3, a total of 36 pigs (BW of 6.40 +/- 0.72 kg) were allotted in the same treatment arrangement with ambient temperatures of 25.9 or 13.8 degrees C during d 14 to 28 postweaning. During d 0 to 14 of all experiments, a neutral ambient temperature (NT) was maintained. In Exp. 1, pigs in high ambient temperature (HT) gained less BW (575 vs. 663 g/d; P < 0.001) and consumed less feed (926 vs. 1,074 g/d; P = 0.001) than pigs in NT during d 14 to 28. However, G:F was not affected by ambient temperature (0.623 vs. 0.618 g/g; P = 0.702). Dietary Cr had no effect on growth performance. Pigs in HT had less plasma cortisol (42.0 vs. 53.7 ng/mL; P = 0.012) and glucose (6.68 vs. 6.96 ng/mL; P = 0.018). Respiratory rate of pigs in HT was greater compared with the pigs in NT (114.6 vs. 65.0 breaths/min; P < 0.001) on d 27. In Exp. 2 and 3 (pooled), pigs in low ambient temperature (LT) had decreased G:F (0.636 vs. 0.663 g/g; P < 0.01) associated with a tendency toward a greater ADFI (1,026 vs. 942 g; P = 0.079) during d 14 to 26 (28). Ambient temperature or dietary Cr supplementation had no effect on blood measurements. In Exp. 3, the respiratory rate measured on d 22 and 27 was less (43.2 vs. 54.2 breaths/min and 42.2 vs. 57.0 breaths/min, respectively; P < 0.001) in the pigs in LT than the pigs in NT with no effects of dietary Cr supplementation

  18. Near-ambient pressure XPS of high-temperature surface chemistry in Sr2Co2O5 thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Wesley T.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Crumlin, Ethan J.; ...

    2016-02-11

    Transition metal perovskite oxides are promising electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, but a lack of fundamental understanding of oxide surfaces impedes the rational design of novel catalysts with improved device efficiencies. In particular, understanding the surface chemistry of oxides is essential for controlling both catalytic activity and long-term stability. Thus, elucidating the physical nature of species on perovskite surfaces and their catalytic enhancement would generate new insights in developing oxide electrocatalysts. In this article, we perform near-ambient pressure XPS of model brownmillerite Sr2Co2O5 (SCO) epitaxial thin films with different crystallographic orientations. Detailed analysis of themore » Co 2p spectra suggests that the films lose oxygen as a function of temperature. Moreover, deconvolution of the O 1s spectra shows distinct behavior for (114)-oriented SCO films compared to (001)-oriented SCO films, where an additional bulk oxygen species is observed. These findings indicate a change to a perovskite-like oxygen chemistry that occurs more easily in (114) SCO than (001) SCO, likely due to the orientation of oxygen vacancy channels out-of-plane with respect to the film surface. This difference in surface chemistry is responsible for the anisotropy of the oxygen surface exchange coefficient of SCO and may contribute to the enhanced ORR kinetics of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ thin films by SCO surface particles observed previously.« less

  19. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  20. High-T(sub c) Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Junctions with Polyimide-Passivated Ambient Temperature Edge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barner, J. B.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Hunt, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to controllably fabricate High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) S-Normal-S (SNS) Josephson Juntions (JJ's) enhances the possibilities fro many applications, including digital circuits, SQUID's, and mixers. A wide variety of approaches to fabricating SNS-like junctions has been tried and analyzed in terms of proximity effect behavior.

  1. High-T(sub c) Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Junctions with Polyimide-Passivated Ambient Temperature Edge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barner, J. B.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Hunt, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to controllably fabricate High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) S-Normal-S (SNS) Josephson Juntions (JJ's) enhances the possibilities fro many applications, including digital circuits, SQUID's, and mixers. A wide variety of approaches to fabricating SNS-like junctions has been tried and analyzed in terms of proximity effect behavior.

  2. Ambient-temperature co-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation catalysts which operate at ambient temperature were developed for the recombination of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) dissociation products which are formed during carbon dioxide (CO2) laser operation. Recombination of these products to regenerate CO2 allows continuous operation of CO2 lasers in a closed cycle mode. Development of these catalyst materials provides enabling technology for the operation of such lasers from space platforms or in ground based facilities without constant gas consumption required for continuous open cycle operation. Such catalysts also have other applications in various areas outside the laser community for removal of CO from other closed environments such as indoor air and as an ambient temperature catalytic converter for control of auto emissions.

  3. Near-ambient pressure XPS of high-temperature surface chemistry in Sr2Co2O5 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wesley T.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-02-11

    Transition metal perovskite oxides are promising electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, but a lack of fundamental understanding of oxide surfaces impedes the rational design of novel catalysts with improved device efficiencies. In particular, understanding the surface chemistry of oxides is essential for controlling both catalytic activity and long-term stability. Thus, elucidating the physical nature of species on perovskite surfaces and their catalytic enhancement would generate new insights in developing oxide electrocatalysts. In this article, we perform near-ambient pressure XPS of model brownmillerite Sr2Co2O5 (SCO) epitaxial thin films with different crystallographic orientations. Detailed analysis of the Co 2p spectra suggests that the films lose oxygen as a function of temperature. Moreover, deconvolution of the O 1s spectra shows distinct behavior for (114)-oriented SCO films compared to (001)-oriented SCO films, where an additional bulk oxygen species is observed. These findings indicate a change to a perovskite-like oxygen chemistry that occurs more easily in (114) SCO than (001) SCO, likely due to the orientation of oxygen vacancy channels out-of-plane with respect to the film surface. This difference in surface chemistry is responsible for the anisotropy of the oxygen surface exchange coefficient of SCO and may contribute to the enhanced ORR kinetics of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ thin films by SCO surface particles observed previously.

  4. Ambient temperature sodium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Yu, Xingwen

    2015-05-13

    Ambient- or room-temperature sodium-sulfur batteries (RT Na-S) are gaining much attention as a low-cost option for large-scale electrical energy storage applications. However, their adoption is hampered by severe challenges. This concept paper summarizes first the operating principles, history, recent progress, and challenges of RT Na-S battery technology, and then suggests future directions towards enhancing performance in order for it to be a viable technology.

  5. Rapid characterization of lithium ion battery electrolytes and thermal aging products by low-temperature plasma ambient ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Britta; Nowak, Sascha; Engelhard, Carsten

    2013-03-19

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are key components for portable electronic devices that are used around the world. However, thermal decomposition products in the battery reduce its lifetime, and decomposition processes are still not understood. In this study, a rapid method for in situ analysis and reaction monitoring in LIB electrolytes is presented based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) with low-temperature plasma probe (LTP) ambient desorption/ionization for the first time. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the capabilities of ambient mass spectrometry in battery research. LTP-HR-MS is ideally suited for qualitative analysis in the ambient environment because it allows direct sample analysis independent of the sample size, geometry, and structure. Further, it is environmental friendly because it eliminates the need of organic solvents that are typically used in separation techniques coupled to mass spectrometry. Accurate mass measurements were used to identify the time-/condition-dependent formation of electrolyte decomposition compounds. A LIB model electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate was analyzed before and after controlled thermal stress and over the course of several weeks. Major decomposition products identified include difluorophosphoric acid, monofluorophosphoric acid methyl ester, monofluorophosphoric acid dimethyl ester, and hexafluorophosphate. Solvents (i.e., dimethyl carbonate) were partly consumed via an esterification pathway. LTP-HR-MS is considered to be an attractive method for fundamental LIB studies.

  6. Ambient air temperature effects on the temperature of sewage sludge composting process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-fei; Chen, Tong-bin; Gao, Ding; Huang, Ze-chun

    2005-01-01

    Using data obtained with a full-scale sewage sludge composting facility, this paper studied the effects of ambient air temperature on the composting temperature with varying volume ratios of sewage sludge and recycled compost to bulking agent. Two volume ratios were examined experimentally, 1: 0: 1 and 3: 1: 2. The results show that composting temperature was influenced by ambient air temperature and the influence was more significant when composting was in the temperature rising process: composting temperature changed 2.4-6.5 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 13 degrees C. On the other hand, the influence was not significant when composting was in the high-temperature and/or temperature falling process: composting temperature changed 0.75-1.3 degrees C when ambient air temperature changed 8-15 degrees C. Hysteresis effect was observed in composting temperature's responses to ambient air temperature. When the ventilation capability of pile was excellent (at a volume ratio of 1:0:1), the hysteresis time was short and ranging 1.1-1.2 h. On the contrary, when the proportion of added bulking agent was low, therefore less porosity in the substrate (at a volume ratio of 3:1:2), the hysteresis time was long and ranging 1.9-3.1 h.

  7. The use of climate information to estimate future mortality from high ambient temperature: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Arbuthnott, Katherine; Kovats, Sari; Hajat, Shakoor; Falloon, Pete

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Heat related mortality is of great concern for public health, and estimates of future mortality under a warming climate are important for planning of resources and possible adaptation measures. Papers providing projections of future heat-related mortality were critically reviewed with a focus on the use of climate model data. Some best practice guidelines are proposed for future research. Methods The electronic databases Web of Science and PubMed/Medline were searched for papers containing a quantitative estimate of future heat-related mortality. The search was limited to papers published in English in peer-reviewed journals up to the end of March 2017. Reference lists of relevant papers and the citing literature were also examined. The wide range of locations studied and climate data used prevented a meta-analysis. Results A total of 608 articles were identified after removal of duplicate entries, of which 63 were found to contain a quantitative estimate of future mortality from hot days or heat waves. A wide range of mortality models and climate model data have been used to estimate future mortality. Temperatures in the climate simulations used in these studies were projected to increase. Consequently, all the papers indicated that mortality from high temperatures would increase under a warming climate. The spread in projections of future climate by models adds substantial uncertainty to estimates of future heat-related mortality. However, many studies either did not consider this source of uncertainty, or only used results from a small number of climate models. Other studies showed that uncertainty from changes in populations and demographics, and the methods for adaptation to warmer temperatures were at least as important as climate model uncertainty. Some inconsistencies in the use of climate data (for example, using global mean temperature changes instead of changes for specific locations) and interpretation of the effects on

  8. The use of climate information to estimate future mortality from high ambient temperature: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Michael; Arbuthnott, Katherine; Kovats, Sari; Hajat, Shakoor; Falloon, Pete

    2017-01-01

    Heat related mortality is of great concern for public health, and estimates of future mortality under a warming climate are important for planning of resources and possible adaptation measures. Papers providing projections of future heat-related mortality were critically reviewed with a focus on the use of climate model data. Some best practice guidelines are proposed for future research. The electronic databases Web of Science and PubMed/Medline were searched for papers containing a quantitative estimate of future heat-related mortality. The search was limited to papers published in English in peer-reviewed journals up to the end of March 2017. Reference lists of relevant papers and the citing literature were also examined. The wide range of locations studied and climate data used prevented a meta-analysis. A total of 608 articles were identified after removal of duplicate entries, of which 63 were found to contain a quantitative estimate of future mortality from hot days or heat waves. A wide range of mortality models and climate model data have been used to estimate future mortality. Temperatures in the climate simulations used in these studies were projected to increase. Consequently, all the papers indicated that mortality from high temperatures would increase under a warming climate. The spread in projections of future climate by models adds substantial uncertainty to estimates of future heat-related mortality. However, many studies either did not consider this source of uncertainty, or only used results from a small number of climate models. Other studies showed that uncertainty from changes in populations and demographics, and the methods for adaptation to warmer temperatures were at least as important as climate model uncertainty. Some inconsistencies in the use of climate data (for example, using global mean temperature changes instead of changes for specific locations) and interpretation of the effects on mortality were apparent. Some factors which have

  9. Does ambient temperature affect foodborne disease?

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Rennie M; Becker, Niels G; Hall, Gillian; Moodie, Keith B A

    2004-01-01

    Foodborne illness is a significant public health issue in most countries, including Australia. We examined the association between temperature and salmonellosis notifications, and compared these associations for 5 Australian cities. Log-linear models describing monthly salmonellosis notifications in terms of calendar time and monthly average temperatures were fitted over the period 1991 to 2001 for each city. We used a negative binomial chance model to accommodate overdispersion in the counts. The long-term trend showed an increase in salmonellosis notifications in each of the 5 cities. There was a positive association between monthly salmonellosis notifications and mean monthly temperature of the previous month in every city. Seasonal patterns in salmonellosis notifications were fully explained by changes in temperature. The strength of the association, the consistency across 5 cities, and a plausible biologic pathway suggest that higher ambient temperatures are a cause of higher salmonellosis notifications. The lag of 1 month suggests that temperature might be more influential earlier in the production process rather than at the food preparation stage. This knowledge can help to guide policy on food preparation and distribution. It also suggests a basis for an early warning system for increased risk from salmonellosis, and raises yet another possible health problem with global warming.

  10. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions.During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70% (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions.

  11. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions. During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70 % (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions.

  12. Hydride reorientation and its impact on ambient temperature mechanical properties of high burn-up irradiated and unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding with an inner liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzoux, Q.; Bouffioux, P.; Machiels, A.; Yagnik, S.; Bourdiliau, B.; Mallet, C.; Mozzani, N.; Colas, K.

    2017-10-01

    Precipitation of radial hydrides in zirconium-based alloy cladding concomitant with the cooling of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage can potentially compromise cladding integrity during its subsequent handling and transportation. This paper investigates hydride reorientation and its impact on ductility in unirradiated and irradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 cladding with an inner liner (cladding for boiling water reactors) subjected to hydride reorientation treatments. Cooling from 400 °C, hydride reorientation occurs in recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner at a lower effective stress in irradiated samples (below 40 MPa) than in unirradiated specimens (between 40 and 80 MPa). Despite significant hydride reorientation, unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼200 wppm hydrogen shows a high diametral strain at fracture (>15%) during burst tests at ambient temperature. This ductile behavior is due to (1) the lower yield stress of the recrystallized cladding materials in comparison to hydride fracture strength (corrected by the compression stress arising from the precipitation) and (2) the hydride or hydrogen-depleted zone as a result of segregation of hydrogen into the liner layer. In irradiated Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼340 wppm hydrogen, the conservation of some ductility during ring tensile tests at ambient temperature after reorientation treatment at 400 °C with cooling rates of ∼60 °C/h is also attributed to the existence of a hydride-depleted zone. Treatments at lower cooling rates (∼6 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h) promote greater levels of hydrogen segregation into the liner and allow for increased irradiation defect annealing, both of which result in a significant increase in ductility. Based on this investigation, given the very low cooling rates typical of dry storage systems, it can be concluded that the thermal transients associated with dry storage should not degrade, and more likely should actually

  13. The Combined Effect of High Ambient Temperature and Antihypertensive Treatment on Renal Function in Hospitalized Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Novack, Victor; Rogachev, Boris; Haviv, Yosef S.; Barski, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Background The aging kidney manifests structural, functional as well as pharmacological changes, rendering elderly patients more susceptible to adverse environmental influences on their health, dehydration in particular. Hypothesis Higher temperature is associated with renal function impairment in patients 65 years and older who routinely take thiazide and/or ACE-inhibitors/ARBs. Methods We obtained health data of patients older than 65 who were admitted to a large tertiary center during the years 2006–2011, with a previous diagnosis of hypertension, and treated with thiazide, ACE-inhibitors/ARBs or both. We collected environmental data of daily temperature, available from collaborative public and governmental institutions. In order to estimate the effect of daily temperature on renal function we performed linear mixed models, separately for each treatment group and creatinine change during hospital admission. Results We identified 26,286 admissions for 14, 268 patients with a mean age of 75.6 (±6.9) years, of whom 53.6% were men. Increment in daily temperature on admission of 5°C had significant effect on creatinine increase in the no treatment (baseline creatinine adjusted 0.824 mg/dL, % change 1.212, % change 95% C.I 0.082–2.354) and dual treatment groups (baseline creatinine adjusted 1.032mg/dL, % change 3.440, % change 95% C.I 1.227–5.700). Sub-analysis stratified by advanced age, chronic kidney disease and primary diagnosis on hospital admission, revealed a significant association within patients admitted due to acute infection and treated with dual therapy. Conclusion Whereas previous studies analyzed sporadic climate effects during heat waves and/or excluded older population taking anti-hypertensive medications, the present study is novel by showing a durable association of temperature and decreased renal function specifically in elderly patients taking anti-hypertensive medications. PMID:27992525

  14. In Situ Ptychography of Heterogeneous Catalysts using Hard X-Rays: High Resolution Imaging at Ambient Pressure and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Scholz, Maria; Benzi, Federico; Rochet, Amélie; Hoppe, Robert; Scherer, Torsten; Shi, Junjie; Wittstock, Arne; Weinhausen, Britta; Wagner, Jakob B; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-02-01

    A new closed cell is presented for in situ X-ray ptychography which allows studies under gas flow and at elevated temperature. In order to gain complementary information by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the cell makes use of a Protochips E-chipTM which contains a small, thin electron transparent window and allows heating. Two gold-based systems, 50 nm gold particles and nanoporous gold as a relevant catalyst sample, were used for studying the feasibility of the cell. Measurements showing a resolution around 40 nm have been achieved under a flow of synthetic air and during heating up to temperatures of 933 K. An elevated temperature exhibited little influence on image quality and resolution. With this study, the potential of in situ hard X-ray ptychography for investigating annealing processes of real catalyst samples is demonstrated. Furthermore, the possibility to use the same sample holder for ex situ electron microscopy before and after the in situ study underlines the unique possibilities available with this combination of electron microscopy and X-ray microscopy on the same sample.

  15. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

  16. Stirling, near-ambient temperature refrigerators - Innovative compact designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, G.; Reader, G.; Fauvel, R.; Bingham, E. R.

    Opportunities for the development and application of 'near-ambient' temperature refrigerating systems in connection with public concern over the impact of Freon refrigerants on the earth's ozone layer are examined. Previous work is reviewed, and recent innovative concepts and designs for compact Stirling refrigerators that could be the basis for alternatives for Freon-free refrigeration are presented. The advantages offered by Stirling refrigerators are high thermodynamic performance, simplicity, compactness, low weight and low cost.

  17. Effect of a high or low ambient perinatal temperature on adult obesity in Osborne-Mendel and S5B/Pl rats.

    PubMed

    White, Christy L; Braymer, H Doug; York, David A; Bray, George A

    2005-05-01

    Perinatal environment is an important determinant of health status of adults. We tested the hypothesis that perinatal ambient temperature alters sympathetic activity and affects body composition in adult life and that this effect differs between S5B/Pl (S5B) and Osborne-Mendel (OM) strains of rat that were resistant (S5B) or susceptible (OM) to dietary obesity. From 1 wk before birth, rat litters were raised at either 18 or 30 degrees C until 2 mo of age while consuming a chow diet. Rats were then housed at normal housing temperature (22 degrees C) and provided either high-fat or low-fat diet. OM rats initially reared at 18 degrees C gained more weight on both diets than those reared at 30 degrees C. Perinatal temperature had no effect on body weight gain of the S5B rats on either diet. At 12 wk of age, OM and S5B rats reared at 18 degrees C had higher intakes of the high-fat diet than those reared at 30 degrees C but lower beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3-AR) and uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT). The increase in metabolic rate in response to the beta3-agonist CL-316243, was greater in both OM and S5B rats reared at 18 degrees C than in those reared at 30 degrees C. Perinatal temperature differentially affects body weight in OM and S5B rats while having similar effects on food intake, response to a beta3-agonist, and BAT beta3-AR and UCP-1. The data suggest that OM rats are more susceptible to epigenetic programming than S5B rats.

  18. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  19. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous TiO2-sphere-supported Au-nanoparticle catalysts with high activity for CO oxidation at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Huang, Shouying; Zhu, Baolin; Zhang, Shoumin; Huang, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Mesoporous TiO2-sphere-supported Au-nanoparticles (Au/m-TiO2-spheres) catalysts have been synthesized by a simple method using tetrabutyl titanate as TiO2 precursor and characterized with XRD, BET, ICP, SEM, TEM, UV-Vis DRS, XPS, as well as FT-IR. The samples with the size in the range of 200-400 nm were almost perfectly spherical. The average diameter of pores was about 3.6 nm, and the mesopore size distribution was in the range of 2-6 nm with a narrow distribution. When the catalyst was calcined at 300 °C, the Au NPs with the size ca. 5 nm were highly dispersed on the surfaces of m-TiO2 spheres and partially embedded in the supports. Remarkably, the specific surface area of the Au/m-TiO2-spheres was as high as 117 m2 g-1. The CO-adsorbed catalyst showed an apparent IR adsorption peak at 1714 cm-1 that matched with bridging model CO. It means the catalysts should be of high catalytic activity for the CO oxidation due to they could adsorb and activate CO commendably. When Au-content was 0.48 wt.%, the Au/m-TiO2-spheres could convert CO completely into CO2 at ambient temperature.

  20. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  1. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  2. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  3. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  4. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  5. Measurement of the mechanical properties of car body sheet steels at high strain rates and non ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleck, W.; Larour, P.

    2003-09-01

    Crash behaviour and light weight have become the major design criteria for car bodies. Modem high strength steels offer appropriate solutions for these requirements. The prediction of the crash behaviour in simulation programs requires the information on materials behaviour during dynamic testing. The reduction of the signal waviness and the inertia effects at strain rates above 50s^{-1} are major issues in dynamic tensile testing. Damping techniques or load measurement on the sample itself are the common way to reduce oscillations. Strain measurement from the piston displacement or from optical devices on the specimen itself are also compared. Advantages and drawbacks of those various measurement techniques are presented.

  6. Effect of natural betaine and ractopamine HCl on whole-body and carcass growth in pigs housed under high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, S M; Boyd, R D; Zier-Rush, C E; Ferket, P R; Haydon, K D; van Heugten, E

    2017-07-01

    .0 mm), and predicted lean percentage (53.2 vs. 52.6%), and reduced backfat (18.7 vs. 20.4 mm). Collectively, data indicate that under commercial conditions, betaine did not improve performance of pigs housed under high ambient temperatures, regardless of ractopamine inclusion. Ractopamine improved whole-body growth and especially carcass growth of pigs raised under high ambient temperatures. The ability of ractopamine to stimulate growth during heat stress makes it an important production technology.

  7. Promoted Metals Combustion at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    Promoted combustion testing of materials, Test 17 of NASA STD-6001, has been used to assess metal propensity to burn in oxygen rich environments. An igniter is used at the bottom end of a rod to promote ignition, and if combustion is sustained, the burning progresses from the bottom to the top of the rod. The physical mechanisms are very similar to the upward flammability test, Test 1 of NASA STD-6001. The differences are in the normal environmental range of pressures, oxygen content, and sample geometry. Upward flammability testing of organic materials can exhibit a significant transitional region between no burning to complete quasi-state burning. In this transitional region, the burn process exhibits a probabilistic nature. This transitional region has been identified for metals using the promoted combustion testing method at ambient initial temperatures. The work given here is focused on examining the transitional region and the quasi-steady burning region both at conventional ambient testing conditions and at elevated temperatures. A new heated promoted combustion facility and equipment at Marshall Space Flight Center have just been completed to provide the basic data regarding the metals operating temperature limits in contact with oxygen rich atmospheres at high pressures. Initial data have been obtained for Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 321, Haynes 214, and Inconel 718 at elevated temperatures in 100-percent oxygen atmospheres. These data along with an extended data set at ambient initial temperature test conditions are examined. The pressure boundaries of acceptable, non-burning usage is found to be lowered at elevated temperature.

  8. Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, G.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-07-01

    A new type of highly conductive Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte, referred to as the Innovision polymer electrolyte, is completely amorphous at room temperature and has an ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm. This report discusses the electrochemical characteristics (lithium oxidation and reduction), conductivity, and physical properties of Innovision electrolytes containing various dissolved salts. These electrolytes are particularly interesting since they appear to have some of the highest room-temperature lithium ion conductivities yet observed among polymer electrolytes. 13 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  10. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  11. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  12. Developing a thermoacoustic sensor adaptive to ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Ang, Woon; Lim, Allan; Yu, Xiaojian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and adaptive thermoacoustic sensor was designed to measure Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS). Compared to other thermoacoustic sensor designs, our novelty lies in (i) integrating an ultrasound medium layer during the measurement to simplify the complicated set-up procedures and (ii) taking the effect of ambient temperatures into design consideration. After measuring temperature increases with various ambient temperatures under different ultrasound intensities, a relationship among ultrasound intensities, ambient temperatures and coefficients of temporal temperature changes was calculated. Our improved design has made the sensor easy to operate and its performance more accurate and consistent than the thermoacoustic sensor designs without considering ambient temperatures. In all, our improved design greatly enhances the thermoacoustic sensor in practical ultrasound calibration.

  13. Ambient temperature and morbidity: a review of epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan; Tong, Shilu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature-morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature-morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable.

  14. Quantitative methods for stochastic high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear analysis: Assessing health effects of exposure to extreme ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Alexander

    regionalization method algorithmically forms eight climatically homogeneous regions for Conterminous US from satellite Remote Sensing inputs. The relative risk of hospitalizations due to extreme ambient temperature varied across climatic regions. Difference in regional hospitalization rates suggests presence of an adaptation effect to a prevailing climate. In various climatic regions the hospitalizations peaked earlier than the peak of exposure. This suggests disproportionally high impact of extreme weather events, such as cold spells or heat waves when they occur early in the season. These findings provide an insight into the use of high frequency disjoint data sets for the assessment of the magnitude, timing, synchronization and non-linear properties of adverse health consequences due to exposure to extreme weather events to the elderly in defined climatic regions. These findings assist in the creation of decision support frameworks targeting preventions and adaptation strategies such as improving infrastructure, providing energy assistance, education and early warning notifications for the vulnerable population. This dissertation offers a number of methodological innovations for the assessment of the high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear impacts of extreme weather events on human health. These innovations help to ensure an improved protection of the elderly population, aid policy makers in the development of efficient disaster prevention strategies, and facilitate more efficient allocation of scarce resources.

  15. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  16. Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Human Tear Film.

    PubMed

    Abusharha, Ali A; Pearce, E Ian; Fagehi, Raied

    2016-09-01

    During everyday life, the tear film is exposed to a wide range of ambient temperatures. This study aims to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on tear film physiology. A controlled environment chamber was used to create different ambient temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) at a constant relative humidity of 40%. Subjects attended for two separate visits and were exposed to 25, 20, and 15°C at one visit and to 10 and 5°C at the other visit. The subjects were exposed to each room temperature for 10 min before investigating tear film parameters. The order of the visits was random. Tear physiology parameters assessed were tear evaporation rate, noninvasive tear break-up time (NITBUT), lipid layer thickness (LLT), and ocular surface temperature (OST). Each parameter was assessed under each condition. A threefold increase in tear evaporation rate was observed as ambient temperature increased to 25°C (P=0.00). The mean evaporation rate increased from 0.056 μL/min at 5°C to 0.17 μL/min at 25°C. The mean NITBUT increased from 7.31 sec at 5°C to 12.35 sec at 25°C (P=0.01). A significant change in LLT was also observed (P=0.00), LLT median ranged between 20 and 40 nm at 5 and 10°C and increased to 40 and 90 nm at 15, 20, and 25°C. Mean reduction of 4°C OST was observed as ambient temperature decreased from 25 to 5°C. Ambient temperature has a considerable effect on human tear film characteristics. Tear evaporation rate, tear LLT, tear stability, and OST were considerably affected by ambient temperature. Chronic exposure to low ambient temperature would likely result in symptoms of dry eye and ultimately ocular surface disorders.

  17. A method to measure internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; Li, Zhou; He, Fengyun; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    The suppression level of internal stray radiation is a key criterion for infrared imaging systems, especially for high-precision cryogenic infrared imaging systems. To achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures, a measurement method, which is based on radiometric calibration, is presented in this paper. First of all, the calibration formula is deduced considering the integration time, and the effect of ambient temperature on internal stray radiation is further analyzed in detail. Then, an approach is proposed to measure the internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures. By calibrating the system under two ambient temperatures, the quantitative relation between the internal stray radiation and the ambient temperature can be acquired, and then the internal stray radiation of the cryogenic infrared imaging system under various ambient temperatures can be calculated. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can be used to measure internal stray radiation with high accuracy at various ambient temperatures and integration times. The proposed method has some advantages, such as simple implementation and the capability of high-precision measurement. The measurement results can be used to guide the stray radiation suppression and to test whether the internal stray radiation suppression performance meets the requirement or not.

  18. Ambient Temperature and Morbidity: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. Data sources and data extraction: We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Data synthesis: Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature–morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature–morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. Conclusions: There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable. PMID:21824855

  19. High Temperature, High Ambient CO₂ Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes.

  20. High Temperature, High Ambient CO2 Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Del Toro, Francisco J.; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J.; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes. PMID:26313753

  1. Ambient Temperature and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Eliot, Melissa N.; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Wellenius, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some prior studies have linked ambient temperature with risk of cerebrovascular events. If causal, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this putative association remain unknown. Temperature-related changes in cerebral vascular function may play a role, but this hypothesis has not been previously evaluated. Methods We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and cerebral vascular function among 432 participants ≥65 years old from the MOBILIZE Boston Study with data on cerebrovascular blood flow, cerebrovascular resistance, and cerebrovascular reactivity in the middle cerebral artery. We used linear regression models to assess the association of mean ambient temperature in the previous 1 to 28 days with cerebrovascular hemodynamics adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results A 10°C increase in the 21-day moving average of ambient temperature was associated with a 10.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2%, 17.3%) lower blood flow velocity, a 9.0% (95% CI, 0.7%, 18.0%) higher cerebrovascular resistance, and a 15.3% (95%CI, 2.7%, 26.4%) lower cerebral vasoreactivity. Further adjustment for ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) did not materially alter the results. However, we found statistically significant interactions between ambient temperature and PM2.5 such that the association between temperature and blood flow velocity was attenuated at higher levels of PM2.5. Conclusions In this elderly population, we found that ambient temperature was negatively associated with cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular vasoreactivity and positively associated with cerebrovascular resistance. Changes in vascular function may partly underlie the observed associations between ambient temperature and risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26258469

  2. Ambient pressure, low-temperature synthesis and characterization of colloidal InN nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Yun, Dong Soo; Hu, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Highly soluble, non-aggregated colloidal wurtzite InN nanocrystals were obtained through an ambient pressure, low-temperature method followed by post-synthesis treatment with nitric acid. PMID:25484524

  3. Entrainment of circadian rhythm by ambient temperature cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Much is known about how environmental light-dark cycles synchronize circadian rhythms in animals. The ability of environmental cycles of ambient temperature to synchronize circadian rhythms has also been investigated extensively but mostly in ectotherms. In the present study, the synchronization of the circadian rhythm of running-wheel activity by environmental cycles of ambient temperature was studied in laboratory mice. Although all mice were successfully entrained by a light-dark cycle, only 60% to 80% of the mice were entrained by temperature cycles (24-32 degrees C or 24-12 degrees C), and attainment of stable entrainment seemed to take longer under temperature cycles than under a light-dark cycle. This suggests that ambient temperature cycles are weaker zeitgebers than light-dark cycles, which is consistent with the results of the few previous studies using mammalian species. Whereas 80% of the mice were entrained by 24-h temperature cycles, only 60% were entrained by 23-h cycles, and none was entrained by 25-h cycles. The results did not clarify whether entrainment by temperature cycles is caused directly by temperature or indirectly through a temperature effect on locomotor activity, but it is clear that the rhythm of running-wheel activity in mice can be entrained by ambient temperature cycles in the nonnoxious range.

  4. High temperature be panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, R.; Jensen, M.; Grant, L.

    1989-01-01

    Beryllium materials have been used for many aerospace applications over the years. Most of these applications have been fairly ambient environments. The possibility of fabricating beryllium panels for high temperature applications up to 1200 F is investigated. Joining alloys were reviewed, tested and evaluated for high temperature applications.

  5. Effects of dietary supplementation of selenium-enriched probiotics on production performance and intestinal microbiota of weanling piglets raised under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lv, C H; Wang, T; Regmi, N; Chen, X; Huang, K; Liao, S F

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of selenium-enriched probiotics (SeP) on production performance and intestinal microbiota of piglets raised under high ambient temperature. Forty-eight cross-bred weanling piglets (28 days old), randomly allotted into 12 pens (four piglets/pen) and four dietary treatments (three pens/treatment group), were fed ad libitum for 42 days a basal diet (Con) or the basal diet supplemented with probiotics (Pro), sodium selenite (ISe) or a SeP preparation. Blood and faecal samples were collected on days 0, 14, 28 and 42 post-treatment. The SeP group had higher final BW (p < 0.05), greater ADG (p < 0.05) and lower FCR (p < 0.01) than the Pro, ISe or Con group. The diarrhoea incidence rate of either SeP or Pro group was lower (p < 0.01) than the ISe or Con group. Blood Se concentration and GSH-Px activity were both higher (p < 0.01) in the SeP than in the Pro, ISe or Con group. On days 28 and 42, the serum concentrations of T3 were higher (p < 0.01) and T4 lower (p < 0.01) in the SeP than in the ISe group, and the T3 and T4 concentrations in the ISe group, in turn, were higher (p < 0.05) and lower (p < 0.01), respectively, than in the Pro or Con group. Also on days 28 and 42, the faecal counts of lactobacillus bacteria were higher (p < 0.01) while Escherichia coli lower (p < 0.01) in the SeP or Pro group as compared to the ISe or Con group. The results of RFLP showed that the faecal microbial flora in the SeP group changed the most (numerically) as compared to the Pro or ISe group. These results suggest that the SeP product may serve as a better alternative to antibiotics than the solo probiotics for using as a growth promoter for weanling piglets.

  6. Effect of high ambient temperature and naked neck genotype on performance of dwarf brown-egg layers selected for improved clutch length.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Bordas, A; Gourichon, D; Tixier-Boichard, M

    2004-06-01

    1. Two experimental lines of dwarf brown-egg layers selected on clutch length were reciprocally crossed. In total, 288 hens, from three genotypes: L1, purebred normally feathered (121 hens), F1, crossbred and heterozygous for the NA mutation (99 hens) or L2, purebred homozygous for NA (68 hens) were housed in three climatic rooms at 22 degrees C and three climatic rooms at 32 degrees C. 2. Body weight, daily egg production records, feed intake and some anatomical and physiological traits were recorded. Canonical discriminant analysis was used to examine the relationships among all measured traits and to compare the experimental groups as defined by genotype and temperature. 3. Heterosis effects were observed on body weight, feed intake, egg mass and some anatomical traits at 22 degrees C, but were negligible for most of the traits measured at 32 degrees C except for body weight at 34 weeks, clutch length and some anatomical traits. 4. Genotype by temperature interactions were observed for egg production, egg mass and feed intake. The temperature stress was severe, with a marked decrease in egg production. The naked neck gene could limit the negative effect of long-term heat stress. Egg weight was increased by the NA gene, as usually observed in layers. 5. The first three canonical variates explained altogether 97.4% of the variance. The first canonical variate was associated almost exclusively with ambient temperature. The second was associated with genotype. The third was associated with heterozygous genotype for NA mutation and genotype by temperature interaction. Stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that 12 traits out of 20 were effective at detecting the differences among the genotype and temperature combinations.

  7. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  8. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M Denise

    2013-10-23

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals.

  9. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M. Denise

    2013-01-01

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals. PMID:24046878

  10. Three Mile Island ambient-air-temperature sensor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, M.O.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the ambient-air-temperature sensors in Three Mile Island-Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor containment building are analyzed. The data were for the period of the hydrogen burn that was part of the TMI-2 accident. From the temperature data, limits are placed on the duration of the hydrogen burn.

  11. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters.

  12. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  13. Ambient Temperature Compensation of Thin Film Pirani Vacuum Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    A thin film Pirani vacuum sensor having a single microheater and two diode-thermistors (Th-A and Th-B) composed of pn junction diodes on the micro-air-bridge (MAB) is fabricated by micromachining technologies. A method to eliminate the ambient temperature effects based on double pulse-heating (pulse duration: 125ms) up to two different temperatures, Th and Tl, above the room temperature in vacuum sensing is proposed. Pulse-heating has also a merit to prevent temperature increase of the sensor chip. It is demonstrated that the Pirani gauge with a cantilever type MAB structure can almost compensate the ambient temperature effects by double pulse-heating. A method to correct the errors due to the non-linearity in the I-T relationship of the diode-thermistor as a very sensitive temperature sensor is also described.

  14. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  15. Method for emissivity measurement of semitransparent coatings at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Honnerová, Petra; Martan, Jiří; Veselý, Zdeněk; Honner, Milan

    2017-05-03

    Coatings deposited on a material surface are effective way of changing its surface properties. For increasing or decreasing radiation heat transfer, coatings with high or low emissivity are used. Measurement of spectral emissivity is a fundamental step to effective use of coatings for this application. Up to now the measurement methods are focused on bulk samples and mainly opaque ones. Here we present a method enabling measurement of emissivity of semitransparent coating itself, although it is deposited on a substrate. The method is based on measurement of transmittance and reflectance using an integration sphere system and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for samples with two different coating thicknesses deposited on transparent substrates. Measured transmittance of the coating indicates spectral regions of potential emissivity differences using different substrates. From all the measured values, spectral emissivity can be characterized for different coating thicknesses. The spectral range of the method is from 2 μm to 20 μm. The measurement is done at ambient temperature enabling measurement of samples sensitive to heating like biomedical or nanocoatings. The method was validated on known bulk samples and an example of semitransparent coating measurement is shown on high-temperature high-emissivity coating.

  16. Ambient temperature influences birds' decisions to eat toxic prey☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, M.; Halpin, C.G.; Rowe, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aposematic prey warn predators of their toxicity using conspicuous signals. However, predators regularly include aposematic prey in their diets, particularly when they are in a poor energetic state and in need of nutrients. We investigated whether or not an environmental factor, ambient temperature, could change the energetic state of predators and lead to an increased intake of prey that they know to contain toxins. We found that European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, increased their consumption of mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, prey containing quinine (a mild toxin) when the ambient temperature was reduced below their thermoneutral zone from 20 °C to 6 °C. The birds differed in their sensitivity to changes in ambient temperature, with heavier birds increasing the number of toxic prey they ate more rapidly with decreasing temperature compared to birds with lower body mass. This could have been the result of their requiring more nutrients at lower temperatures or being better able to detoxify quinine. Taken together, our results suggest that conspicuous coloration may be more costly at lower temperatures, and that aposematic prey may need to invest more in chemical defences as temperatures decline. Our study also provides novel insights into what factors affect birds' decisions to eat toxic prey, and demonstrates that selection pressures acting on prey defences can vary with changing temperature across days, seasons, climes, and potentially in response to climate change. PMID:24109148

  17. Ambient temperature influences birds' decisions to eat toxic prey.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Halpin, C G; Rowe, C

    2013-10-01

    Aposematic prey warn predators of their toxicity using conspicuous signals. However, predators regularly include aposematic prey in their diets, particularly when they are in a poor energetic state and in need of nutrients. We investigated whether or not an environmental factor, ambient temperature, could change the energetic state of predators and lead to an increased intake of prey that they know to contain toxins. We found that European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, increased their consumption of mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, prey containing quinine (a mild toxin) when the ambient temperature was reduced below their thermoneutral zone from 20 °C to 6 °C. The birds differed in their sensitivity to changes in ambient temperature, with heavier birds increasing the number of toxic prey they ate more rapidly with decreasing temperature compared to birds with lower body mass. This could have been the result of their requiring more nutrients at lower temperatures or being better able to detoxify quinine. Taken together, our results suggest that conspicuous coloration may be more costly at lower temperatures, and that aposematic prey may need to invest more in chemical defences as temperatures decline. Our study also provides novel insights into what factors affect birds' decisions to eat toxic prey, and demonstrates that selection pressures acting on prey defences can vary with changing temperature across days, seasons, climes, and potentially in response to climate change.

  18. Imaging hydrothermal systems associated with oceanic ridge: ambient noise and travel-time tomographies in the Reykjanes high-temperature area, SW-Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Ágústsson, Kristjan; Verdel, Arie; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Specht, Sebastian; Stefánsson, Stefán; Tryggvason, Hörður; Erbas, Kemal; Deon, Fiorenza; Erlendsson, Ögmundur; Guðnason, Egill; Hersir, Gylfi; Ryberg, Trond; Halldórsdóttir, Sæunn; Weemstra, Cornelius; Bruhn, David; Flovenz, Ólafur; Friðleifsson, Ómar

    2015-04-01

    Analogue outcrops of hydrothermal fossil systems and simulating pressure/temperature conditions in the laboratory are classical methods for assessing supercritical conditions in magmatic environments. Scientific drilling is used when Earth surface sampled rocks cannot sufficiently explain past geological processes and when geophysical imaging does not sufficiently explain observed phenomena. However, our understanding of structural and dynamic characteristics of geothermal systems can be improved through application of advanced and/or innovative exploration technologies. Unlike resistivity imaging, active and passive seismic techniques have rarely been used in volcanic geothermal areas, because processing techniques were not adapted to geothermal conditions. Recent advances in volcano-seismology have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present here preliminary analyses of seismic records around a geothermal reservoir located both on-land and offshore along the Reykjanes Ridge, SW-Iceland. We deployed 214 on-land stations and 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers since April 2014. We analyse more than 6 months of part of those records. We present first results of both travel-time tomography and ambient noise tomography and we discuss briefly implications for geothermal exploration in volcanic contexts.

  19. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates ࣈ 5.7 L/min and ࣈ 11.3 L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range - 10(o) C ⩽ To ⩽50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Ambient temperature, air pollution, and heart rate variability in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cizao; O'Neill, Marie S; Park, Sung Kyun; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2011-05-01

    Studies show that ambient temperature and air pollution are associated with cardiovascular disease and that they may interact to affect cardiovascular events. However, few epidemiologic studies have examined mechanisms through which ambient temperature may influence cardiovascular function. The authors examined whether temperature was associated with heart rate variability (HRV) in a Boston, Massachusetts, study population and whether such associations were modified by ambient air pollution concentrations. The population was a cohort of 694 older men examined between 2000 and 2008. The authors fitted a mixed model to examine associations between temperature and air pollution and their interactions with repeated HRV measurements, adjusting for covariates selected a priori on the basis of their previous studies. Results showed that higher ambient temperature was associated with decreases in HRV measures (standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals, low-frequency power, and high-frequency power) during the warm season but not during the cold season. These warm-season associations were significantly greater when ambient ozone levels were higher (>22.3 ppb) but did not differ according to levels of ambient fine (≤2.5 μm) particulate matter. The authors conclude that temperature and ozone, exposures to both of which are expected to increase with climate change, might act together to worsen cardiovascular health and/or precipitate cardiovascular events via autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

  1. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes.

  2. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  3. Antioxidant enzyme activities, plasma hormone levels and serum metabolites of finishing broiler chickens reared under high ambient temperature and fed lemon and orange peel extracts and Curcuma xanthorrhiza essential oil.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, A; Golian, A; Kermanshahi, H; De Smet, S; Michiels, J

    2015-02-01

    The negative effects of high ambient temperature during some months of the year on poultry production have been of great concern in many countries. Dietary modifications are among the most practical ways to alleviate the effects of high temperature. Possible effects of dietary supplementation with 200 or 400 mg/kg feed of lemon peel extract (LPE), orange peel extract (OPE) and Curcuma xanthorrhiza essential oil (CXEO) under hot conditions (34 °C with 50% relative humidity for 5 h daily starting from day 28 until day 38 of age) on blood antioxidant enzyme activities, biochemical parameters and antibody titres of broiler chickens were investigated. All extracts are rich in phenolic compounds and highly available. Compared to control, supplementation with OPE at 400 mg/kg and CXEO significantly increased erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity, plasma growth hormone concentrations and serum phosphorus, total protein and chloride concentrations and decreased serum low-density lipoprotein and cholesterol concentrations in chickens at 38 days of age. Regarding antibody titres, CXEO supplementation at 400 mg/kg caused a significant increase in bronchitis antibody titres. Supplementation with LPE and OPE gave more inconsistent results. Most interesting, 400 mg/kg LPE significantly increased 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and GH concentration as compared to the control. In conclusion, the herbal extracts tested in this study, in particular CXEO at 400 mg/kg, may relieve some of the changes in blood composition induced by increased ambient temperatures.

  4. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  5. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150-220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99-1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31-2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89-5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30-14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079.

  6. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  7. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  8. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  9. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  10. Protein flexibility acclimatizes photosynthetic energy conversion to the ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Shlyk-Kerner, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Kaftan, David; Holland, Neta; Sai, P S Maruthi; Kless, Hadar; Scherz, Avigdor

    2006-08-17

    Adjustment of catalytic activity in response to diverse ambient temperatures is fundamental to life on Earth. A crucial example of this is photosynthesis, where solar energy is converted into electrochemical potential that drives oxygen and biomass generation at temperatures ranging from those of frigid Antarctica to those of scalding hot springs. The energy conversion proceeds by concerted mobilization of electrons and protons on photoexcitation of reaction centre protein complexes. Following physicochemical paradigms, the rates of imperative steps in this process were predicted to increase exponentially with rising temperatures, resulting in different yields of solar energy conversion at the distinct growth temperatures of photosynthetic mesophiles and extremophiles. In contrast, here we show a meticulous adjustment of energy conversion rate, resulting in similar yields from mesophiles and thermophiles. The key molecular players in the temperature adjustment process consist of a cluster of hitherto unrecognized protein cavities and an adjacent packing motif that jointly impart local flexibility crucial to the reaction centre proteins. Mutations within the packing motif of mesophiles that increase the bulkiness of the amino-acid side chains, and thus reduce the size of the cavities, promote thermophilic behaviour. This novel biomechanical mechanism accounts for the slowing of the catalytic reaction above physiological temperatures in contradiction to the classical Arrhenius paradigm. The mechanism provides new guidelines for manipulating the acclimatization of enzymes to the ambient temperatures of diverse habitats. More generally, it reveals novel protein elements that are of potential significance for modulating structure-activity relationships in membrane and globular proteins alike.

  11. Incubation Temperature during Fetal Development Influences Morphophysiological Characteristics and Preferred Ambient Temperature of Chicken Hatchlings

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Viviane de Souza; de Almeida, Vitor Rosa; Matos, João Batista; Vicentini, Tamiris Iara; van den Brand, Henry; Boleli, Isabel Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Skin and feather characteristics, which play a critical role in body temperature maintenance, can be affected by incubation circumstances, such as incubation temperature. However, no study to date has assessed the influence of incubation temperature during the fetal stage on morphometric characteristics and vascular development of the skin, feather characteristics, and their relationship to hormone levels and preferred temperature in later life in chickens. Broiler breeder eggs were exposed to low (36°C), control (37.5°C), or high (39°C) temperatures (treatments LT, CK, and HT, respectively) from day 13 of incubation onward, because it is known that the endocrine axes are already established at this time. During this period, eggshell temperature of HT eggs (38.8±0.33°C) was higher than of LT (37.4±0.08°C) and CK eggs (37.8 ±0.15°C). The difference between eggshell and incubator air temperature diminished with the increasing incubation temperature, and was approximately zero for HT. HT hatchlings had higher surface temperature on the head, neck, and back, and thinner and more vascularized skin than did CK and LT hatchlings. No differences were found among treatments for body weight, total feather weight, number and length of barbs, barbule length, and plasma T4 concentration. LT hatchlings showed lower plasma T3 and GH, as well as lower T3/T4 ratio and decreased vascularity in the neck, back, and thigh skin compared to CK hatchlings. On the other hand, HT hatchlings had decreased skin thickness and increased vascularity, and preferred a higher ambient temperature compared to CK and HT hatchlings. In addition, for all treatments, surface temperature on the head was higher than of the other body regions. We conclude that changes in skin thickness and vascularity, as well as changes in thyroid and growth hormone levels, are the result of embryonic strategies to cope with higher or lower than normal incubation temperatures. Additionally exposure to increased

  12. Incubation Temperature during Fetal Development Influences Morphophysiological Characteristics and Preferred Ambient Temperature of Chicken Hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Morita, Viviane de Souza; Almeida, Vitor Rosa de; Matos, João Batista; Vicentini, Tamiris Iara; van den Brand, Henry; Boleli, Isabel Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Skin and feather characteristics, which play a critical role in body temperature maintenance, can be affected by incubation circumstances, such as incubation temperature. However, no study to date has assessed the influence of incubation temperature during the fetal stage on morphometric characteristics and vascular development of the skin, feather characteristics, and their relationship to hormone levels and preferred temperature in later life in chickens. Broiler breeder eggs were exposed to low (36°C), control (37.5°C), or high (39°C) temperatures (treatments LT, CK, and HT, respectively) from day 13 of incubation onward, because it is known that the endocrine axes are already established at this time. During this period, eggshell temperature of HT eggs (38.8±0.33°C) was higher than of LT (37.4±0.08°C) and CK eggs (37.8 ±0.15°C). The difference between eggshell and incubator air temperature diminished with the increasing incubation temperature, and was approximately zero for HT. HT hatchlings had higher surface temperature on the head, neck, and back, and thinner and more vascularized skin than did CK and LT hatchlings. No differences were found among treatments for body weight, total feather weight, number and length of barbs, barbule length, and plasma T4 concentration. LT hatchlings showed lower plasma T3 and GH, as well as lower T3/T4 ratio and decreased vascularity in the neck, back, and thigh skin compared to CK hatchlings. On the other hand, HT hatchlings had decreased skin thickness and increased vascularity, and preferred a higher ambient temperature compared to CK and HT hatchlings. In addition, for all treatments, surface temperature on the head was higher than of the other body regions. We conclude that changes in skin thickness and vascularity, as well as changes in thyroid and growth hormone levels, are the result of embryonic strategies to cope with higher or lower than normal incubation temperatures. Additionally exposure to increased

  13. Composition for producing polyurethane resin at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatani, Y.; Nishino, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    1984-06-26

    Disclosed is a composition for polyurethane resins which is ordinarily of two-package type and curable at ambient temperature and which comprises an isocyanate component having oxadiazinetrione ring as a curing agent and a polyol component, having in the molecule, at least one of a tertiary amino group, a quaternary ammonium group and a salt-formed carboxyl group as a main component. The composition has excellent curability and provides cured products excellent in adhesiveness and physical properties.

  14. Lithium-doped MOF impregnated with lithium-coated fullerenes: a hydrogen storage route for high gravimetric and volumetric uptakes at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Dewei; Lu, Ruifeng; Xiao, Chuanyun; Kan, Erjun; Deng, Kaiming

    2011-07-21

    We theoretically demonstrated that by the impregnation of Li-decorated IRMOF-10 with Li-coated C(60), the hydrogen storage capacity is improved to be 6.3 wt% and 42 g L(-1) at 100 bar and 243 K. Both the gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen uptakes reach the 2015 DOE target at near ambient conditions.

  15. Correlation between corneal and ambient temperature with particular focus on polar conditions.

    PubMed

    Slettedal, Jon Klokk; Ringvold, Amund

    2015-08-01

    To examine the relationship between human corneal and environmental temperature. An infrared camera was used to measure the corneal surface temperature in a group of healthy volunteers as well as in an experimental setting with donor corneas and an artificial anterior chamber, employing circulating saline at +37°C. Liquid nitrogen was used to obtain a very low temperature in the experimental setting. High ambient temperature measurements were performed in a sauna. In healthy volunteers, the cornea required at least 20-30 min to adapt to change in ambient temperature. The relationship between corneal and external temperature was relatively linear. At the two extremes, +83°C and -40°C, the corneal temperature was +42°C and +25.1°C, respectively. In the experimental setting, corneal temperature was +24.3°C at air temperature -40°C. A rather stable aqueous humour temperature of +37°C and high thermal conductivity of the corneal tissue prevent corneal frostbite even at extremely low ambient temperatures. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Freely chosen cadence during a covert manipulation of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Geoffrey L; Cheung, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated relationships between changes in power output (PO) to torque (TOR) or freely chosen cadence (FCC) during thermal loading. Twenty participants cycled at a constant rating of perceived exertion while ambient temperature (Ta) was covertly manipulated at 20-min intervals of 20 °C, 35 °C, and 20 °C. The magnitude responses of PO, FCC and TOR were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, while the temporal correlations were analyzed using Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Averages (ARIMA). Increases in Ta caused significant thermal strain (p < .01), and subsequently, a decrease in PO and TOR magnitude (p < .01), whereas FCC remained unchanged (p = .51). ARIMA indicates that changes in PO were highly correlated to TOR (stationary r2 = .954, p = .04), while FCC was moderately correlated (stationary r2 = .717, p = .01) to PO. In conclusion, changes in PO are caused by a modulation in TOR, whereas FCC remains unchanged and therefore, unaffected by thermal stressors.

  17. Npvf: Hypothalamic Biomarker of Ambient Temperature Independent of Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Jaroslawska, Julia; Chabowska-Kita, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Monika M.; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which mice, exposed to the cold, mobilize endogenous or exogenous fuel sources for heat production is unknown. To address this issue we carried out experiments using 3 models of obesity in mice: C57BL/6J+/+ (wild-type B6) mice with variable susceptibility to obesity in response to being fed a high-fat diet (HFD), B6. Ucp1-/- mice with variable diet-induced obesity (DIO) and a deficiency in brown fat thermogenesis and B6. Lep-/- with defects in thermogenesis, fat mobilization and hyperphagia. Mice were exposed to the cold and monitored for changes in food intake and body composition to determine their energy balance phenotype. Upon cold exposure wild-type B6 and Ucp1-/- mice with diet-induced obesity burned endogenous fat in direct proportion to their fat reserves and changes in food intake were inversely related to fat mass, whereas leptin-deficient and lean wild-type B6 mice fed a chow diet depended on increased food intake to fuel thermogenesis. Analysis of gene expression in the hypothalamus to uncover a central regulatory mechanism revealed suppression of the Npvf gene in a manner that depends on the reduced ambient temperature and degree of exposure to the cold, but not on adiposity, leptin levels, food intake or functional brown fat. PMID:26070086

  18. EPR-based distance measurements at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumkacheva, Olesya; Bagryanskaya, Elena

    2017-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar (PD) EPR spectroscopy is a powerful technique allowing for distance measurements between spin labels in the range of 2.5-10.0 nm. It was proposed more than 30 years ago, and nowadays is widely used in biophysics and materials science. Until recently, PD EPR experiments were limited to cryogenic temperatures (T < 80 K). Recently, application of spin labels with long electron spin dephasing time at room temperature such as triarylmethyl radicals and nitroxides with bulky substituents at a position close to radical centers enabled measurements at room temperature and even at physiologically relevant temperatures by PD EPR as well as other approaches based on EPR (e.g., relaxation enhancement; RE). In this paper, we review the features of PD EPR and RE at ambient temperatures, in particular, requirements on electron spin phase memory time, ways of immobilization of biomolecules, the influence of a linker between the spin probe and biomolecule, and future opportunities.

  19. Ambient Temperature Synthesis of High Enantiopurity N-Protected Peptidyl Ketones by Peptidyl Thiol Ester–Boronic Acid Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Li, Hao; Wittenberg, Rüdiger; Egi, Masahiro; Huang, Wenwei; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2009-01-01

    α-Amino acid thiol esters derived from N-protected mono-, di-, and tripeptides couple with aryl, π-electron-rich heteroaryl, or alkenyl boronic acids in the presence of stoichiometric Cu(I) thiophene-2-carboxylate (CuTC) and catalytic Pd2(dba)3/triethylphosphite to generate the corresponding N-protected peptidyl ketones in good to excellent yields and in high enantiopurity. Triethylphosphite plays a key role as a supporting ligand by mitigating an undesired palladium-catalyzed decarbonylation-β-elimination of the α-amino thiol esters. The peptidyl ketone synthesis proceeds at room temperature under non-basic conditions and demonstrates a high tolerance to functionality. PMID:17263394

  20. [Research on Raman spectra of isooctane at ambient temperature and ambient pressure to 1. 2 GPa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei-fei; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-03-01

    The experimental study of the Raman spectral character for liquid isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane, ATM) was con ducted by moissanite anvil cell at the pressure of 0-1.2 GPa and the ambient temperature. The results show that the Raman peaks of the C-H stretching vibration shift to higher frenquencies with increasing pressures. The relations between the system pressure and peaks positions is given as following: v2 873 = 0.002 8P+2 873.3; v2 905 = 0.004 8P+2 905.4; v2 935 = 0.002 7P+ 2 935.0; v2 960 = 0.012P+2 960.9. The Raman spectra of isooctane abruptly changed at the pressure about 1.0 GPa and the liquid-solid phase transition was observed by microscope. With the freezing pressure at ambient temperature and the melting temperature available at 1 atm, the authors got the liquid-solid phase diagram of isooctane. According to Clapeyron equation, the authors obtained the differences of volume and entropy for the liquid-solid phase transition of isooctane: deltaV(m) = 4.46 x 10(-6) m3 x mol-1 and deltaS = -30.32 J x K(-1) x mol(-1).

  1. Effect of ambient temperature on evaporative water loss in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum.

    PubMed

    Baldo, María Belén; Antenucci, C Daniel; Luna, Facundo

    2015-10-01

    Subterranean rodents face unique thermoregulatory challenges. Evaporative water loss (EWL) is a crucial mechanism for maintaining heat balance in endotherms subjected to heat stress but also leads to potential dehydration. EWL depends on gradients of temperature and humidity between the surface of the individual and the surrounding environment. Underground burrows generally provide a stable water vapor saturated atmosphere which may impede evaporative heat loss (EHL). This will mainly occur when ambient temperature exceeds the upper limit of individual's thermoneutral zone, or when body temperature rises as result of digging activities. Here we evaluate the effect of ambient temperature on EWL and energy metabolism in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (tuco-tucos), which inhabits sealed burrows, but makes an extensive use of the aboveground environment. We observed that EWL is increased when ambient temperature rises above thermoneutrality; below this point, evaporation remains stable. Though EWL contributes to total heat loss by increasing ∼1.3 times at 35°C, dry thermal conductance is raised four times. In tuco-tucos' burrows both non-evaporative and, to some extent, evaporative and behavioral mechanisms are essential for body temperature regulation, preventing overheating at high ambient temperatures in a water vapor-saturated atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  3. Ambient Temperature and Early Delivery of Singleton Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sandie; Liu, Danping; Zhu, Yeyi; Kim, Sung Soo; Sherman, Seth; Mendola, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extreme temperature is associated with adverse birth outcomes but it is unclear whether it increases early delivery risk.Background: Extreme temperature is associated with adverse birth outcomes but it is unclear whether it increases early delivery risk. Objectives: We aimed to determine the association between ambient temperature and early delivery.Objectives: We aimed to determine the association between ambient temperature and early delivery. Methods: Medical records from 223,375 singleton deliveries from 12 U.S. sites were linked to local ambient temperature. Exposure to hot (> 90th percentile) or cold (< 10th percentile) using site-specific and window-specific temperature distributions were defined for 3-months preconception, 7-week periods during the first two trimesters, 1 week preceding delivery, and whole pregnancy. Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations calculated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval for early deliveries associated with hot/cold exposures, adjusting for conception month, humidity, site, sex, maternal demographics, parity, insurance, prepregnancy body mass index, pregnancy complications, and smoking or drinking during pregnancy. Acute temperature associations were estimated separately for warm (May–September) and cold season (October–April) in a case-crossover analysis using conditional logistic regression.Methods: Medical records from 223,375 singleton deliveries from 12 U.S. sites were linked to local ambient temperature. Exposure to hot (> 90th percentile) or cold (< 10th percentile) using site-specific and window-specific temperature distributions were defined for 3-months preconception, 7-week periods during the first two trimesters, 1 week preceding delivery, and whole pregnancy. Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations calculated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval for early deliveries associated with hot/cold exposures, adjusting for conception month

  4. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2010-12-01

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. The 9 treatments consisted of 3 levels of temperatures (low = 15.6°C; moderate = 21.1°C; high = 26.7°C) from 21 to 56 d of age and 3 levels of light intensities (0.5, 3.0, 20 lx) from 8 to 56 d of age at 50% RH. A total of 540 Ross 708 chicks were randomly distributed into 9 environmentally controlled chambers (30 male and 30 female chicks/chamber) at 1 d of age. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21 (baseline), 28, 42, and 56. High ambient temperature significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced BW, partial pressure of CO(2), bicarbonate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, K(+), and Na(+) along with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) elevated pH level, Cl(-), glucose, osmolality, and anion gap concentrations. Partial pressure of O(2) was slightly increased in response to increased ambient temperature. There was no effect of light intensity on most of the blood variables examined. Acid-base regulation during high ambient temperature and light intensity exposure did not deteriorate despite a lower partial pressure of CO(2), which consequently increased blood pH because of a compensatory decrease in HCO(3)(-) concentration. Plasma corticosterone was not affected by temperature, light intensity, or their interaction. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to varying light intensities had a minor effect on physiological blood variables, whereas high ambient temperature markedly affected various blood variables without inducing stress in broilers.

  5. Correlation between structure and fluidity of coal tar pitch fractions studied by ambient {sup 13}C and high temperature in-situ {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; Schober, H.H.; Rusinko, F.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The unique properties of coal tar pitches have resulted in numerous applications for carbon products, such as binders for carbon artifacts. However, as the number of by-product coke ovens is diminishing, the design of superior binders from alternative materials or processes is sought by the carbon industry. Accordingly, structural characterization of coal tar pitches and their solvent fractions, using quantitative analytical techniques is required to successfully obtain this goal. Quantitative solid state {sup 13}C NMR has previously been shown to be a powerful technique to study the overall aromatic ring-size for coal tar pitches and their toluene insoluble (TI) fractions. The TI fraction can further be separated into its quinoline soluble part (beta-resin) and insoluble fraction (QI). Both these fractions affect the overall coking yield and especially the fluidity of the pitches. The assessment of fluidity interactions between coal tar pitch solvent fractions during heating is therefore important for the future design of pitches from untraditional sources or processes. High temperature {sup 1}H NMR is a useful technique to investigate the fluid and rigid components of pitches, especially with its interaction with coal and to quantify mesophase. However, very little work has been performed to correlate the overall fluidity behavior of pitch with the mobility of its different solubility fractions and their structure. Accordingly, this paper addresses the fluidity interactions between different pitch solvent fractions (TS, beta-resin and QI) by high temperature {sup 1}H NMR. Particularly, the fluidity studies on the beta-resin alone can verify whether this fraction becomes plastic during heating.

  6. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  11. Ambient temperature normalization for infrared face recognition based on the second-order polynomial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzi

    2015-08-01

    The influence of ambient temperature is a big challenge to robust infrared face recognition. This paper proposes a new ambient temperature normalization algorithm to improve the performance of infrared face recognition under variable ambient temperatures. Based on statistical regression theory, a second order polynomial model is learned to describe the ambient temperature's impact on infrared face image. Then, infrared image was normalized to reference ambient temperature by the second order polynomial model. Finally, this normalization method is applied to infrared face recognition to verify its efficiency. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed temperature normalization method is feasible and can significantly improve the robustness of infrared face recognition.

  12. Gibberellic acid signaling is required for ambient temperature-mediated induction of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Collani, Silvio; Horrer, Daniel; Schmid, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Distinct molecular mechanisms integrate changes in ambient temperature into the genetic pathways that govern flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana. Temperature-dependent eviction of the histone variant H2A.Z from nucleosomes has been suggested to facilitate the expression of FT by PIF4 at elevated ambient temperatures. Here we show that, in addition to PIF4, PIF3 and PIF5, but not PIF1 and PIF6, can promote flowering when expressed specifically in phloem companion cells (PCC), where they can induce FT and its close paralog, TSF. However, despite their strong potential to promote flowering, genetic analyses suggest that the PIF genes seem to have only a minor role in adjusting flowering in response to photoperiod or high ambient temperature. In addition, loss of PIF function only partially suppressed the early flowering phenotype and FT expression of the arp6 mutant, which is defective in H2A.Z deposition. In contrast, the chemical inhibition of gibberellic acid (GA) biosynthesis resulted in a strong attenuation of early flowering and FT expression in arp6. Furthermore, GA was able to induce flowering at low temperature (15°C) independently of FT, TSF, and the PIF genes, probably directly at the shoot apical meristem. Together, our results suggest that the timing of the floral transition in response to ambient temperature is more complex than previously thought and that GA signaling might play a crucial role in this process. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ambient temperature influences the neural benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Mark E; Chung, Chasity; Comer, Ashley; Nelson, Katharine; Tran, Jamie; Werries, Nadja; Barton, Emily A; Spinetta, Michael; Leasure, J Leigh

    2016-02-15

    Many of the neural benefits of exercise require weeks to manifest. It would be useful to accelerate onset of exercise-driven plastic changes, such as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise represents a significant challenge to the brain because it produces heat, but brain temperature does not rise during exercise in the cold. This study tested the hypothesis that exercise in cold ambient temperature would stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis more than exercise in room or hot conditions. Adult female rats had exercise access 2h per day for 5 days at either room (20 °C), cold (4.5 °C) or hot (37.5 °C) temperature. To label dividing hippocampal precursor cells, animals received daily injections of BrdU. Brains were immunohistochemically processed for dividing cells (Ki67+), surviving cells (BrdU+) and new neurons (doublecortin, DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Animals exercising at room temperature ran significantly farther than animals exercising in cold or hot conditions (room 1490 ± 400 m; cold 440 ± 102 m; hot 291 ± 56 m). We therefore analyzed the number of Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells normalized for shortest distance run. Contrary to our hypothesis, exercise in either cold or hot conditions generated significantly more Ki67+, BrdU+ and DCX+ cells compared to exercise at room temperature. Thus, a limited amount of running in either cold or hot ambient conditions generates more new cells than a much greater distance run at room temperature. Taken together, our results suggest a simple means by which to augment exercise effects, yet minimize exercise time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Etanercept (Enbrel(®)) alternative storage at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Edel; Daffy, Joanne; Jones, Heather; Paulson, Andrea; Vicik, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including tumor necrosis factor inhibitors such as etanercept (Enbrel(®)), have improved outcomes for patients with rheumatic and other inflammatory diseases, with sustained remission being the optimal goal for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Flexible and convenient treatment options, compatible with modern lifestyle, are important in helping patients maintain treatment and manage their disease. Etanercept drug product (DP) is available in lyophilized powder (Lyo) for solution injection, prefilled syringe, and prefilled pen presentations and is typically stored under refrigerated conditions. We aimed to generate a comprehensive analytical data package from stability testing of key quality attributes, consistent with regulatory requirements, to determine whether the product profile of etanercept is maintained at ambient temperature. Test methods assessing key attributes of purity, quality, potency, and safety were performed over time, following storage of etanercept DP presentations under a range of conditions. Results and statistical analysis from stability testing (based on size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Coomassie) across all etanercept presentations (10 and 25 mg/vial Lyo DP; 25 and 50 mg prefilled syringe DP; 50 mg prefilled pen DP) showed key stability-indicating parameters were within acceptable limits through the alternative storage condition of 25°C±2°C for 1 month. Stability testing performed in line with regulatory requirements supports a single period of storage for etanercept DP at an alternative storage condition of 25°C±2°C for up to 1 month within the approved expiry of the product. This alternative storage condition represents further innovation in the etanercept product lifecycle, providing greater flexibility and enhanced overall convenience for patients.

  15. Etanercept (Enbrel®) alternative storage at ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Edel; Daffy, Joanne; Jones, Heather; Paulson, Andrea; Vicik, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Background Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including tumor necrosis factor inhibitors such as etanercept (Enbrel®), have improved outcomes for patients with rheumatic and other inflammatory diseases, with sustained remission being the optimal goal for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Flexible and convenient treatment options, compatible with modern lifestyle, are important in helping patients maintain treatment and manage their disease. Etanercept drug product (DP) is available in lyophilized powder (Lyo) for solution injection, prefilled syringe, and prefilled pen presentations and is typically stored under refrigerated conditions. We aimed to generate a comprehensive analytical data package from stability testing of key quality attributes, consistent with regulatory requirements, to determine whether the product profile of etanercept is maintained at ambient temperature. Methods Test methods assessing key attributes of purity, quality, potency, and safety were performed over time, following storage of etanercept DP presentations under a range of conditions. Results Results and statistical analysis from stability testing (based on size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Coomassie) across all etanercept presentations (10 and 25 mg/vial Lyo DP; 25 and 50 mg prefilled syringe DP; 50 mg prefilled pen DP) showed key stability-indicating parameters were within acceptable limits through the alternative storage condition of 25°C±2°C for 1 month. Conclusion Stability testing performed in line with regulatory requirements supports a single period of storage for etanercept DP at an alternative storage condition of 25°C±2°C for up to 1 month within the approved expiry of the product. This alternative storage condition represents further innovation in the etanercept product lifecycle, providing greater flexibility and enhanced overall

  16. Influence of low ambient temperature on epitympanic temperature measurement: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Procter, Emily; Putzer, Gabriel; Avancini, Giovanni; Dal Cappello, Tomas; Überbacher, Norbert; Hofer, Georg; Rainer, Bernhard; Rammlmair, Georg; Brugger, Hermann

    2015-11-05

    Epitympanic temperature (Tty) measured with thermistor probes correlates with core body temperature (Tcore), but the reliability of measurements at low ambient temperature is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if commercially-available thermistor-based Tty reflects Tcore in low ambient temperature and if Tty is influenced by insulation of the ear. Thirty-one participants (two females) were exposed to room (23.2 ± 0.4 °C) and low (-18.7 ± 1.0 °C) ambient temperature for 10 min using a randomized cross-over design. Tty was measured using an epitympanic probe (M1024233, GE Healthcare Finland Oy) and oesophageal temperature (Tes) with an oesophageal probe (M1024229, GE Healthcare Finland Oy) inserted into the lower third of the oesophagus. Ten participants wore ear protectors (Arton 2200, Emil Lux GmbH & Co. KG, Wermelskirchen, Switzerland) to insulate the ear from ambient air. During exposure to room temperature, mean Tty increased from 33.4 ± 1.5 to 34.2 ± 0.8 °C without insulation of the ear and from 35.0 ± 0.8 to 35.5 ± 0.7 °C with insulation. During exposure to low ambient temperature, mean Tty decreased from 32.4 ± 1.6 to 28.5 ± 2.0 °C without insulation and from 35.6 ± 0.6 to 35.2 ± 0.9 °C with insulation. The difference between Tty and Tes at low ambient temperature was reduced by 82% (from 7.2 to 1.3 °C) with insulation of the ear. Epitympanic temperature measurements are influenced by ambient temperature and deviate from Tes at room and low ambient temperature. Insulating the ear with ear protectors markedly reduced the difference between Tty and Tes and improved the stability of measurements. The use of models to correct Tty may be possible, but results should be validated in larger studies.

  17. The effect of nozzle diameter, injection pressure and ambient temperature on spray characteristics in diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhaodah Andsaler, Adiba; Khalid, Amir; Sharifhatul Adila Abdullah, Nor; Sapit, Azwan; Jaat, Norrizam

    2017-04-01

    Mixture formation of the ignition process is a key element in the diesel combustion as it influences the combustion process and exhaust emission. Aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of nozzle diameter, injection pressure and ambient temperature to the formation of spray. This study investigated diesel formation spray using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Multiphase volume of fluid (VOF) behaviour in the chamber are determined by means of transient simulation, Eulerian of two phases is used for implementation of mixing fuel and air. The detail behaviour of spray droplet diameter, spray penetration and spray breakup length was visualised using the ANSYS 16.1. This simulation was done in different nozzle diameter 0.12 mm and 0.2 mm performed at the ambient temperature 500 K and 700 K with different injection pressure 40 MPa, 70 MPa and 140 MPa. Results show that high pressure influence droplet diameter become smaller and the penetration length longer with the high injection pressure apply. Smaller nozzle diameter gives a shorter length of the breakup. It is necessary for nozzle diameter and ambient temperature condition to improve the formation of spray. High injection pressure is most effective in improvement of formation spray under higher ambient temperature and smaller nozzle diameter.

  18. Estimation of time since death by vitreous humor hypoxanthine, potassium, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rognum, T O; Holmen, S; Musse, M A; Dahlberg, P S; Stray-Pedersen, A; Saugstad, O D; Opdal, S H

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of vitreous humor potassium (K(+)) has since the 1960s been recognized as an adjunct for estimation of time since death. In 1991 we introduced hypoxanthine (Hx) as a new marker. Furthermore we demonstrated that time since death estimation was more accurate when ambient temperature was included in the calculations, both for K(+) and for Hx. In this paper we present a refined method. The subjects consist of 132 cases with known time of death and ambient temperature. One sample from each subject was used in the calculations. Vitreous humor Hx levels were available in all subjects, while K(+) was measured in 106 of the subjects, due to insufficient volume of vitreous humor. Linear regression analysis was applied to model the correlation between vitreous humor Hx and K(+), taking the interactions with temperature into consideration. The diagrams published in 1991, which also included ambient temperature, estimated median time since death with range between the 10th and 90th percentile, whereas the linear regression analysis presented in this paper estimates mean time since death with a corresponding 95% interval of confidence. We conclude that time since death may be estimated with relatively high precision applying vitreous humor Hx and K(+) concentrations combined with ambient temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ambient-temperature incubation for the field detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Stauber, C; Murphy, J L; Khan, A; Mu, T; Elliott, M; Sobsey, M D

    2011-04-01

     Escherichia coli is the pre-eminent microbiological indicator used to assess safety of drinking water globally. The cost and equipment requirements for processing samples by standard methods may limit the scale of water quality testing in technologically less developed countries and other resource-limited settings, however. We evaluate here the use of ambient-temperature incubation in detection of E. coli in drinking water samples as a potential cost-saving and convenience measure with applications in regions with high (>25°C) mean ambient temperatures.   This study includes data from three separate water quality assessments: two in Cambodia and one in the Dominican Republic. Field samples of household drinking water were processed in duplicate by membrane filtration (Cambodia), Petrifilm™ (Cambodia) or Colilert® (Dominican Republic) on selective media at both standard incubation temperature (35–37°C) and ambient temperature, using up to three dilutions and three replicates at each dilution. Matched sample sets were well correlated with 80% of samples (n = 1037) within risk-based microbial count strata (E. coli CFU 100 ml−1 counts of <1, 1–10, 11–100, 101–1000, >1000), and a pooled coefficient of variation of 17% (95% CI 15–20%) for paired sample sets across all methods.   These results suggest that ambient-temperature incubation of E. coli in at least some settings may yield sufficiently robust data for water safety monitoring where laboratory or incubator access is limited.

  20. The influence of methanol on the chemical state of PtRu anodes in a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell studied in situ by synchrotron-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveleva, Viktoriia A.; Daletou, Maria K.; Savinova, Elena R.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) has recently become a powerful tool for the investigation of interfacial phenomena in electrochemical power sources such as batteries and fuel cells. Here we present an in situ NAP-XPS study of the anode of a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell with a phosphoric acid-doped hydrocarbon membrane, which reveals an enhanced flooding of the Pt3Ru anode with phosphoric acid in the presence of methanol. An analysis of the electrode surface composition depending on the cell voltage and on the presence of methanol reveals the strong influence of the latter on the extent of Pt oxidation and on the transformation of Ru into Ru (IV) hydroxide.

  1. Impact of Seasonal Variant Temperatures and Laboratory Room Ambient Temperature on Mortality of Rats with Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishanan, Sivakumar; Babu, Mg. Ramesh; Thangarajan, Rajesh; Punja, Dhiren; Jaganath, Vidyadhara Devarunda; Kanth, Akriti B.; Rao, Mohandas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A popular rat model for hypoperfusion ischemic brain injury is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). BCCAO surgery when performed in varying geographical locations and during different seasons of the year is reported to have variable mortality rates. Studies have also documented the diminishing influence of Ketamine-Xylazine (KT-XY) on thermoregulatory functions in rodents. Aim To explore the impact of seasonal variant temperatures and laboratory room ambient temperatures on mortality of rats following BCCAO surgery. Materials and Methods The study has two parts: 1 The first part is an analysis of a three year retrospective data to explore the association between the geographical season (hot summer and cold winter) induced laboratory room ambient temperature variations and the mortality rate in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO rats. 2. The second part investigated the effect of conditioned laboratory room ambient temperature (CAT) (23-250C) in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO group of rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups(n =8/group) as-Normal control, BCCAO and Sham BCCAO where they were all exposed to unconditioned ambient temperature (UCAT) during their surgery and postoperative care. And finally fourth group rats exposed to CAT during the BCCAO surgery and postoperative care. Results Pearson’s chi-square test indicates a significantly high association (p<0.006) between post-BCCAO mortality and hot season of the year. CAT during the hot season reduced the mortality rate (24% less) in post- BCCAO rats compared to the rats of UCAT. Conclusion Despite seasonal variations in temperature, conditioning the laboratory room ambient temperatures to 23–250C, induces hypothermia in KT-XY anaesthetized ischemic brain injured rodents and improves their survival rate. PMID:27190796

  2. Coagulation defects resulting from ambient temperature-induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Staab, D B; Sorensen, V J; Fath, J J; Raman, S B; Horst, H M; Obeid, F N

    1994-05-01

    Ambient temperature-induced hypothermia noted in trauma patients is frequently accompanied by a bleeding diathesis despite "laboratory normal" coagulation values. To document this impression, the following experiment was conducted. Coagulation studies and platelet function studies were performed in ten minipigs during induced whole body hypothermia (40 degrees C to 34 degrees C) and rewarming. Cooling was achieved in 2 to 3 hours and rewarming took 4 to 5 hours. In addition, similar coagulation and platelet function studies were conducted on plasma samples from the same animals that were cooled and then rewarmed in a water bath. Platelet counts and function as measured by Sonoclot analysis and aggregation did not decrease significantly with hypothermia in either model. Plasma cooled in a water bath demonstrated abnormal PT and aPTT (p < 0.001). Whole body hypothermia demonstrated abnormal bleeding time and PT (p < 0.001). Ambient temperature-induced hypothermia produced significant coagulation defects in a porcine model. Some of the coagulation defects were most pronounced during rewarming.

  3. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in water at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Crole, David A; Freakley, Simon J; Edwards, Jennifer K; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-06-01

    The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from hydrogen and oxygen has been studied using an Au-Pd/TiO2 catalyst. The aim of this study is to understand the balance of synthesis and sequential degradation reactions using an aqueous, stabilizer-free solvent at ambient temperature. The effects of the reaction conditions on the productivity of H2O2 formation and the undesirable hydrogenation and decomposition reactions are investigated. Reaction temperature, solvent composition and reaction time have been studied and indicate that when using water as the solvent the H2O2 decomposition reaction is the predominant degradation pathway, which provides new challenges for catalyst design, which has previously focused on minimizing the subsequent hydrogenation reaction. This is of importance for the application of this catalytic approach for water purification.

  4. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  5. The direction and range of ambient temperature change influences yawning in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Miller, Michael L; Clark, Anne B

    2010-05-01

    Comparative research suggests that yawning is a thermoregulatory behavior in homeotherms. Our previous experiments revealed that yawning increased in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) as ambient temperature was raised toward body temperature (22-->34 degrees C). In this study, we identify the range of temperatures that triggers yawning to rule out the possible effect of changing temperature in any range. To corroborate its thermoregulatory function, we also related the incidence of yawning to other avian thermoregulatory behaviors in budgerigars (e.g., panting, wing venting). In a repeated measures design, 16 budgerigars were exposed to 4 separate 10-min periods of changing temperatures: (a) low-increasing (23-->27 degrees C), (b) high-increasing (27-->33 degrees C), (c) high-decreasing (34-->28 degrees C), and (d) low-decreasing (28-->24 degrees C). Birds yawned significantly more during the high-increasing temperature range, and yawning was positively correlated with ambient temperature across trials. Yawning was also positively correlated with other thermoregulatory behaviors. This research clarifies the previously demonstrated relationship between yawning rate and temperature by providing evidence that the physiological trigger for yawning is related to increasing body temperatures rather than the detection of changing external temperatures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Association of elevated ambient temperature with death from cocaine overdose.

    PubMed

    Auger, Nathalie; Bilodeau-Bertrand, Marianne; Labesse, Maud Emmanuelle; Kosatsky, Tom

    2017-09-01

    Ecologic data suggest that elevated outdoor temperature is correlated with mortality rates from cocaine overdose. Using non-aggregated death records, we studied the association of hot temperatures with risk of death from cocaine overdose. We carried out a case-crossover study of all deaths from cocaine or other drug overdose between the months of May and September, from 2000 through 2013 in Quebec, Canada. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between maximum outdoor temperature and death from cocaine or other drug overdose. The main outcome measure was death from cocaine overdose as a function of maximum temperature the day of death and the days immediately preceding death. There were 316 deaths from cocaine overdose and 446 from other drug overdoses during the study. Elevated temperature the preceding week was associated with the likelihood of death from cocaine but not other drug overdose. Compared with 20°C, a maximum weekly temperature of 30°C was associated with an OR of 2.07 for death from cocaine overdose (95% CI 1.15-3.73), but an OR of 1.03 for other drug overdoses (95% CI 0.60-1.75). Associations for cocaine overdose were present with maximum daily temperature the day of and each of the three days preceding death. Elevated ambient temperature is associated with the risk of death from cocaine overdose. Public health practitioners and drug users should be aware of the added risk of mortality when cocaine is used during hot days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Donor Acceptor Polymerization Chemistry as a Vehicle to Low Energy Cure of Matrix Resins: Evolution of the 2-Tg Concept to Produce High Tg Polymers at Ambient Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    tetrafunctional acceptors. DSC and TGA analysis of these polymers indicated they possessed the thermal stability necessary for performance in their...be enhanced by choosing comonomers that act as "solvents", and that the "onset of decomposition" temperature as measured by TGA analysis under nitrogen

  8. Effect of ambient temperatures on disinfection efficiency of various sludge treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeld, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Sewage sludge produced during municipal wastewater treatment has to be treated efficiently in order to reduce impacts on the environment and on public health. In Germany and many countries, large quantities of sludge are reused in agriculture in order to recycle nutrients and organic material. In order to quantify the effect of different ambient temperatures on conventional and advanced sludge treatment technologies as well as on disinfection efficiency, a comprehensive research study was performed at Braunschweig Institute of Technology. The detailed results show that ambient temperature has a strong effect on biological liquid sludge stabilization and on natural dewatering and drying technologies, although microbiological quality of treated sludge, indicated by Escherichia coli concentration, does not meet the requirements for unrestricted reuse in agriculture. Composting and lime treatment of sludge are most efficient on reducing E. coli, as high temperatures and high pH values arise in the material respectively.

  9. The Importance of Ambient Temperature to Growth and the Induction of Flowering

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. R.; Lou, Ping; Hermand, Victor; Kim, Jin A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod) have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population. PMID:27602044

  10. Habitat type and ambient temperature contribute to bill morphology

    PubMed Central

    Luther, David; Greenberg, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Avian bills are iconic structures for the study of ecology and evolution, with hypotheses about the morphological structure of bills dating back to Darwin. Several ecological and physiological hypotheses have been developed to explain the evolution of the morphology of bill shape. Here, we test some of these hypotheses such as the role of habitat, ambient temperature, body size, intraspecific competition, and ecological release on the evolution of bill morphology. Bill morphology and tarsus length were measured from museum specimens of yellow warblers, and grouped by habitat type, sex, and subspecies. We calculated the mean maximum daily temperature for the month of July, the hottest month for breeding specimens at each collecting location. Analysis of covariance models predicted total bill surface area as a function of sex, habitat type, body size, and temperature, and model selection techniques were used to select the best model. Habitat, mangrove forests compared with inland habitats, and climate had the largest effects on bill size. Coastal wetland habitats and island populations of yellow warblers had similar bill morphology, both of which are larger than mainland inland populations. Temperate but not tropical subspecies exhibited sexual dimorphism in bill morphology. Overall, this study provides evidence that multiple environmental factors, such as temperature and habitat, contribute to the evolution of bill morphology. PMID:24683453

  11. Habitat type and ambient temperature contribute to bill morphology.

    PubMed

    Luther, David; Greenberg, Russell

    2014-03-01

    Avian bills are iconic structures for the study of ecology and evolution, with hypotheses about the morphological structure of bills dating back to Darwin. Several ecological and physiological hypotheses have been developed to explain the evolution of the morphology of bill shape. Here, we test some of these hypotheses such as the role of habitat, ambient temperature, body size, intraspecific competition, and ecological release on the evolution of bill morphology. Bill morphology and tarsus length were measured from museum specimens of yellow warblers, and grouped by habitat type, sex, and subspecies. We calculated the mean maximum daily temperature for the month of July, the hottest month for breeding specimens at each collecting location. Analysis of covariance models predicted total bill surface area as a function of sex, habitat type, body size, and temperature, and model selection techniques were used to select the best model. Habitat, mangrove forests compared with inland habitats, and climate had the largest effects on bill size. Coastal wetland habitats and island populations of yellow warblers had similar bill morphology, both of which are larger than mainland inland populations. Temperate but not tropical subspecies exhibited sexual dimorphism in bill morphology. Overall, this study provides evidence that multiple environmental factors, such as temperature and habitat, contribute to the evolution of bill morphology.

  12. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH.

    PubMed

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  13. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  14. The control of short-term feed intake by metabolic oxidation in late-pregnant and early lactating dairy cows exposed to high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Eslamizad, Mehdi; Lamp, Ole; Derno, Michael; Kuhla, Björn

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to integrate the dynamics of feed intake and metabolic oxidation in late pregnant and early lactating Holstein cows under heat stress conditions. On day 21 before parturition and again on day 20 after parturition, seven Holstein cows were kept for 7days at thermoneutral (TN) conditions (15°C; temperature-humidity-index (THI)=60) followed by a 7day heat stress (HS) period at 28°C (THI=76). On the last day of each temperature condition, gas exchange, feed intake and water intake were recorded every 6min in a respiration chamber. Pre- and post-partum cows responded to HS by decreasing feed intake. The reduction in feed intake in pre-partum cows was achieved through decreased meal size, meal duration, eating rate and daily eating time with no change in meal frequency, while post-partum cows kept under HS conditions showed variable responses in feeding behavior. In both pre- and post-partum cows exposed to heat stress, daily and resting metabolic heat production decreased while the periprandial respiratory quotient (RQ) increased. The prolonged time between meal and the postprandial minimum in fat oxidation and the postprandial RQ maximum, respectively, revealed that HS as compared to TN early-lactating cows have slower postprandial fat oxidation, longer feed digestion, and thereby showing a shift from fat to glucose utilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting from Transient Ambient Temperature Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, André; Erd, Metin; Kostic, Milos; Cobry, Keith; Kroener, Michael; Woias, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We examine a thermoelectric harvester that converts electrical energy from the naturally occurring temperature difference between ambient air and large thermal storage capacitors such as building walls or the soil. For maximum power output, the harvester design is implemented in two steps: source matching of the thermal and electrical interfaces to the energy source (system level) followed by load matching of the generator to these interfaces (subsystem level). Therefore, we measure thermal source properties such as the temperature difference, the air velocity, and the cutoff frequency in two application scenarios (road tunnel and office building). We extend a stationary model of the harvester into the time domain to account for transient behavior of the source. Based on the model and the source measurements, we perform the source and load matching. The resulting harvester consists of a pin fin heat sink with a thermal resistance of 6.2 K/W and a cutoff frequency 2.5 times greater than that of the source, a thermoelectric generator, and a DC/DC step-up converter starting at a total temperature difference of only Δ T = 1.2 K. In a final road tunnel field test, this optimized harvester converts 70 mJ of electrical energy per day without any direct solar irradiation. The energy provided by the harvester enables 415 data transmissions from a wireless sensor node per day.

  16. Influence of relative humidity and ambient temperature on hydrothermal waves (HTWs) of organic solvent volatile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Okauchi, Yuya; Fukatani, Yuki; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Sefiane, Khellil; Kim, Jungho

    2016-11-01

    Droplets of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinctive hydrothermal patterns or HTWs at the liquid-vapor interface. Since the evaporation of mentioned organic solvents in ambient conditions is ubiquitous, in this work we investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the self-generated HTWs by means of infrared thermography. The intensity of the HTWs was found to decrease when lowering the ambient temperature due to a reduction in droplet evaporative cooling. On other hand, the enhancement or suppression of the HTWs was also possible by controlling the relative humidity of the system. Absorption and/or condensation of water vapor onto the evaporating droplet was found to be the main cause for the differences observed on the HTWs retrieved at the liquid-vapor interface. To account for the water adsorbed or condensed we perform in-situ gas chromatography analysis at different droplet lifetimes. Experimental results showed an increase in the amount of water condensed when increasing the relative humidity of the system as expected. In addition, for the same ambient temperature ethanol evaporation was enhanced by high relative humidity. The authors acknowledge the support of WPI-I2CNER.

  17. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  18. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 regulates low ambient temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Jung; Kim, Joonki; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2012-10-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development, but little is known about its role in ambient temperature-responsive flowering. In addition to being regulated by daylength, the onset of flowering in many plants can also be delayed by low ambient temperatures. Here, we show that HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1), which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, controls flowering time in response to ambient temperatures (16 and 23°C) and intermittent cold. hos1 mutants flowered early, and were insensitive to ambient temperature, but responded normally to vernalization and gibberellic acid. Genetic analyses suggested that this ambient temperature-insensitive flowering was independent of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Also, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) expression was up-regulated in hos1 mutants at both temperatures. The ft tsf mutation almost completely suppressed the early flowering of hos1 mutants at different temperatures, suggesting that FT and TSF are downstream of HOS1 in the ambient temperature response. A lesion in CONSTANS (CO) did not affect the ambient temperature-insensitive flowering phenotype of hos1-3 mutants. In silico analysis showed that FVE was spatiotemporally co-expressed with HOS1. A HOS1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion co-localized with FVE-GFP in the nucleus at both 16 and 23°C. HOS1 physically interacted with FVE and FLK in yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, hos1 mutants were insensitive to intermittent cold. Collectively, our results suggest that HOS1 acts as a common regulator in the signaling pathways that control flowering time in response to low ambient temperature.

  19. Selective O2 sorption at ambient temperatures via node distortions in Sc-MIL-100

    DOE PAGES

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Chapman, Karena W.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; ...

    2016-04-14

    In this study, oxygen selectivity in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) at exceptionally high temperatures originally predicted by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) modeling is now confirmed by synthesis, sorption metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Based on DFT M-O2 binding energies, we chose the large pored MIL-100 framework for metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Both resulted in preferential O2 and N2 gas uptake at temperatures ranging from 77 K to ambient temperatures (258 K, 298 K and 313 K).

  20. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  1. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  2. Thermoregulation responses of broiler chickens to humidity at different ambient temperatures. I. One week of age.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Zhang, H F; Jiao, H C; Zhao, T; Sui, S J; Gu, X H; Zhang, Z Y; Buyse, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-08-01

    Three trials were conducted to investigate the effect of RH (35, 60, and 85%) on thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens at different temperatures (35, 30, and 25 degrees C). The response to humidity in rectal temperature and plumage temperature at the back and breast within 24 h after exposure were recorded at 5 time points (1,4,8,16, and 24 h). Humidity affected the thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens by redistributing heat within the body at high, low, and thermoneutral temperatures. The redistribution of heat resulted in decreased rectal temperature and increased peripheral temperature, which were, respectively, beneficial and unfavorable at high and low temperatures. These results suggested that feedback effects of surface temperature on core temperature also exist in poultry, as already observed in mammals, and could be induced not only by changed ambient temperature but also by the changes in humidity at high temperature. The disturbance of thermal equilibrium could not be established solely by changes in RT, but rather core and surface temperatures had to be considered. The daily rhythms in rectal and surface temperatures were affected by humidity.

  3. Migration and sensory properties of plastics-based nets used as food-contacting materials under ambient and high temperature heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Kontominas, M G; Goulas, A E; Badeka, A V; Nerantzaki, A

    2006-06-01

    Overall migration from a wide range of commercial plastics-based netting materials destined to be used as either meat or vegetable packaging materials into the fatty food simulant isooctane or the aqueous simulant distilled water, respectively, was studied. In addition, sensory tests of representative netting materials were carried out in bottled water in order to investigate possible development of off-odour/taste and discoloration in this food simulant as a result of migration from the netting material. Sensory tests were supplemented by determination of the volatile compounds' profile in table water exposed to the netting materials using SPME-GC/MS. Test conditions for packaging material/food simulant contact and method of overall migration analysis were according to European Union Directives 90/128 (EEC, 1990) and 2002/72 (EEC, 2002). The results showed that for both PET and polyethylene-based netting materials, overall migration values into distilled water ranged between 11.5 and 48.5 mg l(-1), well below the upper limit (60 mg l(-1)) for overall migration values from plastics-packaging materials set by the European Union. The overall migration values from netting materials into isooctane ranged between 38.0 and 624.0 mg l(-1), both below and above the European Union upper limit for migration. Sensory tests involving contact of representative samples with table water under refluxing (100 degrees C/4 h) conditions showed a number of the netting materials produced both off-odour and/or taste as well as discoloration of the food simulant rendering such materials unfit for the packaging of foodstuffs in applications involving heating at elevated temperatures. GC/MS analysis showed the presence of numerous volatile compounds being produced after netting materials/water contact under refluxing conditions. Although it is extremely difficult to establish a clear correlation between sensory off-odour development and GC/MS volatile compounds' profile, it may be

  4. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F). ...

  5. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F). ...

  6. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F). ...

  7. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F). ...

  8. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient temperature must at least equal the cargo's vapor pressure at 46 °C (approx. 115 °F). ...

  9. High chronic ambient temperature stress effects on broiler acid-base balance and their response to supplemental ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, and potassium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Teeter, R G; Smith, M O

    1986-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of heat stress on acid-base status and the birds' response to supplemental KCl and KCO3. The corn-soybean meal fish-meal basal ration (.73% K+) contained more K+ and Cl- than is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences for chicks reared under near optimal conditions (24 C and 55% relative humidity). Chicks reared under continuous thermostress (35 C, 70% relative humidity) exhibited panting phase blood alkalosis (pH of 7.46). Supplementing drinking water with .2% NH4Cl reduced panting phase blood pH to normal values and increased live weight gain (23%) and feed efficiency (7.7%). Supplementing drinking water with .15% KCl also increased (P less than .05) live weight gain (46%) and feed efficiency (15.4%) but did not affect (P less than .46) blood pH. A significant (P less than .01) interaction existed between NH4Cl and KCl for body weight gain. Adding .2% NH4Cl to broiler drinking water reduced the level of KCl required in drinking water to optimize weight gain to .1% KCl. Potassium chloride alone, or with NH4Cl, can alleviate some consequences of heat stress, but supplementing drinking water with a high level of NH4Cl (.5%) decreased (P less than .05) blood pH to acidotic levels and reduced body weight gain. Potassium chloride supplementation exacerbated NH4Cl toxicity. Potassium carbonate reduced (P less than .05) body weight gain indicating that the response may not be attributed to K+ alone. Beneficial effects of NH4Cl therapy for heat stressed broilers are speculative.

  10. O-GlcNAc reports ambient temperature and confers heat resistance on ectotherm development

    PubMed Central

    Radermacher, Pablo T.; Myachina, Faina; Bosshardt, Fritz; Pandey, Rahul; Mariappa, Daniel; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Lehner, Christian F.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of temperature on biological processes are complex. Diffusion is less affected than the diverse enzymatic reactions that have distinct individual temperature profiles. Hence thermal fluctuations pose a formidable challenge to ectothermic organisms in which body temperature is largely dictated by the ambient temperature. How cells in ectotherms cope with the myriad disruptive effects of temperature variation is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic posttranslational modification of proteins with O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) is closely correlated with ambient temperature during development of distantly related ectotherms ranging from the insect Drosophila melanogaster to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to the fish Danio rerio. Regulation seems to occur at the level of activity of the only two enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase, that add and remove, respectively, this posttranslational modification in nucleus and cytoplasm. With genetic approaches in D. melanogaster and C. elegans, we demonstrate the importance of high levels of this posttranslational modification for successful development at elevated temperatures. Because many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins in diverse pathways are O-GlcNAc targets, temperature-dependent regulation of this modification might contribute to an efficient coordinate adjustment of cellular processes in response to thermal change. PMID:24706800

  11. O-GlcNAc reports ambient temperature and confers heat resistance on ectotherm development.

    PubMed

    Radermacher, Pablo T; Myachina, Faina; Bosshardt, Fritz; Pandey, Rahul; Mariappa, Daniel; Müller, H-Arno J; Lehner, Christian F

    2014-04-15

    Effects of temperature on biological processes are complex. Diffusion is less affected than the diverse enzymatic reactions that have distinct individual temperature profiles. Hence thermal fluctuations pose a formidable challenge to ectothermic organisms in which body temperature is largely dictated by the ambient temperature. How cells in ectotherms cope with the myriad disruptive effects of temperature variation is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that nucleocytoplasmic posttranslational modification of proteins with O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) is closely correlated with ambient temperature during development of distantly related ectotherms ranging from the insect Drosophila melanogaster to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to the fish Danio rerio. Regulation seems to occur at the level of activity of the only two enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase, that add and remove, respectively, this posttranslational modification in nucleus and cytoplasm. With genetic approaches in D. melanogaster and C. elegans, we demonstrate the importance of high levels of this posttranslational modification for successful development at elevated temperatures. Because many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins in diverse pathways are O-GlcNAc targets, temperature-dependent regulation of this modification might contribute to an efficient coordinate adjustment of cellular processes in response to thermal change.

  12. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  13. Raman Channel Temperature Measurement of SiC MESFET as a Function of Ambient Temperature and DC Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey J.; Krainsky, Isay L.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to measure the junction temperature of a Cree SiC MESFET as a function of the ambient temperature and DC power. The carrier temperature, which is approximately equal to the ambient temperature, is varied from 25 C to 450 C, and the transistor is biased with VDS=10V and IDS of 50 mA and 100 mA. It is shown that the junction temperature is approximately 52 and 100 C higher than the ambient temperature for the DC power of 500 and 1000 mW, respectively.

  14. Ambient Temperature Influences Australian Native Stingless Bee (Trigona carbonaria) Preference for Warm Nectar

    PubMed Central

    Norgate, Melanie; Boyd-Gerny, Skye; Simonov, Vera; Rosa, Marcello G. P.; Heard, Tim A.; Dyer, Adrian G.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between flowers and insect pollinators is an important aspect of the reproductive mechanisms of many plant species. Several laboratory and field studies indicate that raising flower temperature above ambient can be an advantage in attracting pollinators. Here we demonstrate that this preference for warmer flowers is, in fact, context-dependent. Using an Australian native bee as a model, we demonstrate for the first time a significant shift in behaviour when the ambient temperature reaches 34°C, at which point bees prefer ambient temperature nectar over warmer nectar. We then use thermal imaging techniques to show warmer nectar maintains the flight temperature of bees during the period of rest on flowers at lower ambient temperatures but the behavioural switch is associated with the body temperature rising above that maintained during flight. These findings suggest that flower-pollinator interactions are dependent upon ambient temperature and may therefore alter in different thermal environments. PMID:20711250

  15. Effects of transport container and ambient storage temperature on motion characteristics of equine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P; Rowan, K R; Varner, D D; Blanchard, T L

    2000-05-01

    condition. However, time below 4 degrees C was highly correlated (P < 0.05) with a reduction in spermatozoal motility. Mean cooling rates from 20 degrees C to 8 degrees C did not correlate with spermatozoal motility, except when containers were exposed to temporary freezing conditions. No container cooled samples below 6 degrees C in 22 degrees C or 37 degrees C environments except for the ExpectaFoal, in which samples fell below 4 degrees C under all ambient conditions. Ambient temperature affected MOT, PMOT and VCL of semen stored in all containers (P < 0.05) except for the Equitainer II in which motion characteristics remained high and were similar among all ambient temperatures (P > 0.05). Results suggest that stallion semen may be able to tolerate a wider range of cooling rates and storage temperatures than previously considered safe.

  16. Ambient temperature and risk of death from accidental drug overdose in New York City, 1990-2006.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Amy S B; Prescott, Marta R; Vlahov, David; Tardiff, Kenneth J; Galea, Sandro

    2010-06-01

    Mortality increases as ambient temperature increases. Because cocaine affects core body temperature, ambient temperature may play a role in cocaine-related mortality in particular. The present study examined the association between ambient temperature and fatal overdoses over time in New York City. Mortality data were obtained from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for 1990 to 2006, and temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. We used generalized additive models to test the relationship between weekly average temperatures and counts of accidental overdose deaths in New York City, controlling for year and average length of daylight hours. We found a significant relation between ambient temperature and accidental overdose fatality for all models where the overdoses were due in whole or in part to cocaine (all P < 0.05), but not for non-cocaine overdoses. Risk of accidental overdose deaths increased for weeks when the average temperature was above 24 degrees Celsius. These results suggest a strong relation between temperature and accidental overdose mortality that is driven by cocaine-related overdoses rising at temperatures above 24 degrees Celsius; this is a substantially lower temperature than prior estimates. To put this into perspective, approximately 7 weeks a year between 1990 and 2006 had an average weekly temperature of 24 or above in New York City. Heat-related mortality presents a considerable public health concern, and cocaine users constitute a high-risk group.

  17. Ambient temperature and risk of death from accidental drug overdose in New York City, 1990-2006

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Amy S.B.; Prescott, Marta; Vlahov, David; Tardiff, Kenneth J.; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mortality increases as ambient temperature increases. Because cocaine affects core body temperature, ambient temperature may play a role in cocaine-related mortality in particular. The present study examined the association between ambient temperature and fatal overdoses over time in New York City (NYC). Methods: Mortality data were obtained from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for 1990 through 2006, and temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. We used Generalized Additive Models to test the relationship between weekly average temperatures and counts of accidental overdose deaths in NYC, controlling for year and average length of daylight hours. Results: We found a significant relation between ambient temperature and accidental overdose fatality for all models where the overdoses were due in whole or in part to cocaine (all p < 0.05), but not for non-cocaine overdoses. Risk of accidental overdose deaths increased for weeks when the average temperature was above 24 degrees Celsius. Conclusions: These results suggest a strong relation between temperature and accidental overdose mortality that is driven by cocaine-related overdoses rising at temperatures above 24 degrees Celsius; this is a substantially lower temperature than prior estimates. To put this in perspective, approximately seven weeks a year between 1990 and 2006 had an average weekly temperature of 24 or above in NYC. Heat-related mortality presents a considerable public health concern, and cocaine users constitute a high-risk group. PMID:20219056

  18. Characterization of air temperature in modern ion chambers due to phantom geometry and ambient temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Kirby, Neil; Gutiérrez, Alonso N

    2016-07-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections are necessary to account for the varying mass of air in the sensitive volume of a vented ionization chamber (IC) when performing absolute dose measurements. Locations commonly used to measure the presumed IC air temperature may not accurately represent the chamber cavity air temperature, and phantoms undergoing temperature changes further compound the problem. Prior studies have characterized thermal equilibrium in separate phantoms for Farmer chambers alone. However, the purpose of this study was to characterize the cavity air temperature dependence on changes in the ambient temperature and phantom geometry configuration for a wider and more modern variety of chambers to determine if previously published wait times apply to these chambers as well. Thermal conduction properties were experimentally investigated by modifying a PTW 0.3 cm(3) Semiflex IC with a thermocouple replacing the central electrode. Air cavity temperature versus time was recorded in three phantom geometries characteristic of common absolute dose measurements. The phantoms were (15 ± 1) °C before measurement with an IC at the treatment vault temperature of (21 ± 1) °C. Simulations were conducted to provide a theoretical basis for the measurements and to simulate temperature response of a PTW PinPoint® and Farmer chamber. The simulation methods were first validated by comparison with measured Semiflex chamber thermal response curves before extension to the other chambers. Two thermal equilibria curves were recorded on different time scales. IC temperature initially dropped to the colder phantom temperature but subsequently increased as the phantom itself equilibrated with the warmer room temperature. In a large phantom of dimensions (25.5 × 25.5 × 23.4) cm(3), 3 min was required before the IC temperature reached within 0.5 °C of its equilibrium within the phantom. Similarly, wait times of 2 min were needed for 7.5 and 2 cm slab phantoms. Recording

  19. The application of exhaled breath analysis in racing Thoroughbreds and the influence of high intensity exercise and ambient temperature on the concentration of carbon monoxide and pH in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Michael P; Love, Sandy; Sutton, David G M; Reardon, Richard J M; Hughes, Kristopher J

    2013-08-01

    Analyses of exhaled breath (EB) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are non-invasive modalities for assessing the lower airways but these methods have not been applied to Thoroughbred racehorses in training. The aims of this study were to determine whether EB and EBC could be obtained from Thoroughbred racehorses in the field and to investigate the effects of exercise per se and during different ambient temperatures and humidity on exhaled concentrations of nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO) and EBC pH. EB and EBC samples were obtained from 28 Thoroughbred racehorses pre- and post-exercise during warm (n=23) and/or cold (n=19) ambient temperatures. eNO was detected in 19/84 EB samples. eCO was measured in 39/42 EB samples pre-exercise (median 1.3 ppm) and concentrations decreased significantly post-exercise (median 0.8 ppm, P<0.005) and were associated with ambient temperature. EBC pH was 4.51 ± 0.23 pre-exercise and increased significantly post-exercise (4.79 ± 0.59, P=0.003). The study documented the collection of EB and EBC from Thoroughbred racehorses in a field setting. Alterations in concentrations of volatile gases and EBC pH occurred in response to exercise, and were likely to have been influenced by environmental factors.

  20. Maternal exposure to ambient temperature and the risks of preterm birth and stillbirth in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Strand, Linn B; Barnett, Adrian G; Tong, Shilu

    2012-01-15

    Almost 10% of all births are preterm, and 2.2% are stillbirths. Recent research has suggested that environmental factors may be a contributory cause of these adverse birth outcomes. The authors examined the relation between ambient temperature and preterm birth and stillbirth in Brisbane, Australia, between 2005 and 2009 (n = 101,870). They used a Cox proportional hazards model with livebirth and stillbirth as competing risks. They also examined whether there were periods in pregnancy where exposure to high temperatures had a greater effect. Higher ambient temperatures in the last 4 weeks of the pregnancy increased the risk of stillbirth. The hazard ratio for stillbirth was 0.3 at 12°C relative to the reference temperature of 21°C. The temperature effect was greatest at less than 36 weeks of gestation. There was an association between higher temperature and shorter gestation, as the hazard ratio for livebirth was 0.96 at 15°C and 1.02 at 25°C. This effect was greatest at later gestational ages. These results provide strong evidence of an association between increased temperature and increased risk of stillbirth and shorter gestation.

  1. CHANGES IN AMBIENT TEMPERATURE TRIGGER YAWNING BUT NOT STRETCHING IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Gallup, Andrew C.; Miller, Ralph R.; Clark, Anne B.

    2010-01-01

    Yawning appears to be involved in arousal, state change, and activity across vertebrates. Recent research suggests that yawning may support effective changes in mental state or vigilance through cerebral cooling. To further investigate the relationship between yawning, state change, and thermoregulation, 12 Sprague-Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) were exposed to a total of two hours of ambient temperature manipulation over a period of 48 hours. Using a repeated measures design, each rat experienced a range of increasing (22→32°C), decreasing (32→22°C), and constant temperatures (22°C; 32°C). Yawning and locomotor activity occurred most frequently during initial changes in temperature, irrespective of direction, compared to more extended periods of temperature manipulation. The rate of yawning also diminished during constant high temperatures (32°C) compared to low temperatures (22°C). Unlike yawning, however, stretching was unaffected by ambient temperature variation. These findings are compared to recent work on budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), and the ecological selective pressures for yawning in challenging thermal environments are discussed. The results support previous comparative research connecting yawning with arousal and state change, and contribute to refining the predictions of the thermoregulatory hypothesis across vertebrates. PMID:21132114

  2. Evaluation of a commercial, portable, ambient-temperature emissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Freddie J.; McElroy, David L.

    1990-05-01

    The Devices&Services Company model AE emissometer was evaluated by measurements at ambient temperature on materials with emittances, ɛ, from 0.03 to 0.95, including plates of copper and stainless steel, aluminum foil, adhesive tape, wood, paper, and oxide coatings on a metal pipe. A repeatability of ±0.008 units was observed for measurements of ɛ of working standards over a one-year period. The accuracy of the emissometer was established by measurements on specimens of known ɛ; an uncertainty of ±0.014 units was determined. These repeatability and accuracy values were confirmed by a round-robin investigation using two working standards whose ɛ's were measured by three independent laboratories using model AE emissometers and by four laboratories that used absolute methods. The instrument was shown to measure the total hemispherical ɛ, not the total normal ɛ. Experimental difficulties were encountered during measurements on a very anisotropic material and in determinations of ɛ's of materials with transparencies less than 0.1. Critical procedural steps are discussed.

  3. Ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings: Theory and design equations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1997-12-30

    Research has been underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to build a theoretical and experimental base for the design of ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings for a variety of possible applications. in the approach taken the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s theorem with respect to the stability of passive magnetic bearing systems employing axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements are overcome by employing special combinations of elements, as follows: Levitating and restoring forces are provided by combinations of permanent-magnet-excited elements chosen to provide positive stiffnesses (negative force derivatives) for selected displacements (i.e., those involving translations or angular displacement of the axis of rotation). As dictated by Eamshaw`s theorem, any bearing system thus constructed will be statically unstable for at least one of the remaining possible displacements. Stabilization against this displacement is accomplished by using periodic arrays (`Halbach arrays`) of permanent magnets to induce currents in close-packed inductively loaded circuits, thereby producing negative force derivatives stabilizing the system while in rotation. Disengaging mechanical elements stabilize the system when at rest and when below a low critical speed. The paper discusses theory and equations needed for the design of such systems.

  4. The influence of hypothalamic temperature and ambient temperature on thermoregulatory mechanisms in the pig

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, B. A.; Ingram, D. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. Two types of temperature fluctuation have been recorded from the preoptic region of the conscious pig. One, which is associated with arousal or movement, and another, which is related to rhythms in respiration and blood pressure. 2. When the pigs were subjected to infra-red irradiation at various ambient temperatures it was found that there was no precise temperature of the preoptic region at which the respiratory frequency increased. 3. Local heating of the preoptic region was effective in increasing the respiratory frequency only when the ambient temperature was above 30° C. 4. Even when both the peripheral temperature and central temperatures were increased there was a delay of several minutes before the onset of panting. 5. Cooling the preoptic region of the hypothalamus prevented the onset of panting in a hot environment, and reduced respiratory frequency in an animal which was already panting. 6. Oxygen consumption was reduced in a cold environment when the preoptic region was warmed, and increased when it was cooled. No increase in oxygen consumption occurred when the hypothalamus was cooled in a hot environment. PMID:5685285

  5. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  6. Association between the ambient temperature and the occurrence of human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Josef; Greiner, Matthias; Höller, Christiane; Messelhäusser, Ute; Rampp, Albert; Klein, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. and thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. are the most important causes of human bacterial diarrheal infections worldwide. These bacterial species are influenced by several factors like behaviour of the host, shedding, environment incl. directly or indirectly through ambient temperature, and the infections show seasonality. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the association between the occurrence of human campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis and the ambient temperature. The number of campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis cases in two German metropolises, Munich and Berlin, and three rural regions was analysed with simultaneous consideration of the ambient temperature over a period of four years (2001 to 2004) using regression, time series, and cross-correlation analysis. The statistical analysis showed that an increase in the ambient temperature correlated positively with an increase in human Salmonella and Campylobacter cases. The correlation occurred with a delay of approximately five weeks. The seasonal rise in ambient temperature correlated with increased incidence of bacterial diarrheal infections. PMID:27324200

  7. Ambient temperature: a factor affecting performance and physiological response of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Donkoh, A

    1989-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to elucidate the influence of four constant ambient temperatures (20 degrees, 25 degrees, 30 degrees and 35 degrees C) on the performance and physiological reactions of male commercial broiler chicks from 3 to 7 weeks of age. A 12 h light-dark cycle was operated, while relative humidity and air circulation were not controlled. Exposure of broiler chickens to the 20 degrees, 25 degrees, 30 degrees and 35 degrees C treatments showed highly significant (P less than 0.0001) depression in growth rate, food intake and efficiency of food utilization, and a significant increase in water consumption for the 30 degrees and 35 degrees C groups. Mortality was, however, not affected by the temperature treatments. Changes in physiological status, such as increased rectal temperatures, decreased concentration of red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, and total plasma protein were observed in birds housed in the higher temperature (30 degrees and 35 degrees C) environments. Moreover, in these broiler chickens, there was an increased blood glucose concentration and a decreased thyroid gland weight. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to high ambient temperatures markedly affects their performance and physiological response.

  8. Ambient temperature: a factor affecting performance and physiological response of broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkoh, A.

    1989-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to elucidate the influence of four constant ambient temperatures (20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C) on the performance and physiological reactions of male commercial broiler chicks from 3 to 7 weeks of age. A 12 h light-dark cycle was operated, while relative humidity and air circulation were not controlled. Exposure of broiler chickens to the 20°, 25°, 30° and 35°C treatments showed highly significant ( P<0.0001) depression in growth rate, food intake and efficiency of food utilization, and a significant increase in water consumption for the 30° and 35°C groups. Mortality was, however, not affected by the temperature treatments. Changes in physiological status, such as increased rectal temperatures, decreased concentration of red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, and total plasma protein were observed in birds housed in the higher temperature (30° and 35°C) environments. Moreover, in these broiler chickens, there was an increased blood glucose concentration and a decreased thyroid gland weight. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to high ambient temperatures markedly affects their performance and physiological response.

  9. High temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Maw-Kuen

    1987-01-01

    The two principle objectives are to develop materials that superconduct at higher temperatures and to better understand the mechanisms behind high temperature superconductivity. Experiments on the thermal reaction, structure, and physical properties of materials that exhibit superconductivity at high temperatures are discussed.

  10. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  11. Changes of body temperature and thermoregulatory responses of freely moving rats during GABAergic pharmacological stimulation to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus in several ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Takayuki; Saito, Takehito; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yazawa, Toru; Kotani, Yasunori; Otokawa, Minoru; Aihara, Yasutsugu

    2005-06-28

    Action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH) has been implicated to regulate body temperature (T(b)). However, its precise role in thermoregulation remains unclear. Moreover, little is known about its release pattern in the PO/AH during active thermoregulation. Using microdialysis and telemetry techniques, we measured several parameters related to thermoregulation of freely moving rats during pharmacological stimulation of GABA in normal (23 degrees C), cold (5 degrees C), and hot (35 degrees C) ambient temperatures. We also measured extracellular GABA levels in the PO/AH during cold (5 degrees C) and heat (35 degrees C) exposure combined with microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Perfusion of GABA(A) agonist muscimol into the PO/AH increased T(b), which is associated with increased heart rate (HR), as an index of heat production in all ambient temperatures. Although tail skin temperature (T(tail)) as an index of heat loss increased only under normal ambient temperatures, its response was relatively delayed in comparison with HR and T(b), suggesting that the increase in T(tail) was a secondary response to increased HR and T(b). Locomotor activity also increased in all ambient temperatures, but its response was not extraordinary. Interestingly, thermoregulatory responses were different after perfusion of GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline at each ambient temperature. In normal ambient temperature conditions, perfusion of bicuculline had no effect on any parameter. However, under cold ambient temperature, the procedure induced significant hypothermia concomitant with a decrease in HR in spite of hyperactivity and increase of T(tail). It induced hyperthermia with the increase of HR but no additional change of T(tail) in hot ambient temperature conditions. Furthermore, the extracellular GABA level increased significantly during cold exposure. Its release was lower during heat exposure than in a

  12. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  13. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  14. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  15. Ambient temperature does not affect the tactile sensitivity of mystacial vibrissae in harbour seals.

    PubMed

    Dehnhardt, G; Mauck, B; Hyvärinen, H

    1998-11-01

    Vibrissae provide pinnipeds with tactile information primarily in the aquatic environment, which is characterized by its high thermal conductivity and large potential cooling power. Since studies of thermal effects on human tactile sensitivity have revealed that cooling below normal skin temperature impairs sensitivity, the present study investigates the tactile sensitivity of the vibrissal system of harbour seals at varying ambient temperatures. Using plates bearing gratings of alternating grooves and ridges, the texture difference thresholds of two adult seals were determined under water. We took advantage of the natural difference in ambient temperature between summer and winter. Mean water temperature was 1. 2 degreesC during the winter and 22 degreesC during the summer. During the cold season, the thermal status of both seals was examined using an infrared-sensitive camera system. The texture difference threshold of both seals remained the same (0.18 mm groove width difference) under both test conditions. The thermographic examination revealed that the skin areas of the head where the mystacial and supraorbital vibrissae are located show a substantially higher degree of thermal emission than do adjacent skin areas. This suggests that, in the vibrissal follicles of harbour seals, no vasoconstriction occurs during cold acclimation, so that the appropriate operating temperature for the mechanoreceptors is maintained.

  16. Ambient temperature effect on single-bubble sonoluminescence in different concentrations of sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Kh.; Bemani, F.; Silatani, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ambient temperature on the parameters of the single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid (SA) diluted in water is studied. Using a hydrochemical model, three dominant instabilities of shape, Bjerknes, and diffusion are considered. The phase diagrams of the bubble in the (R0 - Pa) space are presented, and the parametric dependence of the light intensity is discussed. In contrast to water, the calculated thermal-bremsstrahlung mechanism of light emission at the fixed degassing condition of high SA concentrations shows that, with increasing the temperature of aqueous SA solutions, the light intensity increases. However, at diluted SA solutions similar to water, the light intensity decreases with increasing the ambient temperature. For 50 wt % SA, it was observed that the emitted light was almost temperature independent. Furthermore, it is found that, at the fixed temperatures of 20 °C, 10 °C, and 0 °C, the aqueous solutions of 65 wt %, 50 wt %, and 45 wt % SA, respectively, have the maximum light emission.

  17. Experiments on the transition from the steady to the oscillatory marangoni convection of a floating-zone under various cold wall temperatures and various ambient air temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selver, Ramazan

    2005-12-01

    The transition from the steady to the oscillatory Marangoni convection of a floating-zone under various cold wall temperatures and various ambient air temperature effects have been investigated experimentally by heating the sample from above (opposite direction of Marangoni convection and buoyant forces). The heat transfer takes place mainly through conduction as well as the natural convection of the air around the cylindrical liquid bridge. The ambient airflow in the present work is varied by varying the cold wall temperature and ambient air temperature. In this study, the transition from the steady to the oscillatory Marangoni convection flow of a high Prandtl number fluid in a floating half-zone is visualized by means of the already proven method of the "light-cut-technique". The test fluid zone is held in ambient air at +4 °C, +10 °C, +16 °C, +23 °C, and +28 °C. The onset of oscillations, the oscillation level, and oscillation pattern are investigated under various conditions. It is found that the critical temperature difference (ΔTCr) varies substantially when the cold wall temperature and the ambient air temperature are varied.

  18. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  19. High-temperature thermodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamics requiring species and phases identification, crystal structures, molecular geometries and vibrational, rotational and electronic energy levels and equilibrium constants

  20. The influences of ambient temperature and crude protein levels on performance and serum biochemical parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q W; Feng, J H; Chao, Z; Chen, Y; Wei, L M; Wang, F; Sun, R P; Zhang, M H

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of ambient temperature, crude protein levels and their interaction on performance and serum biochemical parameters of broiler chickens. A total of 216 Arbor Acre broiler chickens (108 males and 108 females) were used in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement and randomly reared at two temperatures (normal temperature: 23 °C; daily cyclic high temperature: 28-32 °C) and fed on three diets with different crude protein levels (153.3, 183.3 or 213.3 g/kg, with constant essential amino acids) from 28 to 42 days of age. Daily cyclic high ambient temperature decreased final body weight, average daily weight gain, average daily feed intake and serum total protein contents (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.008 respectively), but increased feed/gain, mortality, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, serum uric acid contents and serum creatine kinase activity (p = 0.008, p = 0.003, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.003 respectively), irrespective of crude protein levels. At the ambient temperature, reducing crude protein levels resulted in an increase in feed/gain (p < 0.001), but a decrease in serum total protein and uric acid contents. Only serum creatine kinase activity in broiler chickens was interacted by daily cyclic high ambient temperature and dietary crude protein levels (p = 0.003). These results indicated that daily cyclic high ambient temperature had a great effect on performance and serum biochemical parameters in broiler chickens, whereas dietary crude protein levels affected them partially.

  1. The association between ambient temperature and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yue; Chen, Renjie; Liu, Cong; Ran, Pixin; Chen, Ailan; Chen, Xinyu; Kan, Haidong

    2016-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is becoming a considerable public health burden worldwide. The seasonal variation of OHCA has been observed, but the potential effects of ambient temperature on OHCA were rarely investigated. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate the association between ambient temperature and OHCA in Guangzhou, China. We collected daily emergency ambulance dispatches for OHCA from the Guangzhou Emergency Center from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. We analyzed the associations using the time-series method. We applied the generalized linear model combined with the distributed lag non-linear model to estimate the potentially non-linear and lagged effects of temperature on OHCA. Time trends, day of the week, and air pollutants were controlled as covariates. We identified a total of 4369 cases of OHCD. The associations between daily mean temperature and OHCA were generally J-shaped. Both low and high temperatures could increase the risk of OHCA. The effects were strongest on the concurrent day (lag 0) and lasted for 6 or 7days. The cumulative risks of extreme cold (1st percentile of temperature) and extreme heat (99th percentile of temperature) over lags 0-21days were 3.75 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.63, 8.63) and 2.45 (95%CI: 1.15, 5.33), respectively, compared with the referent temperature (28°C)·This study suggested that both cold and hot temperatures could significantly increase the risk of OHCA in Guangzhou, China. Our results might have important public health implications for the prevention of OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Is ambient temperature associated with risk of infant mortality? A multi-city study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae; Bell, Michelle L

    2017-10-01

    Although numerous studies have shown increased risk of mortality from elevated temperatures for adults, limited studies have examined temperature's effect on mortality for infants. Our study investigated the city-specific and overall effects of ambient temperature on infant mortality in seven major cities in Korea, 2004-2007. Birth cohort using a linked birth and death records included 777,570 births with 557 all-cause deaths. We estimated city-specific hazard ratios for each city using an extended Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates. Then we combined city-specific hazard ratios to generate overall hazard ratio across the seven cities using a Bayesian hierarchical model. Stratified analyses were conducted by cause of death (total and SIDS), exposure period (whole gestation, each trimester, lifetime, 1 month before death, and 2 weeks before death), sex, and maternal characteristics. Overall across the cities, we found significantly positive associations between ambient temperature during 1 month before death or 2 weeks before death and infant mortality from total or SIDS. The overall hazard ratio of infant mortality from total deaths and SIDS for a 1°C increase during 1 month before death was 1.52 (95% CI, 1.46-1.57) and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.35-1.66), respectively. We also found suggestive evidence that some factors such as mother's age may modify the association. Our findings have implications for establishment of policy to reduce the risk of infant mortality from high ambient temperature under climate change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  4. Exhaled air temperature as a function of ambient temperature in flying and resting ducks.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sophia; Klaassen, Raymond H G; Klaassen, Marcel; Biebach, Herbert

    2006-08-01

    Exhaled air temperature (T (exh)) has a paramount effect on respiratory water loss during flight. For migratory birds, low T (exh) potentially reduces water loss and increases flight range. However, only three studies provide empirical data on T (exh) during flight. The aim of this study was to record T (exh) of birds during rest and flight at a range of controlled ambient temperatures (T (amb)). One wigeon and two teal flew a total of 20 times in a wind tunnel at T (amb) ranging from 1 degrees to 24 degrees C. T (exh) during flight did not differ between the two species and was strongly correlated with T (amb) (T (exh)=1.036 T (amb) + 13.426; R2=0.58). In addition, body temperature had a weak positive effect on T (exh). At a given T (amb), T (exh )was about 5 degrees C. higher during flight than at rest.

  5. Ambient temperature effect on pulse rate variability as an alternative to heart rate variability in young adult.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hangsik

    2016-12-01

    Pulse rate variability (PRV) is a promising physiological and analytic technique used as a substitute for heart rate variability (HRV). PRV is measured by pulse wave from various devices including mobile and wearable devices but HRV is only measured by an electrocardiogram (ECG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate PRV and HRV at various ambient temperatures and elaborate on the interchangeability of PRV and HRV. Twenty-eight healthy young subjects were enrolled in the experiment. We prepared temperature-controlled rooms and recorded the ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) under temperature-controlled, constant humidity conditions. The rooms were kept at 17, 25, and 38 °C as low, moderate, and high ambient temperature environments, respectively. HRV and PRV were derived from the synchronized ECG and PPG measures and they were studied in time and frequency domain analysis for PRV/HRV ratio and pulse transit time (PTT). Similarity and differences between HRV and PRV were determined by a statistical analysis. PRV/HRV ratio analysis revealed that there was a significant difference between HRV and PRV for a given ambient temperature; this was with short-term variability measures such as SDNN SDSD or RMSSD, and HF-based variables including HF, LF/HF and normalized HF. In our analysis the absolute value of PTT was not significantly influenced by temperature. Standard deviation of PTT, however, showed significant difference not only between low and moderate temperatures but also between low and high temperatures. Our results suggest that ambient temperature induces a significant difference in PRV compared to HRV and that the difference becomes greater at a higher ambient temperature.

  6. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  7. Low cycle fatigue behavior of polycrystalline Ni3Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Graham; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1994-11-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance of polycrystalline Ni3Al has been evaluated at ambient, intermediate (300 °C), and elevated (600 °C) temperatures using strain rates of 10-2/s and 10-4/s. Testing was conducted on a binary and a Cr-containing alloy of similar stoichiometry and B content (hypostoichiometric, 200 wppm B). Test results were combined with electron microscope investigations in order to evaluate microstructural changes during LCF. At ambient and intermediate temperatures, the cyclic constitutive response of both alloys was similar, and the LCF behavior was virtually rate independent. Under these conditions, the alloys rapidly hardened and then gradually softened for the remainder of the life. Initial hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris within the deformed microstructure, whereas softening was related to localized disordering. For these experimental conditions, crack initiation resulted within persistent slip bands (PSBs). At the elevated temperature, diffusion-assisted deformation resulted in a rate-dependent constitutive response and crack-initiation characteristics. At the high strain rate (10-2/s), continuous cyclic hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris. At the low strain rate (10-4/s), the diffusion of dislocation debris to grain boundaries resulted in cyclic softening. The elevated temperature LCF resistance was determined by the effect of the constitutive response on the driving force for environmental embrittlement. Chromium additions were observed to enhance LCF performance only under conditions where crack initiation was environmentally driven.

  8. Changes in ambient temperature at the onset of thermoregulatory responses in exercise-trained rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, N.; Sakurada, S.; Shido, O.

    Spontaneous running in a wheel has emerged as a useful method of exercise in rodents. We investigated how exercise training with a running wheel affects ambient temperatures (Ta) at the onset of thermoregulatory responses in rats. Female rats were allowed to run freely in the wheel for 6 months. Sedentary control rats did not exercise during the same period. After the exercise training period, they were loosely restrained and Ta values at the onset of tail skin vasodilation and cold- induced thermogenesis were determined by raising or lowering Ta. Resting levels of core temperature and heat production of the exercise-trained rats were significantly higher than those of the controls. Ta values at the onset of tail skin vasodilation and cold-induced thermogenesis of the exercise-trained rats were higher than those of the controls. The results suggest that, in rats, exercise training with a running wheel elevates ambient temperatures for heat loss and heat production, which may then contribute to maintaining the core temperature at a high level.

  9. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  10. Transporting Cells in Semi-Solid Gel Condition and at Ambient Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjian; Chen, Peng; Xu, Jianzhen; Zou, June.X; Wang, Haibin; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells including human cancer cells are usually transported in cryovials on dry ice or in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipping vessel between different places at long distance. The hazardous nature of dry ice and liquid nitrogen, and the associated high shipping cost strongly limit their routine use. In this study, we tested the viability and properties of cells after being preserved or shipped over long distance in Matrigel mixture for different days. Our results showed that cells mixed with Matrigel at suitable ratios maintained excellent viability (>90%) for one week at room temperature and preserved the properties such as morphology, drug sensitivity and metabolism well, which was comparable to cells cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. We also sent cells in the Matrigel mixture via FedEx service to different places at ambient temperature. Upon arrival, it was found that over 90% of the cells were viable and grew well after replating. These data collectively suggested that our Matrigel-based method was highly convenient for shipping live cells for long distances in semi-solid gel condition and at ambient temperature. PMID:26098554

  11. Sodium-promoted Pd/TiO2 for catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changbin; Li, Yaobin; Wang, Yafei; He, Hong

    2014-05-20

    Catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO) to CO2 at ambient conditions is of great interest for indoor HCHO purification. Here, we report that sodium-doped Pd/TiO2 is a highly effective catalyst for the catalytic oxidation of HCHO at room temperature. It was observed that Na doping has a dramatic promotion effect on the Pd/TiO2 catalyst and that nearly 100% HCHO conversion could be achieved over the 2Na-Pd/TiO2 catalyst at a GHSV of 95000 h(-1) and HCHO inlet concentration of 140 ppm at 25 °C. The mechanism of the Na-promotion effect was investigated by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), CO chemisorption, Temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption of O2 (O2-TPD) methods. The results showed that Na species addition can induce and further stabilize a negatively charged and well-dispersed Pd species, which then facilitates the activation of H2O and chemisorbed oxygen, therefore resulting in the high performance of the 2Na-Pd/TiO2 catalyst for the ambient HCHO destruction.

  12. [Numerical simulation study on effects of ambient temperature on airflow in the nasal cavity].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guan-xia; Li, Jian-feng; Lei, Wen-bin; Zhou, Xu-hui; Zhan, Jie-min; Xu, Geng

    2011-11-01

    To study the aerodynamics of the normal human nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures. Based on CT scanning, a model of a healthy adult's nasal cavity was established using computational fluid dynamics software from Fluent. Airflow in this model was simulated and calculated at ambient temperatures of 0 °C, 24 °C, and 37 °C during periodic breathing. Ambient temperature only had an impact on the temperature in the nasal cavity during the inspiratory phase, and the temperature distribution was not symmetrical in the inspiratory acceleration and deceleration phases. The ambient temperature significantly affected airflow speed in main nasal passages during the inspiratory process, but had little impact on flow status (proportion and streamline of airflow in different nasal passages). Temperature differences increased the irregular air movement within sinuses. The anterior nasal segment, including the area between the valve and the head of the middle turbinate, was the most effective part of the nasal airway in heating the ambient air. Our findings describe the effects of ambient temperature on airflow parameters in the nasal cavity within a single respiratory cycle. This data is more comprehensively and accurately to determine the relationship between nasal cavity aerodynamics and physiological functions.

  13. Increased ambient air temperature alters the severity of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Sinclair, Kat; Hallin, Ingrid; Doerr, Stefan; Urbanek, Emilia; Quinn, Gerry; Matthews, Peter; Dudley, Ed; Francis, Lewis; Gazze, S. Andrea; Whalley, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Soil repellency, the inability of soils to wet readily, has detrimental environmental impacts such as increased runoff, erosion and flooding, reduced biomass production, inefficient use of irrigation water and preferential leaching of pollutants. Its impacts may exacerbate (summer) flood risks associated with more extreme drought and precipitation events. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that transitions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic soil particle surface characteristics, in conjunction with soil structural properties, strongly influence the hydrological behaviour of UK soils under current and predicted UK climatic conditions. We have addressed the hypothesis by applying different ambient air temperatures under controlled conditions to simulate the effect of predicted UK climatic conditions on the wettability of soils prone to develop repellency at different severities. Three UK silt-loam soils under permanent vegetation were selected for controlled soil perturbation studies. The soils were chosen based on the severity of hydrophobicity that can be achieved in the field: severe to extreme (Cefn Bryn, Gower, Wales), intermediate to severe (National Botanical Garden, Wales), and subcritical (Park Grass, Rothamsted Research near London). The latter is already highly characterised so was also used as a control. Soils were fully saturated with water and then allowed to dry out gradually upon exposure to controlled laboratory conditions. Soils were allowed to adapt for a few hours to a new temperature prior to initiation of the controlled experiments. Soil wettability was determined at highly regular intervals by measuring water droplet penetration times. Samples were collected at four time points: fully wettable, just prior to and after the critical soil moisture concentrations (CSC), and upon reaching air dryness (to constant weight), for further (ultra)metaproteomic and nanomechanical studies to allow integration of bulk soil characterisations with

  14. Daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence in Guangzhou, China: a time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyuan; Chen, Xinyu; Chen, Renjie; Cai, Jing; Meng, Xia; Wan, Yue; Kan, Haidong

    2016-08-01

    Few previous studies have examined the association between temperature and renal colic in developing regions, especially in China, the largest developing country in the world. We collected daily emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for renal colic from Guangzhou Emergency Center from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012. We used a distributed-lag nonlinear model in addition to the over-dispersed generalized additive model to investigate the association between daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence after controlling for seasonality, humidity, public holidays, and day of the week. We identified 3158 EADs for renal colic during the study period. This exposure-response curve was almost flat when the temperature was low and moderate and elevated when the temperature increased over 21 °C. For heat-related effects, the significant risk occurred on the concurrent day and diminished until lag day 7. The cumulative relative risk of hot temperatures (90th percentile) and extremely hot temperatures (99th percentile) over lag days 0-7 was 1.92 (95 % confidence interval, 1.21, 3.05) and 2.45 (95 % confidence interval, 1.50, 3.99) compared with the reference temperature of 21 °C. This time-series analysis in Guangzhou, China, suggested a nonlinear and lagged association between high outdoor temperatures and daily EADs for renal colic. Our findings might have important public health significance to prevent renal colic.

  15. Daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence in Guangzhou, China: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changyuan; Chen, Xinyu; Chen, Renjie; Cai, Jing; Meng, Xia; Wan, Yue; Kan, Haidong

    2016-08-01

    Few previous studies have examined the association between temperature and renal colic in developing regions, especially in China, the largest developing country in the world. We collected daily emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for renal colic from Guangzhou Emergency Center from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012. We used a distributed-lag nonlinear model in addition to the over-dispersed generalized additive model to investigate the association between daily ambient temperature and renal colic incidence after controlling for seasonality, humidity, public holidays, and day of the week. We identified 3158 EADs for renal colic during the study period. This exposure-response curve was almost flat when the temperature was low and moderate and elevated when the temperature increased over 21 °C. For heat-related effects, the significant risk occurred on the concurrent day and diminished until lag day 7. The cumulative relative risk of hot temperatures (90th percentile) and extremely hot temperatures (99th percentile) over lag days 0-7 was 1.92 (95 % confidence interval, 1.21, 3.05) and 2.45 (95 % confidence interval, 1.50, 3.99) compared with the reference temperature of 21 °C. This time-series analysis in Guangzhou, China, suggested a nonlinear and lagged association between high outdoor temperatures and daily EADs for renal colic. Our findings might have important public health significance to prevent renal colic.

  16. High Temperature Semiconductor Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A sputtering deposition system capable of depositing large areas of high temperature superconducting materials was developed by CVC Products, Inc. with the support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) program. The system was devleoped for NASA to produce high quality films of high temperature superconducting material for microwave communication system components. The system is also being used to deposit ferroelectric material for capacitors and the development of new electro-optical materials.2002103899

  17. Effect of cold ambient temperature on palmar sweating response to vibration stress.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hideo; Noguchi, Ryo; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Matoba, Tsunetaka

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the effect of cold ambient temperature on the palmar sweating response to vibration stress. Ten healthy, male subjects were exposed to eight ambient temperatures (5, 7, 10, 14, 18, 22, 24 and 28 degrees C). At each ambient temperature, each subject gripped the handle of a vibration generator with his left hand with a grasp strength of 49 N. This hand was then exposed to a 125-Hz sinusoidal vibration with an acceleration of 50 m/s(2) (rms) for 3 min at each ambient temperature. Palmar sweating and skin temperature were measured simultaneously on the palm and the fourth finger, respectively, of the subjects' right palm. The palmar sweating response showed a significant change among eight ambient temperatures. The palmar sweating measured at an ambient temperature of 5 degrees C was found to be significantly larger than those measured at 10, 14, 18, 22, 24 and 28 degrees C. Vibration exposure caused a significant increase in the palmar sweating response. Our results suggest that a cold environment plays a significant role in the palmar sweating response to vibration stress.

  18. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems.

  19. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  20. High temperature loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.; Fershtater, Y.; Goncharov, K.A.; Nikitkin, M.; Juhasz, A.

    1995-12-31

    Advantages of loop heat pipes over conventional heat pipes include self-priming during start-up, improved tolerance for noncondensible gas, and ability for ground testing in any orientation. The applications for high temperature, alkali-metal working fluid loop heat pipes include space radiators, and bimodal systems. A high temperature loop heat pipe was fabricated and tested at 850 K, using cesium as the working fluid. Previous loop heat pipes were tested with ambient temperature working fluids at temperatures below about 450 K. The loop heat pipe had a titanium envelope, and a titanium aluminide wick. The maximum cesium loop heat pipe power was only about 600 watts, which was lower the predicted 1,000 W power. The power limitation may be due to a wettability problem with the cesium not completely wetting the titanium aluminide wick. This would reduce the pumping capability of the wick, and the maximum power that the heat pipe could carry. This problem could be solved by using a refractory metal powder wick, since the alkali metals are known to wet refractory metal wicks.

  1. Synchronous Crepuscular Flight of Female Asian Gypsy Moths: Relationships of Light Intensity and Ambient and Body Temperatures

    Treesearch

    Ralph E. Charlton; Ring T. Carde; William E. Wallner; William E. Wallner

    1999-01-01

    Female gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar) of Asian heritage studied in central Siberia and Germany exhibit a highly synchronous flight at dusk, after light intensity falls to about 2 lux. This critical light intensity sets the timing of flight behaviors independent of ambient temperature. Flight follows several minutes of preflight wing fanning during which females in...

  2. Effect of change in ambient temperature on core temperature during the daytime.

    PubMed

    Kakitsuba, Naoshi; White, Matthew D

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the hypothesis is tested that continuous increases in ambient temperature (Ta) during daytime would give elevated core and skin temperatures, and consequently better thermal sensation and comfort. Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperatures and regional dry heat losses at 7 sites were continuously measured for 10 Japanese male subjects in three thermal conditions: cond. 1, stepwise increases in Ta from 26 °C at 9 h00 to 30 °C at 18 h00; cond. 2, steady Ta at 28 °C from 9 h00 to 18 h00 and cond. 3, stepwise decreases in Ta from 30 °C at 9 h00 to 26 °C at 18 h00. Oxygen consumption was measured and thermal sensation and comfort votes were monitored at 15 min intervals. Body weight loss was measured at 1 h intervals. While Tre increased continuously in the morning period in any condition, it increased to a significantly greater (p<0.05) 36.9±0.3 °C at 18 h00 in cond. 1 relative to 36.7±0.28 °C in Cond. 2 and 36.5±0.37 °C in cond. 3. Better thermal comfort was observed in the afternoon and the evening in Cond.1 as compared with the other 2 conditions. Thus, a progressive and appropriate increase in Ta may induce optimal cycle in core temperature during daytime, particularly for a resting person.

  3. Improved resolution of ambient flow through fractured rock with temperature logs.

    PubMed

    Pehme, P E; Parker, B L; Cherry, J A; Greenhouse, J P

    2010-01-01

    In contaminant hydrogeology, investigations at fractured rock sites are typically undertaken to improve understanding of the fracture networks and associated groundwater flow that govern past and/or future contaminant transport. Conventional hydrogeologic, geophysical, and hydrophysical techniques used to develop a conceptual model are often implemented in open boreholes under conditions of cross-connected flow. A new approach using high-resolution temperature (+/-0.001 degrees C) profiles measured within static water columns of boreholes sealed using continuous, water-inflated, flexible liners (FLUTe) identifies hydraulically active fractures under ambient (natural) groundwater flow conditions. The value of this approach is assessed by comparisons of temperature profiles from holes (100 to 200 m deep) with and without liners at four contaminated sites with distinctly different hydrogeologic conditions. The results from the lined holes consistently show many more hydraulically active fractures than the open-hole profiles, in which the influence of vertical flow through the borehole between a few fractures masks important intermediary flow zones. Temperature measurements in temporarily sealed boreholes not only improve the sensitivity and accuracy of identifying hydraulically active fractures under ambient conditions but also offer new insights regarding previously unresolvable flow distributions in fractured rock systems, while leaving the borehole available for other forms of testing and monitoring device installation.

  4. Estimation of the postmortem interval by means of ¹H MRS of decomposing brain tissue: influence of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ith, Michael; Scheurer, Eva; Kreis, Roland; Thali, Michael; Dirnhofer, Richard; Boesch, Chris

    2011-08-01

    Standard methods for the estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI, time since death), based on the cooling of the corpse, are limited to about 48 h after death. As an alternative, noninvasive postmortem observation of alterations of brain metabolites by means of (1)H MRS has been suggested for an estimation of the PMI at room temperature, so far without including the effect of other ambient temperatures. In order to study the temperature effect, localized (1)H MRS was used to follow brain decomposition in a sheep brain model at four different temperatures between 4 and 26°C with repeated measurements up to 2100 h postmortem. The simultaneous determination of 25 different biochemical compounds at each measurement allowed the time courses of concentration changes to be followed. A sudden and almost simultaneous change of the concentrations of seven compounds was observed after a time span that decreased exponentially from 700 h at 4°C to 30 h at 26°C ambient temperature. As this represents, most probably, the onset of highly variable bacterial decomposition, and thus defines the upper limit for a reliable PMI estimation, data were analyzed only up to this start of bacterial decomposition. As 13 compounds showed unequivocal, reproducible concentration changes during this period while eight showed a linear increase with a slope that was unambiguously related to ambient temperature. Therefore, a single analytical function with PMI and temperature as variables can describe the time courses of metabolite concentrations. Using the inverse of this function, metabolite concentrations determined from a single MR spectrum can be used, together with known ambient temperatures, to calculate the PMI of a corpse. It is concluded that the effect of ambient temperature can be reliably included in the PMI determination by (1)H MRS. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Study of catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde on Pt/TiO2 alumite catalyst at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Sakurai, Makoto; Kameyama, Hideo

    2009-08-15

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) emitted from buildings, furnishing materials and consumer products is one of the most dominant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an indoor environment. In this work, a Pt/TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst was prepared on an anodic alumite plate and was employed in the catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde at ambient temperature. Firstly, TiO(2) was deposited on the anodic alumite plate with electro-deposition technology. Then, platinum was supported on the anodic alumite plate with wet impregnation method. The developed catalyst exhibits good activity towards the decomposition of HCHO at ambient temperature. TPR (temperature programmed reduction) and TPD (temperature programmed desorption) analysis results indicate that oxygen adsorbed on the Pt/TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst can be activated and generated to O:Pt(surface) species quickly at ambient temperature. Hence, the developed catalyst experiences the high activity towards the catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde at ambient temperature. Moreover, in accordance with the process requirements, the developed catalyst can be formed into various shapes such as a mesh, plate, fin, serrate etc., because aluminum can be formed into any shapes. The serrate type catalyst was prepared in this work and it also exhibits fine activity towards the decomposition of HCHO.

  6. Short communication: Changes in body temperature of calves up to 2 months of age as affected by time of day, age, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Suarez-Mena, F X; Dennis, T S; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-11-01

    Extensive measurements of calf body temperature are limited in the literature. In this study, body temperatures were collected by taping a data logger to the skin over the tail vein opposing the rectum of Holstein calves between 4 and 60d of age during 3 different periods of the summer and fall. The summer period was separated into moderate (21-33°C average low to high) and hot (25-37°C) periods, whereas the fall exhibited cool (11-19°C) ambient temperatures. Tail temperatures were compared in a mixed model ANOVA using ambient temperature, age of calf, and time of day (10-min increments) as fixed effects and calf as a random effect. Measures within calf were modeled as repeated effects of type autoregressive 1. Calf temperature increased 0.0325°C (±0.00035) per 1°C increase in ambient temperature. Body temperature varied in a distinct, diurnal pattern with time of day, with body temperatures being lowest around 0800h and highest between 1700 and 2200h. During periods of hot weather, the highest calf temperature was later in the day (~2200h). Calf minimum, maximum, and average body temperatures were all higher in hot than in moderate periods and higher in moderate than in cool periods. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ambient temperature influences diet selection and physiology of an herbivorous mammal, Neotoma albigula.

    PubMed

    Dearing, M D; Forbey, J S; McLister, J D; Santos, L

    2008-01-01

    The whitethroat woodrat (Neotoma albigula) eats juniper (Juniperus monosperma), but the amount of juniper in its diet varies seasonally. We tested whether changes in juniper consumption are due to changes in ambient temperature and what the physiological consequences of consuming plant secondary compounds (PSCs) at different ambient temperatures might be. Woodrats were acclimated to either 20 degrees C or 28 degrees C. Later, they were given two diets to choose from (50% juniper and a nontoxic control) for 7 d. Food intake, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and body temperature (T(b)) were measured over the last 2 d. Woodrats at 28 degrees C ate significantly less juniper, both proportionally and absolutely, than woodrats at 20 degrees C. RMRs were higher for woodrats consuming juniper regardless of ambient temperature, and T(b) was higher for woodrats consuming juniper at 28 degrees C than for woodrats eating control diet at 28 degrees C. Thus, juniper consumption by N. albigula is influenced by ambient temperature. We conclude that juniper may influence thermoregulation in N. albigula in ways that are helpful at low temperatures but harmful at warmer temperatures in that juniper PSCs may be more toxic at warmer temperatures. The results suggest that increases in ambient temperature associated with climate change could significantly influence foraging behavior of mammalian herbivores.

  8. The effect of ambient air temperature on whole-body bioelectrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Burke, Sean; Endemann, Sarah; Graham, Heidi; Gressard, Christel; Griswold, Lisa; Michalewicz, Betty

    2004-02-01

    It has previously been shown that extreme changes in ambient air temperature can affect whole-body bioelectrical impedance. The purpose of this study was to determine if more moderate changes in ambient air temperature, such as those experienced in most laboratory settings, would also affect bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA). In addition, to elucidate the mechanism responsible for changes in BIA with ambient air temperature, both skin blood flow (SBF) and the electrode-skin interface temperature were independently manipulated to determine their effect on BIA. During the first part of the study, nine healthy volunteers had their BIA measured in five different ambient air temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 degrees C). Mean BIA was 513 ohms under the 15 degrees C condition and decreased significantly (p < 0.05) to 486 ohms in the 35 degrees C trial. However, no significant change was found in mean BIA between the 20 and 25 degrees C trials, which is the temperature range seen in most laboratories. Thus, moderate changes in ambient air temperature have only minor effects on BIA. In the second and third parts of the study, the electrode-skin interface temperature and SBF were independently manipulated using ice packs and electric heating pads placed over the four BIA electrodes. The results showed that BIA was inversely related to SBF (r = -0.95), and strongly suggest that changes in SBF, not electrode-skin interface temperature, are responsible for the changes seen in BIA.

  9. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  10. Ambient air pollution, temperature and out-of-hospital coronary deaths in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinping; Chen, Renjie; Meng, Xia; Yang, Changyuan; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of ambient air pollution and temperature in triggering out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCDs) in China. We evaluated the associations of air pollution and temperature with daily OHCDs in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2011. We applied an over-dispersed generalized additive model and a distributed lag nonlinear model to analyze the effects of air pollution and temperature, respectively. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in the present-day PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO were associated with increases in OHCD mortality of 0.49%, 0.68%, 0.88%, 1.60% and 0.08%, respectively. A 1 °C decrease below the minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 3.81% increase in OHCD mortality on lags days 0-21, and a 1 °C increase above minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 4.61% increase over lag days 0-3. No effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. This analysis suggests that air pollution, low temperature and high temperature may increase the risk of OHCDs.

  11. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  12. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  13. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  14. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  15. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  16. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  17. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Čaja, Alexander E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  18. Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    Samples of a plasticized Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte having high conductivity at room temperature were prepared with mixed plasticizer compositions of ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC). The influence of EC:PC in varying proportions with 1M LiAsF{sub 6} as the dissolved salt on the chemical and electrochemical properties of the electrolyte was studied. Electrolytes with mixed EC:PC compositions were found to have greater thermal stability, improved lithium and cathode (V{sub 6}O{sub 13}) interfacial properties, and superior mechanical properties compared to those prepared with pure EC and PC. The results of this work are relevant to possible uses of such electrolytes in energy storage technologies.

  19. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čaja, Alexander; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  20. Ethylammonium nitrate in high temperature stable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zech, Oliver; Thomaier, Stefan; Kolodziejski, Agnes; Touraud, Didier; Grillo, Isabelle; Kunz, Werner

    2010-07-15

    The increasing number of publications reflects the still growing interest in nonaqueous microemulsions containing room-temperature ionic liquids. Recently, we characterized microemulsions composed of the room-temperature ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) as polar phase, dodecane as continuous phase and 1-hexadecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([C(16)mim][Cl]), an IL that exhibits surfactant properties, and decanol as cosurfactant at ambient temperature. We demonstrate here the high thermal stability of these microemulsions. Along an experimental path, no phase change could be observed visually within a temperature range between 30 degrees C and 150 degrees C. The microemulsions are characterized with quasi-elastic light scattering measurements at ambient temperature and temperature dependent small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments between 30 degrees C and 150 degrees C. DLS measurements at ambient temperature indicate a swelling of the formed structures with increasing amount of EAN up to a certain threshold. The SANS experiments were performed below this threshold. The data evaluation of such concentrated systems like microemulsions is possible with the "generalized indirect Fourier transformation" method (GIFT). We evaluated the small angle scattering data via the GIFT method, for comparison we also applied the model of Teubner and Strey (TS) which was often used to describe scattering curves of microemulsions. The GIFT method gives good fits throughout the experimental path, while the TS model gives relatively poor fits. Both, light scattering and SANS results are in agreement with the existence of EAN droplets stabilized by surfactant with dodecane as continuous phase along the whole investigated temperature range. Moreover, these results clearly demonstrate the possibility to formulate high temperature stable microemulsions with ionic liquids at ambient pressure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Heat exchange of the rat in thermoneutral zone temperature and comparison with heat exchange in ambient temperature over and under it].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, G V

    2011-08-01

    With the help of thermonetry and general calorimetry body temperature and heat production in ambient temperatures 20 degrees C, 28 degrees C, 33 degrees C were recorded. The experiments showed, that at the temperature 20 degrees C the rectal temperature was changing very little. But in ambient temperature 33 degrees C the rectal temperature was 40.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C.

  2. [Effects of the microwave exposure at elevated ambient temperature on the thermo-compensatory responses of small laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Kolganova, O I; Zhavoronkov, L P; Matrënina, V L; Posadskaia, V M

    2003-01-01

    Thermogenic effectiveness of electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of UHF range (7 GHz) in the dependence on intensity (10-50 mW/cm2) and environmental temperature (22 degrees and 30 degrees C) was studied in experiments with mice and rats. Negative influence of high ambient temperature on thermoregulate responses of animals at microwave exposure was showed. It is concluded that this interaction should been taken into account for hygienic standardization of non-ionizing EMI.

  3. Polymer Membranes with Vertically Oriented Pores Constructed by 2D Freezing at Ambient Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong-Qing; Ji, Ke-Jia; Zha, Li-Yun; Hu, Wen-Bing; Ou, Yang; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-06-08

    Polymer membranes with well-controlled and vertically oriented pores are of great importance in the applications for water treatment and tissue engineering. On the basis of two-dimensional solvent freezing, we report environmentally friendly facile fabrication of such membranes from a broad spectrum of polymer resources including poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(l-lactic acid), polyacrylonitrile, polystyrene, polysulfone and polypropylene. Dimethyl sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and arachidic acid are selected as green solvents crystallized in the polymer matrices under two-dimensional temperature gradients induced by water at ambient temperature. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice polymers demonstrate that the directional process is feasible for each polymer holding suitable interaction with a corresponding solvent. As a typical example of this approach, poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes exhibit excellent tensile strength, high optical transparence, and outstanding separation performance for the mixtures of yeasts and lactobacilli.

  4. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  5. High Mortality of Red Sea Zooplankton under Ambient Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M. O.; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h−1, five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h−1% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  6. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  7. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  8. Triggering of stroke by ambient temperature variation: A case-crossover study in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Joana; Damasceno, Albertino; Carrilho, Carla; Lobo, Vitória; Lopes, Hélder; Madede, Tavares; Pravinrai, Pius; Silva-Matos, Carla; Diogo, Domingos; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The effect of ambient temperature as a stroke trigger is likely to differ by type of stroke and to depend on non-transient exposures that influence the risk of this outcome. We aimed to quantify the association between ambient temperature variation and stroke, according to clinical characteristics of the events, and other risk factors for stroke. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study based on a 1-year registry of the hospital admissions due to newly occurring ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke events in Maputo, Mozambique's capital city (N = 593). The case-period was defined as the 7 days before the stroke event, which was compared to two control periods (14–21 days and 21–28 days before the event). We computed humidity- and precipitation-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) using conditional logistic regression. Results An association between minimum temperature declines higher than 2.4 °C in any two consecutive days in the previous week and the occurrence of stroke was observed only for first events (OR = 1.43, 95%CI: 1.15–1.76). Stronger and statistically significant associations were observed for hemorrhagic stroke (OR = 1.50, 95%CI: 1.07–2.09) and among subjects not exposed to risk factors, including smoking, high serum cholesterol or atrial fibrillation. No differences in the effect of temperature were found according to the patients’ vital status 28 days after the event. Conclusions First stroke events, especially of the hemorrhagic type, were triggered by declines in the minimum temperature between consecutive days of the preceding week. PMID:25559679

  9. Pressure induced ionic-superionic transition in silver iodide at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Y H; Wang, H B; Troyan, I A; Gao, C X; Eremets, M I

    2014-01-28

    Silver iodide (AgI-V) is an archetypical ionic compound for studying the formation mechanism of a superionic state. Previous studies have proven that superionic AgI with high ionic conductivity greater than 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1) could only be obtained at high temperatures. We show in this paper that high pressure could also induce the superionic state in AgI even at ambient temperature. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we investigated Ag(+) ions diffusing in rock-salt structured AgI-III and KOH-type AgI-V under high pressures and directly observed the superionic state in AgI-V. The diffusion coefficient of AgI-V is ∼3.4 × 10(-4)-8.6 × 10(-4) cm(2)/s in the investigated pressure range of 12-17 GPa, comparable with those of superionic α-AgI and AgI-III'. By analyzing the half infinite length Warburg diffusion process, two parameters α and β, which closely relate to the disordered state of Ag(+) ions, have been determined and it was suggested that Ag(+) ions in AgI-V become disordered. The ionic conductivity of AgI-V is three orders of magnitude higher than that of AgI-III, and has reached around 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1). Evidence for all three, the diffusion coefficient, α and β, and conductivity have proven that AgI-V is a superionic conductor at ambient temperature.

  10. Pressure induced ionic-superionic transition in silver iodide at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Wang, H. B.; Troyan, I. A.; Gao, C. X.; Eremets, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Silver iodide (AgI-V) is an archetypical ionic compound for studying the formation mechanism of a superionic state. Previous studies have proven that superionic AgI with high ionic conductivity greater than 0.1 Ω-1cm-1 could only be obtained at high temperatures. We show in this paper that high pressure could also induce the superionic state in AgI even at ambient temperature. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we investigated Ag+ ions diffusing in rock-salt structured AgI-III and KOH-type AgI-V under high pressures and directly observed the superionic state in AgI-V. The diffusion coefficient of AgI-V is ˜3.4 × 10-4-8.6 × 10-4 cm2/s in the investigated pressure range of 12-17 GPa, comparable with those of superionic α-AgI and AgI-III'. By analyzing the half infinite length Warburg diffusion process, two parameters α and β, which closely relate to the disordered state of Ag+ ions, have been determined and it was suggested that Ag+ ions in AgI-V become disordered. The ionic conductivity of AgI-V is three orders of magnitude higher than that of AgI-III, and has reached around 0.1 Ω-1cm-1. Evidence for all three, the diffusion coefficient, α and β, and conductivity have proven that AgI-V is a superionic conductor at ambient temperature.

  11. Impact of ambient temperature on spring-based relative gravimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Chery, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of ambient temperature changes on the gravity reading of spring-based relative gravimeters. Controlled heating experiments using two Scintrex CG5 gravimeters allowed us to determine a linear correlation ( R 2> 0.9) between ambient temperature and gravity variations. The relation is stable and constant for the two CG5 we used: -5 nm/s2/° C. A linear relation is also seen between gravity and residual sensor temperature variations ( R 2> 0.75), but contrary to ambient temperature, this relation is neither constant over time nor similar between the two instruments. The linear correction of ambient temperature on the controlled heating time series reduced the standard deviation at least by a factor of 2, to less than 10 nm/s2. The laboratory results allowed for reprocessing the data gathered on a field survey that originally aimed to characterize local hydrological heterogeneities on a karstic area. The correction of two years of monthly CG5 measurements from ambient temperature variations halved the standard deviation (from 62 to 32 nm/s2) and led us to a better hydrological interpretation. Although the origin of this effect is uncertain, we suggest that an imperfect control of the sensor temperature may be involved, as well as a change of the properties of an electronic component.

  12. Thermoregulation in newborn lambs: influence of feeding and ambient temperature on brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L; Symonds, M E

    1998-09-01

    We have previously shown that feeding 50 ml of colostrum can increase the thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in newborn lambs maintained at a warm (30 degrees C) ambient temperature. This study further examines the effect of ambient temperature on BAT and thermoregulation by investigating the response to feeding 50 ml of water. Immediately after vaginal birth, lambs were placed in either a warm (30 degrees C) or cool (15 degrees C) environment a ambient temperature and measurements of colonic temperature and heat production were recorded for 6 h. Lambs were fed 50 ml of water when 5 h old. The level of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) binding was higher, but adrenaline content lower in BAT sampled from lambs maintained at 15 degrees C compared with those at 30 degrees C. Feeding was associated with an increase in colonic temperature and plasma concentrations of glucose and non-esterified fatty acids in lambs maintained at 15 degrees C only. In this group plasma concentrations of adrenaline and dopamine declined after feeding, but noradrenaline concentrations were not influenced by feeding in either group of lambs. O2 consumption and CO2 production were higher in lambs maintained at 15 degrees C but were not influenced by ambient temperature or feeding. It is concluded that feeding a small volume of water can influence thermoregulation by a mechanism that is dependent on the ambient temperature at which the lamb is maintained.

  13. Impact of ambient temperature on spring-based relative gravimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Chery, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of ambient temperature changes on the gravity reading of spring-based relative gravimeters. Controlled heating experiments using two Scintrex CG5 gravimeters allowed us to determine a linear correlation (R 2> 0.9) between ambient temperature and gravity variations. The relation is stable and constant for the two CG5 we used: -5 nm/s2/° C. A linear relation is also seen between gravity and residual sensor temperature variations (R 2> 0.75), but contrary to ambient temperature, this relation is neither constant over time nor similar between the two instruments. The linear correction of ambient temperature on the controlled heating time series reduced the standard deviation at least by a factor of 2, to less than 10 nm/s2 . The laboratory results allowed for reprocessing the data gathered on a field survey that originally aimed to characterize local hydrological heterogeneities on a karstic area. The correction of two years of monthly CG5 measurements from ambient temperature variations halved the standard deviation (from 62 to 32 nm/s2 ) and led us to a better hydrological interpretation. Although the origin of this effect is uncertain, we suggest that an imperfect control of the sensor temperature may be involved, as well as a change of the properties of an electronic component.

  14. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  15. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  16. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  17. Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jinling; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Shijie; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis of the CLC reactor system was conducted, which shows that the parameters that influence the temperatures of the CLC reactors most are the flow rate and temperature of air entering the air reactor. For the ambient temperature variation, three off-design control strategies have been assumed and compared: 1) without any Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) control, 2) IGV control to maintain air reactor temperature and 3) IGV control to maintain constant fuel reactor temperature, aside from fuel flow rate adjusting. Results indicate that, compared with the conventional combined cycle, due to the requirement of pressure balance at outlet of the two CLC reactors, CLC combined cycle shows completely different off-design thermodynamic characteristics regardless of the control strategy adopted. For the first control strategy, temperatures of the two CLC reactors both rise obviously as ambient temperature increases. IGV control adopted by the second and the third strategy has the effect to maintain one of the two reactors' temperatures at design condition when ambient temperature is above design point. Compare with the second strategy, the third would induce more severe decrease of efficiency and output power of the CLC combined cycle.

  18. Enhancement of ANAMMOX activity by low-intensity ultrasound irradiation at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Jin; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jue; Ji, Yu-Xin; Liu, Qi-Zhen; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the enhancement effect of low intensity intermittent ultrasound irradiation on the efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process at ambient temperature. With intermittently irradiated (ultrasound intensity of 0.19 w/cm(2), exposure time of 0.2 min), the reactor (RU) had a nitrogen removal rate (NRR) of 5.49 kgTN/m(3)/d at 14.8°C, while the NRR was 1.53 kgTN/m(3)/d in the control reactor (RC). At the end of operation, the contents of polysaccharide, protein, TTC-dehydrogenase and VSS were 6.82 mg/mgVSS, 26.79 mg/mgVSS, 0.58 mgTF/L/H and 10.11 gVSS/L in RU, higher than the levels in the RC. These results demonstrated that it is possible to achieve stable and highly efficient operation in an ANAMMOX reactor at low ambient temperature by implementation of ultrasonication.

  19. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-05-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.

  20. Ambient Temperature Changes and the Impact to Time Measurement Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Gucevic, J.; Delcev, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements in Geodetic Astronomy are mainly outdoors and performed during a night, when the temperature often decreases very quickly. The time-keeping during a measuring session is provided by collecting UTC time ticks from a GPS receiver and transferring them to a laptop computer. An interrupt handler routine processes received UTC impulses in real-time and calculates the clock parameters. The characteristics of the computer quartz clock are influenced by temperature changes of the environment. We exposed the laptop to different environmental temperature conditions, and calculate the clock parameters for each environmental model. The results show that the laptop used for time-keeping in outdoor measurements should be kept in a stable temperature environment, at temperatures near 20° C.

  1. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  2. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  3. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual.

  4. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  5. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-12-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100-300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900-2,500 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact.

  6. Low-temperature-grown continuous graphene films from benzene by chemical vapor deposition at ambient pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jisu; Son, Myungwoo; Chung, Sunki; Kim, Kihyeun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in synthesizing large-area graphene films at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for nanoelectronic and flexible device applications. However, to date, low-temperature CVD methods have suffered from lower surface coverage because micro-sized graphene flakes are produced. Here, we demonstrate a modified CVD technique for the production of large-area, continuous monolayer graphene films from benzene on Cu at 100–300 °C at ambient pressure. In this method, we extended the graphene growth step in the absence of residual oxidizing species by introducing pumping and purging cycles prior to growth. This led to continuous monolayer graphene films with full surface coverage and excellent quality, which were comparable to those achieved with high-temperature CVD; for example, the surface coverage, transmittance, and carrier mobilities of the graphene grown at 300 °C were 100%, 97.6%, and 1,900–2,500 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. In addition, the growth temperature was substantially reduced to as low as 100 °C, which is the lowest temperature reported to date for pristine graphene produced by CVD. Our modified CVD method is expected to allow the direct growth of graphene in device manufacturing processes for practical applications while keeping underlying devices intact. PMID:26658923

  7. Effects of RVP on emissions at 20F ambient temperature. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, B.; Enns, P.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency is currently proposing rules that will establish cold carbon monoxide (CO) emission standards. The vehicle emission certification testing will be performed using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle at 20 F ambient temperature. Questions have arisen as to whether the Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) of the fuel used for the FTP test will have an impact on cold temperature CO emissions. The purpose of the report is to describe the test program used to determine whether the RVP of fuel could affect the CO exhaust emissions of recent technology motor vehicles tested at 20 F ambient temperature.

  8. Rice LTG1 is involved in adaptive growth and fitness under low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangwen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Wu, Weixun; Wang, Hong-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yunhui; Chen, Xiuling; Zhou, Kunneng; Jin, Mingna; Cheng, Zhijun; Li, Xueyong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most prevalent factors limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the effect of LT on seed germination and reproductive development in rice, the genetic component affecting vegetative growth under LT remains poorly understood. Here, we report that rice cultivars harboring the dominant LTG1 (Low Temperature Growth 1) allele are more tolerant to LT (15-25°C, a temperature range prevalent in high-altitude, temperate zones and high-latitude areas), than those with the ltg1 allele. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we show that LTG1 encodes a casein kinase I. A functional nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the coding region of LTG1, causing a single amino acid substitution (I357K) that is associated with the growth rate, heading date and yield of rice plants grown at LT. We present evidence that LTG1 affects rice growth at LT via an auxin-dependent process(es). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of this locus suggests that the ltg1 haplotype arose before the domestication of rice in tropical climates. Together, our data demonstrate that LTG1 plays an important role in the adaptive growth and fitness of rice cultivars under conditions of low ambient temperature. © 2014 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Influence of ambient temperatures on the production of restraint ulcers in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchel, L.; Gallaire, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the influence of ambient temperature on the production of restraint ulcers in the rat is described. It concludes that the production of restrain ulcers, is favored by the reduction of the environmental temperature, whether the rat has been subjected to a fast or not.

  10. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2016-07-12

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  12. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power line voltage and ambient temperature. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is a combined... temperature. Tests shall be conducted in a temperature-controlled environment over four 6-hour time periods...

  13. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power line voltage and ambient temperature. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is a combined... temperature. Tests shall be conducted in a temperature-controlled environment over four 6-hour time periods...

  14. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power line voltage and ambient temperature. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is a combined... temperature. Tests shall be conducted in a temperature-controlled environment over four 6-hour time periods...

  15. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power line voltage and ambient temperature. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is a combined... temperature. Tests shall be conducted in a temperature-controlled environment over four 6-hour time periods...

  16. 40 CFR 53.55 - Test for effect of variations in power line voltage and ambient temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... line voltage and ambient temperature. 53.55 Section 53.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... power line voltage and ambient temperature. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is a combined... temperature. Tests shall be conducted in a temperature-controlled environment over four 6-hour time periods...

  17. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  18. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  19. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  20. Stable Calcium Nitrides at Ambient and High Pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuangshuang; Peng, Feng; Liu, Hanyu; Majumdar, Arnab; Gao, Tao; Yao, Yansun

    2016-08-01

    The knowledge of stoichiometries of alkaline-earth metal nitrides, where nitrogen can exist in polynitrogen forms, is of significant interest for understanding nitrogen bonding and its applications in energy storage. For calcium nitrides, there were three known crystalline forms, CaN2, Ca2N, and Ca3N2, at ambient conditions. In the present study, we demonstrated that there are more stable forms of calcium nitrides than what is already known to exist at ambient and high pressures. Using a global structure searching method, we theoretically explored the phase diagram of CaNx and discovered a series of new compounds in this family. In particular, we found a new CaN phase that is thermodynamically stable at ambient conditions, which may be synthesized using CaN2 and Ca2N. Four other stoichiometries, namely, Ca2N3, CaN3, CaN4, and CaN5, were shown to be stable under high pressure. The predicted CaNx compounds contain a rich variety of polynitrogen forms ranging from small molecules (N2, N4, N5, and N6) to extended chains (N∞). Because of the large energy difference between the single and triple nitrogen bonds, dissociation of the CaNx crystals with polynitrogens is expected to be highly exothermic, making them as potential high-energy-density materials.

  1. Effects of ambient temperature on adaptive thermogenesis during maintenance of reduced body weight in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ravussin, Yann; LeDuc, Charles A.; Watanabe, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that, at ambient room temperature (22°C), mice maintained at 20% below their initial body weight by calorie restriction expend energy at a rate below that which can be accounted for by the decrease of fat and fat-free mass. Food-restricted rodents may become torpid at subthermoneutral temperatures, a possible confounding factor when using mice as human models in obesity research. We examined the bioenergetic, hormonal, and behavioral responses to maintenance of a 20% body weight reduction in singly housed C57BL/6J +/+ and Lepob mice housed at both 22°C and 30°C. Weight-reduced high-fat-fed diet mice (HFD-WR) showed similar quantitative reductions in energy expenditure—adjusted for body mass and composition—at both 22°C and 30°C: −1.4 kcal/24 h and −1.6 kcal/24 h below predicted, respectively, and neither group entered torpor. In contrast, weight-reduced Lepob mice (OB-WR) housed at 22°C became torpid in the late lights-off period (0200–0500) but did not when housed at 30°C. These studies indicate that mice with an intact leptin axis display similar decreases in “absolute” energy expenditure in response to weight reduction at both 22°C and 30°C ambient temperature. More importantly, the “percent” decrease in total energy expenditure observed in the HFD-WR compared with AL mice is much greater at 30°C (−19%) than at 22°C (−10%). Basal energy expenditure demands are ∼45% lower in mice housed at 30°C vs. 22°C, since the mice housed at thermoneutrality do not allocate extra energy for heat production. The higher total energy expenditure of mice housed at 22°C due to these increased thermogenic demands may mask physiologically relevant changes in energy expenditure showing that ambient temperature must be carefully considered when quantifying energy metabolism in both rodents and humans. PMID:22761182

  2. Acute Changes in Ambient Temperature Are Associated With Adverse Changes in Cardiac Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Erin B.; Zareba, Wojciech; Utell, Mark J.; Oakes, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Frampton, Mark; Chalupa, David; Beckett, William; Rich, David Q.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both increases and decreases in ambient temperature have been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, the mechanism(s) remain unclear. Objectives We examined associations between biomarkers of pathways thought to, in part, explain these associations and changes in ambient temperature in a panel of predominantly post-myocardial infarction or post-stent patients. Methods We studied 76 subjects who had a recent coronary event and were participating in a cardiac rehabilitation program. In these patients, we measured heart rate variability, repolarization, and baroreflex sensitivity parameters using Holter ECG recordings before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. Hourly temperature measurements were made at a monitoring site near the rehabilitation center. Results Using linear mixed models, we observed decreases in rMSSD (square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent NN intervals) and deceleration capacity, associated with increases in ambient temperature in the previous four days. Additionally, decreased rMSSD was associated with both increasing temperature (mean in previous 6 hours) in the summer and decreasing temperature (mean in the previous 3 weeks) in the winter. Conclusions In a panel of cardiac rehabilitation patients, changes in ambient temperature were associated with decreases in markers of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity, which may lead to increased risk of arrhythmic events and sudden death in post-infarction patients. PMID:25368681

  3. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  4. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  5. Detection of acidification limit in anaerobic membrane bioreactors at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Kjerstadius, Hamse; de Vrieze, Jo; la Cour Jansen, Jes; Davidsson, Åsa

    2016-12-01

    High-volume, low-strength industrial wastewaters constitute a large potential for biogas production, which could be realized by membrane bioreactors operating at the ambient temperature of the wastewater. However, the start-up of low-temperature anaerobic processes using unadapted inoculum can be sensitive to overloading, which results in acidification. This study assessed if a novel acidification limit test can be used to identify stable organic loading rates as well as process over-loading. The test is based on easy-to-apply batch experiments for determination of the hydrolysis rate constant and the specific methanogenic activity of the acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic pathways. For evaluation, two anaerobic membrane bioreactors, treating synthetic dairy wastewater at an ambient temperature of 24 °C, were used with a slow or a rapid start-up regime, respectively. Tests for hydrolysis rate and methanogenic activity were performed throughout the experiment and were used to calculate acidification limits for each system throughout the start-up. The acidification limit test was able to successfully identify both stable operation of one reactor and process failure of the other reactor as the organic loading rate increased. The reactor failure was caused by over-loading the acetotrophic pathway and coincided with microbial changes observed in real-time PCR and moving window analysis. Overall, the acidification limit tests seem promising as an easy applicable method for estimating what organic loading rate can be utilized, without risking acidification of anaerobic systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  7. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  8. Experimental and casework validation of ambient temperature corrections in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aidan P; Wallman, James F; Archer, Melanie S

    2012-01-01

    This paper expands on Archer (J Forensic Sci 49, 2004, 553), examining additional factors affecting ambient temperature correction of weather station data in forensic entomology. Sixteen hypothetical body discovery sites (BDSs) in Victoria and New South Wales (Australia), both in autumn and in summer, were compared to test whether the accuracy of correlation was affected by (i) length of correlation period; (ii) distance between BDS and weather station; and (iii) periodicity of ambient temperature measurements. The accuracy of correlations in data sets from real Victorian and NSW forensic entomology cases was also examined. Correlations increased weather data accuracy in all experiments, but significant differences in accuracy were found only between periodicity treatments. We found that a >5°C difference between average values of body in situ and correlation period weather station data was predictive of correlations that decreased the accuracy of ambient temperatures estimated using correlation. Practitioners should inspect their weather data sets for such differences.

  9. Splicing-related genes are alternatively spliced upon changes in ambient temperatures in plants.

    PubMed

    Verhage, Leonie; Severing, Edouard I; Bucher, Johan; Lammers, Michiel; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Bonnema, Guusje; Rodenburg, Nicole; Proveniers, Marcel C G; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2017-01-01

    Plants adjust their development and architecture to small variations in ambient temperature. In a time in which temperatures are rising world-wide, the mechanism by which plants are able to sense temperature fluctuations and adapt to it, is becoming of special interest. By performing RNA-sequencing on two Arabidopsis accession and one Brassica species exposed to temperature alterations, we showed that alternative splicing is an important mechanism in ambient temperature sensing and adaptation. We found that amongst the differentially alternatively spliced genes, splicing related genes are enriched, suggesting that the splicing machinery itself is targeted for alternative splicing when temperature changes. Moreover, we showed that many different components of the splicing machinery are targeted for ambient temperature regulated alternative splicing. Mutant analysis of a splicing related gene that was differentially spliced in two of the genotypes showed an altered flowering time response to different temperatures. We propose a two-step mechanism where temperature directly influences alternative splicing of the splicing machinery genes, followed by a second step where the altered splicing machinery affects splicing of downstream genes involved in the adaptation to altered temperatures.

  10. Splicing-related genes are alternatively spliced upon changes in ambient temperatures in plants

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Johan; Lammers, Michiel; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Bonnema, Guusje; Rodenburg, Nicole; Proveniers, Marcel C. G.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Plants adjust their development and architecture to small variations in ambient temperature. In a time in which temperatures are rising world-wide, the mechanism by which plants are able to sense temperature fluctuations and adapt to it, is becoming of special interest. By performing RNA-sequencing on two Arabidopsis accession and one Brassica species exposed to temperature alterations, we showed that alternative splicing is an important mechanism in ambient temperature sensing and adaptation. We found that amongst the differentially alternatively spliced genes, splicing related genes are enriched, suggesting that the splicing machinery itself is targeted for alternative splicing when temperature changes. Moreover, we showed that many different components of the splicing machinery are targeted for ambient temperature regulated alternative splicing. Mutant analysis of a splicing related gene that was differentially spliced in two of the genotypes showed an altered flowering time response to different temperatures. We propose a two-step mechanism where temperature directly influences alternative splicing of the splicing machinery genes, followed by a second step where the altered splicing machinery affects splicing of downstream genes involved in the adaptation to altered temperatures. PMID:28257507

  11. Mouse reproductive fitness is maintained up to an ambient temperature of 28℃ when housed in individually-ventilated cages.

    PubMed

    Helppi, J; Schreier, D; Naumann, R; Zierau, O

    2016-08-01

    Production of genetically-modified mice is strongly dependent on environmental conditions. Mice are commonly housed at 22℃, which is significantly lower than their thermoneutral zone. But, when given a choice, mice often seem to prefer higher ambient temperatures. In the current study we investigated the effect of higher ambient temperature on the production of transgenic mice, with emphasis on embryo and sperm yield and quality. Mice (C57BL/6JOlaHsd) were housed under four different ambient temperatures (22, 25, 28 and 30℃). Female mice were superovulated, and mated with males. As indicators for reproductive fitness, the success of the mating was observed, including embryo yield and quality, as well as sperm count, motility and progressivity. Female mice were found to produce high amounts of high quality embryos from 22 to 28℃. Sperm count dropped continuously from 22 to 30℃, but sperm motility and progressivity remained high from 22 to 28℃. We conclude that mice can be housed at significantly higher temperatures than is commonly recommended without compromising embryo production and quality, or sperm quality. These results could lead to fundamental changes in how mouse facilities are built and operated - especially in warmer climates whereby energy consumption and therefore costs could be significantly reduced.

  12. Association between ambient temperature and humidity, vaginal temperature, and automatic activity monitoring on induced estrus in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Liam B; Madureira, Augusto M L; Filho, Eraldo L Drago; Soriano, Sergio; Sica, Alex F; Vasconcelos, José L M; Cerri, Ronaldo L A

    2017-08-09

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between ambient temperature and humidity, vaginal temperature, and automated activity monitoring in synchronized cows. Lactating Holstein cows (n = 641; 41.5 ± 9.4 kg of milk/d) were fitted with leg-mounted pedometers, resulting in 843 evaluated activity episodes of estrus. Vaginal temperature was monitored using thermometers attached to an intravaginal device as part of a timed artificial insemination (TAI) protocol; vaginal temperature was recorded every 10 min for 3 d. Ambient temperature and relative humidity were monitored using an external thermometer placed in the center of each pen. Milk production and body condition score (BCS) data were collected at the time of thermometer insertion. All statistical analysis was performed in R (https://www.r-project.org/) using Pearson correlation, analysis of variance, and logistic regression. Heat stress was calculated based on the percentage of time the cow spent with a vaginal temperature ≥39.1°C (PCT39) 9 to 11 d before TAI, and was classified as high (≥22.9%) or low (<22.9%). The mean vaginal temperature was 38.9 ± 0.2°C, and the mean maximum and minimum vaginal temperatures were 39.7 ± 0.5°C and 38.0 ± 0.8°C, respectively, with an average amplitude of 1.71 ± 0.9°C. Mean relative increase (RI) of estrus walking activity was 237.0 ± 160%. Animals with low BCS had a lower RI compared with cows with medium BCS (260.31 ± 17.45% vs. 296.42 ± 6.62%). Cows in early lactation showed lower RI compared with mid- and late-lactation animals (265.40 ± 9.90% vs. 288.36 ± 11.58% vs. 295.75 ± 11.29% for early, mid, and late lactation, respectively). Temperature-humidity index (THI) conditions categorized as low (THI ≤65) were associated with greater RI compared with medium (>65 to <70) and high THI (≥70). We detected no significant effect of PCT39 or milk production on RI, whereas parity exhibited a tendency. Cows that displayed greater RI at

  13. Small changes in ambient temperature affect alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Streitner, Corinna; Simpson, Craig G.; Shaw, Paul; Danisman, Selahattin; Brown, John W.S.; Staiger, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) gives rise to multiple mRNA isoforms from the same gene, providing possibilities to regulate gene expression beyond the level of transcription. In a recent paper in Nucleic Acids Research we used a high resolution RT-PCR based panel to study changes in AS patterns in plants with altered levels of an hnRNP-like RNA-binding protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we detected significant changes in AS patterns between different Arabidopsis ecotypes. Here we investigated how small changes in ambient temperature affect AS. We found significant changes in AS for 12 of 28 investigated events (43%) upon transfer of Arabidopsis plants from 20°C to 16°C and for 6 of the 28 investigated events (21%) upon transfer from 20°C to 24°C. PMID:23656882

  14. Crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade 2 steel in hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic-load crack growth measurements were performed on ASME SA-105 Grade 2 steel specimens exposed to 10,000- and 15,000-psi hydrogen and to 5000-psi helium, all at ambient temperatures. The cyclic-load crack growth rate was found to be faster in high-pressure hydrogen than in helium. Cyclic-load crack growth rates in this steel were not reduced by preloading in air to a stress intensity of 1.5 times the cyclic K sub max in hydrogen. There are indications that holding under load in hydrogen, and loading and unloading in helium retards hydrogen-accelerated cyclic-load crack growth. Cyclic frequency and R (ratio of K sub min/k sub max) were important variables determining crack growth rate. The crack growth rate increased as a logarithm of the cycle duration and decreased with increasing R.

  15. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  16. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  17. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  18. Selective O2 Sorption at Ambient Temperatures via Node Distortions in Sc-MIL-100

    SciTech Connect

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Chapman, Karena W.; Rodriguez, Mark; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Parkes, Marie V.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2016-05-24

    An open pored metal–organic framework (MOF) with oxygen selectivity at exceptionally high temperatures is confirmed by synthesis, sorption, and synchrotron structural analyses. The large-pore MIL-100 framework with access to the metal center (e.g., Sc and Fe) resulted in preferential O2 over N2 gas uptake at temperatures ranging from 77 K to ambient temperatures (258, 298, and 313 K). Most notably, Sc-MIL-100 shows exceptional O2 sorption; pair distribution function analyses indicate that this is due to distortions in the framework owing to the size of Sc atoms, in particular in the trimer metal cluster. Experimental studies also correlate very well with GCMC simulations, confirming more favorable O2-framework interactions at pressures up to 1 bar, due to the close proximity of O2 to the high density of metal centers in the small tetrahedral cages. Both materials maintain their crystallinity upon gas adsorption cycling, are regenerable, and show exceptional promise for use in energy efficient oxygen purification processes, such as Pressure Swing Adsorption.

  19. Effect of Volatility and Oxygenates on Driveability at Intermediate Ambient Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    oxygenate blends. The pro- gram was conducted in Yakima , Washington , from October 9 through November 18, 1989. Test temperatures were 301F to 56F. Members... cold -start and warmup driveability of late model vehicles at intermediate ambient temperatures . Front-end volatility was measured by RVP, and mid-range...vehicle fuel system (carbureted, TBI, PFI), vehicles within the fuel system, transmission type, and run temperature were siqnificant cold -start and warmup

  20. High-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of conventional superconductors. Structures. Normal-state properties. Superconducting properties. Vortex behavior, J[sub c], and applications. Index. An introductory presentation of high-temperature superconductivity, with emphasis on the experimental approach. Intended as a supplementary text for undergraduate solid state physics courses, assumes some background in physics and applicable technologies. Chapters contain unsolved problems. Bibliography and chapter notes appear at end of text.

  1. Ambient-temperature creep failure of silver-aided diffusion bonds between steel

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Kassner, M.E.; Rosen, R.S.

    1990-01-15

    It has long been known that thin (e.g., 1 {mu}m {minus} 1 mm) interlayer bonds between higher strength base materials may have high ultimate tensile or rupture strengths despite the relatively low strength of the filler metal. The high strength of the joint is due to the mechanical constraint provided by the stronger base metals which restricts transverse contraction of the interlayer. The constraint produces a triaxial state or stress and reduces the effective stress, thus reducing the tendency for the interlayer to plastically deform. Plasticity of the base metal reduces the constraint and decreases the strength of the bond. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, the validity of the base-metal- accelerated'' delayed-failure theory for bonds utilizing plastic base metals was checked. Creep-rupture tests were performed on diffusion-bonded specimens using silver interlayers deposited by planar-magnetron sputtering (PMS), a physical vapor-deposition process. The PMS process was preferred because of the superior quality and strength of the bond and because this modern low-temperature joining process is increasingly utilized for joining ceramic and composite materials. The role of plastic base metals in the fracture process was further investigated by conducting tensile-rupture tests of diffusion bonds made with stainless steel base metals of different yield strengths, and therefore different creep rates. The second purpose was to determine whether delayed failure occurs in interlayer bonds between elastic base metals, which do not creep over the range of applied stresses. This question is particularly relevant since many alloys, ceramics and composites fall within this category. Again, ambient and near-ambient temperature creep-rupture tests were performed at a variety of stresses below the UTS of the bond. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  2. The influence of food intake and ambient temperature on the rate of thyroxine utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, D L; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H

    1977-01-01

    Young growing pigs of both sexes were subjected to changes in (1) energy intake, (2) ambient temperature, and (3) bulk of food. The rate of disappearance of injected 125I-labelled thyroxine from the plasma (K) was measured. An analysis of variance revealed that the effect attributable to changes in the energy content of the food intake was statistically significant (P less 0-01). A change in ambient temperature had no statistically significant effect on K, nor did a change in the bulk of food when energy intake was constant (P less than 0-05). PMID:903901

  3. Lithium doping on covalent organic framework-320 for enhancing hydrogen storage at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Liangzhi; Liu, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) combines with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations are performed to explore the effect of Li doping on the hydrogen storage capability of COF-320. The results show that the interaction energy between the H2 and the Li-doped COF-320 is about three times higher than that of pristine COF-320. GCMC simulations are employed to study the hydrogen uptake of Li-doped COF-320 at ambient temperature, further confirm that the lithium doping can improve the hydrogen uptake at ambient temperature. Our results demonstrate that Li-doped COFs have good potential in the field of hydrogen storage.

  4. Selective O2 sorption at ambient temperatures via node distortions in Sc-MIL-100

    SciTech Connect

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Chapman, Karena W.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Parkes, Marie V.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2016-04-14

    In this study, oxygen selectivity in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) at exceptionally high temperatures originally predicted by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) modeling is now confirmed by synthesis, sorption metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Based on DFT M-O2 binding energies, we chose the large pored MIL-100 framework for metal center access, in particular Sc and Fe. Both resulted in preferential O2 and N2 gas uptake at temperatures ranging from 77 K to ambient temperatures (258 K, 298 K and 313 K).

  5. Interactions Between Housing Density and Ambient Temperature in the Cage Environment: Effects on Mouse Physiology and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Linda A; Trammell, Rita A; Ilsley-Woods, Megan

    2015-01-01

    To determine how housing density and ambient temperature interact to influence the physiology and behavior of mice, we systematically varied housing density (1 to 5 mice per cage) and ambient temperature (22, 26, or 30 °C) and measured effects on body weight, food intake, diurnal patterns of locomotor activity and core temperature, fecal corticosterone, and serum cytokine and adipokine panels. Temperatures inside cages housing 5 mice were 1 to 2 °C higher than the ambient temperature. As the housing density decreased, in-cage temperatures began to fall at a density of 2 or 3 mice per cage and did not differ from ambient temperature at 1 mouse per cage. Ambient temperature, but not housing density, significantly affected food intake. Although neither ambient temperature nor housing density affected core temperature or activity, hyperthermia and behavioral activation occurred during the 12-h period after cage change. Fecal concentrations of corticosterone metabolites and serum cytokines, chemokines, insulin, and leptin were not influenced by cage density and were only sporadically influenced by ambient temperature. Our data document that the number of mice housed per cage influences the intracage environmental conditions and that ambient temperature influences food intake even when temperatures are within or near recommended or thermoneutral ranges. We conclude that investigators should be cautious when changing the number of mice housed in a cage over the course of a study, because doing so significantly alters the cage environment to which remaining mice are exposed. PMID:26632780

  6. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: a nationwide United States cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D. Michal; Kitahara, Cari M.; Linet, Martha S.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3,556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.31, p-trend =0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR = 1.54 (95% CI = 1.35–1.75, p-trend= <0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR. PMID:25996074

  7. Ambient temperature and risk of first primary basal cell carcinoma: A nationwide United States cohort study.

    PubMed

    Michal Freedman, D; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Alexander, Bruce H; Neta, Gila; Little, Mark P; Cahoon, Elizabeth K

    2015-07-01

    The Earth's surface is warming and animal studies have shown higher temperatures promote ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin carcinogenesis. There are, however, no population studies of long-term temperature exposure and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. We linked average lifetime summer ambient temperatures (based on weather station data) and satellite-based UVR estimates to self-reported lifetime residences in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists' cohort. We assessed the relationship between time-dependent average lifetime summer ambient temperature (20-year lag) in quintiles and BCC in whites, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Risks were adjusted for time-dependent lagged average lifetime UVR and time outdoors, body mass index, eye color, and sex (baseline hazard stratified on birth cohort). During a median 19.4 years follow-up, we identified 3556 BCC cases. There was no significant trend in risk between temperature and BCC. However, BCC risk was highest in the fourth quintile of temperature (Q4 vs. Q1; hazards ratio (HR)=1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.06-1.31, p-trend=0.09). BCC risk was strongly related to average lifetime ambient UVR exposure (Q5 vs. Q1; HR=1.54 (95% CI=1.35-1.75, p-trend=<0.001)). Future studies of temperature and BCC risk should include a broad range of UVR and temperature values, along with improved indicators of exposure to temperatures and UVR.

  8. Ambient Temperature and the Risk of Preterm Birth in Guangzhou, China (2001–2011)

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian-Rong; Liu, Yu; Xia, Xiao-Yan; Ma, Wen-Jun; Lin, Hua-Liang; Kan, Hai-Dong; Lu, Jin-Hua; Feng, Qiong; Mo, Wei-Jian; Wang, Ping; Xia, Hui-Min; Qiu, Xiu; Muglia, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although effects of weather changes on human health have been widely reported, there is limited information regarding effects on pregnant women in developing countries. Objective: We investigated the association between maternal exposure to ambient temperature and the risk of preterm birth (< 37 weeks of gestation) in Guangzhou, China. Methods: We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate associations between preterm birth and average temperature during each week of gestation, with weekly temperature modeled as a time-varying exposure during four time windows: 1 week (the last week of the pregnancy), 4 weeks (the last 4 weeks of the pregnancy), late pregnancy (gestational week 20 onward), and the entire pregnancy. Information on singleton vaginal birth between 2001 and 2011 was collected. Daily meteorological data during the same period were obtained from the Guangzhou Meteorological Bureau. Results: A total of 838,146 singleton vaginal births were included, among which 47,209 (5.6%) were preterm births. High mean temperatures during the 4 weeks, late pregnancy, and the entire pregnancy time windows were associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. Compared with the median temperature (24.4°C), weekly exposures during the last 4 weeks of the pregnancy to extreme cold (7.6°C, the 1st percentile) and extreme heat (31.9°C, the 99th percentile) were associated with 17.9% (95% CI: 10.2, 26.2%) and 10.0% (95% CI: 2.9, 17.6%) increased risks of preterm birth, respectively. The association between extreme heat and preterm birth was stronger for preterm births during weeks 20–31 and 32–34 than those during weeks 35–36. Conclusions: These findings might have important implications in preventing preterm birth in Guangzhou as well as other areas with similar weather conditions. Citation: He JR, Liu Y, Xia XY, Ma WJ, Lin HL, Kan HD, Lu JH, Feng Q, Mo WJ, Wang P, Xia HM, Qiu X, Muglia LJ. 2016. Ambient temperature and the risk of preterm birth

  9. Ambient Temperature and the Risk of Preterm Birth in Guangzhou, China (2001-2011).

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Rong; Liu, Yu; Xia, Xiao-Yan; Ma, Wen-Jun; Lin, Hua-Liang; Kan, Hai-Dong; Lu, Jin-Hua; Feng, Qiong; Mo, Wei-Jian; Wang, Ping; Xia, Hui-Min; Qiu, Xiu; Muglia, Louis J

    2016-07-01

    Although effects of weather changes on human health have been widely reported, there is limited information regarding effects on pregnant women in developing countries. We investigated the association between maternal exposure to ambient temperature and the risk of preterm birth (< 37 weeks of gestation) in Guangzhou, China. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate associations between preterm birth and average temperature during each week of gestation, with weekly temperature modeled as a time-varying exposure during four time windows: 1 week (the last week of the pregnancy), 4 weeks (the last 4 weeks of the pregnancy), late pregnancy (gestational week 20 onward), and the entire pregnancy. Information on singleton vaginal birth between 2001 and 2011 was collected. Daily meteorological data during the same period were obtained from the Guangzhou Meteorological Bureau. A total of 838,146 singleton vaginal births were included, among which 47,209 (5.6%) were preterm births. High mean temperatures during the 4 weeks, late pregnancy, and the entire pregnancy time windows were associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. Compared with the median temperature (24.4°C), weekly exposures during the last 4 weeks of the pregnancy to extreme cold (7.6°C, the 1st percentile) and extreme heat (31.9°C, the 99th percentile) were associated with 17.9% (95% CI: 10.2, 26.2%) and 10.0% (95% CI: 2.9, 17.6%) increased risks of preterm birth, respectively. The association between extreme heat and preterm birth was stronger for preterm births during weeks 20-31 and 32-34 than those during weeks 35-36. These findings might have important implications in preventing preterm birth in Guangzhou as well as other areas with similar weather conditions. He JR, Liu Y, Xia XY, Ma WJ, Lin HL, Kan HD, Lu JH, Feng Q, Mo WJ, Wang P, Xia HM, Qiu X, Muglia LJ. 2016. Ambient temperature and the risk of preterm birth in Guangzhou, China (2001-2011). Environ Health Perspect 124

  10. Recrystallization at ambient temperature of heavily deformed ETP copper wire

    SciTech Connect

    Schamp, J.; Verlinden, B.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    1996-06-01

    Recrystallization of electrolytic tough pitch (ETP) copper wire at room temperature has been reported by several authors. The phenomenon changes the mechanical properties of the wire which can cause a loss of process control, but remains largely unpredictable. The aim of this study is to get a better understanding of the conditions under which partial recrystallization can be expected. It is observed that the recrystallization pattern is non-homogeneous across the cross-section of the wire. Recrystallization starts in a cylindrical zone with diameter 0.5 to 0.8 times the wire diameter. The core and the surface of the wire recrystallize at a later stage. It is proposed that this is due to different modes of deformation along the wire diameter. The progress of recrystallization at room temperature depends on a large extent on the chemical composition of the material. It is well known that all impurity elements slow down recrystallization, but some elements, such as Se, Te, Bi, S and Pb are more deleterious than others. It is shown that a few tenths of ppm`s of these impurities determine whether the wire is stable in time or not.

  11. Submicron friction mechanics at ambient and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Jason; Peterson, Lee; Klein, Kerry; Levine, Marie; Peng, Chia-Yen

    2005-08-01

    Mechanism interface mechanics play an important role in the static and dynamic dimensional stability of deployable optical instruments. Friction mechanics in deployment mechanisms has been found to be a source of kinematic indeterminacy allowing elastic energy to be stored throughout the structure. At submicron scales, microslip mechanics allow this behavior to persist well below the classical Coulomb friction limit. This paper presents the design of a cryogenic tribometer for measuring this behavior in candidate mechanism interfaces in both room temperature and cryogenic environments. Room temperature results are presented and compared to a proposed generalized microslip model form. This model form is intended to allow the parametric characterization of microslip behavior caused by smooth nonconforming contact as well as roughness-induced microslip. Spherical ball-on-flat interface geometries were used with two unlubricated material combinations: 440C stainless steel ball on a 440C stainless steel flat and a silicon nitride ball on a 440C stainless steel flat. Consistent parameters were identified for the generalized microslip model from steady cyclic shear responses for both of these interface cases. While these parameters exhibited a measurable sensitivity to normal preload levels, the model form appears to provide the necessary level of robustness. Non-ideal transient shear phenomena including rate dependence were also observed but should play only a secondary role in future modeling efforts.

  12. The effect of ambient temperature on diabetes mortality in China: A multi-city time series study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Yin, Peng; Zhou, Maigeng; Ou, Chun-Quan; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Yunning; Gao, Jinghong; Chen, Bin; Liu, Jiangmei; Bai, Li; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-02-01

    Few multi-city studies have been conducted to investigate the acute health effects of low and high temperatures on diabetes mortality worldwide. We aimed to examine effects of ambient temperatures on city-/gender-/age-/education-specific diabetes mortality in nine Chinese cities using a two-stage analysis. Distributed lag non-linear model was first applied to estimate the city-specific non-linear and delayed effects of temperatures on diabetes mortality. Pooled effects of temperatures on diabetes mortality were then obtained using meta-analysis, based on restricted maximum likelihood. We found that heat effects were generally acute and followed by a period of mortality displacement, while cold effects could last for over two weeks. The pooled relative risks of extreme high (99th percentile of temperature) and high temperature (90th percentile of temperature) were 1.29 (95%CI: 1.11-1.47) and 1.11 (1.03-1.19) over lag 0-21 days, compared with the 75th percentile of temperature. In contrast, the pooled relative risks over lag 0-21 days were 1.44 (1.25-1.66) for extreme low (1st percentile of temperature) and 1.20 (1.12-1.30) for low temperature (10th percentile of temperature), compared to 25th percentile of temperature. The estimate of heat effects was relatively higher among females than that among males, with opposite trend for cold effects, and the estimates of heat and cold effects were particularly higher among the elderly and those with low education, although the differences between these subgroups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). These findings have important public health implications for protecting diabetes patients from adverse ambient temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ambient temperature-mediated changes in hepatic gene expression of a mammalian herbivore (Neotoma lepida).

    PubMed

    Connors, Patrice Kurnath; Malenke, Jael R; Dearing, M Denise

    2017-08-01

    Herbivores regularly ingest natural toxins produced by plants as a defence against herbivory. Recent work suggests that compound toxicity is exacerbated at higher ambient temperatures. This phenomenon, known as temperature-dependent toxicity (TDT), is the likely result of decreased liver function at warmer temperatures; however, the underlying cause of TDT remains speculative. In the present study, we compared the effects of temperature and dietary plant toxins on differential gene expression in the liver of an herbivorous rodent (Neotoma lepida), using species-specific microarrays. Expression profiles revealed a greater number of differentially expressed genes at an ambient temperature below the thermal neutral zone for N. lepida (22°C) compared to one within (27°C). Genes and pathways upregulated at 22°C were related to growth and biosynthesis, whereas those upregulated at 27°C were associated with gluconeogenesis, apoptosis and protein misfolding, suggestive of a stressed state for the liver. Additionally, few genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism were induced when woodrats ingested plant toxins compared to nontoxic diets, regardless of temperature. Taken together, the results highlight the important role of ambient temperature on gene expression profiles in the desert woodrat. Temperatures just below the thermal neutral zone might be a favourable state for liver metabolism. Furthermore, the reduction in the number of genes expressed at a temperature within the thermal neutral zone indicates that liver function may be reduced at temperatures that are not typically considered as thermally stressful. Understanding how herbivorous mammals will respond to ambient temperature is imperative to accurately predict the impacts of climate change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The effect of acclimatization and ambient temperature on heat withdrawal threshold in rats.

    PubMed

    Vítková, J; Loučka, M; Boček, J; Vaculín, S

    2015-01-01

    Nociception in rats is frequently measured in terms of latency of withdrawal reaction to radiant heat (thermal nociceptive threshold). The aim of this study was to determine how much housing acclimatization and ambient temperature affect the results of thermal pain threshold testing. All experiments used adult male Wistar rats. Thermal pain thresholds were tested using the radiant heat withdrawal reaction at three different body sites: forepaws, hind paws and tail. Skin temperature was measured using an Infrared thermometer and ambient temperature was set at 18, 20, 24 or 26 °C. The results demonstrate that (1) thermal pain threshold was inversely related to both ambient and skin temperature; (2) housing acclimatization and repeated testing had no effect on nociceptive thresholds at any of the three body sites; (3) a resting, cranio-caudal distribution, of nociceptive sensitivity was observed; (4) hind paws and tail were more sensitive to changes of skin and ambient temperature than forepaws. These findings show the importance of recording laboratory conditions in experiments and their influence on results. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. High temperature superconducting compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    1992-11-01

    The major accomplishment of this grant has been to develop techniques for the in situ preparation of high-Tc superconducting films involving the use of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The techniques are generalizable to the growth of trilayer and multilayer structures. Films of both the DyBa2Cu3O(7-x) and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compounds as well as the La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 compound have been grown on the usual substrates, SrTiO3, YSZ, MgO, and LaAlO3, as well as on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been fabricated on a thermally isolated SiN substrate coated with YSZ, an effort carried out in collaboration with Honeywell Inc. The deposition process facilitates the fabrication of very thin and transparent films creating new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo-doping with carriers of high temperature superconductors. In addition to a thin film technology, a patterning technology has been developed. Trilayer structures have been developed for FET devices and tunneling junctions. Other work includes the measurement of the magnetic properties of bulk single crystal high temperature superconductors, and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, measurement of electric transport properties of T1-based high-Tc films.

  16. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  17. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  18. Imidapril provides a protective effect on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Shou-Yan; Li, Meng; Yang, Zhen; Niu, Ming-Fu; Sun, Tong-Wen; Yang, Dan-Li; Kong, Tao; Li, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this article is to explore the role of imidapril on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. Ninety chickens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 30): a control group, a low-temperature group and an imidapril group. Chickens in the low-temperature group and imidapril group were exposed to low ambient temperature from 14 days of age until 45 days of age; chickens in the imidapril group were gavaged with imidapril 3 mg/kg once daily for 30 days. The pulmonary arterial pressure, main pulmonary arterial diameter and pulmonary arterial wall thickness were measured, and lung tissue ACE, ACE2 mRNA expression, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells and Ang II, Ang (1-7) concentration were evaluated. The pulmonary arterial pressure was higher, the main pulmonary arterial diameter was wider and the pulmonary arterial wall was thicker in the low-temperature group than those in the control group and the imidapril group. ACE mRNA and PCNA-positive cells increased significantly in the low-temperature group compared with the control group and imidapril group; lung tissue Ang II concentration in the low-temperature group was higher, but Ang (1-7) content was lower than that in the control group and imidapril group. Imidapril provides a protective effect on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Pacing in Soccer depends on Skill Level.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik

    2015-05-16

    This study examines the influence ambient temperature has on the distances covered by players in soccer matches. For this purpose, 1211 games from the top German professional leagues were analysed over the course of the seasons 2011/12 and 2012/13 using an optical tracking system. The data shows a) significant differences in the total distance covered (TDC, in m/10 min) between the 1. Bundesliga (M = 1225) and 2. Bundesliga (M = 1201) and b) a significant decrease in TDC from NEUTRAL (-4 to 13° C, M = 1229) to WARM (≥ 14° C, M = 1217) environments. The size of the temperature effect is greater in the 1. Bundesliga (d=.30 vs. d=.16), even though these players presumably have a higher level of fitness. This suggests that better players reduce their exertion level to a greater extent, thus preserving their ability to undertake the high intensity activities when called upon. No reduction in running performance due to COLD (≤ 5° C) temperatures was observed.

  20. Polymer Electrolyte-Based Ambient Temperature Oxygen Microsensors for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2011-01-01

    An ambient temperature oxygen microsensor, based on a Nafion polymer electrolyte, has been developed and was microfabricated using thin-film technologies. A challenge in the operation of Nafion-based sensor systems is that the conductivity of Nafion film depends on the humidity in the film. Nafion film loses conductivity when the moisture content in the film is too low, which can affect sensor operation. The advancement here is the identification of a method to retain the operation of the Nafion films in lower humidity environments. Certain salts can hold water molecules in the Nafion film structure at room temperature. By mixing salts with the Nafion solution, water molecules can be homogeneously distributed in the Nafion film increasing the film s hydration to prevent Nafion film from being dried out in low-humidity environment. The presence of organics provides extra sites in the Nafion film to promote proton (H+) mobility and thus improving Nafion film conductivity and sensor performance. The fabrication of ambient temperature oxygen microsensors includes depositing basic electrodes using noble metals, and metal oxides layer on one of the electrode as a reference electrode. The use of noble metals for electrodes is due to their strong catalytic properties for oxygen reduction. A conducting polymer Nafion, doped with water-retaining components and extra sites facilitating proton movement, was used as the electrolyte material, making the design adequate for low humidity environment applications. The Nafion solution was coated on the electrodes and air-dried. The sensor operates at room temperature in potentiometric mode, which measures voltage differences between working and reference electrodes in different gases. Repeat able responses to 21-percent oxygen in nitrogen were achieved using nitrogen as a baseline gas. Detection of oxygen from 7 to 21 percent has also been demonstrated. The room-temperature oxygen micro sensor developed has extremely low power

  1. High Temperature Superconducting Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    usual substrates, SrTiO3 , YSZ, MgO, and LaA103, it has been possible to deposit films on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been...new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo- doping with carriers of high temperature super... SrTiO3 (00), SrTiO3 (l 10), LaA103 (100), MgO(100), and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The surfaces of these films could be imaged with a scanning

  2. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  3. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  4. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    measurement precision (i.e. earthquake location), while considering this extremely complex boundary condition. To solve this problem I have developed a high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe. The model is based on land-use data derived from satellite imagery by the EU-project CORINE in a resolution of 100x100m. The the CORINE data consists of several land-use classes, which, besides others, contain: industrial areas, mines, urban fabric, agricultural areas, permanent corps, forests and open spaces. Additionally, open GIS data for highways, and major and minor roads and railway lines were included from the OpenStreetMap project (www.openstreetmap.org). This data was divided into three classes that represent good, intermediate and bad ambient conditions of the corresponding land-use class based on expert judgment. To account for noise propagation away from its source a smoothing operator was applied to individual land-use noise-fields. Finally, the noise-fields were stacked to obtain an European map of ambient noise conditions. A calibration of this map with data of existing seismic stations Europe allowed me to estimate the expected noise level in actual ground motion units for the three ambient noise condition classes of the map. The result is a high-resolution ambient seismic noise map, that allows the network designer to make educated predictions on the expected noise level for arbitrary location in Europe. The ambient noise model was successfully tested in several network optimization projects in Switzerland and surrounding countries and will hopefully be a valuable contribution to improving the data quality of microseismic monitoring networks in Europe.

  5. Enhanced neuroendocrine response to insulin tolerance test performed under increased ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    The hypothesis that an increase in ambient temperature modulates neuroendocrine response in clinically used provocative pituitary function tests was verified. Healthy male volunteers were subjected to insulin tolerance tests in two randomized trials. In the first trial hypoglycemia was induced by a bolus injection of insulin (0.1 U per kg of BW, i.v.) at room temperature. In the second trial, the subjects were exposed to increased ambient temperature for 45 min before insulin injection and for 45 min thereafter. The environmental temperature was selected to increase body temperature less than 1C. Under conditions of increased temperature basal hormone levels as measured in antecubital venous blood samples failed to be modified and the hypoglycemia was less severe. Nevertheless, the responses of most (beta-endorphin, ACTH, prolactin, catecholamines), but not all (growth hormone, cortisol), hormones to hypoglycemia were exaggerated. The remarkable increase in ACTH and beta-endorphin release was not accompanied by concomitant increase of plasma cortisol response. The sympathetic-adrenomedullary system was significantly activated, which was manifested particularly by enhanced norepinephrine release. Growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was not modified, while that of prolactin was enhanced. Thus during evaluation of neuroendocrine function under clinical conditions, changes in ambient and body temperature should not be underestimated.

  6. Iron/tetramethylethylenediamine-catalyzed ambient-temperature coupling of alkyl Grignard reagents and aryl chlorides.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, Philip J; Hulcoop, David G; Fox, David J

    2013-09-20

    Tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) acts as cheap and readily removed ligand in the iron-catalyzed coupling of alkyl Grignard reagents and activated aryl chlorides. The use of TMEDA allows for low ligand and iron catalyst loading as well as an increased reaction concentration and an ambient reaction temperature on a mole scale.

  7. Sorption Capacity of Europium for Media #1 and Media #2 from Solution at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-03-16

    This dataset shows the capacity for Europium of media #1 and media #2 in a shakertable experiment. The experimental conditions were 150mL of 500ppm Eu solution, 2g of media, pH of 3.2, at ambient temperature.

  8. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a r...

  9. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed. The strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling, and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with su...

  10. Nanoscale tubular vessels for storage of methane at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Solarz, Lech; Do, D D; Samborski, Adam; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-10-10

    Novel carbon nanostructures can serve as effective storage media for methane, a source of "clean energy" for the future. We have used Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation for the modeling of methane storage at 293 K and pressures up to 80 MPa in idealized bundles of (10,10) armchair-type single-walled carbon nanotubes and wormlike carbon pores. We have found that these carbon nanomaterials can be treated as the world's smallest high-capacity methane storage vessels. Our simulation results indicate that such novel carbon nanostructures can reach a high volumetric energy storage, exceeding the US FreedomCAR Partnership target of 2010 (5.4 MJ dm(-3)), at low to moderate pressures ranging from 1 to 7 MPa at 293 K. On the contrary, in the absence of these nanomaterials, methane needs to be compressed to approximately 13 MPa at 293 K to achieve the same target. The light carbon membranes composed of bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes or wormlike pores efficiently physisorb methane at low to moderate pressures at 293 K, which we believe should be particularly important for automobiles and stationary devices. However, above 15-20 MPa at 293 K, all investigated samples of novel carbon nanomaterials are not as effective when compared with compression alone since the stored volumetric energy and power saturate at values below those of the bulk, compressed fluid.

  11. Suicide and Ambient Temperature in East Asian Countries: A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue Leon; Chen, Bing-Yu; Woo, Jong-Min; Ebi, Kristie L

    2016-01-01

    A limited number of studies suggest that ambient temperature contributes to suicide; these studies typically focus on a single nation and use temporally and spatially aggregated data. We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and suicide in multiple cities in three East Asian countries. A time-stratified case-crossover method was used to explore the relationship between temperature and suicide, adjusting for potential time-varying confounders and time-invariant individual characteristics. Sex- and age-specific associations of temperature with suicide were estimated, as were interactions between temperature and these variables. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate country-specific pooled associations of temperature with suicide. An increase in temperature corresponding to half of the city-specific standard deviation was positively associated with suicide in most cities, although average suicide rates varied substantially. Pooled country-level effect estimates were 7.8% (95% CI: 5.0, 10.8%) for a 2.3°C increase in ambient temperature in Taiwan, 6.8% (95% CI: 5.4, 8.2%) for a 4.7°C increase in Korea, and 4.5% (95% CI: 3.3, 5.7%) for a 4.2°C increase in Japan. The association between temperature and suicide was significant even after adjusting for sunshine duration; the association between sunshine and suicide was not significant. The associations were greater among men than women in 12 of the 15 cities although not significantly so. There was little evidence of a consistent pattern of associations with age. In general, associations were strongest with temperature on the same day or the previous day, with little evidence of associations with temperature over longer lags (up to 5 days). We estimated consistent positive associations between suicide and elevated ambient temperature in three East Asian countries, regardless of country, sex, and age. Kim Y, Kim H, Honda Y, Guo YL, Chen BY, Woo JM, Ebi KL. 2016. Suicide and ambient

  12. Short-term changes in ambient temperature and risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Wilker, Elissa H; Schwartz, Joel; Zanobetti, Antonella; Gold, Diane R; Wellenius, Gregory A; Mittleman, Murray A

    2014-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence of a higher short-term risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with ambient temperature, there have been discrepant findings on the association between temperature and ischemic stroke. Moreover, few studies have considered potential confounding by ambient fine particulate matter air pollution <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and none have examined the impact of temperature changes on stroke in the subsequent hours rather than days. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether changes in temperature trigger an ischemic stroke in the following hours and days and whether humid days are particularly harmful. We reviewed the medical records of 1,705 patients residing in the metropolitan region of Boston, Mass., USA, who were hospitalized with neurologist-confirmed ischemic stroke, and we abstracted data on the time of symptom onset and clinical characteristics. We obtained hourly meteorological data from the National Weather Service station and hourly PM2.5 data from the Harvard ambient monitoring station. We used the time-stratified case-crossover design to assess the association between ischemic stroke and apparent temperature averaged over 1-7 days prior to stroke onset adjusting for PM2.5. We assessed whether differences in apparent temperature trigger a stroke within shorter time periods by examining the association between stroke onset and apparent temperature levels averaged in 2-hour increments prior to stroke onset (0-2 h through 36-38 h). We tested whether the association varied by health characteristics or by PM2.5, ozone or relative humidity. The incidence rate ratio of ischemic stroke was 1.09 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.18) following a 5°C decrement in average apparent temperature over the 2 days preceding symptom onset. The higher risk associated with cooler temperatures peaked in the first 14-34 h. There was no statistically significant difference in the association between temperature and ischemic stroke across seasons

  13. Suicide and Ambient Temperature in East Asian Countries: A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoonhee; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue Leon; Chen, Bing-Yu; Woo, Jong-Min; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-01-01

    Background A limited number of studies suggest that ambient temperature contributes to suicide; these studies typically focus on a single nation and use temporally and spatially aggregated data. Objective We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and suicide in multiple cities in three East Asian countries. Methods A time-stratified case-crossover method was used to explore the relationship between temperature and suicide, adjusting for potential time-varying confounders and time-invariant individual characteristics. Sex- and age-specific associations of temperature with suicide were estimated, as were interactions between temperature and these variables. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate country-specific pooled associations of temperature with suicide. Results An increase in temperature corresponding to half of the city-specific standard deviation was positively associated with suicide in most cities, although average suicide rates varied substantially. Pooled country-level effect estimates were 7.8% (95% CI: 5.0, 10.8%) for a 2.3°C increase in ambient temperature in Taiwan, 6.8% (95% CI: 5.4, 8.2%) for a 4.7°C increase in Korea, and 4.5% (95% CI: 3.3, 5.7%) for a 4.2°C increase in Japan. The association between temperature and suicide was significant even after adjusting for sunshine duration; the association between sunshine and suicide was not significant. The associations were greater among men than women in 12 of the 15 cities although not significantly so. There was little evidence of a consistent pattern of associations with age. In general, associations were strongest with temperature on the same day or the previous day, with little evidence of associations with temperature over longer lags (up to 5 days). Conclusions We estimated consistent positive associations between suicide and elevated ambient temperature in three East Asian countries, regardless of country, sex, and age. Citation Kim Y, Kim H, Honda Y, Guo YL

  14. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  15. Ambient temperature secondary lithium cells containing inorganic electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    The history and current status of rechargeable lithium cells using electrolytes based on liquid sulfur dioxide are reviewed. Three separate approaches currently under development include lithium/lithium dithionite/carbon cells with a supporting electrolyte salt; lithium/cupric chloride cells using sulfur dioxide/lithium tetrachloroaluminate; and several adaptations of a lithium/carbon cell using sulfur dioxide/lithium tetrachloroaluminate in which the discharge reaction involves the incorporation of aluminum into the positive electrode. The latter two chemistries have been studied in prototype hardware. For AA size cells with cupric chloride, 157 Whr/1 at 24 W/1 for 230 cycles was reported. For AA size cells containing 2LiCl-CaCl2-4AlCl3-12SO2, energy densities as high as 265 Whr/liter and 100 Whr/kg have been observed, but, at 26 W/1, for only 10 cycles. The advantages and remaining problems are discussed.

  16. Mutation design of a thermophilic Rubisco based on three-dimensional structure enhances its activity at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Nishitani, Yuichi; Kiriyama, Tomohiro; Aono, Riku; Sato, Takaaki; Takai, Tomoyuki; Tagashira, Kenta; Fukuda, Wakao; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2016-10-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) plays a central role in carbon dioxide fixation on our planet. Rubisco from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tk-Rubisco) shows approximately twenty times the activity of spinach Rubisco at high temperature, but only one-eighth the activity at ambient temperature. We have tried to improve the activity of Tk-Rubisco at ambient temperature, and have successfully constructed several mutants which showed higher activities than the wild-type enzyme both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we designed new Tk-Rubisco mutants based on its three-dimensional structure and a sequence comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic plant Rubiscos. Four mutations were introduced to generate new mutants based on this strategy, and one of the four mutants, T289D, showed significantly improved activity compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the Tk-Rubisco T289D mutant suggested that the increase in activity was due to mechanisms distinct from those involved in the improvement in activity of Tk-Rubisco SP8, a mutant protein previously reported to show the highest activity at ambient temperature. Combining the mutations of T289D and SP8 successfully generated a mutant protein (SP8-T289D) with the highest activity to date both in vitro and in vivo. The improvement was particularly pronounced for the in vivo activity of SP8-T289D when introduced into the mesophilic, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which resulted in a strain with nearly two-fold higher specific growth rates compared to that of a strain harboring the wild-type enzyme at ambient temperature. Proteins 2016; 84:1339-1346. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of Ambient Temperature and Relative Humidity on Subsurface Defect Detection in Concrete Structures by Active Thermal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tran, Quang Huy; Han, Dongyeob; Kang, Choonghyun; Haldar, Achintya; Huh, Jungwon

    2017-07-26

    Active thermal imaging is an effective nondestructive technique in the structural health monitoring field, especially for concrete structures not exposed directly to the sun. However, the impact of meteorological factors on the testing results is considerable and should be studied in detail. In this study, the impulse thermography technique with halogen lamps heat sources is used to detect defects in concrete structural components that are not exposed directly to sunlight and not significantly affected by the wind, such as interior bridge box-girders and buildings. To consider the effect of environment, ambient temperature and relative humidity, these factors are investigated in twelve cases of testing on a concrete slab in the laboratory, to minimize the influence of wind. The results showed that the absolute contrast between the defective and sound areas becomes more apparent with an increase of ambient temperature, and it increases at a faster rate with large and shallow delaminations than small and deep delaminations. In addition, the absolute contrast of delamination near the surface might be greater under a highly humid atmosphere. This study indicated that the results obtained from the active thermography technique will be more apparent if the inspection is conducted on a day with high ambient temperature and humidity.

  18. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  19. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  20. Observation of a Pressure-Induced First-Order Polyamorphic Transition in a Chalcogenide Glass at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Gaudio, S.; Lesher, C. E.; Aitken, B. G.

    2006-07-14

    An apparently first-order polyamorphic transition has been observed with increasing pressure at ambient temperature in a molecular glass of composition Ge{sub 2.5}As{sub 51.25}S{sub 46.25}. Raman spectroscopic measurements on pressure-quenched samples and in situ x-ray diffraction measurements indicate that this transition corresponds to a collapse of the ambient-pressure molecular phase to a high-pressure network phase. The high-pressure phase first appears at a pressure of {approx}8-9 GPa and the transformation becomes complete at {approx}14-15 GPa. Calorimetric measurements indicate that the low- and high-pressure phases are thermodynamically distinct and that they coexist in the transition range.

  1. Enhancing photovoltaic efficiency through radiative cooling of solar cells below ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Taqiyyah; Munday, Jeremy

    Sunlight heats up solar cells and the resulting elevated solar cell temperature adversely effects the photovoltaic efficiency and the reliability of the cell. Currently, a variety of active and passive cooling strategies are used to lower the operating temperature of the solar cell. Passive radiative cooling requires no energy input, and is ideal for solar cells; however, previously demonstrated devices still operate above the ambient, leading to a lower efficiency as compared to the ideal Shockley-Queisser limit, which is defined for a cell in contact with an ideal heat sink at ambient temperature (300 K). In this talk, we will describe the use of radiative cooling techniques to lower the cell temperature below the ambient temperature. We show that by combining specifically designed radiative cooling structures with solar cells, efficiencies higher than the limiting efficiency achievable at 300 K can be obtained for solar cells in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. We show that these structures yield an efficiency 0.87% higher than a typical PV module at operating temperatures in a terrestrial application. We also demonstrate an efficiency advantage of 0.4-2.6% for cells in an extraterrestrial environment in near-earth orbit.

  2. Effects of ambient room temperature on cold air cooling during laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ramin; Rosenbach, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Forced air cooling is a well-established technique that protects the epidermis during laser heating of deeper structures, thereby allowing for increased laser fluences. The goal of this prospective study was to identify whether an elevation in ambient room temperature influences the efficacy of forced air cooling. Skin surface temperatures were measured on 24 sites (12 subjects) during cold air exposure in examination rooms with ambient temperatures of 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C) and 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C), respectively. Before cooling, mean skin surface temperature was 9 degrees F (5 degrees C) higher in the warmer room (P < 0.01). Immediately after exposure to forced air cooling (within 1 s), the skin surface temperature remained considerably higher (10.75 degrees F, or 5.8 degrees C, P < 0.01) in the warmer room. We conclude that forced air cooling in a room with an ambient temperature of 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C) is not as effective as in a room that is at 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C).

  3. Molecular dynamics of itraconazole at ambient and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Tarnacka, M; Adrjanowicz, K; Kaminska, E; Kaminski, K; Grzybowska, K; Kolodziejczyk, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Hawelek, L; Garbacz, G; Kocot, A; Paluch, M

    2013-12-21

    Comprehensive molecular dynamics studies of vitrified and cryogrounded itraconazole (Itr) were performed at ambient and elevated pressure. DSC measurements yielded besides melting and glass transition observed during heating and cooling of both samples two further endothermic events at around T = 363 K and T = 346 K. The nature of these transitions was investigated using X-ray diffraction, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory calculations. The X-ray measurements indicated that extra ordering in itraconazole is likely to occur. Based on calculations and theory derived by Letz et al. the transition observed at T = 363 K was discussed in the context of formation of the nematic mesophase. In fact, additional FTIR measurements revealed that order parameter variation in Itr shows a typical sequence of liquid crystal phases with axially symmetric orientational order; i.e. a nematic phase in the temperature range 361.7 K to 346.5 K and a smectic A phase below 346.5. Moreover, dielectric measurements demonstrated that except for the structural relaxation process, there is also slower mode above the glass transition temperature in both vitrified and cryogrounded samples. We considered the origin of this mode taking into account DFT calculations, rod like shape of itraconazole and distribution of its dipole moment vectors. For the dielectric data collected at elevated pressure, evolution of the steepness index versus pressure was determined. Finally, the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature was evaluated to be equal to 190 K GPa(-1).

  4. The effects of methamphetamine on core body temperature in the rat--part 1: chronic treatment and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Myles, Benita J; Jarrett, Lee Ann; Broom, Susan L; Speaker, H Anton; Sabol, Karen E

    2008-06-01

    Stimulants such as methamphetamine (METH) alter core temperature in a manner that is dependent on ambient temperature and that shows tolerance after chronic use. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether tolerance to METH-induced hyperthermia was a consequence of neurotoxicity to dopamine or serotonin and (2) determine the relationship between ambient temperature and chronic treatment on the METH-induced temperature response. Rats were treated with 1.0, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg METH at 24 degrees C (experiment 1) or treated with 5.0 mg/kg METH at 20 degrees C, 24 degrees C, or 28 degrees C (experiment 2). Treatment occurred for 12 days, and temperature measurements were made once per minute telemetrically during 7-h sessions in computer-regulated environments. Peak increases in core temperature occurred at 60 min post-treatment for the 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg doses, and at 180 min for the 5.0 mg/kg dose. Tolerance-like effects were seen with chronic 5.0 (mixed results) and 10.0 mg/kg METH in the absence of dopamine or serotonin depletions measured 2 weeks after the completion of treatment. After 5.0 mg/kg METH, variations in ambient temperature resulted in an early flexible change in core temperature (phase 1) (hyperthermia at 28 degrees and hypothermia at 20 degrees ) and a later inflexible hyperthermia (phase 2). The results suggest that (1) the peak effect of different doses of METH occurs at different times (24 degrees ), (2) the diminished temperature response with chronic METH treatment was not associated with long-term dopamine and serotonin depletions, and (3) a two-phase temperature response to METH may reflect two independent mechanisms.

  5. SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE Up-Regulates TEMPRANILLO2 Floral Repressor at Low Ambient Temperatures1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marín-González, Esther; Matías-Hernández, Luis; Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Suárez-López, Paula; Pelaz, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Plants integrate day length and ambient temperature to determine the optimal timing for developmental transitions. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its closest homolog TWIN SISTER OF FT promote flowering in response to their activator CONSTANS under long-day inductive conditions. Low ambient temperature (16°C) delays flowering, even under inductive photoperiods, through repression of FT, revealing the importance of floral repressors acting at low temperatures. Previously, we have reported that the floral repressors TEMPRANILLO (TEM; TEM1 and TEM2) control flowering time through direct regulation of FT at 22°C. Here, we show that tem mutants are less sensitive than the wild type to changes in ambient growth temperature, indicating that TEM genes may play a role in floral repression at 16°C. Moreover, we have found that TEM2 directly represses the expression of FT and TWIN SISTER OF FT at 16°C. In addition, the floral repressor SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) directly regulates TEM2 but not TEM1 expression at 16°C. Flowering time analyses of svp tem mutants indicate that TEM may act in the same genetic pathway as SVP to repress flowering at 22°C but that SVP and TEM are partially independent at 16°C. Thus, TEM2 partially mediates the temperature-dependent function of SVP at low temperatures. Taken together, our results indicate that TEM genes are also able to repress flowering at low ambient temperatures under inductive long-day conditions. PMID:26243615

  6. The effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on body temperature and brain amine concentrations in the rat at differnt ambient temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, M R; Taylor, D A

    1977-01-01

    1. Rats were injected intravenously with 2 mg/kg (-)-trans-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) at ambient temperatures of 4 degrees, 21 degrees, 31 degrees and 37 degrees C. 2. The general behavior exhibited by rats treated with delta9-THC was similar at all four ambient temperatures. 3. Body temperatures were recorded continuously before and after drug administration. At 4 degrees and 21 degrees C, delta9-THC caused hypothermia whereas no change in body temperature occurred at 31 degrees and 37 degrees C. 4. The concentrations in the whole brain of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were determined spectrophotofluorimetrically 1 h after drug administration. At 4 degrees C delta9-THC caused an increase of 5-HT, at 21 degrees C an increase of 5-HIAA, at 21 degrees C an increase of 5-HIAA AND A decrease of NA, and at 37 degrees C an increase of 5-HT and 5-HIAA. 5. At all ambient temperatures, delta9-THC increased the brain levels of 5-HT and/or 5-HIAA. A correlation between the delta9-THC-induced hypothermic response and the possible alteration of brain 5-HT metabolism cannot be excluded. PMID:884391

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of ambient temperature and diarrhoeal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Elizabeth J; Woster, Andrew P; DeWitt, Peter; Goldstein, Rebecca S; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Global climate change is expected to increase the risk of diarrhoeal diseases, a leading cause of childhood mortality. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the magnitude of these effects and which populations bear the greatest risks. Methods: We conducted a systematic review using defined search terms across four major databases and, additionally, examined the references of 54 review articles captured by the search. We evaluated sources of heterogeneity by pathogen taxon, exposure measure, study quality, country income level and regional climate, and estimated pooled effect estimates for the subgroups identified in the heterogeneity analysis, using meta-analysis methods. Results: We identified 26 studies with 49 estimates. Pathogen taxa were a source of heterogeneity. There was a positive association between ambient temperature and all-cause diarrhoea (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03, 1.10) and bacterial diarrhoea (IRR 1.07; 95% CI 1.04, 1.10), but not viral diarrhoea (IRR 0.96; 95% CI 0.82, 1.11). These associations were observed in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Only one study of protozoan diarrhoea was identified. Conclusions: Changes in temperature due to global climate change can and may already be affecting diarrhoeal disease incidence. The vulnerability of populations may depend, in part, on local pathogen distribution. However, evidence of publication bias and the uneven geographical distribution of studies limit the precision and generalizability of the pooled estimates. PMID:26567313

  8. Synthesis of indium nanoparticles at ambient temperature; simultaneous phase transfer and ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghazadeh Meshgi, Mohammad; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Biswas, Subhajit; Holmes, Justin D.; Marschner, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of size-monodispersed indium nanoparticles via an innovative simultaneous phase transfer and ripening method is reported. The formation of nanoparticles occurs in a one-step process instead of well-known two-step phase transfer approaches. The synthesis involves the reduction of InCl3 with LiBH4 at ambient temperature and although the reduction occurs at room temperature, fine indium nanoparticles, with a mean diameter of 6.4 ± 0.4 nm, were obtained directly in non-polar n-dodecane. The direct synthesis of indium nanoparticles in n-dodecane facilitates their fast formation and enhances their size-monodispersity. In addition, the nanoparticles were highly stable for more than 2 months. The nanoparticles were characterised by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine their morphology, structure and phase purity.

  9. Hibernation patterns of Turkish hamsters: influence of sex and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Batavia, Mariska; Nguyen, George; Harman, Kristine; Zucker, Irving

    2013-02-01

    Turkish hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti) are a model organism for studies of hibernation, yet a detailed account of their torpor characteristics has not been undertaken. This study employed continuous telemetric monitoring of body temperature (T(b)) in hibernating male and female Turkish hamsters at ambient temperatures (T(a)s) of 5 and 13 °C to precisely characterize torpor bout depth, duration, and frequency, as well as rates of entry into and arousal from torpor. Hamsters generated brief intervals of short (<12 h), shallow test bouts (T(b) > 20 °C), followed by deep torpor bouts lasting 4-6 days at T(a) = 5 °C and 2-3 days at T(a) = 13 °C. Females at T(a) = 5 °C had longer bouts than males, but maintained higher torpor T(b); there were no sex differences at T(a) = 13 °C. Neither body mass loss nor food intake differed between the two T(a)s. Hamsters entered torpor primarily during the scotophase (subjective night), but timing of arousals was highly variable. Hamsters at both T (a)s generated short, shallow torpor bouts between deep bouts, suggesting that this species may be capable of both hibernation and daily torpor.

  10. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  11. Variation of forearm, hand, and finger blood flow indices with ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger blood flow (impedance) changes are measured by impedance rheography on seven healthy male subjects aged 20-35 yr during exposure to ambient temperatures ranging from 10 to 46 C. All observations are made in an environmental chamber at a dew point temperature of 13 + or - 0.25 C. It is shown that impedance rheography is suitable for quantifying peripheral circulatory responses to thermal stress. The measured blood flow indices are found to be consistent with previously reported values for the forearm, hand, and fingers obtained using air or water displacement plethysmography. In particular, the more distal body segments exhibit relatively larger vasomotor responses to changes in ambient temperature than do the more proximal body segments.

  12. (Ultra)fast catalyst-free macromolecular conjugation in aqueous environment at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Mathias; Delaittre, Guillaume; Kaupp, Michael; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2012-05-02

    Tailor-made water-soluble macromolecules, including a glycopolymer, obtained by living/controlled RAFT-mediated polymerization are demonstrated to react in water with diene-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)s without pre- or post-functionalization steps or the need for a catalyst at ambient temperature. As previously observed in organic solvents, hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) conjugations reached quantitative conversion within minutes when cyclopentadienyl moieties were involved. However, while catalysts and elevated temperatures were previously necessary for open-chain diene conjugation, additive-free HDA cycloadditions occur in water within a few hours at ambient temperature. Experimental evidence for efficient conjugations is provided via unambiguous ESI-MS, UV/vis, NMR, and SEC data. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  13. The monitoring and fatigue behavior of CFCCs at ambient temperature and 1000{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Miriyala, N.; Liaw, P.K.; McHargue, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Metallographically polished flexure bars of Nicalon/SiC and Nicalon/alumina composites were subjected to monotonic and cycle-fatigue loadings, with loading either parallel or normal to the fabric plies. The fabric orientation did not significantly affect the mechanical behavior of the Nicalon/SiC composite at ambient temperature. However, the mechanical behavior of the Nicalon/alumina composite was significantly affected by the fabric orientation at ambient temperature in air and at 1000{degrees}C in argon atmosphere. In addition, there was a significant degradation in the fatigue performance of the alumina matrix composite at the elevated temperature, owing to creep in the material and degradation in the fiber strength.

  14. Ambient temperature effects on broadband UV-B measurements using fluorescent phosphor (MgWO4)-based detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichter, Bronislaw K.; Beaubien, David J.; Beaubien, Arthur F.

    1994-01-01

    Results of field tests on a group of broadband UV-B pyranometers are presented. A brief description of the instrument is given. The effects of ambient temperature on thermally unregulated fluorescent phosphor (Robertson type) meters are presented and compared with the performance of thermally stabilized instruments. Means for correcting data from thermally unregulated instruments, where the prevailing ambient temperatures are known, are outlined.

  15. Screening of agrochemicals in foodstuffs using low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Joshua S; García-Reyes, Juan F; Harper, Jason D; Charipar, Nicholas A; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-05-01

    Low-temperature plasma (LTP) permits direct ambient ionization and mass analysis of samples in their native environment with minimal or no prior preparation. LTP utilizes dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) to create a low power plasma which is guided by gas flow onto the sample from which analytes are desorbed and ionized. In this study, the potential of LTP-MS for the detection of pesticide residues in food is demonstrated. Thirteen multi-class agricultural chemicals were studied (ametryn, amitraz, atrazine, buprofezin, DEET, diphenylamine, ethoxyquin, imazalil, isofenphos-methyl, isoproturon, malathion, parathion-ethyl and terbuthylazine). To evaluate the potential of the proposed approach, LTP-MS experiments were performed directly on fruit peels as well as on fruit/vegetable extracts. Most of the agrochemicals examined displayed remarkable sensitivity in the positive ion mode, giving limits of detection (LOD) for the direct measurement in the low picogram range. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to confirm identification of selected pesticides by using for these experiments spiked fruit/vegetable extracts (QuEChERS, a standard sample treatment protocol) at levels as low as 1 pg, absolute, for some of the analytes. Comparisons of the data obtained by direct LTP-MS were made with the slower but more accurate conventional LC-MS/MS procedure. Herbicides spiked in aqueous solutions were detectable at LODs as low as 0.5 microg L(-1) without the need for any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that ambient LTP-MS can be applied for the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased produce and in natural water samples. Quantitative analysis was also performed in a few selected cases and displayed a relatively high degree of linearity over four orders of magnitude.

  16. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  17. Investigation of effective base transit time and current gain modulation of light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hao-Hsiang; Tu, Wen-Chung; Wang, Hsiao-Lun; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-11-03

    In this report, the modulation of current gain of InGaP/GaAs light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures are measured and analyzed using thermionic emission model of quantum well embedded in the transistor base region. Minority carriers captured by quantum wells gain more energy at high temperatures and escape from quantum wells resulting in an increase of current gain and lower optical output, resulting in different I-V characteristics from conventional heterojunction bipolar transistors. The effect of the smaller thermionic lifetime thus reduces the effective base transit time of transistors at high temperatures. The unique current gain enhancement of 27.61% is achieved when operation temperature increase from 28 to 85 °C.

  18. Thermoregulatory responses to beta-adrenergic agonists at low ambient temperatures in the rat.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, H J; Stock, M J

    1993-11-01

    Dose-response effects on heat production (HP) and dry heat loss (DHL) following injection with the non-selective (beta 1/beta 2) adrenergic agonist isoprenaline (ISO) and the atypical B3 agonist BRL 35135 (BRL) were established at an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C in rats. Subsequently, the effects of HP and DHL of a maximal thermogenic dose of ISO (75 micrograms/kg) and a supramaximal dose of BRL (40 micrograms/kg) were tested at ambient temperatures of 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. In terms of heat production, BRL was no different from saline at 5 degrees C, but its thermogenic activity became increasingly evident as ambient temperature increased. For ISO, HP was lower than, or no different from, saline at 5 and 10 degrees C, respectively, but DHL exceeded HP at both temperatures, and colonic temperature fell significantly; ISO and BRL responses were similar at 15 degrees C. ISO was also capable of producing a decrease in HP at 10 degrees C if the rats were shaven. Substitution for endogenous, sympathetically mediated thermogenesis would explain the attenuation of the BRL and ISO effects at cool ambient temperatures, whereas the hypothermic effects of ISO in the cold appeared to be due to an inappropriate increase in DHL, which was exacerbated at 5 degrees C by a reduction in HP below saline values. The increase in DHL was consistent with beta 2-mediated effects of ISO on peripheral blood flow, but the mechanism responsible for the reduction in HP in the cold is unknown, although reduced vascular thermogenesis has been offered as a putative explanation.

  19. Proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in the development of ascites syndrome in broilers induced by low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Qiao, J; Zhao, L H; Li, K; Wang, H; Xu, T; Tian, Y; Gao, M; Wang, X

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodelling, mainly characterized by arterial medial thickening, is an important pathological feature of broiler ascites syndrome (AS). Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) form the major cellular component of arterial medial layer, we speculate that VSMC proliferation is one of the causes of pulmonary arterial medial thickening in ascitic broilers. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the role of VSMC proliferation in pulmonary vascular remodelling in development of AS induced by low ambient temperature. Broilers in control group (22 +/- 1.5 degrees C) and low temperature group (11 +/- 2 degrees C) were sampled every week at 15-50 days of age. Proliferative indexes of VSMC in pulmonary arteries were assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the relative medial thickness (RMT) and relative wall area (RWA), as indexes of pulmonary vascular remodelling, were examined by computer-image analysing system. The results showed that the high incidence (18.75%) of AS was induced by low temperature, and a significantly increased VSMC proliferation was observed in pulmonary arteries in the low temperature group at 22-50 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, RMT and RWA in pulmonary arteries were significantly elevated in the low temperature group from 36 days of age (P < 0.05), indicating that pulmonary vascular remodelling occurred following VSMC proliferation in AS. Our data suggest that proliferation of VSMC may facilitate pulmonary vascular remodelling and have a pivotal role in AS induced by low ambient temperature.

  20. The association between ambient temperature and children's lung function in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanshan; Guo, Yuming; Williams, Gail; Baker, Peter; Ye, Xiaofang; Madaniyazi, Lina; Kim, Dae-Seon; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between ambient temperature and children's lung function in Baotou, China. We recruited 315 children (8-12 years) from Baotou, China in the spring of 2004, 2005, and 2006. They performed three successive forced expiratory measurements three times daily (morning, noon, and evening) for about 5 weeks. The highest peak expiratory flow (PEF) was recorded for each session. Daily data on ambient temperature, relative humidity, and air pollution were monitored during the same period. Mixed models with a distributed lag structure were used to examine the effects of temperature on lung function while adjusting for individual characteristics and environmental factors. Low temperatures were significantly associated with decreases in PEF. The effects lasted for lag 0-2 days. For all participants, the cumulative effect estimates (lag 0-2 days) were -1.44 (-1.93, -0.94) L/min, -1.39 (-1.92, -0.86) L/min, -1.40 (-1.97, -0.82) L/min, and -1.28 (-1.69, -0.88) L/min for morning, noon, evening, and daily mean PEF, respectively, associated with 1 °C decrease in daily mean temperature. Generally, the effects of temperature were slightly stronger in boys than in girls for noon, evening, and daily mean PEF, while the effects were stronger in girls for morning PEF. PM2.5 had joint effects with temperature on children's PEF. Higher PM2.5 increased the impacts of low temperature. Low ambient temperatures are associated with lower lung function in children in Baotou, China. Preventive health policies will be required for protecting children from the cold weather.

  1. Ambient Temperature and Stroke Occurrence: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Cao, Yongjun; Hong, Daqing; Zheng, Danni; Richtering, Sarah; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Leong, Tzen Hugh; Arima, Hisatomi; Islam, Shariful; Salam, Abdul; Anderson, Craig; Robinson, Thompson; Hackett, Maree L.

    2016-01-01

    Biologically plausible associations exist between climatic conditions and stroke risk, but study results are inconsistent. We aimed to summarize current evidence on ambient temperature and overall stroke occurrence, and by age, sex, and variation of temperature. We performed a systematic literature search across MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and GEOBASE, from inception to 16 October 2015 to identify all population-based observational studies. Where possible, data were pooled for meta-analysis with Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by means of the random effects meta-analysis. We included 21 studies with a total of 476,511 patients. The data were varied as indicated by significant heterogeneity across studies for both ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Pooled OR (95% CI) in every 1 degree Celsius increase in ambient temperature was significant for ICH 0.97 (0.94–1.00), but not for IS 1.00 (0.99–1.01) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) 1.00 (0.98–1.01). Meta-analysis was not possible for the pre-specified subgroup analyses by age, sex, and variation of temperature. Change in temperature over the previous 24 h appeared to be more important than absolute temperature in relation to the risk of stroke, especially in relation to the risk of ICH. Older age appeared to increase vulnerability to low temperature for both IS and ICH. To conclude, this review shows that lower mean ambient temperature is significantly associated with the risk of ICH, but not with IS and SAH. Larger temperature changes were associated with higher stroke rates in the elderly. PMID:27420077

  2. Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Spiers, D.E.; Rawson, R.O.; Adams, B.W.; Sheldon, D.K.

    1984-08-01

    The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 mW/sq. cm. (SAR = 0.16 W/kg per mW/sq. cm.) and were presented at controlled environmental temperatures of 25, 30, and 35 C. Standardized tests, conducted periodically, assessed changes in thermoregulatory responses. Dependent variables measured included body mass, certain blood properties, metabolic heat production, sweating, skin temperatures, deep body temperature, and behavioral responses by which the monkeys selected a preferred environmental temperature. Results showed no alteration of metabolic rate, internal body temperature, or thermoregulatory behavior by microwave exposure although the ambient temperature prevailing during chronic exposure could exert an effect. An increase in sweating rate occurred in the 35 C environment, not enhanced significantly by microwave exposure. Skin temperature, reflecting vasomotor state, was reliably influenced by both ambient temperature and microwaves. The most robust consequence of microwave exposure was a reduction in body mass which appeared to be a function of microwave power density.

  3. Impact of ambient temperature and atmospheric evaporation on the incidence of acute deep venous thrombosis in the northeast of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeni; Ji, Chao; Ju, Hao; Han, Yanshuo

    2017-06-01

    Meteorological variables have been reported to be associated with increased morbidity; however, fewer studies have study the correlations between the occurrences of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and meteorological variables. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Shenyang were collected retrospectively for a ten year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM), we estimated the relative risk (RR) of DVT presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 28-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 28 days. We found significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. A significant correlation was found between the ambient temperature and the number of hospital admissions for DVT. The lower the average, minimal, and maximal ambient temperature, the higher the incidence of DVT (P=0.001, P=0.002, and P<0.001). Furthermore, high evaporation (P=0.026) and high vapor pressure (P=0.003) on the date of admission was associated with an increase in the rate of presenting with DVT. Based on a time-series analysis, this study showed that the associations between mean daily temperature and DVT presentation were not monotonic. Compared to centered temperature at 8 °C, the cumulative 28-day (lag 0 to lag 27) RR was significantly elevated at -16 °C, -15 °C, -14 °C, and -13°C for DVT (P<0.05). To the extreme low temperature (-17.7 °C) in Shenyang, the RR of cumulative 8-day (lag 0 to 7 days) was remarkably increased for DVT (RRlag8-day=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05). For the extreme high temperature, nevertheless, no particular finding was detected regarding acute and prolonged effects for DVT. In general, low ambient temperature was significantly associated with DVT presentations in comparison with that of high temperature. The effects of cold were delayed by one week. DVT is particularly associated with high

  4. High temperature energy harvester for wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. E.; Heijl, R.; Staaf, L. G. H.; Zenkic, S.; Svenman, E.; Lindblom, A.; Palmqvist, A. E. C.; Enoksson, P.

    2014-09-01

    Implementing energy harvesters and wireless sensors in jet engines will simplify development and decrease costs by reducing the need for cables. Such a device could include a small thermoelectric generator placed in the cooling channels of the jet engine where the temperature is between 500-900 °C. This paper covers the synthesis of suitable thermoelectric materials, design of module and proof of concept tests of a thermoelectric module. The materials and other design variables were chosen based on an analytic model and numerical analysis. The module was optimized for 600-800 °C with the thermoelectric materials n-type Ba8Ga16Ge30 and p-type La-doped Yb14MnSb11, both with among the highest reported figure-of-merit values, zT, for bulk materials in this region. The materials were synthesized and their structures confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Proof of concept modules containing only two thermoelectric legs were built and tested at high temperatures and under high temperature gradients. The modules were designed to survive an ambient temperature gradient of up to 200 °C. The first measurements at low temperature showed that the thermoelectric legs could withstand a temperature gradient of 123 °C and still be functional. The high temperature measurement with 800 °C on the hot side showed that the module remained functional at this temperature.

  5. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  6. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  7. Effect of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy") on body temperature and liver antioxidant status in mice: influence of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Márcia; Carvalho, Félix; Remião, Fernando; de Lourdes Pereira, Maria; Pires-das-Neves, Ricardo; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria

    2002-04-01

    The consumption of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is known to cause severe hyperthermia and liver damage in humans. The thermogenic response induced by MDMA is complex and partially determined by the prevailing ambient temperature (AT). This is of extreme importance since ecstasy is often consumed at "rave" parties, where dancing takes place in a warm environment, which may exacerbate the effect of MDMA on thermoregulation. In view of the fact that hyperthermia is a well-known pro-oxidant aggressive condition, its potential role in ecstasy-induced hepatocellular toxicity should be further studied. Thus, the present study was performed in order to evaluate the influence of AT on the effects of single administration of MDMA on body temperature and liver toxicity in Charles River mice. Animals were given an acute intraperitoneal dose of MDMA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) and placed in AT of 20+/-2 degrees C or 30+/-2 degrees C for 24 h. Body temperature was measured during the study using implanted transponders and a temperature probe reading device. Plasma and liver samples were used for biochemical analysis. Liver sections were also taken for histological examination. The parameters evaluated were (1) plasma levels of transaminases and alkaline phosphatase, (2) hepatic glutathione (GSH), (3) hepatic lipid peroxidation, (4) activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione- S-transferase, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase), and (5) liver histology. The hyperthermic response elicited by MDMA was clearly dose-related and potentiated by high AT. Administration of MDMA produced some evidence of oxidative stress, expressed as GSH depletion at both ATs studied, as well as by lipid peroxidation and decreased catalase activity at high AT. High AT, by itself, decreased glutathione peroxidase activity. Histological examination of the liver revealed abnormalities of a dose

  8. Influence of Ambient Temperature and Confinement on the Chemical Immobilization of Fallow Deer ( Dama dama ).

    PubMed

    Costa, Giovanna Lucrezia; Nastasi, Bernadette; Musicò, Marcello; Spadola, Filippo; Morici, Manuel; Cucinotta, Giuseppe; Interlandi, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    We used physiological parameters and the duration and quality of anesthesia to compare the effects of two ambient temperatures and of the duration of pre-immobilization confinement on the chemical immobilization of fallow deer. We divided 45 free-ranging fallow deer ( Dama dama ) into two groups: Group A were deer captured in winter (average 12 C), using 1 mg/kg of xylazine and 1 mg/kg of tiletamine-zolazepam; and Group B were deer captured in spring (average 24 C), using 2 mg/kg of xylazine and 1.5 mg/kg of tiletamine-zolazepam, after being confined in a pen. We observed lower mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation in Group B. In contrast, the mean body temperature and the mean blood lactate concentration were significantly higher in Group B, and quality of anesthesia was better in Group A. Mean induction time (time to achieve recumbency) and durations of recumbency were the same in Groups A and B: approximately 8 and 50 min, respectively. Despite the lower drug dosage, better sedation was obtained in Group A than in group B. The time of year, most likely associated with differences in ambient temperature and in confinement, influenced the recommended dosage for xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam in fallow deer. As all the animals were sound, we concluded that the only factors that influenced the outcome of the present study were the ambient temperature and the level of stress caused by confinement in the pen.

  9. Analyzing the impact of ambient temperature indicators on transformer life in different regions of Chinese mainland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known.

  10. Analyzing the Impact of Ambient Temperature Indicators on Transformer Life in Different Regions of Chinese Mainland

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known. PMID:23843729

  11. Direct Transformation of Amorphous Silicon Carbide into Graphene under Low Temperature and Ambient Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Lv, Haifeng; He, Daping; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale availability of the graphene is critical to the successful application of graphene-based electronic devices. The growth of epitaxial graphene (EG) on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces has opened a new promising route for large-scale high-quality graphene production. However, two key obstacles to epitaxial growth are extremely high requirements for almost perfectly ordered crystal SiC and harsh process conditions. Here, we report that the amorphous SiC (a-Si1−xCx) nano-shell (nano-film) can be directly transformed into graphene by using chlorination method under very mild reaction conditions of relative low temperature (800°C) and the ambient pressure in chlorine (Cl2) atmosphere. Therefore, our finding, the direct transformation of a-Si1−xCx into graphene under much milder condition, will open a door to apply this new method to the large-scale production of graphene at low costs. PMID:23359349

  12. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  13. Imidapril inhibits right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Shou-Yan; Cheng, Xiang-Chao; Li, Meng; Sun, Tong-Wen; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Guo, Wen; Li, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the effect of imidapril on the right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. Twenty-four broiler chickens were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 8), including the control group, low temperature group, and imidapril group. Chickens in the control group were raised at normal temperature, whereas chickens in the low temperature group and imidapril group were exposed to low ambient temperature (12 to 18°C) from 14 d of age until 45 d of age. At the same time, chickens in the imidapril group were gavaged with imidapril at 3 mg/kg once daily for 30 d. The thickness of the right ventricular wall was observed with echocardiography. The BW and wet lung weight as well as weight of right and left ventricles and ventricular septum were measured. Both wet lung weight index and right ventricular hypertrophy index were calculated. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure was assessed according to echocardiography. The expression of ACE and ACE2 mRNA in the right ventricular myocardial tissue was quantified by real-time PCR. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells were detected by immunohistostaining. The concentration of angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang (1-7) in the right ventricular myocardial tissue was measured with ELISA. The results showed that right ventricular hypertrophy index, wet lung weight index, pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, expression of ACE mRNA in the right ventricular tissue, Ang II concentration, and the thickness of the right ventricular wall in the low temperature group increased significantly compared with those in the control group and imidapril group. The ACE2 mRNA expression increased 36%, whereas Ang (1-7) concentration decreased significantly in the low temperature group compared with that in the control group and imidapril group. In conclusion, imidapril inhibits right ventricular remodeling induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

  14. Carbon/Carbon Fasteners For Use At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Fasteners made of advanced carbon/carbon material perform well at ambient and high temperatures. Exhibit shear strengths of more than 10 kpsi at room temperature and 13 kpsi at temperature of 2,700 degrees F. However, fasteners exhibited poor tensile strength at room temperature. Best suited to applications in which exposed to shear loads with minimal tension loads. Parts reused after thermal cycling.

  15. Time relationship between ambient temperature change and antigen stimulation on immune responses of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, O.; Kikuchi, M.

    1989-03-01

    We investigated the time relationship between ambient temperature change and antigen stimulation on immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in mice. In the case of a shift from comfortable (25°C) to cold (8°C) temperatures, suppression in the number of splenic plaque-forming cells (PFC) took place mainly when the shift was done between 1 day before and 2 to 4 days after immunization. The suppression of the PVP response lasted for up to a maximum of 6 days when mice were transferred 1 day before immunization. In the case of a temperature shift from 25° to 36.5°C, the suppressive effect was found when the temperature shift was done between 4 days before and 2 days after immunization. The effect lasted longer than that of the temperature shift to cold, i.e., at least 9 days after the temperature shift. Blood corticosterone levels after the temperature shifts corresponded to changes in the immune responses: elevation of the blood corticosterone levels was observed for only the first 3 days after a temperature shift to 8°C but for 10 days after a temperature shift to 36.5°C during the period time of the experiment. These result suggested that blood corticosterone level contributes to the duration of the effects of temperature shifts on immune responses of mice. Furthermore, it appeared that the early stage of the immune response is more susceptible to temperature shifts than the later stage. To explain these results, the terms “effective period” in the course of physiological adaptation to changed ambient temperature and “susceptible period” in the course of the immune response, were proposed.

  16. Global variation in the effects of ambient temperature on mortality: a systematic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuming; Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben; Li, Shanshan; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tobias, Aurelio; Lavigne, Eric; de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline; Leone, Michela; Pan, Xiaochuan; Tong, Shilu; Tian, Linwei; Kim, Ho; Hashizume, Masahiro; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Wu, Chang-Fu; Punnasiri, Kornwipa; Yi, Seung-Muk; Michelozzi, Paola; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Williams, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have examined the effects of temperature on mortality in a single city, country or region. However, less evidence is available on the variation in the associations between temperature and mortality in multiple countries, analyzed simultaneously. Methods We obtained daily data on temperature and mortality in 306 communities from 12 countries/regions (Australia, Brazil, Thailand, China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, United States and Canada). Two-stage analyses were used to assess the non-linear and delayed relationship between temperature and mortality. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing over-dispersion with distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the community-specific temperature-mortality relationship. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was used to pool the non-linear and delayed effects of ambient temperature at the national level, in each country. Results The temperatures associated with the lowest mortality were around the 75th percentile of temperature in all the countries/regions, ranging from 66th (Taiwan) to 80th (UK) percentiles. The estimated effects of cold and hot temperatures on mortality varied by community and country. Meta-analysis results show that both cold and hot temperatures increased the risk of mortality in all the countries/regions. Cold effects were delayed and lasted for many days, while hot effects appeared quickly and did not last long. Conclusions People have some ability to adapt to their local climate type, but both cold and hot temperatures are still associated with the risk of mortality. Public health strategies to alleviate the impact of ambient temperatures are important, in particular in the context of climate change. PMID:25166878

  17. Depicting the Dependency of Isoprene in Ambient Air and from Plants on Temperature and Solar Radiation by Using Regression Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Pallavi; Ghosh, Chirashree

    2016-07-01

    Among all sources of volatile organic compounds, isoprene emission from plants is an important part of the atmospheric hydrocarbon budget. In the present study, isoprene emission capacity at the bottom of the canopies of plant species viz. Dalbergia sissoo and Nerium oleander and in ambient air at different sites selected on the basis of land use pattern viz. near to traffic intersection with dense vegetation, away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under floodplain area (Site I) and away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under hilly ridge area (Site II) during three different seasons (monsoon, winter and summer) in Delhi were measured. In order to find out the dependence of isoprene emission rate on temperature and solar radiation, regression analysis has been performed. In case of dependency of isoprene in ambient air on temperature and solar radiation in selected seasons it has been found that high isoprene was found during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar rdaiation and isoprene during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. On the other hand, in case of isoprene emission from selected plant species, it has been found that high temperature and solar radiation promotes high isoprene emission rates during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons in D. sissoo. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene emission rate during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. In contrast, in case of Nerium oleander, no such appropriate relationship was obtained. The study concludes that in ambient air, isoprene concentration was found to be high during summer season as compared to other seasons and gives best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene. In case of plants, Dalbergia sissoo comes under high isoprene emission category

  18. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter, Outdoor Temperature, and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallwork, Rachel S; Colicino, Elena; Zhong, Jia; Kloog, Itai; Coull, Brent A; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel D; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2017-01-01

    Ambient air pollution and temperature have been linked with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Metabolic syndrome and its components-abdominal obesity, elevated fasting blood glucose concentration, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia-predict cardiovascular disease, but the environmental causes are understudied. In this study, we prospectively examined the long-term associations of air pollution, defined as particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5), and temperature with the development of metabolic syndrome and its components. Using covariate-adjustment Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated associations of mean annual PM2.5 concentration and temperature with risk of incident metabolic dysfunctions between 1993 and 2011 in 587 elderly (mean = 70 (standard deviation, 7) years of age) male participants in the Normative Aging Study. A 1-μg/m(3) increase in mean annual PM2.5 concentration was associated with a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.52), an elevated fasting blood glucose level (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.39), and hypertriglyceridemia (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.30). Our findings for metabolic syndrome and high fasting blood glucose remained significant for PM2.5 levels below the Environmental Protection Agency's health-safety limit (12 μg/m(3)). A 1°C increase in mean annual temperature was associated with a higher risk of developing elevated fasting blood glucose (HR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.56). Men living in neighborhoods with worse air quality-with higher PM2.5 levels and/or temperatures than average-showed increased risk of developing metabolic dysfunctions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure and Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320degF. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  20. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable the designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320 F. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  1. Thermal degradation of concrete in the temperature range from ambient to 315{degrees}C (600{degrees}F)

    SciTech Connect

    Kassir, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Reich, M.

    1993-06-01

    This report is concerned with determining the effect of elevated temperatures on the behavior of concrete. Emphasis is placed on quantifying the degree of potential degradation of the physical properties of concrete in high-level waste storage tanks. The range in the temperature elevation of interest covers from ambient to 315{degrees}C (600{degrees}F). The literature has been reviewed to examine the applicable experimental data and quantify the degradation in the concrete and reinforcing steel. Since many variables and test conditions control the results in the data base, upper and lower bounds of the degraded properties at temperatures applicable to the environments of the storage tanks are summarized and presented in explicit forms. Such results are useful in assessing the effect of elevated temperatures on the structural behavior of the tanks. Also, they provide the technical basis for a parametric study that may be necessary to investigate the thermal aspects of the structural integrity of the tanks.

  2. Psychophysics of a Nociceptive Test in the Mouse: Ambient Temperature as a Key Factor for Variation

    PubMed Central

    Pincedé, Ivanne; Pollin, Bernard; Meert, Theo; Plaghki, Léon; Le Bars, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background The mouse is increasingly used in biomedical research, notably in behavioral neurosciences for the development of tests or models of pain. Our goal was to provide the scientific community with an outstanding tool that allows the determination of psychophysical descriptors of a nociceptive reaction, which are inaccessible with conventional methods: namely the true threshold, true latency, conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response and latency of the central decision-making process. Methodology/Principal Findings Basically, the procedures involved heating of the tail with a CO2 laser, recording of tail temperature with an infrared camera and stopping the heating when the animal reacted. The method is based mainly on the measurement of three observable variables, namely the initial temperature, the heating rate and the temperature reached at the actual moment of the reaction following random variations in noxious radiant heat. The initial temperature of the tail, which itself depends on the ambient temperature, very markedly influenced the behavioral threshold, the behavioral latency and the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers but not the latency of the central decision-making. Conclusions/Significance We have validated a psychophysical approach to nociceptive reactions for the mouse, which has already been described for rats and Humans. It enables the determination of four variables, which contribute to the overall latency of the response. The usefulness of such an approach was demonstrated by providing new fundamental findings regarding the influence of ambient temperature on nociceptive processes. We conclude by challenging the validity of using as “pain index" the reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus and emphasize the need for a very careful control of the ambient temperature, as a prevailing environmental source of variation, during any behavioral testing of mice. PMID:22629325

  3. Fundamental Studies on Ambient Temperature Creep Deformation Behavior of Alpha and Alpha-Beta Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    4 . Dilute Titanium Etchant 81 5. Twinning Rotation Angle and Rotation Axis 81 6 . Creep Curve Parameter n, Time Exponent 82 XI LIST OF FIGURES...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fundamental Studies on Ambient Temperature Creep Deformation Behavior of Alpha and Alpha-Beta Titanium Alloys 6 . AUTHORS Charles...Treatments 6 2.2. Attaching Fiducial Grid of Au to the Titanium Specimens 8 2.3. Scanning Electron Microscopy. 15 2.4. Online Computerization of Zeiss

  4. DPPH·, ABTS·+ and FRAP activity of kiwifruit during post-ripening process at a