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Sample records for ambipolar diffusion calcuations

  1. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  2. AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION HEATING IN TURBULENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Myers, Andrew; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: atmyers@berkeley.edu

    2012-11-20

    The temperature of the gas in molecular clouds is a key determinant of the characteristic mass of star formation. Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is considered one of the most important heating mechanisms in weakly ionized molecular clouds. In this work, we study the AD heating rate using two-fluid turbulence simulations and compare it with the overall heating rate due to turbulent dissipation. We find that for observed molecular clouds, which typically have Alfven Mach numbers of {approx}1 and AD Reynolds numbers of {approx}20, about 70% of the total turbulent dissipation is in the form of AD heating. AD has an important effect on the length scale where energy is dissipated: when AD heating is strong, most of the energy in the cascade is removed by ion-neutral drift, with a comparatively small amount of energy making it down to small scales. We derive a relation for the AD heating rate that describes the results of our simulations to within a factor of two. Turbulent dissipation, including AD heating, is generally less important than cosmic-ray heating in molecular clouds, although there is substantial scatter in both.

  3. The relevance of ambipolar diffusion for neutron star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-03-01

    We study ambipolar diffusion in strongly magnetized neutron stars, with special focus on the effects of neutrino reaction rates and the impact of a superfluid/superconducting transition in the neutron star core. For axisymmetric magnetic field configurations, we determine the deviation from β-equilibrium induced by the magnetic force and calculate the velocity of the slow, quasi-stationary, ambipolar drift. We study the temperature dependence of the velocity pattern and clearly identify the transition to a predominantly solenoidal flow. For stars without superconducting/superfluid constituents and with a mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field of typical magnetar strength, we find that ambipolar diffusion proceeds fast enough to have a significant impact on the magnetic field evolution only at low core temperatures, T ≲ 1-2 × 108 K. The ambipolar diffusion time-scale becomes appreciably shorter when fast neutrino reactions are present, because the possibility to balance part of the magnetic force with pressure gradients is reduced. We also find short ambipolar diffusion time-scales in the case of superconducting cores for T ≲ 109 K, due to the reduced interaction between protons and neutrons. In the most favourable scenario, with fast neutrino reactions and superconducting cores, ambipolar diffusion results in advection velocities of several km kyr-1. This velocity can substantially reorganize magnetic fields in magnetar cores, in a way which can only be confirmed by dynamical simulations.

  4. Gravitational instability of filamentary molecular clouds, including ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinirad, Mohammad; Naficy, Kazem; Abbassi, Shahram; Roshan, Mahmood

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational instability of a filamentary molecular cloud in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics is investigated. The filament is assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium. We add the effect of ambipolar diffusion to the filament which is threaded by an initial uniform axial magnetic field along its axis. We write down the fluid equations in cylindrical coordinates and perform linear perturbation analysis. We integrate the resultant differential equations and then derive the numerical dispersion relation. We find that a more efficient ambipolar diffusion leads to an enhancement of the growth of the most unstable mode, and to the increase of the fragmentation scale of the filament.

  5. Ambipolar diffusion drifts and dynamos in turbulent gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1988-01-01

    Ambipolar drift in turbulent fluids are considered. Using mean-field electrodynamics, a two-scale theory originally used to study hydromagnetic dynamos, it is shown that magnetic fields can be advected by small-scale magnetosonic (compressional) turbulence or generated by Alfvenic (helical) turbulence. A simple dynamo theory is made and is compared with standard theories in which dissipation is caused by turbulent diffusion. The redistribution of magnetic flux in interstellar clouds is also discussed.

  6. Formation of magnetized prestellar cores with ambipolar diffusion and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-10

    We investigate the roles of magnetic fields and ambipolar diffusion during prestellar core formation in turbulent giant molecular clouds, using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Our simulations focus on the shocked layer produced by a converging large-scale flow and survey varying ionization and the angle between the upstream flow and magnetic field. We also include ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic models. From our simulations, we identify hundreds of self-gravitating cores that form within 1 Myr, with masses M ∼ 0.04-2.5 M {sub ☉} and sizes L ∼ 0.015-0.07 pc, consistent with observations of the peak of the core mass function. Median values are M = 0.47 M {sub ☉} and L = 0.03 pc. Core masses and sizes do not depend on either the ionization or upstream magnetic field direction. In contrast, the mass-to-flux ratio does increase with lower ionization, from twice to four times the critical value. The higher mass-to-flux ratio for low ionization is the result of enhanced transient ambipolar diffusion when the shocked layer first forms. However, ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. For ideal MHD, we find similar masses to other cases. These masses are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the value M {sub mag,} {sub sph} = 0.007B {sup 3}/(G {sup 3/2}ρ{sup 2}) that defines a magnetically supercritical sphere under post-shock ambient conditions. This discrepancy is the result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which is clearly evident in both ideal MHD and diffusive simulations. We interpret our numerical findings using a simple scaling argument that suggests that gravitationally critical core masses will depend on the sound speed and mean turbulent pressure in a cloud, regardless of magnetic effects.

  7. Ambipolar Diffusion Effects on Weakly Ionized Turbulence Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-04-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is a key process in molecular clouds (MCs). Non-ideal MHD turbulence simulations are technically very challenging because of the large Alfvén speed of ions in weakly ionized clouds. Using the Heavy-Ion Approximation method (Li, McKee & Klein 2006), we have carried out two-fluid simulations of AD in isothermal, turbulent boxes at a resolution of 5123, to investigate the effect of AD on the weakly ionized turbulence in MCs. Our simulation results show that the neutral gas component of the two-fluid system gradually transforms from an ideal MHD turbulence system to near a pure hydrodynamic turbulence system within the standard AD regime, in which the neutrals and ions are coupled over a flow time. The change of the turbulent state has a profound effect on the weakly ionized MCs.

  8. Electron Sheaths and Non-ambipolar Diffusion in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-10-01

    Electron sheaths were first predicted by Langmuir in 1929 when he stated that, ``with a large area, A, an anode sheath is a positive ion sheath, but that as A decreases, a point is reached where the positive ion sheath disappears and it is replaced by an electron sheath.''. We show that electron sheath formation near a positive anode depends on the anode area, Aa, as well as the area available for ion loss, Ai. When Aa/Ai< (me/mi)^1/2, the electron sheath potential monotonically decreases from the anode to the bulk plasma. When the anode is larger than this, a potential dip forms in the electron sheath to reduce the electron current lost to the anode. This potential dip is necessary to preserve global current balance and when it is present, total non-ambipolar diffusion can occur where all electrons are lost from the plasma through an electron sheath and all positive ions are lost elsewhere. Additional measurements were carried out to identify the transition from positive (ion) to negative (electron) sheaths. Data were taken in low-pressure argon plasma generated by hot filaments and confined in a multidipole chamber. I. Langmuir, Physical Review. 33, 954 (1929).

  9. Ambipolarity and transport with resonant ion diffusion in EBT

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hastings, D.E.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1983-10-01

    Using recently derived analytic expressions for resonant and nonresonant neoclassical transport coefficients in EBT, we calculate the ambipolar potential required to maintain quasi-charge neutrality in the presence of a high-energy ion tail produced by nonclassical heating. The electric field obeys a differential rather than an algebraic equation. Solution of this equation gives a potential proportional to the local magnetic field strength and thus a rigid rotation of low-energy ions near the magnetic axis. Radial-transport calculations using this potential give improved agreement with experimental data for neutral density and particle lifetime. However, high-energy ion orbits in the calculated potential exhibit banana widths larger than assumed in the resonant transport theory. The required density of high-energy ions is therefore larger than would be expected if realistic banana widths could be included.

  10. Ambipolar and non-ambipolar diffusion in an rf plasma source containing a magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-06-15

    By placing a magnetic filter across a rectangular plasma source (closed at one end with a ceramic plate and an rf antenna, and terminated at the opposite end by a grounded grid), we experimentally investigate the effect of conducting and insulating source walls on the nature of the plasma diffusion phenomena. The use of a magnetic filter creates a unique plasma, characterized by a high upstream electron temperature (T{sub e{sub u}}∼5 eV) near the rf antenna and a low downstream electron temperature (T{sub e{sub d}}∼1 eV) near the grid, which more clearly demonstrates the role of the source wall materials. For conducting walls a net ion current to ground is measured on the grid, and the plasma potential is determined by a mean electron temperature within the source. For insulating walls the plasma potential is determined by the downstream electron temperature (i.e., V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub d}} in argon), and the net current to the grid is exactly zero. Furthermore, by inserting a small additional upstream conductor (that can be made floating or grounded through an external circuit switch), we demonstrate that the plasma potential can be controlled and set to a low (V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub d}}), or high (V{sub p}∼5.2T{sub e{sub u}}) value.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of ambipolar and nonambipolar diffusion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Boswell, R. W.

    2012-05-15

    Using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we investigate cross-field diffusion in low-pressure magnetized plasmas both in the presence and absence of conducting axial boundaries. With no axial boundary, the cross-field diffusion is observed to be ambipolar, as expected. However, when axial boundaries are added, the diffusion becomes distinctly nonambipolar. Electrons are prevented from escaping to the transverse walls and are preferentially removed from the discharge along the magnetic field lines, thus allowing quasi-neutrality to be maintained via a short-circuit effect at the axial boundaries.

  12. Ambipolar diffusion in low-mass star formation. I. General comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Vaytet, N.; Commerçon, B.

    2016-03-01

    Angular momentum transport and the formation of rotationally supported structures are major issues in our understanding of protostellar core formation. Whereas purely hydrodynamical simulations lead to large Keplerian disks, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models yield the opposite result, with essentially no disk formation. This stems from the flux-freezing condition in ideal MHD, which leads to strong magnetic braking. In this paper, we provide a more accurate description of the evolution of the magnetic flux redistribution by including resistive terms in the MHD equations. We focus more particularly on the effect of ambipolar diffusion on the properties of the first Larson core and its surrounding structure, exploring various initial magnetisations and magnetic field versus rotation axis orientations of a 1 M⊙ collapsing prestellar dense core. We used the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics version of the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES to carry out these calculations. The resistivities required to calculate the ambipolar diffusion terms were computed using a reduced chemical network of charged, neutral, and grain species. Including ambipolar diffusion leads to the formation of a magnetic diffusion barrier (also known as the decoupling stage) in the vicinity of the core, which prevents accumulation of magnetic flux in and around the core and amplification of the field above 0.1 G. The mass and radius of the first Larson core, however, remain similar between ideal and non-ideal MHD models. This diffusion plateau, preventing further amplification of the field and reorganising the field topology, has crucial consequences for magnetic braking processes, allowing the formation of disk structures. Magnetically supported outflows launched in ideal MHD models are weakened or even disappear when using non-ideal MHD. In contrast to ideal MHD calculations, misalignment between the initial rotation axis and the magnetic field direction does not significantly affect the

  13. The Diffusion of Charged Particles in Collisional Plasmas: Free and Ambipolar Diffusion at Low and Moderate Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, A. V.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of measurements of the properties of weakly ionized plasmas in terms of diffusion of electrons and ions is reviewed both critically and tutorially. A particular effort is made to tie together various aspects of charged particle diffusion phenomena in quiescent, partially ionized plasmas. The concepts of diffusion length and effective diffusion coefficient and the treatment of partially reflecting boundaries are developed in the limit of the space-charge-free motion of the electrons or ions. A simplified derivation of the screening length for space charge electric fields is followed by a review of the conventional derivation of diffusion in the ambipolar limit. A discussion of the scaling parameters of the ratio of the diffusion length to the screening length and the ratio of the diffusion length to the ion mean-free-path leads to a map used to correlate published models covering the complete range of these parameters. The models of measurements of the diffusion of electrons, several types of positive ions, and negative ions are reviewed. The role of diffusion in the decay of charged particle densities and wall currents during the afterglow of a discharge is then considered. The effects of collapse of the space charge field and of diffusion cooling are reviewed. Finally, the application of the diffusion models to a number of different discharges is discussed. PMID:28179784

  14. Thanatology in protoplanetary discs. The combined influence of Ohmic, Hall, and ambipolar diffusion on dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Fromang, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Protoplanetary discs are poorly ionised due to their low temperatures and high column densities and are therefore subject to three "non-ideal" magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects: Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. The existence of magnetically driven turbulence in these discs has been a central question since the discovery of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Early models considered Ohmic diffusion only and led to a scenario of layered accretion, in which a magnetically "dead" zone in the disc midplane is embedded within magnetically "active" surface layers at distances of about 1-10 au from the central protostellar object. Recent work has suggested that a combination of Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion can render both the midplane and surface layers of the disc inactive and that torques due to magnetically driven outflows are required to explain the observed accretion rates. We reassess this picture by performing three-dimensional numerical simulations that include all three non-ideal MHD effects for the first time. We find that the Hall effect can generically "revive" dead zones by producing a dominant azimuthal magnetic field and a large-scale Maxwell stress throughout the midplane, provided that the angular velocity and magnetic field satisfy Ω·B > 0. The attendant large magnetic pressure modifies the vertical density profile and substantially increases the disc scale height beyond its hydrostatic value. Outflows are produced but are not necessary to explain accretion rates ≲ 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The flow in the disc midplane is essentially laminar, suggesting that dust sedimentation may be efficient. These results demonstrate that if the MRI is relevant for driving mass accretion in protoplanetary discs, one must include the Hall effect to obtain even qualitatively correct results. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. INCORPORATING AMBIPOLAR AND OHMIC DIFFUSION IN THE AMR MHD CODE RAMSES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, J.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Chabrier, G.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have implemented non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, namely, ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation, as additional source terms in the ideal MHD equations. We describe in details how we have discretized these terms using the adaptive Cartesian mesh, and how the time step is diminished with respect to the ideal case, in order to perform a stable time integration. We have performed a large suite of test runs, featuring the Barenblatt diffusion test, the Ohmic diffusion test, the C-shock test, and the Alfven wave test. For the latter, we have performed a careful truncation error analysis to estimate the magnitude of the numerical diffusion induced by our Godunov scheme, allowing us to estimate the spatial resolution that is required to address non-ideal MHD effects reliably. We show that our scheme is second-order accurate, and is therefore ideally suited to study non-ideal MHD effects in the context of star formation and molecular cloud dynamics.

  16. Energy balance in the solar transition region. I - Hydrostatic thermal models with ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1990-01-01

    The energy balance in the lower transition region is analyzed by constructing theoretical models which satisfy the energy balance constraint. The energy balance is achieved by balancing the radiative losses and the energy flowing downward from the corona. This energy flow is mainly in two forms: conductive heat flow and hydrogen ionization energy flow due to ambipolar diffusion. Hydrostatic equilibrium is assumed, and, in a first calculation, local mechanical heating and Joule heating are ignored. In a second model, some mechanical heating compatible with chromospheric energy-balance calculations is introduced. The models are computed for a partial non-LTE approach in which radiation departs strongly from LTE but particles depart from Maxwellian distributions only to first order. The results, which apply to cases where the magnetic field is either absent, or uniform and vertical, are compared with the observed Lyman lines and continuum from the average quiet sun. The approximate agreement suggests that this type of model can roughly explain the observed intensities in a physically meaningful way, assuming only a few free parameters specified as chromospheric boundary conditions.

  17. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  18. Bridging the gap: disk formation in the Class 0 phase with ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Basu, Shantanu; Kunz, Matthew W.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations have revealed catastrophic magnetic braking in the protostellar phase, which prevents the formation of a centrifugal disk around a nascent protostar. Aims: We determine if non-ideal MHD, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation determined from a detailed chemical network model, will allow for disk formation at the earliest stages of star formation. Methods: We employ the axisymmetric thin-disk approximation in order to resolve a dynamic range of 9 orders of magnitude in length and 16 orders of magnitude in density, while also calculating partial ionization using up to 19 species in a detailed chemical equilibrium model. Magnetic braking is applied to the rotation using a steady-state approximation, and a barotropic relation is used to capture the thermal evolution. Results: We resolve the formation of the first and second cores, with expansion waves at the periphery of each, a magnetic diffusion shock, and prestellar infall profiles at larger radii. Power-law profiles in each region can be understood analytically. After the formation of the second core, the centrifugal support rises rapidly and a low-mass disk of radius ≈ 10 R⊙ is formed at the earliest stage of star formation, when the second core has mass ~10-3 M⊙. The mass-to-flux ratio is ~104 times the critical value in the central region. Conclusions: A small centrifugal disk can form in the earliest stage of star formation, due to a shut-off of magnetic braking caused by magnetic field dissipation in the first core region. There is enough angular momentum loss to allow the second collapse to occur directly, and a low-mass stellar core to form with a surrounding disk. The disk mass and size will depend upon how the angular momentum transport mechanisms within the disk can keep up with mass infall onto the disk. Accounting only for direct infall, we estimate that the disk will remain ≲10 AU, undetectable even by ALMA, for

  19. SUB-ALFVENIC NON-IDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS WITH AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSERVATIONS AND TURBULENT ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2012-01-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is believed to be a crucial process for redistributing magnetic flux in the dense molecular gas that occurs in regions of star formation. We carry out numerical simulations of this process in regions of low ionization using the heavy-ion approximation. The simulations are for regions of strong field (plasma {beta} = 0.1) and mildly supersonic turbulence (M=3, corresponding to an Alfven Mach number of 0.67). The velocity power spectrum of the neutral gas changes from an Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum in the case of ideal MHD to a Burgers spectrum in the case of a shock-dominated hydrodynamic system. The magnetic power spectrum shows a similar behavior. We use a one-dimensional radiative transfer code to post-process our simulation results; the simulated emission from the CS J = 2-1 and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 1-0 lines shows that the effects of AD are observable in principle. Linewidths of ions are observed to be less than those of neutrals, and we confirm previous suggestions that this is due to AD. We show that AD is unlikely to affect the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method for inferring field strengths unless the AD is stronger than generally observed. Finally, we present a study of the enhancement of AD by turbulence, finding that AD is accelerated by factor 2-4.5 for non-self-gravitating systems with the level of turbulence we consider.

  20. A conservative multicomponent diffusion algorithm for ambipolar plasma flows in local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; van Boxtel, Jochem; Janssen, Jesper; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The usage of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation can be a very powerful assumption for simulations of plasmas in or close to equilibrium. In general, the elemental composition in LTE is not constant in space and effects of mixing and demixing have to be taken into account using the Stefan-Maxwell diffusion description. In this paper, we will introduce a method to discretize the resulting coupled set of elemental continuity equations. The coupling between the equations is taken into account by the introduction of the concept of a Péclet matrix. It will be shown analytically and numerically that the mass and charge conservation constraints can be fulfilled exactly. Furthermore, a case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method to a simulation of a mercury-free metal-halide lamp. The source code for the simulations presented in this paper is provided as supplementary material (stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/47/425202/mmedia).

  1. Multi-Ion Ambipolar Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    corresponding to probes inside the plasma. Tonks and Langmuir used Poisson’s equation as the basic equation of their system (Tonks and Langmuir , 1929...2-6 Schottky’s Solutions ................................ 2-7 Tonks and Langmuir ................................. 2-9 Ecker...theory to non-neutral plasmas, but retained congruence (Ecker, 1954). We also consider the paper of Tonks and Langmuir , who used an approach more general

  2. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  3. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  4. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  5. Direct current-self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiying; Chen, Lee; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-16

    For decades, non-ambipolar diffusion has been observed and studied in laboratory plasmas that contain a double layer. However, self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma has yet to be demonstrated. This article reports the method and results for achieving such a condition at low pressure, with a wide power range (as low as 6 W). The findings reveal that to achieve self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma, both the balance between electron and ion heating and the space-potential gradient are critical. The plasma reactor developed in this work has potential applications that include microelectronic surface processing and space propulsion, via space-charge-neutral plasma-beam thruster, when operated in the high power regime.

  6. Reconfigurable Complementary Logic Circuits with Ambipolar Organic Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hocheon; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C. P.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Lee, Han-Koo; Torricelli, Fabrizio; Kim, Jae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Ambipolar organic electronics offer great potential for simple and low-cost fabrication of complementary logic circuits on large-area and mechanically flexible substrates. Ambipolar transistors are ideal candidates for the simple and low-cost development of complementary logic circuits since they can operate as n-type and p-type transistors. Nevertheless, the experimental demonstration of ambipolar organic complementary circuits is limited to inverters. The control of the transistor polarity is crucial for proper circuit operation. Novel gating techniques enable to control the transistor polarity but result in dramatically reduced performances. Here we show high-performance non-planar ambipolar organic transistors with electrical control of the polarity and orders of magnitude higher performances with respect to state-of-art split-gate ambipolar transistors. Electrically reconfigurable complementary logic gates based on ambipolar organic transistors are experimentally demonstrated, thus opening up new opportunities for ambipolar organic complementary electronics. PMID:27762321

  7. Outlook and emerging semiconducting materials for ambipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Piliego, Claudia; Gao, Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2014-02-26

    Ambipolar or bipolar transistors are transistors in which both holes and electrons are mobile inside the conducting channel. This device allows switching among several states: the hole-dominated on-state, the off-state, and the electron-dominated on-state. In the past year, it has attracted great interest in exotic semiconductors, such as organic semiconductors, nanostructured materials, and carbon nanotubes. The ability to utilize both holes and electrons inside one device opens new possibilities for the development of more compact complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits, and new kinds of optoelectronic device, namely, ambipolar light-emitting transistors. This progress report highlights the recent progresses in the field of ambipolar transistors, both from the fundamental physics and application viewpoints. Attention is devoted to the challenges that should be faced for the realization of ambipolar transistors with different material systems, beginning with the understanding of the importance of interface modification, which heavily affects injections and trapping of both holes and electrons. The recent development of advanced gating applications, including ionic liquid gating, that open up more possibility to realize ambipolar transport in materials in which one type of charge carrier is highly dominant is highlighted. Between the possible applications of ambipolar field-effect transistors, we focus on ambipolar light-emitting transistors. We put this new device in the framework of its prospective for general lightings, embedded displays, current-driven laser, as well as for photonics-electronics interconnection.

  8. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  9. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform.

  10. A new viewpoint on the ambipolar diffusion Schottky theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2013-04-15

    A modern modification of the Schottky theory is proposed. It enables overcoming some of the difficulties and contradictions of the old theory and extends its capabilities in the analysis of radial distributions of ionized species. This allows us to consider the distributions of positive column plasma in noble gas d.c. discharges within a proper universal framework. The radial distributions of plasma species are basically similar in their nature and are independent of the character and features of plasma reactions.

  11. Ambipolar solution-processed hybrid perovskite phototransistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ma, Chun; Wang, Hong; Hu, Weijin; Yu, Weili; Sheikh, Arif D.; Wu, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskites have attracted substantial attention because of their excellent physical properties, which enable them to serve as the active material in emerging hybrid solid-state solar cells. Here we investigate the phototransistors based on hybrid perovskite films and provide direct evidence for their superior carrier transport property with ambipolar characteristics. The field-effect mobilities for triiodide perovskites at room temperature are measured as 0.18 (0.17) cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes (electrons), which increase to 1.24 (1.01) cm2 V−1 s−1 for mixed-halide perovskites. The photoresponsivity of our hybrid perovskite devices reaches 320 A W−1, which is among the largest values reported for phototransistors. Importantly, the phototransistors exhibit an ultrafast photoresponse speed of less than 10 μs. The solution-based process and excellent device performance strongly underscore hybrid perovskites as promising material candidates for photoelectronic applications. PMID:26345730

  12. Ambipolar Organic Tri-Gate Transistor for Low-Power Complementary Electronics.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Fabrizio; Ghittorelli, Matteo; Smits, Edsger C P; Roelofs, Christian W S; Janssen, René A J; Gelinck, Gerwin H; Kovács-Vajna, Zsolt M; Cantatore, Eugenio

    2016-01-13

    Ambipolar transistors typically suffer from large off-current inherently due to ambipolar conduction. Using a tri-gate transistor it is shown that it is possible to electrostatically switch ambipolar polymer transistors from ambipolar to unipolar mode. In unipolar mode, symmetric characteristics with an on/off current ratio of larger than 10(5) are obtained. This enables easy integration into low-power complementary logic and volatile electronic memories.

  13. Ambipolar charge transport in microcrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Knipp, Dietmar; Marinkovic, M.; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Gordijn, Aad; Stiebig, Helmut

    2011-01-15

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) is a promising candidate for thin-film transistors (TFTs) in large-area electronics due to high electron and hole charge carrier mobilities. We report on ambipolar TFTs based on {mu}c-Si:H prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at temperatures compatible with flexible substrates. Electrons and holes are directly injected into the {mu}c-Si:H channel via chromium drain and source contacts. The TFTs exhibit electron and hole charge carrier mobilities of 30-50 cm{sup 2}/V s and 10-15 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. In this work, the electrical characteristics of the ambipolar {mu}c-Si:H TFTs are described by a simple analytical model that takes the ambipolar charge transport into account. The analytical expressions are used to model the transfer curves, the potential and the net surface charge along the channel of the TFTs. The electrical model provides insights into the electronic transport of ambipolar {mu}c-Si:H TFTs.

  14. Electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, D.; Yanagi, K.; Takenobu, T.; Okada, S.; Marumoto, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit various excellent properties, such as ballistic transport. However, their electrically induced charge carriers and the relation between their spin states and the ballistic transport have not yet been microscopically investigated because of experimental difficulties. Here we show an electron spin resonance (ESR) study of semiconducting single-walled CNT thin films to investigate their spin states and electrically induced charge carriers using transistor structures under device operation. The field-induced ESR technique is suitable for microscopic investigation because it can directly observe spins in the CNTs. We observed a clear correlation between the ESR decrease and the current increase under high charge density conditions, which directly demonstrated electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in the CNTs. The result provides a first clear evidence of antimagnetic interactions between spins of electrically induced charge carriers and vacancies in the CNTs. The ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute the improvement of transport properties of CNTs because of greatly reduced carrier scatterings. PMID:26148487

  15. Nonradiative decay mechanism of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile ambipolar derivatives.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Leandro A; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2011-03-24

    We report recent results on the nonradiative decay (NRD) of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile (FM) ambipolar derivatives (FMDs). 2,7- and 3,6-disubstituted FMDs present distinctive photophysics. Charge separation was found dominant for excited state relaxation. The radiative decay (RD) is sensitive to changes in temperature and solvent medium only for the case of 3,6-FMDs. Excited state deactivation of carbazole-containing 3,6-FMD (CPAFM36) was exclusively nonradiative in polar solvents with excited state lifetimes shorter than 10 ps. The charge separation/recombination mechanism of the corresponding FMDs is suggested to fall in the inverted Marcus region of electron transfer. Given the electron-withdrawing properties of the FM unit, its ambipolar derivatives are suggested as potential candidates for air-stable organic thin-film transistors and molecular organic photovoltaics.

  16. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors on unconventional substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosseddu, P.; Mattana, G.; Orgiu, E.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we report on the realization of flexible all-organic ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) realized on unconventional substrates, such as plastic films and textile yarns. A double layer pentacene-C60 heterojunction was used as the semiconductor layer. The contacts were made with poly(ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and patterned by means of soft lithography microcontact printing (μCP). Very interestingly growing C60 on a predeposited pentacene buffer layer leads to a clear improvement in the morphology and crystallinity of the film so it obtains n-type conduction despite the very high electron injection barrier at the interface between PEDOT:PSS and C60. As a result, it was possible to obtain all-organic ambipolar FETs and to optimize their electrical properties by tuning the thicknesses of the two employed active layers. Moreover, it will be shown that modifying the triple interface between dielectric/semiconductor/electrodes is a crucial point for optimizing and balancing injection and transport of both kinds of charge carriers. In particular, we demonstrate that using a middle contact configuration in which source and drain electrodes are sandwiched between pentacene and C60 layers allows significantly improving the electrical performance in planar ambipolar devices. These findings are very important because they pave the way for the realization of low-cost, fully flexible and stretchable organic complementary circuits for smart wearable and textile electronics applications.

  17. High performance n-type and ambipolar small organic semiconductors for organic thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke; Dong, Huanli; Zhang, Hao-li; Hu, Wenping

    2014-11-07

    Remarkable progress has recently been achieved in n-type and ambipolar OFETs. In this mini review, we will highlight the representative development of high performance n-type and ambipolar organic semiconductors (OSCs) especially for those n-type small OSCs with thin film mobilities >1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and ambipolar small OSCs with both hole and electron mobilities of over 0.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This overview shall provide a meaningful guideline for further development of high performance n-type and ambipolar materials and devices.

  18. Ambipolar ion acceleration in an expanding magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Benjamin W.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Carter, Mark D.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.; Díaz, Franklin R. Chang; Glover, Tim W.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ilin, Andrew V.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Olsen, Chris S.; Squire, Jared P.

    2011-02-01

    The helicon plasma stage in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) VX-200i device was used to characterize an axial plasma potential profile within an expanding magnetic nozzle region of the laboratory based device. The ion acceleration mechanism is identified as an ambipolar electric field produced by an electron pressure gradient, resulting in a local axial ion speed of Mach 4 downstream of the magnetic nozzle. A 20 eV argon ion kinetic energy was measured in the helicon source, which had a peak magnetic field strength of 0.17 T. The helicon plasma source was operated with 25 mg s-1 argon propellant and 30 kW of RF power. The maximum measured values of plasma density and electron temperature within the exhaust plume were 1 × 1020 m-3 and 9 eV, respectively. The measured plasma density is nearly an order of magnitude larger than previously reported steady-state helicon plasma sources. The exhaust plume also exhibits a 95% to 100% ionization fraction. The size scale and spatial location of the plasma potential structure in the expanding magnetic nozzle region appear to follow the size scale and spatial location of the expanding magnetic field. The thickness of the potential structure was found to be 104 to 105 λDe depending on the local electron temperature in the magnetic nozzle, many orders of magnitude larger than typical laboratory double layer structures. The background plasma density and neutral argon pressure were 1015 m-3 and 2 × 10-5 Torr, respectively, in a 150 m3 vacuum chamber during operation of the helicon plasma source. The agreement between the measured plasma potential and plasma potential that was calculated from an ambipolar ion acceleration analysis over the bulk of the axial distance where the potential drop was located is a strong confirmation of the ambipolar acceleration process.

  19. Improving Ambipolar Charge Injection in Polymer FETs with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Efficient charge injection is a key issue for organic field-effect transistors (FET). Various methods can be used to optimize injection of either holes or electrons, for example, by modifying the workfunction of metallic electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. For ambipolar FETs this is much more difficult because injection of both charge carriers has to be improved at the same time. Here we demonstrate a simple process to significantly improve ambipolar charge injection in bottom contact/top gate polymer field-effect transistors by adding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) to the semiconducting polymer at concentrations well below the percolation limit. Such polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid systems are easily produced by ultrasonication and dispersion of SWNT in a conjugated polymer solution. Even at very low nanotube concentrations the charge injection of both holes and electrons, for example, into poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is significantly enhanced leading to lower contact resistances and threshold voltages than in FETs with pristine polymer films. This method can be extended to other semiconductors like n-type naphthalene-bis(dicarboximide)-based polymers (e.g. P(NDI2OD-T2)) for which hole injection was greatly enhanced. The proposed mechanism for this effect of carbon nanotubes on injection is independent of the polarity of the charge carriers. It can be maximized by patterning layers of pure carbon nanotubes onto the injecting electrodes before spincoating the pristine polymers leading to almost ohmic contacts for polymers, which usually show only strongly Schottky-barrier-limited injection. This improved injection of holes and electrons allows for a wider range of accessible polymers for ambipolar and thus also light-emitting transistors.

  20. A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene)-based field-effect transistor (FET) sensitively detects xylene isomers at low ppm levels with multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, can discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from one another.

  1. Stable All-Organic Radicals with Ambipolar Charge Transport.

    PubMed

    Reig, Marta; Gozálvez, Cristian; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Gaidelis, Valentas; Grazulevicius, Juozas V; Fajarí, Lluís; Juliá, Luis; Velasco, Dolores

    2016-12-19

    A series of neutral long-lived purely organic radicals based on the stable [4-(N-carbazolyl)-2,6-dichlorophenyl]bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl radical adduct (Cbz-TTM) is reported herein. All compounds exhibit ambipolar charge-transport properties under ambient conditions owing to their radical character. High electron and hole mobilities up to 10(-2) and 10(-3)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) , respectively, were achieved. Xerographic single-layered photoreceptors were fabricated from the radicals studied herein, exhibiting good xerographic photosensitivity across the visible spectrum.

  2. Fabrication and characterisation of gallium arsenide ambipolar quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. C. H. Klochan, O.; Micolich, A. P.; Hamilton, A. R.; Das Gupta, K.; Sfigakis, F.; Ritchie, D. A.; Trunov, K.; Wieck, A. D.; Reuter, D.

    2015-05-04

    We show that ballistic one-dimensional channels can be formed in an ambipolar device fabricated on a high mobility Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs heterostructure. Both electron and hole quantised conductances can be measured in the same one-dimensional channel. We have used this device to compare directly the subband spacings of the two charge carriers in the same confining potential and used this to compare the electron and hole effective masses.

  3. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jie Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jing; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  4. Light-sensing ambipolar organic transistors for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Wöbkenberg, Paul H.; Bradley, Donal D. C.

    2008-04-01

    Since their invention use of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) has been restricted to applications that explore their unifunctional, i.e. current switching, characteristics. Recently, however, OFETs with additional functionalities have been designed and demonstrated with most notable examples the light-emitting (LE-OFET) [1] and light-sensing (LS-OFET) [2] transistors. These devices are of particular significance since design and fabrication of a new type of organic circuits can now be envisioned. Here we report on electro-optical circuits based on ambipolar LS-OFETs and unipolar OFETs. By carefully tuning the ambipolar transport of LS-OFETs their photosensitivity can be controlled and optimised. By going a step further and integrating LS-OFETs with unipolar OFETs we are able to demonstrate various optoelectronic circuits including electro-optical switches and logic gates. A unique characteristic of these gates is that their input signal(s) can be designed to be either all-optical or electro-optical. An additional advantage of the technology is that LS-OFETs can be integrated with the driving electronics using the same number of processing steps, hence eliminating the need of additional fabrication costs. This is one of the first demonstrations of organic circuits where signal processing involves the use of both optical and electrical input signals. Such optoelectronic devices/circuits could one day be explored in various applications including electro-optical transceivers and optical sensor arrays.

  5. Correlation between morphology and ambipolar transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Th. B.; Günes, S.; Marjanović, N.; Sariciftci, N. S.; Menon, R.

    2005-06-01

    Attaining ambipolar charge transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) is highly desirable from both fundamental understanding and application points of view. We present the results of an approach to obtain ambipolar OFET with an active layer of organic semiconductor blends using semiconducting polymers in composite with fullerene derivatives. Clear features of forming the superposition of both hole and electron-enhanced channels for an applied gate field are observed. The present studies suggest a strong correlation of thin-film nanomorphology and ambipolar transport in field-effect devices.

  6. Local Ambipolar Graphene Field Effect Transistors via Metal Side Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Jauregui, Luis; Lopez, Gabriel; Cao, Helin; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated local graphene field effect transistors (FET) based on metal side gates. The characteristic ambipolar field effect of graphene device was observed by sweeping only the voltage of a local metal side gate. The local charge neutrality point of the side-gate graphene FET can be tuned in a large voltage range from positive to negative by a second side gate. Furthermore, we observed that the field effect due to the side gate can be appreciably weakened by electrically grounding the back gate compared to floating the back gate. The experimental results can be well explained by electrostatic simulation using COMSOL. Our technique offers a simple method for local tuning of charge density of graphene nanodevices while avoiding coating graphene surface with dielectrics, which may cause contamination and degradation of graphene.

  7. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistor using gate insulator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Eriko; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2005-04-01

    An organic field-effect transistor based on a copper-phthalocyanine and cyanoethylpullulan gate insulator showed ambipolar operation using gate insulator hysteresis, which appeared at less than 1mHz. The gate insulator possesses spontaneous polarization of 1.6μC/cm2 and a coercive electric field of 50kV/cm. After poling in an effort to obtain a large amount of accumulated charge, the field-effect mobilities of the hole and electron were 4.1×10-3 and 3.5×10-6cm2/Vs, respectively. The on/off ratio at VSG=±10V was 6×104 for the p type and 70 for the n type.

  8. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lore, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Deng, C. B.; Likin, K. M.; Spong, D. A.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.

    2010-05-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large "electron root" radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  9. Absence of carrier separation in ambipolar charge and spin drift in p{sup +}-GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Cadiz, F.; Paget, D.; Rowe, A. C. H.; Martinelli, L.; Arscott, S.

    2015-10-19

    The electric field-induced modifications of the spatial distribution of photoelectrons, photoholes, and electronic spins in optically pumped p{sup +} GaAs are investigated using a polarized luminescence imaging microscopy. At low pump intensity, application of an electric field reveals the tail of charge and spin density of drifting electrons. These tails disappear when the pump intensity is increased since a slight differential drift of photoelectrons and photoholes causes the buildup of a strong internal electric field. Spatial separation of photoholes and photoelectrons is very weak so that photoholes drift in the same direction as photoelectrons, thus exhibiting a negative effective mobility. In contrast, for a zero electric field, no significant ambipolar diffusive effects are found in the same sample.

  10. The study of ambipolar behavior in phosphorene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Xing, Huaizhong; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2016-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated with the two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation. In this study, it is found that the Schottky barrier plays an important role in the ambipolar transfer characteristics of phosphorene-based FETs. It is demonstrated that when the barrier heights are equal between electron and hole doping, the ambipolar current output dominates across the whole bias range. In the meantime, the saturation leakage current output of the transfer characteristic is only determined by the number of phosphorene layers or the bandgap rather than the Schottky barrier height between phosphorene and metal contact. The ambipolar behaviors become more pronounced as the channel lengths of transistors are decreased, all the geometric and material parameters are taken into account to improve the ambipolar output and understanding its underlying mechanisms. The presented results open the path to design phosphorene-based logic device, photo detector with low dark current for both electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  11. Ambipolar MoS2 thin flake transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijin; Ye, Jianting; Matsuhashi, Yusuke; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2012-03-14

    Field effect transistors (FETs) made of thin flake single crystals isolated from layered materials have attracted growing interest since the success of graphene. Here, we report the fabrication of an electric double layer transistor (EDLT, a FET gated by ionic liquids) using a thin flake of MoS(2), a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides, an archetypal layered material. The EDLT of the thin flake MoS(2) unambiguously displayed ambipolar operation, in contrast to its commonly known bulk property as an n-type semiconductor. High-performance transistor operation characterized by a large "ON" state conductivity in the order of ~mS and a high on/off ratio >10(2) was realized for both hole and electron transport. Hall effect measurements revealed mobility of 44 and 86 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron and hole, respectively. The hole mobility is twice the value of the electron mobility, and the density of accumulated carrier reached 1 × 10(14) cm(-2), which is 1 order of magnitude larger than conventional FETs with solid dielectrics. The high-density carriers of both holes and electrons can create metallic transport in the MoS(2) channel. The present result is not only important for device applications with new functionalities, but the method itself would also act as a protocol to study this class of material for a broader scope of possibilities in accessing their unexplored properties.

  12. Enhancement of ambipolar characteristics in single-walled carbon nanotubes using C{sub 60} and fabrication of logic gates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Steve; Nam, Ji Hyun; Koo, Ja Hoon; Lei, Ting; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate a technique to convert p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network transistor into ambipolar transistor by thermally evaporating C{sub 60} on top. The addition of C{sub 60} was observed to have two effects in enhancing ambipolar characteristics. First, C{sub 60} served as an encapsulating layer that enhanced the ambipolar characteristics of SWNTs. Second, C{sub 60} itself served as an electron transporting layer that contributed to the n-type conduction. Such a dual effect enables effective conversion of p-type into ambipolar characteristics. We have fabricated inverters using our SWNT/C{sub 60} ambipolar transistors with gain as high as 24, along with adaptive NAND and NOR logic gates.

  13. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics.

  14. Dithienocoronenediimide-based copolymers as novel ambipolar semiconductors for organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Usta, Hakan; Newman, Christopher; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2012-07-17

    A new class of ambipolar donor-acceptor π-conjugated polymers based on a dithienocoronenediimide core is presented. Solution-processed top-gate/bottom-contact thin film transistors (TFTs) exhibit electron and hole mobilities of up to 0.30 cm(2)/V·s and 0.04 cm(2)/V·s, respectively, which are the highest reported to date for an ambipolar polymer in ambient conditions. The polymers presented here are the first examples of coronenediimide-based semiconductors showing high organic TFT performances.

  15. Boosting the ambipolar performance of solution-processable polymer semiconductors via hybrid side-chain engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Han, A-Reum; Yu, Hojeong; Shin, Tae Joo; Yang, Changduk; Oh, Joon Hak

    2013-06-26

    Ambipolar polymer semiconductors are highly suited for use in flexible, printable, and large-area electronics as they exhibit both n-type (electron-transporting) and p-type (hole-transporting) operations within a single layer. This allows for cost-effective fabrication of complementary circuits with high noise immunity and operational stability. Currently, the performance of ambipolar polymer semiconductors lags behind that of their unipolar counterparts. Here, we report on the side-chain engineering of conjugated, alternating electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers using diketopyrrolopyrrole-selenophene copolymers with hybrid siloxane-solubilizing groups (PTDPPSe-Si) to enhance ambipolar performance. The alkyl spacer length of the hybrid side chains was systematically tuned to boost ambipolar performance. The optimized three-dimensional (3-D) charge transport of PTDPPSe-Si with pentyl spacers yielded unprecedentedly high hole and electron mobilities of 8.84 and 4.34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. These results provide guidelines for the molecular design of semiconducting polymers with hybrid side chains.

  16. Carrier trapping anisotropy in ambipolar SnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Liang, Lingyan; Cao, Hongtao

    2017-03-01

    The anisotropic carrier trapping behaviors was demonstrated for ambipolar tin monoxide (SnO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). On one hand, the TFTs exhibited good stability with almost no changes in transfer characteristics under negative gate-bias stress (NGBS). On the other, under positive gate-bias stress (PGBS), the transfer curves presented parallel and positive shift with no degradation in field-effect mobility and subthreshold voltage swing. The stress-time evolution of the turn-on voltage shift, induced by different positive stress voltages and temperatures, could be described by the stretched exponential model. The relaxation time was extracted to be 1.6 × 104 s at room temperature with activation energy of 0.43 eV, indicating that the ambipolar SnO TFTs under PGBS approach the stability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide based TFTs.

  17. Ambipolar surface state transport in nonmetallic stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syers, Paul; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-01-01

    Achieving true bulk insulating behavior in Bi2Se3 , the archetypal topological insulator with a simplistic one-band electronic structure and sizable band gap, has been prohibited by a well-known self-doping effect caused by selenium vacancies, whose extra electrons shift the chemical potential into the bulk conduction band. We report a synthesis method for achieving stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals that exhibit nonmetallic behavior in electrical transport down to low temperatures. Hall-effect measurements indicate the presence of both electron- and holelike carriers, with the latter identified with surface state conduction and the achievement of ambipolar transport in bulk Bi2Se3 crystals without gating techniques. With carrier mobilities surpassing the highest values yet reported for topological surface states in this material, the achievement of ambipolar transport via upward band bending is found to provide a key method to advancing the potential of this material for future study and applications.

  18. Ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors by using catalytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H.-K.; Jin, J. E.; Shin, J. M.; Kim, D.-H.; Kim, G.-T.

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of electrical properties in MoS2 flakes is an attractive issue from the point of view of device applications. In this work, we demonstrate that an ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) can be easily obtained by heating MoS2 flakes under air atmosphere in the presence of cobalt oxide catalyst (MoS2 + O2 → MoOx + SOx). The catalytic oxidation of MoS2 flakes between source-drain electrodes resulted in lots of MoOx nanoparticles (NPs) on MoS2 flakes with thickness reduction from 64 nm to 17 nm. Consequently, N-type behavior of MoS2 FETs was converted into ambipolar transport characteristics by MoOx NPs which inject hole carriers to MoS2 flakes.

  19. Indigo--a natural pigment for high performance ambipolar organic field effect transistors and circuits.

    PubMed

    Irimia-Vladu, Mihai; Głowacki, Eric D; Troshin, Pavel A; Schwabegger, Günther; Leonat, Lucia; Susarova, Diana K; Krystal, Olga; Ullah, Mujeeb; Kanbur, Yasin; Bodea, Marius A; Razumov, Vladimir F; Sitter, Helmut; Bauer, Siegfried; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2012-01-17

    Millenniums-old natural dye indigo--a "new" ambipolar organic semiconductor. Indigo shows balanced electron and hole mobilities of 1 × 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and good stability against degradation in air. Inverters with gains of 105 in the first and 110 in the third quadrant are demonstrated. Fabricated entirely from natural and biodegradable compounds, these devices show the large potential of such materials for green organic electronics.

  20. Ferroelectric-induced carrier modulation for ambipolar transition metal dichalcogenide transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Feng; Xu, Kai; Cheng, Ruiqing; Wen, Yao; Li, Jie; He, Jun

    2017-03-01

    For multifarious electronic and optoelectronic applications, it is indispensable exploration of stable and simple method to modulate electrical behavior of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). In this study, an effective method to adjust the electrical properties of ambipolar TMDs is developed by introducing the dipole electric field from poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) ferroelectric polymer. The transition from ambipolar to p-type conductive characteristics is realized, and the transistor performances are also significantly enhanced. Hole density of MoTe2- and WSe2-based back-gate field effect transistors increases by 4.4 and 2.5 times. Moreover, the corresponding hole mobilities are strikingly improved from 0.27 to 10.7 cm2 V-1 s-1 and from 1.6 to 59.8 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. After optimizing, p-channel MoTe2 phototransistors present ultrahigh responsivity of 3521 A/W, which is superior to most layered phototransistors. The remarkable control of conductive type, carrier concentration, and field-effect mobility of ambipolar TMDs via P(VDF-TrFE) treatment paves a way for realization of high-performance and versatile electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Efficient and Hysteresis-Free Field Effect Modulation of Ambipolarly Doped Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Hou, Yasen; Travaglini, Henry C.; Hellwig, Luke; Hihath, Sahar; van Benthem, Klaus; Lee, Kathleen; Liu, Weifeng; Yu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The subpicosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors, which are based on electric-field-induced phase transition. However, the development of VO2 -based transistors lags behind, owing to inefficient and hysteretic gate modulation. Here we report ambipolar doping and strong field effects free of hysteresis in single-crystal VO2 nanowires synthesized via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The ambipolarly doped VO2 nanowires are achieved by controlling the oxygen vacancy density during the synthesis and show strong gate effects because of their relatively low doping level. Both the doping type of the nanowires and the band-bending direction at the metal-insulator domain walls are reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, as revealed by scanning photocurrent microscopy. Furthermore, we eliminate the hysteresis in gate sweep via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid-ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables electronic applications based on VO2 .

  2. Polymer Thin Film Transistors: High Electron Mobility and Ambipolar Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenekhe, Samson; Babel, Amit

    2004-03-01

    Along with high performance unipolar FETs, knowledge of ambipolar charge transport in conjugated polymers and organic semiconductors is important to realize the ultimate vision of all-plastic complementary integrated circuits for logic and memory applications. We present herein studies of electron transport in n-type conjugated ladder polymer, poly(benzobisimidazobenzophenanthroline) (BBL) in which we observed field-effect electron mobilities as high as 0.05-0.1 cm^2/Vs.^[1] We have also developed new ambipolar thin film transistors based on blends of BBL and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). Ambipolar hole mobilities were as high as 2.0 × 10-4 cm^2/Vs while electron mobilities were up to 3.0 × 10-5 cm^2/Vs. Transmission electron microscopy showed crystallization of CuPc in the α -crystal form within the semicrystalline BBL matrix. On prolonged treatment of the blend FETs in methanol, unipolar hole mobilities as high as 2.0 × 10-3 cm^2/Vs were observed, comparable to hole mobilities in thermally evaporated CuPc FETs. [1] Babel, A.; Jenekhe, S. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 13656.

  3. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  4. Influence of gate overlap engineering on ambipolar and high frequency characteristics of tunnel-CNTFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.; Abouelatta, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of gate overlapping-on-drain on the ambipolar behavior and high frequency performance of tunnel CNTFET (T-CNTFET). It is found that gate overlapping-on-drain suppresses the ambipolar behavior and improves OFF-state current. The simulation results show that there is an optimum choice for the overlapped length. On the other hand, this overlap deteriorates the high frequency performance. The high frequency figure of merit is analyzed in terms of the unit-gain cutoff frequency (fT). Further, we propose two different approaches to improve the high frequency performance of the overlapped T-CNTFET. The first one is based on inserting a high-dielectric constant material below the overlapped part of the gate and the second is based on depositing a different work function gate metal for the overlapped region. The two solutions show very good improvement in the high frequency performance with maintaining the suppression of the ambipolar characteristics.

  5. High-Mobility Ambipolar Organic Thin-Film Transistor Processed From a Nonchlorinated Solvent.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Prashant; Chang, Jingjing; Kim, Jae H; Ong, Kok-Haw; Gann, Eliot; Manzhos, Sergei; Wu, Jishan; McNeill, Christopher R

    2016-09-21

    Polymer semiconductor PDPPF-DFT, which combines furan-substituted diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and a 3,4-difluorothiophene base, has been designed and synthesized. PDPPF-DFT polymer semiconductor thin film processed from nonchlorinated hexane is used as an active layer in thin-film transistors. As a result, balanced hole and electron mobilities of 0.26 and 0.12 cm(2)/(V s) are achieved for PDPPF-DFT. This is the first report of using nonchlorinated hexane solvent for fabricating high-performance ambipolar thin-film transistor devices.

  6. Large-scale fabrication of 4-nm-channel vertical protein-based ambipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Mentovich, Elad D; Belgorodsky, Bogdan; Kalifa, Itsik; Cohen, Hagai; Richter, Shachar

    2009-04-01

    We suggest a universal method for the mass production of nanometer-sized molecular transistors. This vertical-type device was fabricated using conventional photolithography and self-assembly methods and was processed in parallel fashion. We used this transistor to investigate the transport properties of a single layer of bovine serum albumin protein. This 4-nm-channel device exhibits low operating voltages, ambipolar behavior, and high gate sensitivity. The operation mechanism of this new device is suggested, and the charge transfer through the protein layer was explored.

  7. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  8. Balanced Ambipolar Poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-alt-tetrafluorobenzene) Semiconducting Polymers Synthesized via Direct Arylation Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Guojie; Wang, Mingfeng

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis of an ambipolar π-conjugated copolymer consisting of alternating diketopyrrolopyrrole and tetrafluorobenzene via direct arylation polymerization (DAP) is reported. Two different combinations of monomers are investigated under various catalytic conditions for DAP. The target polymer obtained under an optimized catalytic condition shows minimal structural defects, a number-average molecular weight of 33.2 kDa, and balanced electron and hole mobility of 1 × 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) S(-1) in the organic field-effect transistors fabricated and tested under ambient conditions.

  9. Giant ambipolar Rashba effect in the semiconductor BiTeI.

    PubMed

    Crepaldi, A; Moreschini, L; Autès, G; Tournier-Colletta, C; Moser, S; Virk, N; Berger, H; Bugnon, Ph; Chang, Y J; Kern, K; Bostwick, A; Rotenberg, E; Yazyev, O V; Grioni, M

    2012-08-31

    We observe a giant spin-orbit splitting in the bulk and surface states of the noncentrosymmetric semiconductor BiTeI. We show that the Fermi level can be placed in the valence or in the conduction band by controlling the surface termination. In both cases, it intersects spin-polarized bands, in the corresponding surface depletion and accumulation layers. The momentum splitting of these bands is not affected by adsorbate-induced changes in the surface potential. These findings demonstrate that two properties crucial for enabling semiconductor-based spin electronics-a large, robust spin splitting and ambipolar conduction-are present in this material.

  10. Effect of electronic acceptor segments on photophysical properties of low-band-gap ambipolar polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation.

  11. Organic light emitting field effect transistors based on an ambipolar p-i-n layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorano, V.; Bramanti, A.; Carallo, S.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G.

    2010-03-01

    A bottom contact/top gate ambipolar "p-i-n" layered light emitting field effect transistor with the active medium inserted between two doped transport layers, is reported. The doping profile results crucial to the capability of emitting light, as well as to the electrical characteristics of the device. In this sense, high output current at relative low applied gate/drain voltage and light emission along the whole large area transistor channel are observed, putting the basis to full integration of organic light emitting field effect transistors in planar complex devices.

  12. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  13. Ambipolar Small-Molecule:Polymer Blend Semiconductors for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minji; Hwang, Hansu; Park, Won-Tae; Khim, Dongyoon; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Yunseul; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-01-25

    We report on the fabrication of an organic thin-film semiconductor formed using a blend solution of soluble ambipolar small molecules and an insulating polymer binder that exhibits vertical phase separation and uniform film formation. The semiconductor thin films are produced in a single step from a mixture containing a small molecular semiconductor, namely, quinoidal biselenophene (QBS), and a binder polymer, namely, poly(2-vinylnaphthalene) (PVN). Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on QBS/PVN blend semiconductor are then assembled using top-gate/bottom-contact device configuration, which achieve almost four times higher mobility than the neat QBS semiconductor. Depth profile via secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the QBS domains in the films made from the blend are evenly distributed with a smooth morphology at the bottom of the PVN layer. Bias stress test and variable-temperature measurements on QBS-based OFETs reveal that the QBS/PVN blend semiconductor remarkably reduces the number of trap sites at the gate dielectric/semiconductor interface and the activation energy in the transistor channel. This work provides a one-step solution processing technique, which makes use of soluble ambipolar small molecules to form a thin-film semiconductor for application in high-performance OFETs.

  14. Surface transfer doping induced effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Shu; Liu, Yiyang; Lin, Jiadan; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Ping Hu, Wen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Neto, A H Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-12

    Black phosphorus, a fast emerging two-dimensional material, has been configured as field effect transistors, showing a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic. Here we report an effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus transistors through in situ surface functionalization with caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), respectively. Cs2CO3 is found to strongly electron dope black phosphorus. The electron mobility of black phosphorus is significantly enhanced to ~27 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) after 10 nm Cs2CO3 modification, indicating a greatly improved electron-transport behaviour. In contrast, MoO3 decoration demonstrates a giant hole-doping effect. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals significant surface charge transfer occurring at the dopants/black phosphorus interfaces. Moreover, the surface-doped black phosphorus devices exhibit a largely enhanced photodetection behaviour. Our findings coupled with the tunable nature of the surface transfer doping scheme ensure black phosphorus as a promising candidate for further complementary logic electronics.

  15. AMBIPOLAR ELECTRIC FIELD, PHOTOELECTRONS, AND THEIR ROLE IN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE FROM HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the 'polar wind', is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization. We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  16. Ambipolar Electric Field, Photoelectrons, and Their Role in Atmospheric Escape From Hot Jupiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters can be large due to the close proximity of these planets to their host star and the strong radiation the planetary atmosphere receives. On Earth, a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions comes from the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the generation of the ambipolar electric field. This process, known as the "polar wind," is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to Earth's magnetosphere, where they are well observed. The polar wind can also be enhanced by a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) generated by photoionization.We formulate a simplified calculation of the effect of the ambipolar electric field and the photoelectrons on the ion scale height in a generalized manner. We find that the ion scale height can be increased by a factor of 2-15 due to the polar wind effects. We also estimate a lower limit of an order of magnitude increase of the ion density and the atmospheric mass-loss rate when polar wind effects are included.

  17. Surface transfer doping induced effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Shu; Liu, Yiyang; Lin, Jiadan; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Ping Hu, Wen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Black phosphorus, a fast emerging two-dimensional material, has been configured as field effect transistors, showing a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic. Here we report an effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus transistors through in situ surface functionalization with caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), respectively. Cs2CO3 is found to strongly electron dope black phosphorus. The electron mobility of black phosphorus is significantly enhanced to ~27 cm2 V-1 s-1 after 10 nm Cs2CO3 modification, indicating a greatly improved electron-transport behaviour. In contrast, MoO3 decoration demonstrates a giant hole-doping effect. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals significant surface charge transfer occurring at the dopants/black phosphorus interfaces. Moreover, the surface-doped black phosphorus devices exhibit a largely enhanced photodetection behaviour. Our findings coupled with the tunable nature of the surface transfer doping scheme ensure black phosphorus as a promising candidate for further complementary logic electronics.

  18. Influence of plasma diffusion losses on dust charge relaxation in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of diffusive losses on residual dust charge in a complex plasma afterglow has been investigated. The dust residual charges were simulated based on a model developed to describe complex plasma decay. The experimental and simulated data show that the transition from ambipolar to free diffusion in the decaying plasma plays a significant role in determining the residual dust particle charges. The presence of positively charged dust particles is explained by a broadening of the charge distribution function in the afterglow plasma.

  19. Tetracene dicarboxylic imide and its disulfide: synthesis of ambipolar organic semiconductors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hashizume, Daisuke; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2012-01-02

    We have designed and synthesized a new donor/acceptor-type tetracene derivative by the introduction of dicarboxylic imide and disulfide groups as electron-withdrawing and -donating units, respectively. The prepared compounds, tetracene dicarboxylic imide (TI) and its disulfide (TIDS) have high chemical and electrochemical stability as well as long-wavelength absorptions of up to 886 nm in the thin films. The crystal packing structure of TIDS molecules features face-to-face π-stacking, derived from dipole-dipole interactions. Notably, TIDS exhibited ambipolar properties of both electron-donating and -accepting natures in p-n and p-i-n heterojunction organic thin-film photovoltaic devices. Accordingly, TI and TIDS are expected to be promising compounds for designing new organic semiconductors.

  20. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  1. Transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors based on multilayer transparent source-drain electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Li, Yantao; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-08-01

    A fabrication method for transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors with transparent Sb2O3/Ag/Sb2O3 (SAS) source and drain electrodes has been developed. A pentacene/N,N'-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (PTCDI-C13) bilayer heterojunction is used as the active semiconductor. The electrodes are deposited by room temperature electron beam evaporation. The devices are fabricated without damaging the active layers. The SAS electrodes have high transmittance (82.5%) and low sheet resistance (8 Ω/sq). High performance devices with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 cm2/V s and 0.027 cm2/V s, respectively, and average visible range transmittance of 72% were obtained. These transistors have potential for transparent logic integrated circuit applications.

  2. Ambipolar nonvolatile memory based on a quantum-dot transistor with a nanoscale floating gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Xiaolong; Song, Xiaoxian; Cao, Mingxuan; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-01

    Using only solution processing methods, we developed ambipolar quantum-dot (QD) transistor floating-gate memory (FGM) that uses Au nanoparticles as a floating gate. Because of the bipolarity of the active channel of PbSe QDs, the memory could easily trap holes or electrons in the floating gate by programming/erasing (P/E) operations, which could shift the threshold voltage both up and down. As a result, the memory exhibited good programmable memory characteristics: a large memory window (ΔVth ˜ 15 V) and a long retention time (>105 s). The magnitude of ΔVth depended on both P/E voltages and the bias voltage (VDS): ΔVth was a cubic function to VP/E and linearly depended on VDS. Therefore, this FGM based on a QD transistor is a promising alternative to its inorganic counterparts owing to its advantages of bipolarity, high mobility, low cost, and large-area production.

  3. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  4. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design. PMID:28145438

  5. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  6. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. We conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.

  7. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; ...

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. Wemore » conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.« less

  8. Passivation and characterization of charge defects in ambipolar silicon quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Spruijtenburg, Paul C.; Amitonov, Sergey V.; Mueller, Filipp; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-01-01

    In this Report we show the role of charge defects in the context of the formation of electrostatically defined quantum dots. We introduce a barrier array structure to probe defects at multiple locations in a single device. We measure samples both before and after an annealing process which uses an Al2O3 overlayer, grown by atomic layer deposition. After passivation of the majority of charge defects with annealing we can electrostatically define hole quantum dots up to 180 nm in length. Our ambipolar structures reveal amphoteric charge defects that remain after annealing with charging energies of 10 meV in both the positive and negative charge state. PMID:27922048

  9. Reversible Conversion of Dominant Polarity in Ambipolar Polymer/Graphene Oxide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. This hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits. PMID:25801827

  10. Ambipolar escape from Venus, Mars and Titan, and negative ions at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric photoelectrons are a natural product of the photo-ionisation of planetary atmospheres. Their energy spectrum is distinctive and depends on the solar spectrum in the EUV and X-ray region. On production, the energetic electrons move along the magnetic field (open or draped), setting up an ambipolar electric field which can extract ions. This provides an escape mechanism similar to Earth's 'polar wind'. As these objects are unmagnetised, this produces an extended escape mechanism over the whole sunlit ionosphere. Here, we review recent measurements of photoelectrons far from the parent objects at Venus, Mars and Titan, from Venus Express, Mars Express, Maven and Cassini, and discuss similarities and related escape rates. We also review the pioneering observations of the remarkably heavy negative ions discovered in Titan's ionosphere.

  11. Ambipolar-transporting coaxial nanotubes with a tailored molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Zhang, Guanxin; Jin, Wusong; Fukushima, Takanori; Ishii, Noriyuki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Minari, Takeo; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Aida, Takuzo

    2009-12-15

    Despite a large steric bulk of C(60), a molecular graphene with a covalently linked C(60) pendant [hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-C(60); 1] self-assembles into a coaxial nanotube whose wall consists of a graphite-like pi-stacked HBC array, whereas the nanotube surface is fully covered by a molecular layer of clustering C(60). Because of this explicit coaxial configuration, the nanotube exhibits an ambipolar character in the field-effect transistor output [hole mobility (micro(h)) = 9.7 x 10(-7) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1); electron mobility (micro(e)) = 1.1 x 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)] and displays a photovoltaic response upon light illumination. Successful coassembly of 1 and an HBC derivative without C(60) (2) allows for tailoring the p/n heterojunction in the nanotube, so that its ambipolar carrier transport property can be optimized for enhancing the open-circuit voltage in the photovoltaic output. As evaluated by an electrodeless method called flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity technique, the intratubular hole mobility (2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) of a coassembled nanotube containing 10 mol % of HBC-C(60) (1) is as large as the intersheet mobility in graphite. The homotropic nanotube of 2 blended with a soluble C(60) derivative [(6,6)-phenyl C(61) butyric acid methyl ester] displayed a photovoltaic response with a much different composition dependency, where the largest open-circuit voltage attained was obviously lower than that realized by the coassembly of 1 and 2.

  12. Ambipolar-transporting coaxial nanotubes with a tailored molecular graphene–fullerene heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Zhang, Guanxin; Jin, Wusong; Fukushima, Takanori; Ishii, Noriyuki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Minari, Takeo; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Aida, Takuzo

    2009-01-01

    Despite a large steric bulk of C60, a molecular graphene with a covalently linked C60 pendant [hexabenzocoronene (HBC)–C60; 1] self-assembles into a coaxial nanotube whose wall consists of a graphite-like π-stacked HBC array, whereas the nanotube surface is fully covered by a molecular layer of clustering C60. Because of this explicit coaxial configuration, the nanotube exhibits an ambipolar character in the field-effect transistor output [hole mobility (μh) = 9.7 × 10−7 cm2 V−1 s−1; electron mobility (μe) = 1.1 × 10−5 cm2 V−1 s−1] and displays a photovoltaic response upon light illumination. Successful coassembly of 1 and an HBC derivative without C60 (2) allows for tailoring the p/n heterojunction in the nanotube, so that its ambipolar carrier transport property can be optimized for enhancing the open-circuit voltage in the photovoltaic output. As evaluated by an electrodeless method called flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity technique, the intratubular hole mobility (2.0 cm2 V−1 s−1) of a coassembled nanotube containing 10 mol % of HBC–C60 (1) is as large as the intersheet mobility in graphite. The homotropic nanotube of 2 blended with a soluble C60 derivative [(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester] displayed a photovoltaic response with a much different composition dependency, where the largest open-circuit voltage attained was obviously lower than that realized by the coassembly of 1 and 2. PMID:19940243

  13. Sensors: A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene) (PDPPHD-T3) is shown by P. Sonar, H. Haick, and co-workers on page 4012 to sensitively detect xylene isomers at low to 40 ppm level in multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, is able to discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from each other.

  14. Charge transport and velocity distribution in ambipolar organic thin film Transistors based on a diketopyrrolopyrrole-benzothiadiazole copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Sonar, Prashant; Singh, Samarendra Pratap; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2011-03-01

    There have been reports of charge transport mechanisms in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) focusing on steady-state characteristics but these measurements provide limited information. Time-resolved measurements can provide additional information in understanding transport mechanisms but existing reports have focused on unipolar organic characteristics. No previous reports on ambipolar organic devices have involved entire velocity distribution and charge transport mechanisms. Recently, we have fabricated ambipolar OTFTs based on a diketopyrrolopyrrole-benzothiadiazole copolymer (PDPP-TBT) with a field-effect mobility of more than 0.2 cm2 V- 1 s - 1 . Velocity distributions are measured by performing specialized dynamic measurements while keeping the RC-time constant of the measurement circuit small. This yields a distribution in arrival times of charge carriers from source to drain which can be converted to velocity distributions. We will also describe dynamic transport measurements on high-k-dielectric PDPP-TBT OTFTs.

  15. MoS2 /Rubrene van der Waals Heterostructure: Toward Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors and Inverter Circuits.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexia; Chow, WaiLeong; Liu, Fucai; Tay, BengKang; Liu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides are promising channel materials for the next-generation electronic device. Here, vertically 2D heterostructures, so called van der Waals solids, are constructed using inorganic molybdenum sulfide (MoS2 ) few layers and organic crystal - 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene). In this work, ambipolar field-effect transistors are successfully achieved based on MoS2 and rubrene crystals with the well balanced electron and hole mobilities of 1.27 and 0.36 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively. The ambipolar behavior is explained based on the band alignment of MoS2 and rubrene. Furthermore, being a building block, the MoS2 /rubrene ambipolar transistors are used to fabricate CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) inverters that show good performance with a gain of 2.3 at a switching threshold voltage of -26 V. This work paves a way to the novel organic/inorganic ultrathin heterostructure based flexible electronics and optoelectronic devices.

  16. Ringing After a High-Energy Collision: Ambipolar Oscillations During Impact Plasma Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    High-velocity impacts on the Moon and other airless bodies deliver energy and material to the lunar surface and exosphere. The target and i mpactor material may become vaporized and ionized to form a collision al plasma that expands outward and eventually becomes collisionless. In the present work, kinetic simulations of the later collision less stage of impact plasma expansion are performed. Attention is paid to characterizing "ambipolar oscillations" in which thermodynamic distur bances propagate outward to generate "ringing" within the expanding e lectron cloud, which could radiate an electromagnetic signature of lo cal plasma conditions. The process is not unlike a beam-plasma intera ction, with the perturbing electron population in the present case ac ting as a highly thermal "beam" that resonates along the expanding de nsity gradient. Understanding the electromagnetic aspects of impact p lasma expansion could provide insight into the lasting effects of nat ural, impact-generated currents on airless surfaces and charging haza rds to human exploration infrastructure and instrumentation.

  17. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  18. III-V nanocrystals capped with molecular metal chalcogenide ligands: high electron mobility and ambipolar photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyong; Lee, Jong-Soo; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2013-01-30

    In this work, we synthesized InP and InAs nanocrystals (NCs) capped with different inorganic ligands, including various molecular metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs) and chalcogenide ions. We found that MCCs and chalcogenide ions can quantitatively displace organic ligands from the surface of III-V NCs and serve as the inorganic capping groups for III-V NC surfaces. These inorganic ligands stabilize colloidal solutions of InP and InAs NCs in polar solvents and greatly facilitate charge transport between individual NCs. Charge transport studies revealed high electron mobility in the films of MCC-capped InP and InAs NCs. For example, we found that bridging InAs NCs with Cu(7)S(4)(-) MCC ligands can lead to very high electron mobility exceeding 15 cm(2)/(V s). In addition, we observed unprecedented ambipolar (positive/negative) photoresponse of MCC-capped InAs NC solids that changed sign depending on the ligand chemistry, illumination wavelength, and doping of the NC solid. For example, the sign of photoconductance of InAs NCs capped with Cu(7)S(4)(-) or Sn(2)S(6)(4-) ions converted from positive at 0.80 and 0.95 eV to negative at 1.27 and 1.91 eV. We propose an explanation of this unusually complex photoconductivity of InAs NC solids.

  19. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Luzio, Alessandro; Natali, Dario; Kim, Juhwan; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young; Caironi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μe) and hole (μh) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μh = 0.29 cm2/V s and μe = 0.001 cm2/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μe = 0.12 cm2/V s and μh = 8 × 10-4 cm2/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  20. Sub-10 nm transparent all-around-gated ambipolar ionic field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hyomin; Jin, Tianguang; Park, Sungmin; Yoon, Byung Jun; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Ki-Bum; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we developed a versatile ionic field effect transistor (IFET) which has an ambipolar function for manipulating molecules regardless of their polarity and can be operated at a wide range of electrolytic concentrations (10-5 M-1 M). The IFET has circular nanochannels radially covered by gate electrodes, called ``all-around-gate'', with an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) oxide layer of a near-zero surface charge. Experimental and numerical validations were conducted for characterizing the IFET. We found that the versatility originated from the zero-charge density of the oxide layer and all-around-gate structure which increased the efficiency of the gate effect 5 times higher than a previously developed planar-gate by capacitance calculations. Our numerical model adapted Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes (PNPS) formulations with additional nonlinear constraints of a fringing field effect and a counter-ion condensation and the experimental and numerical results were well matched. The device can control the transportation of ions at concentrations up to 1 M electrolyte which resembles a backflow of a shale gas extraction process. Furthermore, while traditional IFETs can manipulate either positively or negatively charged species depending on the inherently large surface charge of oxide layer, the presenting device and mechanism provide effective means to control the motion of both negatively and positively charged molecules which is important in biomolecule transport through nanochannels, medical diagnosis system and point-of-care system, etc.In this paper, we developed a versatile ionic field effect transistor (IFET) which has an ambipolar function for manipulating molecules regardless of their polarity and can be operated at a wide range of electrolytic concentrations (10-5 M-1 M). The IFET has circular nanochannels radially covered by gate electrodes, called ``all-around-gate'', with an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) oxide layer of a near-zero surface charge. Experimental and

  1. Electrical transport and photoconduction in ambipolar tungsten diselenide and n-type indium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fralaide, Michael Orcino

    In today's "silicon age" in which we live, field-effect transistors (FET) are the workhorse of virtually all modern-day electronic gadgets. Although silicon currently dominates most of these electronics, layered 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have great potential in low power optoelectronic applications due to their indirect-to-direct band gap transition from bulk to few-layer and high on/off switching ratios. TMDC WSe2 is studied here, mechanically exfoliated from CVT-grown bulk WSe2 crystals, to create a few-layered ambipolar FET, which transitions from dominant p-type behavior to n-type behavior dominating as temperature decreases. A high electron mobility mu>150 cm2V-1s-1 was found in the low temperature region near 50 K. Temperature-dependent photoconduction measurements were also taken, revealing that both the application of negative gate bias and decreasing the temperature resulted in an increase of the responsivity of the WSe2 sample. Besides TMDCs, Group III-VI van der Waals structures also show promising anisotropic optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. In particular, mechanically exfoliated few-layered InSe is studied here for its indirect band gap of 1.4 eV, which should offer a broad spectral response. It was found that the steady state photoconduction slightly decreased with the application of positive gate bias, likely due to the desorption of adsorbates on the surface of the sample. A room temperature responsivity near 5 AW -1 and external quantum efficiency of 207% was found for the InSe FET. Both TMDC's and group III-VI chalcogenides continue to be studied for their remarkably diverse properties that depend on their thickness and composition for their applications as transistors, sensors, and composite materials in photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  2. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Natali, Dario; Luzio, Alessandro; Caironi, Mario E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu; Noh, Yong-Young E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu

    2014-04-14

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μ{sub e}) and hole (μ{sub h}) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μ{sub h} = 0.29 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub e} = 0.001 cm{sup 2}/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μ{sub e} = 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub h} = 8 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  3. MarsCAT: Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, Edgar Andrew; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Li, Liming; Jackson, David; Chen, Ji; Reed, Helen; Moldwin, Mark; Kasper, Justin; Sheehan, J. P.; Forbes, James Richard; Heine, Thomas; Case, Anthony; Stevens, Michael; Sibeck, David G.

    2015-11-01

    The MarsCAT (Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster) Mission is a two 6U CubeSat mission to study the ionosphere of Mars proposed for the NASA SIMPLeX opportunity. The mission will investigate the plasma and magnetic structure of the Martian ionosphere, including transient plasma structures, magnetic field structure and dynamics, and energetic particle activity. The transit plan calls for a piggy back ride with Mars 2020 using a CAT burn for MOI, the first demonstration of CubeSat propulsion for interplanetary travel. MarsCAT will make correlated multipoint studies of the ionosphere and magnetic field of Mars. Specifically, the two spacecraft will make in situ observations of the plasma density, temperature, and convection in the ionosphere of Mars. They will also make total electron content measurements along the line of sight between the two spacecraft and simultaneous 3-axis local magnetic field measurements in two locations. Additionally, MarsCAT will demonstrate the performance of new CubeSat telemetry antennas designed at the University of Houston that are designed to be low profile, rugged, and with a higher gain than conventional monopole (whip) antennas. The two MarsCAT CubeSats will have five science instruments: a 3-axis DC magnetometer, adouble-Langmuir probe, a Faraday cup, a solid state energetic particle detector (Science Enhancement Option), and interspacecraft total electron content radio occulation experiment. The MarsCAT spacecraft will be solar powered and equipped with a CAT thruster that can provide up to 4.8 km/s of delta-V, which is sufficient to achieve Mars orbit using the Mars 2020 piggyback. They have an active attitude control system, using a sun sensor and flight-proven star tracker for determination, and momentum wheels for 3-axis attitude control.

  4. MarsCAT: Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A., III; Pinsky, L.; Li, L.; Jackson, D. R.; Chen, J.; Reed, H.; Moldwin, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Sheehan, J. P.; Forbes, J.; Heine, T.; Case, A. W.; Stevens, M. L.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The MarsCAT (Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster) Mission is a two 6U CubeSat mission to study the ionosphere of Mars proposed for the NASA SIMPLeX opportunity. The mission will investigate the plasma and magnetic structure of the Martian ionosphere, including transient plasma structures, magnetic field structure and dynamics, and energetic particle activity. The transit plan calls for a piggy back ride with Mars 2020 using a CAT burn for MOI, the first demonstration of CubeSat propulsion for interplanetary travel. MarsCAT will make correlated multipoint studies of the ionosphere and magnetic field of Mars. Specifically, the two spacecraft will make in situ observations of the plasma density, temperature, and convection in the ionosphere of Mars. They will also make total electron content measurements along the line of sight between the two spacecraft and simultaneous 3-axis local magnetic field measurements in two locations. Additionally, MarsCAT will demonstrate the performance of new CubeSat telemetry antennas designed at the University of Houston that are designed to be low profile, rugged, and with a higher gain than conventional monopole (whip) antennas. The two MarsCAT CubeSats will have five science instruments: a 3-axis DC magnetometer, adouble-Langmuir probe, a Faraday cup, a solid state energetic particle detector (Science Enhancement Option), and interspacecraft total electron content radio occulation experiment. The MarsCAT spacecraft will be solar powered and equipped with a CAT thruster that can provide up to 4.8 km/s of delta-V, which is sufficient to achieve Mars orbit using the Mars 2020 piggyback. They have an active attitude control system, using a sun sensor and flight-proven star tracker for determination, and momentum wheels for 3-axis attitude control.

  5. Strong ambipolar-driven ion upflow within the cleft ion fountain during low geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangyang; Knudsen, David J.; Burchill, Johnathan K.; Howarth, Andrew; Yau, Andrew; Redmon, Robert J.; Miles, David M.; Varney, Roger H.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate low-energy (<10 eV) ion upflows (mainly O+) within the cleft ion fountain (CIF) using conjunctions of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite, the DMSP F16 satellite, the SuperDARN radar, and the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar North (RISR-N). The SEI instrument on board e-POP enables us to derive ion upflow velocities from the 2-D images of ion distribution functions with a frame rate of 100 images per second, and with a velocity resolution of the order of 25 m/s. We identify three cleft ion fountain events with very intense (>1.6 km/s) ion upflow velocities near 1000 km altitude during quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp < 3). Such large ion upflow velocities have been reported previously at or below 1000 km, but only during active periods. Analysis of the core ion distribution images allows us to demonstrate that the ion temperature within the CIF does not rise by more than 0.3 eV relative to background values, which is consistent with RISR-N observations in the F region. The presence of soft electron precipitation seen by DMSP and lack of significant ion heating indicate that the ion upflows we observe near 1000 km altitude are primarily driven by ambipolar electric fields. DC field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection velocity gradients accompany these events. The strongest ion upflows are associated with downward current regions, which is consistent with some (although not all) previously published results. The moderate correlation coefficient (0.51) between upflow velocities and currents implies that FACs serve as indirect energy inputs to the ion upflow process.

  6. Air-Stable n-channel Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Diketopyrrolopyrrole Oligomers for High Performance Ambipolar Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Tushita; Puttaraju, Boregowda; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard; Faber, Hendrik A; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Salzner, Ulrike; Meyer, Andreas; Patil, Satish

    2016-09-28

    n-channel organic semiconductors are prone to oxidation upon exposed to ambient conditions. Herein, we report design and synthesis of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based oligomers for ambipolar organic thin-film transistors (OFETs) with excellent air and bias stability at ambient conditions. The cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal exceptional electrochemical stability during the redox cycle of oligomers. Structural properties including aggregation, crystallinity, and morphology in thin film were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), thin-film X-ray diffraction (XRD), and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. AFM reveals morphological changes induced by different processing conditions whereas GISAXS measurements show an increase in the population of face-on oriented crystallites in films subjected to a combination of solvent and thermal treatments. These measurements also highlight the significance of chalcogen atom from sulfur to selenium on the photophysical, optical, electronic, and solid-state properties of DPP-DPP oligomers. Charge carrier mobilities of the oligomers were investigated by fabricating top-gate bottom-contact (TG-BC) thin-film transistors by annealing the thin films under various conditions. Combined solvent and thermal annealing of DPP-DPP oligomer thin films results in consistent electron mobilities as high as ∼0.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on/off ratio exceeding 10(4). Field-effect behavior was retained for up to ∼4 weeks, which illustrates remarkable air and bias stability. This work paves the way toward the development of n-channel DPP-DPP-based oligomers exhibiting retention of field-effect behavior with superior stability at ambient conditions.

  7. Observation of ambipolar switching in a silver nanoparticle single-electron transistor with multiple molecular floating gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Shinohara, Shuhei; Tamada, Kaoru; Ishii, Hisao; Noguchi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Ambipolar switching behavior was observed in a silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-based single-electron transistor (SET) with tetra-tert-butyl copper phthalocyanine (ttbCuPc) as a molecular floating gate. Depending on the wavelength of the incident light, the stability diagram shifted to the negative and positive directions along the gate voltage axis. These results were explained by the photoinduced charging of ttbCuPc molecules in the vicinity of AgNPs. Moreover, multiple device states were induced by the light irradiation at a wavelength of 600 nm, suggesting that multiple ttbCuPc molecules individually worked as a floating gate.

  8. Importance of Solubilizing Group and Backbone Planarity in Low Band Gap Polymers for High Performance Ambipolar field-effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joong Suk; Son, Seon Kyoung; Song, Sanghoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Lee, Dong Ryoul; Kim, Kyungkon; Ko, Min Jae; Choi, Dong Hoon; Kim, BongSoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2012-06-13

    We investigated the performance of ambipolar field-effect transistors based on a series of alternating low band gap polymers of oligothiophene and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP). The polymers contain oligothiophene units of terthiophene [T3] and thiophene-thienothiophene-thiophene [T2TT] and DPP units carrying branched alkyl chains of 2-hexyldecyl [HD] or 2-octyldodecyl [OD]. The structural variation allows us to do a systematic study on the relationship between the interchain stacking/ordering of semiconducting polymers and their resulting device performance. On the basis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements on polymer films, we found that longer branched alkyl side chains, i.e., OD, and longer and more planar oligothiophene, i.e., T2TT, generate the more crystalline structures. Upon thermal annealing, the crystallinity of the polymers was largely improved, and polymers containing a longer branched alkyl chain responded faster because longer alkyl chains have larger cohesive forces than shorter chains. For all the polymers, excellent ambipolar behavior was observed with a maximum hole and electron mobility of 2.2 and 0.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  9. Conjugate acene fused buckybowls: evaluating their suitability for p-type, ambipolar and n-type air stable organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Uppula; Sastry, G Narahari

    2013-04-14

    Elaborate and exhaustive first principles calculations were carried out to screen the novel properties of a series of acene fused buckybowls. The acene fused compounds exhibit hole transport property due to their higher electron injection and lower hole transport barrier relative to the work function potential of Au electrodes. The higher HOMO and lower LUMO energy levels suggest lower hole and electron injection barriers of F and CN substituted and boron doped bowls which indicates ambipolar property of these bowls. The dicyano substituted pentacene fused bowls show only electron transport property with lower LUMO (-4.26 eV to -4.27 eV) and higher HOMO (-5.56 eV to -5.90 eV) energy levels. High electron affinity (>2.80 eV) and low LUMO energy (< -4.00 eV) attributes air stability to these bowls. Curvature decreased frontier orbital energies and increased ionization energy and electron affinity of bowls. This study reveals substitution of electron withdrawing groups and boron doped acene fused bowls can be a prominent materials for ambipolar and electron transport organic semiconductors.

  10. Gate drain-overlapped-asymmetric gate dielectric-GAA-TFET: a solution for suppressed ambipolarity and enhanced ON state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Jaya; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work is to overcome the major impediments of tunnel FET such as the inherent ambipolar current ( I AMB) and the lower ON current ( I ON). To suppress the I AMB, gate drain overlap (GDO) engineering scheme has been incorporated over the cylindrical gate all around TFET (GAA-TFET). However, to enhance the I ON, heterogate dielectrics (HD) are used in the gate oxide region. Results indicate that an appreciably reduced I AMB and significantly enhanced I ON has been obtained with the amalgamation of GDO and HD, respectively, onto GAA-TFET. Further, the effect of GDO length ( L ov) has also been studied. Quantitative analysis of ambipolarity factor " α" reveals that at large L ov, " α" improves. It is found that GDO degrades the high-frequency (HF) performance such as cutoff frequency ( f T) of the device, because of the enhanced parasitic capacitances. To surpass the deterioration at HF caused by GDO, the dielectric over GDO region has been altered, and it has been analyzed that by inserting a material of low-dielectric constant ( k = 1) and parasitic capacitances of the device reduces, resulting into enhancement in f T. Moreover, the low-k dielectric inserted over L ov reduces the I AMB supplementary, along with enhanced f T. Suppressed I AMB and enhanced f T of GDO-HD-GAA-TFET with low-k dielectric over L ov make it adequate for application in HF and digital circuitry.

  11. Modeling solar flare conduction fronts. I - Homogeneous plasmas and ion-acoustic turbulence. II - Inhomogeneous plasmas and ambipolar electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    A one-dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulation is used here to model the expansion of a heated electron population in a coronal loop during a solar flare and the characteristics of the associated X-ray emissions. The hot electrons expand outward from the localized region, creating an ambipolar electric field which accelerates a return current of cooler, ambient electrons. Ion-acoustic waves are generated by the return currents as proposed by Brown et al. (1979), but they play little or no role in containing energetic electrons and the conduction front proposed by Brown et al. does not form. The X-ray emission efficiency of the electrons is too low in the corona for them to be the source of hard X-ray bursts. The particle dynamics changes dramatically if the heated plasma is at low altitudes and expands upward into the more tenuous plasma at higher altitudes. Two important applications of this finding are the radio-frequency heating of the corona and the collisional heating of the chromosphere by precipitating energetic electrons. In both cases, the overlying plasma has a density that is too low to supply a balancing return current to the expanding hot electrons. As a result, an ambipolar electric field develops that tends to confine the energetic electrons behind a front that propagate outward at about the speed of sound.

  12. Toward printed integrated circuits based on unipolar or ambipolar polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Kang-Jun; Caironi, Mario; Noh, Yong-Young

    2013-08-21

    transport properties. Among this class of materials, various polymers can show well balanced electrons and holes mobility, therefore being indicated as ambipolar semiconductors, good environmental stability, and a small band-gap, which simplifies the tuning of charge injection. This opened up the possibility of taking advantage of the superior performances offered by complementary "CMOS-like" logic for the design of digital ICs, easing the scaling down of critical geometrical features, and achieving higher complexity from robust single gates (e.g., inverters) and test circuits (e.g., ring oscillators) to more complete circuits. Here, we review the recent progress in the development of printed ICs based on polymeric semiconductors suitable for large-volume micro- and nano-electronics applications. Particular attention is paid to the strategies proposed in the literature to design and synthesize high mobility polymers and to develop suitable printing tools and techniques to allow for improved patterning capability required for the down-scaling of devices in order to achieve the operation frequencies needed for applications, such as flexible radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, near-field communication (NFC) devices, ambient electronics, and portable flexible displays.

  13. Tuning charge balance in PHOLEDs with ambipolar host materials to achieve high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Chopra, Neetu; So, Franky; Sapochak, Linda S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2009-08-27

    operating voltages, particularly if this is to be achieved in a device that can be manufactured at low cost. To avoid the efficiency losses associated with phosphorescence quenching by back-energy transfer from the dopant onto the host, the triplet excited states of the host material must be higher in energy than the triplet excited state of the dopant.5 This must be accomplished without sacrificing the charge transporting properties of the composite.6 Similar problems limit the efficiency of OLED-based displays, where blue light emitters are the least efficient and least stable. We previously demonstrated the utility of organic phosphine oxide (PO) materials as electron transporting HMs for FIrpic in blue OLEDs.7 However, the high reluctance of PO materials to oxidation and thus, hole injection limits the ability to balance charge injection and transport in the EML without relying on charge transport by the phosphorescent dopant. PO host materials were engineered to transport both electrons and holes in the EML and still maintain high triplet exciton energy to ensure efficient energy transfer to the dopant (Figure 1). There are examples of combining hole transporting moieties (mainly aromatic amines) with electron transport moieties (e.g., oxadiazoles, triazines, boranes)8 to develop new emitter and host materials for small molecule and polymer9 OLEDs. The challenge is to combine the two moieties without lowering the triplet energy of the target molecule. For example, coupling of a dimesitylphenylboryl moiety with a tertiary aromatic amine (FIAMBOT) results in intramolecular electron transfer from the amine to the boron atom through the bridging phenyl. The mesomeric effect of the dimesitylphenylboryl unit acts to extend conjugation and lowers triplet exciton energies (< 2.8 eV) rendering such systems inadequate as ambipolar hosts for blue phosphors.

  14. Strongly Metallic Electron and Hole 2D Transport in an Ambipolar Si-Vacuum Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Binhui; Yazdanpanah, M M; Kane, B E; Hwang, E H; Das Sarma, S

    2015-07-17

    We report experiment and theory on an ambipolar gate-controlled Si(111)-vacuum field effect transistor where we study electron and hole (low-temperature 2D) transport in the same device simply by changing the external gate voltage to tune the system from being a 2D electron system at positive gate voltage to a 2D hole system at negative gate voltage. The electron (hole) conductivity manifests strong (moderate) metallic temperature dependence with the conductivity decreasing by a factor of 8 (2) between 0.3 K and 4.2 K with the peak electron mobility (∼18  m2/V s) being roughly 20 times larger than the peak hole mobility (in the same sample). Our theory explains the data well using random phase approximation screening of background Coulomb disorder, establishing that the observed metallicity is a direct consequence of the strong temperature dependence of the effective screened disorder.

  15. Switching and memory characteristics of thin films of an ambipolar organic compound: effects of device processing and electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung-Won; Pearson, Christopher; Moon, Tae Jung; Fisher, Alison L.; Petty, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the effects of device processing conditions, and of changing the electrode materials, on the switching and negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of metal/organic thin film/metal structures. The organic material was an ambipolar molecule containing both electron transporting (oxadiazole) and hole transporting (carbazole) chemical groups. Switching and NDR effects are observed for device architectures with both electrodes consisting of aluminium; optimized switching behaviour is achieved for structures incorporating gold nanoparticles. If one of the Al electrodes is replaced by a higher work function metal or coated with an electron-blocking layer, switching and NDR are no longer observed. The results are consistent with a model based on the creation and destruction of Al filaments within the thin organic layer.

  16. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Hershkowitz, Noah; Longmier, Benjamin; Baalrud, Scott

    2009-03-03

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  17. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  18. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  19. Ambipolar transport and magneto-resistance crossover in a Mott insulator, Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, J.; Serrao, C. R.; Efetov, D. K.; Yi, D.; Oh, Y. S.; Cheong, S.-W.; Ramesh, R.; Kim, P.

    2016-12-01

    Electric field effect (EFE) controlled magnetoelectric transport in thin films of undoped and La-doped Sr2IrO4 (SIO) is investigated using ionic liquid gating. The temperature dependent resistance measurements exhibit insulating behavior in chemically and EFE doped samples with the band filling up to 10%. The ambipolar transport across the Mott gap is demonstrated by EFE tuning of the channel resistance and chemical doping. We observe a crossover from high temperature negative to low temperature positive magnetoresistance around  ˜80-90 K, irrespective of the filling. This temperature and magnetic field dependent crossover is discussed in the light of conduction mechanisms of SIO, especially variable range hopping (VRH), and its relevance to the insulating ground state of SIO.

  20. Reconnection Diffusion in Turbulent Fluids and Its Implications for Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    2014-05-01

    Astrophysical fluids are turbulent a fact which changes the dynamics of many key processes, including magnetic reconnection. Fast reconnection of magnetic field in turbulent fluids allows the field to change its topology and connections. As a result, the traditional concept of magnetic fields being frozen into the plasma is no longer applicable. Plasma associated with a given magnetic field line at one instant is distributed along a different set of magnetic field lines at the next instant. This diffusion of plasmas and magnetic field is enabled by reconnection and therefore is termed "reconnection diffusion". The astrophysical implications of this concept include heat transfer in plasmas, advection of heavy elements in interstellar medium, magnetic field generation etc. However, the most dramatic implications of the concept are related to the star formation process. The reason is that magnetic fields are dynamically important for most of the stages of star formation. The existing theory of star formation has been developed ignoring the possibility of reconnection diffusion. Instead, it appeals to the decoupling of mass and magnetic field arising from neutrals drifting in respect to ions entrained on magnetic field lines, i.e. through the process that is termed "ambipolar diffusion". The predictions of ambipolar diffusion and reconnection diffusion are very different. For instance, if the ionization of media is high, ambipolar diffusion predicts that the coupling of mass and magnetic field is nearly perfect. At the same time, reconnection diffusion is independent of the ionization but depends on the scale of the turbulent eddies and on the turbulent velocities. In the paper we explain the physics of reconnection diffusion both from macroscopic and microscopic points of view, i.e. appealing to the reconnection of flux tubes and to the diffusion of magnetic field lines. We make use of the Lazarian and Vishniac (Astrophys. J. 517:700, 1999) theory of magnetic

  1. Diffuse spreading of inhomogeneities in the ionospheric dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shalimov, S. L.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2015-08-15

    According to results of sounding of the lower ionosphere at altitudes of about 100 km, the duration of radio reflections from sufficiently dense ionized meteor trails, which characterizes their lifetime, can reach a few tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. This is much longer than the characteristic spreading time (on the order of fractions of a second to several seconds) typical in meteor radar measurements. The presence of dust in the lower ionosphere is shown to affect the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, which determines the spreading of plasma inhomogeneities. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends substantially on the charge and size of dust grains, which allows one to explain the results of ionospheric sounding.

  2. Discharge regime of non-ambipolarity with a self-induced steady-state magnetic field in plasma sources with localized radio-frequency power deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shivarova, A. Lishev, St.; Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.

    2015-10-15

    Involving the idea for the Biermann effect known from space physics as well as recent discussions on non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes in low-pressure discharges, the study builds the discharge pattern in a source with localized RF power deposition outside the region of high electron density. A vortex dc current flowing in an RF discharge and a steady-state magnetic field induced by this current govern the discharge behavior. Owing to a shift in the positions of the electron-density and plasma-potential maxima, the dc current is driven with the purpose of keeping the conservativity of the dc field in the discharge. The results present the spatial structure of a discharge in a regime of non-ambipolarity of the electron and ion fluxes, including its modifications by the magnetic field.

  3. Switching between attractive and repulsive Coulomb-interaction-mediated drag in an ambipolar GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer device

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Croxall, A. F.; Waldie, J. Sfigakis, F.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Das Gupta, K.

    2016-02-08

    We present measurements of Coulomb drag in an ambipolar GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well structure that can be configured as both an electron-hole bilayer and a hole-hole bilayer, with an insulating barrier of only 10 nm between the two quantum wells. Coulomb drag resistivity is a direct measure of the strength of interlayer particle-particle interactions. We explore the strongly interacting regime of low carrier densities (2D interaction parameter r{sub s} up to 14). Our ambipolar device design allows a comparison between the effects of the attractive electron-hole and repulsive hole-hole interactions and also shows the effects of the different effective masses of electrons and holes in GaAs.

  4. Novel red phosphorescent polymers bearing both ambipolar and functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent moieties for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Lian, Meng; Yu, Yue; Yan, Xiaogang; Xu, Xianbin; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel red phosphorescent polymers is successfully developed through Suzuki cross-coupling among ambipolar units, functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent blocks, and fluorene-based silane moieties. The photophysical and electrochemical investigations indicate not only highly efficient energy-transfer from the organic segments to the phosphorescent units in the polymer backbone but also the ambipolar character of the copolymers. Benefiting from all these merits, the phosphorescent polymers can furnish organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with exceptional high electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies with a current efficiency (η L ) of 8.31 cd A(-1) , external quantum efficiency (η ext ) of 16.07%, and power efficiency (η P ) of 2.95 lm W(-1) , representing the state-of-the-art electroluminescent performances ever achieved by red phosphorescent polymers. This work here might represent a new pathway to design and synthesize highly efficient phosphorescent polymers.

  5. Solution-Processed Ambipolar Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Blending p- and n-Type Semiconductors: Solid Solution versus Microphase Separation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomin; Xiao, Ting; Gu, Xiao; Yang, Xuejin; Kershaw, Stephen V; Zhao, Ni; Xu, Jianbin; Miao, Qian

    2015-12-30

    Here, we report solid solution of p- and n-type organic semiconductors as a new type of p-n blend for solution-processed ambipolar organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). This study compares the solid-solution films of silylethynylated tetraazapentacene 1 (acceptor) and silylethynylated pentacene 2 (donor) with the microphase-separated films of 1 and 3, a heptagon-embedded analogue of 2. It is found that the solid solutions of (1)x(2)1-x function as ambipolar semiconductors, whose hole and electron mobilities are tunable by varying the ratio of 1 and 2 in the solid solution. The OTFTs of (1)0.5(2)0.5 exhibit relatively balanced hole and electron mobilities comparable to the highest values as reported for ambipolar OTFTs of stoichiometric donor-acceptor cocrystals and microphase-separated p-n bulk heterojunctions. The solid solution of (1)0.5(2)0.5 and the microphase-separated blend of 1:3 (0.5:0.5) in OTFTs exhibit different responses to light in terms of absorption and photoeffect of OTFTs because the donor and acceptor are mixed at molecular level with π-π stacking in the solid solution.

  6. Scaling and Graphical Transport-Map Analysis of Ambipolar Schottky-Barrier Thin-Film Transistors Based on a Parallel Array of Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Dae-Young; Pregl, Sebastian; Park, So Jeong; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2015-07-08

    Si nanowire (Si-NW) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation flexible and wearable electronics as well as sensor applications with high performance. Here, we have fabricated ambipolar Schottky-barrier (SB) TFTs consisting of a parallel array of Si-NWs and performed an in-depth study related to their electrical performance and operation mechanism through several electrical parameters extracted from the channel length scaling based method. Especially, the newly suggested current-voltage (I-V) contour map clearly elucidates the unique operation mechanism of the ambipolar SB-TFTs, governed by Schottky-junction between NiSi2 and Si-NW. Further, it reveals for the first-time in SB based FETs the important internal electrostatic coupling between the channel and externally applied voltages. This work provides helpful information for the realization of practical circuits with ambipolar SB-TFTs that can be transferred to different substrate technologies and applications.

  7. Anisotropic diffusion in mesh-free numerical magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    We extend recently developed mesh-free Lagrangian methods for numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to arbitrary anisotropic diffusion equations, including: passive scalar diffusion, Spitzer-Braginskii conduction and viscosity, cosmic ray diffusion/streaming, anisotropic radiation transport, non-ideal MHD (Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, the Hall effect) and turbulent 'eddy diffusion'. We study these as implemented in the code GIZMO for both new meshless finite-volume Godunov schemes (MFM/MFV). We show that the MFM/MFV methods are accurate and stable even with noisy fields and irregular particle arrangements, and recover the correct behaviour even in arbitrarily anisotropic cases. They are competitive with state-of-the-art AMR/moving-mesh methods, and can correctly treat anisotropic diffusion-driven instabilities (e.g. the MTI and HBI, Hall MRI). We also develop a new scheme for stabilizing anisotropic tensor-valued fluxes with high-order gradient estimators and non-linear flux limiters, which is trivially generalized to AMR/moving-mesh codes. We also present applications of some of these improvements for SPH, in the form of a new integral-Godunov SPH formulation that adopts a moving-least squares gradient estimator and introduces a flux-limited Riemann problem between particles.

  8. An organic water-gated ambipolar transistor with a bulk heterojunction active layer for stable and tunable photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haihua; Zhu, Qingqing; Wu, Tongyuan; Chen, Wenwen; Zhou, Guodong; Li, Jun; Zhang, Huisheng; Zhao, Ni

    2016-11-01

    Organic water-gated transistors (OWGTs) have emerged as promising sensing architectures for biomedical applications and environmental monitoring due to their ability of in-situ detection of biological substances with high sensitivity and low operation voltage, as well as compatibility with various read-out circuits. Tremendous progress has been made in the development of p-type OWGTs. However, achieving stable n-type operation in OWGTs due to the presence of solvated oxygen in water is still challenging. Here, we report an ambipolar OWGT based on a bulk heterojunction active layer, which exhibits a stable hole and electron transport when exposed to aqueous environment. The device can be used as a photodetector both in the hole and electron accumulation regions to yield a maximum responsivity of 0.87 A W-1. More importantly, the device exhibited stable static and dynamic photodetection even when operated in the n-type mode. These findings bring possibilities for the device to be adopted for future biosensing platforms, which are fully compatible with low-cost and low-power organic complementary circuits.

  9. Field-Effect Modulation of Ambipolar Doping and Domain Wall Band Alignment in P-type Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yasen; Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Yu, Dong

    The sub-picosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors. However, the development of VO2-based transistors lags behind, owing to the lack of an efficient and hysteresis-free electrostatic doping control. Here we report the first synthesis of p-type single crystalline VO2nanowires via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The p-type doping was unambiguously confirmed by both solid and electrochemical gating methods, and further evidenced by the scanning photocurrent microscopic measurements. Interestingly, we observed that the photocurrent spot polarity at the metal-insulator domain walls was reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, which indicates a band bending flipping. Furthermore, we eliminated the common hysteresis in gate sweep and greatly shortened the transistor response time via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers new opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables novel electronic applications based on VO2.

  10. Flexible ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with reverse-offset-printed silver electrodes for a complementary inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsu; Kim, Minseok; Yeom, Seung-Won; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Song, Hyenggun; Jhon, Young Min; Kim, Yun-Hi; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    We report ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and complementary inverter circuits with reverse-offset-printed (ROP) Ag electrodes fabricated on a flexible substrate. A diketopyrrolopyrrole-based co-polymer (PDPP-TAT) was used as the semiconductor and poly(methyl methacrylate) was used as the gate insulator. Considerable improvement is observed in the n-channel electrical characteristics by inserting a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as the electron-injection/hole-blocking layer at the interface between the semiconductors and the electrodes. The saturation mobility values are 0.35 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the p-channel and 0.027 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the n-channel. A complementary inverter is demonstrated based on the ROP process, and it is selectively controlled by the insertion of Cs2CO3 onto the n-channel region via thermal evaporation. Moreover, the devices show stable operation during the mechanical bending test using tensile strains ranging from 0.05% to 0.5%. The results confirm that these devices have great potential for use in flexible and inexpensive integrated circuits over a large area.

  11. A two-dimensional π-d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; Di, Chong-an; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-06-15

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid-liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm(2 )V(-1 )s(-1) for holes and 116 cm(2 )V(-1 )s(-1) for electrons) under field-effect modulation.

  12. A two-dimensional π-d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; di, Chong-An; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-06-01

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid-liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm-1, which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm2 V-1 s-1 for holes and 116 cm2 V-1 s-1 for electrons) under field-effect modulation.

  13. A two-dimensional π–d conjugated coordination polymer with extremely high electrical conductivity and ambipolar transport behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xing; Sheng, Peng; Tu, Zeyi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Junhua; Geng, Hua; Zou, Ye; Di, Chong-an; Yi, Yuanping; Sun, Yimeng; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Currently, studies on organic two-dimensional (2D) materials with special optic-electronic properties are attracting great research interest. However, 2D organic systems possessing promising electrical transport properties are still rare. Here a highly crystalline thin film of a copper coordination polymer, Cu-BHT (BHT=benzenehexathiol), is prepared via a liquid–liquid interface reaction between BHT/dichloromethane and copper(II) nitrate/H2O. The morphology and structure characterization reveal that this film is piled up by nanosheets of 2D lattice of [Cu3(C6S6)]n, which is further verified by quantum simulation. Four-probe measurements show that the room temperature conductivity of this material can reach up to 1,580 S cm−1, which is the highest value ever reported for coordination polymers. Meanwhile, it displays ambipolar charge transport behaviour and extremely high electron and hole mobilities (99 cm2 V−1 s−1 for holes and 116 cm2 V−1 s−1 for electrons) under field-effect modulation. PMID:26074272

  14. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-01

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 105 and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  15. Electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and effects of air exposure on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakanoue, Tomo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Takimiya, Kazuo; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics of single-component ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by controlling the device structure and preparation and the measurement conditions. Six organic semiconductor materials (copper-phthalocyanine, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3), alpha-sexithiophene, 4-4'-bis-styrylphenyl, 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, or a photopolymerized polydiacethylene derivative (PDA) were used as the active layer, and all were found to transport both holes and electrons. The PDA-based FETs had the highest hole and electron mobilities (0.12 and 0.025 cm2/V s, respectively). We also investigated the effect of air exposure on the OFETs. The hole mobility was barely affected by the exposure while the electron mobility was significantly affected. The threshold voltage for p-channel operation was shifted by the exposure while that for n-channel operation was not, indicating that the hole density in the active layer is increased by air exposure whereas the electron density is independent of air exposure. Furthermore, we prepared an Alq3-based p-channel OFET and investigated the effect of air exposure on it. While its operation was stable in vacuum, air exposure degraded its characteristics. These behaviors indicate that irreversible chemical reactions occur between cationic Alq3 species and oxygen or water molecules.

  16. Flexible ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with reverse-offset-printed silver electrodes for a complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsu; Kim, Minseok; Yeom, Seung-Won; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Song, Hyenggun; Min Jhon, Young; Kim, Yun-Hi; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-06-03

    We report ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and complementary inverter circuits with reverse-offset-printed (ROP) Ag electrodes fabricated on a flexible substrate. A diketopyrrolopyrrole-based co-polymer (PDPP-TAT) was used as the semiconductor and poly(methyl methacrylate) was used as the gate insulator. Considerable improvement is observed in the n-channel electrical characteristics by inserting a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as the electron-injection/hole-blocking layer at the interface between the semiconductors and the electrodes. The saturation mobility values are 0.35 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the p-channel and 0.027 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the n-channel. A complementary inverter is demonstrated based on the ROP process, and it is selectively controlled by the insertion of Cs2CO3 onto the n-channel region via thermal evaporation. Moreover, the devices show stable operation during the mechanical bending test using tensile strains ranging from 0.05% to 0.5%. The results confirm that these devices have great potential for use in flexible and inexpensive integrated circuits over a large area.

  17. An Ambipolar BODIPY Derivative for a White Exciplex OLED and Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Laser toward Multifunctional Devices.

    PubMed

    Chapran, Marian; Angioni, Enrico; Findlay, Neil J; Breig, Benjamin; Cherpak, Vladyslav; Stakhira, Pavlo; Tuttle, Tell; Volyniuk, Dmytro; Grazulevicius, Juozas V; Nastishin, Yuriy A; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Skabara, Peter J

    2017-02-08

    A new interface engineering method is demonstrated for the preparation of an efficient white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by embedding an ultrathin layer of the novel ambipolar red emissive compound 4,4-difluoro-2,6-di(4-hexylthiopen-2-yl)-1,3,5,7,8-pentamethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (bThBODIPY) in the exciplex formation region. The compound shows a hole and electron mobility of 3.3 × 10(-4) and 2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively, at electric fields higher than 5.3 × 10(5) V cm(-1). The resulting WOLED exhibited a maximum luminance of 6579 cd m(-2) with CIE 1931 color coordinates (0.39; 0.35). The bThBODIPY dye is also demonstrated to be an effective laser dye for a cholesteric liquid crystal (ChLC) laser. New construction of the ChLC laser, by which a flat capillary with an optically isotropic dye solution is sandwiched between two dye-free ChLC cells, provides photonic lasing at a wavelength well matched with that of a dye-doped planar ChLC cell.

  18. Quantum and Classical Magnetoresistance in Ambipolar Topological Insulator Transistors with Gate-tunable Bulk and Surface Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jifa; Chang, Cuizu; Cao, Helin; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-01-01

    Weak antilocalization (WAL) and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) are two most commonly observed magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in topological insulators (TIs) and often attributed to the Dirac topological surface states (TSS). However, ambiguities exist because these phenomena could also come from bulk states (often carrying significant conduction in many TIs) and are observable even in non-TI materials. Here, we demonstrate back-gated ambipolar TI field-effect transistors in (Bi0.04Sb0.96)2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3(111), exhibiting a large carrier density tunability (by nearly 2 orders of magnitude) and a metal-insulator transition in the bulk (allowing switching off the bulk conduction). Tuning the Fermi level from bulk band to TSS strongly enhances both the WAL (increasing the number of quantum coherent channels from one to peak around two) and LMR (increasing its slope by up to 10 times). The SS-enhanced LMR is accompanied by a strongly nonlinear Hall effect, suggesting important roles of charge inhomogeneity (and a related classical LMR), although existing models of LMR cannot capture all aspects of our data. Our systematic gate and temperature dependent magnetotransport studies provide deeper insights into the nature of both MR phenomena and reveal differences between bulk and TSS transport in TI related materials. PMID:24810663

  19. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-07

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 10(5) and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  20. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  1. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  2. Driving voltage reduction in white organic light-emitting devices from selectively doping in ambipolar blue-emitting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chi-Feng; Lee, Jiun-Haw

    2007-11-01

    White organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) consisting of ambipolar 9,10-bis(2'-naphthyl) anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue-emitting layer (EML) were investigated. A thin codoped layer of yellow 5,6,11,12-Tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) served as a probe for detecting the position of maximum recombination rate in the 4,4'-bis[2-(4-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl)vinyl]biphenyl (DPAVBi) doped-ADN EML. Due to the energy barrier and bipolar carrier transport, the maximum recombination rate was found to be close to but not exactly at the interface of the hole-transporting layer and the EML. With appropriate tuning in the thickness, position, and dopant concentrations of the codoped layer (rubrene:DPAVBi:ADN) in the EML, the device driving voltage decreased by 21.7%, nearly 2 V in reduction, due to the increased recombination current from the faster exciton relaxation induced by the yellow dopants. Among the advantages of introducing the codoped layer over conventional single-doped layers are the elimination of the trapping effect to avoid increasing the device driving voltage, the alleviation of the dependence of the recombination zone on the applied voltage for improving color stability, and the utilization of excitons in a more efficient way to enhance device efficiency. Without using any electrically conductive layers such as the p-i-n structure, we were able to successfully generate 112 cd/m2 at 4 V from our white OLED simply by engineering the structure of the EML.

  3. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  4. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  5. Cycle of charge carrier states with formation and extinction of a floating gate in an ambipolar tetracyanoquaterthienoquinoid-based field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takuro; Toyota, Taro; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Michio M.; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    A tetracyanoquaterthienoquinoid (TCT4Q)-based field effect transistor is characterized by the ambipolar transfer characteristics and the facile shift of the threshold voltage induced by the bias stress. The trapping and detrapping kinetics of charge carriers was investigated in detail by the temperature dependence of the decay of source-drain current (ISD). We found a repeatable formation of a molecular floating gate is derived from a 'charge carrier-and-gate' cycle comprising four stages, trapping of mobile carriers, formation of a floating gate, induction of oppositely charged mobile carriers, and recombination between mobile and trapped carriers to restore the initial state.

  6. Photoelectron reflection and scattering at Venus: an upper limit on the "polar wind" ambipolar electric field, and a new source of top-side ionospheric heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Glyn; Glocer, Alex; Grebowsky, Joe; Peterson, William; Frahm, Rudy; Moore, Thomas; Gilbert, Lin; Coates, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    An important mechanism in the generation of Earth's polar wind is the ambipolar potential generated by the outflow along open field lines of superthermal electrons. This ≈20V electric potential assists ions in overcoming the gravitational potential, and is a key mechanism for Terrestrial ionospheric escape. At Venus, except in rare circumstances, every field line is open, and a similar outflow of ionospheric electrons is observed. It is thus hypothesized that a similar electric potential may be present at Venus, contributing to global ionospheric loss. However, a very sensitive electric field instrument would be required to directly measure this potential, and no such instrument has yet been flown to Venus. In this pilot study, we examine photoelectron spectra measured by the ASPERA-ELS instrument on the Venus Express to put an initial upper bound on the total potential drop above 350km of Φ < 10V, weaker than at the Earth despite a comparable gravity field. We thus hypothesize that contrary to our current understanding, a "polar wind" like ambipolar electric field may not be as important a mechanism for atmospheric escape as previously suspected. Additionally, we find our spectra are consistent with the scattering of photoelectrons, the heating from which which we hypothesize may act as a source of top-side ionospheric heating, and may play a role in influencing the scale height of the ionosphere.

  7. (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8]/CuPc two-component bilayer heterojunction-based organic transistors with high ambipolar performance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dameng; Zhang, Xia; Kong, Xia; Chen, Yanli; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2015-02-04

    Organic thin film transistor (OTFT) devices fabricated by the solution-based QLS technique from a mixed (phthalocyaninato)(porphyrinato) europium complex (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] exhibit air-stable ambipolar performance with mobilities of 6.0 × 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-)1 for holes and 1.4 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons, respectively. In good contrast, the two-component bilayer heterojunction thin film devices constructed by directly growing (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] on vacuum deposited (VCD) CuPc film using solution based QLS method were revealed to show unprecedented ambipolar performance with carrier mobilities of 0.16 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for holes and 0.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons. In addition to the intrinsic role of p-type organic semiconductor, the VCD CuPc film on the substrate also acts as a good template that induces significant improvement over the molecular ordering of triple-decker compound in the film. In particular, it results in the change in the aggregation mode of (TFPP)Eu[Pc(OPh)8]Eu[Pc(OPh)8] from J-type in the single-layer film to H-type in the bilayer film according to the UV-vis, XRD, and AFM observations.

  8. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  9. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  10. Self-consistent modeling for estimation of the reduced electric field in a DC excited diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhagat, M. S.; Biswas, A. K.; Rana, L. B.; Pakhare, Jagdish; Rawat, B. S.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of a numerical simulation method that estimate various discharge parameters in the positive column of a DC glow discharge controlled by ambipolar diffusion are presented. The parameters like reduced electric field (E/N), electron temperature, ionization rates, ambipolar diffusion losses and the average gas temperature were numerically evaluated for several mixtures of CO2, N2 and He in low pressure regime. The estimated E/N value which is a primary governing parameter of positive column was verified experimentally using a double probe in diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser for a variety of CO2, N2 and He mixtures. The role of auxiliary ionization source like pulser used for pre-ionization and its effect on the steady state E/N value was also studied. A reasonably good agreement was found between the theoretical and the experimental results. Based on the results of this simulation a zigzag folded, diffusion-cooled, 500 W CW CO2 laser has been designed and developed for research in gas phase nanoparticle synthesis.

  11. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Diffusion Coefficient of Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Isamu; Hishinuma, Masakazu

    1996-05-01

    Electrical conductivity and chemical diffusion coefficient of Sr-doped lanthanum manganites, La 1- xSr xMnO 3±δ( x= 0.05 - 0.20), were measured by the dc four-probe technique and relaxation type experiments where a sudden change of oxygen chemical potential was imposed on the pre-equilibrated sample and the change of electrical conductivity was followed as a function of elapsed time. A defect model is proposed to elucidate the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the measured conductivity and the reported oxygen nonstoichiometry. The transient conductivity behavior after an abrupt change of oxygen partial pressure was successfully described by a diffusion model with consideration of partial control by surface reaction. The determined chemical diffusion coefficients, of the order of 10 -5to 10 -4cm 2s -1at 1000°C, increased with decreased oxygen partial pressure due to the thermodynamic enhancement effect. Using the enhancement factor estimated by combination of the proposed defect model and the ambipolar diffusion theory, the oxygen vacancy diffusion coefficients were derived. High vacancy diffusivity comparable to that of Fe- or Co-based perovskites predicts fast oxide ion diffusion under conditions where the manganites show oxygen deficient type non-stoichiometry.

  12. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  13. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  14. The electric wind of Venus: A global and persistent "polar wind"-like ambipolar electric field sufficient for the direct escape of heavy ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Fedorov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Nordheim, Tom A.; Mitchell, David; Moore, Thomas E.; Peterson, William K.; Winningham, John D.; Zhang, Tielong L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an "ambipolar" electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earth's similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an "electric wind" must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  15. The Electric Wind of Venus: A Global and Persistent Polar Wind -Like Ambipolar Electric Field Sufficient for the Direct Escape of Heavy Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, Glyn A.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Glocer, Alex; Coates, Andrew J.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Barabash, Stas; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Federov, Andrei; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Gilbert, Lin K.; Khazanov, George; Moore, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what processes govern atmospheric escape and the loss of planetary water is of paramount importance for understanding how life in the universe can exist. One mechanism thought to be important at all planets is an ambipolar electric field that helps ions overcome gravity. We report the discovery and first quantitative extraterrestrial measurements of such a field at the planet Venus. Unexpectedly, despite comparable gravity, we show the field to be five times stronger than in Earths similar ionosphere. Contrary to our understanding, Venus would still lose heavy ions (including oxygen and all water-group species) to space, even if there were no stripping by the solar wind. We therefore find that it is possible for planets to lose heavy ions to space entirely through electric forces in their ionospheres and such an electric wind must be considered when studying the evolution and potential habitability of any planet in any star system.

  16. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  17. MAGNETIZATION OF CLOUD CORES AND ENVELOPES AND OTHER OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF RECONNECTION DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Esquivel, A.; Crutcher, R.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observational results for magnetic fields in molecular clouds reviewed by Crutcher seem to be inconsistent with the predictions of the ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation. These include the measured decrease in mass to flux ratio between envelopes and cores, the failure to detect any self-gravitating magnetically subcritical clouds, the determination of the flat probability distribution function (PDF) of the total magnetic field strengths implying that there are many clouds with very weak magnetic fields, and the observed scaling B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 2/3} that implies gravitational contraction with weak magnetic fields. We consider the problem of magnetic field evolution in turbulent molecular clouds and discuss the process of magnetic field diffusion mediated by magnetic reconnection. For this process that we termed 'reconnection diffusion', we provide a simple physical model and explain that this process is inevitable in view of the present-day understanding of MHD turbulence. We address the issue of the expected magnetization of cores and envelopes in the process of star formation and show that reconnection diffusion provides an efficient removal of magnetic flux that depends only on the properties of MHD turbulence in the core and the envelope. We show that as the amplitude of turbulence as well as the scale of turbulent motions decrease from the envelope to the core of the cloud, the diffusion of the magnetic field is faster in the envelope. As a result, the magnetic flux trapped during the collapse in the envelope is being released faster than the flux trapped in the core, resulting in much weaker fields in envelopes than in cores, as observed. We provide simple semi-analytical model calculations which support this conclusion and qualitatively agree with the observational results. Magnetic reconnection is also consistent with the lack of subcritical self-gravitating clouds, with the observed flat PDF of field strengths, and with the

  18. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  19. Self-similar and diffusive expansion of nonextensive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Exact analytical self-similar solution is presented for free collisionless expansion of a two-component plasma of inertial ions and nonextensive electrons into vacuum, using the generalized nonextensive velocity distribution for electrons. Furthermore, a hydrodynamic model of plasma expansion in the presence of the ambipolar diffusion caused by collisions among the plasma species, such as electrons and ions, is developed and a Fokker-Planck-like generalized diffusion equation for steady-state expansion of a nonextensive electron-ion plasma is derived. For the case of generalized statistics and in the absence of particle diffusion, the density, velocity, electric potential, and field of expansion profiles are exactly obtained and studied in terms of the self-similar parameter. It is found that superthermal electrons lead to an accelerated expansion of plasma compared to that of Maxwellian electrons. It is also revealed that the nonextensivity parameter plays a fundamental role on the density, velocity, electric potential, and field configuration of the expansion. Therefore, one is able to distinguish three different regimes q < 1, q = 1, and q > 1 for expansion corresponding to sub-nonextensive, extensive, and super-nonextensive statistical profiles for electrons, respectively. Current research can provide useful information and suggests techniques for investigation of the involved statistical mechanism on the role of the energetic electron fluid in the expansion of plasma in strong pulsed laser-matter interaction experiments. It is also shown that the particle diffusion expansion mechanism becomes more dominant for relatively large values of the nonextensivity parameter, q.

  20. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Howard A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented.

  1. N-type ohmic contacts to undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using only front-sided processing: application to ambipolar FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, D.; Sfigakis, F.; Croxall, A. F.; Das Gupta, K.; Narayan, V.; Waldie, J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a simple and reliable, front-sided-only fabrication technique for n-type ohmic contacts to two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. We have adapted the well-established recessed ohmic contacts/insulated metal gate technique for inducing a 2DEG in an undoped triangular well to also work reliably for undoped square quantum wells. Our adaptation involves a change in the procedure for etching the ohmic contact pits to optimise the etch side-wall profile and depth. As an application of our technique, we present a front-side-gated ambipolar field effect transistor (FET), where both 2D electron and hole gases can be induced in the same quantum well. We present results of low-temperature (0.3 K - 4 K) transport measurements of this device, including assessment of the n-type ohmic contact quality. On the basis of our findings, we discuss why the fabrication of these contacts is difficult and how our technique circumvents the challenges.

  2. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho-García, J. C. Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-07

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from –20 to –30 kcal mol{sup −1} at close distances around 3.0–3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings)

  3. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho-García, J. C.; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from -20 to -30 kcal mol-1 at close distances around 3.0-3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings).

  4. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  5. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  6. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  7. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  8. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  9. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  10. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaibrakhmanov, S. A.; Dudorov, A. E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations on dust grains and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the regions close to the borders of the `dead' zones because electrons are magnetized there. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-radial. We calculate the magnetic field strength and geometry for the discs with accretion rates (10^{-8}-10^{-6}) {M}_{⊙} {yr}^{-1}. The fossil magnetic field geometry does not change significantly during the disc evolution while the accretion rate decreases. We construct the synthetic maps of dust emission polarized due to the dust grain alignment by the magnetic field. In the polarization maps, the `dead' zones appear as the regions with the reduced values of polarization degree in comparison to those in the adjacent regions.

  11. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katherine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm–100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  12. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung-Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katharine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm-100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  13. Microscopic Foundation and Simulation of Coupled Carrier-Temperature Diffusions in Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    and energy relaxation rates. These rates expressed as functions of temperatures and densities lead to microscopic expressions for self- and mutual-diffusion coefficients in the coupled density-temperature diffusion equations. Approximations for reducing the general two-component description of the electron-hole plasma (EHP) to a single-component one are discussed. In particular, we show that a special single-component reduction is possible when e-h scattering dominates over c-LO phonon scattering. The ambipolar diffusion approximation is also discussed and we show that the ambipolar diffusion coefficients are independent of e-h scattering, even though the diffusion coefficients of individual components depend sensitively on the e-h scattering rates. Our discussions lead to new perspectives into the roles played in the single-component reduction by the electron-hole correlation in momentum space induced by scatterings and the electron-hole correlation in real space via internal static electrical field. Finally, the theory is completed by coupling the diffusion equations to the lattice temperature equation and to the effective optical polarization which in turn couples to the laser field. The equations derived above are implemented in various limiting cases to a typical diode laser to study the consequences of nonlinear diffusion and the cross diffusion terms on laser behavior, especially the dynamic behavior of a diode laser under modulation. Detailed results will be presented by comparing with the standard rate equation results.

  14. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  15. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  16. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  17. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  18. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  19. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  20. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  1. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  2. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  4. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  5. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  6. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  7. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  8. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  9. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  10. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  11. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  12. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  13. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  14. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  15. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  16. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  17. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  18. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  19. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  20. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  1. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  2. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  3. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  4. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  5. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  6. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  7. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  8. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  9. Design, synthesis, and characterization of ladder-type molecules and polymers. Air-stable, solution-processable n-channel and ambipolar semiconductors for thin-film transistors via experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Usta, Hakan; Risko, Chad; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Hui; Deliomeroglu, Murat K; Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-04-22

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of new high-performance n-channel molecular/polymeric semiconductors that are solution-processable and air-stable is of great interest for the development of p-n junctions, bipolar transistors, and organic complementary circuitry (CMOS). While over the past two decades there have been many reports on n-channel materials, solution-processability and air-stability still remain as major challenges. We report here the synthesis and detailed characterization of a highly electron-deficient class of indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-dione, 2,2'-(indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-diylidene) dimalononitrile, bisindenofluorene-12,15-dione, and 2,2'-(bisindenofluorene-12,15-diylidene) dimalononitrile-based ladder-type building blocks (1-12) and their corresponding homo- and copolymers (P1-P14), and examine in detail the effects of core size, thiophene vs core regiochemistry, carbonyl vs dicyanovinylene functionality, and alkyl chain orientation on the physicochemical properties, thin film microstructures, and OFET device performance. New compounds are characterized by DSC, TGA, melting point, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), solution/thin film optical, PL, and cyclic voltammetry measurements to evaluate frontier molecular orbital energetics and intermolecular cohesive forces. Thin films are grown by vacuum deposition and spin-coating, and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AFM. By tuning the HOMO/LUMO energetics of the present materials over a 1.1 eV range, p-type, n-type, or ambipolar charge transport characteristics can be observed, thus identifying the MO energetic windows governing majority carrier polarity and air stability. One of these systems, thiophene-terminated indenofluorenedicyanovinylene 10 exhibits an electron mobility of 0.16 cm(2)/V x s and an I(on)/I(off) ratio of 10(7)-10(8), one of the highest to date for a solution-cast air-stable n-channel semiconductor. Here we also report solution-processed ambipolar films

  10. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  11. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  12. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  13. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  14. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  15. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  16. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  17. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  18. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  19. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  20. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  1. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  2. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  3. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  4. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  5. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  6. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  7. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  8. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  10. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  11. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  12. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  13. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  14. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  15. [The diffusion of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Between August 19 and 21, the Feria del Libro de las Ciencias de la Salud (Healthcare Book Fair) took place in the Palacio de Medicina in Mexico City. Archives of Medical Research, Revista Médica del IMSS, and Saber IMSS, three of the main instruments of knowledge diffusion of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, assisted to this book fair, which was organized by the Facultad de Medicina of UNAM.

  16. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  17. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  18. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  19. The ThermalDiffusion class

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2014-10-01

    The ThermalDiffusion class was created to simulate one-dimensional thermal diffusion across one or more material layers. Each layer is assumed to have constant conductivity K and diffusivity κ . Interface conductance between layers may be specified. Internal heating as a function of position and time is also supported. The ThermalDiffusion class is included in the SMASH package [1] as part of the PDE (Partial Differential Equation) subpackage.

  20. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Accelerated stochastic diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    1990-07-01

    We give a purely probabilistic demonstration that all effects of non-random (external, conservative) forces on the diffusion process can be encoded in the Nelson ansatz for the second Newton law. Each random path of the process together with a probabilistic weight carries a phase accumulation (complex valued) weight. Random path summation (integration) of these weights leads to the transition probability density and transition amplitude respectively between two spatial points in a given time interval. The Bohm-Vigier, Fenyes-Nelson-Guerra and Feynman descriptions of the quantum particle behaviours are in fact equivalent.

  2. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  3. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  4. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  5. Cosmic Diffuse Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The final analysis of the COMPTEL cosmic diffuse flux analysis is summarized in the accompanying figure. It shows the intensity of the cosmic diffuse flux spectrum measured jointly between the Virgo region and the South Galactic pole. This spectrum represents flux per unit solid angle over the range of 0.8 to 30 MeV. It contains the first positive measurement of the flux above 10 MeV. The spectrum merges smoothly with that measured with the EGRET instrument, starting at 30 MeV. It also merges smoothly with the latest results of the HEAO-1 measurements. However, the spectrum below is softer than the spectrum above the COMPTEL energy band. In the COMPTEL energy band there must exist a change in spectral shape as the source objects or processes change from the lower energy regime to the higher energy regime. The details of the analysis and the implications and meanings of the results are spelled out in the thesis of Dr. Cheenu Kappadath which is enclosed.

  6. The diffusion of microfinance.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  7. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.

    1976-08-10

    1. A diffuser separator apparatus which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage, each of said channels having an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports, at least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels being a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels having a different cross sectional area, means for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series, a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area.

  8. Diffusing obesity myths.

    PubMed

    Ramos Salas, X; Forhan, M; Sharma, A M

    2014-06-01

    Misinformation or myths about obesity can lead to weight bias and obesity stigma. Counteracting myths with facts and evidence has been shown to be effective educational tools to increase an individuals' knowledge about a certain condition and to reduce stigma.The purpose of this study was to identify common obesity myths within the healthcare and public domains and to develop evidence-based counterarguments to diffuse them. An online search of grey literature, media and public health information sources was conducted to identify common obesity myths. A list of 10 obesity myths was developed and reviewed by obesity experts and key opinion leaders. Counterarguments were developed using current research evidence and validated by obesity experts. A survey of obesity experts and health professionals was conducted to determine the usability and potential effectiveness of the myth-fact messages to reduce weight bias. A total of 754 individuals responded to the request to complete the survey. Of those who responded, 464 (61.5%) completed the survey. All 10 obesity myths were identified to be deeply pervasive within Canadian healthcare and public domains. Although the myth-fact messages were endorsed, respondents also indicated that they would likely not be sufficient to reduce weight bias. Diffusing deeply pervasive obesity myths will require multilevel approaches.

  9. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  10. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  11. Sucrose diffusion in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of sugar in aqueous solution is important both in nature and in technological applications, yet measurements of diffusion coefficients at low water content are scarce. We report directly measured sucrose diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution. Our technique utilises a Raman isotope tracer method to monitor the diffusion of non-deuterated and deuterated sucrose across a boundary between the two aqueous solutions. At a water activity of 0.4 (equivalent to 90 wt% sucrose) at room temperature, the diffusion coefficient of sucrose was determined to be approximately four orders of magnitude smaller than that of water in the same material. Using literature viscosity data, we show that, although inappropriate for the prediction of water diffusion, the Stokes–Einstein equation works well for predicting sucrose diffusion under the conditions studied. As well as providing information of importance to the fundamental understanding of diffusion in binary solutions, these data have technological, pharmaceutical and medical implications, for example in cryopreservation. Moreover, in the atmosphere, slow organic diffusion may have important implications for aerosol growth, chemistry and evaporation, where processes may be limited by the inability of a molecule to diffuse between the bulk and the surface of a particle. PMID:27364512

  12. Characterizing non-Gaussian diffusion by using generalized diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Bammer, Roland; Acar, Burak; Moseley, Michael E

    2004-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is known to have a limited capability of resolving multiple fiber orientations within one voxel. This is mainly because the probability density function (PDF) for random spin displacement is non-Gaussian in the confining environment of biological tissues and, thus, the modeling of self-diffusion by a second-order tensor breaks down. The statistical property of a non-Gaussian diffusion process is characterized via the higher-order tensor (HOT) coefficients by reconstructing the PDF of the random spin displacement. Those HOT coefficients can be determined by combining a series of complex diffusion-weighted measurements. The signal equation for an MR diffusion experiment was investigated theoretically by generalizing Fick's law to a higher-order partial differential equation (PDE) obtained via Kramers-Moyal expansion. A relationship has been derived between the HOT coefficients of the PDE and the higher-order cumulants of the random spin displacement. Monte-Carlo simulations of diffusion in a restricted environment with different geometrical shapes were performed, and the strengths and weaknesses of both HOT and established diffusion analysis techniques were investigated. The generalized diffusion tensor formalism is capable of accurately resolving the underlying spin displacement for complex geometrical structures, of which neither conventional DTI nor diffusion-weighted imaging at high angular resolution (HARD) is capable. The HOT method helps illuminate some of the restrictions that are characteristic of these other methods. Furthermore, a direct relationship between HOT and q-space is also established.

  13. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  14. Osmosis and diffusion conceptual assessment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Williams, Kathy S; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified from the previously published Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (DODT) and some newly developed items. The ODCA, a validated instrument containing fewer items than the DODT and emphasizing different content areas within the realm of osmosis and diffusion, better aligns with our curriculum. Creation of the ODCA involved removal of six DODT item pairs, modification of another six DODT item pairs, and development of three new item pairs addressing basic osmosis and diffusion concepts. Responses to ODCA items testing the same concepts as the DODT were remarkably similar to responses to the DODT collected from students 15 yr earlier, suggesting that student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis remains elusive.

  15. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  16. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  17. Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-08

    DATES COVERED (From - To) April 1,2007-March 31, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goals of this project were: (1) perform a fundamental study of atomic diffusion along dislocation cores in metals and...alloys, (2) develop new methods for the calculation of dislocation diffusion coefficients as functions of temperature and chemical composition and (3

  18. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  19. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  20. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  1. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2009-01-20

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) Enthalpy diffusion preserves the second law. (2) Euler solvers will not produce correct temperatures in mixing regions. (3) Navier-Stokes solvers will only produce correct temperatures if q{sub d} is included. (4) Errors from neglecting enthalpy diffusion are most severe when differences in molecular weights are large. (5) In addition to temperature, enthalpy diffusion affects density, dilatation and other fields in subtle ways. (6) Reacting flow simulations that neglect the term are a dubious proposition. (7) Turbulence models for RANS and LES closures should preserve consistency between energy and species diffusion.

  2. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  3. Selected Dissemination/Diffusion Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.

    This analysis of selected diffusion and dissemination methods used by developer-demonstrator projects in the National Diffusion Network discusses strategies under the following headings: managing the project, developing materials, disseminating information, conducting awareness sessions, training personnel, using certified trainers, providing…

  4. Development of a Detonation Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    reflection of the shock would result in a detonation that runs out of reactants when it encounters the combustion front. Rotating the reflecting surface...FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSERTATION Christopher A Stevens, CTR AFIT-DS...States Government. iii AFIT-DS-ENY-14-M-05 FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSTERTATION

  5. Preliminary Investigation of Supersonic Diffusers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-05-01

    No. L5D20 This pressure was measured with a large mercury manometer . The total ’head after diffusion can be assumed equal to the static pressure at...of the entering kinetic energy. A mercury manometer was used to measure the difference between the total heads before and after diffusion. ‘J!hesetwo

  6. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  7. Demonstrating Diffusion: Why the Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra Lee

    1998-01-01

    Examines the principles of diffusion and how it may be confused with convection. Suggests that educators may be misleading students and clouding their understanding of the process. Provides two contemporary examples to explain the process of diffusion and how it differs from convection. (Author/CCM)

  8. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  9. Diffusion in jammed particle packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusive transport in jammed particle packs is of interest for a number of applications, as well as being a potential indicator of structural properties near the jamming point. To this end, we report stochastic simulations of equilibrium diffusion through monodisperse sphere packs near the jamming point in the limit of a perfectly insulating surrounding medium. The time dependence of various diffusion properties is resolved over several orders of magnitude. Two time regimes of expected Fickian diffusion are observed, separated by an intermediate regime of anomalous diffusion. This intermediate regime grows as the particle volume fraction approaches the critical jamming transition. The diffusion behavior is fully controlled by the extent of the contacts between neighboring particles, which in turn depend on proximity to the jamming point. In particular, the mean first passage time associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles is shown to control both the time to recover Fickian diffusion and the long time diffusivity. Scaling laws are established that relate these quantities to the difference between the actual and critical jamming volume fractions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  11. The Diffusion of New Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Patricia M.

    The life cycle of "new math" is fertile ground for the study of the diffusion of an innovation. New math arrived in 1958 to save the day for America after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first successful space flight in 1957. In a period of 16 years an entire diffusion cycle was completed throughout the entire educational system…

  12. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  13. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  14. Diffusion of polymer gel implants.

    PubMed

    Davis, B K

    1974-08-01

    Crosslinked polyacrylamide and polyvinylpyrrolidone gels have been used to subcutaneously implant (125)I-labeled immunoglobulin, (125)I-labeled luteinizing hormone, (125)I-labeled bovine serum albumin, (125)I-labeled insulin, [(3)H]prostaglandin F(2alpha), and Na(125)I into hamsters. From the rates of absorption of the solutes, their diffusion coefficients were determined. The diffusion coefficients showed a logarithmic dependence on implant polymer concentration and solute molecular weight. Release of the solutes from gel preparations incubated 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees revealed a similar relationship between solute diffusion coefficient, molecular weight, and the concentration of polymer. A general equation was derived that gives the expected diffusion coefficient of a substance in a polymer gel from its molecular weight, diffusion coefficient in solvent, and polymer concentration of the gel.

  15. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  16. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  17. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  18. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  19. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  20. Hydrogen diffusion fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a fuel cell comprising; an elongate case; a thin, flat separator part of non-porous, di-electric, hydrogen-permeable material between the ends of and extending transverse the case and defining anode and cathode chambers; a thin, flat anode part of non-porous, electric conductive, hydrogen-permeable metallic material in the anode chamber in flat contacting engagement with and co-extensive with the separator part; a flat, porous, catalytic cathode part in the cathode chamber in contacting engagement with the separator part; hydrogen supply means supplying hydrogen to the anode part within the anode chamber; oxidant gas supply means supplying oxidant gas to the cathode part within the cathode chamber; and, an external electric circuit connected with and between the anode and cathode parts. The anode part absorbs and is permeated by hydrogen supplied to it and diffuses the hydrogen to hydrogen ions and free electrons; the free electrons in the anode part are conducted from the anode part into the electric circuit to perform useful work. The hydrogen ions in the anode part move from the anode part through the separator part and into the cathode part. Free electrons are conducted by the electric circuit into the cathode part. The hydrogen ions, oxidant gas and free electrons in the cathode part react and generate waste, heat and water.

  1. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Garcia-Sakai, Victoria; Bewley, Robert; Dalgliesh, Robert; Perring, Toby; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  2. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  3. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  4. Macromolecular Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sangah; Meth, Jeff; Zane, Steve; Winey, Karen; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in crowded systems is important in biological and engineered systems. We have studied macromolecular diffusion through a model polymer nanocomposite (PNC) containing phenyl grafted silica nanoparticles (NPs), randomly distributed in a polystyrene matrix. Over a wide range of NP loading and tracer molecular weight (M), the scaling of the diffusion coefficient with M is in excellent agreement with the entropic barrier model (EBM) previously used to describe diffusion of DNA through confined media (e.g., gels and nanopores). To investigate the effect of NP size, diffusion was measured in PNC's with silica NPs having diameters of 28 and 12 nm. The normalized diffusion coefficients (D / D0) plotted against the interparticle separation relative to probe size (i.e., ID/ 2 Rg) collapse on a master curve. Diffusion in a poly(methyl methacrylate):silica NP system was also investigated to understand how attractive interactions (i.e., enthalpy) perturb motion relative to the polystyrene and phenyl-silica NP system which is athermal. Finally, a flux-based model is proposed and compared with experimental results.

  5. Single file diffusion in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Farrell, Spencer; Brown, Aidan

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the single file diffusion (SFD) of large particles entering a confined tubular geometry, such as luminal diffusion of proteins inside microtubules or flagella. While single-file effects have no effect on particle density, we report significant single-file effects for individually-tracked tracer particle motion. Both exact and approximate ordering statistics of particles entering semi-infinite tubes agree well with our stochastic simulations. Considering initially empty semi-infinite tubes, with particles entering at one end starting from an initial time t = 0 , tracked particles display super-diffusive effective exponents just after they enter the system and trends towards diffusive exponents at later times. Equivalently, if diffusive exponents are assumed the effective diffusivity is reduced at early times and enhanced at later times through a logarithmic factor logN , where N is the number of particles in the tube. When we number each particle from the first (n = 1) to the most recent (n = N), we find good scaling collapse of the effective diffusivity for all n. Techniques that track individual particles, or local groups of particles, such as photo-activation or photobleaching, will exhibit single-file effects.

  6. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  7. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  8. ALUMINUM IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN MAGNESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J; Sohn, Yong Ho; Klimov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The Al impurity diffusion in polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) via depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry was studied in the temperature range of 673-573K, utilizing the thin film method and thin film solution to the diffusion equation. Multiple samples were utilized and multiple profiles were obtained to determine statistically confident coefficient with maximum standard deviation of 16%. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Al impurity diffusion in Mg was determined as 155 kJ/mole and 3.9 x 10-3 m2/sec.

  9. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  10. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  11. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  12. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  13. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  14. Diffusion methodology: time to innovate?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, thousands of diffusion studies have been conducted in numerous disciplines of study including sociology, education, communication, marketing, and pubic health. With few exceptions, these studies have been driven by a methodological approach that has become institutionalized in diffusion research. This approach is characterized by the collection of quantitative data about one innovation gathered from adopters at a single point in time after widespread diffusion has occurred. This dominant approach is examined here in terms of both its strengths and weaknesses and with regard to its contribution to the collective base of understanding the diffusion of innovations. Alternative methodological approaches are proposed and reviewed with consideration for the means by which they may expand the knowledge base.

  15. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  16. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  17. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  18. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  19. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  20. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  1. The speed of Arnold diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, C.; Harsoula, M.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed numerical study is presented of the slow diffusion (Arnold diffusion) taking place around resonance crossings in nearly integrable Hamiltonian systems of three degrees of freedom in the so-called ‘Nekhoroshev regime’. The aim is to construct estimates regarding the speed of diffusion based on the numerical values of a truncated form of the so-called remainder of a normalized Hamiltonian function, and to compare them with the outcomes of direct numerical experiments using ensembles of orbits. In this comparison we examine, one by one, the main steps of the so-called analytic and geometric parts of the Nekhoroshev theorem. Thus: (i) we review and implement an algorithm Efthymiopoulos (2008) [45] for Hamiltonian normalization in multiply resonant domains which is implemented as a computer program making calculations up to a high normalization order. (ii) We compute the dependence of the optimal normalization order on the small parameter ɛ in a specific model and compare the result with theoretical estimates on this dependence. (iii) We examine in detail the consequences of assuming simple convexity conditions for the unperturbed Hamiltonian on the geometry of the resonances and on the phase space structure around resonance crossings. (iv) We discuss the dynamical mechanisms by which the remainder of the optimal Hamiltonian normal form drives the diffusion process. Through these steps, we are led to two main results: (i) We construct in our concrete example a convenient set of variables, proposed first by Benettin and Gallavotti (1986) [12], in which the phenomenon of Arnold diffusion in doubly resonant domains can be clearly visualized. (ii) We determine, by numerical fitting of our data, the dependence of the local diffusion coefficient D on the size ‖R‖ of the optimal remainder function, and we compare this with a heuristic argument based on the assumption of normal diffusion. We find a power law D∝‖, where the constant b has a small positive

  2. Diffuse Gamma Rays Galactic and Extragalactic Diffuse Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse gamma rays consist of several components: truly diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, the extragalactic background, whose origin is not firmly established yet, and the contribution from unresolved and faint Galactic point sources. One approach to unravel these components is to study the diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, which traces the interactions of high energy particles with interstellar gas and radiation fields. Because of its origin such emission is potentially able to reveal much about the sources and propagation of cosmic rays. The extragalactic background, if reliably determined, can be used in cosmological and blazar studies. Studying the derived average spectrum of faint Galactic sources may be able to give a clue to the nature of the emitting objects.

  3. Kramers turnover: From energy diffusion to spatial diffusion using metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the rate of transition for a particle between two metastable states coupled to a thermal environment for various magnitudes of the coupling strength using the recently proposed infrequent metadynamics approach [P. Tiwary and M. Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 230602 (2013)]. We are interested in understanding how this approach for obtaining rate constants performs as the dynamics regime changes from energy diffusion to spatial diffusion. Reassuringly, we find that the approach works remarkably well for various coupling strengths in the strong coupling regime, and to some extent even in the weak coupling regime. PMID:27059558

  4. Diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Kil; Seo, Jin-Gyo; Park, Jong-Wan

    2009-07-01

    Cr 3+ diffusion in chrysoberyl (BeAl 2O 4) irradiated by H + ions and electrons has been studied and compared with diffusion in non-irradiated samples. Chrysoberyl crystals were irradiated with 6 MeV H + ions to fluencies of 1×10 16 cm -2 for 25 min and with 10 MeV electrons to fluencies of 2×10 17 cm -2 for 1 h. Three different types of samples, which were doped with Cr 3+, were annealed in horizontal alumina tube furnaces by 50 K intervals in the temperature range from 1773 to 1923 K for 200 h. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX) was used to measure the diffusion. Arrhenius equations for the diffusion coefficient for Cr 3+ in the temperature range 1773-1923 K were developed: Electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.1×10 -5×exp (-482.3±18.2 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Proton beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.3×10 -3×exp (-545.4±25.0 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Natural non-irradiated chrysoberyls Dcr=2.2×10 -3×exp (-547.9±36.8 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 The results indicate that the chromium diffuses deepest into the electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls.

  5. A Diffusion Approach to Study Leadership Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to draw on elements of diffusion theory to understand leadership reform. Many diffusion studies examine the spread of an innovation across social units but the objective is to examine diffusion of a collective leadership model within school units. Specifically, the strength of reform diffusion is tested to account for…

  6. A Short-Duration Gel Diffusion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a gel diffusion experiment that permits the completion of duplicate diffusion runs within a three-hour laboratory session. Information included for the short-duration gel diffusion experiment is the diffusion cell, the experiment, data treatment, and the expected results of the experiment. (Author/DS)

  7. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Igarashi; Lamberto, Rondoni; Antonio, Botrugno; Marco, Pizzi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call “transient osmosis". We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes.

  8. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  9. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  10. Marmot-Fission-Gas-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-10-22

    The MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION software solves a coupled set of partial differential equations describing fission gas evolution in UO2 nuclear fuel. It is part of the MARMOT code, which builds on the MOOSE framework. Both the MARMOT code and the MOOSE framework are developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The model in MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION consists of a set of continuum reaction-diffusion equations capturing formation and annihilation of defects, reactions between defects, diffusion of defects and segregation of defects to grain boundaries. Defects refer to vacancies and interstitials as well fission gas atoms (Xe) occupying various trap sites such as uranium and oxygen vacancies and interstitials sites. The code can treat a large number of defect types. The model is formulated within the phase field framework to be compatible with other MARMOT kernels. The driving forces for all reactions, diffusion and segregation events are consistently formulated as a variational derivatives of the free energy of the system. The rates of the reactions are controlled by the corresponding kinetic coefficients. The free energy and the kinetic coefficients for UO2 have been parameterized by lower length scale simulations. The code can be used to simulate defect evolution in a prescribed UO2 microstructure as well as to solve defect clustering problems that control effective diffusivities under both thermal and irradiation conditions. It I possible to extend the current UO2 model to other fuel types such as accident tolerant fuels based on the U3Si2 compound. This would obviously require a new set of material properties describing the behavior of defects in U3Si2 rather than UO2. The framework is however designed to be generic.

  11. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  12. Diffusion of polyelectrolytes in polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahalkar, Anand; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we have investigated the diffusion coefficient of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) in a matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylate) gels. The diffusion coefficient of the probe polyelectrolyte exhibits a crossover behavior from a particle-diffusion to entropic-barrier dominated diffusion, as the molecular weight is increased. The effect of electrostatics, by varying the charge density of the matrix, on probe diffusion constant will be presented.

  13. Improved Dot Diffusion For Image Halftoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    The dot diffusion method for digital halftoning has the advantage of parallelism unlike the error diffusion method. The method was recently improved...by optimization of the so-called class matrix so that the resulting halftones are comparable to the error diffused halftones . In this paper we will...first review the dot diffusion method. Previously, 82 class matrices were used for dot diffusion method. A problem with this size of class matrix is

  14. Diffusion doping in quantum dots: bond strength and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Makkar, Mahima; Shetty, Amitha; Gahlot, Kushagra; A R, Pavan; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-02-23

    Semiconducting materials uniformly doped with optical or magnetic impurities have been useful in a number of potential applications. However, clustering or phase separation during synthesis has made this job challenging. Recently the "inside out" diffusion doping was proposed to be successful in obtaining large sized quantum dots (QDs) uniformly doped with a dilute percentage of dopant atoms. Herein, we demonstrate the use of basic physical chemistry of diffusion to control the size and concentration of the dopants within the QDs for a given transition metal ion. We have studied three parameters; the bond strength of the core molecules and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing metal ion are found to be important while the ease of cation exchange was not highly influential in the control of size and concentration of the single domain dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) with diverse dopant ions M(2+) (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+)). Steady state optical emission spectra reveal that the dopants are incorporated inside the semiconducting CdS and the emission can be tuned during shell growth. We have shown that this method enables control over doping percentage and the QDs show a superior ferromagnetic response at room temperature as compared to previously reported systems.

  15. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  16. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    During this quarter, progress has been made in two areas: (1) preparation of the calibration curve for gel permeation chromatography analysis of coal asphaltene; (2) preliminary measurements of the effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions. A calibration curve was prepared with standard compounds including polystyrenes, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and tetraphenylporphine in GPC analysis. A correlation equation was obtained from the calibration curve to estimate the molecular weights of coal asphaltene fractions. Based on this GPC analysis, effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions were measured.

  17. Diffuse bands versus extinction parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Walter; Snow, Theodore P.; Sneden, C.; Krelowski, Jacek

    1994-01-01

    All recent available, high quality measurements of the strong diffuse bands 5780 A and 5797 A have been collected. This includes those measurement derived from the authors's recent observations (February, May, and November 1993, taken with a echelle spectrograph) as well as those from a coude spectrograph and from literature. Equivalent widths of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIB's) at 5780 A and 5797 A have been measured on spectrograms. The measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) on their own spectrograms ranged from 250 to 500. The Johnson UBV data were used to estimate the color excesses of our targets.

  18. Diffusive mixing and Tsallis entropy

    DOE PAGES

    O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Cushman, John H.

    2015-04-29

    Brownian motion, the classical diffusive process, maximizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The Tsallis q-entropy, which is non-additive, was developed as an alternative to the classical entropy for systems which are non-ergodic. A generalization of Brownian motion is provided that maximizes the Tsallis entropy rather than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This process is driven by a Brownian measure with a random diffusion coefficient. In addition, the distribution of this coefficient is derived as a function of q for 1 < q < 3. Applications to transport in porous media are considered.

  19. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  20. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  1. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description

    PubMed Central

    SHETTY, ANIL N.; CHIANG, SHARON; MALETIC-SAVATIC, MIRJANA; KASPRIAN, GREGOR; VANNUCCI, MARINA; LEE, WESLEY

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal–Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain. PMID:27441031

  2. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.; Strudler, Neal, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Faculty Technology Integration Project" (Comfort Akwaji); (2) "If It Is Broke, Then What?" (D. Lynnwood Belvin and Jennifer Leaderer); (3) "Developing Video-Based E-Learning Applications"…

  3. Diffusion brazing of nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, S.V.; Parous, L.C.; Gale, W.F.

    1995-09-01

    NiAl is a promising candidate material for high-temperature applications. However, NiAl suffers from poor low-temperature ductility and toughness. Hence, suitable technologies are required for NiAl to Ni-based alloy joining. In view of the poor low-temperature ductility and strong alumina-forming tendency of NiAl, diffusion brazing seems to be the most suitable technology for joining NiAl to itself and to Ni-based alloys. This paper examines the diffusion brazing of NiAl to Ni using Ni-Si-B interlayers and draws comparisons with previous work by authors on NiAl/Ni-Si-B/NiAl and Ni/Ni-Si-B/Ni diffusion brazing. The progression of micro-structural development in the NiAl/Ni-Si-B/Ni joints is compared with that expected from standard models of the diffusion brazing process in which dissolution of the substrate material, isothermal solidification and solid-state homogenization occur sequentially.

  4. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  5. Diffusion Coatings as Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Radoslav; Ignatova-Ivanova, Tsveteslava

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion is the cause of irretrievable loss of huge amounts of metals and alloys. The harmful effects of corrosion can be reduced significantly by applying appropriate methods of corrosion protection. One method to protect metals against corrosion is the formation of diffusion coatings on them. High corrosion resistance is typical for the boride diffusion layers. Aluminothermy is one of the main methods for diffusion saturation of the surface of metal products with various elements, including boron, and under certain conditions with aluminum, too. Samples of steel 45 were put to aluminothermic diffusion saturation with boron in a pressurized steel container at a temperature of 1100K, for 6 hours in powdered aluminothermic mixtures. The content of B2O3 in the starting mixtures decreased from the optimum - 20% to 0%, and the content of Al and the activator - (NH4)2.4BF3 is constant, respectively 7% and 0.5%. Al2O3 was used as filler. The borided samples were tested for corrosion resistance in 10% HCl for 72 hours. The results show that their corrosion resistance depends on the composition of the starting saturating mixture (mainly on the content of B2O3), and respectively on the composition, structure, thickness and degree of adhesion of the layer to the metal base.

  6. Innovation Diffusion: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Shena R.

    2009-01-01

    Whether looking at the spread and adoption of an intervention across a community, across multiple units, or within a single unit, an understanding of diffusion theory can help evaluators uncover patterns and impacts that might otherwise be overlooked. The theory alerts evaluators to examine why uptake of an intervention appeared different in…

  7. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  8. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  9. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  10. Evaluating Technology Transfer and Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles discuss the evaluation of technology transfer and diffusion: (1) "Technology Transfer at the U.S. National Laboratories: A Framework for Evaluation"; (2) "Application of Social Psychological and Evaluation Research: Lessons from Energy Information Programs"; (3) "Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Energy R and D Laboratories: An…

  11. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strudler, Neal, Ed.; Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "A Response to Technology Integration in Teacher Education for Merit, Tenure, and Promotion" (Cindy L. Anderson and David Starrett); (2) "Online Technical Support…

  12. Polymer Diffusion in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by experiments on fluorescently labeled DNA molecules on a supported lipid bilayer, we have examined theoretically diffusion of polymers in two dimensions. The key experimental finding we focus on is the scaling of the diffusion constant of the center of mass, D˜1/N. This implies that no effective hydrodynamic coupling exists between the diffusing DNA segments in the membrane. We construct our theoretical model using the phenomenological hydrodynamic model of supported membranes proposed by Evans and Sackmann. Our model is based on the pre-averaged Oseen tensor, and is similar to the model of Komura and Seki, but elaborated and extended to take explicit account of self-avoidance. We find that the 1/N scaling of D can be understood as a consequence of membrane hydrodynamics in the presence of a supporting surface. Further experimental consequences of the model, in particular the diffusion constant for DNA in free standing membranes, will also be discussed. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  13. Tiny Molybdenites Tell Diffusion Tales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion invokes micron-scale exchange during crystal growth and dissolution in magma chambers on short time-scales. Fundamental to interpreting such data are assumptions on magma-fluid dynamics at all scales. Nevertheless, elemental diffusion profiles are used to estimate time scales for magma storage, eruption, and recharge. An underutilized timepiece to evaluate diffusion and 3D mobility of magmatic fluids is high-precision Re-Os dating of molybdenite. With spatially unique molybdenite samples from a young ore system (e.g., 1 Ma) and a double Os spike, analytical errors of 1-3 ka unambiguously separate events in time. Re-Os ages show that hydrous shallow magma chambers locally recharge and expel Cu-Mo-Au-silica as superimposed stockwork vein networks at time scales less than a few thousand years [1]. Re-Os ages provide diffusion rates controlled by a dynamic crystal mush, accumulation and expulsion of metalliferous fluid, and magma reorganization after explosive crystallization events. Importantly, this approach has broad application far from ore deposits. Here, we use Re-Os dating of molybdenite to assess time scales for generating and diffusing metals through the deep crust. To maximize opportunity for chemical diffusion, we use a continental-scale Sveconorwegian mylonite zone for the study area. A geologically constrained suite of molybdenite samples was acquired from quarry exposures. Molybdenite, previously unreported, is extremely scarce. Tiny but telling molybdenites include samples from like occurrences to assure geologic accuracy in Re-Os ages. Ages range from mid-Mesoproterozoic to mid-Neoproterozoic, and correspond to early metamorphic dehydration of a regionally widespread biotite-rich gneiss, localized melting of gneiss to form cm-m-scale K-feldspar ± quartz pods, development of vapor-rich, vuggy mm stringers that serve as volatile collection surfaces in felsic leucosomes, and low-angle (relative to foliation) cross-cutting cm-scale quartz veins

  14. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  15. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  16. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  17. Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan; Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth; Grest, Gary S.; Kumar, Sanat

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

  18. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  19. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  20. Diffuse Interstellar Bands in Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. B.; Sarre, P.; Marshall, C. C. M.; Spekkens, K.; de Naray, R. Kuzio

    Recent Fabry-Pérot observations towards the galaxy NGC 1325 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) led to the serendipitous discovery of an emission feature centered at 661.3 nm arising from material in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy; this emission feature lies at the wavelength of one of the sharper and stronger diffuse bands normally seen in absorption. The flux of the feature is 4.2 +/- 0.5 × 10-18 es-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. It appears that this is the first observation of emission from a diffuse band carrier in the ISM, excited in this case by the interstellar radiation field. We present the discovery spectra and describe follow-up measurements proposed for SALT.

  1. Ultrasonic enhancement of battery diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hilton, R; Dornbusch, D; Branson, K; Tekeei, A; Suppes, G J

    2014-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that sonic energy can be harnessed to enhance convection in Galvanic cells during cyclic voltammetry; however, the practical value of this approach is limited due to the lack of open volumes for convection patterns to develop in most batteries. This study evaluates the ability of ultrasonic waves to enhance diffusion in membrane separators commonly used in sandwich-architecture batteries. Studies include the measuring of open-circuit performance curves to interpret performances in terms of reductions in concentration overpotentials. The use of a 40 kHz sonicator bath can consistently increase the voltage of the battery and reduce overpotential losses up to 30%. This work demonstrates and quantifies battery enhancement due to enhanced diffusion made possible with ultrasonic energy.

  2. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens, and radius of a diffusing probe.

  3. HOT HYDROGEN IN DIFFUSE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Duley, Walt W.; Williams, David A. E-mail: wwduley@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-08-20

    Laboratory evidence suggests that recombination of adsorbed radicals may cause an abrupt temperature excursion of a dust grain to about 1000 K. One consequence of this is the rapid desorption of adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules with excitation temperatures of this magnitude. We compute the consequences of injection of hot H{sub 2} into cold diffuse interstellar gas at a rate of 1% of the canonical H{sub 2} formation rate. We find that the level populations of H{sub 2} in J = 3, 4, and 5 are close to observed values, and that the abundances of CH{sup +} and OH formed in reactions with hot hydrogen are close to the values obtained from observations of diffuse clouds.

  4. [Kidneys in diffuse systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dębowska, Małgorzata; Staszków, Monika

    Systemic scleroderma is a chronic, autoimmune disease of the connective tissue that involves skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscles and joints, as well as the internal organs: kidneys, lungs, heart. Depending on the extent it can occur as limited or diffuse clinical variant. In 60-80 % of patients with diffuse scleroderma, autopsy studies have shown pathologic changes in the kidneys. About half of the patients with renal involvement the clinical manifestation is limited to a moderate increase in serum creatinine, mild proteinuria, and moderate hypertension. The most serious complication remains sclerodermal renal crisis. It develops in 5-20 % of patients and is characterized by severe hypertension, acute kidney injury with oliguria, proteinuria and erythrocyturia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia. In this article pathogenesis, risk factors, symptoms and treatment of scleroderma renal crisis have been reviewed.

  5. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  6. Surface self-diffusion of organic glasses.

    PubMed

    Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2013-12-19

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been determined for the organic glass Nifedipine using the method of surface grating decay. The flattening of 1000 nm surface gratings occurs by viscous flow at 12 K or more above the glass transition temperature and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion is at least 10(7) times faster than bulk diffusion, indicating a highly mobile surface. Nifedipine glasses have faster surface diffusion than the previously studied Indomethacin glasses, despite their similar bulk relaxation times. Both glasses exhibit fast surface crystal growth, and its rate scales with surface diffusivity. The observed rate of surface diffusion implies substantial surface rearrangement during the preparation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition. The Random First Order Transition Theory and the Coupling Model successfully predict the large surface-enhancement of mobility and its increase on cooling, but disagree with the experimental observation of the faster surface diffusion of Nifedipine.

  7. Diffusion Processes: Experiment, Theory, Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekalski, Andrzej

    The articles in this book reflect the omnipresence of diffusion processes in the natural sciences. They describe experimental results as well as theoretical models and computer simulations, and address a wide readership including graduate students. The problems treated stem from physics, astronomy, physical chemistry, biology, and medicine. The papers are presented in a tutorial style and reflect the present-day trends in the field.

  8. Extragalactic diffuse (C II) emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Suzanne C.; Geis, Norbert; Townes, Charles H.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The 158 micro m (CII) line has been mapped in the galaxies Centaurus A, M83, NGC 6946, and NGC 891. The emission exists over very large scales, peaking in the nuclei and extending beyond the spiral arms and molecular disks. While most of the (CII) emission from the nuclei and spiral arms originates in photodissociated gas, the diffuse atomic gas can account for much of the (CII) emission in the extended regions.

  9. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  10. Hydrogen Diffusion in C_60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Sethna, Dorab; Szuts, Zoltan

    2001-03-01

    Recently^1 it has been shown that hydrogen molecules can be forced into a C_60 lattice under modest pressure. A loading pressure of 2,000 PSI is sufficient to fill almost 50 % of the available octahedral sites. Here we extend this work to consider the kinetics of the hydrogen diffusion within the C_60 lattice. In our procedure the sample is first loaded to its equilibrium H2 concentration. The confining pressure is then quickly removed and the rate at which the H2 outgasses from the powder is monitored via the slow pressure increase with time. Results show that the outgassing time constant depends critically on the particle sized distribution of the C_60. Ground powders have time-constants almost an order of magnitude faster than unground. In all cases the kinetics are consistent with a two-time constant model in which the hydrogen diffuses within the lattice and along the grain boundaries between crystallites. However, the loaded H2 concentration depends solely on the loading pressure independent of the powder type indicating that at equilibrium the H2 molecules reside exclusively at the lattice octahedral sites and not in the grain boundaries. Measurements taken at a series of different temperatures indicate that diffusion within the lattice has an activation barrier of 105 meV. This compares well with the theoretical predictions for the octahedral well depth of 110 meV^1. ^1 S. A. FitzGerald et al., Phys. Rev. B 60, 6439 (1999).

  11. Diffusion of active chiral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Francisco J.

    2016-12-01

    The diffusion of chiral active Brownian particles in three-dimensional space is studied analytically, by consideration of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density of finding a particle at position x and moving along the direction v ̂ at time t , and numerically, by the use of Langevin dynamics simulations. The analysis is focused on the marginal probability density of finding a particle at a given location and at a given time (independently of its direction of motion), which is found from an infinite hierarchy of differential-recurrence relations for the coefficients that appear in the multipole expansion of the probability distribution, which contains the whole kinematic information. This approach allows the explicit calculation of the time dependence of the mean-squared displacement and the time dependence of the kurtosis of the marginal probability distribution, quantities from which the effective diffusion coefficient and the "shape" of the positions distribution are examined. Oscillations between two characteristic values were found in the time evolution of the kurtosis, namely, between the value that corresponds to a Gaussian and the one that corresponds to a distribution of spherical shell shape. In the case of an ensemble of particles, each one rotating around a uniformly distributed random axis, evidence is found of the so-called effect "anomalous, yet Brownian, diffusion," for which particles follow a non-Gaussian distribution for the positions yet the mean-squared displacement is a linear function of time.

  12. Instrument independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Fu, Henry L; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber optic probe is a powerful tool for quantitative tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. Significant systematic errors can arise in the measured reflectance spectra and thus in the derived tissue physiological and morphological parameters due to real-time instrument fluctuations. We demonstrate a novel fiber optic probe with real-time, self-calibration capability that can be used for UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in biological tissue in clinical settings. The probe is tested in a number of synthetic liquid phantoms over a wide range of tissue optical properties for significant variations in source intensity fluctuations caused by instrument warm up and day-to-day drift. While the accuracy for extraction of absorber concentrations is comparable to that achieved with the traditional calibration (with a reflectance standard), the accuracy for extraction of reduced scattering coefficients is significantly improved with the self-calibration probe compared to traditional calibration. This technology could be used to achieve instrument-independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo and obviate the need for instrument warm up and post∕premeasurement calibration, thus saving up to an hour of precious clinical time.

  13. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  14. Economic fluctuations and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plerou, Vasiliki; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Gabaix, Xavier; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2000-09-01

    We quantify the relation between trading activity - measured by the number of transactions NΔt-and the price change GΔt for a given stock, over a time interval [t, t+Δt]. To this end, we analyze a database documenting every transaction for 1000 U.S. stocks for the two-year period 1994-1995. We find that price movements are equivalent to a complex variant of classic diffusion, where the diffusion constant fluctuates drastically in time. We relate the analog for stock price fluctuations of the diffusion constant-known in economics as the volatility-to two microscopic quantities: (i) the number of transactions NΔt in Δt, which is the analog of the number of collisions and (ii) the variance W2Δt of the price changes for all transactions in Δt, which is the analog of the local mean square displacement between collisions. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that the power-law tails of P(GΔt) are due to P(WΔt), and the long-range correlations in \\|GΔt\\| are due to NΔt.

  15. Helium diffusion in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate improved standard solar models using the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity tables, an accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine which takes account of recent measurements and analyses, and the recent Anders-Grevesse determination of heavy element abundances. We also evaluate directly the effect of the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen on the calculated neutrino fluxes, on the primordial solar helium abundance, and on the depth of the convective zone. Helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11 percent of the total rate, in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, by about 3.5 SNU, or 3 percent, in the gallium solar neutrino experiments, and by about 12 percent in the Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, and radiative opacity predicts a value of 8.0 SNU +/- 3.0 SNU for the C1-37 experiment and 132 +21/-17 SNU for the Ga - 71 experiment, where the uncertainties include 3 sigma errors for all measured input parameters.

  16. Diffusion in isotopically controlled semiconductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracht, H.

    1999-12-01

    Isotopically controlled heterostructures of 28Si/natSi and Al71GaAs/Al69GaAs/71GaAs have been used to study the self-diffusion process in this elemental and compound semiconductor material. The directly measured Si self-diffusion coefficient is compared with the self-interstitial and vacancy contribution to self-diffusion which were deduced from metal diffusion experiments. The remarkable agreement between the Si self-diffusion coefficients and the individual contributions to self-diffusion shows that both self-interstitials and vacancies mediate Si self-diffusion. The Ga self-diffusion in undoped AlGaAs was found to decrease with increasing Al concentration. The activation enthalpy of Ga and Al diffusion in GaAs and of Ga diffusion in AlGaAs all lie in the range of (3.6±0.1) eV, but with different pre-exponential factors. The doping dependence of Ga self-diffusion reveals a retardation (enhancement) of Ga diffusion under p-type (n-type) doping compared to intrinsic conditions. All experimental results on the group-III atom diffusion are accurately described if vacancies on the group-III sublattice are assumed to mediate the Ga self- and Al-Ga interdiffusion in undoped AlGaAs and the Ga self-diffusion in Be- and Si-doped GaAs with an active dopant concentration of 3×1018 cm-3. The doping dependence of Ga self-diffusion in GaAs provides strong evidence that neutral, singly and doubly charged Ga vacancies govern the self-diffusion process.

  17. Self-diffusion in liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Herth, Simone; Ye, Feng; Eggersmann, Martin; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Würschum, Roland

    2004-03-05

    For studying self-diffusion in liquid interfaces, 59Fe tracer diffusion was measured on ultrafine-grained Nd2Fe14B which undergoes an intergranular melting transition for low Nd excess. The diffusion coefficient in the intergranular liquid layers is found to be lower than in bulk melts indicating a hampered atomic mobility due to confinement. Well above the intergranular melting transition, the diffusivity in the liquid interfaces approaches a value characteristic for bulk melts.

  18. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  19. Optimal Network Modularity for Information Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ferrara, Emilio; Flammini, Alessandro; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the impact of community structure on information diffusion with the linear threshold model. Our results demonstrate that modular structure may have counterintuitive effects on information diffusion when social reinforcement is present. We show that strong communities can facilitate global diffusion by enhancing local, intracommunity spreading. Using both analytic approaches and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal network modularity, where global diffusion requires the minimal number of early adopters.

  20. Image Halftoning Using Optimized Dot Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    ppvnath@sys.caltech.edu ABSTRACT The dot diffusion method for digital halftoning has the advantage of parallelism unlike the error diffusion ...digital halftoning : ordered dither [1], error diffusion [2], neural-net based methods [8], and more recently direct binary search (DBS) [7]. Ordered...from periodic patterns. On the other hand error diffused halftones do not suffer from periodicity and offer blue noise characteristic [3] which is

  1. Diffusion of Distance Education in North Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Dabaj, Fahme

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to explore how distance education has diffused in north Cyprus. In this paper, Rogers' diffusion theory (1995) was used to analyze the acceptance and implementation of distance education in institutions of higher learning in north Cyprus. The four main elements of the diffusion paradigm--the innovation,…

  2. Mathematical Methods for Diffusion MRI Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lenglet, C.; Campbell, J.S.W.; Descoteaux, M.; Haro, G.; Savadjiev, P.; Wassermann, D.; Anwander, A.; Deriche, R.; Pike, G.B.; Sapiro, G.; Siddiqi, K.; Thompson, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we review recent mathematical models and computational methods for the processing of diffusion Magnetic Resonance Images, including state-of-the-art reconstruction of diffusion models, cerebral white matter connectivity analysis, and segmentation techniques. We focus on Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) and Q-Ball Images (QBI). PMID:19063977

  3. Ultrafast demagnetization by hot electrons: Diffusion or super-diffusion?

    PubMed Central

    Salvatella, G.; Gort, R.; Bühlmann, K.; Däster, S.; Vaterlaus, A.; Acremann, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnetic metals can be achieved by a heat pulse propagating in the electron gas of a non-magnetic metal layer, which absorbs a pump laser pulse. Demagnetization by electronic heating is investigated on samples with different thicknesses of the absorber layer on nickel. This allows us to separate the contribution of thermalized hot electrons compared to non-thermal electrons. An analytical model describes the demagnetization amplitude as a function of the absorber thickness. The observed change of demagnetization time can be reproduced by diffusive heat transport through the absorber layer. PMID:27795975

  4. Basic concepts of MR imaging, diffusion MR imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Eduardo H M S G; Borgonovi, Arthur F N G; Doring, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    MR image contrast is based on intrinsic tissue properties and specific pulse sequences and parameter adjustments. A growing number of MRI imaging applications are based on diffusion properties of water. To better understand MRI diffusion-weighted imaging, a brief overview of MR physics is presented in this article followed by physics of the evolving techniques of diffusion MR imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

  5. Cosmic ray diffusion: Report of the Workshop in Cosmic Ray Diffusion Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.; Jones, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    A workshop in cosmic ray diffusion theory was held at Goddard Space Flight Center on May 16-17, 1974. Topics discussed and summarized are: (1) cosmic ray measurements as related to diffusion theory; (2) quasi-linear theory, nonlinear theory, and computer simulation of cosmic ray pitch-angle diffusion; and (3) magnetic field fluctuation measurements as related to diffusion theory.

  6. Refraction and reflection of diffusion fronts.

    PubMed

    Remhof, A; Wijngaarden, R J; Griessen, R

    2003-04-11

    Diffusion waves form the basis of several measurement technologies in materials science as well as in biological systems. They are, however, so heavily damped that their observation is a real challenge to the experimentalist. We show that accurate information about the refraction-like and reflection-like behavior of diffusion waves can be obtained by studying diffusion fronts. For this we use hydrogen in a metal as a model system and visualize its 2D migration with an optical indicator. The similarities between classical optics and diffusion, in particular, the applicability of Snell's law to diffusive systems are discussed. Our measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  7. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-09-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative.

  8. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative. PMID:24089586

  9. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  10. Probing the diffuse interstellar medium with diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Bailey, Mandy; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2015-08-01

    For a century already, a large number of absorption bands have been known at optical wavelengths, called the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). While their carriers remain unidentified, the relative strengths of these bands in various environments make them interesting new probes of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We present the results from two large, dedicated campaigns to map the ISM using DIBs measured in the high signal-to-noise spectra of hundreds of early-type stars: [1] in and around the Local Bubble using ESO's New Technology Telescope and the Isaac Newton Telescope, and [2] across both Magellanic Clouds using the Very Large Telescope and the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We discuss the implications for the structure and dynamics of the ISM, as well as the constraints these maps place on the nature of the carriers of the DIBs. Partial results have appeared in the recent literature (van Loon et al. 2013; Farhang et al. 2015a,b; Bailey, PhD thesis 2014) with the remainder being prepared for publication now.

  11. Diffusion of Ellipsoids in Bacterial Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Lai, Lipeng; Tai, Yi-Shu; Zhang, Kechun; Xu, Xinliang; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Active fluids such as swarming bacteria and motile colloids exhibit exotic properties different from conventional equilibrium materials. As a peculiar example, a spherical tracer immersed inside active fluids shows an enhanced translational diffusion, orders of magnitude stronger than its intrinsic Brownian motion. Here, rather than spherical tracers, we investigate the diffusion of isolated ellipsoids in a quasi-two-dimensional bacterial bath. Our study shows a nonlinear enhancement of both translational and rotational diffusions of ellipsoids. More importantly, we uncover an anomalous coupling between particles' translation and rotation that is strictly prohibited in Brownian diffusion. The coupling reveals a counterintuitive anisotropic particle diffusion, where an ellipsoid diffuses fastest along its minor axis in its body frame. Combining experiments with theoretical modeling, we show that such an anomalous diffusive behavior arises from the generic straining flow of swimming bacteria. Our work illustrates an unexpected feature of active fluids and deepens our understanding of transport processes in microbiological systems.

  12. Diffuse Optics for Tissue Monitoring and Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, T; Choe, R; Baker, W B; Yodh, A G

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the diffusion model for light transport in tissues and the medical applications of diffuse light. Diffuse optics is particularly useful for measurement of tissue hemodynamics, wherein quantitative assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations and blood flow are desired. The theoretical basis for near-infrared or diffuse optical spectroscopy (NIRS or DOS, respectively) is developed, and the basic elements of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) are outlined. We also discuss diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a technique whereby temporal correlation functions of diffusing light are transported through tissue and are used to measure blood flow. Essential instrumentation is described, and representative brain and breast functional imaging and monitoring results illustrate the workings of these new tissue diagnostics. PMID:26120204

  13. Revealing mesoscopic structural universality with diffusion.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Dmitry S; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Fieremans, Els

    2014-04-08

    Measuring molecular diffusion is widely used for characterizing materials and living organisms noninvasively. This characterization relies on relations between macroscopic diffusion metrics and structure at the mesoscopic scale commensurate with the diffusion length. Establishing such relations remains a fundamental challenge, hindering progress in materials science, porous media, and biomedical imaging. Here we show that the dynamical exponent in the time dependence of the diffusion coefficient distinguishes between the universality classes of the mesoscopic structural complexity. Our approach enables the interpretation of diffusion measurements by objectively selecting and modeling the most relevant structural features. As an example, the specific values of the dynamical exponent allow us to identify the relevant mesoscopic structure affecting MRI-measured water diffusion in muscles and in brain, and to elucidate the structural changes behind the decrease of diffusion coefficient in ischemic stroke.

  14. Theory of plane, symmetrical intake diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodel, Walter

    1950-01-01

    The present report ties in with the investigations on the inlet diffusers by P. Ruden. The theory developed by Ruden had produced results which found excellent confirmation in wind-tunnel tests and in spite of certain still-existing defects, are technically very promising. The reasons for the new theory of the diffuser forms indicated by Ruden are twofold: first, the arguments adduced in Ruden's theory deal only with one specific operating condition, that is, a certain ratio of mean velocity within the diffuser to flying speed, while in the present report any desired velocity ratios are involved; second, a different choice of parameters and the increased possibilities of variation result in diffuser forms which cannot be reconciled at once with Ruden's theory. The first enables a theoretical check of the measurements made with Ruden's diffusers at variable velocity ratio, the second permits the calculation of diffuser types which in many respects are superior to Ruden's diffusers.

  15. MODEL OF DIFFUSERS / PERMEATORS FOR HYDROGEN PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T; William Jacobs, W

    2007-08-27

    Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper.

  16. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments.

    PubMed

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2015-02-17

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together, one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  17. Hopping diffusion across material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppe, J.; Wallis, R. F.; Balkanski, M.

    1993-11-01

    We generalize a one-dimensional lattice-gas model of particle diffusion across material interfaces to include a finite-width interface region, and an energy barrier at the interface. We use overvoltage measurements on InSe and dielectric loss measurements on B 2O+ 3-0.5 Li 2O-0.15 Li 2SO 4 to determine the hopping rates in the two materials. Numerical and analytical results for the particle density versus position are presented for representative values of the energy barrier and a range of hopping rates. The presence of the energy barrier is found to be a dominant factor in the problem.

  18. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 18 different membranes were procured, characterized, and tested in a modified bench-scale vapor diffusion water reclamation unit. Four membranes were selected for further studies involving membrane fouling. Emphasis was placed on the problem of flux decline due to membrane fouling. This is discussed in greater details under "Summary and Discussion on Membrane Fouling Studies" presented in pages 47-51. The system was also investigated for low temperature application on wash-water where the permeated water is not recovered but vented into space vacuum.

  19. Analysis of mercury diffusion pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Several mercury diffusion pump stages in the Tritium Purification process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been removed from service for scheduled preventive maintenance. These stages have been examined to determine if failure has occurred. Evidence of fatigue around the flange portion of the pump has been seen. In addition, erosion and cavitation inside the throat of the venturi tube and corrosion on the other surface of the venturi tube has been observed. Several measures are being examined in an attempt to improve the performance of these pumps. These measures, as well as the noted observations, are described. 4 refs.

  20. Analysis of mercury diffusion pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Several mercury diffusion pump stages in the Tritium Purification process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been removed from service for scheduled preventive maintenance. These stages have been examined to determine if failure has occurred. Evidence of fatigue around the flange portion of the pump has been seen. In addition, erosion and cavitation inside the throat of the venturi tube and corrosion on the other surface of the venturi tube has been observed. Several measures are being examined in an attempt to improve the performance of these pumps. These measures, as well as the noted observations, are described. 4 refs.

  1. Diffuse heterochromia of scalp hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, W S; Lee, I W; Ahn, S K

    1996-11-01

    Heterochromia of hair is the presence of more than one distinct color of hair in the same person. A color difference between scalp hair and a mustache or sideburns is not uncommon. Pubic and axillary hair and eyebrows and eyelashes are often darker than scalp hair in a fair-haired person. Rarely, a circumscribed patch of hair of different colors occurs. However, diffuse heterochromia of black and red scalp hair has not been previously reported. We describe a father and son with this condition.

  2. Acid diffusion through polyaniline membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Su, T.M.; Huang, S.C.; Conklin, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    Polyaniline membranes in the undoped (base) and doped (acid) forms are studied for their utility as pervaporation membranes. The separation of water from mixtures of propionic acid, acetic acid and formic acid have been demonstrated from various feed compositions. Doped polyaniline displays an enhanced selectivity of water over these organic acids as compared with undoped polyaniline. For as-cast polyaniline membranes a diffusion coefficient (D) on the order of 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/sec has been determined for the flux of protons through the membranes using hydrochloric acid.

  3. Diffusive dynamics on paper matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Kar, Shantimoy; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-11-01

    Writing with ink on a paper and the rapid diagnostics of diseases using paper cartridge, despite their remarkable diversities from application perspective, both involve the motion of a liquid from a source on a porous hydrophilic substrate. Here we bring out a generalization in the pertinent dynamics by appealing to the concerned ensemble-averaged transport with reference to the underlying molecular picture. Our results reveal that notwithstanding the associated complexities and diversities, the resultant liquid transport characteristics on a paper matrix, in a wide variety of applications, resemble universal diffusive dynamics. Agreement with experimental results from diversified applications is generic and validates our unified theory.

  4. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  5. DNest3: Diffusive Nested Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Brendon

    2016-04-01

    DNest3 is a C++ implementation of Diffusive Nested Sampling (ascl:1010.029), a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for Bayesian Inference and Statistical Mechanics. Relative to older DNest versions, DNest3 has improved performance (in terms of the sampling overhead, likelihood evaluations still dominate in general) and is cleaner code: implementing new models should be easier than it was before. In addition, DNest3 is multi-threaded, so one can run multiple MCMC walkers at the same time, and the results will be combined together.

  6. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  7. An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  8. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  9. Separation of gases by diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Peieris, R. E.; Simon, F. E.; Arms, H. S.

    1960-12-13

    An apparatus is described for the separation of mixtures of gaseous or vaporous media by diffusion through a permeable membrane. The apparatus consists principally of a housing member having an elongated internal chamber dissected longitudinally by a permeable membrane. Means are provided for producing a pressure difference between opposite sides of the membrane to cause a flow of the media in the chamber therethrough. This pressure difference is alternated between opposite sides of the membrane to produce an oscillating flow through the membrane. Additional means is provided for producing flow parallel to the membrane in opposite directions on the two sides thereof and of the same frequency and in phase wlth the alternating pressure difference. The lighter molecules diffuse through the membrane more readily than the heavier molecules and the parallel flow effects a net transport of the lighter molecules in one direction and the heavier molecules in the opposite direction wlthin the chamber. By these means a concentration gradient along the chamber is established. (auth)

  10. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  11. Diffusion of limonene in polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Limm, W; Begley, T H; Lickly, T; Hentges, S G

    2006-07-01

    Diffusion coefficients of limonene in various linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) resins have been determined from sorption data using a thermogravimetric methodology. From these data, one can determine whether polymer synthesis parameters such as the choice of catalytic process or co-monomer result in substantial differences in how much food packaging additives might migrate to food. For example, LLDPE is currently manufactured using either one of two distinct catalytic processes: Ziegler-Natta (ZN) and metallocene, a single-site catalyst. ZN catalysis is a heterogeneous process that has dominated polyolefin synthesis over the last half-century. It involves a transition metal compound containing a metal-carbon bond that can handle repeated insertion of olefin units. In contrast, metallocene catalysis has fewer than 20 years of history, but has generated much interest due to its ability to produce highly stereospecific polymers at a very high yield. In addition to high stereospecificity, metallocene-catalysed polymers are significantly lower in polydispersity than traditional ZN counterparts. Absorption and desorption testing of heat-pressed films made from LLDPE and LDPE resins of varying processing parameters indicates that diffusion coefficients of limonene in these resins do not change substantially.

  12. Modeling of hydrogen diffusion in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Cao, M.Z.; Wan, X.J.; Shi, C.X.

    1989-02-01

    The study of the diffusion of hydrogen in metals is very important to further understand the hydrogen embrittlement of metals. To describe the diffusion of hydrogen in metals the diffusion equation deduced from Fick's law under an ideal condition has been generally used and the effect of hydrogen trapping in metals has been neglected. In the process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal, hydrogen fills the traps continuously and the fraction of the traps filled by hydrogen, which have only little effect on the diffusion of hydrogen, may be different at different places because the distribution of hydrogen concentration may be different at different places. Thus the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal may also be different at different positions, i.e., the diffusion coefficient should be affected by time in a dynamic process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal. But in the previous analyses, the above fact is not considered and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient is generally taken as a constant. In the present paper a new model of hydrogen diffusion in metals in which the effect of time is taken into account is developed.

  13. Diffusion bonding of copper to niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Adrian R.

    Processes used to join metal to ceramic at low temperatures have proven to be inefficient because multiple brazing cycles with different brazing temperatures and braze filler metals are required. Even though this is reproducible and robust, it is not ideal due to the manufacturing time and cost associated with multiple brazing cycles. A more efficient and cost effective process is to utilize the diffusion bonding technique to join different metallic layers prior to joining the entire ceramic assembly in one brazing cycle. In this study, the diffusion bonding of copper to niobium was examined. To the author's knowledge, the diffusion bonding of Cu to Nb has not been researched, and the diffusion of Cu into Nb or Nb into Cu has not been observed. A series of diffusion bonding experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bonding time, temperature, and pressure for the Cu-Nb system. The diffusion bonded samples were evaluated using mechanical testing and microscopy. Results from characterization indicate that diffusion of Nb into Cu occurs, and a robust bond with no interfacial voids is formed using different combinations of bonding parameters. The diffusion of Nb into Cu and with failure occurring outside the diffusion bonded region during all mechanical testing indicate that Cu can be bonded to Nb via the diffusion bonding technique.

  14. Is Protein Folding Sub-Diffusive?

    PubMed Central

    Krivov, Sergei V.

    2010-01-01

    Protein folding dynamics is often described as diffusion on a free energy surface considered as a function of one or few reaction coordinates. However, a growing number of experiments and models show that, when projected onto a reaction coordinate, protein dynamics is sub-diffusive. This raises the question as to whether the conventionally used diffusive description of the dynamics is adequate. Here, we numerically construct the optimum reaction coordinate for a long equilibrium folding trajectory of a Go model of a -repressor protein. The trajectory projected onto this coordinate exhibits diffusive dynamics, while the dynamics of the same trajectory projected onto a sub-optimal reaction coordinate is sub-diffusive. We show that the higher the (cut-based) free energy profile for the putative reaction coordinate, the more diffusive the dynamics become when projected on this coordinate. The results suggest that whether the projected dynamics is diffusive or sub-diffusive depends on the chosen reaction coordinate. Protein folding can be described as diffusion on the free energy surface as function of the optimum reaction coordinate. And conversely, the conventional reaction coordinates, even though they might be based on physical intuition, are often sub-optimal and, hence, show sub-diffusive dynamics. PMID:20862361

  15. A Multimodal Theory of Affect Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kim; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2015-09-01

    There is broad consensus in the literature that affect diffuses through social networks (such that a person may "acquire" or "catch" an affective state from his or her social contacts). It is further assumed that affect diffusion primarily occurs as the result of people's tendencies to synchronize their affective actions (such as smiles and frowns). However, as we show, there is a lack of clarity in the literature about the substrate and scope of affect diffusion. One consequence of this is a difficulty in distinguishing between affect diffusion and several other affective influence phenomena that look similar but have very different consequences. There is also a growing body of evidence that action synchrony is unlikely to be the only, or indeed the most important, pathway for affect diffusion. This paper has 2 key aims: (a) to craft a formal definition of affect diffusion that does justice to the core of the phenomenon while distinguishing it from other phenomena with which it is frequently confounded and (b) to advance a theory of the mechanisms of affect diffusion. This theory, which we call the multimodal theory of affect diffusion, identifies 3 parallel multimodal mechanisms that may act as routes for affect diffusion. It also provides a basis for novel predictions about the conditions under which affect is most likely to diffuse.

  16. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-05

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  17. Anomalous Extracellular Diffusion in Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  18. Controllable uncertain opinion diffusion under confidence bound and unpredicted diffusion probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fuhan; Li, Zhaofeng; Jiang, Yichuan

    2016-05-01

    The issues of modeling and analyzing diffusion in social networks have been extensively studied in the last few decades. Recently, many studies focus on uncertain diffusion process. The uncertainty of diffusion process means that the diffusion probability is unpredicted because of some complex factors. For instance, the variety of individuals' opinions is an important factor that can cause uncertainty of diffusion probability. In detail, the difference between opinions can influence the diffusion probability, and then the evolution of opinions will cause the uncertainty of diffusion probability. It is known that controlling the diffusion process is important in the context of viral marketing and political propaganda. However, previous methods are hardly feasible to control the uncertain diffusion process of individual opinion. In this paper, we present suitable strategy to control this diffusion process based on the approximate estimation of the uncertain factors. We formulate a model in which the diffusion probability is influenced by the distance between opinions, and briefly discuss the properties of the diffusion model. Then, we present an optimization problem at the background of voting to show how to control this uncertain diffusion process. In detail, it is assumed that each individual can choose one of the two candidates or abstention based on his/her opinion. Then, we present strategy to set suitable initiators and their opinions so that the advantage of one candidate will be maximized at the end of diffusion. The results show that traditional influence maximization algorithms are not applicable to this problem, and our algorithm can achieve expected performance.

  19. Short-time diffusivity of dicolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panczyk, Mark M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-06-01

    The short-time diffusivity of dicolloid particles as a function of particle volume fraction ϕ from 0.01≤ϕ≤0.6 is measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy. The diffusivities of symmetric and asymmetric dicolloids are compared with similarly sized spheres. The short-time diffusivity is independent of salt concentration and decreases with increasing volume fraction for both spheres and asymmetric dicolloids. Symmetric dicolloids have a higher diffusivity than spheres at similar volume fractions. This difference is accounted for by rescaling the dicolloid volume fraction based on the ratio of the random close-packing volume fractions of spheres and dicolloids. Finally, a useful method is provided for calculating the diffusivity of symmetric dicolloid particles of arbitrary aspect ratio based on the calculated hydrodynamic resistance of Zabarankin [Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 2329 (2007), 10.1098/rspa.2007.1872].

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example, we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example,more » we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.« less

  2. Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Iplikcioglu, A C; Bek, S; Gökduman, C A; Bikmaz, K; Cosar, M

    2006-06-01

    Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus (DVHCP) is a rare condition which is characterized by the presence of diffuse enlargement of the entire choroid plexus throughout the length of the choroidal fissure and overproduction of CSF. The diagnosis of diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus can be established by the MR demonstration of diffusely large, contrast enhanced choroid plexus in the cases of overproduction hydrocephalus. Although some authors recommend choroid plexus excision or coagulation, ventriculo-atrial shunt insertion is a simple and effective treatment modality in cases of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. In this report we present a case of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus and a short review of the literature. To our knowledge, in the CT and MRI era only 5 cases of DVHCP cases have been reported.

  3. Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

  4. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  5. Characterizing Unsaturated Diffusion in Porous Tuff Gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Kneafsey, T J; Roberts, J J; Tomutsa, L; Wang, J S

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (e.g., the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent of surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents are calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could significantly hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel.

  6. Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

    2003-11-12

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

  7. Single laser beam measurement of thermal diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Doiron, Serge; Deveaux, Michel; Haché, Alain

    2008-12-10

    Thermal diffusion properties of interfaces are measured using self-induced surface thermal lensing with a single laser beam. The time evolution of the reflected beam reveals information on heat diffusion away from the interface. Unambiguous correlation between measured signal and thermal diffusivity is shown, theoretically and experimentally, from which calibration curves are obtained. Being simpler and less sensitive to vibrations and misalignments, the technique offers definite advantages over standard two-beam (pump-probe) methods.

  8. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  9. Dopant diffusion in tungsten silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, P.; Hsieh, N.; Geipel, H.J. Jr.; Slusser, G.J.

    1982-04-01

    The dopant (B, P, and As) redistribution in a silicide on polycrystalline silicon structure after annealing at 800 and 1000 /sup 0/C was studied. The distribution of boron was found to be quite different from these of phosphorus and arsenic. At 1000 /sup 0/C, the distribution coefficient for boron at the WSi/sub 2//polycrystalline silicon interface was found to be 2.7. The solubilities of phosphorus and arsenic in WSi/sub 2/ at 1000 /sup 0/C were estimated to be 6 x 10/sup 19/ and 1.6 x 10/sup 19/ atoms/cm/sup 3/, respectively. At 800 /sup 0/C, the diffusion coefficient for the dopants was found to be equal to, or greater than 3.3 x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2//s, which is at least three orders of magnitude larger than in silicon.

  10. Word Diffusion and Climate Science

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Garnett, Philip; O'Brien, Michael J.; Brock, William A.

    2012-01-01

    As public and political debates often demonstrate, a substantial disjoint can exist between the findings of science and the impact it has on the public. Using climate-change science as a case example, we reconsider the role of scientists in the information-dissemination process, our hypothesis being that important keywords used in climate science follow “boom and bust” fashion cycles in public usage. Representing this public usage through extraordinary new data on word frequencies in books published up to the year 2008, we show that a classic two-parameter social-diffusion model closely fits the comings and goings of many keywords over generational or longer time scales. We suggest that the fashions of word usage contributes an empirical, possibly regular, correlate to the impact of climate science on society. PMID:23144839

  11. Diffuse Malignant Mesothelioma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rom, William N.; Lockey, James E.

    1982-01-01

    Diffuse malignant mesothelioma is a signal tumor of asbestos exposure. Mesothelioma incidence has been steadily rising during the past two decades, reflecting the increases in asbestos use during and following World War II. The onset of the disease follows exposure by 25 to 40 years. The dose-response relationship appears to be much lower than that for asbestosis or lung cancer—it is not known whether current levels of exposure will entail a risk for disease 30 years hence. There is no synergistic or additive interaction with smoking for this tumor. Current knowledge indicates that pleural plaques, per se, do not increase the risk for this tumor beyond that of the previous asbestos exposure alone. Durable fibers with high aspect ratios, especially amphiboles, are associated with experimental tumor induction. Treatment modalities including surgical procedures and chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-azacytidine offer prospects for palliation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:6761970

  12. Spectrum of fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Padilla, Maria L

    2009-02-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by inflammation and/or fibrosis of the pulmonary interstitium. In 2002, the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society revised the classification of interstitial lung diseases and introduced the term diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are a subtype of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are subdivided into usual interstitial pneumonia (with its clinical counterpart idiopathic interstitial pneumonia), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease, and lymphocytic pneumonia. Sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis are the 2 most common granulomatous diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis/polymyositis (causing antisynthetase syndrome) are diffuse parenchymal lung diseases of known association because these conditions are associated with connective tissue disease. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare genetic diffuse parenchymal lung disease characterized by the clinical triad of pulmonary disease, oculocutaneous albinism, and bleeding diathesis. This review provides an overview of the chronic fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Its primary objective is to illuminate the clinical challenges encountered by clinicians who manage the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases regularly and to offer potential solutions to those challenges. Treatment for the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases is limited, and for many patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation remains the best option. Although much has been learned about the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases during the past decade, research in these diseases is urgently needed.

  13. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schoech, Armin P; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  14. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  15. Phase diffusion in a chaotic pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.A.; Gro/nbech-Jensen, N.

    1996-04-01

    The rate of expansion of the phase coordinate for a harmonically driven pendulum is considered. The mean-squared displacement is found to grow as a linear function of time during chaotic motion, indicating deterministic diffusion. The diffusion coefficient can be significantly influenced by the proximity of a window containing a periodic solution. We find that diffusion associated with intermittent chaos can be described in terms of an interleaving of the diffusion properties of the separate modes taking part in the intermittency. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Wanted: Scalable Tracers for Diffusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scalable tracers are potentially a useful tool to examine diffusion mechanisms and to predict diffusion coefficients, particularly for hindered diffusion in complex, heterogeneous, or crowded systems. Scalable tracers are defined as a series of tracers varying in size but with the same shape, structure, surface chemistry, deformability, and diffusion mechanism. Both chemical homology and constant dynamics are required. In particular, branching must not vary with size, and there must be no transition between ordinary diffusion and reptation. Measurements using scalable tracers yield the mean diffusion coefficient as a function of size alone; measurements using nonscalable tracers yield the variation due to differences in the other properties. Candidate scalable tracers are discussed for two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in membranes and three-dimensional diffusion in aqueous solutions. Correlations to predict the mean diffusion coefficient of globular biomolecules from molecular mass are reviewed briefly. Specific suggestions for the 3D case include the use of synthetic dendrimers or random hyperbranched polymers instead of dextran and the use of core–shell quantum dots. Another useful tool would be a series of scalable tracers varying in deformability alone, prepared by varying the density of crosslinking in a polymer to make say “reinforced Ficoll” or “reinforced hyperbranched polyglycerol.” PMID:25319586

  17. ON A NONHOMOGENEOUS RANDOM DIFFUSION EQUATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CORRELATION TECHNIQUES, FUNCTIONS(MATHEMATICS)), (*STOCHASTIC PROCESSES, EQUATIONS), STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, PROBABILITY, HILBERT SPACE, GREEN’S FUNCTION, SERIES(MATHEMATICS), ALLOYS, DIFFUSION , INTEGRALS

  18. Wanted: scalable tracers for diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Michael J

    2014-11-13

    Scalable tracers are potentially a useful tool to examine diffusion mechanisms and to predict diffusion coefficients, particularly for hindered diffusion in complex, heterogeneous, or crowded systems. Scalable tracers are defined as a series of tracers varying in size but with the same shape, structure, surface chemistry, deformability, and diffusion mechanism. Both chemical homology and constant dynamics are required. In particular, branching must not vary with size, and there must be no transition between ordinary diffusion and reptation. Measurements using scalable tracers yield the mean diffusion coefficient as a function of size alone; measurements using nonscalable tracers yield the variation due to differences in the other properties. Candidate scalable tracers are discussed for two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in membranes and three-dimensional diffusion in aqueous solutions. Correlations to predict the mean diffusion coefficient of globular biomolecules from molecular mass are reviewed briefly. Specific suggestions for the 3D case include the use of synthetic dendrimers or random hyperbranched polymers instead of dextran and the use of core-shell quantum dots. Another useful tool would be a series of scalable tracers varying in deformability alone, prepared by varying the density of crosslinking in a polymer to make say "reinforced Ficoll" or "reinforced hyperbranched polyglycerol."

  19. Diffusion coefficients in leaflets of bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Mogre, Saurabh; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    We study diffusion coefficients of liquid domains by explicitly taking into account the two-layered structure called leaflets of the bilayer membrane. In general, the velocity fields associated with each leaflet are different and the layers sliding past each other cause frictional coupling. We obtain analytical results of diffusion coefficients for a circular liquid domain in a leaflet, and quantitatively study their dependence on the interleaflet friction. We also show that the diffusion coefficients diverge in the absence of coupling between the bilayer and solvents, even when the interleaflet friction is taken into account. In order to corroborate our theory, the effect of the interleaflet friction on the correlated diffusion is examined.

  20. Mechanism for diffusion induced grain boundary migration

    SciTech Connect

    Balluffi, R.W.; Cahn, J.W.

    1980-08-01

    Grain boundaries are found to migrate under certain conditions when solute atoms are diffused along them. This phenomenon, termed diffusion induced grain boundary migration (DIGM), has now been found in six systems. The observed phenomenon and empirical data are used to discard certain concepts for the driving force and the mechanism. A mechanism is proposed in which differences in the diffusion coefficients of the diffusing species along the grain boundary cause a self-sustaining climb of grain boundary dislocations and motion of their associated grain boundary steps.

  1. Diffusion of glycophorin A in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Giger, Katie; Habib, Ibrahim; Ritchie, Ken; Low, Philip S

    2016-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that glycophorin A (GPA) interacts with band 3 in human erythrocyte membranes including: i) the existence of an epitope shared between band 3 and GPA in the Wright b blood group antigen, ii) the fact that antibodies to GPA inhibit the diffusion of band 3, iii) the observation that expression of GPA facilitates trafficking of band 3 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, and iv) the observation that GPA is diminished in band 3 null erythrocytes. Surprisingly, there is also evidence that GPA does not interact with band 3, including data showing that: i) band 3 diffusion increases upon erythrocyte deoxygenation whereas GPA diffusion does not, ii) band 3 diffusion is greatly restricted in erythrocytes containing the Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis mutation whereas GPA diffusion is not, and iii) most anti-GPA or anti-band 3 antibodies do not co-immunoprecipitate both proteins. To try to resolve these apparently conflicting observations, we have selectively labeled band 3 and GPA with fluorescent quantum dots in intact erythrocytes and followed their diffusion by single particle tracking. We report here that band 3 and GPA display somewhat similar macroscopic and microscopic diffusion coefficients in unmodified cells, however perturbations of band 3 diffusion do not cause perturbations of GPA diffusion. Taken together the collective data to date suggest that while weak interactions between GPA and band 3 undoubtedly exist, GPA and band 3 must have separate interactions in the membrane that control their lateral mobility.

  2. Pb-Zn liquid metal diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B., Sr.; Winter, J. M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Lead-Zinc binary equilibrium system is currently being investigated. Ground based studies of this system were performed to examine the possibility of obtaining a couple which, after diffusion, could be examined continuously along the diffusion axis by quantitative metallography to determine the extent of diffusion. The specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscope to provide exact information on the chemical composition gradient. Two diffusion experiments were run simultaneously in the multipurpose furnace, each in its own isothermal cavity. Two flight samples, two flight backup samples, and two flight space samples were generated.

  3. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng‐Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. Materials and Methods A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co‐electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. Results The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4‐month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10‐4 mm2/s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet‐normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. Conclusion A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:594–600. PMID:26213152

  4. Rare earth element diffusion in natural enstatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Liang, Yan

    2007-03-01

    Chemical diffusion coefficients of La, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Yb in natural enstatite have been measured at 850-1250 °C and 1 atm. Anhydrous diffusion experiments were run in Pt capsules in air, or in sealed silica glass capsules under an iron-wüstite (IW) solid buffer. The sources of diffusant were pre-reacted mixtures of synthetic enstatite powder and microcrystalline rare-earth aluminate garnet. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to measure diffusion profiles. For Gd diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1250 °C, the following Arrhenius relation is found for diffusion normal to (210): D=2.55×10-9exp(321±85mol /RT)ms-1. There is no significant difference between Gd diffusion in air and under IW-buffered conditions. Behavior similar to Gd is also noted for Nd. The Arrhenius relationship for Eu diffusion in enstatite, normal to (210) and at 850-1150 °C and IW-buffered conditions, is D=6.93×10-6exp(-384±29mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1200 °C for the same orientation, the following Arrhenius relation is found: D=1.70×10-8exp(-350±42mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions and for experiments run in air, diffusivities normal to (001) are similar to those for diffusion normal to (210). Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions is more than an order of magnitude faster than Eu diffusion in air. It is likely that majority of Eu is in the divalent state for diffusion under IW-buffered conditions, but Eu is in the trivalent state for diffusion in air. In the case of Nd and Gd, where valence state does not change under the investigated fO 2 conditions, diffusivities measured for experiments run both in air and under IW-buffered conditions are comparable to those obtained for trivalent Eu. Further, measurements of La, Nd, Eu +3, Gd, and Yb diffusion suggest that diffusion of trivalent REE in enstatite is not sensitive to ionic size, in contrast to that observed for REE diffusion in

  5. Theoretical comparison of the self diffusion and mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B A; Abney, J R; Owicki, J C

    1988-01-01

    Self diffusion and mutual diffusion in two-dimensional membrane systems are analyzed. It is shown that interprotein interactions can produce markedly different density-dependent changes in the diffusion coefficients describing these two processes; the qualitative differences are illustrated by using a theoretical formalism valid for dilute solutions. Results are obtained for three analytical potentials: hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions. Self diffusion is inhibited by all three interactions. In contrast, mutual diffusion is inhibited by attractions but is enhanced by repulsions. It is shown that such interaction-dependent differences in self diffusion and mutual diffusion could underlie, among other things, the disparity in protein diffusion coefficients extracted from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and postelectrophoresis relaxation data. PMID:3413121

  6. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  7. Neoclassical diffusion in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yushmanov, P. . Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-11-01

    This work describes a new approach to plasma transport where the toroidal drift motion is considered as a perturbation to the fluctuating velocity. Percolation theory is used to determine the scaling of the diffusion coefficient. Several neoclassical phenomena should persist even when diffusion is enhanced from neoclassical predictions. Numerical simulation results support the theoretical scaling arguments.

  8. Diffusion of Super-Gaussian Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, C.-J.; Anderson, D.; Desaix, M.; Johannisson, P.; Lisak, M.

    2007-01-01

    The present analysis describes an analytically simple and systematic approximation procedure for modelling the free diffusive spreading of initially super-Gaussian profiles. The approach is based on a self-similar ansatz for the evolution of the diffusion profile, and the parameter functions involved in the modelling are determined by suitable…

  9. Diffusion of Salt in Tap Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A simple experiment is described to measure the diffusion coefficient of a solute in a fluid. Laboratory-made floats are used to monitor the density changes associated with diffusion behavior. The experiment is ideally suited for undergraduate project work. (BB)

  10. Diffusion and scattering in multifractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Waston, B.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes investigations of radiative properties of multifractal clouds using two different approaches. In the first, diffusion is considered by examining the scaling properties of one dimensional random walks on media with multifractal diffusivities. The second approach considers the scattering statistics associated with radiative transport.

  11. DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 754

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.in

    2009-07-10

    We present a low-frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present a new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and discuss the detection of four diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330, and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upper limits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, {alpha}>2 (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}), for the new feature. The 'west relic' detected at 74 MHz is not detected at 150 MHz and is thus consistent with its nondetection at 1363 MHz and 330 MHz. Integrated spectra of all the diffuse features are presented. The fourth diffuse feature is located along the proposed merger axis in A754 and 0.7 Mpc away from the peak of X-ray emission; we refer to it as a relic. We have made use of the framework of the adiabatic compression model to obtain spectra. We show that the spectrum of the fourth diffuse feature is consistent with that of a cocoon of a radio galaxy lurking for about 9 x 10{sup 7} yr; no shock compression is required. The other three diffuse emission have spectra steeper than 1.5 and could be cocoons lurking for longer time. We discuss other possibilities such as shocks and turbulent reacceleration being responsible for the diffuse emission in A754.

  12. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  13. The fast diffusion of Au IN Pb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Ko, C.; Brotzen, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A treatment of the phenomenon of fast diffusion in lead is presented. The model used is based upon the fast diffusion of free solute interstitials. The very large negative enhancement coefficients found in the Pb-(Au, Ag) systems is explained by the formation of first and second order clusters of vacancies and substitutional solute atoms.

  14. Particle Diffusion in an Inhomogeneous Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an elementary introduction to particle diffusion in a medium where the coefficient of diffusion varies with position. The introduction is aimed at third-year university courses. We start from a simple model of particles hopping on a discrete lattice, in one or more dimensions, and then take the continuous-space limit so as to obtain…

  15. Isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labolle, Eric M.; Fogg, Graham E.; Eweis, Juana B.; Gravner, Janko; Leaist, Derek G.

    2008-07-01

    During the last decade, isotopic fractionation has gained acceptance as an indicator of microbiological and chemical transformations of contaminants in groundwater. These transformation processes typically favor isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, contaminants, resulting in enrichment of the latter in the residual aqueous phase. In these isotope applications, it has been generally presumed that physical transport processes in groundwater have a negligible effect on isotopic enrichment. It is well known, however, that aqueous phase diffusion generally proceeds faster for isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, solute molecules, often resulting in isotopic fractionation in groundwater. This paper considers the potential for isotopic fractionation during transport in groundwater resulting from minute isotopic effects on aqueous diffusion coefficients. Analyses of transport in heterogeneous systems delimit the viable range of isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater. Results show that diffusion can result in similar degrees of depletion and enrichment of isotopically heavy solutes during transport in heterogeneous systems with significant diffusion rate-limited mass transfer between fast- and slow-flow zones. Additional analyses and examples explore conditions that attenuate the development of significant fractionation. Examples are presented for 13C methyl tertiary butyl ether and deuterated and nondeuterated isopropanol and tertiary butyl alcohol using aqueous diffusion coefficients measured by the Taylor dispersion method with refractive index profiling as a part of this study. Examples elucidate the potential for diffusive fractionation as a confounder in isotope applications and emphasize the importance of hydrogeologic analysis for assessing the role of diffusive fractionation in isotope applications at contaminant field sites.

  16. THEORY OF DIFFUSION IN ORDERING ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    interstitial atoms through the interstices Diffusion of interstitial atoms in alloys with a body - centered cubic lattice Diffusion of...sites of the alloy The case of an alloy with body - centered cubic lattic structure The case of an alloy with a face-centered cubic lattic

  17. The Diffusion of Antimony of Alpha Iron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Diffusion coefficients of antimony in alpha iron were determined in the temperature range 700 to 900C using the residual activity method. Specimens...negligible effect on the diffusion of antomony in alpha iron . These results are discussed in relation to the phenomenon of temper brittleness in steels

  18. Laser Speckle from Thin and Cascaded Diffusers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    24. N. G. Gaggioli and M. L. Roblin, "Etudes des etats de surface par les properties de diffusion a l’infini en lumiere transmise," Opt. Commun. 32...N. G. Gaggioli and M. L. Roblin, "Etudes des etats de surface par les properties de diffusion a l’infini en lumiere transmise," Opt. Commun. 32, 209

  19. Fluid dynamics of double diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koseff, J.R.

    1989-04-07

    A study of mixing processes in doubly diffusive systems is being conducted. Continuous gradients of two diffusing components (heat and salinity in our case) are being used as initial conditions, and forcing is introduced by lateral heating and surface shear. The goals of the proposed work include: (1) quantification of the effects of finite amplitude disturbances on stable, double diffusive systems, particularly with respect to lateral heating, (2) development of an improved understanding of the physical phenomena present in wind-driven shear flows in double diffusive stratified environments, (3) increasing our knowledge-base on turbulent flow in stratified environments and how to represent it, and (4) formulation of a numerical code for such flows. The work is being carried out in an experimental facility which is located in the Stanford Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, and on laboratory minicomputers and CRAY computers. In particular we are focusing on the following key issues: (1) the formation and propagation of double diffusive intrusions away from a heated wall and the effects of lateral heating on the double diffusive system; (2) the interaction between the double diffusively influenced fluxes and the turbulence induced fluxes; (3) the measurement of heat and mass fluxes; and (4) the influence of double diffusive gradients on mixed layer deepening. 1 fig.

  20. Diffusion of triglycine sulfate in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, R. L.; Reiss, D.; Silberman, E.; Morgan, S.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of triglycine sulfate (TGS) in water was measured for several concentrations over a temperature range of 25 to 55 C. The activation energy for diffusion obtained from these measurements was 4180 cal/mol. No concentration dependence was seen. The maximum difference in D for the various ionic species present was determined by Raman spectroscopy to be about 5 percent.

  1. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  2. Undergraduate Laboratory Module on Skin Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, James J.; Andrews, Samantha N.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    To introduce students to an application of chemical engineering directly related to human health, we developed an experiment for the unit operations laboratory at Georgia Tech examining diffusion across cadaver skin in the context of transdermal drug delivery. In this laboratory module, students prepare mouse skin samples, set up diffusion cells…

  3. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  4. Amyloidosis: diffuse involvement of the retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Glynn, T P; Kreipke, D L; Irons, J M

    1989-03-01

    Systemic amyloidosis diffusely involving the retroperitoneum has not, to the authors' knowledge, been previously reported. The computed tomographic scans of a 68-year-old man showed evidence of diffuse, nonenhancing thickening of the entire retroperitoneum. This appearance mimicked retroperitoneal fibrosis, but the diagnosis of amyloidosis was confirmed at autopsy.

  5. Diffusion of uranium in compacted sodium bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Muurinen, A.; Ollila, K.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1993-12-31

    In this study the diffusion of uranium dissolved from uranium oxide fuel was studied experimentally in compacted sodium bentonite (Wyoming bentonite MX-80). The parameters varied in the study were the density of bentonite, the salt content of the solution and the redox conditions. In the studies with non-saline water of total dissolved solids about 300 ppm, uranium was both in aerobic and anaerobic experiments as anionic complexes and followed the anionic diffusion mechanism. Anion exclusion decreased effective diffusion coefficients, especially in more dense samples. In the studies with saline water of total dissolves solids about 35000 ppm, uranium appeared in the aerobic experiments probably as cationic complexes and followed the cationic diffusion mechanism. Uranium in the saline, anaerobic experiment was probably U(OH){sub 4} and followed the diffusion mechanism of neutral species.

  6. Diffusion of Charged Species in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, J. A.; Whitaker, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this study the laws of mechanics for multi-component systems are used to develop a theory for the diffusion of ions in the presence of an electrostatic field. The analysis begins with the governing equation for the species velocity and it leads to the governing equation for the species diffusion velocity. Simplification of this latter result provides a momentum equation containing three dominant forces: (a) the gradient of the partial pressure, (b) the electrostatic force, and (c) the diffusive drag force that is a central feature of the Maxwell-Stefan equations. For ideal gas mixtures we derive the classic Nernst-Planck equation. For liquid-phase diffusion we encounter a situation in which the Nernst-Planck contribution to diffusion differs by several orders of magnitude from that obtained for ideal gases.

  7. Search for selective ion diffusion through membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rates of several ions through some membranes developed as battery separators were measured. The ions investigated were Li(+), Rb(+), Cl(-), and So4. The members were crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol, crosslinked polyacrylic acid, a copolymer of the two, crosslinked calcium polyacrylate, cellulose, and several microporous polyphenylene oxide based films. No true specificity for diffusion of any of these ions was found for any of the membranes. But the calcium polyacrylate membrane was found to exhibit ion exchange with the diffusing ions giving rise to the leaching of the calcium ion and low reproducibility. These findings contrast earlier work where the calcium polyacrylate membrane did show specificity to the diffusion of the copper ion. In general, Fick's law appeared to be obeyed. Except for the microporous membranes, the coefficients for ion diffusion through the membranes were comparable with their values in water. For the microporous membranes, the values found for the coefficients were much less, due to the tortuosity of the micropores.

  8. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  9. Preliminary report on the diffusion of solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Orstrand, C. E.; Dewey, F.P.

    1916-01-01

    Although 19 years has elapsed since Roberts-Austen published his classical paper on the diffusion of solid metals, no attempt seems to have been made to verify his important results and conclusions or to extend the investigations to minerals and to the great number of solids in which diffusion may be expected to occur. Progress has been made by means of chemical and electrical methods in the detection of diffusion in a number of metals in the solid state, some progress has been made in explaining the phenomena of diffusion on the basis of osmotic pressure and the kinetic theory, and recent measurements of the vapor pressures of solids have contributed indirectly to the progress of the science, but investigators have not undertaken the difficult and essential task of making definitive determinations of the coefficients of diffusivity at various pressures and temperatures.

  10. Diffusion of Charged Species in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Del Río, J A; Whitaker, S

    2016-11-04

    In this study the laws of mechanics for multi-component systems are used to develop a theory for the diffusion of ions in the presence of an electrostatic field. The analysis begins with the governing equation for the species velocity and it leads to the governing equation for the species diffusion velocity. Simplification of this latter result provides a momentum equation containing three dominant forces: (a) the gradient of the partial pressure, (b) the electrostatic force, and (c) the diffusive drag force that is a central feature of the Maxwell-Stefan equations. For ideal gas mixtures we derive the classic Nernst-Planck equation. For liquid-phase diffusion we encounter a situation in which the Nernst-Planck contribution to diffusion differs by several orders of magnitude from that obtained for ideal gases.

  11. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  12. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Poolman, Bert

    2011-02-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The extremely high macromolecule crowding of prokaryotes is used to rationalize the reported lower diffusion coefficients as compared to eukaryotes, and we speculate on the nature of the barriers for diffusion observed for proteins (and mRNAs) in vivo. Building on in vitro experiments and modeling studies, we evaluate the size dependence of diffusion coefficients for macromolecules in vivo, in case of both water-soluble and integral membrane proteins. We comment on the possibilities of anomalous diffusion and provide examples where the macromolecule mobility may be limiting biological processes.

  13. Diffusion of dextran inside microtubule sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Camelia

    2005-03-01

    Microtubules (Mts) are the bones of the cell. Their exterior has been extensively studied but little is known about their interior. We have studied the diffusion of fluorescein labeled dextran in the presence of GDP Mts and taxol stabilized GDP Mts. The diffusion coefficient, D, of different size dextran (10 kD, 40 kD, 70 kD, 500 kD) was measured using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). If dextran was present during the assembling of Mts, D was smaller then free diffusion coefficient. When dextran was added after the assembling, D was the same as the free diffusion coefficient. For taxol stabilized Mts (0.90 fill ratio), D was also found the same as the free diffusion coefficient .

  14. Damage characterization in concrete using diffuse ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Niederleithinger, Ernst

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse ultrasonic measurements were used to characterize the state of stress-induced damage (volumetric microcracking) in concrete specimens. The test specimens were subjected to cycles of stepwise uniaxial compression. At each step, the loading (stress- or strain-controlled) was held constant and a series of ultrasonic measurements parallel and perpendicular to the loading were obtained. Unusually long signals were recorded, so that the diffuse ultrasonic regime tailing the coherent field could be studied. In the diffuse regime, the measured ultrasonic response is a superposition of reflections from scatters within concrete and thus, very sensitive to the changes in concrete microstructure. Using Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), the evolution of diffuse velocity with the increasing load was monitored. The rate of change in the diffusion velocities was shown to be a good indication of the state of (low to medium intensity) damage in concrete.

  15. Tactile perception of thermal diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Tiest, Wouter M Bergmann; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2009-04-01

    The thermal diffusivity of an object is a parameter that controls the rate at which heat is extracted from the hand when it touches that object. It is an important feature for distinguishing materials by means of touch. In order to quantitatively describe the ability of human observers to discriminate between materials on the basis of heat extraction rate, we conducted an experiment in which this heat extraction was performed in a controlled way. In different conditions, subjects were repeatedly asked to select from two stimuli the one that cooled faster. The discrimination threshold was around 43% of the extraction rate. A rate that was twice as slow also yielded twice the absolute threshold. When we halved the temperature difference between the beginning and end of the stimulus, the threshold did not change as much. In separate experiments, we investigated the different cues that were available in the stimulus: initial cooling rate and end temperature. Both cues were used for discrimination, but cooling rate seemed to be the most important.

  16. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  17. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  18. The Diffuse Extreme Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John; Slavin, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse EUV background towards 138 different directions using the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) have been combined into a spectrum from 150A to 730A and represent an effective exposure of 18 million seconds. There is no significant evidence of any non-local line flux in the resultant spectrum such as that from a hot coronal plasma. These results are inconsistent with the Wisconsin C and B broad-band surveys assuming the source is a logT = 5.8 - 6.1 hot plasma in ionization equilibrium with solar abundances, confirming the previous result of Jelinksy, Vallerga and Edelstein) (hereafter Paper 1) using an observation along the ecliptic with the same instrument. To make these results consistent with the previous broad-band surveys, the plasma responsible for the emission must either be depleted in Fe by a factor of approximately 6, be behind an absorbing slab of neutral H with a column of 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, or not be in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE). One such non-CIE model (Breitswerdt and Schmutzier) that explains the soft x-ray results is also inconsistent with this EUV data.

  19. Turbulent resistivity, diffusion and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; Kennel, C. F.; Mackenzie, K.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kindel, J. M.; Stenzel, R.; Taylor, R. J.; White, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Bernstein, W.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are reported on ion acoustic and ion cyclotron turbulence and their roles in anomalous resistivity, viscosity, diffusion and heating and in the structure of collisionless electrostatic shocks. Resistance due to ion acoustic turbulence has been observed in experiments with a streaming cesium plasma in which electron current, potential rise due to turbulent resistivity, spectrum of unstable ion acoustic waves, and associated electron heating were all measured directly. Kinetic theory calculations for an expanding, unstable plasma, give results in agreement with the experiment. In a strong magnetic field, with T sub e/T sub i approximately 1 and current densities typical for present Tokomaks, the plasma is stable to ion acoustic but unstable to current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves. Relevant characteristics of these waves are calculated and it is shown that for ion, beta greater than m sub e/m sub i, the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave has a lower instability threshold than the electrostatic one. However, when ion acoustic turbulence is present experiments with double plasma devices show rapid anomalous heating of an ion beam streaming through a plasma.

  20. Thermal diffusivity of some crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity data at room temperature and uniaxial pressure of 1 MPa are reported for five sets of crystalline rocks - granite, granodiorite, gabbro, basalt and gneiss. Diffusivity ranges between approximately 0.6 and 1.9 mm/sup 2//s, the lower end of the range being appropriate for basic rocks and the upper end for quartz-bearing acidic rocks. The scatter in diffusivity for each data set is significantly more than that of thermal conductivity, because the diffusivity of water is typically less than 10% of the diffusivity of most common minerals, whereas water conductivity is 25 - 30% of the conductivity of the minerals. For a sample set of uniform mineralogy in which porosity varies, a greater variation of diffusivity than of conductivity is therefore expected. For three of the sets sufficient mineralogical data were available to permit the assessment of methods of estimating thermal diffusivity from mineral content. All models tested yielded higher mean values of diffusivity than the means of the measured values. No model was found to be able to predict diffusivity to better than approximately 20%, but if that accuracy is sufficient, a simple geometrical model, for which only quartz content must be known, is adequate. The diffusivity data have been combined with measurements of thermal conductivity and density to provide estimates of specific heat. These all tend to be higher than those reported in the literature. For some rocks, such as the basalts, this can be explained in terms of relatively high water content and the very high specific heat of water compared with that of most common minerals. For the granites and granodiorites, the new specific heat data redefine the previously published means and ranges, by increasing the data base by approximately an order of magnitude.

  1. Sentinel-2 diffuser on-ground calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazy, E.; Camus, F.; Chorvalli, V.; Domken, I.; Laborie, A.; Marcotte, S.; Stockman, Y.

    2013-10-01

    The Sentinel-2 multi-spectral instrument (MSI) will provide Earth imagery in the frame of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative which is a joint undertaking of the European Commission and the Agency. MSI instrument, under Astrium SAS responsibility, is a push-broom spectro imager in 13 spectral channels in VNIR and SWIR. The instrument radiometric calibration is based on in-flight calibration with sunlight through a quasi Lambertian diffuser. The diffuser covers the full pupil and the full field of view of the instrument. The on-ground calibration of the diffuser BRDF is mandatory to fulfil the in-flight performances. The diffuser is a 779 x 278 mm2 rectangular flat area in Zenith-A material. It is mounted on a motorised door in front of the instrument optical system entrance. The diffuser manufacturing and calibration is under the Centre Spatial of Liege (CSL) responsibility. The CSL has designed and built a completely remote controlled BRDF test bench able to handle large diffusers in their mount. As the diffuser is calibrated directly in its mount with respect to a reference cube, the error budget is significantly improved. The BRDF calibration is performed directly in MSI instrument spectral bands by using dedicated band-pass filters (VNIR and SWIR up to 2200 nm). Absolute accuracy is better than 0.5% in VNIR spectral bands and 1% in SWIR spectral bands. Performances were cross checked with other laboratories. The first MSI diffuser for flight model was calibrated mid 2013 on CSL BRDF measurement bench. The calibration of the diffuser consists mainly in thermal vacuum cycles, BRDF uniformity characterisation and BRDF angular characterisation. The total amount of measurement for the first flight model diffuser corresponds to more than 17500 BRDF acquisitions. Performance results are discussed in comparison with requirements.

  2. Effects of Diffusive Property Heterogeneity on Effective MatrixDiffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Liu, Hui-hai; Zhou, Quanlin; Finsterle, Stefan

    2005-08-16

    Heterogeneities of diffusion properties are likely toinfluence the effective matrix diffusion coefficient determined fromtracer breakthrough curves. The objectives of this study are (1) toexamine if it is appropriate to use a single, effective matrix diffusioncoefficient to predict breakthrough curves in a fractured formation, (2)to examine if a postulated scale dependence of the effective matrixdiffusion coefficient is caused by heterogeneity in diffusion properties,and (3) to examine whether multirate diffusion results in the previouslyobserved time dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient.The results show that the use of a single effective matrix diffusioncoefficient is appropriate only if the interchannel and intrachannelvariability of diffusion properties is small. The scale dependence of theeffective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused by the studied typesof heterogeneity. Finally, the multirate diffusion process does notresult in the time dependence of the effective matrix diffusioncoefficient. oefficient is appropriate only if the inter- andintrachannel variability of diffusion properties is small. The scaledependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused byeither type of the studied heterogeneity. Finally, the multi-ratediffusion process does not result in the time dependence of the effectivematrix diffusion coefficient.

  3. Numerical evaluation of lateral diffusion inside diffusive gradients in thin films samplers.

    PubMed

    Santner, Jakob; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Schnepf, Andrea; Wenzel, Walter W

    2015-05-19

    Using numerical simulation of diffusion inside diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) samplers, we show that the effect of lateral diffusion inside the sampler on the solute flux into the sampler is a nonlinear function of the diffusion layer thickness and the physical sampling window size. In contrast, earlier work concluded that this effect was constant irrespective of parameters of the sampler geometry. The flux increase caused by lateral diffusion inside the sampler was determined to be ∼8.8% for standard samplers, which is considerably lower than the previous estimate of ∼20%. Lateral diffusion is also propagated to the diffusive boundary layer (DBL), where it leads to a slightly stronger decrease in the mass uptake than suggested by the common 1D diffusion model that is applied for evaluating DGT results. We introduce a simple correction procedure for lateral diffusion and demonstrate how the effect of lateral diffusion on diffusion in the DBL can be accounted for. These corrections often result in better estimates of the DBL thickness (δ) and the DGT-measured concentration than earlier approaches and will contribute to more accurate concentration measurements in solute monitoring in waters.

  4. Numerical Evaluation of Lateral Diffusion Inside Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using numerical simulation of diffusion inside diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) samplers, we show that the effect of lateral diffusion inside the sampler on the solute flux into the sampler is a nonlinear function of the diffusion layer thickness and the physical sampling window size. In contrast, earlier work concluded that this effect was constant irrespective of parameters of the sampler geometry. The flux increase caused by lateral diffusion inside the sampler was determined to be ∼8.8% for standard samplers, which is considerably lower than the previous estimate of ∼20%. Lateral diffusion is also propagated to the diffusive boundary layer (DBL), where it leads to a slightly stronger decrease in the mass uptake than suggested by the common 1D diffusion model that is applied for evaluating DGT results. We introduce a simple correction procedure for lateral diffusion and demonstrate how the effect of lateral diffusion on diffusion in the DBL can be accounted for. These corrections often result in better estimates of the DBL thickness (δ) and the DGT-measured concentration than earlier approaches and will contribute to more accurate concentration measurements in solute monitoring in waters. PMID:25877251

  5. Measurement tensors in diffusion MRI: generalizing the concept of diffusion encoding.

    PubMed

    Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Pasternak, Ofer; Ozarslan, Evren; Topgaard, Daniel; Knutsson, Hans; Nilsson, Markus

    2014-01-01

    In traditional diffusion MRI, short pulsed field gradients (PFG) are used for the diffusion encoding. The standard Stejskal-Tanner sequence uses one single pair of such gradients, known as single-PFG (sPFG). In this work we describe how trajectories in q-space can be used for diffusion encoding. We discuss how such encoding enables the extension of the well-known scalar b-value to a tensor-valued entity we call the diffusion measurement tensor. The new measurements contain information about higher order diffusion propagator covariances not present in sPFG. As an example analysis, we use this new information to estimate a Gaussian distribution over diffusion tensors in each voxel, described by its mean (a diffusion tensor) and its covariance (a 4th order tensor).

  6. Interests diffusion in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Gregorio; D'Antonio, Fulvio; De Nicola, Antonio; Tucci, Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    We provide a model for diffusion of interests in Social Networks (SNs). We demonstrate that the topology of the SN plays a crucial role in the dynamics of the individual interests. Understanding cultural phenomena on SNs and exploiting the implicit knowledge about their members is attracting the interest of different research communities both from the academic and the business side. The community of complexity science is devoting significant efforts to define laws, models, and theories, which, based on acquired knowledge, are able to predict future observations (e.g. success of a product). In the mean time, the semantic web community aims at engineering a new generation of advanced services by defining constructs, models and methods, adding a semantic layer to SNs. In this context, a leapfrog is expected to come from a hybrid approach merging the disciplines above. Along this line, this work focuses on the propagation of individual interests in social networks. The proposed framework consists of the following main components: a method to gather information about the members of the social networks; methods to perform some semantic analysis of the Domain of Interest; a procedure to infer members' interests; and an interests evolution theory to predict how the interests propagate in the network. As a result, one achieves an analytic tool to measure individual features, such as members' susceptibilities and authorities. Although the approach applies to any type of social network, here it is has been tested against the computer science research community. The DBLP (Digital Bibliography and Library Project) database has been elected as test-case since it provides the most comprehensive list of scientific production in this field.

  7. Image-based color ink diffusion rendering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Ren-Jie

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an image-based painterly rendering algorithm for automatically synthesizing an image with color ink diffusion. We suggest a mathematical model with a physical base to simulate the phenomenon of color colloidal ink diffusing into absorbent paper. Our algorithm contains three main parts: a feature extraction phase, a Kubelka-Munk (KM) color mixing phase, and a color ink diffusion synthesis phase. In the feature extraction phase, the information of the reference image is simplified by luminance division and color segmentation. In the color mixing phase, the KM theory is employed to approximate the result when one pigment is painted upon another pigment layer. Then, in the color ink diffusion synthesis phase, the physically-based model that we propose is employed to simulate the result of color ink diffusion in absorbent paper using a texture synthesis technique. Our image-based ink diffusing rendering (IBCIDR) algorithm eliminates the drawback of conventional Chinese ink simulations, which are limited to the black ink domain, and our approach demonstrates that, without using any strokes, a color image can be automatically converted to the diffused ink style with a visually pleasing appearance.

  8. MODIS Solar Diffuser Attenuation Screen Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xuong, Xiaoxiong; Guenther, Bruce; Barnes, William

    2004-01-01

    On-orbit calibration of the reflected solar bands on the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is accomplished by have the instrument view a high reflectance diffuse surface illuminated by the sun. For some of the spectral bands this proves to be much too bright a signal that results in the saturation of detectors designed for measuring low reflectance (ocean) surfaces signals. A mechanical attenuation device in the form of a pin hole screen is used to reduce the signals to calibrate these bands. The sensor response to solar illumination of the SD with and without the attenuation screen in place will be presented. The MODIS detector response to the solar diffuser is smooth when the attenuation screen is absent, but has structures up to a few percent when the attenuation screen is present. This structure corresponds to non-uniform illumination from the solar diffuser. Each pin hole produces a pin-hole image of the sun on the solar diffuser, and there are very many pin hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser for each MODIS detector. Even though there are very many pin-hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser, it is no longer perfectly uniformly illuminated. This non-uniformly illuminated solar diffuser produces intensity variation on the focal planes. The results of a very detailed simulation will be discussed which show how the illumination of the focal plane changes as a result of the attenuation, and the impacts on the calibration will be discussed.

  9. Diffusion MRI and its role in neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain’s white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition. PMID:26255305

  10. Diffusion MRI and its Role in Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain's white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition.

  11. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  12. Diffuse flow from hydrothermal vents. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Trivett, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    The effluent from a collection of diffuse hydrothermal vents was modelled to determine the fate of the source of flow under typical environmental conditions at seafloor spreading centers. A laboratory simulation was conducted to test an analytic model of diffuse plume rise. The results showed that diffuse plumes are likely to remain near the seafloor, with their maximum rise height scaled with the diameter of the source of diffuse flow. The entrainment of ambient seawater into these plumes is limited by the proximity to the seafloor, thus slowing the rate of dilution. The model of diffuse plume behaviour was used to guide the design and implementation of a scheme for monitoring the flow from diffuse hydrothermal vents in the ocean. A deployment of an array at the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge yielded measurements of a variety of diffuse plume properties, including total heat output. Two distinct sources of hydrothermal flow were detected during the field deployment. The larger source was 1-1.5km north of the instrument array, and its energy output was 450 + or - 270MW. A smaller source was located 100m east of one instrument in the array. The energy output of the source was 12 + or - 8MW. The rise heights of the centerlines of these plumes were 45m and 10m, respectively.

  13. MR diffusion tensor spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Basser, P J; Mattiello, J; LeBihan, D

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new NMR imaging modality--MR diffusion tensor imaging. It consists of estimating an effective diffusion tensor, Deff, within a voxel, and then displaying useful quantities derived from it. We show how the phenomenon of anisotropic diffusion of water (or metabolites) in anisotropic tissues, measured noninvasively by these NMR methods, is exploited to determine fiber tract orientation and mean particle displacements. Once Deff is estimated from a series of NMR pulsed-gradient, spin-echo experiments, a tissue's three orthotropic axes can be determined. They coincide with the eigenvectors of Deff, while the effective diffusivities along these orthotropic directions are the eigenvalues of Deff. Diffusion ellipsoids, constructed in each voxel from Deff, depict both these orthotropic axes and the mean diffusion distances in these directions. Moreover, the three scalar invariants of Deff, which are independent of the tissue's orientation in the laboratory frame of reference, reveal useful information about molecular mobility reflective of local microstructure and anatomy. Inherently tensors (like Deff) describing transport processes in anisotropic media contain new information within a macroscopic voxel that scalars (such as the apparent diffusivity, proton density, T1, and T2) do not. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8130344

  14. A3 Subscale Diffuser Test Article Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, G. P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of the design of the A3 Subscale Diffuser Test (SDT) Article Design. The subscale diffuser is a geometrically accurate scale model of the A3 altitude rocket facility. It was designed and built to support the SDT risk mitigation project located at the E3 facility at Stennis Space Center, MS (SSC) supporting the design and construction of the A3 facility at SSC. The subscale test article is outfitted with a large array of instrumentation to support the design verification of the A3 facility. The mechanical design of the subscale diffuser and test instrumentation are described here

  15. Universal diffusion in incoherent black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike

    2016-10-01

    We study charge and energy diffusion in simple holographic theories with broken translational symmetry. We find that when the effects of momentum relaxation are very strong the diffusion constants take universal values Dc˜De˜ℏvB2/(kBT ) . Here vB is the velocity of the butterfly effect and the coefficients of proportionality depend only on the scaling exponents of the infra-red fixed point. Our results suggest that diffusion in these incoherent black holes is controlled by τ ˜ℏ/(kBT ) independently of the mechanism of momentum relaxation.

  16. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Diffusion properties of a radiochromic hydrogel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Kinnari, T. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diffusion properties of a radiochromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. One half of each dosimeter was irradiated while the other half was left un-irradiated creating dose gradients over which diffusion could be investigated. Read-out of the optical response was performed with a high-resolution optical scanner. The dosimeters were found to exhibit a low diffusion rate but a high auto-oxidation level leading to a fading of the contrast in the dose response with time.

  18. Diffuse FDG renal uptake in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Szyszko, Teresa; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Nunan, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    In patients presenting with acute renal failure and known/suspected lymphoma, the diagnosis of diffuse renal involvement is important, as there is potential for rapid resolution with chemotherapy. Although FDG is excreted through the kidneys and focal renal disease may be difficult to identify, diffuse renal FDG is more easily recognized and is always abnormal. We report a patient presenting with acute renal failure and suspected lymphoma. F-18 FDG PET/CT study demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake in bilaterally enlarged kidneys. Following 1 cycle of chemotherapy, the renal function normalized. An interim F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated normal size and FDG uptake within both kidneys.

  19. Measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Craven, John D.; Frank, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite has been used to measure the intensity of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It is found that the isotropic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation (possibly of extragalactic origin) has an intensity of 530 + or - 80 units (a unit is 1 photon per sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The Galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on Galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the Galactic plane.

  20. Eddy diffusivity in the ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Castilla, Robert; Platonov, Alexei

    2010-05-01

    In order to measure eddy diffusivity in the ocean using a scaling that includes the thickness of the surf zone as well as the depth and the wave period[1,2]. Measurements in the Mediterranean are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than in the Pacific coast. On a larger scale, and further away from the coast the relevant eddy diffusivities are much larger, because large eddies often scale on the Rossby deformation radius, LR. Direct measurements of the diffusion and the horizontal velocity field were performed at several sites in the coastal areas of Spain. The diffusion coeficients were calculated by evaluation from video images of the area of milk and fluoresceine blobs released at different positions and with different wave heights, wind speeds and tidal induced currents[1-3]. There are instances with either low hipo-diffusivity or high hyper-diffusivity and local measurements in both cases indicate that spectra deviate strongly from an equilibrium spectrum. A generalized Richardson law [3,4] deduced from Kinematic Simulation (KS) numerical models may be applied also to coastal diffusion[5]. The eddy viscosity values show a complex behaviour that depends on wind friction, wave induced Reynolds number and flow topology. The results of more than 100 experiments show that there is a dependence of the maximum diffusivity on a Reynolds number derived from the wave height[1]. The increase of diffusivity with wave height only occurs for large enough wave Reynolds numbers. Other important factors are wind speed and tidal currents. The horizontal diffusivity shows also a marked anisotropy and spectral dependence [4,6]. [1] M. Diez, M. O. Bezerra, C. Mosso, R. Castilla and J. M. Redondo,Experimental measurements and diffusion in harbor and coastal zones. Il Nuovo Cimento Vol. 31 C, N. 5-6 Settembre-Dicembre (2008), 843. [2] Carrillo A., Sanchez M. A., Platonov A. and Redondo J. M., Phys. Chem. Earth B, 26. 4 (2001) 305. [3] Redondo J. M., Sanchez M. A. and Castilla R

  1. Maximum entropy spherical deconvolution for diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Daniel C

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a maximum entropy method for spherical deconvolution. Spherical deconvolution arises in various inverse problems. This paper uses the method to reconstruct the distribution of microstructural fibre orientations from diffusion MRI measurements. Analysis shows that the PASMRI algorithm, one of the most accurate diffusion MRI reconstruction algorithms in the literature, is a special case of the maximum entropy spherical deconvolution. Experiments compare the new method to linear spherical deconvolution, used previously in diffusion MRI, and to the PASMRI algorithm. The new method compares favourably both in simulation and on standard brain-scan data.

  2. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  3. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Taylor dispersion—shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion—is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle’s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids.

  4. Diffusion in the special theory of relativity.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    The Markovian diffusion theory is generalized within the framework of the special theory of relativity. Since the velocity space in relativity is a hyperboloid, the mathematical stochastic calculus on Riemanian manifolds can be applied but adopted here to the velocity space. A generalized Langevin equation in the fiber space of position, velocity, and orthonormal velocity frames is defined from which the generalized relativistic Kramers equation in the phase space in external force fields is derived. The obtained diffusion equation is invariant under Lorentz transformations and its stationary solution is given by the Jüttner distribution. Besides, a nonstationary analytical solution is derived for the example of force-free relativistic diffusion.

  5. Diffusion of spherical particles in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Imperio, A; Padding, J T; Briels, W J

    2011-04-21

    The diffusive motion of a colloidal particle trapped inside a small cavity filled with fluid is reduced by hydrodynamic interactions with the confining walls. In this work, we study these wall effects on a spherical particle entrapped in a closed cylinder. We calculate the diffusion coefficient along the radial, azimuthal, and axial direction for different particle positions. At all locations the diffusion is smaller than in a bulk fluid and it becomes anisotropic near the container's walls. We present a simple model which reasonably well describes the simulation results for the given dimensions of the cylinder, which are taken from the recent experimental work.

  6. Enhanced diffusion of phosphorus at grain boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, L. J.; Shyu, C. M.; Stika, K. M.; Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1982-01-01

    Enhanced diffusion of phosphorus at grain boundaries in cast polycrystalline photovoltaic materials (Wacker, HEM, and Semix) was studied. It was found that the enhancements for the three materials were the same, indicating that the properties of boundaries are similar, even though they were grown by different techniques. In addition, it was observed that grain boundaries capable of enhancing the diffusion always have strong recombination activities. Both phenomena could be related to dangling bonds existing at the boundaries. The present study gives the first evidence that incoherent second order twins of 111/115-plane type are diffusion-active.

  7. CFD analysis of a rocket exhaust diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tarit K.; Thanawala, R. H.; Annamalai, K.

    1992-11-01

    The nature of the complex shock structure responsible for the pressure recovery phenomenon in supersonic diffusers is investigated by means of a theoretical CFD analysis using a newly developed computer program for Navier-Stokes solution of an ejector system, and the Prandtl mixing length to model the turbulent boundary layer. The pressure recovery characteristics of an ejector diffuser system was studied for various geometric and flow conditions. A comparison of the results with those of pressure measurements along the diffuser length in an experimental facility showed discrepancies, which are attributed to the boundary conditions imposed.

  8. Computerized Analysis Of Thermal-Diffusivity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.; Wood, Charles; Vandersande, Jan W.

    1988-01-01

    Improved data-acquisition and data-analysis system for thermal-diffusivity measurements using flash method incorporates digital oscilloscope and microcomputer for rapid reduction of experimental data. In thermal-diffusivity apparatus thin specimen heated on one face by pulsed xenon flashlamp, subsequent temperature rise on opposite face monitored by infrared detector. Thermal diffusivity estimated from thickness of specimen and from time after initial pulse during which temperature rise reaches half maximum value. Accuracy of estimate improved by correcting temperature measurements for radiative loss of heat from specimen and for finite duration and specific waveform of flashlamp pulse. System devised for use in high-temperature measurements of thermoelectric materials.

  9. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress.

  10. Diffusion Background Model for Moving Objects Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, B. V.; Sidyakin, S. V.; Vizilter, Y. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach for moving objects detection in video surveillance systems. It is based on construction of the regression diffusion maps for the image sequence. This approach is completely different from the state of the art approaches. We show that the motion analysis method, based on diffusion maps, allows objects that move with different speed or even stop for a short while to be uniformly detected. We show that proposed model is comparable to the most popular modern background models. We also show several ways of speeding up diffusion maps algorithm itself.

  11. Effects of Diffusion Time on Short-Range Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusivity Measurements in Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Gierada, David S.; Woods, Jason C.; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Bartel, Seth T.; Ritter, Jon H.; Choong, Cliff K.; Das, Nitin A.; Hong, Cheng; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Chang, Yulin V.; Jacob, Richard E.; Hogg, James C.; Battafarano, Richard J.; Cooper, Joel D.; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Conradi, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effect of diffusion time on short-range hyperpolarized 3He MR diffusion measurements across a wide range of emphysema severity. Materials and Methods 3He diffusion MR imaging was performed on 19 lungs or lobes resected from 18 subjects with varying degrees of emphysema using 3 diffusion times (1.6 msec, 5 msec, and 10 msec) at constant b value. Emphysema severity was quantified as the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and as the percentage of pixels with ADC higher than multiple thresholds from 0.30–0.55 cm2/sec (ADC index). Quantitative histology (mean linear intercept) was obtained in 10 of the lung specimens from 10 of the subjects. Results The mean ADCs with diffusion times of 1.6, 5.0, and 10.0 msec were 0.46, 0.40, and 0.37 cm2/sec, respectively (P <0.0001, ANOVA). There was no relationship between the ADC magnitude and the effect of diffusion time on ADC values. Mean linear intercept correlated with ADC (r=0.91–0.94, P<0.001) and ADC index (r=0.78–0.92, P<0.01) at all diffusion times. Conclusion Decreases in ADC with longer diffusion time were unrelated to emphysema severity. The strong correlations between the ADC at all diffusion times tested and quantitative histology demonstrate that the ADC is a robust measure of emphysema. PMID:19787725

  12. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  13. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Argon Diffusion in Pyroxene and Albite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J. R.; Isachsen, C. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T. D.

    2010-03-01

    Shock greatly raises the diffusivity of albite, and also explains why meteorites often have low activation energies. Unshocked pyroxene cannot explain the high temperature release of argon in meteorites, though shocked pyroxene is a possibility.

  15. Diffusion in active suspension of microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, Eric; Delmotte, Blaise; Plouraboue, Franck; Keaveny, Eric; Martin, Matthieu; Rafai, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Bertin, Eric; IMFT Team; IC Team; LiPhy Team

    2015-11-01

    The presence of microswimmers in a fluid generates flow agitation due to multi-body hydrodynamic interactions. This agitation of the fluid leads to random trajectories of passive tracers particles and the swimmers themselves, and from a macroscopic point view, it can be interpreted as a diffusive mechanism. By means of experiments (videomicroscopy of suspensions of chlamydomonas reinhardtii)and numerical simulations (Stokesian fluid populated with squirmers), we investigate the evolution of the effective diffusion coefficient when the volumetric concentration of the active suspension varies. By comparing the experimental and numerical results, we quantify the role of active swimming on the measured diffusion and identify the physical mechanisms that lead to diffusion enhancement. Our results aim to provide a better understanding of how swimming organisms affect micron-scale transport in the environment.

  16. General theory of heat diffusion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröster, A.; Schranz, W.

    2002-11-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation of the influence of heat diffusion processes on the low-frequency dispersion in macroscopic elastic susceptibilities is presented. In particular, a general solution of the heat diffusion equation is derived for arbitrary boundary conditions and externally imposed periodic and spatially inhomogeneous stress. In contrast to other calculations found in the literature, our results indicate that in elastic experiments on monodomain samples of macroscopic dimensions the isothermal-adiabatic crossover function necessarily reduces to a Debye-like dispersion. Experimentally, this is illustated by measurements of the complex dynamic elastic susceptibilities of KSCN and KMnF3. Our approach also allows to discuss heat diffusion in polydomain crystals and heterogeneous systems, for which one obtains dispersions of a non-Debye type. While explicitly derived in an elastic context, the present theory also applies to heat diffusion in dielectric materials.

  17. Earthquake-explosion discrimination using diffusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, N.; Bregman, Y.; Lindenbaum, O.; Ben-Horin, Y.; Averbuch, A.

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination between earthquakes and explosions is an essential component of nuclear test monitoring and it is also important for maintaining the quality of earthquake catalogues. Currently used discrimination methods provide a partial solution to the problem. In this work, we apply advanced machine learning methods and in particular diffusion maps for modelling and discriminating between seismic signals. Diffusion maps enable us to construct a geometric representation that capture the intrinsic structure of the seismograms. The diffusion maps are applied after a pre-processing step, in which seismograms are converted to normalized sonograms. The constructed low-dimensional model is used for automatic earthquake-explosion discrimination of data that are collected in single seismic stations. We demonstrate our approach on a data set comprising seismic events from the Dead Sea area. The diffusion-based algorithm provides correct discrimination rate that is higher than 90 per cent.

  18. The Turbulent Diffusivity of Convective Overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Schwab, Josiah; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Timmes, Frank; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Oishi, Jeffrey; Brown, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    There are many natural systems with convectively unstable fluid adjacent to stably stratified fluid; including the Earth's atmosphere, most stars, and perhaps even the Earth's liquid core. The convective motions penetrating into the stable region can enhance mixing, leading to changes in transport within the stable region. This work describes convective overshoot simulations. To study the extra mixing due to overshoot, we evolve a passive tracer field. The horizontal average of the passive tracer quickly approaches a self-similar state. The self-similar state is the solution to a diffusion equation with a spatially dependent turbulent diffusivity. We find the extra mixing due to convection can be accurately modeled as a turbulent diffusivity, and discuss implications of this turbulent diffusivity for the astrophysical problem of mixing in convectively bounded carbon flames.

  19. Communication: Probing anomalous diffusion in frequency space

    SciTech Connect

    Stachura, Sławomir; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2015-11-21

    Anomalous diffusion processes are usually detected by analyzing the time-dependent mean square displacement of the diffusing particles. The latter evolves asymptotically as W(t) ∼ 2D{sub α}t{sup α}, where D{sub α} is the fractional diffusion constant and 0 < α < 2. In this article we show that both D{sub α} and α can also be extracted from the low-frequency Fourier spectrum of the corresponding velocity autocorrelation function. This offers a simple method for the interpretation of quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from complex (bio)molecular systems, in which subdiffusive transport is frequently encountered. The approach is illustrated and validated by analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of molecular diffusion in a lipid POPC bilayer.

  20. How a Nanodroplet Diffuses on Smooth Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate how nanodroplets diffuse on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. The simulations results show that the surface diffusion of nanodroplet is different from that of single molecules and solid nanoparticles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature is surface wettability dependent, which undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for different surface wettabilities and sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region under Grant No. 615312.