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Sample records for ambipolar diffusion calcuations

  1. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  2. AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION HEATING IN TURBULENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Myers, Andrew; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: atmyers@berkeley.edu

    2012-11-20

    The temperature of the gas in molecular clouds is a key determinant of the characteristic mass of star formation. Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is considered one of the most important heating mechanisms in weakly ionized molecular clouds. In this work, we study the AD heating rate using two-fluid turbulence simulations and compare it with the overall heating rate due to turbulent dissipation. We find that for observed molecular clouds, which typically have Alfven Mach numbers of {approx}1 and AD Reynolds numbers of {approx}20, about 70% of the total turbulent dissipation is in the form of AD heating. AD has an important effect on the length scale where energy is dissipated: when AD heating is strong, most of the energy in the cascade is removed by ion-neutral drift, with a comparatively small amount of energy making it down to small scales. We derive a relation for the AD heating rate that describes the results of our simulations to within a factor of two. Turbulent dissipation, including AD heating, is generally less important than cosmic-ray heating in molecular clouds, although there is substantial scatter in both.

  3. The relevance of ambipolar diffusion for neutron star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-03-01

    We study ambipolar diffusion in strongly magnetized neutron stars, with special focus on the effects of neutrino reaction rates and the impact of a superfluid/superconducting transition in the neutron star core. For axisymmetric magnetic field configurations, we determine the deviation from β-equilibrium induced by the magnetic force and calculate the velocity of the slow, quasi-stationary, ambipolar drift. We study the temperature dependence of the velocity pattern and clearly identify the transition to a predominantly solenoidal flow. For stars without superconducting/superfluid constituents and with a mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field of typical magnetar strength, we find that ambipolar diffusion proceeds fast enough to have a significant impact on the magnetic field evolution only at low core temperatures, T ≲ 1-2 × 108 K. The ambipolar diffusion time-scale becomes appreciably shorter when fast neutrino reactions are present, because the possibility to balance part of the magnetic force with pressure gradients is reduced. We also find short ambipolar diffusion time-scales in the case of superconducting cores for T ≲ 109 K, due to the reduced interaction between protons and neutrons. In the most favourable scenario, with fast neutrino reactions and superconducting cores, ambipolar diffusion results in advection velocities of several km kyr-1. This velocity can substantially reorganize magnetic fields in magnetar cores, in a way which can only be confirmed by dynamical simulations.

  4. Gravitational instability of filamentary molecular clouds, including ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinirad, Mohammad; Naficy, Kazem; Abbassi, Shahram; Roshan, Mahmood

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational instability of a filamentary molecular cloud in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics is investigated. The filament is assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium. We add the effect of ambipolar diffusion to the filament which is threaded by an initial uniform axial magnetic field along its axis. We write down the fluid equations in cylindrical coordinates and perform linear perturbation analysis. We integrate the resultant differential equations and then derive the numerical dispersion relation. We find that a more efficient ambipolar diffusion leads to an enhancement of the growth of the most unstable mode, and to the increase of the fragmentation scale of the filament.

  5. On the relationship between meteor height and ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligan, D. P.; Thomas, G. E.; Baggaley, W. J.

    2004-07-01

    A large data set provided by the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR) is used to obtain discrete measurements of ambipolar diffusion (Da) in the upper atmosphere (70-120km). AMOR has a number of advantages over previous systems. These include a tristatic setup which allows up to three diffusion measurements from a single meteor record, independent height and elevation measurements, and a large fairly continuous data set spanning a number of years. In the period 1995-1999~3×105 individual meteor echoes were found to satisfy rigorous criteria for ambipolar diffusion measurement. A summary is provided of the diffusion measurement method (including the necessary data filtration process) that has been applied. At a given height meteors with a wide range of Da values are observed. The trend of increasing ambipolar diffusion coefficient (Da) with height (h) is explored and found to be best described by h=4.43logDa+87.9km. The influence of the Earth's geomagnetic field on the diffusion rate is also explored. This is found to be too small to be detected, even though current theory predicts a large change in Da with echo elevation angle: anomalous cross-field diffusion is suggested as the reason for this.

  6. Ambipolar diffusion drifts and dynamos in turbulent gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1988-01-01

    Ambipolar drift in turbulent fluids are considered. Using mean-field electrodynamics, a two-scale theory originally used to study hydromagnetic dynamos, it is shown that magnetic fields can be advected by small-scale magnetosonic (compressional) turbulence or generated by Alfvenic (helical) turbulence. A simple dynamo theory is made and is compared with standard theories in which dissipation is caused by turbulent diffusion. The redistribution of magnetic flux in interstellar clouds is also discussed.

  7. Formation of magnetized prestellar cores with ambipolar diffusion and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-10

    We investigate the roles of magnetic fields and ambipolar diffusion during prestellar core formation in turbulent giant molecular clouds, using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Our simulations focus on the shocked layer produced by a converging large-scale flow and survey varying ionization and the angle between the upstream flow and magnetic field. We also include ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic models. From our simulations, we identify hundreds of self-gravitating cores that form within 1 Myr, with masses M ∼ 0.04-2.5 M {sub ☉} and sizes L ∼ 0.015-0.07 pc, consistent with observations of the peak of the core mass function. Median values are M = 0.47 M {sub ☉} and L = 0.03 pc. Core masses and sizes do not depend on either the ionization or upstream magnetic field direction. In contrast, the mass-to-flux ratio does increase with lower ionization, from twice to four times the critical value. The higher mass-to-flux ratio for low ionization is the result of enhanced transient ambipolar diffusion when the shocked layer first forms. However, ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. For ideal MHD, we find similar masses to other cases. These masses are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the value M {sub mag,} {sub sph} = 0.007B {sup 3}/(G {sup 3/2}ρ{sup 2}) that defines a magnetically supercritical sphere under post-shock ambient conditions. This discrepancy is the result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which is clearly evident in both ideal MHD and diffusive simulations. We interpret our numerical findings using a simple scaling argument that suggests that gravitationally critical core masses will depend on the sound speed and mean turbulent pressure in a cloud, regardless of magnetic effects.

  8. Ambipolar Diffusion Effects on Weakly Ionized Turbulence Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-04-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is a key process in molecular clouds (MCs). Non-ideal MHD turbulence simulations are technically very challenging because of the large Alfvén speed of ions in weakly ionized clouds. Using the Heavy-Ion Approximation method (Li, McKee & Klein 2006), we have carried out two-fluid simulations of AD in isothermal, turbulent boxes at a resolution of 5123, to investigate the effect of AD on the weakly ionized turbulence in MCs. Our simulation results show that the neutral gas component of the two-fluid system gradually transforms from an ideal MHD turbulence system to near a pure hydrodynamic turbulence system within the standard AD regime, in which the neutrals and ions are coupled over a flow time. The change of the turbulent state has a profound effect on the weakly ionized MCs.

  9. Electron Sheaths and Non-ambipolar Diffusion in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-10-01

    Electron sheaths were first predicted by Langmuir in 1929 when he stated that, ``with a large area, A, an anode sheath is a positive ion sheath, but that as A decreases, a point is reached where the positive ion sheath disappears and it is replaced by an electron sheath.''. We show that electron sheath formation near a positive anode depends on the anode area, Aa, as well as the area available for ion loss, Ai. When Aa/Ai< (me/mi)^1/2, the electron sheath potential monotonically decreases from the anode to the bulk plasma. When the anode is larger than this, a potential dip forms in the electron sheath to reduce the electron current lost to the anode. This potential dip is necessary to preserve global current balance and when it is present, total non-ambipolar diffusion can occur where all electrons are lost from the plasma through an electron sheath and all positive ions are lost elsewhere. Additional measurements were carried out to identify the transition from positive (ion) to negative (electron) sheaths. Data were taken in low-pressure argon plasma generated by hot filaments and confined in a multidipole chamber. I. Langmuir, Physical Review. 33, 954 (1929).

  10. Ambipolar diffusion regulated collapse of filaments threaded by perpendicular magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, C. A.; Van Loo, S.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), the fractional ionisation is low enough that the neutral and charged particles are weakly coupled. A consequence of this is that the magnetic flux redistributes within the cloud, allowing an initially magnetically supported region to collapse. Aims: We aim to elucidate the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the evolution of infinitely long filaments and the effect of decaying turbulence on that evolution. Methods: First, in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), a two-dimensional cylinder of an isothermal magnetised plasma with initially uniform density was allowed to evolve to an equilibrium state. Then, the response of the filament to ambipolar diffusion was followed using an adaptive mesh refinement multifluid MHD code. Various ambipolar resistivities were chosen to reflect different ratios of Jeans length to ambipolar diffusion length scale. To study the effect of turbulence on the ambipolar diffusion rate, we perturbed the equilibrium filament with a turbulent velocity field quantified by a rms sonic Mach number, Mrms, of 10, 3 or 1. Results: We numerically reproduce the density profiles for filaments that are in magnetohydrostatic and pressure equilibrium with their surroundings obtained in a published model and show that these equilibria are dynamically stable. If the effect of ambipolar diffusion is considered, these filaments lose magnetic support initiating cloud collapse. The filaments do not lose magnetic flux. Rather the magnetic flux is redistributed within the filament from the dense centre towards the diffuse envelope. The rate of the collapse is inversely proportional to the fractional ionisation and two gravitationally-driven ambipolar diffusion regimes for the collapse are observed as predicted in a published model. For high values of the ionisation coefficient, that is X ≥ 10-7, the gas is strongly coupled to the magnetic field and the Jeans length is larger than the ambipolar diffusion length scale. Then

  11. Ambipolarity and transport with resonant ion diffusion in EBT

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hastings, D.E.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1983-10-01

    Using recently derived analytic expressions for resonant and nonresonant neoclassical transport coefficients in EBT, we calculate the ambipolar potential required to maintain quasi-charge neutrality in the presence of a high-energy ion tail produced by nonclassical heating. The electric field obeys a differential rather than an algebraic equation. Solution of this equation gives a potential proportional to the local magnetic field strength and thus a rigid rotation of low-energy ions near the magnetic axis. Radial-transport calculations using this potential give improved agreement with experimental data for neutral density and particle lifetime. However, high-energy ion orbits in the calculated potential exhibit banana widths larger than assumed in the resonant transport theory. The required density of high-energy ions is therefore larger than would be expected if realistic banana widths could be included.

  12. Ambipolar spin diffusion in p-type GaAs: A case where spin diffuses more than charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadiz, F.; Notot, V.; Filipovic, J.; Paget, D.; Weber, C. P.; Martinelli, L.; Rowe, A. C. H.; Arscott, S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the diffusion of charge and spin at 15 K in p-type GaAs, combining transient-grating and energy-resolved microluminescence measurements to cover a broad range of photoelectron density. At very low optical power, in a unipolar nondegenerate regime, charge and spin diffuse at the same rate, implying that the spin-drag effects are negligible. Upon increasing the photoelectron concentration up to about 1016 cm-3, the charge diffusion constant decreases because of ambipolar electrostatic interactions with the slower-diffusing holes while the spin diffusion constant is reduced only weakly by the ambipolar interaction. A further increase in the excitation power causes increases in both the charge and spin diffusion constants as a consequence of the Pauli principle since the photoelectron gas becomes degenerate.

  13. Ambipolar and non-ambipolar diffusion in an rf plasma source containing a magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-06-15

    By placing a magnetic filter across a rectangular plasma source (closed at one end with a ceramic plate and an rf antenna, and terminated at the opposite end by a grounded grid), we experimentally investigate the effect of conducting and insulating source walls on the nature of the plasma diffusion phenomena. The use of a magnetic filter creates a unique plasma, characterized by a high upstream electron temperature (T{sub e{sub u}}∼5 eV) near the rf antenna and a low downstream electron temperature (T{sub e{sub d}}∼1 eV) near the grid, which more clearly demonstrates the role of the source wall materials. For conducting walls a net ion current to ground is measured on the grid, and the plasma potential is determined by a mean electron temperature within the source. For insulating walls the plasma potential is determined by the downstream electron temperature (i.e., V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub d}} in argon), and the net current to the grid is exactly zero. Furthermore, by inserting a small additional upstream conductor (that can be made floating or grounded through an external circuit switch), we demonstrate that the plasma potential can be controlled and set to a low (V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub d}}), or high (V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub u}}) value.

  14. OBSERVATIONAL DETERMINATION OF THE TURBULENT AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION SCALE AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hezareh, Talayeh; Houde, Martin; McCoey, Carolyn; Li Huabai

    2010-09-01

    We study the correlation of the velocity dispersion of the coexisting molecules H{sup 13}CN and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} and the turbulent energy dissipation scale in the DR21(OH) star-forming region. The downshift of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} spectrum relative to H{sup 13}CN is consistent with the presence of ambipolar diffusion at dissipation length scales that helps the process of turbulent energy dissipation, but at a different cutoff for ions compared with the neutrals. We use our observational data to calculate a turbulent ambipolar diffusion length scale L' {approx_equal} 17 mpc and a strength of B{sub pos} {approx_equal} 1.7 mG for the plane of the sky component of the magnetic field in DR21(OH).

  15. Effect of Ambipolar Diffusion on Ion Abundances in Contracting Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolek, Glenn E.; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1998-09-01

    Numerical simulations and analytical solutions have established that ambipolar diffusion can reduce the dust-to-gas ratio in magnetically and thermally supercritical cores during the epoch of core formation. We study the effect that this has on the ion chemistry in contracting protostellar cores and present a simplified analytical method that allows one to calculate the ion power-law exponent k (≡d ln ni/d ln nn, where ni and nn are the ion and neutral densities, respectively) as a function of core density. We find that, as in earlier numerical simulations, no single value of k can adequately describe the ion abundance for nn <~ 109 cm-3, a result that is contrary to the ``canonical'' value of k = 1/2 found in previous static equilibrium chemistry calculations and often used to study the effect of ambipolar diffusion in interstellar clouds. For typical cloud and grain parameters, reduction of the abundance of grains results in k > 1/2 during the core formation epoch (densities <~105 cm-3). As a consequence, observations of the degree of ionization in cores could be used, in principle, to determine whether ambipolar diffusion is responsible for core formation in interstellar molecular clouds. For densities >>105 cm-3, k is generally <<1/2.

  16. Particle-in-cell simulations of ambipolar and nonambipolar diffusion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Boswell, R. W.

    2012-05-15

    Using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we investigate cross-field diffusion in low-pressure magnetized plasmas both in the presence and absence of conducting axial boundaries. With no axial boundary, the cross-field diffusion is observed to be ambipolar, as expected. However, when axial boundaries are added, the diffusion becomes distinctly nonambipolar. Electrons are prevented from escaping to the transverse walls and are preferentially removed from the discharge along the magnetic field lines, thus allowing quasi-neutrality to be maintained via a short-circuit effect at the axial boundaries.

  17. Magnetic field evolution and equilibrium configurations in neutron star cores: the effect of ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    As another step towards understanding the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in neutron stars, we provide the first simulations of ambipolar diffusion in a spherical star. Restricting ourselves to axial symmetry, we consider a charged-particle fluid of protons and electrons carrying the magnetic flux through a motionless, uniform background of neutrons that exerts a collisional drag force on the former. We also ignore the possible impact of β decays, proton superconductivity and neutron superfluidity. All initial magnetic field configurations considered are found to evolve on the analytically expected time-scales towards 'barotropic equilibria' satisfying the 'Grad-Shafranov equation', in which the magnetic force is balanced by the degeneracy pressure gradient, so ambipolar diffusion is choked. These equilibria are so-called 'twisted torus' configurations, which include poloidal and toroidal components, the latter restricted to the toroidal volumes in which the poloidal field lines close inside the star. In axial symmetry, they appear to be stable, although they are likely to undergo non-axially symmetric instabilities.

  18. Ambipolar diffusion in low-mass star formation. I. General comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Vaytet, N.; Commerçon, B.

    2016-03-01

    Angular momentum transport and the formation of rotationally supported structures are major issues in our understanding of protostellar core formation. Whereas purely hydrodynamical simulations lead to large Keplerian disks, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models yield the opposite result, with essentially no disk formation. This stems from the flux-freezing condition in ideal MHD, which leads to strong magnetic braking. In this paper, we provide a more accurate description of the evolution of the magnetic flux redistribution by including resistive terms in the MHD equations. We focus more particularly on the effect of ambipolar diffusion on the properties of the first Larson core and its surrounding structure, exploring various initial magnetisations and magnetic field versus rotation axis orientations of a 1 M⊙ collapsing prestellar dense core. We used the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics version of the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES to carry out these calculations. The resistivities required to calculate the ambipolar diffusion terms were computed using a reduced chemical network of charged, neutral, and grain species. Including ambipolar diffusion leads to the formation of a magnetic diffusion barrier (also known as the decoupling stage) in the vicinity of the core, which prevents accumulation of magnetic flux in and around the core and amplification of the field above 0.1 G. The mass and radius of the first Larson core, however, remain similar between ideal and non-ideal MHD models. This diffusion plateau, preventing further amplification of the field and reorganising the field topology, has crucial consequences for magnetic braking processes, allowing the formation of disk structures. Magnetically supported outflows launched in ideal MHD models are weakened or even disappear when using non-ideal MHD. In contrast to ideal MHD calculations, misalignment between the initial rotation axis and the magnetic field direction does not significantly affect the

  19. The Diffusion of Charged Particles in Collisional Plasmas: Free and Ambipolar Diffusion at Low and Moderate Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, A. V.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of measurements of the properties of weakly ionized plasmas in terms of diffusion of electrons and ions is reviewed both critically and tutorially. A particular effort is made to tie together various aspects of charged particle diffusion phenomena in quiescent, partially ionized plasmas. The concepts of diffusion length and effective diffusion coefficient and the treatment of partially reflecting boundaries are developed in the limit of the space-charge-free motion of the electrons or ions. A simplified derivation of the screening length for space charge electric fields is followed by a review of the conventional derivation of diffusion in the ambipolar limit. A discussion of the scaling parameters of the ratio of the diffusion length to the screening length and the ratio of the diffusion length to the ion mean-free-path leads to a map used to correlate published models covering the complete range of these parameters. The models of measurements of the diffusion of electrons, several types of positive ions, and negative ions are reviewed. The role of diffusion in the decay of charged particle densities and wall currents during the afterglow of a discharge is then considered. The effects of collapse of the space charge field and of diffusion cooling are reviewed. Finally, the application of the diffusion models to a number of different discharges is discussed. PMID:28179784

  20. Thanatology in protoplanetary discs. The combined influence of Ohmic, Hall, and ambipolar diffusion on dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Fromang, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Protoplanetary discs are poorly ionised due to their low temperatures and high column densities and are therefore subject to three "non-ideal" magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects: Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. The existence of magnetically driven turbulence in these discs has been a central question since the discovery of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Early models considered Ohmic diffusion only and led to a scenario of layered accretion, in which a magnetically "dead" zone in the disc midplane is embedded within magnetically "active" surface layers at distances of about 1-10 au from the central protostellar object. Recent work has suggested that a combination of Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion can render both the midplane and surface layers of the disc inactive and that torques due to magnetically driven outflows are required to explain the observed accretion rates. We reassess this picture by performing three-dimensional numerical simulations that include all three non-ideal MHD effects for the first time. We find that the Hall effect can generically "revive" dead zones by producing a dominant azimuthal magnetic field and a large-scale Maxwell stress throughout the midplane, provided that the angular velocity and magnetic field satisfy Ω·B > 0. The attendant large magnetic pressure modifies the vertical density profile and substantially increases the disc scale height beyond its hydrostatic value. Outflows are produced but are not necessary to explain accretion rates ≲ 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The flow in the disc midplane is essentially laminar, suggesting that dust sedimentation may be efficient. These results demonstrate that if the MRI is relevant for driving mass accretion in protoplanetary discs, one must include the Hall effect to obtain even qualitatively correct results. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. INCORPORATING AMBIPOLAR AND OHMIC DIFFUSION IN THE AMR MHD CODE RAMSES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, J.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Chabrier, G.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have implemented non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, namely, ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation, as additional source terms in the ideal MHD equations. We describe in details how we have discretized these terms using the adaptive Cartesian mesh, and how the time step is diminished with respect to the ideal case, in order to perform a stable time integration. We have performed a large suite of test runs, featuring the Barenblatt diffusion test, the Ohmic diffusion test, the C-shock test, and the Alfven wave test. For the latter, we have performed a careful truncation error analysis to estimate the magnitude of the numerical diffusion induced by our Godunov scheme, allowing us to estimate the spatial resolution that is required to address non-ideal MHD effects reliably. We show that our scheme is second-order accurate, and is therefore ideally suited to study non-ideal MHD effects in the context of star formation and molecular cloud dynamics.

  2. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  3. Energy balance in the solar transition region. I - Hydrostatic thermal models with ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1990-01-01

    The energy balance in the lower transition region is analyzed by constructing theoretical models which satisfy the energy balance constraint. The energy balance is achieved by balancing the radiative losses and the energy flowing downward from the corona. This energy flow is mainly in two forms: conductive heat flow and hydrogen ionization energy flow due to ambipolar diffusion. Hydrostatic equilibrium is assumed, and, in a first calculation, local mechanical heating and Joule heating are ignored. In a second model, some mechanical heating compatible with chromospheric energy-balance calculations is introduced. The models are computed for a partial non-LTE approach in which radiation departs strongly from LTE but particles depart from Maxwellian distributions only to first order. The results, which apply to cases where the magnetic field is either absent, or uniform and vertical, are compared with the observed Lyman lines and continuum from the average quiet sun. The approximate agreement suggests that this type of model can roughly explain the observed intensities in a physically meaningful way, assuming only a few free parameters specified as chromospheric boundary conditions.

  4. Modeling of silicon in femtosecond laser-induced modification regimes: accounting for ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2017-05-01

    During the last decades, femtosecond laser irradiation of materials has led to the emergence of various applications based on functionalization of surfaces at the nano- and microscale. Via inducing a periodic modification on material surfaces (band gap modification, nanostructure formation, crystallization or amorphization), optical and mechanical properties can be tailored, thus turning femtosecond laser to a key technology for development of nanophotonics, bionanoengineering, and nanomechanics. Although modification of semiconductor surfaces with femtosecond laser pulses has been studied for more than two decades, the dynamics of coupling of intense laser light with excited matter remains incompletely understood. In particular, swift formation of a transient overdense electron-hole plasma dynamically modifies optical properties in the material surface layer and induces large gradients of hot charge carriers, resulting in ultrafast charge-transport phenomena. In this work, the dynamics of ultrafast laser excitation of a semiconductor material is studied theoretically on the example of silicon. A special attention is paid to the electron-hole pair dynamics, taking into account ambipolar diffusion effects. The results are compared with previously developed simulation models, and a discussion of the role of charge-carrier dynamics in localization of material modification is provided.

  5. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  6. Global Simulations of Protoplanetary Disks With Ohmic Resistivity and Ambipolar Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Turner, Neal J.; Nelson, Richard P.; McNally, Colin P.

    2015-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are believed to accrete onto their central T Tauri star because of magnetic stresses. Recently published shearing box simulations indicate that Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion (AD) and the Hall effect all play important roles in disk evolution. In the presence of a vertical magnetic field, the disk remains laminar between 1-5 AU, and a magnetocentrifugal disk wind forms that provides an important mechanism for removing angular momentum. Questions remain, however, about the establishment of a true physical wind solution in the shearing box simulations because of the symmetries inherent in the local approximation. We present global MHD simulations of PPDs that include Ohmic resistivity and AD, where the time-dependent gas-phase electron and ion fractions are computed under FUV and X-ray ionization with a simplified recombination chemistry. Our results show that the disk remains laminar, and that a physical wind solution arises naturally in global disk models. The wind is sufficiently efficient to explain the observed accretion rates. Furthermore, the ionization fraction at intermediate disk heights is large enough for magneto-rotational channel modes to grow and subsequently develop into belts of horizontal field. Depending on the ionization fraction, these can remain quasi-global, or break-up into discrete islands of coherent field polarity. The disk models we present here show a dramatic departure from our earlier models including Ohmic resistivity only. It will be important to examine how the Hall effect modifies the evolution, and to explore the influence this has on the observational appearance of such systems, and on planet formation and migration.

  7. Bridging the gap: disk formation in the Class 0 phase with ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Basu, Shantanu; Kunz, Matthew W.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations have revealed catastrophic magnetic braking in the protostellar phase, which prevents the formation of a centrifugal disk around a nascent protostar. Aims: We determine if non-ideal MHD, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation determined from a detailed chemical network model, will allow for disk formation at the earliest stages of star formation. Methods: We employ the axisymmetric thin-disk approximation in order to resolve a dynamic range of 9 orders of magnitude in length and 16 orders of magnitude in density, while also calculating partial ionization using up to 19 species in a detailed chemical equilibrium model. Magnetic braking is applied to the rotation using a steady-state approximation, and a barotropic relation is used to capture the thermal evolution. Results: We resolve the formation of the first and second cores, with expansion waves at the periphery of each, a magnetic diffusion shock, and prestellar infall profiles at larger radii. Power-law profiles in each region can be understood analytically. After the formation of the second core, the centrifugal support rises rapidly and a low-mass disk of radius ≈ 10 R⊙ is formed at the earliest stage of star formation, when the second core has mass ~10-3 M⊙. The mass-to-flux ratio is ~104 times the critical value in the central region. Conclusions: A small centrifugal disk can form in the earliest stage of star formation, due to a shut-off of magnetic braking caused by magnetic field dissipation in the first core region. There is enough angular momentum loss to allow the second collapse to occur directly, and a low-mass stellar core to form with a surrounding disk. The disk mass and size will depend upon how the angular momentum transport mechanisms within the disk can keep up with mass infall onto the disk. Accounting only for direct infall, we estimate that the disk will remain ≲10 AU, undetectable even by ALMA, for

  8. SUB-ALFVENIC NON-IDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS WITH AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSERVATIONS AND TURBULENT ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2012-01-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is believed to be a crucial process for redistributing magnetic flux in the dense molecular gas that occurs in regions of star formation. We carry out numerical simulations of this process in regions of low ionization using the heavy-ion approximation. The simulations are for regions of strong field (plasma {beta} = 0.1) and mildly supersonic turbulence (M=3, corresponding to an Alfven Mach number of 0.67). The velocity power spectrum of the neutral gas changes from an Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum in the case of ideal MHD to a Burgers spectrum in the case of a shock-dominated hydrodynamic system. The magnetic power spectrum shows a similar behavior. We use a one-dimensional radiative transfer code to post-process our simulation results; the simulated emission from the CS J = 2-1 and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 1-0 lines shows that the effects of AD are observable in principle. Linewidths of ions are observed to be less than those of neutrals, and we confirm previous suggestions that this is due to AD. We show that AD is unlikely to affect the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method for inferring field strengths unless the AD is stronger than generally observed. Finally, we present a study of the enhancement of AD by turbulence, finding that AD is accelerated by factor 2-4.5 for non-self-gravitating systems with the level of turbulence we consider.

  9. A conservative multicomponent diffusion algorithm for ambipolar plasma flows in local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; van Boxtel, Jochem; Janssen, Jesper; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The usage of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation can be a very powerful assumption for simulations of plasmas in or close to equilibrium. In general, the elemental composition in LTE is not constant in space and effects of mixing and demixing have to be taken into account using the Stefan-Maxwell diffusion description. In this paper, we will introduce a method to discretize the resulting coupled set of elemental continuity equations. The coupling between the equations is taken into account by the introduction of the concept of a Péclet matrix. It will be shown analytically and numerically that the mass and charge conservation constraints can be fulfilled exactly. Furthermore, a case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method to a simulation of a mercury-free metal-halide lamp. The source code for the simulations presented in this paper is provided as supplementary material (stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/47/425202/mmedia).

  10. Multi-Ion Ambipolar Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    again. N, is reduced almost to the point of extinction , compared to N 2 . As a result, N 2 and N. are identical to within less than one part in 103...continuity equations become: 6-78 a r + N. ar DiNo (kTo + M~j kTj I rj a)Ne JA ar kTe + kTi E- IN r (6Z3) ar r We chse prameers hat orrepond rogltoa1/0mtuef

  11. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  12. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  13. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  14. Direct current-self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiying; Chen, Lee; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-16

    For decades, non-ambipolar diffusion has been observed and studied in laboratory plasmas that contain a double layer. However, self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma has yet to be demonstrated. This article reports the method and results for achieving such a condition at low pressure, with a wide power range (as low as 6 W). The findings reveal that to achieve self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma, both the balance between electron and ion heating and the space-potential gradient are critical. The plasma reactor developed in this work has potential applications that include microelectronic surface processing and space propulsion, via space-charge-neutral plasma-beam thruster, when operated in the high power regime.

  15. Ambipolar Barristors for Reconfigurable Logic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Guo; Zhou, Hailong; Li, Zheng; Cheng, Rui; Xu, Yang; Gambin, Vincent; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2017-03-08

    Vertical heterostructures based on graphene have emerged as a unique architecture for novel electronic devices with unusual characteristics. Here we report a new design of vertical ambipolar barristors based on metal-graphene-silicon-graphene sandwich structure, using the bottom graphene as a gate-tunable "active contact", the top graphene as an adaptable Ohmic contact, and the low doping thin silicon layer as the switchable channel. Importantly, with finite density of states and weak screening effect of graphene, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both the carrier concentration and majority carrier type in the sandwiched silicon can be readily modulated by gate potential penetrating through graphene. It can thus enable a new type of ambipolar barristors with an ON-OFF ratio exceeding 10(3). Significantly, these ambipolar barristors can be flexibly configured into either p-type or n-type transistors and used to create integrated circuits with reconfigurable logic functions. This unconventional device structure and ambipolar reconfigurable characteristics can open up exciting opportunities in future electronics based on graphene or two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures.

  16. Reconfigurable Complementary Logic Circuits with Ambipolar Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hocheon; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C P; Gelinck, Gerwin H; Lee, Han-Koo; Torricelli, Fabrizio; Kim, Jae-Joon

    2016-10-20

    Ambipolar organic electronics offer great potential for simple and low-cost fabrication of complementary logic circuits on large-area and mechanically flexible substrates. Ambipolar transistors are ideal candidates for the simple and low-cost development of complementary logic circuits since they can operate as n-type and p-type transistors. Nevertheless, the experimental demonstration of ambipolar organic complementary circuits is limited to inverters. The control of the transistor polarity is crucial for proper circuit operation. Novel gating techniques enable to control the transistor polarity but result in dramatically reduced performances. Here we show high-performance non-planar ambipolar organic transistors with electrical control of the polarity and orders of magnitude higher performances with respect to state-of-art split-gate ambipolar transistors. Electrically reconfigurable complementary logic gates based on ambipolar organic transistors are experimentally demonstrated, thus opening up new opportunities for ambipolar organic complementary electronics.

  17. Reconfigurable Complementary Logic Circuits with Ambipolar Organic Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hocheon; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C. P.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Lee, Han-Koo; Torricelli, Fabrizio; Kim, Jae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Ambipolar organic electronics offer great potential for simple and low-cost fabrication of complementary logic circuits on large-area and mechanically flexible substrates. Ambipolar transistors are ideal candidates for the simple and low-cost development of complementary logic circuits since they can operate as n-type and p-type transistors. Nevertheless, the experimental demonstration of ambipolar organic complementary circuits is limited to inverters. The control of the transistor polarity is crucial for proper circuit operation. Novel gating techniques enable to control the transistor polarity but result in dramatically reduced performances. Here we show high-performance non-planar ambipolar organic transistors with electrical control of the polarity and orders of magnitude higher performances with respect to state-of-art split-gate ambipolar transistors. Electrically reconfigurable complementary logic gates based on ambipolar organic transistors are experimentally demonstrated, thus opening up new opportunities for ambipolar organic complementary electronics. PMID:27762321

  18. Outlook and emerging semiconducting materials for ambipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Piliego, Claudia; Gao, Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2014-02-26

    Ambipolar or bipolar transistors are transistors in which both holes and electrons are mobile inside the conducting channel. This device allows switching among several states: the hole-dominated on-state, the off-state, and the electron-dominated on-state. In the past year, it has attracted great interest in exotic semiconductors, such as organic semiconductors, nanostructured materials, and carbon nanotubes. The ability to utilize both holes and electrons inside one device opens new possibilities for the development of more compact complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits, and new kinds of optoelectronic device, namely, ambipolar light-emitting transistors. This progress report highlights the recent progresses in the field of ambipolar transistors, both from the fundamental physics and application viewpoints. Attention is devoted to the challenges that should be faced for the realization of ambipolar transistors with different material systems, beginning with the understanding of the importance of interface modification, which heavily affects injections and trapping of both holes and electrons. The recent development of advanced gating applications, including ionic liquid gating, that open up more possibility to realize ambipolar transport in materials in which one type of charge carrier is highly dominant is highlighted. Between the possible applications of ambipolar field-effect transistors, we focus on ambipolar light-emitting transistors. We put this new device in the framework of its prospective for general lightings, embedded displays, current-driven laser, as well as for photonics-electronics interconnection.

  19. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  20. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform.

  1. Organic inverter circuits employing ambipolar pentacene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Th. B.; Senkarabacak, P.; Sariciftci, N. S.; Tanda, A.; Lackner, C.; Hagelauer, R.; Horowitz, Gilles

    2006-07-01

    Ambipolar transport has been observed in pentacene films grown on polyvinyl alcohol gate dielectric with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 and 0.04cm2/Vs, respectively. A simple device structure with Au as source-drain electrode can be used to operate a transistor in both p-channel and n-channel modes without employing low work function metal electrodes for ambipolar charge injection. Using ambipolar pentacene field-effect transistors, we construct a complementarylike inverter with voltage inversion gain of ˜10. These inverters are able to operate both in first and third quadrants of the voltage output to voltage input characteristics which is a unique feature of employing ambipolar transistors.

  2. Ambipolar solution-processed hybrid perovskite phototransistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ma, Chun; Wang, Hong; Hu, Weijin; Yu, Weili; Sheikh, Arif D.; Wu, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskites have attracted substantial attention because of their excellent physical properties, which enable them to serve as the active material in emerging hybrid solid-state solar cells. Here we investigate the phototransistors based on hybrid perovskite films and provide direct evidence for their superior carrier transport property with ambipolar characteristics. The field-effect mobilities for triiodide perovskites at room temperature are measured as 0.18 (0.17) cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes (electrons), which increase to 1.24 (1.01) cm2 V−1 s−1 for mixed-halide perovskites. The photoresponsivity of our hybrid perovskite devices reaches 320 A W−1, which is among the largest values reported for phototransistors. Importantly, the phototransistors exhibit an ultrafast photoresponse speed of less than 10 μs. The solution-based process and excellent device performance strongly underscore hybrid perovskites as promising material candidates for photoelectronic applications. PMID:26345730

  3. A new viewpoint on the ambipolar diffusion Schottky theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2013-04-15

    A modern modification of the Schottky theory is proposed. It enables overcoming some of the difficulties and contradictions of the old theory and extends its capabilities in the analysis of radial distributions of ionized species. This allows us to consider the distributions of positive column plasma in noble gas d.c. discharges within a proper universal framework. The radial distributions of plasma species are basically similar in their nature and are independent of the character and features of plasma reactions.

  4. Ambipolar Organic Tri-Gate Transistor for Low-Power Complementary Electronics.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Fabrizio; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C P; Roelofs, Christian W S; Janssen, René A J; Gelinck, Gerwin H; Kovács-Vajna, Zsolt M; Cantatore, Eugenio

    2016-01-13

    Ambipolar transistors typically suffer from large off-current inherently due to ambipolar conduction. Using a tri-gate transistor it is shown that it is possible to electrostatically switch ambipolar polymer transistors from ambipolar to unipolar mode. In unipolar mode, symmetric characteristics with an on/off current ratio of larger than 10(5) are obtained. This enables easy integration into low-power complementary logic and volatile electronic memories.

  5. Implementación numérica del efecto Hall, difusión ambipolar y difusión de Ohm en un código MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapp, L.; Benítez-Llambay, P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this work is to present an extension to the public magnetohydrodynamic code fargo3d via the implementation of a new physical module which includes the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms, known as Hall effect and Ohmic and ambipolar diffusions. We present a set of simulations which allows to study the damping of Alfven waves by ambipolar diffusion, the Alfven wave splitting by Hall effect, and the behaviour of the magnetorotational instability under the Hall effect and Ohmic resistivity. The results of these simulations validate our implementation.

  6. Ambipolar charge transport in microcrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Knipp, Dietmar; Marinkovic, M.; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Gordijn, Aad; Stiebig, Helmut

    2011-01-15

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) is a promising candidate for thin-film transistors (TFTs) in large-area electronics due to high electron and hole charge carrier mobilities. We report on ambipolar TFTs based on {mu}c-Si:H prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at temperatures compatible with flexible substrates. Electrons and holes are directly injected into the {mu}c-Si:H channel via chromium drain and source contacts. The TFTs exhibit electron and hole charge carrier mobilities of 30-50 cm{sup 2}/V s and 10-15 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. In this work, the electrical characteristics of the ambipolar {mu}c-Si:H TFTs are described by a simple analytical model that takes the ambipolar charge transport into account. The analytical expressions are used to model the transfer curves, the potential and the net surface charge along the channel of the TFTs. The electrical model provides insights into the electronic transport of ambipolar {mu}c-Si:H TFTs.

  7. Flexible black phosphorus ambipolar transistors, circuits and AM demodulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weinan; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Yang, Shixuan; Aldave, Sandra H; Kim, Joon-Seok; Sonde, Sushant; Tao, Li; Lu, Nanshu; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-11

    High-mobility two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are desirable for high-performance mechanically flexible nanoelectronics. In this work, we report the first flexible black phosphorus (BP) field-effect transistors (FETs) with electron and hole mobilities superior to what has been previously achieved with other more studied flexible layered semiconducting transistors such as MoS2 and WSe2. Encapsulated bottom-gated BP ambipolar FETs on flexible polyimide afforded maximum carrier mobility of about 310 cm(2)/V·s with field-effect current modulation exceeding 3 orders of magnitude. The device ambipolar functionality and high-mobility were employed to realize essential circuits of electronic systems for flexible technology including ambipolar digital inverter, frequency doubler, and analog amplifiers featuring voltage gain higher than other reported layered semiconductor flexible amplifiers. In addition, we demonstrate the first flexible BP amplitude-modulated (AM) demodulator, an active stage useful for radio receivers, based on a single ambipolar BP transistor, which results in audible signals when connected to a loudspeaker or earphone. Moreover, the BP transistors feature mechanical robustness up to 2% uniaxial tensile strain and up to 5000 bending cycles.

  8. Electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, D.; Yanagi, K.; Takenobu, T.; Okada, S.; Marumoto, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit various excellent properties, such as ballistic transport. However, their electrically induced charge carriers and the relation between their spin states and the ballistic transport have not yet been microscopically investigated because of experimental difficulties. Here we show an electron spin resonance (ESR) study of semiconducting single-walled CNT thin films to investigate their spin states and electrically induced charge carriers using transistor structures under device operation. The field-induced ESR technique is suitable for microscopic investigation because it can directly observe spins in the CNTs. We observed a clear correlation between the ESR decrease and the current increase under high charge density conditions, which directly demonstrated electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in the CNTs. The result provides a first clear evidence of antimagnetic interactions between spins of electrically induced charge carriers and vacancies in the CNTs. The ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute the improvement of transport properties of CNTs because of greatly reduced carrier scatterings. PMID:26148487

  9. Nonradiative decay mechanism of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile ambipolar derivatives.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Leandro A; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2011-03-24

    We report recent results on the nonradiative decay (NRD) of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile (FM) ambipolar derivatives (FMDs). 2,7- and 3,6-disubstituted FMDs present distinctive photophysics. Charge separation was found dominant for excited state relaxation. The radiative decay (RD) is sensitive to changes in temperature and solvent medium only for the case of 3,6-FMDs. Excited state deactivation of carbazole-containing 3,6-FMD (CPAFM36) was exclusively nonradiative in polar solvents with excited state lifetimes shorter than 10 ps. The charge separation/recombination mechanism of the corresponding FMDs is suggested to fall in the inverted Marcus region of electron transfer. Given the electron-withdrawing properties of the FM unit, its ambipolar derivatives are suggested as potential candidates for air-stable organic thin-film transistors and molecular organic photovoltaics.

  10. Graphene Ambipolar Nanoelectronics for High Noise Rejection Amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Che-Hung; Chen, Qi; Liu, Chang-Hua; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2016-02-10

    In a modern wireless communication system, signal amplification is critical for overcoming losses during multiple data transformations/processes and long-distance transmission. Common mode and differential mode are two fundamental amplification mechanisms, and they utilize totally different circuit configurations. In this paper, we report a new type of dual-gate graphene ambipolar device with capability of operating under both common and differential modes to realize signal amplification. The signal goes through two stages of modulation where the phase of signal can be individually modulated to be either in-phase or out-of-phase at two stages by exploiting the ambipolarity of graphene. As a result, both common and differential mode amplifications can be achieved within one single device, which is not possible in the conventional circuit configuration. In addition, a common-mode rejection ratio as high as 80 dB can be achieved, making it possible for low noise circuit application. These results open up new directions of graphene-based ambipolar electronics that greatly simplify the RF circuit complexity and the design of multifunction device operation.

  11. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors on unconventional substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosseddu, P.; Mattana, G.; Orgiu, E.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we report on the realization of flexible all-organic ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) realized on unconventional substrates, such as plastic films and textile yarns. A double layer pentacene-C60 heterojunction was used as the semiconductor layer. The contacts were made with poly(ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and patterned by means of soft lithography microcontact printing (μCP). Very interestingly growing C60 on a predeposited pentacene buffer layer leads to a clear improvement in the morphology and crystallinity of the film so it obtains n-type conduction despite the very high electron injection barrier at the interface between PEDOT:PSS and C60. As a result, it was possible to obtain all-organic ambipolar FETs and to optimize their electrical properties by tuning the thicknesses of the two employed active layers. Moreover, it will be shown that modifying the triple interface between dielectric/semiconductor/electrodes is a crucial point for optimizing and balancing injection and transport of both kinds of charge carriers. In particular, we demonstrate that using a middle contact configuration in which source and drain electrodes are sandwiched between pentacene and C60 layers allows significantly improving the electrical performance in planar ambipolar devices. These findings are very important because they pave the way for the realization of low-cost, fully flexible and stretchable organic complementary circuits for smart wearable and textile electronics applications.

  12. Electron physics and ambipolarity in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Catto, P.J.

    1994-04-01

    Models of the electron behavior in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of diverted and limited boundary conditions that occurs tokamak plasmas must retain the abrupt change in boundary conditions that occurs across the separatrix or last closed flux surface as well as the electron reflecting Debye sheath established at the limiter or divertor plates. The balance between ion radial diffusion and streaming to the plates sets the SOL width and the electrons must adjust the Debye sheath at the plates to main tain quasineutrality and ambipolarity in the SOL beyond the last closed flux surface. We consider the long mean-free-path limit where a bounce-averaged kinetic electron model results in a steady-state balance in the SOL between radial diffusive feed from the core and velocity space diffusive loss to the plates due to collisional detrapping. In this double diffusion model a velocity space boundary layer occurs about the trapped-passing boundary where strong velocity space gradients must balance the streaming of the newly de-trapped electrons to the plates. The behavior of the electron distribution function in the velocity provides the information needed to evaluate the Debye-sheath-dependent electron loss rate.

  13. High performance n-type and ambipolar small organic semiconductors for organic thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke; Dong, Huanli; Zhang, Hao-li; Hu, Wenping

    2014-11-07

    Remarkable progress has recently been achieved in n-type and ambipolar OFETs. In this mini review, we will highlight the representative development of high performance n-type and ambipolar organic semiconductors (OSCs) especially for those n-type small OSCs with thin film mobilities >1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and ambipolar small OSCs with both hole and electron mobilities of over 0.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This overview shall provide a meaningful guideline for further development of high performance n-type and ambipolar materials and devices.

  14. Ambipolar ion acceleration in an expanding magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Benjamin W.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Carter, Mark D.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.; Díaz, Franklin R. Chang; Glover, Tim W.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ilin, Andrew V.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Olsen, Chris S.; Squire, Jared P.

    2011-02-01

    The helicon plasma stage in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) VX-200i device was used to characterize an axial plasma potential profile within an expanding magnetic nozzle region of the laboratory based device. The ion acceleration mechanism is identified as an ambipolar electric field produced by an electron pressure gradient, resulting in a local axial ion speed of Mach 4 downstream of the magnetic nozzle. A 20 eV argon ion kinetic energy was measured in the helicon source, which had a peak magnetic field strength of 0.17 T. The helicon plasma source was operated with 25 mg s-1 argon propellant and 30 kW of RF power. The maximum measured values of plasma density and electron temperature within the exhaust plume were 1 × 1020 m-3 and 9 eV, respectively. The measured plasma density is nearly an order of magnitude larger than previously reported steady-state helicon plasma sources. The exhaust plume also exhibits a 95% to 100% ionization fraction. The size scale and spatial location of the plasma potential structure in the expanding magnetic nozzle region appear to follow the size scale and spatial location of the expanding magnetic field. The thickness of the potential structure was found to be 104 to 105 λDe depending on the local electron temperature in the magnetic nozzle, many orders of magnitude larger than typical laboratory double layer structures. The background plasma density and neutral argon pressure were 1015 m-3 and 2 × 10-5 Torr, respectively, in a 150 m3 vacuum chamber during operation of the helicon plasma source. The agreement between the measured plasma potential and plasma potential that was calculated from an ambipolar ion acceleration analysis over the bulk of the axial distance where the potential drop was located is a strong confirmation of the ambipolar acceleration process.

  15. Improving Ambipolar Charge Injection in Polymer FETs with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Efficient charge injection is a key issue for organic field-effect transistors (FET). Various methods can be used to optimize injection of either holes or electrons, for example, by modifying the workfunction of metallic electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. For ambipolar FETs this is much more difficult because injection of both charge carriers has to be improved at the same time. Here we demonstrate a simple process to significantly improve ambipolar charge injection in bottom contact/top gate polymer field-effect transistors by adding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) to the semiconducting polymer at concentrations well below the percolation limit. Such polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid systems are easily produced by ultrasonication and dispersion of SWNT in a conjugated polymer solution. Even at very low nanotube concentrations the charge injection of both holes and electrons, for example, into poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is significantly enhanced leading to lower contact resistances and threshold voltages than in FETs with pristine polymer films. This method can be extended to other semiconductors like n-type naphthalene-bis(dicarboximide)-based polymers (e.g. P(NDI2OD-T2)) for which hole injection was greatly enhanced. The proposed mechanism for this effect of carbon nanotubes on injection is independent of the polarity of the charge carriers. It can be maximized by patterning layers of pure carbon nanotubes onto the injecting electrodes before spincoating the pristine polymers leading to almost ohmic contacts for polymers, which usually show only strongly Schottky-barrier-limited injection. This improved injection of holes and electrons allows for a wider range of accessible polymers for ambipolar and thus also light-emitting transistors.

  16. A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene)-based field-effect transistor (FET) sensitively detects xylene isomers at low ppm levels with multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, can discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from one another.

  17. Fabrication and characterisation of gallium arsenide ambipolar quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. C. H. Klochan, O.; Micolich, A. P.; Hamilton, A. R.; Das Gupta, K.; Sfigakis, F.; Ritchie, D. A.; Trunov, K.; Wieck, A. D.; Reuter, D.

    2015-05-04

    We show that ballistic one-dimensional channels can be formed in an ambipolar device fabricated on a high mobility Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs heterostructure. Both electron and hole quantised conductances can be measured in the same one-dimensional channel. We have used this device to compare directly the subband spacings of the two charge carriers in the same confining potential and used this to compare the electron and hole effective masses.

  18. Ambipolarity in a tokamak with magnetic field ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2016-08-15

    In view of the recognized importance of electrostatic fields regarding turbulent transport, the radial electric field in a tokamak with magnetic field ripple is reconsidered. Terms in the ambipolarity condition involving the radial derivative of the field are derived from an extended drift-kinetic equation, including effects of second order in the gyroradius. Such terms are of interest in part because of their known importance in rotational relaxation equations for the axisymmetric case. The electric field is found to satisfy a nonlinear differential equation that is universal in a certain sense, and that implies spatial relaxation of the potential to its conventionally predicted value.

  19. Stable All-Organic Radicals with Ambipolar Charge Transport.

    PubMed

    Reig, Marta; Gozálvez, Cristian; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Gaidelis, Valentas; Grazulevicius, Juozas V; Fajarí, Lluís; Juliá, Luis; Velasco, Dolores

    2016-12-19

    A series of neutral long-lived purely organic radicals based on the stable [4-(N-carbazolyl)-2,6-dichlorophenyl]bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl radical adduct (Cbz-TTM) is reported herein. All compounds exhibit ambipolar charge-transport properties under ambient conditions owing to their radical character. High electron and hole mobilities up to 10(-2) and 10(-3)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) , respectively, were achieved. Xerographic single-layered photoreceptors were fabricated from the radicals studied herein, exhibiting good xerographic photosensitivity across the visible spectrum.

  20. Light-sensing ambipolar organic transistors for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Wöbkenberg, Paul H.; Bradley, Donal D. C.

    2008-04-01

    Since their invention use of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) has been restricted to applications that explore their unifunctional, i.e. current switching, characteristics. Recently, however, OFETs with additional functionalities have been designed and demonstrated with most notable examples the light-emitting (LE-OFET) [1] and light-sensing (LS-OFET) [2] transistors. These devices are of particular significance since design and fabrication of a new type of organic circuits can now be envisioned. Here we report on electro-optical circuits based on ambipolar LS-OFETs and unipolar OFETs. By carefully tuning the ambipolar transport of LS-OFETs their photosensitivity can be controlled and optimised. By going a step further and integrating LS-OFETs with unipolar OFETs we are able to demonstrate various optoelectronic circuits including electro-optical switches and logic gates. A unique characteristic of these gates is that their input signal(s) can be designed to be either all-optical or electro-optical. An additional advantage of the technology is that LS-OFETs can be integrated with the driving electronics using the same number of processing steps, hence eliminating the need of additional fabrication costs. This is one of the first demonstrations of organic circuits where signal processing involves the use of both optical and electrical input signals. Such optoelectronic devices/circuits could one day be explored in various applications including electro-optical transceivers and optical sensor arrays.

  1. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jie Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jing; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  2. Correlation between morphology and ambipolar transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Th. B.; Günes, S.; Marjanović, N.; Sariciftci, N. S.; Menon, R.

    2005-06-01

    Attaining ambipolar charge transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) is highly desirable from both fundamental understanding and application points of view. We present the results of an approach to obtain ambipolar OFET with an active layer of organic semiconductor blends using semiconducting polymers in composite with fullerene derivatives. Clear features of forming the superposition of both hole and electron-enhanced channels for an applied gate field are observed. The present studies suggest a strong correlation of thin-film nanomorphology and ambipolar transport in field-effect devices.

  3. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistor using gate insulator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Eriko; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2005-04-01

    An organic field-effect transistor based on a copper-phthalocyanine and cyanoethylpullulan gate insulator showed ambipolar operation using gate insulator hysteresis, which appeared at less than 1mHz. The gate insulator possesses spontaneous polarization of 1.6μC/cm2 and a coercive electric field of 50kV/cm. After poling in an effort to obtain a large amount of accumulated charge, the field-effect mobilities of the hole and electron were 4.1×10-3 and 3.5×10-6cm2/Vs, respectively. The on/off ratio at VSG=±10V was 6×104 for the p type and 70 for the n type.

  4. Local Ambipolar Graphene Field Effect Transistors via Metal Side Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Jauregui, Luis; Lopez, Gabriel; Cao, Helin; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated local graphene field effect transistors (FET) based on metal side gates. The characteristic ambipolar field effect of graphene device was observed by sweeping only the voltage of a local metal side gate. The local charge neutrality point of the side-gate graphene FET can be tuned in a large voltage range from positive to negative by a second side gate. Furthermore, we observed that the field effect due to the side gate can be appreciably weakened by electrically grounding the back gate compared to floating the back gate. The experimental results can be well explained by electrostatic simulation using COMSOL. Our technique offers a simple method for local tuning of charge density of graphene nanodevices while avoiding coating graphene surface with dielectrics, which may cause contamination and degradation of graphene.

  5. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lore, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Deng, C. B.; Likin, K. M.; Spong, D. A.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.

    2010-05-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large "electron root" radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  6. The study of ambipolar behavior in phosphorene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Xing, Huaizhong; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2016-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated with the two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation. In this study, it is found that the Schottky barrier plays an important role in the ambipolar transfer characteristics of phosphorene-based FETs. It is demonstrated that when the barrier heights are equal between electron and hole doping, the ambipolar current output dominates across the whole bias range. In the meantime, the saturation leakage current output of the transfer characteristic is only determined by the number of phosphorene layers or the bandgap rather than the Schottky barrier height between phosphorene and metal contact. The ambipolar behaviors become more pronounced as the channel lengths of transistors are decreased, all the geometric and material parameters are taken into account to improve the ambipolar output and understanding its underlying mechanisms. The presented results open the path to design phosphorene-based logic device, photo detector with low dark current for both electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  7. Absence of carrier separation in ambipolar charge and spin drift in p{sup +}-GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Cadiz, F.; Paget, D.; Rowe, A. C. H.; Martinelli, L.; Arscott, S.

    2015-10-19

    The electric field-induced modifications of the spatial distribution of photoelectrons, photoholes, and electronic spins in optically pumped p{sup +} GaAs are investigated using a polarized luminescence imaging microscopy. At low pump intensity, application of an electric field reveals the tail of charge and spin density of drifting electrons. These tails disappear when the pump intensity is increased since a slight differential drift of photoelectrons and photoholes causes the buildup of a strong internal electric field. Spatial separation of photoholes and photoelectrons is very weak so that photoholes drift in the same direction as photoelectrons, thus exhibiting a negative effective mobility. In contrast, for a zero electric field, no significant ambipolar diffusive effects are found in the same sample.

  8. Single-charge transport in ambipolar silicon nanoscale field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Filipp; Konstantaras, Georgios; Wiel, Wilfred G. van der; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2015-04-27

    We report single-charge transport in ambipolar nanoscale MOSFETs, electrostatically defined in near-intrinsic silicon. We use the ambipolarity to demonstrate the confinement of either a few electrons or a few holes in exactly the same crystalline environment underneath a gate electrode. We find similar electron and hole quantum dot properties while the mobilities differ quantitatively like in microscale devices. The understanding and control of individual electrons and holes are essential for spin-based quantum information processing.

  9. Ambipolar MoS2 thin flake transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijin; Ye, Jianting; Matsuhashi, Yusuke; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2012-03-14

    Field effect transistors (FETs) made of thin flake single crystals isolated from layered materials have attracted growing interest since the success of graphene. Here, we report the fabrication of an electric double layer transistor (EDLT, a FET gated by ionic liquids) using a thin flake of MoS(2), a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides, an archetypal layered material. The EDLT of the thin flake MoS(2) unambiguously displayed ambipolar operation, in contrast to its commonly known bulk property as an n-type semiconductor. High-performance transistor operation characterized by a large "ON" state conductivity in the order of ~mS and a high on/off ratio >10(2) was realized for both hole and electron transport. Hall effect measurements revealed mobility of 44 and 86 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron and hole, respectively. The hole mobility is twice the value of the electron mobility, and the density of accumulated carrier reached 1 × 10(14) cm(-2), which is 1 order of magnitude larger than conventional FETs with solid dielectrics. The high-density carriers of both holes and electrons can create metallic transport in the MoS(2) channel. The present result is not only important for device applications with new functionalities, but the method itself would also act as a protocol to study this class of material for a broader scope of possibilities in accessing their unexplored properties.

  10. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2015-01-21

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV.

  11. Enhancement of ambipolar characteristics in single-walled carbon nanotubes using C{sub 60} and fabrication of logic gates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Steve; Nam, Ji Hyun; Koo, Ja Hoon; Lei, Ting; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate a technique to convert p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network transistor into ambipolar transistor by thermally evaporating C{sub 60} on top. The addition of C{sub 60} was observed to have two effects in enhancing ambipolar characteristics. First, C{sub 60} served as an encapsulating layer that enhanced the ambipolar characteristics of SWNTs. Second, C{sub 60} itself served as an electron transporting layer that contributed to the n-type conduction. Such a dual effect enables effective conversion of p-type into ambipolar characteristics. We have fabricated inverters using our SWNT/C{sub 60} ambipolar transistors with gain as high as 24, along with adaptive NAND and NOR logic gates.

  12. Adaptive logic circuits with doping-free ambipolar carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Woo Jong; Kim, Un Jeong; Kang, Bo Ram; Lee, Il Ha; Lee, Eun-Hong; Lee, Young Hee

    2009-04-01

    A CMOS-like inverter was integrated by using ambipolar carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors without doping. The ambipolar CNT transistors automatically configure themselves to play a role as an n-type or p-type transistor in a logic circuit depending on the supply voltage (V(DD)) and ground. A NOR (NAND) gate is adaptively converted to a NAND (NOR) gate. This adaptiveness of logic gates exhibiting two logic gate functions in a single logic circuit offers a new opportunity for designing logic circuits with high integration density for next generation applications.

  13. An efficient strategy for designing ambipolar organic semiconductor material: Introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Dan

    2017-09-01

    The charge transport properties of phosphapentacene (P-PEN) derivatives were systematically explored by theoretical calculation. The dehydrogenated P-PENs have reasonable frontier molecular orbital energy levels to facilitate both electron and hole injection. The reduced reorganization energies of dehydrogenated P-PENs could be intimately connected to the bonding nature of phosphorus atoms. From the idea of homology modeling, the crystal structure of TIPSE-4P-2p is constructed and fully optimized. Fascinatingly, TIPSE-4P-2p shows the intrinsic property of ambipolar transport in both hopping and band models. Thus, introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core could be an efficient strategy for designing ambipolar material.

  14. Ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinhua; Wang, Wei Ying, Jun; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-01-06

    An ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory was demonstrated, with discrete distributed gold nanoparticles, tetratetracontane (TTC), pentacene as the floating-gate layer, tunneling layer, and active layer, respectively. The electron traps at the TTC/pentacene interface were significantly suppressed, which resulted in an ambipolar operation in present memory. As both electrons and holes were supplied in the channel and trapped in the floating-gate by programming/erasing operations, respectively, i.e., one type of charge carriers was used to overwrite the other, trapped, one, a large memory window, extending on both sides of the initial threshold voltage, was realized.

  15. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics. PMID:23900459

  16. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics.

  17. Dithienocoronenediimide-based copolymers as novel ambipolar semiconductors for organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Usta, Hakan; Newman, Christopher; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2012-07-17

    A new class of ambipolar donor-acceptor π-conjugated polymers based on a dithienocoronenediimide core is presented. Solution-processed top-gate/bottom-contact thin film transistors (TFTs) exhibit electron and hole mobilities of up to 0.30 cm(2)/V·s and 0.04 cm(2)/V·s, respectively, which are the highest reported to date for an ambipolar polymer in ambient conditions. The polymers presented here are the first examples of coronenediimide-based semiconductors showing high organic TFT performances. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Boosting the ambipolar performance of solution-processable polymer semiconductors via hybrid side-chain engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Han, A-Reum; Yu, Hojeong; Shin, Tae Joo; Yang, Changduk; Oh, Joon Hak

    2013-06-26

    Ambipolar polymer semiconductors are highly suited for use in flexible, printable, and large-area electronics as they exhibit both n-type (electron-transporting) and p-type (hole-transporting) operations within a single layer. This allows for cost-effective fabrication of complementary circuits with high noise immunity and operational stability. Currently, the performance of ambipolar polymer semiconductors lags behind that of their unipolar counterparts. Here, we report on the side-chain engineering of conjugated, alternating electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers using diketopyrrolopyrrole-selenophene copolymers with hybrid siloxane-solubilizing groups (PTDPPSe-Si) to enhance ambipolar performance. The alkyl spacer length of the hybrid side chains was systematically tuned to boost ambipolar performance. The optimized three-dimensional (3-D) charge transport of PTDPPSe-Si with pentyl spacers yielded unprecedentedly high hole and electron mobilities of 8.84 and 4.34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. These results provide guidelines for the molecular design of semiconducting polymers with hybrid side chains.

  19. Carrier trapping anisotropy in ambipolar SnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Liang, Lingyan; Cao, Hongtao

    2017-03-01

    The anisotropic carrier trapping behaviors was demonstrated for ambipolar tin monoxide (SnO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). On one hand, the TFTs exhibited good stability with almost no changes in transfer characteristics under negative gate-bias stress (NGBS). On the other, under positive gate-bias stress (PGBS), the transfer curves presented parallel and positive shift with no degradation in field-effect mobility and subthreshold voltage swing. The stress-time evolution of the turn-on voltage shift, induced by different positive stress voltages and temperatures, could be described by the stretched exponential model. The relaxation time was extracted to be 1.6 × 104 s at room temperature with activation energy of 0.43 eV, indicating that the ambipolar SnO TFTs under PGBS approach the stability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide based TFTs.

  20. Ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors by using catalytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H.-K.; Jin, J. E.; Shin, J. M.; Kim, D.-H.; Kim, G.-T.

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of electrical properties in MoS2 flakes is an attractive issue from the point of view of device applications. In this work, we demonstrate that an ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) can be easily obtained by heating MoS2 flakes under air atmosphere in the presence of cobalt oxide catalyst (MoS2 + O2 → MoOx + SOx). The catalytic oxidation of MoS2 flakes between source-drain electrodes resulted in lots of MoOx nanoparticles (NPs) on MoS2 flakes with thickness reduction from 64 nm to 17 nm. Consequently, N-type behavior of MoS2 FETs was converted into ambipolar transport characteristics by MoOx NPs which inject hole carriers to MoS2 flakes.

  1. Naphthodipyrrolidone (NDP) based conjugated polymers with high electron mobility and ambipolar transport properties

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haichang; Zhang, Shuo; Mao, Yifan; ...

    2017-05-12

    Two novel donor–acceptor π-conjugated polymers based on naphthodipyrrolidone (NDP) were synthesized and characterized. The polymers possess low band gaps and suitable molecular orbital levels as ambipolar semiconductors. The thin film organic field effect transistor of NDP polymers exhibited ambipolar transport properties with a high electron mobility up to 0.67 cm2 V–1 s–1. The grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) studies demonstrated that the polymer molecules pack into a long-range-ordered lamellar structure with isotropically oriented crystalline domains. Thermal annealing promoted edge-on lamellar stacking as evidenced by the increased diffraction intensity along the out-of-plane direction. In conclusion, the polymer with NDP and bithiophenemore » units achieved the best edge-on lamellar stacking after thermal annealing, which yielded the best electron transport performance in this work.« less

  2. Interaction of Ambipolar Plasma Flow with Magnetic Islands in a Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    A. Reiman; M. Zarnstorff; D. Mikkelsen; L. Owen; H. Mynick; S. Hudson; D. Monticello

    2004-12-17

    A reference equilibrium for the U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment is predicted to be sufficiently close to quasi-symmetry to allow the plasma to flow in the toroidal direction with little viscous damping, yet to have sufficiently large deviations from quasi-symmetry that nonambipolarity significantly affects the physics of the shielding of resonant magnetic perturbations by plasma flow. The unperturbed velocity profile is modified by the presence of an ambipolar potential, which broadens the profile and improves the shielding near the plasma edge. In the presence of a resonant magnetic field perturbation, nonambipolar transport produces a radial current, and the resulting jxB force resists departures from the ambipolar velocity and enhances the shielding.

  3. Ambipolar surface state transport in nonmetallic stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syers, Paul; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-01-01

    Achieving true bulk insulating behavior in Bi2Se3 , the archetypal topological insulator with a simplistic one-band electronic structure and sizable band gap, has been prohibited by a well-known self-doping effect caused by selenium vacancies, whose extra electrons shift the chemical potential into the bulk conduction band. We report a synthesis method for achieving stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals that exhibit nonmetallic behavior in electrical transport down to low temperatures. Hall-effect measurements indicate the presence of both electron- and holelike carriers, with the latter identified with surface state conduction and the achievement of ambipolar transport in bulk Bi2Se3 crystals without gating techniques. With carrier mobilities surpassing the highest values yet reported for topological surface states in this material, the achievement of ambipolar transport via upward band bending is found to provide a key method to advancing the potential of this material for future study and applications.

  4. Influence of gate overlap engineering on ambipolar and high frequency characteristics of tunnel-CNTFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.; Abouelatta, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of gate overlapping-on-drain on the ambipolar behavior and high frequency performance of tunnel CNTFET (T-CNTFET). It is found that gate overlapping-on-drain suppresses the ambipolar behavior and improves OFF-state current. The simulation results show that there is an optimum choice for the overlapped length. On the other hand, this overlap deteriorates the high frequency performance. The high frequency figure of merit is analyzed in terms of the unit-gain cutoff frequency (fT). Further, we propose two different approaches to improve the high frequency performance of the overlapped T-CNTFET. The first one is based on inserting a high-dielectric constant material below the overlapped part of the gate and the second is based on depositing a different work function gate metal for the overlapped region. The two solutions show very good improvement in the high frequency performance with maintaining the suppression of the ambipolar characteristics.

  5. Ferroelectric-induced carrier modulation for ambipolar transition metal dichalcogenide transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Feng; Xu, Kai; Cheng, Ruiqing; Wen, Yao; Li, Jie; He, Jun

    2017-03-01

    For multifarious electronic and optoelectronic applications, it is indispensable exploration of stable and simple method to modulate electrical behavior of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). In this study, an effective method to adjust the electrical properties of ambipolar TMDs is developed by introducing the dipole electric field from poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) ferroelectric polymer. The transition from ambipolar to p-type conductive characteristics is realized, and the transistor performances are also significantly enhanced. Hole density of MoTe2- and WSe2-based back-gate field effect transistors increases by 4.4 and 2.5 times. Moreover, the corresponding hole mobilities are strikingly improved from 0.27 to 10.7 cm2 V-1 s-1 and from 1.6 to 59.8 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. After optimizing, p-channel MoTe2 phototransistors present ultrahigh responsivity of 3521 A/W, which is superior to most layered phototransistors. The remarkable control of conductive type, carrier concentration, and field-effect mobility of ambipolar TMDs via P(VDF-TrFE) treatment paves a way for realization of high-performance and versatile electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  7. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <$\\tilde{j}$$\\parallel$ $\\tilde{B}$r>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  8. Efficient and Hysteresis-Free Field Effect Modulation of Ambipolarly Doped Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Hou, Yasen; Travaglini, Henry C.; Hellwig, Luke; Hihath, Sahar; van Benthem, Klaus; Lee, Kathleen; Liu, Weifeng; Yu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The subpicosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors, which are based on electric-field-induced phase transition. However, the development of VO2 -based transistors lags behind, owing to inefficient and hysteretic gate modulation. Here we report ambipolar doping and strong field effects free of hysteresis in single-crystal VO2 nanowires synthesized via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The ambipolarly doped VO2 nanowires are achieved by controlling the oxygen vacancy density during the synthesis and show strong gate effects because of their relatively low doping level. Both the doping type of the nanowires and the band-bending direction at the metal-insulator domain walls are reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, as revealed by scanning photocurrent microscopy. Furthermore, we eliminate the hysteresis in gate sweep via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid-ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables electronic applications based on VO2 .

  9. Polymer Thin Film Transistors: High Electron Mobility and Ambipolar Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenekhe, Samson; Babel, Amit

    2004-03-01

    Along with high performance unipolar FETs, knowledge of ambipolar charge transport in conjugated polymers and organic semiconductors is important to realize the ultimate vision of all-plastic complementary integrated circuits for logic and memory applications. We present herein studies of electron transport in n-type conjugated ladder polymer, poly(benzobisimidazobenzophenanthroline) (BBL) in which we observed field-effect electron mobilities as high as 0.05-0.1 cm^2/Vs.^[1] We have also developed new ambipolar thin film transistors based on blends of BBL and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). Ambipolar hole mobilities were as high as 2.0 × 10-4 cm^2/Vs while electron mobilities were up to 3.0 × 10-5 cm^2/Vs. Transmission electron microscopy showed crystallization of CuPc in the α -crystal form within the semicrystalline BBL matrix. On prolonged treatment of the blend FETs in methanol, unipolar hole mobilities as high as 2.0 × 10-3 cm^2/Vs were observed, comparable to hole mobilities in thermally evaporated CuPc FETs. [1] Babel, A.; Jenekhe, S. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 13656.

  10. Fingerprints of collisionless reconnection at the separator, I, Ambipolar-Hall signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Maynard, N. C.; Russell, C. T.

    2002-10-01

    Plasma, electric, and magnetic field data on the Polar spacecraft have been analyzed for the 29 May 1996 magnetopause traversal searching for evidence of in situ reconnection and traversal of the separator. In this paper we confine our analysis to model-free observations and intrasensor coherence of detection of the environs of the separator. (1) We illustrate the first documented penetration of the separator of collisionless magnetic reconnection in temporal proximity to successful Walén tests with opposite slopes. (2) We present the first direct measurements of E∥ at the magnetopause. (3) We make the first empirical argument that E∥ derives from the electron pressure gradient force. (4) We document the first detection of the electron pressure ridge astride the magnetic depression that extends from the separator. (5) We provide the first empirical detection of the reconnection rate at the magnetopause with the locally sub-Alfvénic ion inflow, MAi ≃ 0.1, and trans-Alfvénic exhaust at high electron pressure of MiA ≃ 1.1-5. (6) We exhibit the first empirical detection of supra-Alfvénic electron flows parallel to B in excess of 5 in narrow sheets. (7) We illustrate the detection of heat flux sheets indicative of separatrices near, but not always in superposition, with the supra-Alfvénic parallel electron bulk flows. (8) We present the first evidence that pressure gradient scales are short enough to explain the electron fluid's measured cross-field drifts not explained by E × B drift but predicted by the measured size of E∥. (9) We illustrate that the size of the observed E∥ is well organized with the limit implied by Vasyliunas's analysis of the generalized Ohm's law of scale length ?, indicative of the intermediate scale of the diffusion region. (10) We document the first detection of departure from electron gyrotropy not only at the separator crossing but also in its vicinity, an effect presaged by [1975]. (11) We make the first reports of very

  11. Organic light emitting field effect transistors based on an ambipolar p-i-n layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorano, V.; Bramanti, A.; Carallo, S.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G.

    2010-03-01

    A bottom contact/top gate ambipolar "p-i-n" layered light emitting field effect transistor with the active medium inserted between two doped transport layers, is reported. The doping profile results crucial to the capability of emitting light, as well as to the electrical characteristics of the device. In this sense, high output current at relative low applied gate/drain voltage and light emission along the whole large area transistor channel are observed, putting the basis to full integration of organic light emitting field effect transistors in planar complex devices.

  12. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  13. Giant ambipolar Rashba effect in the semiconductor BiTeI.

    PubMed

    Crepaldi, A; Moreschini, L; Autès, G; Tournier-Colletta, C; Moser, S; Virk, N; Berger, H; Bugnon, Ph; Chang, Y J; Kern, K; Bostwick, A; Rotenberg, E; Yazyev, O V; Grioni, M

    2012-08-31

    We observe a giant spin-orbit splitting in the bulk and surface states of the noncentrosymmetric semiconductor BiTeI. We show that the Fermi level can be placed in the valence or in the conduction band by controlling the surface termination. In both cases, it intersects spin-polarized bands, in the corresponding surface depletion and accumulation layers. The momentum splitting of these bands is not affected by adsorbate-induced changes in the surface potential. These findings demonstrate that two properties crucial for enabling semiconductor-based spin electronics-a large, robust spin splitting and ambipolar conduction-are present in this material.

  14. Effect of electronic acceptor segments on photophysical properties of low-band-gap ambipolar polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation.

  15. High-Mobility Ambipolar Organic Thin-Film Transistor Processed From a Nonchlorinated Solvent.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Prashant; Chang, Jingjing; Kim, Jae H; Ong, Kok-Haw; Gann, Eliot; Manzhos, Sergei; Wu, Jishan; McNeill, Christopher R

    2016-09-21

    Polymer semiconductor PDPPF-DFT, which combines furan-substituted diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and a 3,4-difluorothiophene base, has been designed and synthesized. PDPPF-DFT polymer semiconductor thin film processed from nonchlorinated hexane is used as an active layer in thin-film transistors. As a result, balanced hole and electron mobilities of 0.26 and 0.12 cm(2)/(V s) are achieved for PDPPF-DFT. This is the first report of using nonchlorinated hexane solvent for fabricating high-performance ambipolar thin-film transistor devices.

  16. Effect of Ambipolar Plasma Flow on the Penetration of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in a Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    A. Reiman; M. Zarnstorff; D. Mikkelsen; L. Owen; H. Mynick; S. Hudson; D. Monticello

    2005-04-19

    A reference equilibrium for the U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment is predicted to be sufficiently close to quasi-symmetry to allow the plasma to flow in the toroidal direction with little viscous damping, yet to have sufficiently large deviations from quasi-symmetry that nonambipolarity significantly affects the physics of the shielding of resonant magnetic perturbations by plasma flow. The unperturbed velocity profile is modified by the presence of an ambipolar potential, which produces a broad velocity profile. In the presence of a resonant magnetic field perturbation, nonambipolar transport produces a radial current, and the resulting j x B force resists departures from the ambipolar velocity and enhances the shielding.

  17. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  18. Ambipolar Electric Field, Photoelectrons, and Their Role in Atmospheric Escape From Hot Jupiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the "polar wind," is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization.We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  19. Ambipolar Graphene-Quantum Dot Hybrid Vertical Photodetector with a Graphene Electrode.

    PubMed

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Haiting; Song, Xiaoxian; Cao, Mingxuan; Yu, Yu; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-09-20

    A strategy to fabricate an ambipolar near-infrared vertical photodetector (VPD) by sandwiching a photoactive material as a channel film between the bottom graphene and top metal electrodes was developed. The channel length in the vertical architecture was determined by the channel layer thickness, which can provide an ultrashort channel length without the need for a high-precision manufacturing process. The performance of VPDs with two types of semiconductor layers, a graphene-PbS quantum dot hybrid (GQDH) and PbS quantum dots (QDs), was measured. The GQDH VPD showed better photoelectric properties than the QD VPD because of the high mobility of graphene doped in the channel. The GQDH VPD exhibited excellent photoresponse properties with a responsivity of 1.6 × 10(4) A/W in the p-type regime and a fast response speed with a rise time of 8 ms. The simple manufacture and the promising photoresponse of the GQDH VPDs reveal that an easy and effective way to fabricate high-performance ambipolar photodetectors was developed.

  20. Surface transfer doping induced effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Shu; Liu, Yiyang; Lin, Jiadan; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Ping Hu, Wen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Neto, A H Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-12

    Black phosphorus, a fast emerging two-dimensional material, has been configured as field effect transistors, showing a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic. Here we report an effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus transistors through in situ surface functionalization with caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), respectively. Cs2CO3 is found to strongly electron dope black phosphorus. The electron mobility of black phosphorus is significantly enhanced to ~27 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) after 10 nm Cs2CO3 modification, indicating a greatly improved electron-transport behaviour. In contrast, MoO3 decoration demonstrates a giant hole-doping effect. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals significant surface charge transfer occurring at the dopants/black phosphorus interfaces. Moreover, the surface-doped black phosphorus devices exhibit a largely enhanced photodetection behaviour. Our findings coupled with the tunable nature of the surface transfer doping scheme ensure black phosphorus as a promising candidate for further complementary logic electronics.

  1. Efficient ambipolar transport properties in alternate stacking donor-acceptor complexes: from experiment to theory.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunke; Cheng, Changli; Geng, Hua; Wang, Chao; Hu, Wenping; Xu, Wei; Shuai, Zhigang; Zhu, Daoben

    2016-05-18

    Comprehensive investigations of crystal structures, electrical transport properties and theoretical simulations have been performed over a series of sulfur-bridged annulene-based donor-acceptor complexes with an alternate stacking motif. A remarkably high mobility, up to 1.57 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for holes and 0.47 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons, was obtained using organic single crystal field-effect transistor devices, demonstrating the efficient ambipolar transport properties. These ambipolar properties arise from the fact that the electronic couplings for both holes and electrons have the same super-exchange nature along the alternate stacking direction. The magnitude of super-exchange coupling depends not only on the intermolecular stacking distance and pattern, but also the energy level alignments between the adjacent donor-acceptor moieties. The concluded transport mechanism and structure-property relationship from this research will provide an important guideline for the future design of organic semiconductors based on donor-acceptor complexes.

  2. Magnetic field driven ambipolar quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene close to the charge neutrality point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachawaty, A.; Yang, M.; Desrat, W.; Nanot, S.; Jabakhanji, B.; Kazazis, D.; Yakimova, R.; Cresti, A.; Escoffier, W.; Jouault, B.

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated the disorder of epitaxial graphene close to the charge neutrality point (CNP) by various methods: (i) at room temperature, by analyzing the dependence of the resistivity on the Hall coefficient; (ii) by fitting the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient down to liquid helium temperature; (iii) by fitting the magnetoresistances at low temperature. All methods converge to give a disorder amplitude of (20 ±10 ) meV. Because of this relatively low disorder, close to the CNP, at low temperature, the sample resistivity does not exhibit the standard value ≃h /4 e2 but diverges. Moreover, the magnetoresistance curves have a unique ambipolar behavior, which has been systematically observed for all studied samples. This is a signature of both asymmetry in the density of states and in-plane charge transfer. The microscopic origin of this behavior cannot be unambiguously determined. However, we propose a model in which the SiC substrate steps qualitatively explain the ambipolar behavior.

  3. AMBIPOLAR ELECTRIC FIELD, PHOTOELECTRONS, AND THEIR ROLE IN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE FROM HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the 'polar wind', is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization. We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  4. Ambipolar Small-Molecule:Polymer Blend Semiconductors for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minji; Hwang, Hansu; Park, Won-Tae; Khim, Dongyoon; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Yunseul; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-01-25

    We report on the fabrication of an organic thin-film semiconductor formed using a blend solution of soluble ambipolar small molecules and an insulating polymer binder that exhibits vertical phase separation and uniform film formation. The semiconductor thin films are produced in a single step from a mixture containing a small molecular semiconductor, namely, quinoidal biselenophene (QBS), and a binder polymer, namely, poly(2-vinylnaphthalene) (PVN). Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on QBS/PVN blend semiconductor are then assembled using top-gate/bottom-contact device configuration, which achieve almost four times higher mobility than the neat QBS semiconductor. Depth profile via secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the QBS domains in the films made from the blend are evenly distributed with a smooth morphology at the bottom of the PVN layer. Bias stress test and variable-temperature measurements on QBS-based OFETs reveal that the QBS/PVN blend semiconductor remarkably reduces the number of trap sites at the gate dielectric/semiconductor interface and the activation energy in the transistor channel. This work provides a one-step solution processing technique, which makes use of soluble ambipolar small molecules to form a thin-film semiconductor for application in high-performance OFETs.

  5. Surface transfer doping induced effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Shu; Liu, Yiyang; Lin, Jiadan; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Ping Hu, Wen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Black phosphorus, a fast emerging two-dimensional material, has been configured as field effect transistors, showing a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic. Here we report an effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus transistors through in situ surface functionalization with caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), respectively. Cs2CO3 is found to strongly electron dope black phosphorus. The electron mobility of black phosphorus is significantly enhanced to ~27 cm2 V-1 s-1 after 10 nm Cs2CO3 modification, indicating a greatly improved electron-transport behaviour. In contrast, MoO3 decoration demonstrates a giant hole-doping effect. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals significant surface charge transfer occurring at the dopants/black phosphorus interfaces. Moreover, the surface-doped black phosphorus devices exhibit a largely enhanced photodetection behaviour. Our findings coupled with the tunable nature of the surface transfer doping scheme ensure black phosphorus as a promising candidate for further complementary logic electronics.

  6. Influence of plasma diffusion losses on dust charge relaxation in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of diffusive losses on residual dust charge in a complex plasma afterglow has been investigated. The dust residual charges were simulated based on a model developed to describe complex plasma decay. The experimental and simulated data show that the transition from ambipolar to free diffusion in the decaying plasma plays a significant role in determining the residual dust particle charges. The presence of positively charged dust particles is explained by a broadening of the charge distribution function in the afterglow plasma.

  7. Analysis of charge injection and contact resistance as a function of electrode surface treatment in ambipolar polymer transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seon Jeng; Kim, Chaewon; Jung, Seok-Heon; Di Pietro, Riccardo; Lee, Jin-Kyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Miso; Lee, Mi Jung

    2017-08-01

    Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have both of hole and electron enhancements in charge transport. The characteristics of conjugated diketopyrrolopyrrole ambipolar OFETs depend on the metal-contact surface treatment for charge injection. To investigate the charge-injection characteristics of ambipolar transistors, these devices are processed via various types of self-assembled monolayer treatments and annealing. We conclude that treatment by the self-assembled monolayer 1-decanethiol gives the best enhancement of electron charge injection at both 100 and 300 °C annealing temperature. In addition, the contact resistance is calculated by using two methods: One is the gated four-point probe (gFPP) method that gives the voltage drop between channels, and the other is the simultaneous contact resistance extraction method, which extracts the contact resistance from the general transfer curve. We confirm that the gFPP method and the simultaneous extraction method give similar contact resistance, which means that we can extract contact resistance from the general transfer curve without any special contact pattern. Based on these characteristics of ambipolar p- and n-type transistors, we fabricate inverter devices with only one active layer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Beyond modulation doping: Engineering a semiconductor to be ambipolar, or making an ON-OFF-ON transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, K. Das; Croxall, A. F.; Zheng, B.; Sfigakis, F.; Farrer, I.; Nicoll, C. A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-04-24

    Semiconductors are traditionaly either p-type or n-type, meaning that the mobile charge carriers in them are either 'holes' in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. Ambipolar conduction implies that the experimenter should be able to populate the same channel with either electrons or holes in a controlled manner. This has been shown to be possible in newer materials like Graphene and some organic semiconductors. 'Ambipolarity' can open up new device possibilities as well as new ways to study fundamental scattering mechanisms in semiconductors. However, achieving this in a conventional high mobility structure like a GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure/quantum well requires new thinking. It was realized, that to do this modulation doping must be given up and techniques to make an undoped heterostructure conduct, must be developed first. Such structures have been developed by only a few groups worldwide. They are of great interest to low temperature physicists working with Quantum Hall states and mesoscopic/nano structures in the ballistic regime. We discuss the reason behind this interest and the analysis of scattering mechanisms in such structures. Finally very recent experimental success in developing fully gate controlled ambipolar structures where both electron and hole mobilites exceed 1 million cm{sup 2}/Vs at low temperatures (T∼1Kelvin) are discussed. Such gated ambipolar structures can be used to analyse scattering mechanisms in ultra-high mobility 2dimensional electron and hole gases in a way that is not possible using other techniques.

  9. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  10. Transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors based on multilayer transparent source-drain electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Nan; Hu, Yongsheng E-mail: liuxy@ciomp.ac.cn; Lin, Jie; Li, Yantao; Liu, Xingyuan E-mail: liuxy@ciomp.ac.cn

    2016-08-08

    A fabrication method for transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors with transparent Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ag/Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} (SAS) source and drain electrodes has been developed. A pentacene/N,N′-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (PTCDI-C13) bilayer heterojunction is used as the active semiconductor. The electrodes are deposited by room temperature electron beam evaporation. The devices are fabricated without damaging the active layers. The SAS electrodes have high transmittance (82.5%) and low sheet resistance (8 Ω/sq). High performance devices with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 cm{sup 2}/V s and 0.027 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively, and average visible range transmittance of 72% were obtained. These transistors have potential for transparent logic integrated circuit applications.

  11. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; ...

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. Wemore » conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.« less

  12. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. We conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.

  13. Passivation and characterization of charge defects in ambipolar silicon quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Spruijtenburg, Paul C.; Amitonov, Sergey V.; Mueller, Filipp; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-01-01

    In this Report we show the role of charge defects in the context of the formation of electrostatically defined quantum dots. We introduce a barrier array structure to probe defects at multiple locations in a single device. We measure samples both before and after an annealing process which uses an Al2O3 overlayer, grown by atomic layer deposition. After passivation of the majority of charge defects with annealing we can electrostatically define hole quantum dots up to 180 nm in length. Our ambipolar structures reveal amphoteric charge defects that remain after annealing with charging energies of 10 meV in both the positive and negative charge state. PMID:27922048

  14. Ambipolar nonvolatile memory based on a quantum-dot transistor with a nanoscale floating gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Xiaolong; Song, Xiaoxian; Cao, Mingxuan; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-01

    Using only solution processing methods, we developed ambipolar quantum-dot (QD) transistor floating-gate memory (FGM) that uses Au nanoparticles as a floating gate. Because of the bipolarity of the active channel of PbSe QDs, the memory could easily trap holes or electrons in the floating gate by programming/erasing (P/E) operations, which could shift the threshold voltage both up and down. As a result, the memory exhibited good programmable memory characteristics: a large memory window (ΔVth ˜ 15 V) and a long retention time (>105 s). The magnitude of ΔVth depended on both P/E voltages and the bias voltage (VDS): ΔVth was a cubic function to VP/E and linearly depended on VDS. Therefore, this FGM based on a QD transistor is a promising alternative to its inorganic counterparts owing to its advantages of bipolarity, high mobility, low cost, and large-area production.

  15. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  16. Tetracene dicarboxylic imide and its disulfide: synthesis of ambipolar organic semiconductors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hashizume, Daisuke; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2012-01-02

    We have designed and synthesized a new donor/acceptor-type tetracene derivative by the introduction of dicarboxylic imide and disulfide groups as electron-withdrawing and -donating units, respectively. The prepared compounds, tetracene dicarboxylic imide (TI) and its disulfide (TIDS) have high chemical and electrochemical stability as well as long-wavelength absorptions of up to 886 nm in the thin films. The crystal packing structure of TIDS molecules features face-to-face π-stacking, derived from dipole-dipole interactions. Notably, TIDS exhibited ambipolar properties of both electron-donating and -accepting natures in p-n and p-i-n heterojunction organic thin-film photovoltaic devices. Accordingly, TI and TIDS are expected to be promising compounds for designing new organic semiconductors.

  17. Ambipolar field-effect transistors by few-layer InSe with asymmetry contact metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chang-Yu; Ulaganathan, Rajesh Kumar; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang-Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Group IIIA-VIA layered semiconductors (MX, where M = Ga and In, X = S, Se, and Te) have attracted tremendous interest for their anisotropic optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. In this study, we demonstrated that metal and InSe junctions can lead to carrier behaviors in few-layered InSe FETs. These results indicate that the polarity of few-layered InSe FETs can be determined by using metals with different work functions. We adopted FET S/D metal contacts with asymmetric work functions to reduce the Schottky barriers of electrons and holes, and discovered that few-layered InSe FETs with carefully selected metal contacts can achieve ambipolar behaviors. These results indicate that group IIIA-VIA layered semiconductor FETs with asymmetry contact metals have great potential for applications in photovoltaic devices, optical sensors, and CMOS inverter circuits.

  18. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  19. Ambipolar field effect in Sb-doped Bi2Se3 nanoplates by solvothermal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Desheng; Koski, Kristie J; Cha, Judy J; Hong, Seung Sae; Cui, Yi

    2013-02-13

    A topological insulator is a new phase of quantum matter with a bulk band gap and spin-polarized surface states, which might find use in applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion. Despite much exciting progress in the field, high-yield solution synthesis has not been widely used for the study of topological insulator behavior. Here, we demonstrate that solvothermally synthesized Bi(2)Se(3) nanoplates are attractive for topological insulator studies. The carrier concentration of these Bi(2)Se(3) nanoplates is controlled by compensational Sb doping during the synthesis. In low-carrier-density, Sb-doped Bi(2)Se(3) nanoplates, we observe pronounced ambipolar field effect that demonstrates the flexible manipulation of carrier type and concentration for these nanostructures. Solvothermal synthesis offers an affordable, facile approach to produce high-quality nanomaterials to explore the properties of topological insulators.

  20. Reversible Conversion of Dominant Polarity in Ambipolar Polymer/Graphene Oxide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. This hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits. PMID:25801827

  1. Ambipolar escape from Venus, Mars and Titan, and negative ions at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric photoelectrons are a natural product of the photo-ionisation of planetary atmospheres. Their energy spectrum is distinctive and depends on the solar spectrum in the EUV and X-ray region. On production, the energetic electrons move along the magnetic field (open or draped), setting up an ambipolar electric field which can extract ions. This provides an escape mechanism similar to Earth's 'polar wind'. As these objects are unmagnetised, this produces an extended escape mechanism over the whole sunlit ionosphere. Here, we review recent measurements of photoelectrons far from the parent objects at Venus, Mars and Titan, from Venus Express, Mars Express, Maven and Cassini, and discuss similarities and related escape rates. We also review the pioneering observations of the remarkably heavy negative ions discovered in Titan's ionosphere.

  2. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design. PMID:28145438

  3. Transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors based on multilayer transparent source-drain electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Li, Yantao; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-08-01

    A fabrication method for transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors with transparent Sb2O3/Ag/Sb2O3 (SAS) source and drain electrodes has been developed. A pentacene/N,N'-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (PTCDI-C13) bilayer heterojunction is used as the active semiconductor. The electrodes are deposited by room temperature electron beam evaporation. The devices are fabricated without damaging the active layers. The SAS electrodes have high transmittance (82.5%) and low sheet resistance (8 Ω/sq). High performance devices with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 cm2/V s and 0.027 cm2/V s, respectively, and average visible range transmittance of 72% were obtained. These transistors have potential for transparent logic integrated circuit applications.

  4. Coexistence of Midgap Antiferromagnetic and Mott States in Undoped, Hole- and Electron-Doped Ambipolar Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinmao; Zeng, Shengwei; Das, Tanmoy; Baskaran, G; Asmara, Teguh Citra; Santoso, Iman; Yu, Xiaojiang; Diao, Caozheng; Yang, Ping; Breese, Mark B H; Venkatesan, T; Lin, Hsin; Ariando; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2016-05-13

    We report the first observation of the coexistence of a distinct midgap state and a Mott state in undoped and their evolution in electron and hole-doped ambipolar Y_{0.38}La_{0.62}(Ba_{0.82}La_{0.18})_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} films using spectroscopic ellipsometry and x-ray absorption spectroscopies at the O K and Cu L_{3,2} edges. Supported by theoretical calculations, the midgap state is shown to originate from antiferromagnetic correlation. Surprisingly, while the magnetic state collapses and its correlation strength weakens with dopings, the Mott state in contrast moves toward a higher energy and its correlation strength increases. Our result provides important clues to the mechanism of electronic correlation strengths and superconductivity in cuprates.

  5. Ambipolar-transporting coaxial nanotubes with a tailored molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Zhang, Guanxin; Jin, Wusong; Fukushima, Takanori; Ishii, Noriyuki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Minari, Takeo; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Aida, Takuzo

    2009-12-15

    Despite a large steric bulk of C(60), a molecular graphene with a covalently linked C(60) pendant [hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-C(60); 1] self-assembles into a coaxial nanotube whose wall consists of a graphite-like pi-stacked HBC array, whereas the nanotube surface is fully covered by a molecular layer of clustering C(60). Because of this explicit coaxial configuration, the nanotube exhibits an ambipolar character in the field-effect transistor output [hole mobility (micro(h)) = 9.7 x 10(-7) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1); electron mobility (micro(e)) = 1.1 x 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)] and displays a photovoltaic response upon light illumination. Successful coassembly of 1 and an HBC derivative without C(60) (2) allows for tailoring the p/n heterojunction in the nanotube, so that its ambipolar carrier transport property can be optimized for enhancing the open-circuit voltage in the photovoltaic output. As evaluated by an electrodeless method called flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity technique, the intratubular hole mobility (2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) of a coassembled nanotube containing 10 mol % of HBC-C(60) (1) is as large as the intersheet mobility in graphite. The homotropic nanotube of 2 blended with a soluble C(60) derivative [(6,6)-phenyl C(61) butyric acid methyl ester] displayed a photovoltaic response with a much different composition dependency, where the largest open-circuit voltage attained was obviously lower than that realized by the coassembly of 1 and 2.

  6. Ambipolar-transporting coaxial nanotubes with a tailored molecular graphene–fullerene heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Zhang, Guanxin; Jin, Wusong; Fukushima, Takanori; Ishii, Noriyuki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Minari, Takeo; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Aida, Takuzo

    2009-01-01

    Despite a large steric bulk of C60, a molecular graphene with a covalently linked C60 pendant [hexabenzocoronene (HBC)–C60; 1] self-assembles into a coaxial nanotube whose wall consists of a graphite-like π-stacked HBC array, whereas the nanotube surface is fully covered by a molecular layer of clustering C60. Because of this explicit coaxial configuration, the nanotube exhibits an ambipolar character in the field-effect transistor output [hole mobility (μh) = 9.7 × 10−7 cm2 V−1 s−1; electron mobility (μe) = 1.1 × 10−5 cm2 V−1 s−1] and displays a photovoltaic response upon light illumination. Successful coassembly of 1 and an HBC derivative without C60 (2) allows for tailoring the p/n heterojunction in the nanotube, so that its ambipolar carrier transport property can be optimized for enhancing the open-circuit voltage in the photovoltaic output. As evaluated by an electrodeless method called flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity technique, the intratubular hole mobility (2.0 cm2 V−1 s−1) of a coassembled nanotube containing 10 mol % of HBC–C60 (1) is as large as the intersheet mobility in graphite. The homotropic nanotube of 2 blended with a soluble C60 derivative [(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester] displayed a photovoltaic response with a much different composition dependency, where the largest open-circuit voltage attained was obviously lower than that realized by the coassembly of 1 and 2. PMID:19940243

  7. Ambipolar transport based on CVD-synthesized ReSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byunggil; Kim, Youngchan; Cho, Jeong Ho; Lee, Changgu

    2017-06-01

    Control of the carrier type in two dimensional (2D) materials is a serious issue for the realization of logic devices. The carrier type control of 2D semiconducting materials such as MoTe2, WSe2 and black phosphorus have been studied for this purpose. However, the systematic study on the polarity control of transistors based on ReSe2, a new member of 2D materials, has remained unexplored despite the intriguing anisotropic optical and electrical properties deriving from the exotic crystal structure. Here, we report the electrical characterization of field effect transistors (FETs) of single crystalline ReSe2 grown by a chemical vapor deposition. In contrast to a previous report of unipolar p-type exfoliated crystals, synthesized ReSe2 FETs on SiO2 with Au contact exhibit highly symmetric ambipolar behaviors with the current on/off ratios of ~104 for both of hole and electron injection. The carrier type could be controlled via the metal contact. With Al contacts, ReSe2 FETs display perfect transition to pure n-type unipolar behavior. It is found that carrier type of ReSe2 via thickness variation was hardly modulated because the ReSe2 bandgap has little dependence on its thickness. We successfully achieved the fabrication of a logic inverter by using only ambipolar ReSe2 FETs on SiO2/Si without electrostatic doping or chemical treatments. These results demonstrate that ReSe2 is a promising candidate for future low power logic devices and functional nano electronic applications.

  8. Sensors: A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene) (PDPPHD-T3) is shown by P. Sonar, H. Haick, and co-workers on page 4012 to sensitively detect xylene isomers at low to 40 ppm level in multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, is able to discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from each other.

  9. Charge transport and velocity distribution in ambipolar organic thin film Transistors based on a diketopyrrolopyrrole-benzothiadiazole copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Sonar, Prashant; Singh, Samarendra Pratap; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2011-03-01

    There have been reports of charge transport mechanisms in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) focusing on steady-state characteristics but these measurements provide limited information. Time-resolved measurements can provide additional information in understanding transport mechanisms but existing reports have focused on unipolar organic characteristics. No previous reports on ambipolar organic devices have involved entire velocity distribution and charge transport mechanisms. Recently, we have fabricated ambipolar OTFTs based on a diketopyrrolopyrrole-benzothiadiazole copolymer (PDPP-TBT) with a field-effect mobility of more than 0.2 cm2 V- 1 s - 1 . Velocity distributions are measured by performing specialized dynamic measurements while keeping the RC-time constant of the measurement circuit small. This yields a distribution in arrival times of charge carriers from source to drain which can be converted to velocity distributions. We will also describe dynamic transport measurements on high-k-dielectric PDPP-TBT OTFTs.

  10. Selective remanent ambipolar charge transport in polymeric field-effect transistors for high-performance logic circuits fabricated in ambient.

    PubMed

    Fabiano, Simone; Usta, Hakan; Forchheimer, Robert; Crispin, Xavier; Facchetti, Antonio; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-26

    Ambipolar polymeric field-effect transistors can be programmed into a p- or n-type mode by using the remanent polarization of a ferroelectric gate insulator. Due to the remanent polarity, the device architecture is suited as a building block in complementary logic circuits and in CMOS-compatible memory cells for non-destructive read-out operations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. MoS2 /Rubrene van der Waals Heterostructure: Toward Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors and Inverter Circuits.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexia; Chow, WaiLeong; Liu, Fucai; Tay, BengKang; Liu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides are promising channel materials for the next-generation electronic device. Here, vertically 2D heterostructures, so called van der Waals solids, are constructed using inorganic molybdenum sulfide (MoS2 ) few layers and organic crystal - 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene). In this work, ambipolar field-effect transistors are successfully achieved based on MoS2 and rubrene crystals with the well balanced electron and hole mobilities of 1.27 and 0.36 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively. The ambipolar behavior is explained based on the band alignment of MoS2 and rubrene. Furthermore, being a building block, the MoS2 /rubrene ambipolar transistors are used to fabricate CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) inverters that show good performance with a gain of 2.3 at a switching threshold voltage of -26 V. This work paves a way to the novel organic/inorganic ultrathin heterostructure based flexible electronics and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Imaging ambipolar two-dimensional carriers induced by the spontaneous electric polarization of a polar semiconductor BiTeI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohsaka, Y.; Kanou, M.; Takagi, H.; Hanaguri, T.; Sasagawa, T.

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) mobile carriers are a wellspring of quantum phenomena. Among various 2D-carrier systems, such as field effect transistors and heterostructures, polar materials hold a unique potential; the spontaneous electric polarization in the bulk could generate positive and negative 2D carriers at the surface. Although several experiments have shown ambipolar carriers at the surface of a polar semiconductor BiTeI, their origin is yet to be specified. Here we provide compelling experimental evidences that the ambipolar 2D carriers at the surface of BiTeI are induced by the spontaneous electric polarization. By imaging electron standing waves with spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that positive or negative carriers with Rashba-type spin splitting emerge at the surface corresponding to the polar directions in the bulk. The electron densities at the surface are constant independently of those in the bulk, corroborating that the 2D carriers are induced by the spontaneous electric polarization. We also successfully image that lateral p -n junctions are formed along the boundaries of submicron-scale domains with opposite polar directions. Our study presents a means to endow nonvolatile, spin-polarized, and ambipolar 2D carriers as well as, without elaborate fabrication, lateral p -n junctions of those carriers at atomically sharp interfaces.

  13. Spin-valley dynamics of electrically driven ambipolar carbon-nanotube quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osika, E. N.; Chacón, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Szafran, B.

    2017-07-01

    An ambipolar n-p double quantum dot defined by potential variation along a semiconducting carbon-nanotube is considered. We focus on the (1e,1h) charge configuration with a single excess electron of the conduction band confined in the n-type dot and a single missing electron in the valence band state of the p-type dot for which lifting of the Pauli blockade of the current was observed in the electric-dipole spin resonance (Laird et al 2013 Nat. Nanotechnol. 8 565). The dynamics of the system driven by periodic electric field is studied with the Floquet theory and the time-dependent configuration interaction method with the single-electron spin-valley-orbitals determined for atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian. We find that the transitions lifting the Pauli blockade are strongly influenced by coupling to a vacuum state with an empty n dot and a fully filled p dot. The coupling shifts the transition energies and strongly modifies the effective g factors for axial magnetic field. The coupling is modulated by the bias between the dots but it appears effective for surprisingly large energy splitting between the (1e,1h) ground state and the vacuum (0e, 0h) state. Multiphoton transitions and high harmonic generation effects are also discussed.

  14. Ambipolar nonvolatile memory based on a quantum-dot transistor with a nanoscale floating gate

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating Song, Xiaoxian; Cao, Mingxuan; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan; Cao, Xiaolong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo

    2016-07-04

    Using only solution processing methods, we developed ambipolar quantum-dot (QD) transistor floating-gate memory (FGM) that uses Au nanoparticles as a floating gate. Because of the bipolarity of the active channel of PbSe QDs, the memory could easily trap holes or electrons in the floating gate by programming/erasing (P/E) operations, which could shift the threshold voltage both up and down. As a result, the memory exhibited good programmable memory characteristics: a large memory window (ΔV{sub th} ∼ 15 V) and a long retention time (>10{sup 5 }s). The magnitude of ΔV{sub th} depended on both P/E voltages and the bias voltage (V{sub DS}): ΔV{sub th} was a cubic function to V{sub P/E} and linearly depended on V{sub DS}. Therefore, this FGM based on a QD transistor is a promising alternative to its inorganic counterparts owing to its advantages of bipolarity, high mobility, low cost, and large-area production.

  15. Ringing After a High-Energy Collision: Ambipolar Oscillations During Impact Plasma Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    High-velocity impacts on the Moon and other airless bodies deliver energy and material to the lunar surface and exosphere. The target and i mpactor material may become vaporized and ionized to form a collision al plasma that expands outward and eventually becomes collisionless. In the present work, kinetic simulations of the later collision less stage of impact plasma expansion are performed. Attention is paid to characterizing "ambipolar oscillations" in which thermodynamic distur bances propagate outward to generate "ringing" within the expanding e lectron cloud, which could radiate an electromagnetic signature of lo cal plasma conditions. The process is not unlike a beam-plasma intera ction, with the perturbing electron population in the present case ac ting as a highly thermal "beam" that resonates along the expanding de nsity gradient. Understanding the electromagnetic aspects of impact p lasma expansion could provide insight into the lasting effects of nat ural, impact-generated currents on airless surfaces and charging haza rds to human exploration infrastructure and instrumentation.

  16. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Luzio, Alessandro; Natali, Dario; Kim, Juhwan; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young; Caironi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μe) and hole (μh) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μh = 0.29 cm2/V s and μe = 0.001 cm2/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μe = 0.12 cm2/V s and μh = 8 × 10-4 cm2/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of a solid-state ambipolar ionic field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riskey, Kory L.

    Transistors are a fundamental building block of the integrated circuit. While standard transistors are based on electron (n-type) or hole (p-type) majority carrier modulation, a new type of transistor known as the ionic field-effect transistor (IFET) has recently been developed that modulates ionic current through an ion-conducting channel when a voltage is applied to a gating electrode. In this thesis work, standard lithography and etching techniques are used to develop the first ever solid-state IC compatible IFET device. Using this approach, large scale arrays of multiple transistor geometries are simultaneously realized for the first time on a single silicon wafer. The active channel layer for the devices is made from the proton-conducting material Nafion ®, and the contacts are a proton-transparent Pd/Ag alloy. The elegant design of this state-of-the-art ionic transistor allows it to operate in conditions unsuitable for standard microelectronics, such as aqueous environments. The design also provides an excellent test structure to characterize ionic thin films. As a unique feature, the transistors exhibit an ambipolar response, exhibiting either n-type or p-type behavior, depending on the polarity of the applied gate voltage.

  18. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  19. III-V nanocrystals capped with molecular metal chalcogenide ligands: high electron mobility and ambipolar photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyong; Lee, Jong-Soo; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2013-01-30

    In this work, we synthesized InP and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) capped with different inorganic ligands, including various molecular metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs) and chalcogenide ions. We found that MCCs and chalcogenide ions can quantitatively displace organic ligands from the surface of III-V NCs and serve as the inorganic capping groups for III-V NC surfaces. These inorganic ligands stabilize colloidal solutions of InP and InAs NCs in polar solvents and greatly facilitate charge transport between individual NCs. Charge transport studies revealed high electron mobility in the films of MCC-capped InP and InAs NCs. For example, we found that bridging InAs NCs with Cu(7)S(4)(-) MCC ligands can lead to very high electron mobility exceeding 15 cm(2)/(V s). In addition, we observed unprecedented ambipolar (positive/negative) photoresponse of MCC-capped InAs NC solids that changed sign depending on the ligand chemistry, illumination wavelength, and doping of the NC solid. For example, the sign of photoconductance of InAs NCs capped with Cu(7)S(4)(-) or Sn(2)S(6)(4-) ions converted from positive at 0.80 and 0.95 eV to negative at 1.27 and 1.91 eV. We propose an explanation of this unusually complex photoconductivity of InAs NC solids.

  20. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  1. Ambipolar light-emitting organic single-crystal transistors with a grating resonator

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Kenichi; Sawabe, Kosuke; Sakanoue, Tomo; Li, Jinpeng; Takahashi, Wataru; Hotta, Shu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven organic lasers are among the best lasing devices due to their rich variety of emission colors as well as other advantages, including printability, flexibility, and stretchability. However, electrically driven lasing in organic materials has not yet been demonstrated because of serious luminescent efficiency roll-off under high current density. Recently, we found that the organic ambipolar single-crystal transistor is an excellent candidate for lasing devices because it exhibits less efficient roll-off, high current density, and high luminescent efficiency. Although a single-mode resonator combined with light-emitting transistors (LETs) is necessary for electrically driven lasing devices, the fragility of organic crystals has strictly limited the fabrication of resonators, and LETs with optical cavities have never been fabricated until now. To achieve this goal, we improved the soft ultraviolet-nanoimprint lithography method and demonstrated electroluminescence from a single-crystal LET with a grating resonator, which is a crucial milestone for future organic lasers. PMID:25959455

  2. Sub-10 nm transparent all-around-gated ambipolar ionic field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hyomin; Jin, Tianguang; Park, Sungmin; Yoon, Byung Jun; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Ki-Bum; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we developed a versatile ionic field effect transistor (IFET) which has an ambipolar function for manipulating molecules regardless of their polarity and can be operated at a wide range of electrolytic concentrations (10-5 M-1 M). The IFET has circular nanochannels radially covered by gate electrodes, called ``all-around-gate'', with an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) oxide layer of a near-zero surface charge. Experimental and numerical validations were conducted for characterizing the IFET. We found that the versatility originated from the zero-charge density of the oxide layer and all-around-gate structure which increased the efficiency of the gate effect 5 times higher than a previously developed planar-gate by capacitance calculations. Our numerical model adapted Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes (PNPS) formulations with additional nonlinear constraints of a fringing field effect and a counter-ion condensation and the experimental and numerical results were well matched. The device can control the transportation of ions at concentrations up to 1 M electrolyte which resembles a backflow of a shale gas extraction process. Furthermore, while traditional IFETs can manipulate either positively or negatively charged species depending on the inherently large surface charge of oxide layer, the presenting device and mechanism provide effective means to control the motion of both negatively and positively charged molecules which is important in biomolecule transport through nanochannels, medical diagnosis system and point-of-care system, etc.In this paper, we developed a versatile ionic field effect transistor (IFET) which has an ambipolar function for manipulating molecules regardless of their polarity and can be operated at a wide range of electrolytic concentrations (10-5 M-1 M). The IFET has circular nanochannels radially covered by gate electrodes, called ``all-around-gate'', with an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) oxide layer of a near-zero surface charge. Experimental and

  3. Air-Stable n-channel Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Diketopyrrolopyrrole Oligomers for High Performance Ambipolar Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Tushita; Puttaraju, Boregowda; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard; Faber, Hendrik A; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Salzner, Ulrike; Meyer, Andreas; Patil, Satish

    2016-09-28

    n-channel organic semiconductors are prone to oxidation upon exposed to ambient conditions. Herein, we report design and synthesis of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based oligomers for ambipolar organic thin-film transistors (OFETs) with excellent air and bias stability at ambient conditions. The cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal exceptional electrochemical stability during the redox cycle of oligomers. Structural properties including aggregation, crystallinity, and morphology in thin film were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), thin-film X-ray diffraction (XRD), and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. AFM reveals morphological changes induced by different processing conditions whereas GISAXS measurements show an increase in the population of face-on oriented crystallites in films subjected to a combination of solvent and thermal treatments. These measurements also highlight the significance of chalcogen atom from sulfur to selenium on the photophysical, optical, electronic, and solid-state properties of DPP-DPP oligomers. Charge carrier mobilities of the oligomers were investigated by fabricating top-gate bottom-contact (TG-BC) thin-film transistors by annealing the thin films under various conditions. Combined solvent and thermal annealing of DPP-DPP oligomer thin films results in consistent electron mobilities as high as ∼0.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on/off ratio exceeding 10(4). Field-effect behavior was retained for up to ∼4 weeks, which illustrates remarkable air and bias stability. This work paves the way toward the development of n-channel DPP-DPP-based oligomers exhibiting retention of field-effect behavior with superior stability at ambient conditions.

  4. MarsCAT: Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, Edgar Andrew; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Li, Liming; Jackson, David; Chen, Ji; Reed, Helen; Moldwin, Mark; Kasper, Justin; Sheehan, J. P.; Forbes, James Richard; Heine, Thomas; Case, Anthony; Stevens, Michael; Sibeck, David G.

    2015-11-01

    The MarsCAT (Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster) Mission is a two 6U CubeSat mission to study the ionosphere of Mars proposed for the NASA SIMPLeX opportunity. The mission will investigate the plasma and magnetic structure of the Martian ionosphere, including transient plasma structures, magnetic field structure and dynamics, and energetic particle activity. The transit plan calls for a piggy back ride with Mars 2020 using a CAT burn for MOI, the first demonstration of CubeSat propulsion for interplanetary travel. MarsCAT will make correlated multipoint studies of the ionosphere and magnetic field of Mars. Specifically, the two spacecraft will make in situ observations of the plasma density, temperature, and convection in the ionosphere of Mars. They will also make total electron content measurements along the line of sight between the two spacecraft and simultaneous 3-axis local magnetic field measurements in two locations. Additionally, MarsCAT will demonstrate the performance of new CubeSat telemetry antennas designed at the University of Houston that are designed to be low profile, rugged, and with a higher gain than conventional monopole (whip) antennas. The two MarsCAT CubeSats will have five science instruments: a 3-axis DC magnetometer, adouble-Langmuir probe, a Faraday cup, a solid state energetic particle detector (Science Enhancement Option), and interspacecraft total electron content radio occulation experiment. The MarsCAT spacecraft will be solar powered and equipped with a CAT thruster that can provide up to 4.8 km/s of delta-V, which is sufficient to achieve Mars orbit using the Mars 2020 piggyback. They have an active attitude control system, using a sun sensor and flight-proven star tracker for determination, and momentum wheels for 3-axis attitude control.

  5. MarsCAT: Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A., III; Pinsky, L.; Li, L.; Jackson, D. R.; Chen, J.; Reed, H.; Moldwin, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Sheehan, J. P.; Forbes, J.; Heine, T.; Case, A. W.; Stevens, M. L.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The MarsCAT (Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster) Mission is a two 6U CubeSat mission to study the ionosphere of Mars proposed for the NASA SIMPLeX opportunity. The mission will investigate the plasma and magnetic structure of the Martian ionosphere, including transient plasma structures, magnetic field structure and dynamics, and energetic particle activity. The transit plan calls for a piggy back ride with Mars 2020 using a CAT burn for MOI, the first demonstration of CubeSat propulsion for interplanetary travel. MarsCAT will make correlated multipoint studies of the ionosphere and magnetic field of Mars. Specifically, the two spacecraft will make in situ observations of the plasma density, temperature, and convection in the ionosphere of Mars. They will also make total electron content measurements along the line of sight between the two spacecraft and simultaneous 3-axis local magnetic field measurements in two locations. Additionally, MarsCAT will demonstrate the performance of new CubeSat telemetry antennas designed at the University of Houston that are designed to be low profile, rugged, and with a higher gain than conventional monopole (whip) antennas. The two MarsCAT CubeSats will have five science instruments: a 3-axis DC magnetometer, adouble-Langmuir probe, a Faraday cup, a solid state energetic particle detector (Science Enhancement Option), and interspacecraft total electron content radio occulation experiment. The MarsCAT spacecraft will be solar powered and equipped with a CAT thruster that can provide up to 4.8 km/s of delta-V, which is sufficient to achieve Mars orbit using the Mars 2020 piggyback. They have an active attitude control system, using a sun sensor and flight-proven star tracker for determination, and momentum wheels for 3-axis attitude control.

  6. Strong ambipolar-driven ion upflow within the cleft ion fountain during low geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangyang; Knudsen, David J.; Burchill, Johnathan K.; Howarth, Andrew; Yau, Andrew; Redmon, Robert J.; Miles, David M.; Varney, Roger H.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate low-energy (<10 eV) ion upflows (mainly O+) within the cleft ion fountain (CIF) using conjunctions of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite, the DMSP F16 satellite, the SuperDARN radar, and the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar North (RISR-N). The SEI instrument on board e-POP enables us to derive ion upflow velocities from the 2-D images of ion distribution functions with a frame rate of 100 images per second, and with a velocity resolution of the order of 25 m/s. We identify three cleft ion fountain events with very intense (>1.6 km/s) ion upflow velocities near 1000 km altitude during quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp < 3). Such large ion upflow velocities have been reported previously at or below 1000 km, but only during active periods. Analysis of the core ion distribution images allows us to demonstrate that the ion temperature within the CIF does not rise by more than 0.3 eV relative to background values, which is consistent with RISR-N observations in the F region. The presence of soft electron precipitation seen by DMSP and lack of significant ion heating indicate that the ion upflows we observe near 1000 km altitude are primarily driven by ambipolar electric fields. DC field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection velocity gradients accompany these events. The strongest ion upflows are associated with downward current regions, which is consistent with some (although not all) previously published results. The moderate correlation coefficient (0.51) between upflow velocities and currents implies that FACs serve as indirect energy inputs to the ion upflow process.

  7. Electrical transport and photoconduction in ambipolar tungsten diselenide and n-type indium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fralaide, Michael Orcino

    In today's "silicon age" in which we live, field-effect transistors (FET) are the workhorse of virtually all modern-day electronic gadgets. Although silicon currently dominates most of these electronics, layered 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have great potential in low power optoelectronic applications due to their indirect-to-direct band gap transition from bulk to few-layer and high on/off switching ratios. TMDC WSe2 is studied here, mechanically exfoliated from CVT-grown bulk WSe2 crystals, to create a few-layered ambipolar FET, which transitions from dominant p-type behavior to n-type behavior dominating as temperature decreases. A high electron mobility mu>150 cm2V-1s-1 was found in the low temperature region near 50 K. Temperature-dependent photoconduction measurements were also taken, revealing that both the application of negative gate bias and decreasing the temperature resulted in an increase of the responsivity of the WSe2 sample. Besides TMDCs, Group III-VI van der Waals structures also show promising anisotropic optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. In particular, mechanically exfoliated few-layered InSe is studied here for its indirect band gap of 1.4 eV, which should offer a broad spectral response. It was found that the steady state photoconduction slightly decreased with the application of positive gate bias, likely due to the desorption of adsorbates on the surface of the sample. A room temperature responsivity near 5 AW -1 and external quantum efficiency of 207% was found for the InSe FET. Both TMDC's and group III-VI chalcogenides continue to be studied for their remarkably diverse properties that depend on their thickness and composition for their applications as transistors, sensors, and composite materials in photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  8. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Natali, Dario; Luzio, Alessandro; Caironi, Mario E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu; Noh, Yong-Young E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu

    2014-04-14

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μ{sub e}) and hole (μ{sub h}) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μ{sub h} = 0.29 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub e} = 0.001 cm{sup 2}/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μ{sub e} = 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub h} = 8 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  9. Unified description of potential profiles and electrical transport in unipolar and ambipolar organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Edsger C. P.; Mathijssen, Simon G. J.; Cölle, Michael; Mank, Arjan J. G.; Bobbert, Peter A.; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Boer, Bert; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2007-09-01

    Validation of models for charge transport in organic transistors is fundamentally important for their technological use. Usually current-voltage measurements are performed to investigate organic transistors. In situ scanning Kelvin probe microscopy measurements provide a powerful complementary technique to distinguish between models based on band and hopping transports. We perform combined current-voltage and Kelvin probe microscopy measurements on unipolar and ambipolar organic field-effect transistors. We demonstrate that by this combination we can stringently test these two different transport models and come up with a unified description of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors.

  10. Observation of ambipolar switching in a silver nanoparticle single-electron transistor with multiple molecular floating gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Shinohara, Shuhei; Tamada, Kaoru; Ishii, Hisao; Noguchi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Ambipolar switching behavior was observed in a silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-based single-electron transistor (SET) with tetra-tert-butyl copper phthalocyanine (ttbCuPc) as a molecular floating gate. Depending on the wavelength of the incident light, the stability diagram shifted to the negative and positive directions along the gate voltage axis. These results were explained by the photoinduced charging of ttbCuPc molecules in the vicinity of AgNPs. Moreover, multiple device states were induced by the light irradiation at a wavelength of 600 nm, suggesting that multiple ttbCuPc molecules individually worked as a floating gate.

  11. Light emitting ambipolar field-effect transistors of 2,5-bis(4-biphenyl)bithiophene single crystals with anisotropic carrier mobilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Li, Zhaofei; Nouchi, Ryo; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2009-09-01

    Ambipolar carrier injection is observed in organic field-effect transistors (FETs) based on 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)bithiophene single crystals. The device shows carrier mobilities of 0.04 and 0.02 cm2 V s for holes and electrons, respectively. Strong edge emission is observed, and the emission zone shifts upon the applied gate voltage. Hysteresis is found mainly in the ambipolar and electron-dominated regions. The electron mobility is significantly more sensitive to the transport direction than the hole mobility, suggesting that tuning the transport direction is very important to realize amplified spontaneous emission in organic FETs.

  12. Importance of Solubilizing Group and Backbone Planarity in Low Band Gap Polymers for High Performance Ambipolar field-effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joong Suk; Son, Seon Kyoung; Song, Sanghoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Lee, Dong Ryoul; Kim, Kyungkon; Ko, Min Jae; Choi, Dong Hoon; Kim, BongSoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2012-06-13

    We investigated the performance of ambipolar field-effect transistors based on a series of alternating low band gap polymers of oligothiophene and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP). The polymers contain oligothiophene units of terthiophene [T3] and thiophene-thienothiophene-thiophene [T2TT] and DPP units carrying branched alkyl chains of 2-hexyldecyl [HD] or 2-octyldodecyl [OD]. The structural variation allows us to do a systematic study on the relationship between the interchain stacking/ordering of semiconducting polymers and their resulting device performance. On the basis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements on polymer films, we found that longer branched alkyl side chains, i.e., OD, and longer and more planar oligothiophene, i.e., T2TT, generate the more crystalline structures. Upon thermal annealing, the crystallinity of the polymers was largely improved, and polymers containing a longer branched alkyl chain responded faster because longer alkyl chains have larger cohesive forces than shorter chains. For all the polymers, excellent ambipolar behavior was observed with a maximum hole and electron mobility of 2.2 and 0.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  13. Gate drain-overlapped-asymmetric gate dielectric-GAA-TFET: a solution for suppressed ambipolarity and enhanced ON state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Jaya; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work is to overcome the major impediments of tunnel FET such as the inherent ambipolar current ( I AMB) and the lower ON current ( I ON). To suppress the I AMB, gate drain overlap (GDO) engineering scheme has been incorporated over the cylindrical gate all around TFET (GAA-TFET). However, to enhance the I ON, heterogate dielectrics (HD) are used in the gate oxide region. Results indicate that an appreciably reduced I AMB and significantly enhanced I ON has been obtained with the amalgamation of GDO and HD, respectively, onto GAA-TFET. Further, the effect of GDO length ( L ov) has also been studied. Quantitative analysis of ambipolarity factor " α" reveals that at large L ov, " α" improves. It is found that GDO degrades the high-frequency (HF) performance such as cutoff frequency ( f T) of the device, because of the enhanced parasitic capacitances. To surpass the deterioration at HF caused by GDO, the dielectric over GDO region has been altered, and it has been analyzed that by inserting a material of low-dielectric constant ( k = 1) and parasitic capacitances of the device reduces, resulting into enhancement in f T. Moreover, the low-k dielectric inserted over L ov reduces the I AMB supplementary, along with enhanced f T. Suppressed I AMB and enhanced f T of GDO-HD-GAA-TFET with low-k dielectric over L ov make it adequate for application in HF and digital circuitry.

  14. Modeling solar flare conduction fronts. I - Homogeneous plasmas and ion-acoustic turbulence. II - Inhomogeneous plasmas and ambipolar electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    A one-dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulation is used here to model the expansion of a heated electron population in a coronal loop during a solar flare and the characteristics of the associated X-ray emissions. The hot electrons expand outward from the localized region, creating an ambipolar electric field which accelerates a return current of cooler, ambient electrons. Ion-acoustic waves are generated by the return currents as proposed by Brown et al. (1979), but they play little or no role in containing energetic electrons and the conduction front proposed by Brown et al. does not form. The X-ray emission efficiency of the electrons is too low in the corona for them to be the source of hard X-ray bursts. The particle dynamics changes dramatically if the heated plasma is at low altitudes and expands upward into the more tenuous plasma at higher altitudes. Two important applications of this finding are the radio-frequency heating of the corona and the collisional heating of the chromosphere by precipitating energetic electrons. In both cases, the overlying plasma has a density that is too low to supply a balancing return current to the expanding hot electrons. As a result, an ambipolar electric field develops that tends to confine the energetic electrons behind a front that propagate outward at about the speed of sound.

  15. Conjugate acene fused buckybowls: evaluating their suitability for p-type, ambipolar and n-type air stable organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Uppula; Sastry, G Narahari

    2013-04-14

    Elaborate and exhaustive first principles calculations were carried out to screen the novel properties of a series of acene fused buckybowls. The acene fused compounds exhibit hole transport property due to their higher electron injection and lower hole transport barrier relative to the work function potential of Au electrodes. The higher HOMO and lower LUMO energy levels suggest lower hole and electron injection barriers of F and CN substituted and boron doped bowls which indicates ambipolar property of these bowls. The dicyano substituted pentacene fused bowls show only electron transport property with lower LUMO (-4.26 eV to -4.27 eV) and higher HOMO (-5.56 eV to -5.90 eV) energy levels. High electron affinity (>2.80 eV) and low LUMO energy (< -4.00 eV) attributes air stability to these bowls. Curvature decreased frontier orbital energies and increased ionization energy and electron affinity of bowls. This study reveals substitution of electron withdrawing groups and boron doped acene fused bowls can be a prominent materials for ambipolar and electron transport organic semiconductors.

  16. Air stable, ambipolar organic transistors and inverters based upon a heterojunction structure of pentacene on N ,N'-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Min-Jun; Seo, Hoon-Seok; Zhang, Ying; Oh, Jeong-Do; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication and electrical characterization of top-contact, ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and inverters based upon a heterostructure of p-type pentacene on n-type N ,N'-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (P13), using the neutral cluster beam deposition (NCBD) method. The device characteristics measured as a function of both P13 and pentacene layer thicknesses revealed that OFETs with thicknesses of P13 (300 Å) and pentacene (200 Å) showed high air-stability and well-balanced ambipolarity with hole and electron mobilities of 0.12 and 0.08 cm2/V s. The complementary inverters, comprising two identical ambipolar OFETs, were found to operate both in the first and third quadrants of the transfer curves and exhibited a high voltage inversion gain of 13, good noise margins, and little hysteresis under ambient conditions. The results presented demonstrate that the NCBD-based ambipolar transistors and inverters qualify them as promising potential candidates for the construction of high-performance, organic thin film-based integrated circuits.

  17. Tuning charge balance in PHOLEDs with ambipolar host materials to achieve high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Chopra, Neetu; So, Franky; Sapochak, Linda S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2009-08-27

    operating voltages, particularly if this is to be achieved in a device that can be manufactured at low cost. To avoid the efficiency losses associated with phosphorescence quenching by back-energy transfer from the dopant onto the host, the triplet excited states of the host material must be higher in energy than the triplet excited state of the dopant.5 This must be accomplished without sacrificing the charge transporting properties of the composite.6 Similar problems limit the efficiency of OLED-based displays, where blue light emitters are the least efficient and least stable. We previously demonstrated the utility of organic phosphine oxide (PO) materials as electron transporting HMs for FIrpic in blue OLEDs.7 However, the high reluctance of PO materials to oxidation and thus, hole injection limits the ability to balance charge injection and transport in the EML without relying on charge transport by the phosphorescent dopant. PO host materials were engineered to transport both electrons and holes in the EML and still maintain high triplet exciton energy to ensure efficient energy transfer to the dopant (Figure 1). There are examples of combining hole transporting moieties (mainly aromatic amines) with electron transport moieties (e.g., oxadiazoles, triazines, boranes)8 to develop new emitter and host materials for small molecule and polymer9 OLEDs. The challenge is to combine the two moieties without lowering the triplet energy of the target molecule. For example, coupling of a dimesitylphenylboryl moiety with a tertiary aromatic amine (FIAMBOT) results in intramolecular electron transfer from the amine to the boron atom through the bridging phenyl. The mesomeric effect of the dimesitylphenylboryl unit acts to extend conjugation and lowers triplet exciton energies (< 2.8 eV) rendering such systems inadequate as ambipolar hosts for blue phosphors.

  18. Toward printed integrated circuits based on unipolar or ambipolar polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Kang-Jun; Caironi, Mario; Noh, Yong-Young

    2013-08-21

    transport properties. Among this class of materials, various polymers can show well balanced electrons and holes mobility, therefore being indicated as ambipolar semiconductors, good environmental stability, and a small band-gap, which simplifies the tuning of charge injection. This opened up the possibility of taking advantage of the superior performances offered by complementary "CMOS-like" logic for the design of digital ICs, easing the scaling down of critical geometrical features, and achieving higher complexity from robust single gates (e.g., inverters) and test circuits (e.g., ring oscillators) to more complete circuits. Here, we review the recent progress in the development of printed ICs based on polymeric semiconductors suitable for large-volume micro- and nano-electronics applications. Particular attention is paid to the strategies proposed in the literature to design and synthesize high mobility polymers and to develop suitable printing tools and techniques to allow for improved patterning capability required for the down-scaling of devices in order to achieve the operation frequencies needed for applications, such as flexible radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, near-field communication (NFC) devices, ambient electronics, and portable flexible displays.

  19. Computational design of high efficiency nonplanar tri-s-triazine-based ambipolar host materials for phosphorescent blue emitters.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhaomin; Mai, Zhirui; Peng, Yiming; Chen, Kaiping; Zhang, Yiyun; Zheng, Wenxu

    2016-12-07

    A series of nonplanar tri-s-triazine-based molecules were designed, and their optical, electronic, and charge transport properties as ambipolar host materials for blue electrophosphorescence emitters were explored by density functional theory. The influence of the linkage between tri-s-triazine and carbazole, diphenylamine and triphenylamine, as well as the influence of a series of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on triplet energy, energy level matching and charge transport of the designed molecules was discussed in detail. Our results reveal that the molecules under investigation can serve as host materials for blue electrophosphorescence emitters. We also predicted the mobility of designed molecules with better performance in the P1[combining macron] space group. Based on the investigated results, we proposed a rational way for the design of host materials for OLEDs, and also expanded the application field of tri-s-triazine.

  20. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Hershkowitz, Noah; Longmier, Benjamin; Baalrud, Scott

    2009-03-03

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  1. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  2. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  3. Switching and memory characteristics of thin films of an ambipolar organic compound: effects of device processing and electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung-Won; Pearson, Christopher; Moon, Tae Jung; Fisher, Alison L.; Petty, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the effects of device processing conditions, and of changing the electrode materials, on the switching and negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of metal/organic thin film/metal structures. The organic material was an ambipolar molecule containing both electron transporting (oxadiazole) and hole transporting (carbazole) chemical groups. Switching and NDR effects are observed for device architectures with both electrodes consisting of aluminium; optimized switching behaviour is achieved for structures incorporating gold nanoparticles. If one of the Al electrodes is replaced by a higher work function metal or coated with an electron-blocking layer, switching and NDR are no longer observed. The results are consistent with a model based on the creation and destruction of Al filaments within the thin organic layer.

  4. Ambipolar transport and magneto-resistance crossover in a Mott insulator, Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, J.; Serrao, C. R.; Efetov, D. K.; Yi, D.; Oh, Y. S.; Cheong, S.-W.; Ramesh, R.; Kim, P.

    2016-12-01

    Electric field effect (EFE) controlled magnetoelectric transport in thin films of undoped and La-doped Sr2IrO4 (SIO) is investigated using ionic liquid gating. The temperature dependent resistance measurements exhibit insulating behavior in chemically and EFE doped samples with the band filling up to 10%. The ambipolar transport across the Mott gap is demonstrated by EFE tuning of the channel resistance and chemical doping. We observe a crossover from high temperature negative to low temperature positive magnetoresistance around  ˜80-90 K, irrespective of the filling. This temperature and magnetic field dependent crossover is discussed in the light of conduction mechanisms of SIO, especially variable range hopping (VRH), and its relevance to the insulating ground state of SIO.

  5. Characterization of photo-induced electron and hole transfer in a porphyrin based ambipolar organic molecule with cascade energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyang; Weerasinghe, Krishanthi C.; Sun, Haiya; Li, Ping'an; Liu, Dongzhi; Li, Wei; Hu, Wenping; Zhou, Xueqin; Wang, Lichang

    2017-08-01

    A porphyrin based ambipolar organic molecule consisting of styrene based triphenylamine derivative (MTPA) as electron donor, s-triazine group (TRC) as electron acceptor 1 and metal-free tetraphenyl porphyrin (HTPP) as electron acceptor 2 was synthesized and characterized using computational methods and electrochemical and spectroscopic measurements. The kinetics analysis indicates that the photo-induced charge-separated states, MTPA.+-TRC-HTPP.-, were generated by sequential electron transfers from MTPA to TRC then to HTPP and/or a direct hole transfer from HTPP to MTPA. In toluene, the charge-separated states were formed with 54% through electron transfer and 46% through hole transfer once MTPA moiety was excited. However, in dichloromethane, they were formed with 75% through electron transfer and 25% through hole transfer. Furthermore, more charge-separated species were generated in dichloromethane than in toluene.

  6. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  7. Reconnection Diffusion in Turbulent Fluids and Its Implications for Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    2014-05-01

    Astrophysical fluids are turbulent a fact which changes the dynamics of many key processes, including magnetic reconnection. Fast reconnection of magnetic field in turbulent fluids allows the field to change its topology and connections. As a result, the traditional concept of magnetic fields being frozen into the plasma is no longer applicable. Plasma associated with a given magnetic field line at one instant is distributed along a different set of magnetic field lines at the next instant. This diffusion of plasmas and magnetic field is enabled by reconnection and therefore is termed "reconnection diffusion". The astrophysical implications of this concept include heat transfer in plasmas, advection of heavy elements in interstellar medium, magnetic field generation etc. However, the most dramatic implications of the concept are related to the star formation process. The reason is that magnetic fields are dynamically important for most of the stages of star formation. The existing theory of star formation has been developed ignoring the possibility of reconnection diffusion. Instead, it appeals to the decoupling of mass and magnetic field arising from neutrals drifting in respect to ions entrained on magnetic field lines, i.e. through the process that is termed "ambipolar diffusion". The predictions of ambipolar diffusion and reconnection diffusion are very different. For instance, if the ionization of media is high, ambipolar diffusion predicts that the coupling of mass and magnetic field is nearly perfect. At the same time, reconnection diffusion is independent of the ionization but depends on the scale of the turbulent eddies and on the turbulent velocities. In the paper we explain the physics of reconnection diffusion both from macroscopic and microscopic points of view, i.e. appealing to the reconnection of flux tubes and to the diffusion of magnetic field lines. We make use of the Lazarian and Vishniac (Astrophys. J. 517:700, 1999) theory of magnetic

  8. Discharge regime of non-ambipolarity with a self-induced steady-state magnetic field in plasma sources with localized radio-frequency power deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shivarova, A. Lishev, St.; Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.

    2015-10-15

    Involving the idea for the Biermann effect known from space physics as well as recent discussions on non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes in low-pressure discharges, the study builds the discharge pattern in a source with localized RF power deposition outside the region of high electron density. A vortex dc current flowing in an RF discharge and a steady-state magnetic field induced by this current govern the discharge behavior. Owing to a shift in the positions of the electron-density and plasma-potential maxima, the dc current is driven with the purpose of keeping the conservativity of the dc field in the discharge. The results present the spatial structure of a discharge in a regime of non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes, including its modifications by the magnetic field.

  9. Switching between attractive and repulsive Coulomb-interaction-mediated drag in an ambipolar GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer device

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Croxall, A. F.; Waldie, J. Sfigakis, F.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Das Gupta, K.

    2016-02-08

    We present measurements of Coulomb drag in an ambipolar GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well structure that can be configured as both an electron-hole bilayer and a hole-hole bilayer, with an insulating barrier of only 10 nm between the two quantum wells. Coulomb drag resistivity is a direct measure of the strength of interlayer particle-particle interactions. We explore the strongly interacting regime of low carrier densities (2D interaction parameter r{sub s} up to 14). Our ambipolar device design allows a comparison between the effects of the attractive electron-hole and repulsive hole-hole interactions and also shows the effects of the different effective masses of electrons and holes in GaAs.

  10. Novel red phosphorescent polymers bearing both ambipolar and functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent moieties for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Lian, Meng; Yu, Yue; Yan, Xiaogang; Xu, Xianbin; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel red phosphorescent polymers is successfully developed through Suzuki cross-coupling among ambipolar units, functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent blocks, and fluorene-based silane moieties. The photophysical and electrochemical investigations indicate not only highly efficient energy-transfer from the organic segments to the phosphorescent units in the polymer backbone but also the ambipolar character of the copolymers. Benefiting from all these merits, the phosphorescent polymers can furnish organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with exceptional high electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies with a current efficiency (η L ) of 8.31 cd A(-1) , external quantum efficiency (η ext ) of 16.07%, and power efficiency (η P ) of 2.95 lm W(-1) , representing the state-of-the-art electroluminescent performances ever achieved by red phosphorescent polymers. This work here might represent a new pathway to design and synthesize highly efficient phosphorescent polymers.

  11. Effect of asymmetrical double-pockets and gate-drain underlap on Schottky barrier tunneling FET: Ambipolar conduction vs. high frequency performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a proposed structure based on asymmetrical double pockets SB-TFET with gate-drain underlap is presented. 2D extensive modeling and simulation, using Silvaco TCAD, were carried out to study the effect of both underlap length and pockets' doping on the transistor performance. It was found that the underlap from the drain side suppresses the ambipolar conduction and doesn't enhance the high-frequency characteristics. The enhancement of the high-frequency characteristics could be realized by increasing the doping of the drain pocket over the doping of the source pocket. An optimum choice was found which gives the conditions of minimum ambipolar conduction, maximum ON current and maximum cut-off frequency. These enhancements render the device more competitive as a nanometer transistor.

  12. Diffuse spreading of inhomogeneities in the ionospheric dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shalimov, S. L.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2015-08-15

    According to results of sounding of the lower ionosphere at altitudes of about 100 km, the duration of radio reflections from sufficiently dense ionized meteor trails, which characterizes their lifetime, can reach a few tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. This is much longer than the characteristic spreading time (on the order of fractions of a second to several seconds) typical in meteor radar measurements. The presence of dust in the lower ionosphere is shown to affect the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, which determines the spreading of plasma inhomogeneities. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends substantially on the charge and size of dust grains, which allows one to explain the results of ionospheric sounding.

  13. Scaling and Graphical Transport-Map Analysis of Ambipolar Schottky-Barrier Thin-Film Transistors Based on a Parallel Array of Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Dae-Young; Pregl, Sebastian; Park, So Jeong; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2015-07-08

    Si nanowire (Si-NW) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation flexible and wearable electronics as well as sensor applications with high performance. Here, we have fabricated ambipolar Schottky-barrier (SB) TFTs consisting of a parallel array of Si-NWs and performed an in-depth study related to their electrical performance and operation mechanism through several electrical parameters extracted from the channel length scaling based method. Especially, the newly suggested current-voltage (I-V) contour map clearly elucidates the unique operation mechanism of the ambipolar SB-TFTs, governed by Schottky-junction between NiSi2 and Si-NW. Further, it reveals for the first-time in SB based FETs the important internal electrostatic coupling between the channel and externally applied voltages. This work provides helpful information for the realization of practical circuits with ambipolar SB-TFTs that can be transferred to different substrate technologies and applications.

  14. Solution-Processed Ambipolar Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Blending p- and n-Type Semiconductors: Solid Solution versus Microphase Separation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomin; Xiao, Ting; Gu, Xiao; Yang, Xuejin; Kershaw, Stephen V; Zhao, Ni; Xu, Jianbin; Miao, Qian

    2015-12-30

    Here, we report solid solution of p- and n-type organic semiconductors as a new type of p-n blend for solution-processed ambipolar organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). This study compares the solid-solution films of silylethynylated tetraazapentacene 1 (acceptor) and silylethynylated pentacene 2 (donor) with the microphase-separated films of 1 and 3, a heptagon-embedded analogue of 2. It is found that the solid solutions of (1)x(2)1-x function as ambipolar semiconductors, whose hole and electron mobilities are tunable by varying the ratio of 1 and 2 in the solid solution. The OTFTs of (1)0.5(2)0.5 exhibit relatively balanced hole and electron mobilities comparable to the highest values as reported for ambipolar OTFTs of stoichiometric donor-acceptor cocrystals and microphase-separated p-n bulk heterojunctions. The solid solution of (1)0.5(2)0.5 and the microphase-separated blend of 1:3 (0.5:0.5) in OTFTs exhibit different responses to light in terms of absorption and photoeffect of OTFTs because the donor and acceptor are mixed at molecular level with π-π stacking in the solid solution.

  15. An Ambipolar BODIPY Derivative for a White Exciplex OLED and Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Laser toward Multifunctional Devices.

    PubMed

    Chapran, Marian; Angioni, Enrico; Findlay, Neil J; Breig, Benjamin; Cherpak, Vladyslav; Stakhira, Pavlo; Tuttle, Tell; Volyniuk, Dmytro; Grazulevicius, Juozas V; Nastishin, Yuriy A; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Skabara, Peter J

    2017-02-08

    A new interface engineering method is demonstrated for the preparation of an efficient white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by embedding an ultrathin layer of the novel ambipolar red emissive compound 4,4-difluoro-2,6-di(4-hexylthiopen-2-yl)-1,3,5,7,8-pentamethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (bThBODIPY) in the exciplex formation region. The compound shows a hole and electron mobility of 3.3 × 10(-4) and 2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively, at electric fields higher than 5.3 × 10(5) V cm(-1). The resulting WOLED exhibited a maximum luminance of 6579 cd m(-2) with CIE 1931 color coordinates (0.39; 0.35). The bThBODIPY dye is also demonstrated to be an effective laser dye for a cholesteric liquid crystal (ChLC) laser. New construction of the ChLC laser, by which a flat capillary with an optically isotropic dye solution is sandwiched between two dye-free ChLC cells, provides photonic lasing at a wavelength well matched with that of a dye-doped planar ChLC cell.

  16. Flexible ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with reverse-offset-printed silver electrodes for a complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsu; Kim, Minseok; Yeom, Seung-Won; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Song, Hyenggun; Min Jhon, Young; Kim, Yun-Hi; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-06-03

    We report ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and complementary inverter circuits with reverse-offset-printed (ROP) Ag electrodes fabricated on a flexible substrate. A diketopyrrolopyrrole-based co-polymer (PDPP-TAT) was used as the semiconductor and poly(methyl methacrylate) was used as the gate insulator. Considerable improvement is observed in the n-channel electrical characteristics by inserting a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as the electron-injection/hole-blocking layer at the interface between the semiconductors and the electrodes. The saturation mobility values are 0.35 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the p-channel and 0.027 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the n-channel. A complementary inverter is demonstrated based on the ROP process, and it is selectively controlled by the insertion of Cs2CO3 onto the n-channel region via thermal evaporation. Moreover, the devices show stable operation during the mechanical bending test using tensile strains ranging from 0.05% to 0.5%. The results confirm that these devices have great potential for use in flexible and inexpensive integrated circuits over a large area.

  17. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-01

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 105 and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  18. Electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and effects of air exposure on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakanoue, Tomo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Takimiya, Kazuo; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by controlling the device structure and preparation and the measurement conditions. Six organic semiconductor materials (copper-phthalocyanine, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3), alpha-sexithiophene, 4-4'-bis-styrylphenyl, 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, or a photopolymerized polydiacethylene derivative (PDA) were used as the active layer, and all were found to transport both holes and electrons. The PDA-based FETs had the highest hole and electron mobilities (0.12 and 0.025 cm2/V s, respectively). We also investigated the effect of air exposure on the OFETs. The hole mobility was barely affected by the exposure while the electron mobility was significantly affected. The threshold voltage for p-channel operation was shifted by the exposure while that for n-channel operation was not, indicating that the hole density in the active layer is increased by air exposure whereas the electron density is independent of air exposure. Furthermore, we prepared an Alq3-based p-channel OFET and investigated the effect of air exposure on it. While its operation was stable in vacuum, air exposure degraded its characteristics. These behaviors indicate that irreversible chemical reactions occur between cationic Alq3 species and oxygen or water molecules.

  19. An organic water-gated ambipolar transistor with a bulk heterojunction active layer for stable and tunable photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haihua; Zhu, Qingqing; Wu, Tongyuan; Chen, Wenwen; Zhou, Guodong; Li, Jun; Zhang, Huisheng; Zhao, Ni

    2016-11-01

    Organic water-gated transistors (OWGTs) have emerged as promising sensing architectures for biomedical applications and environmental monitoring due to their ability of in-situ detection of biological substances with high sensitivity and low operation voltage, as well as compatibility with various read-out circuits. Tremendous progress has been made in the development of p-type OWGTs. However, achieving stable n-type operation in OWGTs due to the presence of solvated oxygen in water is still challenging. Here, we report an ambipolar OWGT based on a bulk heterojunction active layer, which exhibits a stable hole and electron transport when exposed to aqueous environment. The device can be used as a photodetector both in the hole and electron accumulation regions to yield a maximum responsivity of 0.87 A W-1. More importantly, the device exhibited stable static and dynamic photodetection even when operated in the n-type mode. These findings bring possibilities for the device to be adopted for future biosensing platforms, which are fully compatible with low-cost and low-power organic complementary circuits.

  20. Field-Effect Modulation of Ambipolar Doping and Domain Wall Band Alignment in P-type Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yasen; Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Yu, Dong

    The sub-picosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors. However, the development of VO2-based transistors lags behind, owing to the lack of an efficient and hysteresis-free electrostatic doping control. Here we report the first synthesis of p-type single crystalline VO2nanowires via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The p-type doping was unambiguously confirmed by both solid and electrochemical gating methods, and further evidenced by the scanning photocurrent microscopic measurements. Interestingly, we observed that the photocurrent spot polarity at the metal-insulator domain walls was reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, which indicates a band bending flipping. Furthermore, we eliminated the common hysteresis in gate sweep and greatly shortened the transistor response time via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers new opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables novel electronic applications based on VO2.

  1. A two-dimensional π-d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; Di, Chong-an; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-06-15

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid-liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm(2 )V(-1 )s(-1) for holes and 116 cm(2 )V(-1 )s(-1) for electrons) under field-effect modulation.

  2. Ambipolar field effect in the ternary topological insulator (Bi(x)Sb(1-x))2Te3 by composition tuning.

    PubMed

    Kong, Desheng; Chen, Yulin; Cha, Judy J; Zhang, Qianfan; Analytis, James G; Lai, Keji; Liu, Zhongkai; Hong, Seung Sae; Koski, Kristie J; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Fisher, Ian R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Cui, Yi

    2011-10-02

    Topological insulators exhibit a bulk energy gap and spin-polarized surface states that lead to unique electronic properties, with potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processing. However, transport measurements have typically been dominated by residual bulk charge carriers originating from crystal defects or environmental doping, and these mask the contribution of surface carriers to charge transport in these materials. Controlling bulk carriers in current topological insulator materials, such as the binary sesquichalcogenides Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and Bi2Se3, has been explored extensively by means of material doping and electrical gating, but limited progress has been made to achieve nanostructures with low bulk conductivity for electronic device applications. Here we demonstrate that the ternary sesquichalcogenide (Bi(x)Sb(1-x))2Te3 is a tunable topological insulator system. By tuning the ratio of bismuth to antimony, we are able to reduce the bulk carrier density by over two orders of magnitude, while maintaining the topological insulator properties. As a result, we observe a clear ambipolar gating effect in (Bi(x)Sb(1-x))2Te3 nanoplate field-effect transistor devices, similar to that observed in graphene field-effect transistor devices. The manipulation of carrier type and density in topological insulator nanostructures demonstrated here paves the way for the implementation of topological insulators in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  3. A two-dimensional π-d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; di, Chong-An; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-06-01

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid-liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm-1, which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm2 V-1 s-1 for holes and 116 cm2 V-1 s-1 for electrons) under field-effect modulation.

  4. A two-dimensional π–d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; Di, Chong-an; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid–liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm−1, which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes and 116 cm2 V−1 s−1 for electrons) under field-effect modulation. PMID:26074272

  5. Flexible ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with reverse-offset-printed silver electrodes for a complementary inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsu; Kim, Minseok; Yeom, Seung-Won; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Song, Hyenggun; Jhon, Young Min; Kim, Yun-Hi; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    We report ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and complementary inverter circuits with reverse-offset-printed (ROP) Ag electrodes fabricated on a flexible substrate. A diketopyrrolopyrrole-based co-polymer (PDPP-TAT) was used as the semiconductor and poly(methyl methacrylate) was used as the gate insulator. Considerable improvement is observed in the n-channel electrical characteristics by inserting a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as the electron-injection/hole-blocking layer at the interface between the semiconductors and the electrodes. The saturation mobility values are 0.35 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the p-channel and 0.027 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the n-channel. A complementary inverter is demonstrated based on the ROP process, and it is selectively controlled by the insertion of Cs2CO3 onto the n-channel region via thermal evaporation. Moreover, the devices show stable operation during the mechanical bending test using tensile strains ranging from 0.05% to 0.5%. The results confirm that these devices have great potential for use in flexible and inexpensive integrated circuits over a large area.

  6. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-07

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 10(5) and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  7. Quantum and Classical Magnetoresistance in Ambipolar Topological Insulator Transistors with Gate-tunable Bulk and Surface Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jifa; Chang, Cuizu; Cao, Helin; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-01-01

    Weak antilocalization (WAL) and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) are two most commonly observed magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in topological insulators (TIs) and often attributed to the Dirac topological surface states (TSS). However, ambiguities exist because these phenomena could also come from bulk states (often carrying significant conduction in many TIs) and are observable even in non-TI materials. Here, we demonstrate back-gated ambipolar TI field-effect transistors in (Bi0.04Sb0.96)2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3(111), exhibiting a large carrier density tunability (by nearly 2 orders of magnitude) and a metal-insulator transition in the bulk (allowing switching off the bulk conduction). Tuning the Fermi level from bulk band to TSS strongly enhances both the WAL (increasing the number of quantum coherent channels from one to peak around two) and LMR (increasing its slope by up to 10 times). The SS-enhanced LMR is accompanied by a strongly nonlinear Hall effect, suggesting important roles of charge inhomogeneity (and a related classical LMR), although existing models of LMR cannot capture all aspects of our data. Our systematic gate and temperature dependent magnetotransport studies provide deeper insights into the nature of both MR phenomena and reveal differences between bulk and TSS transport in TI related materials. PMID:24810663

  8. Two-stage bulk electron heating in the diffusion region of anti-parallel symmetric reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Le, Ari Yitzchak; Egedal, Jan; Daughton, William Scott

    2016-10-13

    Electron bulk energization in the diffusion region during anti-parallel symmetric reconnection entails two stages. First, the inflowing electrons are adiabatically trapped and energized by an ambipolar parallel electric field. Next, the electrons gain energy from the reconnection electric field as they undergo meandering motion. These collisionless mechanisms have been described previously, and they lead to highly structured electron velocity distributions. Furthermore, a simplified control-volume analysis gives estimates for how the net effective heating scales with the upstream plasma conditions in agreement with fully kinetic simulations and spacecraft observations.

  9. Anisotropic diffusion in mesh-free numerical magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    We extend recently developed mesh-free Lagrangian methods for numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to arbitrary anisotropic diffusion equations, including: passive scalar diffusion, Spitzer-Braginskii conduction and viscosity, cosmic ray diffusion/streaming, anisotropic radiation transport, non-ideal MHD (Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, the Hall effect) and turbulent 'eddy diffusion'. We study these as implemented in the code GIZMO for both new meshless finite-volume Godunov schemes (MFM/MFV). We show that the MFM/MFV methods are accurate and stable even with noisy fields and irregular particle arrangements, and recover the correct behaviour even in arbitrarily anisotropic cases. They are competitive with state-of-the-art AMR/moving-mesh methods, and can correctly treat anisotropic diffusion-driven instabilities (e.g. the MTI and HBI, Hall MRI). We also develop a new scheme for stabilizing anisotropic tensor-valued fluxes with high-order gradient estimators and non-linear flux limiters, which is trivially generalized to AMR/moving-mesh codes. We also present applications of some of these improvements for SPH, in the form of a new integral-Godunov SPH formulation that adopts a moving-least squares gradient estimator and introduces a flux-limited Riemann problem between particles.

  10. On the diffusion of free carriers in {beta}-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Werheit, H. . E-mail: helmut.werheit@koeln.de; Moldenhauer, A.

    2006-09-15

    To determine the diffusion of untrapped carriers in {beta}-rhombohedral boron, we constructed a feedback pico-ammeter based on pulse integration technique. This enabled measuring deviations from the bias in a 10{sup 9}{omega} sample in the order of 1nA with 0.7ms time resolution. For the first time, we obtained the drift velocity of optically generated untrapped electron-hole pairs 106(20)cms{sup -1} yielding for the band-determined diffusion coefficient D=12(4)cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and for the carrier mobility {mu}{sub ambipolar}=565(120)cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Fitting Fick's second law to the measured trap-determined dispersion of carriers yields the ambipolar diffusion coefficient D*=0.043(14) and 0.28(10)cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 260 and 340K, respectively. The thermal activation energy of 0.18eV agrees with the well-known trapping levels in {beta}-rhombohedral boron.

  11. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  12. Reappearance of linear hole transport in an ambipolar undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, Deepyanti; Shlimak, Issai; Narayan, Vijay; Kaveh, Moshe; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David

    2017-05-01

    We report the results of an investigation of ambipolar transport in a quantum well of 15 nm width in an undoped GaAs/AlGaAs structure, which was populated either by electrons or holes using positive or negative gate voltage Vtg, respectively. More attention was focussed on the low concentration of electrons n and holes p near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). It is shown that the electron mobility {μe} increases almost linearly with increase of n and is independent of temperature T in the interval 0.3 K-1.4 K, while the hole mobility {μp} depends non-monotonically on p and T. This difference is explained on the basis of the different effective masses of electrons and holes in GaAs. Intriguingly, we observe that at low p the source-drain current (ISD)-voltage (V) characteristics, which become non-linear beyond a certain ISD, exhibit a re-entrant linear regime at even higher ISD. We find, remarkably, that the departure and reappearance of linear behaviour are not due to non-linear response of the system, but due to an intrinsic mechanism by which there is a reduction in the net number of mobile carriers. This effect is interpreted as evidence of inhomogeneity of the conductive 2D layer in the vicinity of MIT and trapping of holes in ‘dead ends’ of insulating islands. Our results provide insights into transport mechanisms as well as the spatial structure of the 2D conducting medium near the 2D MIT.

  13. Driving voltage reduction in white organic light-emitting devices from selectively doping in ambipolar blue-emitting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chi-Feng; Lee, Jiun-Haw

    2007-11-01

    White organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) consisting of ambipolar 9,10-bis(2'-naphthyl) anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue-emitting layer (EML) were investigated. A thin codoped layer of yellow 5,6,11,12-Tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) served as a probe for detecting the position of maximum recombination rate in the 4,4'-bis[2-(4-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl)vinyl]biphenyl (DPAVBi) doped-ADN EML. Due to the energy barrier and bipolar carrier transport, the maximum recombination rate was found to be close to but not exactly at the interface of the hole-transporting layer and the EML. With appropriate tuning in the thickness, position, and dopant concentrations of the codoped layer (rubrene:DPAVBi:ADN) in the EML, the device driving voltage decreased by 21.7%, nearly 2 V in reduction, due to the increased recombination current from the faster exciton relaxation induced by the yellow dopants. Among the advantages of introducing the codoped layer over conventional single-doped layers are the elimination of the trapping effect to avoid increasing the device driving voltage, the alleviation of the dependence of the recombination zone on the applied voltage for improving color stability, and the utilization of excitons in a more efficient way to enhance device efficiency. Without using any electrically conductive layers such as the p-i-n structure, we were able to successfully generate 112 cd/m2 at 4 V from our white OLED simply by engineering the structure of the EML.

  14. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  15. Plasmapause diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Bohm diffusion coefficient and observed electrostatic wave scattering are used as the bases of estimates of the smoothing effect that diffusion may have on steep plasmapause density gradients. The estimate for diffusion resulting from scattering by observed electrostatic waves is found to be much lower than that of the perpendicular Bohm diffusion coefficient for characteristic plasma temperatures and magnetic fields. This diffusion rate estimate may be too small, however, if the wave amplitudes are significantly higher for steep plasmapauses. The effects are therefore negligible for most considerations of macroscopic plasmapause dynamics, but may be significant in limiting drift wave instabilities and similar phenomena driven by the steepness of the plasmapause density gradient.

  16. Cycle of charge carrier states with formation and extinction of a floating gate in an ambipolar tetracyanoquaterthienoquinoid-based field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takuro; Toyota, Taro; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Michio M.; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    A tetracyanoquaterthienoquinoid (TCT4Q)-based field effect transistor is characterized by the ambipolar transfer characteristics and the facile shift of the threshold voltage induced by the bias stress. The trapping and detrapping kinetics of charge carriers was investigated in detail by the temperature dependence of the decay of source-drain current (ISD). We found a repeatable formation of a molecular floating gate is derived from a 'charge carrier-and-gate' cycle comprising four stages, trapping of mobile carriers, formation of a floating gate, induction of oppositely charged mobile carriers, and recombination between mobile and trapped carriers to restore the initial state.

  17. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  18. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  19. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  20. Floating-Gate Manipulated Graphene-Black Phosphorus Heterojunction for Nonvolatile Ambipolar Schottky Junction Memories, Memory Inverter Circuits, and Logic Rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Chen, Mingyuan; Zong, Qijun; Zhang, Zengxing

    2017-10-02

    The Schottky junction is an important unit in electronics and optoelectronics. However, its properties greatly degrade with device miniaturization. The fast development of circuits has fueled a rapid growth in the study of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, which may lead to breakthroughs in the semiconductor industry. Here we report a floating-gate manipulated nonvolatile ambipolar Schottky junction memory from stacked all-2D layers of graphene-BP/h-BN/graphene (BP, black phosphorus; h-BN, hexagonal boron nitride) in a designed floating-gate field-effect Schottky barrier transistor configuration. By manipulating the voltage pulse applied to the control gate, the device exhibits ambipolar characteristics and can be tuned to act as graphene-p-BP or graphene-n-BP junctions with reverse rectification behavior. Moreover, the junction exhibits good storability properties of more than 10 years and is also programmable. On the basis of these characteristics, we further demonstrate the application of the device to dual-mode nonvolatile Schottky junction memories, memory inverter circuits, and logic rectifiers.

  1. (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8]/CuPc two-component bilayer heterojunction-based organic transistors with high ambipolar performance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dameng; Zhang, Xia; Kong, Xia; Chen, Yanli; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2015-02-04

    Organic thin film transistor (OTFT) devices fabricated by the solution-based QLS technique from a mixed (phthalocyaninato)(porphyrinato) europium complex (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] exhibit air-stable ambipolar performance with mobilities of 6.0 × 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-)1 for holes and 1.4 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons, respectively. In good contrast, the two-component bilayer heterojunction thin film devices constructed by directly growing (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] on vacuum deposited (VCD) CuPc film using solution based QLS method were revealed to show unprecedented ambipolar performance with carrier mobilities of 0.16 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for holes and 0.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons. In addition to the intrinsic role of p-type organic semiconductor, the VCD CuPc film on the substrate also acts as a good template that induces significant improvement over the molecular ordering of triple-decker compound in the film. In particular, it results in the change in the aggregation mode of (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] from J-type in the single-layer film to H-type in the bilayer film according to the UV-vis, XRD, and AFM observations.

  2. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  3. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  4. Self-consistent modeling for estimation of the reduced electric field in a DC excited diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhagat, M. S.; Biswas, A. K.; Rana, L. B.; Pakhare, Jagdish; Rawat, B. S.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of a numerical simulation method that estimate various discharge parameters in the positive column of a DC glow discharge controlled by ambipolar diffusion are presented. The parameters like reduced electric field (E/N), electron temperature, ionization rates, ambipolar diffusion losses and the average gas temperature were numerically evaluated for several mixtures of CO2, N2 and He in low pressure regime. The estimated E/N value which is a primary governing parameter of positive column was verified experimentally using a double probe in diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser for a variety of CO2, N2 and He mixtures. The role of auxiliary ionization source like pulser used for pre-ionization and its effect on the steady state E/N value was also studied. A reasonably good agreement was found between the theoretical and the experimental results. Based on the results of this simulation a zigzag folded, diffusion-cooled, 500 W CW CO2 laser has been designed and developed for research in gas phase nanoparticle synthesis.

  5. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Diffusion Coefficient of Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Isamu; Hishinuma, Masakazu

    1996-05-01

    Electrical conductivity and chemical diffusion coefficient of Sr-doped lanthanum manganites, La 1- xSr xMnO 3±δ( x= 0.05 - 0.20), were measured by the dc four-probe technique and relaxation type experiments where a sudden change of oxygen chemical potential was imposed on the pre-equilibrated sample and the change of electrical conductivity was followed as a function of elapsed time. A defect model is proposed to elucidate the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the measured conductivity and the reported oxygen nonstoichiometry. The transient conductivity behavior after an abrupt change of oxygen partial pressure was successfully described by a diffusion model with consideration of partial control by surface reaction. The determined chemical diffusion coefficients, of the order of 10 -5to 10 -4cm 2s -1at 1000°C, increased with decreased oxygen partial pressure due to the thermodynamic enhancement effect. Using the enhancement factor estimated by combination of the proposed defect model and the ambipolar diffusion theory, the oxygen vacancy diffusion coefficients were derived. High vacancy diffusivity comparable to that of Fe- or Co-based perovskites predicts fast oxide ion diffusion under conditions where the manganites show oxygen deficient type non-stoichiometry.

  6. The Electric Wind of Venus: A Global and Persistent Polar Wind -Like Ambipolar Electric Field Sufficient for the Direct Escape of Heavy Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Federov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an ambipolar electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earths similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an electric wind must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  7. The electric wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind"-like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Fedorov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Nordheim, Tom A.; Mitchell, David; Moore, Thomas E.; Peterson, William K.; Winningham, John D.; Zhang, Tielong L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  8. The Electric Wind of Venus: A Global and Persistent Polar Wind -Like Ambipolar Electric Field Sufficient for the Direct Escape of Heavy Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Federov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Moore, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an ambipolar electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earths similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an electric wind must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  9. The Electric Wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind" like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, G.; Frahm, R.; Glocer, A.; Coates, A. J.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Barbash, S.; Fedorov, A.; Futaana, Y.; Gilbert, L.; Khazanov, G. V.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Nordheim, T.; Mitchell, D. L.; Moore, T. E.; Peterson, W.; Winningham, D.; Zhang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres, and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system

  10. Magnetic diffusivities in 3D radiative chemo-hydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Commerçon, Benoît; Lesaffre, Pierre; Semenov, Dimitry

    2017-07-01

    Context. Both theory and observations of star-forming clouds require simulations that combine the co-evolving chemistry, magneto-hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer in protostellar collapse simulation. A detailed knowledge of self-consistent chemical evolution for the main charge carriers (both gas species and dust grains) allows us to correctly estimate the rate and nature of magnetic dissipation in the collapsing core. This knowledge is critical to answer one of the most significant issues of star and planet formation: what is the magnitude and spatial distribution of magnetic flux as the initial condition to protoplanetary disk evolution? Aims: We use a chemo-dynamical version of RAMSES, which is described in a companion publication, to follow the chemo-dynamical evolution of collapsing dense cores with various dust properties and interpret differences that occur in magnetic diffusivity terms. These differences are crucial to circumstellar disk formation. Methods: We performed 3D chemo-dynamical simulations of 1 M⊙ isolated dense core collapse for a range in dust size assumptions. The number density of dust and its mean size affect the efficiency of charge capturing and the formation of ices. The radiative hydrodynamics and dynamical evolution of chemical abundances were used to reconstruct the magnetic diffusivity terms for clouds with various magnetisation. Results: The simulations are performed for a mean dust size ranging from 0.017 μm to 1 μm, and we adopt both a fixed dust size and a dust size distribution. The chemical abundances for this range of dust sizes are produced by RAMSES and serve as inputs to calculations of Ohmic, ambipolar, and Hall diffusivity terms. Ohmic resistivity only plays a role at the late stage of the collapse in the innermost region of the cloud where gas density is in excess of a few times 1013 cm-3. Ambipolar diffusion is a dominant magnetic diffusivity term in cases where mean dust size is a typical ISM value or larger. We

  11. Diffuser Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-13

    Tests begun at Stennis Space Center's E Complex Sept. 13 evaluated a liquid oxygen lead for engine start performance, part of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at SSC's E-3 Test Facility. Phase 1 of the subscale diffuser project, completed Sept. 24, was a series of 18 hot-fire tests using a 1,000-pound liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen thruster to verify maximum duration and repeatability for steam generation supporting the A-3 Test Stand project. The thruster is a stand-in for NASA's developing J-2X engine, to validate a 6 percent scale version of A-3's exhaust diffuser. Testing the J-2X at altitude conditions requires an enormous diffuser. Engineers will generate nearly 4,600 pounds per second of steam to reduce pressure inside A-3's test cell to simulate altitude conditions. A-3's exhaust diffuser has to be able to withstand regulated pressure, temperatures and the safe discharge of the steam produced during those tests. Before the real thing is built, engineers hope to work out any issues on the miniature version. Phase 2 testing is scheduled to begin this month.

  12. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  13. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  14. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  15. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  16. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Howard A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented.

  17. MAGNETIZATION OF CLOUD CORES AND ENVELOPES AND OTHER OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF RECONNECTION DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Esquivel, A.; Crutcher, R.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observational results for magnetic fields in molecular clouds reviewed by Crutcher seem to be inconsistent with the predictions of the ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation. These include the measured decrease in mass to flux ratio between envelopes and cores, the failure to detect any self-gravitating magnetically subcritical clouds, the determination of the flat probability distribution function (PDF) of the total magnetic field strengths implying that there are many clouds with very weak magnetic fields, and the observed scaling B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 2/3} that implies gravitational contraction with weak magnetic fields. We consider the problem of magnetic field evolution in turbulent molecular clouds and discuss the process of magnetic field diffusion mediated by magnetic reconnection. For this process that we termed 'reconnection diffusion', we provide a simple physical model and explain that this process is inevitable in view of the present-day understanding of MHD turbulence. We address the issue of the expected magnetization of cores and envelopes in the process of star formation and show that reconnection diffusion provides an efficient removal of magnetic flux that depends only on the properties of MHD turbulence in the core and the envelope. We show that as the amplitude of turbulence as well as the scale of turbulent motions decrease from the envelope to the core of the cloud, the diffusion of the magnetic field is faster in the envelope. As a result, the magnetic flux trapped during the collapse in the envelope is being released faster than the flux trapped in the core, resulting in much weaker fields in envelopes than in cores, as observed. We provide simple semi-analytical model calculations which support this conclusion and qualitatively agree with the observational results. Magnetic reconnection is also consistent with the lack of subcritical self-gravitating clouds, with the observed flat PDF of field strengths, and with the

  18. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  19. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  20. Self-similar and diffusive expansion of nonextensive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Exact analytical self-similar solution is presented for free collisionless expansion of a two-component plasma of inertial ions and nonextensive electrons into vacuum, using the generalized nonextensive velocity distribution for electrons. Furthermore, a hydrodynamic model of plasma expansion in the presence of the ambipolar diffusion caused by collisions among the plasma species, such as electrons and ions, is developed and a Fokker-Planck-like generalized diffusion equation for steady-state expansion of a nonextensive electron-ion plasma is derived. For the case of generalized statistics and in the absence of particle diffusion, the density, velocity, electric potential, and field of expansion profiles are exactly obtained and studied in terms of the self-similar parameter. It is found that superthermal electrons lead to an accelerated expansion of plasma compared to that of Maxwellian electrons. It is also revealed that the nonextensivity parameter plays a fundamental role on the density, velocity, electric potential, and field configuration of the expansion. Therefore, one is able to distinguish three different regimes q < 1, q = 1, and q > 1 for expansion corresponding to sub-nonextensive, extensive, and super-nonextensive statistical profiles for electrons, respectively. Current research can provide useful information and suggests techniques for investigation of the involved statistical mechanism on the role of the energetic electron fluid in the expansion of plasma in strong pulsed laser-matter interaction experiments. It is also shown that the particle diffusion expansion mechanism becomes more dominant for relatively large values of the nonextensivity parameter, q.

  1. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho-García, J. C.; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from -20 to -30 kcal mol-1 at close distances around 3.0-3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings).

  2. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho-García, J. C. Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-07

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from –20 to –30 kcal mol{sup −1} at close distances around 3.0–3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings)

  3. Flat-on ambipolar triphenylamine/C60 nano-stacks formed from the self-organization of a pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Wei; Huang, Chi-Feng; Wu, Kuan-Yi; Wu, San-Lien; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Yen-Ju; Wang, Chien-Lung

    2016-04-21

    A giant amphiphile, which is constructed with an amorphous nano-pyramid (triphenylamine, TPA) and a crystalline nano-sphere (C60), was synthesized. Structural characterization indicates that this pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile (TPA-C60 ) forms a solvent-induced ordered phase, in which the two constituent units self-assemble into alternating stacks of two-dimensional (2D) TPA and C60 nano-sheets. Due to the complexity of the molecular structure and the amorphous nature of the nano-pyramid, phase formation was driven by intermolecular C60-C60 interactions and the ordered phase could not be reformed from the TPA-C60 melt. Oriented crystal arrays of TPA-C60 , which contain flat-on TPA/C60 nano-stacks, can be obtained via a PDMS-assisted crystallization (PAC) technique. The flat-on dual-channel supramolecular structure of TPA-C60 delivered ambipolar and balanced charge-transport characteristics with an average μe of 2.11 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and μh of 3.37 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The anisotropic charge-transport ability of the pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile was further understood based on the lattice structure and the lattice orientation of TPA-C60 revealed from electron diffraction analyses.

  4. Light induced double ‘on’ state anti-ambipolar behavior and self-driven photoswitching in p-WSe2/n-SnS2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Huang, Le; Xia, Congxin; Tang, Li-Ming; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Li, Yongtao; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2017-06-01

    P-n junctions based on vertically stacked van der Waals (vdW) materials have attracted extensive attentions and may offer novel physical performances for the design of next-generation electronics. Here, vertically stacked p-WSe2/n-SnS2 heterostructures have been fabricated by a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-assisted transfer method. The unique electronical properties and self-driven photoelectric characteristics of the heterostructures are measured. The transfer current of the heterostructures show gate-tunable ‘anti-ambipolar’ behavior under dark condition with the maximum of the on/off ratio exceeding 105, while under light illumination it triggers double ‘on’ state anti-ambipolar behavior. The ‘anti-ambipolar’ behavior under dark condition and the ‘on’ state I under light illumination is originating from the in series of p-channel in WSe2 and n-channel in SnS2, while the ‘on’ state II can be attributed to the gate-controlled Schottky barrier modulation between the heterostructure and the Au electrodes. The heterostructure also shows self-driven photoswitching performance under 532 nm laser, which can be attributed to the type-II band alignment and the build-in potential of p-n heterostructure.

  5. N-type ohmic contacts to undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using only front-sided processing: application to ambipolar FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, D.; Sfigakis, F.; Croxall, A. F.; Das Gupta, K.; Narayan, V.; Waldie, J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a simple and reliable, front-sided-only fabrication technique for n-type ohmic contacts to two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. We have adapted the well-established recessed ohmic contacts/insulated metal gate technique for inducing a 2DEG in an undoped triangular well to also work reliably for undoped square quantum wells. Our adaptation involves a change in the procedure for etching the ohmic contact pits to optimise the etch side-wall profile and depth. As an application of our technique, we present a front-side-gated ambipolar field effect transistor (FET), where both 2D electron and hole gases can be induced in the same quantum well. We present results of low-temperature (0.3 K - 4 K) transport measurements of this device, including assessment of the n-type ohmic contact quality. On the basis of our findings, we discuss why the fabrication of these contacts is difficult and how our technique circumvents the challenges.

  6. Cyano-substituted oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) single-crystal with balanced hole and electron injection and transport for ambipolar field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian; Tang, Jia; Xu, Yuanxiang; Liu, Liqun; Wang, Yan; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-02-07

    High and balanced hole and electron mobilities were achieved in OFETs based on the high photoluminescence of a 1,4-bis(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)benzene single-crystal with symmetric electrodes. For electron and hole, the operation voltage in the OFETs based on symmetric gold electrodes was 30 and -20 V, respectively. The accumulation threshold voltage is low enough for the OFETs to operate in an ambipolar model with the source/drain voltage (Vds) around 50 V despite the high injection barrier. The highest electron and hole mobility was 0.745 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 0.239 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and the current density reached 90.7 and 27.4 A cm(-2), respectively with an assumed 10 nm accumulation layer. The high mobility comes from the strong π-π interactions. In addition, the highly ordered hydrogen bonding matrix may create an efficient route to pump the charge to the inner layer which can improve the injection ability.

  7. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  8. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  11. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  12. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  13. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung-Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katharine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm-100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  14. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katherine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm–100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  15. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaibrakhmanov, S. A.; Dudorov, A. E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations on dust grains and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the regions close to the borders of the `dead' zones because electrons are magnetized there. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-radial. We calculate the magnetic field strength and geometry for the discs with accretion rates (10^{-8}-10^{-6}) {M}_{⊙} {yr}^{-1}. The fossil magnetic field geometry does not change significantly during the disc evolution while the accretion rate decreases. We construct the synthetic maps of dust emission polarized due to the dust grain alignment by the magnetic field. In the polarization maps, the `dead' zones appear as the regions with the reduced values of polarization degree in comparison to those in the adjacent regions.

  16. Diffusing diffusivity: Rotational diffusion in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the probability distribution function (pdf) of angular displacement for rotational diffusion in a crowded, rearranging medium. We use the diffusing diffusivity model and following our previous work on translational diffusion [R. Jain and K. L. Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016)], we show that the problem can be reduced to that of calculating the survival probability of a particle undergoing Brownian motion, in the presence of a sink. We use the approach to calculate the pdf for the rotational motion in two and three dimensions. We also propose new dimensionless, time dependent parameters, αr o t ,2 D and αr o t ,3 D, which can be used to analyze the experimental/simulation data to find the extent of deviation from the normal behavior, i.e., constant diffusivity, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for them, within our model.

  17. On the Grain-modified Magnetic Diffusivities in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-03-01

    Weakly ionized protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are subject to nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, including ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion (AD), and the resulting magnetic diffusivities ({η }{{O}},{η }{{H}}, and {η }{{A}}) largely control the disk gas dynamics. The presence of grains not only strongly reduces the disk ionization fraction, but also modifies the scalings of {η }{{H}} and {η }{{A}} with magnetic field strength. We analytically derive asymptotic expressions of {η }{{H}} and {η }{{A}} in both the strong and weak field limits and show that toward a strong field, {η }{{H}} can change sign (at a threshold field strength {B}{{th}}), mimicking a flip of field polarity, and AD is substantially reduced. Applied to PPDs, we find that when small ˜0.1 (0.01)μm grains are sufficiently abundant (mass ratio ˜0.01 (10-4)), {η }{{H}} can change sign up to ˜2-3 scale heights above the midplane at a modest field strength (plasma β ˜ 100) over a wide range of disk radii. The reduction of AD is also substantial toward the AD-dominated outer disk and may activate the magnetorotational instability. We further perform local nonideal MHD simulations of the inner disk (within 10 au) and show that, with sufficiently abundant small grains, the magnetic field amplification due to the Hall-shear instability saturates at a very low level near the threshold field strength {B}{{th}}. Together with previous studies, we conclude by discussing the grain-abundance-dependent phenomenology of PPD gas dynamics.

  18. Microscopic Foundation and Simulation of Coupled Carrier-Temperature Diffusions in Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    and energy relaxation rates. These rates expressed as functions of temperatures and densities lead to microscopic expressions for self- and mutual-diffusion coefficients in the coupled density-temperature diffusion equations. Approximations for reducing the general two-component description of the electron-hole plasma (EHP) to a single-component one are discussed. In particular, we show that a special single-component reduction is possible when e-h scattering dominates over c-LO phonon scattering. The ambipolar diffusion approximation is also discussed and we show that the ambipolar diffusion coefficients are independent of e-h scattering, even though the diffusion coefficients of individual components depend sensitively on the e-h scattering rates. Our discussions lead to new perspectives into the roles played in the single-component reduction by the electron-hole correlation in momentum space induced by scatterings and the electron-hole correlation in real space via internal static electrical field. Finally, the theory is completed by coupling the diffusion equations to the lattice temperature equation and to the effective optical polarization which in turn couples to the laser field. The equations derived above are implemented in various limiting cases to a typical diode laser to study the consequences of nonlinear diffusion and the cross diffusion terms on laser behavior, especially the dynamic behavior of a diode laser under modulation. Detailed results will be presented by comparing with the standard rate equation results.

  19. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  20. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  1. Acoustic diffusers III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  2. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  3. A Student Diffusion Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration…

  4. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  5. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  6. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  7. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  8. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  9. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  10. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  11. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  12. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  13. Correlated diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. Methods In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Results Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Conclusions A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer. PMID:23924150

  14. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  15. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  16. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  17. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  18. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  19. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  20. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  1. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  2. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  3. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  4. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  5. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  6. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  7. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  8. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  9. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  10. Helium Diffusion in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion of helium has been characterized in natural Fe-bearing olivine (~Fo90) and synthetic forsterite. Polished, oriented slabs of olivine were implanted with 3He, at 100 keV at a dose of 5x1015/cm2 or at 3.0 MeV at a dose of 1x1016/cm2. A set of experiments on the implanted olivine were run in 1-atm furnaces. In addition to the one-atm experiments, experiments on implanted samples were also run at higher pressures (2.6 and 2.7 GPa) to assess the potential effects of pressure on He diffusion and the applicability of the measured diffusivities in describing He transport in the mantle. The high-pressure experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus using an "ultra-soft" pressure cell, with the diffusion sample directly surrounded by AgCl. 3He distributions following experiments were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. This direct profiling method permits us to evaluate anisotropy of diffusion, which cannot be easily assessed using bulk-release methods. For diffusion in forsterite parallel to c we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperatures 250-950°C: D = 3.91x10-6exp(-159 ± 4 kJ mol-1/RT) m2/sec. The data define a single Arrhenius line spanning more than 7 orders of magnitude in D and 700°C in temperature. Diffusion parallel to a appears slightly slower, yielding an activation energy for diffusion of 135 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 3.73x10-8 m2/sec. Diffusion parallel to b is slower than diffusion parallel to a (by about two-thirds of a log unit); for this orientation an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 1.34x10-8 m2/sec are obtained. This anisotropy is broadly consistent with observations for diffusion of Ni and Fe-Mg in olivine. Diffusion in Fe-bearing olivine (transport parallel to b) agrees within uncertainty with findings for He diffusion in forsterite. The higher-pressure experiments yield diffusivities in agreement with those from the 1-atm

  11. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  12. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  13. Design, synthesis, and characterization of ladder-type molecules and polymers. Air-stable, solution-processable n-channel and ambipolar semiconductors for thin-film transistors via experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Usta, Hakan; Risko, Chad; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Hui; Deliomeroglu, Murat K; Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-04-22

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of new high-performance n-channel molecular/polymeric semiconductors that are solution-processable and air-stable is of great interest for the development of p-n junctions, bipolar transistors, and organic complementary circuitry (CMOS). While over the past two decades there have been many reports on n-channel materials, solution-processability and air-stability still remain as major challenges. We report here the synthesis and detailed characterization of a highly electron-deficient class of indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-dione, 2,2'-(indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-diylidene) dimalononitrile, bisindenofluorene-12,15-dione, and 2,2'-(bisindenofluorene-12,15-diylidene) dimalononitrile-based ladder-type building blocks (1-12) and their corresponding homo- and copolymers (P1-P14), and examine in detail the effects of core size, thiophene vs core regiochemistry, carbonyl vs dicyanovinylene functionality, and alkyl chain orientation on the physicochemical properties, thin film microstructures, and OFET device performance. New compounds are characterized by DSC, TGA, melting point, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), solution/thin film optical, PL, and cyclic voltammetry measurements to evaluate frontier molecular orbital energetics and intermolecular cohesive forces. Thin films are grown by vacuum deposition and spin-coating, and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AFM. By tuning the HOMO/LUMO energetics of the present materials over a 1.1 eV range, p-type, n-type, or ambipolar charge transport characteristics can be observed, thus identifying the MO energetic windows governing majority carrier polarity and air stability. One of these systems, thiophene-terminated indenofluorenedicyanovinylene 10 exhibits an electron mobility of 0.16 cm(2)/V x s and an I(on)/I(off) ratio of 10(7)-10(8), one of the highest to date for a solution-cast air-stable n-channel semiconductor. Here we also report solution-processed ambipolar films

  14. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  15. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  16. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  17. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  18. Diffusion in monodisperse ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peredo-Ortíz, R.; Hernández-Contreras, M.; Hernández Gómez, R.

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients characterizing the translational and rotational Brownian motion of a particle in a concentrated suspension were determined in the long time diffusive regime for a ferrofluid suspension with the use of a Langevin equation approach. These dynamical properties depend on the equilibrium micro-structural information of the suspension and take into account the effect of direct anisotropic inter-particle's interactions on self-diffusion. The comparison of this theory with Brownian dynamic simulations results is made in terms of colloid density and dipole interaction strength.

  19. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  20. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  1. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  2. Hydrogen Diffusion in Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S.; Mackwell, S.

    2002-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle are readily modified by interaction with volatiles, such as water. Thus, characterization of solubility and kinetics of incorporation for water in nominally anhydrous minerals is important in order to understand the behavior of Earth's interior under hydrous conditions. Experimental studies on the olivine-water system indicate that significant amounts of OH can dissolve within olivine as point defects (Bell and Rossman, 1992; Kohlstedt et al. 1996). Extending Kohlstedt and Mackwell's (1998) work, our study concerns the kinetics of hydrogen transport in the iron-free olivine-water system. This study is based on hydrogenation of forsterite samples during piston-cylinder and TZM cold-seal vessel experiments. We use infrared analyses in order to constrain the speciation of the mobile water-derived defects in forsterite single-crystal sample, and the rates of diffusion of such species under uppermost mantle conditions (0.2 to 1.5 GPa, 900 to 1100° C). Hydrogen defect transport in single crystals of forsterite is investigated for diffusion parallel to each crystallographic axis. Defect diffusivities are obtained by fitting a diffusion law to the OH content as a function of position in the sample. Our current results indicate that incorporation of hydroxyl species into iron-free olivine is a one-stage process with hydrogen diffusion linked to magnesium vacancy self-diffusion DV, such that DV = D~/3 = 10-12 m2/s at 1000° C parallel to [001], where D~ represents the chemical diffusivity. Those diffusion rates are slightly lower than in iron-bearing olivine for the same incorporation mechanism. The different concentration profiles show a clear anisotropy of diffusion, with fastest diffusion parallel to [001] as in iron-bearing olivine. Thus, while hydrogen solubilities are dependent on iron content, the rate of incorporation of water-derived species in olivine is not strongly coupled to the concentration of iron. This

  3. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  4. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  5. Brownian yet Non-Gaussian Diffusion: From Superstatistics to Subordination of Diffusing Diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Seno, Flavio; Metzler, Ralf; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2017-04-01

    A growing number of biological, soft, and active matter systems are observed to exhibit normal diffusive dynamics with a linear growth of the mean-squared displacement, yet with a non-Gaussian distribution of increments. Based on the Chubinsky-Slater idea of a diffusing diffusivity, we here establish and analyze a minimal model framework of diffusion processes with fluctuating diffusivity. In particular, we demonstrate the equivalence of the diffusing diffusivity process with a superstatistical approach with a distribution of diffusivities, at times shorter than the diffusivity correlation time. At longer times, a crossover to a Gaussian distribution with an effective diffusivity emerges. Specifically, we establish a subordination picture of Brownian but non-Gaussian diffusion processes, which can be used for a wide class of diffusivity fluctuation statistics. Our results are shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations and numerical evaluations.

  6. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  7. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-14

    Rigorous numerical description of multi-species diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication for imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multi-species diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multi-species diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multi-species U(VI) diffusion under steady-state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that a fully coupled diffusion model can be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model, which considers difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be rigorously enforced, if necessary, by adding an artificial kinetic reaction term induced by the charge separation. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from US Department of Energy's Hanford 300A where intragrain diffusion is a rate-limiting process controlling U(VI) adsorption and desorption. The grain-scale reactive diffusion model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetics that has been described using a semi-empirical, multi-rate model

  8. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  9. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  10. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  11. Bicarbonate diffusion through mucus.

    PubMed

    Livingston, E H; Miller, J; Engel, E

    1995-09-01

    The mucus layer overlying duodenal epithelium maintains a pH gradient against high luminal acid concentrations. Despite these adverse conditions, epithelial surface pH remains close to neutrality. The exact nature of the gradient-forming barrier remains unknown. The barrier consists of mucus into which HCO3- is secreted. Quantification of the ability of HCO3- to establish and maintain the gradient depends on accurate measurement of this ion's diffusion coefficient through mucus. We describe new experimental and mathematical methods for diffusion measurement and report diffusion coefficients for HCO3- diffusion through saline, 5% mucin solutions, and rat duodenal mucus. The diffusion coefficients were 20.2 +/- 0.10, 3.02 +/- 0.31, and 1.81 +/- 0.12 x 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. Modeling of the mucobicarbonate layer with this latter value suggests that for conditions of high luminal acid strength the neutralization of acid by HCO3- occurs just above the epithelial surface. Under these conditions the model predicts that fluid convection toward the lumen could be important in maintaining the pH gradient. In support of this hypothesis we were able to demonstrate a net luminal fluid flux of 5 microliters.min-1.cm-2 after perfusion of 0.15 N HCl in the rat duodenum.

  12. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  13. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  14. Memory-controlled diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Memory effects require for their incorporation into random-walk models an extension of the conventional equations. The linear Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density p(r⃗,t) is generalized by including nonlinear and nonlocal spatial-temporal memory effects. The realization of the memory kernel is restricted due the conservation of the basic quantity p . A general criteria is given for the existence of stationary solutions. In case the memory kernel depends on p polynomially, transport may be prevented. Owing to the delay effects a finite amount of particles remains localized and the further transport is terminated. For diffusion with nonlinear memory effects we find an exact solution in the long-time limit. Although the mean square displacement exhibits diffusive behavior, higher order cumulants offer differences to diffusion and they depend on the memory strength.

  15. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  16. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  17. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  18. Lead diffusion in monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Harold A.; Giletti, Bruno J.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured the tracer diffusion rate of Pb in natural, annealed, gem-quality monazite from Alexander Co., NC, USA, and Riverside Co., CA, USA. Observations from the literature concerning low T annealing in monazite suggest the possibility that Pb diffusion at geologic conditions occurs, in effect, within a similarly annealed lattice. Our experiments were performed by evaporating an aqueous solution containing 204Pb onto a crystal face and then heating the charge to 1000-1200°C for 4 to 36 days. To the extent that the compositions of the two samples differed, we observed no effect of composition upon the rate of Pb diffusion. We do find that transport parallel to the c-axis is ˜2-5 times slower than that measured perpendicular to c. For Pb diffusion perpendicular to c, the Arrhenius parameters are Q = 180 ± 48 kJ/mol and log D0 = -14.18 ± 1.54 (for D0 in m 2/s). While these parameters now allow for a direct calculation of closure temperatures for monazite, we believe a more useful form of our data for geochronologists is the fraction of Pb lost from crystals, expressed as a function of T, time, and crystal size. We have applied this formalism to discordant monazite UPb ages from the recent literature and find that Pb diffusion at rates extrapolated from our experiments can account for the observed degree of discordancy. We suggest that, rather than employing the concept of closure temperature to evaluate possible Pb loss in monazite, the diffusion data presented here be used in Pb loss models based upon T and duration conditions appropriate for a given geological setting.

  19. Carbon Diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    With the recent discovery of potentially biogenic carbon in 4.1 billion-year-old zircon (Bell et al., 2015), it is important to understand diffusion of C in zircon in order to assess the potential of these carbonaceous inclusions to preserve isotopic evidence of Earth's early history. In this study, we have characterized carbon diffusion in natural zircon at 1-atm and under high-pressure conditions in the presence of hydrous species. The 1-atm experiments were conducted by implanting 13C into polished, oriented slabs of zircon, with implanted samples heated in air or under buffered conditions in silica glass ampoules sealed under vacuum. High-pressure experiments (1 GPa) were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using 13C labeled glycine as the starting source (this breaks down at run conditions). In all cases, 13C distributions in zircon were measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 13C(p,γ)14N. In addition to the NRA measurements, we have also conducted analyses of carbon in zircon by ion microprobe. For diffusion parallel to c we obtain a well-constrained Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 600-1100°C. Diffusion normal to c is similar. Data from the high-pressure experiments and those run under buffered conditions also yield similar diffusivities, suggesting that carbon diffusion is not significantly affected by these parameters over the range of conditions studied. Carbon diffuses more rapidly than most cations in zircon, with the exception of lithium, but several orders of magnitude more slowly than helium. Zircon will therefore be moderately retentive of carbon. For example, diffusion distances on Gyr timescales would be on order of nm at 200°C, μm at 350°C and mm at 650°C, suggesting that carbon isotopic signatures contained within carbonaceous inclusions in zircon may be retained over long timeframes if zircons experience only moderate heating. E.A. Bell, P. Boehnke, T. M. Harrison, W.L. Mao (2015) PNAS 47, 14518-14521

  20. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  1. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  2. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  3. DEVELOPMENT, DIFFUSION, AND EVALUATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUBA, EGON G.

    THE KNOWLEDGE GAP BETWEEN INITIAL RESEARCH AND FINAL USE IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF THE FOUR STATES OF THE THEORY-PRACTICE CONTINUUM (RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, DIFFUSION, AND ADOPTION). THE TWO MIDDLE STAGES ARE EMPHASIZED. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES, AND TITLE III PROJECTS ARE SUGGESTED AS AGENCIES RESPONSIBLE…

  4. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  5. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood from the lungs, and to allow carbon dioxide to "diffuse" from the blood into the lungs. How the Test is Performed You breathe in (inhale) air containing a very small amount of carbon monoxide and a tracer gas, such as methane ...

  6. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  7. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  8. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  9. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  10. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  11. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  12. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  13. Elevating the triplet energy levels of dibenzofuran-based ambipolar phosphine oxide hosts for ultralow-voltage-driven efficient blue electrophosphorescence: from D-A to D-π-A systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunmiao; Zhang, Zhensong; Xu, Hui; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yi; Yan, Pengfei; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-01-21

    A series of donor (D)-π-acceptor (A)-type phosphine-oxide hosts (DBF(x) POPhCz(n)), which were composed of phenylcarbazole, dibenzofuran (DBF), and diphenylphosphine-oxide (DPPO) moieties, were designed and synthesized. Phenyl π-spacer groups were inserted between the carbazolyl and DBF groups, which effectively weakened the charge transfer and triplet-excited-state extension. As the result, the first triplet energy levels (T(1)) of DBF(x)POPhCz(n) are elevated to about 3.0 eV, 0.1 eV higher than their D-A-type analogues. Nevertheless, the electrochemical analysis and DFT calculations demonstrated the ambipolar characteristics of DBF(x)POPhCz(n). The phenyl π spacers hardly influenced the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy levels and the carrier-transporting ability of the materials. Therefore, these D-π-A systems are endowed with higher T(1) states, as well as comparable electrical properties to D-A systems. Phosphorescent blue-light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) that were based on DBF(x)POPhCz(n) not only inherited the ultralow driving voltages (2.4 V for onset, about 2.8 V at 200 cd m(-2), and <3.4 V at 1000 cd m(-2)) but also had much-improved efficiencies, including about 26 cd A(-1) for current efficiency, 30 Lm W(-1) for power efficiency, and 13% for external quantum efficiency, which were more than twice the values of devices that are based on conventional unipolar host materials. This performance makes DBFDPOPhCz(n) among the best hosts for ultralow-voltage-driven blue PHOLEDs reported so far. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Origin of CH+ in diffuse molecular clouds. Warm H2 and ion-neutral drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Godard, Benjamin; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gerin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre; Le Bourlot, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    abundances of CH+. Compared to previous works, our multiphase simulations reduce the spread in vd, and our self-consistent treatment of the ionisation leads to much reduced vd. Nevertheless, our resolution study shows that this velocity distribution is not converged: the ion-neutral drift has a higher impact on CH+ at higher resolution. On the other hand, our ideal MHD simulations do not include ambipolar diffusion, which would yield lower drift velocities. Conclusions: Within these limitations, we conclude that warm H2 is a key ingredient in the efficient formation of CH+ and that the ambipolar diffusion has very little influence on the abundance of CH+, mainly due to the small drift velocities obtained. However, we point out that small-scale processes and other non-thermal processes not included in our MHD simulation may be of crucial importance, and higher resolution studies with better controlled dissipation processes are needed.

  15. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  16. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  17. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  18. Orientability and Diffusion Maps

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Amit; Wu, Hau-tieng

    2010-01-01

    One of the main objectives in the analysis of a high dimensional large data set is to learn its geometric and topological structure. Even though the data itself is parameterized as a point cloud in a high dimensional ambient space ℝp, the correlation between parameters often suggests the “manifold assumption” that the data points are distributed on (or near) a low dimensional Riemannian manifold ℳd embedded in ℝp, with d ≪ p. We introduce an algorithm that determines the orientability of the intrinsic manifold given a sufficiently large number of sampled data points. If the manifold is orientable, then our algorithm also provides an alternative procedure for computing the eigenfunctions of the Laplacian that are important in the diffusion map framework for reducing the dimensionality of the data. If the manifold is non-orientable, then we provide a modified diffusion mapping of its orientable double covering. PMID:21765628

  19. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K; Leemans, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) is the only non-invasive method for characterising the microstructural organization of tissue in vivo. Generating parametric maps that help to visualise different aspects of the tissue microstructure (mean diffusivity, tissue anisotropy and dominant fibre orientation) involves a number of steps from deciding on the optimal acquisition parameters on the scanner, collecting the data, pre-processing the data and fitting the model to generating final parametric maps for entry into statistical data analysis. Here, we describe an entire protocol that we have used on over 400 subjects with great success in our laboratory. In the 'Notes' section, we justify our choice of the various parameters/choices along the way so that the reader may adapt/modify the protocol to their own time/hardware constraints.

  1. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  2. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  3. [The diffusion of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Between August 19 and 21, the Feria del Libro de las Ciencias de la Salud (Healthcare Book Fair) took place in the Palacio de Medicina in Mexico City. Archives of Medical Research, Revista Médica del IMSS, and Saber IMSS, three of the main instruments of knowledge diffusion of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, assisted to this book fair, which was organized by the Facultad de Medicina of UNAM.

  4. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  5. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  6. The ThermalDiffusion class

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2014-10-01

    The ThermalDiffusion class was created to simulate one-dimensional thermal diffusion across one or more material layers. Each layer is assumed to have constant conductivity K and diffusivity κ . Interface conductance between layers may be specified. Internal heating as a function of position and time is also supported. The ThermalDiffusion class is included in the SMASH package [1] as part of the PDE (Partial Differential Equation) subpackage.

  7. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  9. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Particle diffusion in a spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.; Yamada, M.

    1988-01-01

    The local carbon particle diffusion coefficient was measured in the Proto S-1/C spheromak using a test particle injection scheme. When the plasma was not in a force-free Taylor state, and when there were pressure gradients in the plasma, the particle diffusion was five times that predicted by Bohm and was consistent with collisional drift wave diffusion. The diffusion appears to be driven by correlations of the fluctuating electric field and density. During the decay phase of the discharge when the plasma was in the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient of the carbon was classical. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  12. Vapor Diffusion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA and VDA-2) was developed by the University of Alabama in Birmingham for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In the original VDA, a protein solution and a precipitant are extruded by two plungers onto the tip of a small syringe and allowed to evaporate, raising the concentration and prompting protein molecules to crystallize. In the VDA-2 version, a third plunger was added to mix the two solutions before returning the mix to the syringe tip. The principal investigator is Dr. Larry Delucas of the University of Alabama in Birmingham

  13. Vapor Diffusion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA-2) was developed by the University of Alabama in Birmingham for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In the original VDA, a protein solution and a precipitant are extruded by two plungers onto the tip of a small syringe and allowed to evaporate, raising the concentration and prompting protein molecules to crystallize. In the VDA-2 version, a third plunger was added to mix the two solutions before returning the mix to the syringe tip. The principal investigator is Dr. Larry Delucas of the University of Alabama in Birmingham.

  14. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  15. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  16. Accelerated stochastic diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    1990-07-01

    We give a purely probabilistic demonstration that all effects of non-random (external, conservative) forces on the diffusion process can be encoded in the Nelson ansatz for the second Newton law. Each random path of the process together with a probabilistic weight carries a phase accumulation (complex valued) weight. Random path summation (integration) of these weights leads to the transition probability density and transition amplitude respectively between two spatial points in a given time interval. The Bohm-Vigier, Fenyes-Nelson-Guerra and Feynman descriptions of the quantum particle behaviours are in fact equivalent.

  17. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  18. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  19. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.

    1976-08-10

    1. A diffuser separator apparatus which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage, each of said channels having an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports, at least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels being a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels having a different cross sectional area, means for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series, a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area.

  20. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    SciTech Connect

    F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-12

    We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

  1. Cosmic Diffuse Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The final analysis of the COMPTEL cosmic diffuse flux analysis is summarized in the accompanying figure. It shows the intensity of the cosmic diffuse flux spectrum measured jointly between the Virgo region and the South Galactic pole. This spectrum represents flux per unit solid angle over the range of 0.8 to 30 MeV. It contains the first positive measurement of the flux above 10 MeV. The spectrum merges smoothly with that measured with the EGRET instrument, starting at 30 MeV. It also merges smoothly with the latest results of the HEAO-1 measurements. However, the spectrum below is softer than the spectrum above the COMPTEL energy band. In the COMPTEL energy band there must exist a change in spectral shape as the source objects or processes change from the lower energy regime to the higher energy regime. The details of the analysis and the implications and meanings of the results are spelled out in the thesis of Dr. Cheenu Kappadath which is enclosed.

  2. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  3. Cosmic Diffuse Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The final analysis of the COMPTEL cosmic diffuse flux analysis is summarized in the accompanying figure. It shows the intensity of the cosmic diffuse flux spectrum measured jointly between the Virgo region and the South Galactic pole. This spectrum represents flux per unit solid angle over the range of 0.8 to 30 MeV. It contains the first positive measurement of the flux above 10 MeV. The spectrum merges smoothly with that measured with the EGRET instrument, starting at 30 MeV. It also merges smoothly with the latest results of the HEAO-1 measurements. However, the spectrum below is softer than the spectrum above the COMPTEL energy band. In the COMPTEL energy band there must exist a change in spectral shape as the source objects or processes change from the lower energy regime to the higher energy regime. The details of the analysis and the implications and meanings of the results are spelled out in the thesis of Dr. Cheenu Kappadath which is enclosed.

  4. The diffusion of microfinance.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  5. Diffusing obesity myths.

    PubMed

    Ramos Salas, X; Forhan, M; Sharma, A M

    2014-06-01

    Misinformation or myths about obesity can lead to weight bias and obesity stigma. Counteracting myths with facts and evidence has been shown to be effective educational tools to increase an individuals' knowledge about a certain condition and to reduce stigma.The purpose of this study was to identify common obesity myths within the healthcare and public domains and to develop evidence-based counterarguments to diffuse them. An online search of grey literature, media and public health information sources was conducted to identify common obesity myths. A list of 10 obesity myths was developed and reviewed by obesity experts and key opinion leaders. Counterarguments were developed using current research evidence and validated by obesity experts. A survey of obesity experts and health professionals was conducted to determine the usability and potential effectiveness of the myth-fact messages to reduce weight bias. A total of 754 individuals responded to the request to complete the survey. Of those who responded, 464 (61.5%) completed the survey. All 10 obesity myths were identified to be deeply pervasive within Canadian healthcare and public domains. Although the myth-fact messages were endorsed, respondents also indicated that they would likely not be sufficient to reduce weight bias. Diffusing deeply pervasive obesity myths will require multilevel approaches.

  6. Diffuse Optical Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Arjun

    2000-03-01

    Application of diffuse near-infrared (NIR) optical methods for imaging and spectroscopy of tissues is attractive for several reasons. The techniques utilize non-ionizing radiation, are non-invasive, and are often technologically simple and fast. The optical method also has several unique measurable parameters with potential to enhance tumor sensitivity and specificity. For example, blood dynamics, blood volume, blood oxygen saturation, and water content are often substantially different in the rapidly growing tumor, and will alter tissue optical absorption coefficients. An increase in organelle population, particularly mitochondria, accompanies the higher metabolic activity of the rapidly growing tumor, and leads to an increasing scattering coefficient for the tumor. Similarly the optical absorption, fluorescence, and scattering of contrast agents such as Indocyanine green (ICG) that occupy vascular and extravascular space provide useful forms of sensitization. In this paper I will discuss our work exploring the tumor contrasts accessible to the diffuse optical method, and I will describe how we extract this optical information using state-of-the-art theoretical, computational, and experimental technologies.

  7. Sucrose diffusion in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of sugar in aqueous solution is important both in nature and in technological applications, yet measurements of diffusion coefficients at low water content are scarce. We report directly measured sucrose diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution. Our technique utilises a Raman isotope tracer method to monitor the diffusion of non-deuterated and deuterated sucrose across a boundary between the two aqueous solutions. At a water activity of 0.4 (equivalent to 90 wt% sucrose) at room temperature, the diffusion coefficient of sucrose was determined to be approximately four orders of magnitude smaller than that of water in the same material. Using literature viscosity data, we show that, although inappropriate for the prediction of water diffusion, the Stokes–Einstein equation works well for predicting sucrose diffusion under the conditions studied. As well as providing information of importance to the fundamental understanding of diffusion in binary solutions, these data have technological, pharmaceutical and medical implications, for example in cryopreservation. Moreover, in the atmosphere, slow organic diffusion may have important implications for aerosol growth, chemistry and evaporation, where processes may be limited by the inability of a molecule to diffuse between the bulk and the surface of a particle. PMID:27364512

  8. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  9. A rarely seen diffuse parenchymal lung disease: diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis.

    PubMed

    Şen, Nazan; Canpolat, Emine Tuba; Koç, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary meningothelial-like nodules (MLNs) are usually detected incidentally during pathologic evaluation of resected pulmonary parenchymal specimens and autopsies. These nodules are generally asymptomatic and most often single. Diffuse pulmonary involvement by MLNs is less frequently described. MLNs are benign lesions and have been associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary conditions and occasionally with extrapulmonary diseases. We report a case of a female patient presenting with multiple and bilateral pulmonary nodules diagnosed with "diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis" by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of diffuse bilateral lung nodules in the radiologic studies.

  10. Characterizing non-Gaussian diffusion by using generalized diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Bammer, Roland; Acar, Burak; Moseley, Michael E

    2004-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is known to have a limited capability of resolving multiple fiber orientations within one voxel. This is mainly because the probability density function (PDF) for random spin displacement is non-Gaussian in the confining environment of biological tissues and, thus, the modeling of self-diffusion by a second-order tensor breaks down. The statistical property of a non-Gaussian diffusion process is characterized via the higher-order tensor (HOT) coefficients by reconstructing the PDF of the random spin displacement. Those HOT coefficients can be determined by combining a series of complex diffusion-weighted measurements. The signal equation for an MR diffusion experiment was investigated theoretically by generalizing Fick's law to a higher-order partial differential equation (PDE) obtained via Kramers-Moyal expansion. A relationship has been derived between the HOT coefficients of the PDE and the higher-order cumulants of the random spin displacement. Monte-Carlo simulations of diffusion in a restricted environment with different geometrical shapes were performed, and the strengths and weaknesses of both HOT and established diffusion analysis techniques were investigated. The generalized diffusion tensor formalism is capable of accurately resolving the underlying spin displacement for complex geometrical structures, of which neither conventional DTI nor diffusion-weighted imaging at high angular resolution (HARD) is capable. The HOT method helps illuminate some of the restrictions that are characteristic of these other methods. Furthermore, a direct relationship between HOT and q-space is also established.

  11. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  12. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  13. Osmosis and diffusion conceptual assessment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Williams, Kathy S; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified from the previously published Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (DODT) and some newly developed items. The ODCA, a validated instrument containing fewer items than the DODT and emphasizing different content areas within the realm of osmosis and diffusion, better aligns with our curriculum. Creation of the ODCA involved removal of six DODT item pairs, modification of another six DODT item pairs, and development of three new item pairs addressing basic osmosis and diffusion concepts. Responses to ODCA items testing the same concepts as the DODT were remarkably similar to responses to the DODT collected from students 15 yr earlier, suggesting that student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis remains elusive.

  14. Facilitated diffusion on confined DNA.

    PubMed

    Foffano, G; Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E

    2012-02-01

    In living cells, proteins combine three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA to reach a target faster. This process is known as facilitated diffusion and we investigate its dynamics in the physiologically relevant case of confined DNA. The confining geometry and DNA elasticity are key parameters: We find that facilitated diffusion is most efficient inside an isotropic volume and on a flexible polymer. By considering the typical copy numbers of proteins in vivo, we show that the speedup due to sliding becomes insensitive to fine tuning of parameters, rendering facilitated diffusion a robust mechanism to speed up intracellular diffusion-limited reactions. The parameter range we focus on is relevant for in vitro systems and for facilitated diffusion on yeast chromatin. © 2012 American Physical Society

  15. Is anomalous transport diffusive

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.

    1989-09-01

    It has often been assumed that the anomalous transport from saturated plasma instabilities is diffusive'' in the sense that the particle flux, {Gamma}, the electron energy flux, q{sub e}, and the ion energy flux, q{sub i}, can be written in forms that are linear in the density gradient, dn/dr, the electron temperature gradient, dT{sub e}/dr, and the ion temperature gradient dT{sub i}/dr. In the simplest form, {Gamma} = {minus} D{sub n}{sup n}(dn/dr), q{sub e} = {minus} D{sub e}{sup e}n(dT{sub e}/dr), and q{sub i} = {minus}D{sub i}{sup i}n(dT{sub i}/dr). A possible generalization of this is to include so-called off-diagonal'' terms, with {Gamma} = nV{sub n} {minus} D{sub n}{sup n}(dn/dr) {minus} D{sub n}{sup e}(n/T{sub e})(dT{sub e}/dr) {minus} D{sub n}{sup i}(n/T{sub i})(dT{sub i}/dr), with corresponding forms for the energy fluxes. Here, general results for the quasilinear particle and energy fluxes, resulting from tokamak linear microinstabilities, are evaluated to assess the relative importance of the diagonal and the off-diagonal terms. A further possible generatlization is to include also contributions to the fluxes from higher powers of the gradients, specifically quadratic'' contributions proportional to (dn/dr){sup 2}, (dn/dr)(dT{sub e}/dr), and so on. A procedure is described for evaluating the corresponding coefficients, and results are presented for illustrative realistic tokamak cases. Qualitatively, it is found that the off-diagonal diffusion coefficients can be as big as the diagonal ones, and that the quadratic terms can be larger than the linear ones. The results thus strongly suggest that the commonly used diffusive'' approximation with only diagonal terms, {Gamma} = {minus}D{sub n}{sup n}(dn/dr), and correspondingly for the energy fluxes, is not adequate in practice. 9 refs., 1 tabs.

  16. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  17. Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-08

    DATES COVERED (From - To) April 1,2007-March 31, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goals of this project were: (1) perform a fundamental study of atomic diffusion along dislocation cores in metals and...alloys, (2) develop new methods for the calculation of dislocation diffusion coefficients as functions of temperature and chemical composition and (3

  18. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  19. Anomalous ballistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1986-07-01

    We introduce a novel two-component random network. Unit resistors are placed at random along the bonds of a pure superconducting linear chain, with the distance l between successive resistors being chosen from the distribution P(l)~l-(α+1) where α>0 is a tunable parameter. We study the transport exponents dw and ζ~ defined by ~t2/dw and ρ~Lζ~, where is the mean-square displacement, ρ the resistivity, and L the system size. We find that for α>=1 both dw and ζ~ stick at their value for a nonzero concentration of resistors. For α<1 they vary continuously with α: dw=2α and ζ~=α. In the presence of a bias field, we find dw=α. This is the first exactly soluble model displaying ``anomalous ballistic diffusion,'' which we interpret physically in terms of a Lévy-flight random walk on a linear chain lattice.

  20. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  1. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  2. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  3. COMPLEX DIFFUSION ON IMAGE GRAPHS

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dohyung; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-01-01

    Complex diffusion was introduced in image processing literature as a means to achieve simultaneous denoising and enhancement of scalar valued images. In this paper, we present a novel geometric framework for achieving complex diffusion on color images expressed as image graphs. In this framework, we develop a new variational formulation for achieving complex diffusion. This formulation involves a modified harmonic map functional and is quite distinct from the Polyakov action described in earlier work by Sochen et al. Our formulation provides a framework for simultaneous (feature preserving) denoising and enhancement. We present results of comparison between the complex diffusion, and Beltrami flow all in the image graph framework. PMID:20490365

  4. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2009-01-20

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) Enthalpy diffusion preserves the second law. (2) Euler solvers will not produce correct temperatures in mixing regions. (3) Navier-Stokes solvers will only produce correct temperatures if q{sub d} is included. (4) Errors from neglecting enthalpy diffusion are most severe when differences in molecular weights are large. (5) In addition to temperature, enthalpy diffusion affects density, dilatation and other fields in subtle ways. (6) Reacting flow simulations that neglect the term are a dubious proposition. (7) Turbulence models for RANS and LES closures should preserve consistency between energy and species diffusion.

  5. Facilitated Diffusion of Transcription Factor Proteins with Anomalous Bulk Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-02-16

    What are the physical laws of the diffusive search of proteins for their specific binding sites on DNA in the presence of the macromolecular crowding in cells? We performed extensive computer simulations to elucidate the protein target search on DNA. The novel feature is the viscoelastic non-Brownian protein bulk diffusion recently observed experimentally. We examine the influence of the protein-DNA binding affinity and the anomalous diffusion exponent on the target search time. In all cases an optimal search time is found. The relative contribution of intermittent three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding of proteins along the DNA is quantified. Our results are discussed in the light of recent single molecule tracking experiments, aiming at a better understanding of the influence of anomalous kinetics of proteins on the facilitated diffusion mechanism.

  6. Isotopic selectivity of surface diffusion: An activated diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1989-11-01

    Gaseous diffusion systems are designed to separate UF{sub 6} isotopes by pumping gas through a microporous membrane. A second mode of transport exists in barrier, namely that of surface diffusion. The primary purpose of this report is to illustrate, with a very simple model, the qualitative behavior of surface diffusion in a way intended to retain the physical insight into how this flow will behave, and to show how it might manifest itself when observed in combination with gas-phase flow. The model developed uses general concepts of activated diffusion and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to examine surface diffusion from the standpoint of characteristics important to isotope separation, namely the conductivity and isotopic selectivity of surface flow, as a function of temperature, pressure, and adsorption energy. 25 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  8. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  9. Demonstrating Diffusion: Why the Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra Lee

    1998-01-01

    Examines the principles of diffusion and how it may be confused with convection. Suggests that educators may be misleading students and clouding their understanding of the process. Provides two contemporary examples to explain the process of diffusion and how it differs from convection. (Author/CCM)

  10. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  11. Diffusion in jammed particle packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusive transport in jammed particle packs is of interest for a number of applications, as well as being a potential indicator of structural properties near the jamming point. To this end, we report stochastic simulations of equilibrium diffusion through monodisperse sphere packs near the jamming point in the limit of a perfectly insulating surrounding medium. The time dependence of various diffusion properties is resolved over several orders of magnitude. Two time regimes of expected Fickian diffusion are observed, separated by an intermediate regime of anomalous diffusion. This intermediate regime grows as the particle volume fraction approaches the critical jamming transition. The diffusion behavior is fully controlled by the extent of the contacts between neighboring particles, which in turn depend on proximity to the jamming point. In particular, the mean first passage time associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles is shown to control both the time to recover Fickian diffusion and the long time diffusivity. Scaling laws are established that relate these quantities to the difference between the actual and critical jamming volume fractions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Demonstrating Diffusion: Why the Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra Lee

    1998-01-01

    Examines the principles of diffusion and how it may be confused with convection. Suggests that educators may be misleading students and clouding their understanding of the process. Provides two contemporary examples to explain the process of diffusion and how it differs from convection. (Author/CCM)

  13. Preliminary Investigation of Supersonic Diffusers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-05-01

    No. L5D20 This pressure was measured with a large mercury manometer . The total ’head after diffusion can be assumed equal to the static pressure at...of the entering kinetic energy. A mercury manometer was used to measure the difference between the total heads before and after diffusion. ‘J!hesetwo

  14. Selected Dissemination/Diffusion Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.

    This analysis of selected diffusion and dissemination methods used by developer-demonstrator projects in the National Diffusion Network discusses strategies under the following headings: managing the project, developing materials, disseminating information, conducting awareness sessions, training personnel, using certified trainers, providing…

  15. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  16. Teaching Diffusion with a Coin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Hamilton; Baldo, Marcus Vinicius Chrysostomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an inexpensive and simple way to make students intuitively experience the probabilistic nature and nonorientated motion of diffusing particles. This understanding allows students to realize why diffusion works so well over short distances and becomes increasingly and rapidly less effective as the distances…

  17. Gas Diffusion in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Grande, Beatriz; Konsman, Jan-Pieter

    2017-05-15

    Gases have been long known to have essential physiological functions in the CNS such as respiration or regulation of vascular tone. Since gases have been classically considered to freely diffuse, research in gas biology has so far focused on mechanisms of gas synthesis and gas reactivity, rather than gas diffusion and transport. However, the discovery of gas pores during the last two decades and the characterization of diverse diffusion patterns through different membranes has raised the possibility that modulation of gas diffusion is also a physiologically relevant parameter. Here we review the means of gas movement into and within the brain through "free" diffusion and gas pores, notably aquaporins, discussing the role that gas diffusion may play in the modulation of gas function. We highlight how diffusion is relevant to neuronal signaling, volume transmission, and cerebrovascular control in the case of NO, one of the most extensively studied gases. We point out how facilitated transport can be especially relevant for gases with low permeability in lipid membranes like NH3 and discuss the possible implications of NH3 -permeable channels in physiology and hyperammonemic encephalopathy. We identify novel research questions about how modulation of gas diffusion could intervene in CNS pathologies. This emerging area of research can provide novel and interesting insights in the field of gas biology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Diffusion of New Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Patricia M.

    The life cycle of "new math" is fertile ground for the study of the diffusion of an innovation. New math arrived in 1958 to save the day for America after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first successful space flight in 1957. In a period of 16 years an entire diffusion cycle was completed throughout the entire educational system…

  19. Ambipolar quantum dots in intrinsic silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, A. C. Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Podd, G.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2014-10-13

    We electrically measure intrinsic silicon quantum dots with electrostatically defined tunnel barriers. The presence of both p- and n-type ohmic contacts enables the accumulation of either electrons or holes. Thus, we are able to study both transport regimes within the same device. We investigate the effect of the tunnel barriers and the electrostatically defined quantum dots. There is greater localisation of charge states under the tunnel barriers in the case of hole conduction, leading to higher charge noise in the p-type regime.

  20. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  1. Diffusion on ruffled membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Naji, Ali; Brown, Frank L H

    2007-06-21

    We present a position Langevin equation for overdamped particle motion on rough two-dimensional surfaces. A Brownian dynamics algorithm is suggested to evolve this equation numerically, allowing for the prediction of effective (projected) diffusion coefficients over corrugated surfaces. In the case of static surface roughness, we find that a simple area-scaling prediction for the projected diffusion coefficient leads to seemingly quantitative agreement with numerical results. To study the effect of dynamic surface evolution on the diffusive process, we consider particle diffusion over a thermally fluctuating elastic membrane. Surface fluctuation has the effect of increasing the effective diffusivity toward a limiting annealed-surface value discussed previously. We argue that protein motion over cell surfaces spans a variety of physical regimes, making it impossible to identify a single approximation scheme appropriate to all measurements of interest.

  2. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  3. Diffusion of polymer gel implants.

    PubMed

    Davis, B K

    1974-08-01

    Crosslinked polyacrylamide and polyvinylpyrrolidone gels have been used to subcutaneously implant (125)I-labeled immunoglobulin, (125)I-labeled luteinizing hormone, (125)I-labeled bovine serum albumin, (125)I-labeled insulin, [(3)H]prostaglandin F(2alpha), and Na(125)I into hamsters. From the rates of absorption of the solutes, their diffusion coefficients were determined. The diffusion coefficients showed a logarithmic dependence on implant polymer concentration and solute molecular weight. Release of the solutes from gel preparations incubated 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees revealed a similar relationship between solute diffusion coefficient, molecular weight, and the concentration of polymer. A general equation was derived that gives the expected diffusion coefficient of a substance in a polymer gel from its molecular weight, diffusion coefficient in solvent, and polymer concentration of the gel.

  4. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  5. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  6. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  7. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Garcia-Sakai, Victoria; Bewley, Robert; Dalgliesh, Robert; Perring, Toby; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  8. Dim and diffuse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    Tucked away in the small northern constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs) is the galaxy NGC 4242, shown here as seen by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy lies some 30 million light-years from us. At this distance from Earth, actually not all that far on a cosmic scale, NGC 4242 is visible to anyone armed with even a basic telescope (as British astronomer William Herschel found when he discovered the galaxy in 1788). This image shows the galaxy’s bright centre and the surrounding dimmer and more diffuse “fuzz”. Despite appearing to be relatively bright in this image, studies have found that NGC 4242 is actually relatively dim (it has a moderate-to-low surface brightness and low luminosity) and also supports a low rate of star formation. The galaxy also seems to have a weak bar of stars cutting through its asymmetric centre, and a very faint and poorly-defined spiral structure throughout its disc. But if NGC 4242 is not all that remarkable, as with much of the Universe, it is still a beautiful and ethereal sight.

  9. Hydrogen diffusion fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a fuel cell comprising; an elongate case; a thin, flat separator part of non-porous, di-electric, hydrogen-permeable material between the ends of and extending transverse the case and defining anode and cathode chambers; a thin, flat anode part of non-porous, electric conductive, hydrogen-permeable metallic material in the anode chamber in flat contacting engagement with and co-extensive with the separator part; a flat, porous, catalytic cathode part in the cathode chamber in contacting engagement with the separator part; hydrogen supply means supplying hydrogen to the anode part within the anode chamber; oxidant gas supply means supplying oxidant gas to the cathode part within the cathode chamber; and, an external electric circuit connected with and between the anode and cathode parts. The anode part absorbs and is permeated by hydrogen supplied to it and diffuses the hydrogen to hydrogen ions and free electrons; the free electrons in the anode part are conducted from the anode part into the electric circuit to perform useful work. The hydrogen ions in the anode part move from the anode part through the separator part and into the cathode part. Free electrons are conducted by the electric circuit into the cathode part. The hydrogen ions, oxidant gas and free electrons in the cathode part react and generate waste, heat and water.

  10. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  11. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  12. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  13. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  14. Single file diffusion in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Farrell, Spencer; Brown, Aidan

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the single file diffusion (SFD) of large particles entering a confined tubular geometry, such as luminal diffusion of proteins inside microtubules or flagella. While single-file effects have no effect on particle density, we report significant single-file effects for individually-tracked tracer particle motion. Both exact and approximate ordering statistics of particles entering semi-infinite tubes agree well with our stochastic simulations. Considering initially empty semi-infinite tubes, with particles entering at one end starting from an initial time t = 0 , tracked particles display super-diffusive effective exponents just after they enter the system and trends towards diffusive exponents at later times. Equivalently, if diffusive exponents are assumed the effective diffusivity is reduced at early times and enhanced at later times through a logarithmic factor logN , where N is the number of particles in the tube. When we number each particle from the first (n = 1) to the most recent (n = N), we find good scaling collapse of the effective diffusivity for all n. Techniques that track individual particles, or local groups of particles, such as photo-activation or photobleaching, will exhibit single-file effects.

  15. Macromolecular Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sangah; Meth, Jeff; Zane, Steve; Winey, Karen; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in crowded systems is important in biological and engineered systems. We have studied macromolecular diffusion through a model polymer nanocomposite (PNC) containing phenyl grafted silica nanoparticles (NPs), randomly distributed in a polystyrene matrix. Over a wide range of NP loading and tracer molecular weight (M), the scaling of the diffusion coefficient with M is in excellent agreement with the entropic barrier model (EBM) previously used to describe diffusion of DNA through confined media (e.g., gels and nanopores). To investigate the effect of NP size, diffusion was measured in PNC's with silica NPs having diameters of 28 and 12 nm. The normalized diffusion coefficients (D / D0) plotted against the interparticle separation relative to probe size (i.e., ID/ 2 Rg) collapse on a master curve. Diffusion in a poly(methyl methacrylate):silica NP system was also investigated to understand how attractive interactions (i.e., enthalpy) perturb motion relative to the polystyrene and phenyl-silica NP system which is athermal. Finally, a flux-based model is proposed and compared with experimental results.

  16. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  17. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  18. ALUMINUM IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN MAGNESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J; Sohn, Yong Ho; Klimov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The Al impurity diffusion in polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) via depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry was studied in the temperature range of 673-573K, utilizing the thin film method and thin film solution to the diffusion equation. Multiple samples were utilized and multiple profiles were obtained to determine statistically confident coefficient with maximum standard deviation of 16%. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Al impurity diffusion in Mg was determined as 155 kJ/mole and 3.9 x 10-3 m2/sec.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder ...

  20. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  1. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  2. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  3. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-07-16

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov-Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects.

  4. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  5. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  6. Diffusion methodology: time to innovate?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, thousands of diffusion studies have been conducted in numerous disciplines of study including sociology, education, communication, marketing, and pubic health. With few exceptions, these studies have been driven by a methodological approach that has become institutionalized in diffusion research. This approach is characterized by the collection of quantitative data about one innovation gathered from adopters at a single point in time after widespread diffusion has occurred. This dominant approach is examined here in terms of both its strengths and weaknesses and with regard to its contribution to the collective base of understanding the diffusion of innovations. Alternative methodological approaches are proposed and reviewed with consideration for the means by which they may expand the knowledge base.

  7. Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. Results The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. Conclusions The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis. PMID:20492677

  8. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  9. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of conducting polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, A. C. R.; Siqueira, A. F.

    1996-11-01

    We have used the photoacoustic technique in an open photoacoustic cell configuration to measure the thermal diffusivity of conducting polypyrrole films. The samples were obtained by electrochemical deposition from solutions of pyrrole dissolved in 0.08 M p-toluene sulfonic acid and their thicknesses were in the 50-125 μm range. The thermal diffusivity α was found to be very dependent on the synthesis conditions.

  11. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified from the previously published Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (DODT) and some newly developed items. The ODCA, a validated instrument containing fewer items than the DODT and emphasizing different content areas within the realm of osmosis and diffusion, better aligns with our curriculum. Creation of the ODCA involved removal of six DODT item pairs, modification of another six DODT item pairs, and development of three new item pairs addressing basic osmosis and diffusion concepts. Responses to ODCA items testing the same concepts as the DODT were remarkably similar to responses to the DODT collected from students 15 yr earlier, suggesting that student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis remains elusive. PMID:22135375

  12. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  13. Lipid diffusion in alcoholic environment.

    PubMed

    Rifici, Simona; Corsaro, Carmelo; Crupi, Cristina; Nibali, Valeria Conti; Branca, Caterina; D'Angelo, Giovanna; Wanderlingh, Ulderico

    2014-08-07

    We have studied the effects of a high concentration of butanol and octanol on the phase behavior and on the lateral mobility of 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) by means of differential scanning calorimetry and pulsed-gradient stimulated-echo (PGSTE) NMR spectroscopy. A lowering of the lipid transition from the gel to the liquid-crystalline state for the membrane-alcohol systems has been observed. NMR measurements reveal three distinct diffusions in the DPPC-alcohol systems, characterized by a high, intermediate, and slow diffusivity, ascribed to the water, the alcohol, and the lipid, respectively. The lipid diffusion process is promoted in the liquid phase while it is hindered in the interdigitated phase due to the presence of alcohols. Furthermore, in the interdigitated phase, lipid lateral diffusion coefficients show a slight temperature dependence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that lateral diffusion coefficients on alcohol with so a long chain, and at low temperatures, are reported. By the Arrhenius plots of the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients, we have evaluated the apparent activation energy in both the liquid and in the interdigitated phase. The presence of alcohol increases this value in both phases. An explanation in terms of a free volume model that takes into account also for energy factors is proposed.

  14. Sandstones of unexpectedly high diffusibility.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Khairul; Tellam, John H

    2011-03-25

    Measurements have been made of diffusion coefficients (D(i)=-mass flux/concentration gradient) using a double reservoir, steady-state method with two tracers, CaBr(2) and amino-G-acid, on intact samples of Triassic red-bed sandstone from northwest England. Diffusibility (D'=D(i)/diffusion coefficient in water) averages 0.124, ranging between 0.075 and 0.215 (porosity 0.1 to 0.24), very similar for the two tracers. Implied tortuosities (actual path length/straight line length) average 1.21 (range 1.06 to 1.47), with constrictivities close to 1. In comparison with limited red-bed sandstone data from elsewhere, these D' values are up to 4 times greater, and tortuosity correspondingly lower. Re-interpretation of formation factor data from previous studies on shallow sandstone samples also from northwest England confirms that diffusibility is significantly higher in these sandstones than others from similar palaeoenvironment/stratigraphic units. The lower tortuosities appear to result from the relatively high permeability, open fabric of the rock, properties likely to be present in shallow sandstone systems used for water supply. It is concluded that diffusion rates may, in some shallow freshwater-containing continental sandstone systems, be significantly greater than is implied by estimates of sandstone diffusibility current in the literature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  16. Tracer diffusion in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Eric W.; Brady, John F.

    2017-05-01

    We study the diffusion of a Brownian probe particle of size R in a dilute dispersion of active Brownian particles of size a , characteristic swim speed U0, reorientation time τR, and mechanical energy ksTs=ζaU02τR/6 , where ζa is the Stokes drag coefficient of a swimmer. The probe has a thermal diffusivity DP=kBT /ζP , where kBT is the thermal energy of the solvent and ζP is the Stokes drag coefficient for the probe. When the swimmers are inactive, collisions between the probe and the swimmers sterically hinder the probe's diffusive motion. In competition with this steric hindrance is an enhancement driven by the activity of the swimmers. The strength of swimming relative to thermal diffusion is set by Pes=U0a /DP . The active contribution to the diffusivity scales as Pes2 for weak swimming and Pes for strong swimming, but the transition between these two regimes is nonmonotonic. When fluctuations in the probe motion decay on the time scale τR, the active diffusivity scales as ksTs/ζP : the probe moves as if it were immersed in a solvent with energy ksTs rather than kBT .

  17. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  18. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  19. Anomalous diffusion and ergodicity breaking in heterogeneous diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the non-ergodicity of a simple Markovian stochastic process with space-dependent diffusion coefficient D(x). For power-law forms D(x) ≃ |x|α, this process yields anomalous diffusion of the form ≃ t2/(2-α). Interestingly, in both the sub- and superdiffusive regimes we observe weak ergodicity breaking: the scaling of the time-averaged mean-squared displacement \\overline{\\delta ^2(\\Delta)} remains linear in the lag time Δ and thus differs from the corresponding ensemble average . We analyse the non-ergodic behaviour of this process in terms of the time-averaged mean-squared displacement \\overline {\\delta ^2} and its random features, i.e. the statistical distribution of \\overline {\\delta ^2} and the ergodicity breaking parameters. The heterogeneous diffusion model represents an alternative approach to non-ergodic, anomalous diffusion that might be particularly relevant for diffusion in heterogeneous media.

  20. The speed of Arnold diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, C.; Harsoula, M.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed numerical study is presented of the slow diffusion (Arnold diffusion) taking place around resonance crossings in nearly integrable Hamiltonian systems of three degrees of freedom in the so-called ‘Nekhoroshev regime’. The aim is to construct estimates regarding the speed of diffusion based on the numerical values of a truncated form of the so-called remainder of a normalized Hamiltonian function, and to compare them with the outcomes of direct numerical experiments using ensembles of orbits. In this comparison we examine, one by one, the main steps of the so-called analytic and geometric parts of the Nekhoroshev theorem. Thus: (i) we review and implement an algorithm Efthymiopoulos (2008) [45] for Hamiltonian normalization in multiply resonant domains which is implemented as a computer program making calculations up to a high normalization order. (ii) We compute the dependence of the optimal normalization order on the small parameter ɛ in a specific model and compare the result with theoretical estimates on this dependence. (iii) We examine in detail the consequences of assuming simple convexity conditions for the unperturbed Hamiltonian on the geometry of the resonances and on the phase space structure around resonance crossings. (iv) We discuss the dynamical mechanisms by which the remainder of the optimal Hamiltonian normal form drives the diffusion process. Through these steps, we are led to two main results: (i) We construct in our concrete example a convenient set of variables, proposed first by Benettin and Gallavotti (1986) [12], in which the phenomenon of Arnold diffusion in doubly resonant domains can be clearly visualized. (ii) We determine, by numerical fitting of our data, the dependence of the local diffusion coefficient D on the size ‖R‖ of the optimal remainder function, and we compare this with a heuristic argument based on the assumption of normal diffusion. We find a power law D∝‖, where the constant b has a small positive

  1. Identification of the Diffusion Parameter in Nonlocal Steady Diffusion Problems

    SciTech Connect

    D’Elia, M. E-mail: mdelia@sandia.gov; Gunzburger, M.

    2016-04-15

    The problem of identifying the diffusion parameter appearing in a nonlocal steady diffusion equation is considered. The identification problem is formulated as an optimal control problem having a matching functional as the objective of the control and the parameter function as the control variable. The analysis makes use of a nonlocal vector calculus that allows one to define a variational formulation of the nonlocal problem. In a manner analogous to the local partial differential equations counterpart, we demonstrate, for certain kernel functions, the existence of at least one optimal solution in the space of admissible parameters. We introduce a Galerkin finite element discretization of the optimal control problem and derive a priori error estimates for the approximate state and control variables. Using one-dimensional numerical experiments, we illustrate the theoretical results and show that by using nonlocal models it is possible to estimate non-smooth and discontinuous diffusion parameters.

  2. Diffuse Gamma Rays Galactic and Extragalactic Diffuse Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse gamma rays consist of several components: truly diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, the extragalactic background, whose origin is not firmly established yet, and the contribution from unresolved and faint Galactic point sources. One approach to unravel these components is to study the diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, which traces the interactions of high energy particles with interstellar gas and radiation fields. Because of its origin such emission is potentially able to reveal much about the sources and propagation of cosmic rays. The extragalactic background, if reliably determined, can be used in cosmological and blazar studies. Studying the derived average spectrum of faint Galactic sources may be able to give a clue to the nature of the emitting objects.

  3. Kramers turnover: From energy diffusion to spatial diffusion using metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the rate of transition for a particle between two metastable states coupled to a thermal environment for various magnitudes of the coupling strength using the recently proposed infrequent metadynamics approach [P. Tiwary and M. Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 230602 (2013)]. We are interested in understanding how this approach for obtaining rate constants performs as the dynamics regime changes from energy diffusion to spatial diffusion. Reassuringly, we find that the approach works remarkably well for various coupling strengths in the strong coupling regime, and to some extent even in the weak coupling regime. PMID:27059558

  4. A Short-Duration Gel Diffusion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a gel diffusion experiment that permits the completion of duplicate diffusion runs within a three-hour laboratory session. Information included for the short-duration gel diffusion experiment is the diffusion cell, the experiment, data treatment, and the expected results of the experiment. (Author/DS)

  5. A Diffusion Approach to Study Leadership Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to draw on elements of diffusion theory to understand leadership reform. Many diffusion studies examine the spread of an innovation across social units but the objective is to examine diffusion of a collective leadership model within school units. Specifically, the strength of reform diffusion is tested to account for…

  6. A Diffusion Approach to Study Leadership Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to draw on elements of diffusion theory to understand leadership reform. Many diffusion studies examine the spread of an innovation across social units but the objective is to examine diffusion of a collective leadership model within school units. Specifically, the strength of reform diffusion is tested to account for…

  7. Diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Kil; Seo, Jin-Gyo; Park, Jong-Wan

    2009-07-01

    Cr 3+ diffusion in chrysoberyl (BeAl 2O 4) irradiated by H + ions and electrons has been studied and compared with diffusion in non-irradiated samples. Chrysoberyl crystals were irradiated with 6 MeV H + ions to fluencies of 1×10 16 cm -2 for 25 min and with 10 MeV electrons to fluencies of 2×10 17 cm -2 for 1 h. Three different types of samples, which were doped with Cr 3+, were annealed in horizontal alumina tube furnaces by 50 K intervals in the temperature range from 1773 to 1923 K for 200 h. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX) was used to measure the diffusion. Arrhenius equations for the diffusion coefficient for Cr 3+ in the temperature range 1773-1923 K were developed: Electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.1×10 -5×exp (-482.3±18.2 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Proton beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.3×10 -3×exp (-545.4±25.0 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Natural non-irradiated chrysoberyls Dcr=2.2×10 -3×exp (-547.9±36.8 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 The results indicate that the chromium diffuses deepest into the electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls.

  8. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Igarashi; Lamberto, Rondoni; Antonio, Botrugno; Marco, Pizzi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call “transient osmosis". We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes.

  9. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  10. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  11. Fractional reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Wojcik, Mariusz; Tachiya, M.

    2003-07-01

    A fractional reaction-diffusion equation is derived from a continuous time random walk model when the transport is dispersive. The exit from the encounter distance, which is described by the algebraic waiting time distribution of jump motion, interferes with the reaction at the encounter distance. Therefore, the reaction term has a memory effect. The derived equation is applied to the geminate recombination problem. The recombination is shown to depend on the intrinsic reaction rate, in contrast with the results of Sung et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 2338 (2002)], which were obtained from the fractional reaction-diffusion equation where the diffusion term has a memory effect but the reaction term does not. The reactivity dependence of the recombination probability is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  12. Overdamped Diffusion in Coupled Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti, G.; Ferrando, R.; Spadacini, R.; Tommei, G. E.

    An analytical "quasi-2D" approximation (Q2DA) for the diffusion coefficient of an adatom migrating in a rectangular lattice, in the presence of a high damping and of a general 2D-coupled potential, is derived. The validity of the Q2DA lies on the assumption that all the most relevant diffusion paths can be treated as straight lines. That is the case of the square 2D-coupled egg-carton potential, where the Q2DA is applied. Comparison with the exact numerical results (2D Smoluchowski equation) shows that the Q2DA provides a very good approximation of the diffusion constant even in the strongest coupling situations.

  13. Improved Dot Diffusion For Image Halftoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    The dot diffusion method for digital halftoning has the advantage of parallelism unlike the error diffusion method. The method was recently improved...by optimization of the so-called class matrix so that the resulting halftones are comparable to the error diffused halftones . In this paper we will...first review the dot diffusion method. Previously, 82 class matrices were used for dot diffusion method. A problem with this size of class matrix is

  14. The diffusion of ions in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion in unconsolidated sediments generally proceeds at rates ranging from half to one twentieth of those applying to diffusion of ions and molecules in free solution. Diffusion rates are predictable with respect to porosity and path tortuosity in host sediments, and can be conveniently measured by determinations of electrical resistivity on bulk sediment samples. Net ion flux is further influenced by reactions of diffusing species with enclosing sediments, but such influences should not be confused with or lumped with diffusion processes. ?? 1970.

  15. Diffusion of polyelectrolytes in polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahalkar, Anand; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we have investigated the diffusion coefficient of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) in a matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylate) gels. The diffusion coefficient of the probe polyelectrolyte exhibits a crossover behavior from a particle-diffusion to entropic-barrier dominated diffusion, as the molecular weight is increased. The effect of electrostatics, by varying the charge density of the matrix, on probe diffusion constant will be presented.

  16. Marmot-Fission-Gas-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-10-22

    The MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION software solves a coupled set of partial differential equations describing fission gas evolution in UO2 nuclear fuel. It is part of the MARMOT code, which builds on the MOOSE framework. Both the MARMOT code and the MOOSE framework are developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The model in MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION consists of a set of continuum reaction-diffusion equations capturing formation and annihilation of defects, reactions between defects, diffusion of defects and segregation of defects to grain boundaries. Defects refer to vacancies and interstitials as well fission gas atoms (Xe) occupying various trap sites such as uranium and oxygen vacancies and interstitials sites. The code can treat a large number of defect types. The model is formulated within the phase field framework to be compatible with other MARMOT kernels. The driving forces for all reactions, diffusion and segregation events are consistently formulated as a variational derivatives of the free energy of the system. The rates of the reactions are controlled by the corresponding kinetic coefficients. The free energy and the kinetic coefficients for UO2 have been parameterized by lower length scale simulations. The code can be used to simulate defect evolution in a prescribed UO2 microstructure as well as to solve defect clustering problems that control effective diffusivities under both thermal and irradiation conditions. It I possible to extend the current UO2 model to other fuel types such as accident tolerant fuels based on the U3Si2 compound. This would obviously require a new set of material properties describing the behavior of defects in U3Si2 rather than UO2. The framework is however designed to be generic.

  17. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  18. Innovation Diffusion: Assessment of Strategies within the Diffusion Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Jacob; Myers, Rodney D.; Lara, Miguel; Frick, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators increasingly view the high level of engagement and experiential learning offered by games as a means to promote learning. However, as with any designed learning experience, player experiences should provide an accurate representation of content to be learned. In this study, the authors investigated the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME (DSG) to…

  19. Diffusion doping in quantum dots: bond strength and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Makkar, Mahima; Shetty, Amitha; Gahlot, Kushagra; A R, Pavan; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-02-23

    Semiconducting materials uniformly doped with optical or magnetic impurities have been useful in a number of potential applications. However, clustering or phase separation during synthesis has made this job challenging. Recently the "inside out" diffusion doping was proposed to be successful in obtaining large sized quantum dots (QDs) uniformly doped with a dilute percentage of dopant atoms. Herein, we demonstrate the use of basic physical chemistry of diffusion to control the size and concentration of the dopants within the QDs for a given transition metal ion. We have studied three parameters; the bond strength of the core molecules and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing metal ion are found to be important while the ease of cation exchange was not highly influential in the control of size and concentration of the single domain dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) with diverse dopant ions M(2+) (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+)). Steady state optical emission spectra reveal that the dopants are incorporated inside the semiconducting CdS and the emission can be tuned during shell growth. We have shown that this method enables control over doping percentage and the QDs show a superior ferromagnetic response at room temperature as compared to previously reported systems.

  20. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  1. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    During this quarter, progress has been made in two areas: (1) preparation of the calibration curve for gel permeation chromatography analysis of coal asphaltene; (2) preliminary measurements of the effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions. A calibration curve was prepared with standard compounds including polystyrenes, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and tetraphenylporphine in GPC analysis. A correlation equation was obtained from the calibration curve to estimate the molecular weights of coal asphaltene fractions. Based on this GPC analysis, effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions were measured.

  2. Diffuse bands versus extinction parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Walter; Snow, Theodore P.; Sneden, C.; Krelowski, Jacek

    1994-01-01

    All recent available, high quality measurements of the strong diffuse bands 5780 A and 5797 A have been collected. This includes those measurement derived from the authors's recent observations (February, May, and November 1993, taken with a echelle spectrograph) as well as those from a coude spectrograph and from literature. Equivalent widths of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIB's) at 5780 A and 5797 A have been measured on spectrograms. The measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) on their own spectrograms ranged from 250 to 500. The Johnson UBV data were used to estimate the color excesses of our targets.

  3. Selective Advantage of Diffusing Faster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Benzi, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    We study a stochastic spatial model of biological competition in which two species have the same birth and death rates, but different diffusion constants. In the absence of this difference, the model can be considered as an off-lattice version of the voter model and presents similar coarsening properties. We show that even a relative difference in diffusivity on the order of a few percent may lead to a strong bias in the coarsening process favoring the more agile species. We theoretically quantify this selective advantage and present analytical formulas for the average growth of the fastest species and its fixation probability.

  4. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Webster, I.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred [angstrom] in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by configurational'' or hindered diffusion,'' which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  5. Nuclear fission with diffusive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, D.; Bertsch, G. F.

    1992-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of nuclear fission, assuming purely diffusive motion up to the saddle point. The resulting Smoluchowski equation is solved for conditions appropriate to the 16O+142Nd-->158Er reaction at 207 MeV. The solution is characterized by an equilibration time τ0 for the system to reach steady state, and the fission decay rate in steady state, Λ. We find that the equilibration time τ0 plays a very small role in determining the number of prescission neutrons. The diffusion coefficient extracted from the experimental data is larger than the theoretical in the work of Bush, Bertsch, and Brown by a factor of 5-11.

  6. Diffusive mixing and Tsallis entropy

    DOE PAGES

    O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Cushman, John H.

    2015-04-29

    Brownian motion, the classical diffusive process, maximizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The Tsallis q-entropy, which is non-additive, was developed as an alternative to the classical entropy for systems which are non-ergodic. A generalization of Brownian motion is provided that maximizes the Tsallis entropy rather than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This process is driven by a Brownian measure with a random diffusion coefficient. In addition, the distribution of this coefficient is derived as a function of q for 1 < q < 3. Applications to transport in porous media are considered.

  7. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  8. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  9. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description

    PubMed Central

    SHETTY, ANIL N.; CHIANG, SHARON; MALETIC-SAVATIC, MIRJANA; KASPRIAN, GREGOR; VANNUCCI, MARINA; LEE, WESLEY

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal–Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain. PMID:27441031

  10. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anil N; Chiang, Sharon; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal-Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain.

  11. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strudler, Neal, Ed.; Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "A Response to Technology Integration in Teacher Education for Merit, Tenure, and Promotion" (Cindy L. Anderson and David Starrett); (2) "Online Technical Support…

  12. SAR Segmentation using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intajag, Sathit; Tipsuwanporn, Vittaya; Cheevasuwit, Fusak

    Speckle effects are commonly observed in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The human eye is capable of deriving meaningful information from SAR images; however, an automatic or semi-automatic processing algorithm has difficulty in distinguishing objects in the images because of noise effects present in those images. This paper presents a segmentation method for SAR images, which employs an anisotropic diffusion algorithm. In the proposed scheme, a SAR image is transformed into a logarithmic domain where the diffusion process is used to grow homogeneous regions in the noise environment until the regions reach some criteria for homogeneity; consequently, the segmented image in the logarithm domain is converted to the intensity domain by an exponential function. To grow homogeneous regions the adaptive diffusion method is introduced with a tensor technique in which tensor data are varied with the neighboring pixels. The diffusion algorithm will stop itself by a standard deviation divided by the mean, which is provided according to the homogeneity criteria. Results are shown on both synthetic and satellite SAR images. The evaluation of the proposed method employs the theoretical gain of equivalent numbers of looks (ENL).

  13. Diffusion brazing of nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, S.V.; Parous, L.C.; Gale, W.F.

    1995-09-01

    NiAl is a promising candidate material for high-temperature applications. However, NiAl suffers from poor low-temperature ductility and toughness. Hence, suitable technologies are required for NiAl to Ni-based alloy joining. In view of the poor low-temperature ductility and strong alumina-forming tendency of NiAl, diffusion brazing seems to be the most suitable technology for joining NiAl to itself and to Ni-based alloys. This paper examines the diffusion brazing of NiAl to Ni using Ni-Si-B interlayers and draws comparisons with previous work by authors on NiAl/Ni-Si-B/NiAl and Ni/Ni-Si-B/Ni diffusion brazing. The progression of micro-structural development in the NiAl/Ni-Si-B/Ni joints is compared with that expected from standard models of the diffusion brazing process in which dissolution of the substrate material, isothermal solidification and solid-state homogenization occur sequentially.

  14. Polymer Diffusion in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by experiments on fluorescently labeled DNA molecules on a supported lipid bilayer, we have examined theoretically diffusion of polymers in two dimensions. The key experimental finding we focus on is the scaling of the diffusion constant of the center of mass, D˜1/N. This implies that no effective hydrodynamic coupling exists between the diffusing DNA segments in the membrane. We construct our theoretical model using the phenomenological hydrodynamic model of supported membranes proposed by Evans and Sackmann. Our model is based on the pre-averaged Oseen tensor, and is similar to the model of Komura and Seki, but elaborated and extended to take explicit account of self-avoidance. We find that the 1/N scaling of D can be understood as a consequence of membrane hydrodynamics in the presence of a supporting surface. Further experimental consequences of the model, in particular the diffusion constant for DNA in free standing membranes, will also be discussed. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  15. Evaluating Technology Transfer and Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles discuss the evaluation of technology transfer and diffusion: (1) "Technology Transfer at the U.S. National Laboratories: A Framework for Evaluation"; (2) "Application of Social Psychological and Evaluation Research: Lessons from Energy Information Programs"; (3) "Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Energy R and D Laboratories: An…

  16. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  17. Diffusion of boron in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhang, S; He, X.

    1995-04-01

    By means of particle tracking autoradiography (PTA), the diffusion coefficients of boron between 900 and 1,200 C were measured in 04MnNbB steel, 25MnTiB steel, Ni-B, Fe-30%Ni-B and Fe-3%Si-B alloys, and the frequency factor D{sub 0} and activation energy Q were obtained respectively. The experiment results indicated that there was an obvious difference between the present result and the result obtained by Busby (in 1953). It was found that the boron diffusivity in {gamma}-Fe increased as Ni was added. The diffusivity of boron in Fe-3%Si-B alloy with b.c.c. structure was much slower than one obtained by Busby in {alpha}-Fe (1954), which, however, was much faster than the results obtained in {gamma}-Fe (with f.c.c. structure). Based on the present data of boron diffusion coefficients, the mechanism of segregation of boron to grain boundaries is discussed.

  18. In Vivo Facilitated Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maximilian; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model. PMID:23349772

  19. In vivo facilitated diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Maximilian; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model.

  20. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  1. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  2. Diffusion Coatings as Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Radoslav; Ignatova-Ivanova, Tsveteslava

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion is the cause of irretrievable loss of huge amounts of metals and alloys. The harmful effects of corrosion can be reduced significantly by applying appropriate methods of corrosion protection. One method to protect metals against corrosion is the formation of diffusion coatings on them. High corrosion resistance is typical for the boride diffusion layers. Aluminothermy is one of the main methods for diffusion saturation of the surface of metal products with various elements, including boron, and under certain conditions with aluminum, too. Samples of steel 45 were put to aluminothermic diffusion saturation with boron in a pressurized steel container at a temperature of 1100K, for 6 hours in powdered aluminothermic mixtures. The content of B2O3 in the starting mixtures decreased from the optimum - 20% to 0%, and the content of Al and the activator - (NH4)2.4BF3 is constant, respectively 7% and 0.5%. Al2O3 was used as filler. The borided samples were tested for corrosion resistance in 10% HCl for 72 hours. The results show that their corrosion resistance depends on the composition of the starting saturating mixture (mainly on the content of B2O3), and respectively on the composition, structure, thickness and degree of adhesion of the layer to the metal base.

  3. Innovation Diffusion: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Shena R.

    2009-01-01

    Whether looking at the spread and adoption of an intervention across a community, across multiple units, or within a single unit, an understanding of diffusion theory can help evaluators uncover patterns and impacts that might otherwise be overlooked. The theory alerts evaluators to examine why uptake of an intervention appeared different in…

  4. Diffusion Kernels on Statistical Manifolds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-16

    International Press, 1994. Michael Spivak . Differential Geometry, volume 1. Publish or Perish, 1979. 36 Chengxiang Zhai and John Lafferty. A study of smoothing...construction of information diffusion kernels, since these concepts are not widely used in machine learning. We refer to Spivak (1979) for details and further

  5. Innovation Diffusion: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Shena R.

    2009-01-01

    Whether looking at the spread and adoption of an intervention across a community, across multiple units, or within a single unit, an understanding of diffusion theory can help evaluators uncover patterns and impacts that might otherwise be overlooked. The theory alerts evaluators to examine why uptake of an intervention appeared different in…

  6. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  7. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.; Strudler, Neal, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Faculty Technology Integration Project" (Comfort Akwaji); (2) "If It Is Broke, Then What?" (D. Lynnwood Belvin and Jennifer Leaderer); (3) "Developing Video-Based E-Learning Applications"…

  8. Tiny Molybdenites Tell Diffusion Tales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion invokes micron-scale exchange during crystal growth and dissolution in magma chambers on short time-scales. Fundamental to interpreting such data are assumptions on magma-fluid dynamics at all scales. Nevertheless, elemental diffusion profiles are used to estimate time scales for magma storage, eruption, and recharge. An underutilized timepiece to evaluate diffusion and 3D mobility of magmatic fluids is high-precision Re-Os dating of molybdenite. With spatially unique molybdenite samples from a young ore system (e.g., 1 Ma) and a double Os spike, analytical errors of 1-3 ka unambiguously separate events in time. Re-Os ages show that hydrous shallow magma chambers locally recharge and expel Cu-Mo-Au-silica as superimposed stockwork vein networks at time scales less than a few thousand years [1]. Re-Os ages provide diffusion rates controlled by a dynamic crystal mush, accumulation and expulsion of metalliferous fluid, and magma reorganization after explosive crystallization events. Importantly, this approach has broad application far from ore deposits. Here, we use Re-Os dating of molybdenite to assess time scales for generating and diffusing metals through the deep crust. To maximize opportunity for chemical diffusion, we use a continental-scale Sveconorwegian mylonite zone for the study area. A geologically constrained suite of molybdenite samples was acquired from quarry exposures. Molybdenite, previously unreported, is extremely scarce. Tiny but telling molybdenites include samples from like occurrences to assure geologic accuracy in Re-Os ages. Ages range from mid-Mesoproterozoic to mid-Neoproterozoic, and correspond to early metamorphic dehydration of a regionally widespread biotite-rich gneiss, localized melting of gneiss to form cm-m-scale K-feldspar ± quartz pods, development of vapor-rich, vuggy mm stringers that serve as volatile collection surfaces in felsic leucosomes, and low-angle (relative to foliation) cross-cutting cm-scale quartz veins

  9. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  10. Intracellular facilitated diffusion: searchers, crowders, and blockers.

    PubMed

    Brackley, C A; Cates, M E; Marenduzzo, D

    2013-09-06

    In bacteria, regulatory proteins search for a specific DNA-binding target via "facilitated diffusion": a series of rounds of three-dimensional diffusion in the cytoplasm, and one-dimensional (1D) linear diffusion along the DNA contour. Using large scale Brownian dynamics simulations we find that each of these steps is affected differently by crowding proteins, which can either be bound to the DNA acting as a road block to the 1D diffusion, or freely diffusing in the cytoplasm. Macromolecular crowding can strongly affect mechanistic features such as the balance between three-dimensional and 1D diffusion, but leads to surprising robustness of the total search time.

  11. Diffuse reflectivity measurement using cubic cavity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Zhang, Y G; Gao, Qiang; Hu, Gang; Zhang, Z G; Wu, S H

    2014-04-01

    A method for measuring diffuse reflectivity using cubic cavity based on the variable port fraction method was developed by measuring oxygen P11 line at 762 nm using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. An experimental method to determine the additional path length l0 was presented. We measured the diffuse reflectivity of a cubic cavity with scattering coatings of different thickness. The error of diffuse reflectivity was reduced from 0.004 to 0.0003 when the diffuse reflectivity increased from 0.867(4) to 0.9887(3). A simulation result manifests that the error of diffuse reflectivity has the potential to be further reduced at higher diffuse reflectivity.

  12. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  13. Anisotropic diffusion phantoms based on microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellmer, Sebastian; Edelhoff, Daniel; Suter, Dieter; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion MRI is an efficient and widely used technique for the investigation of tissue structure and organisation in vivo. Multiple phenomenological and biophysical diffusion models are intensively exploited for the analysis of the diffusion experiments. However, the verification of the applied diffusion models remains challenging. In order to provide a ;gold standard; and to assess the accuracy of the derived parameters and the limitations of the diffusion models, anisotropic diffusion phantoms with well known architecture are demanded. In the present work we built four anisotropic diffusion phantoms consisting of hollow microcapillaries with very small inner diameters of 5, 10 and 20 μ m and outer diameters of 90 and 150 μ m. For testing the suitability of these phantoms, we performed diffusion measurements on all of them and evaluated the resulting data with a set of popular diffusion models, such as diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging, a two compartment model with intra- and extra-capillary water spaces using bi-exponential fitting, and time-dependent diffusion coefficients in Mitra's limit. The perspectives and limitations of these diffusion phantoms are presented and discussed.

  14. Diffuse volume transport in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2010-10-01

    The diffuse flux of volume j in a single-component liquid or gas, the subject of this paper, is a purely molecular quantity defined as the difference between the flux of volume n and the convective flux of volume nvˆ carried by the flowing mass, with n the mass flux, vˆ=1/ρ the specific volume, and ρ the mass density. Elementary statistical-mechanical arguments are used to derive the linear constitutive equation j=DS∇lnρ, valid in near-equilibrium fluids from which body forces are absent. Here, DS is the fluid’s self-diffusion coefficient. The present derivation is based on Einstein’s mesoscopic Brownian motion arguments, albeit applied here to volume- rather than particle-transport phenomena. In contrast to these mesoscale arguments, all prior derivations were based upon macroscale linear irreversible thermodynamic (LIT) arguments. DS replaces the thermometric diffusivity α as the phenomenological coefficient appearing in earlier, ad hoc, derivations. The prior scheme based on α, which had been shown to accord with Burnett’s well-known gas-kinetic constitutive data for the heat flux and viscous stress, carries over intact to now show comparable accord of DS with these same data, since for gases the dimensionless Lewis number Le=α/DS is essentially unity. On the other hand for most liquids, where Le≫1, use of DS in place of α is shown to agree much better with existing experimental data for liquids. For the case of binary mixtures it is shown for the special case of isothermal, isobaric, force-free, Fick’s law-type molecular diffusion processes that j=D∇lnρ, where D is the binary diffusion coefficient. In contrast with the preceding use in the single-component case of both mesoscopic and LIT models to obtain a constitutive equation for j, the corresponding mixture result is derived here without use of any physical model whatsoever. Rather, the derivation effectively requires little more than the respective definitions of the diffuse volume

  15. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  16. Diffusion in A and B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper first summarise the basic physics underlying diffusion in stars, and then reviews some important recent progress in both computation and observation of diffusion in tepid stars on and off the main sequence.

  17. DIFFUSION IN CRYSTALLINE COMPOSITION-MODULATED FILMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A; Saw, C; Harper, J

    2004-12-16

    The diffusivity in alloys at low temperatures is modeled for composition-modulated structures using Khachaturyan's microscopic theory of diffusion. The theory is now applied to assess a two-phase multilayer system.

  18. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  19. Riemann equation for prime number diffusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Liang, Yingjie

    2015-05-01

    This study makes the first attempt to propose the Riemann diffusion equation to describe in a manner of partial differential equation and interpret in physics of diffusion the classical Riemann method for prime number distribution. The analytical solution of this equation is the well-known Riemann representation. The diffusion coefficient is dependent on natural number, a kind of position-dependent diffusivity diffusion. We find that the diffusion coefficient of the Riemann diffusion equation is nearly a straight line having a slope 0.99734 in the double-logarithmic axis. Consequently, an approximate solution of the Riemann diffusion equation is obtained, which agrees well with the Riemann representation in predicting the prime number distribution. Moreover, we interpret the scale-free property of prime number distribution via a power law function with 1.0169 the scale-free exponent in respect to logarithmic transform of the natural number, and then the fractal characteristic of prime number distribution is disclosed.

  20. Surface self-diffusion of organic glasses.

    PubMed

    Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2013-12-19

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been determined for the organic glass Nifedipine using the method of surface grating decay. The flattening of 1000 nm surface gratings occurs by viscous flow at 12 K or more above the glass transition temperature and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion is at least 10(7) times faster than bulk diffusion, indicating a highly mobile surface. Nifedipine glasses have faster surface diffusion than the previously studied Indomethacin glasses, despite their similar bulk relaxation times. Both glasses exhibit fast surface crystal growth, and its rate scales with surface diffusivity. The observed rate of surface diffusion implies substantial surface rearrangement during the preparation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition. The Random First Order Transition Theory and the Coupling Model successfully predict the large surface-enhancement of mobility and its increase on cooling, but disagree with the experimental observation of the faster surface diffusion of Nifedipine.

  1. (VDA) Vapor Diffusion Apparatus Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA) trays were first flown in the Thermal Enclosure System (TES) during the USMP-2 (STS-62) mission. Each tray can hold 20 protein crystal growth chambers. Each chamber contains a double-barrel syringe; one barrel holds protein crystal solution and the other holds precipitant agent solution. During the microgravity mission, a torque device is used to simultaneously retract the plugs in all 20 syringes. The two solutions in each chamber are then mixed. After mixing, droplets of the combined solutions are moved onto the syringe tips so vapor diffusion can begin. During the length of the mission, protein crystals are grown in the droplets. Shortly before the Shuttle's return to Earth, the experiment is deactivated by retracting the droplets containing protein crystals, back into the syringes.

  2. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  3. [Kidneys in diffuse systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dębowska, Małgorzata; Staszków, Monika

    Systemic scleroderma is a chronic, autoimmune disease of the connective tissue that involves skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscles and joints, as well as the internal organs: kidneys, lungs, heart. Depending on the extent it can occur as limited or diffuse clinical variant. In 60-80 % of patients with diffuse scleroderma, autopsy studies have shown pathologic changes in the kidneys. About half of the patients with renal involvement the clinical manifestation is limited to a moderate increase in serum creatinine, mild proteinuria, and moderate hypertension. The most serious complication remains sclerodermal renal crisis. It develops in 5-20 % of patients and is characterized by severe hypertension, acute kidney injury with oliguria, proteinuria and erythrocyturia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia. In this article pathogenesis, risk factors, symptoms and treatment of scleroderma renal crisis have been reviewed.

  4. The Diffusion Tensor Imaging Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Alger, Jeffry R.

    2012-01-01

    During the past few years, the Journal of Neuroscience has published over 30 articles that describe investigations that used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and related techniques as a primary observation method. This illustrates a growing interest in DTI within the basic and clinical neuroscience communities. This article summarizes DTI methodology in terms that can be immediately understood by the neuroscientist who has little previous exposure to DTI. It describes the fundamentals of water molecular diffusion coefficient measurement in brain tissue and illustrates how these fundamentals can be used to form vivid and useful depictions of white matter macroscopic and microscopic anatomy. It also describes current research applications and the technique’s attributes and limitations. It is hoped that this article will help the readers of this Journal to more effectively evaluate neuroscience studies that use DTI. PMID:22649222

  5. Subordination pathways to fractional diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenflo, R.; Mainardi, F.

    2011-03-01

    The uncoupled Continuous Time Random Walk ( CTRW) in one space-dimension and under power law regime is splitted into three distinct random walks: ( rw 1), a random walk along the line of natural time, happening in operational time; ( w 2), a random walk along the line of space, happening in operational time; ( rw 3), the inversion of ( rw 1), namely a random walk along the line of operational time, happening in natural time. Via the general integral equation of CTRW and appropriate rescaling, the transition to the diffusion limit is carried out for each of these three random walks. Combining the limits of ( rw 1) and ( rw 2) we get the method of parametric subordination for generating particle paths, whereas combination of ( rw 2) and ( rw 3) yields the subordination integral for the sojourn probability density in space - time fractional diffusion.

  6. Diffusion nearby elastic cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Guckenberger, Achim; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    The physical approach of a small particle to the cell membrane represents the crucial step before active internalization and is governed by Brownian diffusion. Using a fully analytical theory, we show that the stretching and bending of cell membranes induces a long-lived subdiffusive behavior on the nearby particle. Such behavior is qualitatively different from the normal diffusion in a bulk fluid or near a hard-wall. the scaling exponent of the mean-square displacement can go as low as 0.87 in the perpendicular and 0.92 in the parallel direction. Moreover, we investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between two particles finding that the steady motion of two particles towards an elastic membrane possessing only shearing resistance leads to attractive interaction in contrast to the hard-wall case where the interaction is known to be repulsive. Our analytical predictions are compared with boundary-integral simulations where an excellent agreement is obtained.

  7. Solvent diffusion outside macromolecular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, Erik; Edholm, Olle

    1998-01-01

    The effect of the inhomogeneous environment upon solvent molecules close to a macromolecular surface is evaluated from a molecular-dynamics simulation of a protein, myoglobin, in water solution. The simulation is analyzed in terms of a mean-field potential from the protein upon the water molecules and spatially varying translational diffusion coefficients for solvent molecules in directions parallel and perpendicular to the protein surface. The diffusion coefficients can be obtained from the slope of the average-square displacements vs time, as well as from the integral of the velocity autocorrelation functions. It is shown that the former procedure gives a lot of ambiguities due to the variation of the slope of the curve with time. The latter, however, after analytic correction for the contribution from algebraic long-time tails, furnish a much more reliable alternative.

  8. Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan; Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth; Grest, Gary S.; Kumar, Sanat

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

  9. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  10. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  11. Diffuse Interstellar Bands in Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. B.; Sarre, P.; Marshall, C. C. M.; Spekkens, K.; de Naray, R. Kuzio

    Recent Fabry-Pérot observations towards the galaxy NGC 1325 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) led to the serendipitous discovery of an emission feature centered at 661.3 nm arising from material in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy; this emission feature lies at the wavelength of one of the sharper and stronger diffuse bands normally seen in absorption. The flux of the feature is 4.2 +/- 0.5 × 10-18 es-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. It appears that this is the first observation of emission from a diffuse band carrier in the ISM, excited in this case by the interstellar radiation field. We present the discovery spectra and describe follow-up measurements proposed for SALT.

  12. HOT HYDROGEN IN DIFFUSE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Duley, Walt W.; Williams, David A. E-mail: wwduley@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-08-20

    Laboratory evidence suggests that recombination of adsorbed radicals may cause an abrupt temperature excursion of a dust grain to about 1000 K. One consequence of this is the rapid desorption of adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules with excitation temperatures of this magnitude. We compute the consequences of injection of hot H{sub 2} into cold diffuse interstellar gas at a rate of 1% of the canonical H{sub 2} formation rate. We find that the level populations of H{sub 2} in J = 3, 4, and 5 are close to observed values, and that the abundances of CH{sup +} and OH formed in reactions with hot hydrogen are close to the values obtained from observations of diffuse clouds.

  13. Ultrasonic enhancement of battery diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hilton, R; Dornbusch, D; Branson, K; Tekeei, A; Suppes, G J

    2014-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that sonic energy can be harnessed to enhance convection in Galvanic cells during cyclic voltammetry; however, the practical value of this approach is limited due to the lack of open volumes for convection patterns to develop in most batteries. This study evaluates the ability of ultrasonic waves to enhance diffusion in membrane separators commonly used in sandwich-architecture batteries. Studies include the measuring of open-circuit performance curves to interpret performances in terms of reductions in concentration overpotentials. The use of a 40 kHz sonicator bath can consistently increase the voltage of the battery and reduce overpotential losses up to 30%. This work demonstrates and quantifies battery enhancement due to enhanced diffusion made possible with ultrasonic energy.

  14. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens, and radius of a diffusing probe.

  15. Diffusion in a crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J

    2010-08-01

    We analyze a pair of diffusion equations which are derived in the infinite system-size limit from a microscopic, individual based, stochastic model. Deviations from the conventional Fickian picture are found which ultimately relate to the depletion of resources on which the particles rely. The macroscopic equations are studied both analytically and numerically, and are shown to yield anomalous diffusion which does not follow a power law with time, as is frequently assumed when fitting data for such phenomena. These anomalies are here understood within a consistent dynamical picture which applies to a wide range of physical and biological systems, underlining the need for clearly defined mechanisms which are systematically analyzed to give definite predictions.

  16. More accurate estimation of diffusion tensor parameters using diffusion Kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Veraart, Jelle; Poot, Dirk H J; Van Hecke, Wim; Blockx, Ines; Van der Linden, Annemie; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-01-01

    With diffusion tensor imaging, the diffusion of water molecules through brain structures is quantified by parameters, which are estimated assuming monoexponential diffusion-weighted signal attenuation. The estimated diffusion parameters, however, depend on the diffusion weighting strength, the b-value, which hampers the interpretation and comparison of various diffusion tensor imaging studies. In this study, a likelihood ratio test is used to show that the diffusion kurtosis imaging model provides a more accurate parameterization of both the Gaussian and non-Gaussian diffusion component compared with diffusion tensor imaging. As a result, the diffusion kurtosis imaging model provides a b-value-independent estimation of the widely used diffusion tensor parameters as demonstrated with diffusion-weighted rat data, which was acquired with eight different b-values, uniformly distributed in a range of [0,2800 sec/mm(2)]. In addition, the diffusion parameter values are significantly increased in comparison to the values estimated with the diffusion tensor imaging model in all major rat brain structures. As incorrectly assuming additive Gaussian noise on the diffusion-weighted data will result in an overestimated degree of non-Gaussian diffusion and a b-value-dependent underestimation of diffusivity measures, a Rician noise model was used in this study. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Boundary fluxes for nonlocal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortazar, Carmen; Elgueta, Manuel; Rossi, Julio D.; Wolanski, Noemi

    We study a nonlocal diffusion operator in a bounded smooth domain prescribing the flux through the boundary. This problem may be seen as a generalization of the usual Neumann problem for the heat equation. First, we prove existence, uniqueness and a comparison principle. Next, we study the behavior of solutions for some prescribed boundary data including blowing up ones. Finally, we look at a nonlinear flux boundary condition.

  18. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  19. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  20. Extragalactic diffuse (C II) emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Suzanne C.; Geis, Norbert; Townes, Charles H.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The 158 micro m (CII) line has been mapped in the galaxies Centaurus A, M83, NGC 6946, and NGC 891. The emission exists over very large scales, peaking in the nuclei and extending beyond the spiral arms and molecular disks. While most of the (CII) emission from the nuclei and spiral arms originates in photodissociated gas, the diffuse atomic gas can account for much of the (CII) emission in the extended regions.