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Sample records for american heart association

  1. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educator CPR & ECC Shop Causes Advocate Giving Media American Heart Association Check out Scientific Sessions 2016 news -- translated for ... do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association. Keep color fresh and vibrant by knowing how ...

  2. Improving Children's Heart Health: A Report from the American Heart Association's Children's Heart Health Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidding, Samuel S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article presents recommendations developed at the 1994 American Heart Association's Children's Heart Health Conference to promote cardiovascular health in children, particularly regarding public health, lifestyle, and behavior. The recommendations cover the areas of physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco, providing suggestions for schools,…

  3. The American Heart Association and Heart Health Education in the Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tevis, Betty

    1979-01-01

    Several of the American Heart Association's education programs are described. The newest program is Heart Health Education in the Young, designed to stress the importance of early risk factor education. (JMF)

  4. Continuing Education Programs within the American Heart Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembright, Katherine A.

    1970-01-01

    Because it believes the nurse can and must be a participant in the co-professional health team (doctor, nurse), the American Heart Association has become increasingly concerned with planning and carrying out activities that contribute to the continuing education of nurses. (PT)

  5. Recommended Dietary Pattern to Achieve Adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Guidelines: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Linda; Carson, Jo Ann S; Appel, Lawrence J; Burke, Lora E; Economos, Christina; Karmally, Wahida; Lancaster, Kristie; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Johnson, Rachel K; Thomas, Randal J; Vos, Miriam; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2016-11-29

    In 2013, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the "Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk," which was based on a systematic review originally initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The guideline supports the American Heart Association's 2020 Strategic Impact Goals for cardiovascular health promotion and disease reduction by providing more specific details for adopting evidence-based diet and lifestyle behaviors to achieve those goals. In addition, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans issued updated evidence relevant to reducing cardiovascular risk and provided additional recommendations for adopting healthy diet and lifestyle approaches. This scientific statement, intended for healthcare providers, summarizes relevant scientific and translational evidence and offers practical tips, tools, and dietary approaches to help patients/clients adapt these guidelines according to their sociocultural, economic, and taste preferences.

  6. American Heart Association's Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics in Under-Represented Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Freda; Zhang, Guo; Davey, Adam; Tan, Yin; Ma, Grace X

    2016-12-01

    The American Heart Association's ideal cardiovascular health score is based on 7 cardiovascular health metrics to measure progress toward their Impact Goal of reducing cardiovascular disease by 20 % before 2020. This study applied this construct to assess cardiovascular health in a sample of Asian Americans. Convenience sampling methods were used to enroll self-identified Asian American's over the age of 18 years who were attending community health fairs across the greater Philadelphia and urban areas of New Jersey. The heart health metrics of tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, and glucose were measured. In the greater sample (N = 541), 82 % were female, the mean age was 65.1 (SD = 15.5) years, 45 % were Vietnamese, 38 % were Chinese and 17 % were Korean. Prevalence of ideal heart health for the metrics of tobacco use (95 %) was high. Only 19.4 % achieved ideal levels of physical activity, 35.1 % for BMI, 28.9 % for glucose and 66 % for blood pressure. Dietary intake was ideal for 20.7 % of the sample. More years since migration and Korean race trended toward having a higher prevalence of poor health in some metrics. Most Asian Americans are not achieving ideal cardiovascular health for several of the metrics evaluated, with those residing in the United States for more than 13 years and Korean Americans being higher-risk groups. Targeted community based intervention approaches to improving and monitoring heart health in Asian American, and Asian American subgroups, are needed.

  7. Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Towfighi, Amytis; Ovbiagele, Bruce; El Husseini, Nada; Hackett, Maree L; Jorge, Ricardo E; Kissela, Brett M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Skolarus, Lesli E; Whooley, Mary A; Williams, Linda S

    2017-02-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is common, affecting approximately one third of stroke survivors at any one time after stroke. Individuals with PSD are at a higher risk for suboptimal recovery, recurrent vascular events, poor quality of life, and mortality. Although PSD is prevalent, uncertainty remains regarding predisposing risk factors and optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on the topic of PSD. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. Members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise and reviewed appropriate literature, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, and expert opinion. This multispecialty statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence and gaps in current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, management, and prevention of PSD, and provides implications for clinical practice.

  8. Heterogeneity in statin indications within the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Lima, João A C; Nallamothu, Brahmajee; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-01-01

    A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden.

  9. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Highlights of the hotline sessions presented at the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Möllmann, Helge; Nef, Holger; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summaries and commentaries on trials presented at the hotline sessions of the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association in New Orleans have been generated from the oral presentations and the webcasts of the American Heart Association. The following papers are discussed: APPROACH, ATLAS, BACH, BICC, HF-ACTION, I-PRESERVE, JPAD, JUPITER, Mass-DAC, Physicians' Health Study II, SEARCH, tailored clopidogrel loading to prevent stent thrombosis, and TIMACS.

  11. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Braun, Lynne T; Grady, Kathleen L; Kutner, Jean S; Adler, Eric; Berlinger, Nancy; Boss, Renee; Butler, Javed; Enguidanos, Susan; Friebert, Sarah; Gardner, Timothy J; Higgins, Phil; Holloway, Robert; Konig, Madeleine; Meier, Diane; Morrissey, Mary Beth; Quest, Tammie E; Wiegand, Debra L; Coombs-Lee, Barbara; Fitchett, George; Gupta, Charu; Roach, William H

    2016-09-13

    The mission of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association includes increasing access to high-quality, evidence-based care that improves patient outcomes such as health-related quality of life and is consistent with the patients' values, preferences, and goals. Awareness of and access to palliative care interventions align with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association mission. The purposes of this policy statement are to provide background on the importance of palliative care as it pertains to patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke and their families and to make recommendations for policy decisions. Palliative care, defined as patient- and family-centered care that optimizes health-related quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering, should be integrated into the care of all patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke early in the disease trajectory. Palliative care focuses on communication, shared decision making about treatment options, advance care planning, and attention to physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological distress with inclusion of the patient's family and care system. Our policy recommendations address the following: reimbursement for comprehensive delivery of palliative care services for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke; strong payer-provider relationships that involve data sharing to identify patients in need of palliative care, identification of better care and payment models, and establishment of quality standards and outcome measurements; healthcare system policies for the provision of comprehensive palliative care services during hospitalization, including goals of care, treatment decisions, needs of family caregivers, and transition to other care settings; and health professional education in palliative care as part of licensure requirements.

  12. Late-breaking Trials from the 2016 American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Kyle D; Alraies, M Chadi; Kajita, Alexandre H; Rogers, Toby; Koifman, Edward; Steinvil, Arie

    The late breaking trials released at the American Heart Association scientific sessions conference in November in New Orleans, LA covered a wide range of topics, including new devices within the field of heart failure, new registry data on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in intermediate risk patients, and medical management of peripheral arterial disease, coronary artery disease, and hypercholesterolemia. The following review highlights the late breaking trials presented at the conference that will have significant impact on clinical practice.

  13. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-09

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients.

  14. Summary of the American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article summarizes the recent American Heart Association (AHA) Science Statement, Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations, published in Circulation in the July 4, 2006 issue. Improving diet and lifestyle recommendations is a critical component of the AHA’s strategy for cardiovascular disease risk re...

  15. Workplace wellness recognition for optimizing workplace health: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Calitz, Chris; Arena, Ross; Baase, Catherine; Isaac, Fikry W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Peterson, Eric D; Pronk, Nico; Sanchez, Eduardo; Terry, Paul E; Volpp, Kevin G; Antman, Elliott M

    2015-05-19

    The workplace is an important setting for promoting cardiovascular health and cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention in the United States. Well-designed, comprehensive workplace wellness programs have the potential to improve cardiovascular health and to reduce mortality, morbidity, and disability resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke. Nevertheless, widespread implementation of comprehensive workplace wellness programs is lacking, and program composition and quality vary. Several organizations provide worksite wellness recognition programs; however, there is variation in recognition criteria, and they do not specifically focus on cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention. Although there is limited evidence to suggest that company performance on employer health management scorecards is associated with favorable healthcare cost trends, these data are not currently robust, and further evaluation is needed. As a recognized national leader in evidence-based guidelines, care systems, and quality programs, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is uniquely positioned and committed to promoting the adoption of comprehensive workplace wellness programs, as well as improving program quality and workforce health outcomes. As part of its commitment to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will promote science-based best practices for comprehensive workplace wellness programs and establish benchmarks for a national workplace wellness recognition program to assist employers in applying the best systems and strategies for optimal programming. The recognition program will integrate identification of a workplace culture of health and achievement of rigorous standards for cardiovascular health based on Life's Simple 7 metrics. In addition, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will develop resources that assist employers in meeting these rigorous

  16. Associations between metabolomic compounds and incident heart failure among African Americans: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Yu, Bing; Alexander, Danny; Manolio, Teri A; Aguilar, David; Coresh, Josef; Heiss, Gerardo; Boerwinkle, Eric; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2013-08-15

    Heart failure is more prevalent among African Americans than in the general population. Metabolomic studies among African Americans may efficiently identify novel biomarkers of heart failure. We used untargeted methods to measure 204 stable serum metabolites and evaluated their associations with incident heart failure hospitalization (n = 276) after a median follow-up of 20 years (1987-2008) by using Cox regression in data from 1,744 African Americans aged 45-64 years without heart failure at baseline from the Jackson, Mississippi, field center of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. After adjustment for established risk factors, we found that 16 metabolites (6 named with known structural identities and 10 unnamed with unknown structural identities, the latter denoted by using the format X-12345) were associated with incident heart failure (P < 0.0004 based on a modified Bonferroni procedure). Of the 6 named metabolites, 4 are involved in amino acid metabolism, 1 (prolylhydroxyproline) is a dipeptide, and 1 (erythritol) is a sugar alcohol. After additional adjustment for kidney function, 2 metabolites remained associated with incident heart failure (for metabolite X-11308, hazard ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.86; for metabolite X-11787, hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.37). Further structural analysis revealed X-11308 to be a dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid and X-11787 to be an isoform of either hydroxyleucine or hydroxyisoleucine. Our metabolomic analysis revealed novel biomarkers associated with incident heart failure independent of traditional risk factors.

  17. Associations Between Metabolomic Compounds and Incident Heart Failure Among African Americans: The ARIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan; Yu, Bing; Alexander, Danny; Manolio, Teri A.; Aguilar, David; Coresh, Josef; Heiss, Gerardo; Boerwinkle, Eric; Nettleton, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is more prevalent among African Americans than in the general population. Metabolomic studies among African Americans may efficiently identify novel biomarkers of heart failure. We used untargeted methods to measure 204 stable serum metabolites and evaluated their associations with incident heart failure hospitalization (n = 276) after a median follow-up of 20 years (1987–2008) by using Cox regression in data from 1,744 African Americans aged 45–64 years without heart failure at baseline from the Jackson, Mississippi, field center of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. After adjustment for established risk factors, we found that 16 metabolites (6 named with known structural identities and 10 unnamed with unknown structural identities, the latter denoted by using the format X-12345) were associated with incident heart failure (P < 0.0004 based on a modified Bonferroni procedure). Of the 6 named metabolites, 4 are involved in amino acid metabolism, 1 (prolylhydroxyproline) is a dipeptide, and 1 (erythritol) is a sugar alcohol. After additional adjustment for kidney function, 2 metabolites remained associated with incident heart failure (for metabolite X-11308, hazard ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.86; for metabolite X-11787, hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.37). Further structural analysis revealed X-11308 to be a dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid and X-11787 to be an isoform of either hydroxyleucine or hydroxyisoleucine. Our metabolomic analysis revealed novel biomarkers associated with incident heart failure independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:23788672

  18. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2016, New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Amaki, Makoto; Konagai, Nao; Fujino, Masashi; Kawakami, Shouji; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-12-22

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2016 were held on November 12-16 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA. This 5-day event featured cardiovascular clinical practice covering all aspects of basic, clinical, population, and translational content. One of the hot topics at AHA 2016 was precision medicine. The key presentations and highlights from the AHA Scientific Sessions 2016, including "precision medicine" as one of the hot topics, are herein reported.

  19. Cardiac Arrest in Pregnancy: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M; Zelop, Carolyn M; Lipman, Steve; Carvalho, Brendan; Joglar, Jose; Mhyre, Jill M; Katz, Vern L; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Einav, Sharon; Warnes, Carole A; Page, Richard L; Griffin, Russell E; Jain, Amish; Dainty, Katie N; Arafeh, Julie; Windrim, Rory; Koren, Gideon; Callaway, Clifton W

    2015-11-03

    This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on maternal resuscitation. This document will provide readers with up-to-date and comprehensive information, guidelines, and recommendations for all aspects of maternal resuscitation. Maternal resuscitation is an acute event that involves many subspecialties and allied health providers; this document will be relevant to all healthcare providers who are involved in resuscitation and specifically maternal resuscitation.

  20. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Women: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Laxmi S; Beckie, Theresa M; DeVon, Holli A; Grines, Cindy L; Krumholz, Harlan M; Johnson, Michelle N; Lindley, Kathryn J; Vaccarino, Viola; Wang, Tracy Y; Watson, Karol E; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in American women. Since 1984, the annual cardiovascular disease mortality rate has remained greater for women than men; however, over the last decade, there have been marked reductions in cardiovascular disease mortality in women. The dramatic decline in mortality rates for women is attributed partly to an increase in awareness, a greater focus on women and cardiovascular disease risk, and the increased application of evidence-based treatments for established coronary heart disease. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on acute myocardial infarction in women. Sex-specific differences exist in the presentation, pathophysiological mechanisms, and outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction. This statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence of the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of women with acute myocardial infarction.

  1. Preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: a common agenda for the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Harmon; Kahn, Richard; Robertson, Rose Marie

    2004-07-01

    Collectively, cardiovascular disease (including stroke), cancer, and diabetes account for approximately two-thirds of all deaths in the U.S. and about US dollars 700 billion in direct and indirect economic costs each year. Current approaches to health promotion and prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes do not approach the potential of the existing state of knowledge. A concerted effort to increase application of public health and clinical interventions of known efficacy to reduce prevalence of tobacco use, poor diet, and insufficient physical activity-the major risk factors for these diseases-and to increase utilization of screening tests for their early detection could substantially reduce the human and economic cost of these diseases. In this article, the American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association, and American Heart Association review strategies for the prevention and early detection of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as the beginning of a new collaboration among the three organizations. The goal of this joint venture is to stimulate substantial improvements in primary prevention and early detection through collaboration between key organizations, greater public awareness about healthy lifestyles, legislative action that results in more funding for and access to primary prevention programs and research, and reconsideration of the concept of the periodic medical checkup as an effective platform for prevention, early detection, and treatment.

  2. Familial Hypercholesterolemia and the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines: Myths, Oversimplification, and Misinterpretation Versus Facts.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Joshua W; Stone, Neil J; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2015-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic condition resulting in severe, lifelong elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a marked increased risk of early-onset coronary disease. FH is treatable when identified, yet is vastly under-recognized and undertreated. Although the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of cholesterol presented a paradigm shift, we believe that there have been serious oversimplifications, misinterpretations, and erroneous reporting about the current ACC/AHA cholesterol guidelines that have contributed to suboptimal care for these subjects. In summary, the ACC/AHA guidelines place tremendous emphasis on the identification of patients with FH, the initiation of high-intensity statin therapy, the need to obtain follow-up lipid values to assess the efficacy and compliance to lifestyle and medical therapy, and the role of nonstatin drugs when needed for optimal care of the individual patient.

  3. February Is American Heart Month | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Camille Rees, Guest Writer February is American Heart Month, and Feb. 7 was designated “National Wear Red Day” by the American Heart Association. The American Heart Association has sponsored the “Go Red for Women” campaign for 10 years. The message: heart disease is the number one killer of women. Did you know that more women die of heart disease than men?  In fact, it is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. Over the years, the red dress has become the symbol of the fight against heart disease in women.

  4. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2012, Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held for the first time in Los Angeles in 2012, with the most up-to-date basic and clinical science in the field presented and heard by physicians, research scientists, students, and paramedical personnel from 100 countries. Japan accounted for the second highest number of submitted abstracts and the Japanese Circulation Society actively contributed to the success of the AHA Scientific Sessions this year. The Late-Breaking Clinical Trial sessions comprised 27 clinical studies presented in the main hall. The FREEDOM study revealed the superiority of using a coronary artery bypass graft for diabetic multivessel coronary artery diseases over percutaneous coronary intervention using a drug-eluting stent. A new peptide hormone, serelaxin, improved dyspnea in heart failure patients and significantly reduced mortality rates according to the RELAX-AHF study. In the basic sciences, primary necrosis in mitochondria was the hot topic, while genetics, including genome-wide association studies, and epigenetics were strong features of the basic and clinical cardiovascular (CV) science. It was also clear that regenerative medicine is now part of mainstream CV research, with several clinical trials underway and many basic research projects ongoing around the world. Induced pluripotent stem cells in particular have the potential to change CV medicine, and will underpin the next era of regenerative medicine and personal therapies for heart diseases.

  5. Associations of Adiponectin and Leptin with Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Liu, Jiankang; Chen, Zhimin; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Musani, Solomon K.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Fox, Ervin R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because the predictive significance of previously reported racial differences in leptin and adiponectin levels remains unclear, we assessed the prospective association of these adipokines with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in African Americans, a population with a high prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: Serum specimens from 4,571 Jackson Heart Study participants without prevalent CVD at baseline examination (2000–2004) were analyzed for adiponectin and leptin levels. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the associations of the two adipokines with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and incident ischemic stroke. Results: During 6.2 years average of follow-up, 98 incident CHD and 87 incident ischemic stroke events were documented. Among study participants (64% women; mean age 54 ± 13 years), the mean (standard deviation, SD) was 6.04 (4.32) μg/mL in women and 4.03 (3.14) μg/mL in men for adiponectin and 37.35 (23.90) ng/mL in women and 11.03 (10.05) ng/mL in men for leptin. After multivariable adjustment that included age, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, systolic blood pressure, hypertension medication, smoking, and physical activity, adiponectin was directly associated in women with incident stroke, HR = 1.41 (1.04–1.91) per one SD increase (p = 0.03), but not in men (p = 0.42). It was not associated with incident CHD in women or men. Leptin was not associated with incident CHD or incident stroke. Conclusion: In the largest community-based African American cohort, adiponectin was associated among women with a higher risk of incident stroke. Whether adiponectin harbors harmful properties, or it is produced in response to vascular inflammation to counter the atherosclerotic process, or the putative “adiponectin resistance

  6. Transitions of care in heart failure: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Barnason, Susan; Deswal, Anita; Hernandez, Adrian; Kociol, Robb; Lee, Eunyoung; Paul, Sara; Ryan, Catherine J; White-Williams, Connie

    2015-03-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), use of 30-day rehospitalization as a healthcare metric and increased pressure to provide value-based care compel healthcare providers to improve efficiency and to use an integrated care approach. Transition programs are being used to achieve goals. Transition of care in the context of HF management refers to individual interventions and programs with multiple activities that are designed to improve shifts or transitions from one setting to the next, most often from hospital to home. As transitional care programs become the new normal for patients with chronic HF, it is important to understand the current state of the science of transitional care, as discussed in the available research literature. Of transitional care reports, there was much heterogeneity in research designs, methods, study aims, and program targets, or they were not well described. Often, programs used bundled interventions, making it difficult to discuss the efficiency and effectiveness of specific interventions. Thus, further HF transition care research is needed to ensure best practices related to economically and clinically effective and feasible transition interventions that can be broadly applicable. This statement provides an overview of the complexity of HF management and includes patient, hospital, and healthcare provider barriers to understanding end points that best reflect clinical benefits and to achieving optimal clinical outcomes. The statement describes transitional care interventions and outcomes and discusses implications and recommendations for research and clinical practice to enhance patient-centered outcomes.

  7. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2013, Dallas.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Naoki; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Yamada, Satoshi; Yokoshiki, Hisashi; Mitsuyama, Hirofumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held in Dallas on November 16-20, 2013. The meeting is one of the most leading conferences of cardiology in the world, with over 18,000 professional attendees from more than 105 countries. There were 315 invited sessions and 443 abstract sessions, comprising more than 5,000 presentations. The sessions were expanded to 26 program tracks, which included and integrated basic, translational, clinical, and population science. In the series of late-breaking sessions, updates of results from 20 clinical trials were disclosed. Japanese scientists submitted the second most abstracts to the Scientific Sessions in 2013. We appreciate the significant contribution to the sessions by Japanese cardiologists as well as the Japanese Circulation Society.

  8. The American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on cardiac critical care: implications for pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Penny, Daniel J; Shekerdemian, Lara S

    2013-01-01

    A writing group sponsored by the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation, the Council on Clinical Cardiology, the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, and the Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research of The American Heart Association has recently formulated a roadmap to meet the changing needs of the patient with cardiovascular disease requiring critical care. Although this roadmap has been formulated primarily to address the care needs of the adult with critical cardiovascular disease, it contains useful lessons pertinent to the care of the patient with pediatric and congenital cardiovascular disease. In this document, we have examined The Statement and applied its framework to the evolving field of pediatric cardiac critical care.

  9. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians.

  10. Associations of adiponectin with individual European ancestry in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Choudhry, Shweta; Musani, Solomon K.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Liu, Jiankang; Rotimi, Charles N.; Wilson, James G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compared with European Americans, African Americans (AAs) exhibit lower levels of the cardio-metabolically protective adiponectin even after accounting for adiposity measures. Because few studies have examined in AA the association between adiponectin and genetic admixture, a dense panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) was used to estimate the individual proportions of European ancestry (PEA) for the AAs enrolled in a large community-based cohort, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). We tested the hypothesis that plasma adiponectin and PEA are directly associated and assessed the interaction with a series of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods: Plasma specimens from 1439 JHS participants were analyzed by ELISA for adiponectin levels. Using pseudo-ancestral population genotype data from the HapMap Consortium, PEA was estimated with a panel of up to 1447 genome-wide preselected AIMs by a maximum likelihood approach. Interaction assessment, stepwise linear and cubic multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to analyze the cross-sectional association between adiponectin and PEA. Results: Among the study participants (62% women; mean age 48 ± 12 years), the median (interquartile range) of PEA was 15.8 (9.3)%. Body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04) and insulin resistance (p = 0.0001) modified the association between adiponectin and PEA. Adiponectin was directly and linearly associated with PEA (β = 0.62 ± 0.28, p = 0.03) among non-obese (n = 673) and insulin sensitive participants (n = 1141; β = 0.74 ± 0.23, p = 0.001), but not among those obese or with insulin resistance. No threshold point effect was detected for non-obese participants. Conclusions: In a large AA population, the individual proportion of European ancestry was linearly and directly associated with plasma adiponectin among non-obese and non insulin-resistant participants, pointing to the interaction of genetic and metabolic factors influencing adiponectin levels. PMID:24575123

  11. Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Eva; Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J; Moons, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Although different guidelines on adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) care advocate for lifetime cardiac follow-up, a critical appraisal of the guideline implementation is lacking. We investigated the implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 guidelines for ACHD follow-up by investigating the type of health care professional, care setting, and frequency of outpatient visits in young adults with CHD. Furthermore, correlates for care in line with the recommendations or untraceability were investigated. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, including 306 patients with CHD who had a documented outpatient visit at pediatric cardiology before age 18 years. In all, 210 patients (68.6%) were in cardiac follow-up; 20 (6.5%) withdrew from follow-up and 76 (24.9%) were untraceable. Overall, 198 patients were followed up in tertiary care, 1/4 (n = 52) of which were seen at a formalized ACHD care program and 3/4 (n = 146) remained at pediatric cardiology. Of those followed in formalized ACHD and pediatric cardiology care, the recommended frequency was implemented in 94.2% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.412). No predictors for the implementation of the guidelines were identified. Risk factors for becoming untraceable were none or lower number of heart surgeries, health insurance issues, and nonwhite ethnicity. In conclusion, a significant number of adults continue to be cared for by pediatric cardiologists, indicating that transfer to adult-oriented care was not standard practice. Frequency of follow-up for most patients was in line with the ACC/AHA 2008 guidelines. A considerable proportion of young adults were untraceable in the system, which makes them vulnerable for discontinuation of care.

  12. Vision and Creation of the American Heart Association Pharmaceutical Roundtable Outcomes Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric D.; Spertus, John A.; Cohen, David J.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Go, Alan S.; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Hinton, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The field of outcomes research seeks to define optimal treatment in practice and to promote the rapid, full adoption of efficacious therapies into routine clinical care. The American Heart Association (AHA) formed the AHA Pharmaceutical Roundtable (PRT) Outcomes Research Centers Network to accelerate attainment of these goals. Participating centers were intended to carry out state-of-the-art outcomes research in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, to train the next generation of investigators, and to support the formation of a collaborative research network. Program After a competitive application process, four AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers were selected: Duke Clinical Research Institute; Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute; Stanford University-Kaiser Permanente of Northern California; and University of California, Los Angeles. Each center proposed between one and three projects organized around a single theme in CVD or stroke. Additionally, each center will select and train up to six post-doctoral fellows over the next four years, and will participate in cross-collaborative activities among the centers. Conclusions The AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers Network is designed to further strengthen the field of CVD and stroke outcomes research by fostering innovative research, supporting high quality training, and encouraging center-to-center collaborations. PMID:20031906

  13. Adoption of American Heart Association 2020 ideal healthy diet recommendations prevents weight gain in young adults.

    PubMed

    Forget, Geneviève; Doyon, Myriam; Lacerte, Guillaume; Labonté, Mélissa; Brown, Christine; Carpentier, André C; Langlois, Marie-France; Hivert, Marie-France

    2013-11-01

    In 2010, the American Heart Association established the concept of ideal cardiovascular health. Nationally representative data estimated that <1% of Americans meet the seven health metrics required for achieving ideal cardiovascular health, with the main challenge residing in meeting the criteria for an ideal Healthy Diet Score. In a cohort of young adults (N=196), we aimed to investigate the prevalence of ideal cardiovascular health and ideal Healthy Diet Score and its association to weight gain over a 4-year follow-up period. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, and blood samples were taken according to standardized procedures. Dietary intake was measured by a 3-day food diary and verified by a registered dietitian. We observed that only 0.5% of our sample met the criteria for ideal cardiovascular health and only 4.1% met the criteria for an ideal Healthy Diet Score. The components of the Healthy Diet Score with the lowest observance were consumption of fruits and vegetables (9.7%) and whole grains (14.8%). Meeting zero or one out of five of the Healthy Diet Score components was associated with increased risk of weight gain over 4 years compared with meeting at least two components (P=0.03). With the exception of dietary criteria, prevalence was high for achieving ideal levels of the remaining six cardiovascular health metrics. In conclusion, in this sample of young adults, a very low prevalence of ideal overall cardiovascular health was observed, mainly driven by poor dietary habits, and a poor Healthy Diet Score was associated with increased weight gain.

  14. Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Nutrition Committe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving diet and lifestyle is a critical component of the American Heart Association’s strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in the general population. This document presents recommendations designed to meet this objective. Specific goals are to consume an overall healthy diet; aim fo...

  15. Perceived Discrimination is Associated with Health Behaviors among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study*

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Mario; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Gebreab, Samson Y.; Brenner, Allison; Dubbert, Patricia; Wyatt, Sharon; Bruce, Marino; Hickson, DeMarc; Payne, Tom; Taylor, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Background Using Jackson Heart Study data, we examined associations of multiple measures of perceived discrimination with health behaviors among African Americans (AA). Methods The cross-sectional associations of everyday, lifetime, and burden of discrimination with odds of smoking and mean differences in physical activity, dietary fat, and sleep were examined among 4,939 35–84 year old participants after adjustment for age and socioeconomic status (SES). Results Men reported slightly higher levels of everyday and lifetime discrimination than women and similar levels of burden of discrimination as women. After adjustment for age and SES, everyday discrimination was associated with more smoking and a greater percentage of dietary fat in men and women (OR for smoking: 1.13, 95%CI 1.00,1.28 and 1.19, 95%CI 1.05,1.34; mean difference in dietary fat: 0.37, p<.05 and 0.43, p<.01, in men and women, respectively). Everyday and lifetime discrimination were associated with fewer hours of sleep in men and women (mean difference for everyday discrimination: −0.08, p<.05 and −0.18, p<.001, respectively; and mean difference for lifetime discrimination: −0.08, p<.05, and −0.24, p<.001, respectively). Burden of discrimination was associated with more smoking and fewer hours of sleep in women only. Conclusions Higher levels of perceived discrimination were associated with select health behaviors among men and women. Health behaviors offer a potential mechanism through which perceived discrimination affects health in AA. PMID:26417003

  16. Common genetic variation near the connexin-43 gene is associated with resting heart rate in African Americans: A genome-wide association study of 13,372 participants

    PubMed Central

    Deo, R.; Nalls, M.A.; Avery, C.L.; Smith, J.G.; Evans, D.S.; Keller, M.F.; Butler, A.M.; Buxbaum, S.G.; Li, G.; Quibrera, P. Miguel; Smith, E.N.; Tanaka, T.; Akylbekova, E.L.; Alonso, A.; Arking, D.E.; Benjamin, E.J.; Berenson, G.S.; Bis, J.C.; Chen, L.Y.; Chen, W.; Cummings, S.R.; Ellinor, P.T.; Evans, M.K.; Ferrucci, L.; Fox, E.R.; Heckbert, S.R.; Heiss, G.; Hsueh, W.C.; Kerr, K.F.; Limacher, M.C.; Liu, Y.; Lubitz, S.A.; Magnani, J.W.; Mehra, R.; Marcus, G.M.; Murray, S.S.; Newman, A.B.; Njajou, O.; North, K.E.; Paltoo, D.N.; Psaty, B.M.; Redline, S.S.; Reiner, A.P.; Robinson, J.G.; Rotter, J.I.; Samdarshi, T.E.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schork, N.J.; Singleton, A.B.; Siscovick, D.; Soliman, E.Z.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Srinivasan, S.R.; Taylor, H.A.; Trevisan, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zonderman, A.B.; Newton-Cheh, C.; Whitsel, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci associated with variation in resting heart rate in European and Asian populations. No study has evaluated genetic variants associated with heart rate in African Americans. OBJECTIVE To identify novel genetic variants associated with resting heart rate in African Americans. METHODS Ten cohort studies participating in the Candidate-gene Association Resource and Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network consortia performed genome-wide genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed 2,954,965 SNPs using HapMap YRI and CEU panels in 13,372 participants of African ancestry. Each study measured the RR interval (ms) from 10-second resting 12-lead electrocardiograms and estimated RR-SNP associations using covariate-adjusted linear regression. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to combine cohort-specific measures of association and identify genome-wide significant loci (P ≤ 2.5 × 10−8). RESULTS Fourteen SNPs on chromosome 6q22 exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold. The most significant association was for rs9320841 (+13 ms per minor allele; P = 4.98 × 10−15). This SNP was approximately 350 kb downstream of GJA1, a locus previously identified as harboring SNPs associated with heart rate in Europeans. Adjustment for rs9320841 also attenuated the association between the remaining 13 SNPs in this region and heart rate. In addition, SNPs in MYH6, which have been identified in European genome-wide association study, were associated with similar changes in the resting heart rate as this population of African Americans. CONCLUSIONS An intergenic region downstream of GJA1 (the gene encoding connexin 43, the major protein of the human myocardial gap junction) and an intragenic region within MYH6 are associated with variation in resting heart rate in African Americans as well as in populations of European and Asian origin. PMID:23183192

  17. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2015, Orlando.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Kimura, Mai; Kohno, Takashi; Fujita, Jun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The American Heart Association Scientific Sessions were held in Orlando on November 7-15, 2015. The meeting attracted more than 18,000 participants, including physicians, research scientists, students, and paramedical personnel, from more than 100 countries. Sessions over the 5 days included a comprehensive and unparalleled education delivered via more than 5,000 presentations, with 1,000 invited faculty members and 4,000 abstract presentations from the world leaders in cardiovascular disease. It also displayed the newest cardiovascular technology and resources by more than 200 exhibitors. There were 19 trials scheduled in 6 late-breaking clinical trial sessions. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) aimed to determine the most appropriate targets for the systolic blood pressure among persons without diabetes. A total of 9,361 persons with systolic blood pressure of ≥130 mmHg and an increased cardiovascular risk, but without diabetes, were randomly assigned to a target systolic blood pressure of <120 mmHg (intensive treatment) or a target of <140 mmHg (standard treatment). A significantly lower rate of the primary composite outcome and all-cause mortality in the intensive-treatment group than in the standard-treatment group was observed. Summaries and overviews of the late-breaking trials, clinical science special report sessions, and sessions to which members of the Japanese Circulation Society contributed are presented.

  18. Association of blood pressure with blood viscosity in american indians: the Strong Heart Study.

    PubMed

    de Simone, Giovanni; Devereux, Richard B; Chinali, Marcello; Best, Lyle G; Lee, Elisa T; Welty, Thomas K

    2005-04-01

    Abnormalities in whole blood viscosity (WBV) have been implicated in hypertension. This study analyzes relations between WBV and blood pressure in the Strong Heart Study population of American Indians. We examined 676 participants (489 women, age 62+/-7 years) without prevalent cardiovascular disease or use of antihypertensive medications, digoxin, or aspirin. WBV was calculated from hematocrit and plasma protein concentration, at a shear rate of 208 seconds(-1), by a validated equation. Forty eight percent of participants were obese, 43% had diabetes, 19% had hypertension, and 30% were current smokers. WBV was higher in men, smokers, and participants with central obesity, but it was not associated with hypertension or diabetes, even accounting for confounders. After adjusting for gender, age, center, smoking, obesity, diabetes, and plasma creatinine, WBV was negatively related to pulse pressure (beta=-0.13; P<0.001) and systolic pressure (beta=-0.09; P<0.02), mainly because of negative relations with hematocrit (beta=-0.11 and -0.10). Among hypertensive individuals, pulse pressure was positively related to age, diabetes, and female gender but not to WBV (multiple R=0.63; P<0.0001); in contrast, in normotensive individuals, pulse pressure was related negatively to WBV or hematocrit, independent of body mass index, without relation to diabetes (R=0.42; P<0.0001). Thus, under normal physiological conditions, in vivo WBV is negatively related pulse pressure. In contrast, the presence of arterial hypertension makes this relation less evident.

  19. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  20. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society: Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults aged 75 and older. Despite the effect of CVD on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, individuals aged 75 and older have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older adults with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older adults typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision-making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, a detailed review was conducted of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older adults. A pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision-making in older adults with CVD was found, as well as a paucity of data on the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on outcomes that are particularly important to older adults, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older adults representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older adults in the study design. The results of these studies will provide the foundation for

  1. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on treating blood cholesterol and assessing cardiovascular risk: a busy practitioner's guide.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arpeta; Smith, Donald A

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk were released in mid-November 2013. This article explains the guidelines, the risk equations, and their derivations, and addresses criticisms so that practicing physicians may be more comfortable in using the guidelines and the risk equations to inform patients of their atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk and choices to reduce that risk. The article also addresses patient concerns about statin safety if lifestyle changes have been insufficient to reduce their risk.

  2. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M.; Jones, Peter H.; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Virani, Salim S.

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used to examine our objectives. PMID:27054163

  3. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M; Jones, Peter H; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M; Virani, Salim S

    2016-06-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used to examine our objectives.

  4. Adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction is associated with bone health in older Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share common pathophysiological mechanisms. It is possible that strategies to reduce CVD risk may also benefit bone health. We tested the hypothesis that adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Li...

  5. An updated definition of stroke for the 21st century: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Kasner, Scott E; Broderick, Joseph P; Caplan, Louis R; Connors, J J Buddy; Culebras, Antonio; Elkind, Mitchell S V; George, Mary G; Hamdan, Allen D; Higashida, Randall T; Hoh, Brian L; Janis, L Scott; Kase, Carlos S; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Lee, Jin-Moo; Moseley, Michael E; Peterson, Eric D; Turan, Tanya N; Valderrama, Amy L; Vinters, Harry V

    2013-07-01

    Despite the global impact and advances in understanding the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases, the term "stroke" is not consistently defined in clinical practice, in clinical research, or in assessments of the public health. The classic definition is mainly clinical and does not account for advances in science and technology. The Stroke Council of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association convened a writing group to develop an expert consensus document for an updated definition of stroke for the 21st century. Central nervous system infarction is defined as brain, spinal cord, or retinal cell death attributable to ischemia, based on neuropathological, neuroimaging, and/or clinical evidence of permanent injury. Central nervous system infarction occurs over a clinical spectrum: Ischemic stroke specifically refers to central nervous system infarction accompanied by overt symptoms, while silent infarction by definition causes no known symptoms. Stroke also broadly includes intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The updated definition of stroke incorporates clinical and tissue criteria and can be incorporated into practice, research, and assessments of the public health.

  6. Particulate matter air pollution and cardiovascular disease: An update to the scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Pope, C Arden; Brook, Jeffrey R; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Diez-Roux, Ana V; Holguin, Fernando; Hong, Yuling; Luepker, Russell V; Mittleman, Murray A; Peters, Annette; Siscovick, David; Smith, Sidney C; Whitsel, Laurie; Kaufman, Joel D

    2010-06-01

    In 2004, the first American Heart Association scientific statement on "Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Disease" concluded that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In the interim, numerous studies have expanded our understanding of this association and further elucidated the physiological and molecular mechanisms involved. The main objective of this updated American Heart Association scientific statement is to provide a comprehensive review of the new evidence linking PM exposure with cardiovascular disease, with a specific focus on highlighting the clinical implications for researchers and healthcare providers. The writing group also sought to provide expert consensus opinions on many aspects of the current state of science and updated suggestions for areas of future research. On the basis of the findings of this review, several new conclusions were reached, including the following: Exposure to PM <2.5 microm in diameter (PM(2.5)) over a few hours to weeks can trigger cardiovascular disease-related mortality and nonfatal events; longer-term exposure (eg, a few years) increases the risk for cardiovascular mortality to an even greater extent than exposures over a few days and reduces life expectancy within more highly exposed segments of the population by several months to a few years; reductions in PM levels are associated with decreases in cardiovascular mortality within a time frame as short as a few years; and many credible pathological mechanisms have been elucidated that lend biological plausibility to these findings. It is the opinion of the writing group that the overall evidence is consistent with a causal relationship between PM(2.5) exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This body of evidence has grown and been strengthened substantially since the first American Heart Association scientific statement was published. Finally, PM(2.5) exposure is deemed a modifiable factor

  7. Estimating Longitudinal Risks and Benefits From Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies Among Medicare Patients: The Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool: A Special Report From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Sanghavi, Darshak M; Wright, Janet S; Pelser, Colleen; Gulati, Martha; Masoudi, Frederick A; Goff, David C

    2017-03-28

    The Million Hearts Initiative has a goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes-the leading causes of mortality-through several public health and healthcare strategies by 2017. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology support the program. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model was developed by Million Hearts and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services as a strategy to assess a value-based payment approach toward reduction in 10-year predicted risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) by implementing cardiovascular preventive strategies to manage the "ABCS" (aspirin therapy in appropriate patients, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation). The purpose of this special report is to describe the development and intended use of the Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool. The Million Hearts Tool reinforces and builds on the "2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk" by allowing clinicians to estimate baseline and updated 10-year ASCVD risk estimates for primary prevention patients adhering to the appropriate ABCS over time, alone or in combination. The tool provides updated risk estimates based on evidence from high-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the ABCS therapies. This novel approach to personalized estimation of benefits from risk-reducing therapies in primary prevention may help target therapies to those in whom they will provide the greatest benefit, and serves as the basis for a Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services program designed to evaluate the Million Hearts Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model.

  8. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  9. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  10. Promoting physical activity through the shared use of school recreational spaces: a policy statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Young, Deborah R; Spengler, John O; Frost, Natasha; Evenson, Kelly R; Vincent, Jeffrey M; Whitsel, Laurie

    2014-09-01

    Most Americans are not sufficiently physically active, even though regular physical activity improves health and reduces the risk of many chronic diseases. Those living in rural, non-White, and lower-income communities often have insufficient access to places to be active, which can contribute to their lower level of physical activity. The shared use of school recreational facilities can provide safe and affordable places for communities. Studies suggest that challenges to shared use include additional cost, liability protection, communication among constituencies interested in sharing space, and decision-making about scheduling and space allocation. This American Heart Association policy statement has provided recommendations for federal, state, and local decision-makers to support and expand opportunities for physical activity in communities through the shared use of school spaces.

  11. Promoting Physical Activity Through the Shared Use of School Recreational Spaces: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association

    PubMed Central

    Young, Deborah R.; Spengler, John O.; Frost, Natasha; Evenson, Kelly R.; Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Whitsel, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Most Americans are not sufficiently physically active, even though regular physical activity improves health and reduces the risk of many chronic diseases. Those living in rural, non-White, and lower-income communities often have insufficient access to places to be active, which can contribute to their lower level of physical activity. The shared use of school recreational facilities can provide safe and affordable places for communities. Studies suggest that challenges to shared use include additional cost, liability protection, communication among constituencies interested in sharing space, and decision-making about scheduling and space allocation. This American Heart Association policy statement has provided recommendations for federal, state, and local decision-makers to support and expand opportunities for physical activity in communities through the shared use of school spaces. PMID:24134355

  12. Heart failure in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Yancy, Clyde W

    2005-10-10

    The demographics of the United States are changing, and in the next few decades there will no longer be a racial/ethnic majority population. Increased awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in special populations is warranted as these populations increase. Heart failure carries a substantial burden on those affected, particularly African Americans, who have a disproportionate burden of heart disease. Current treatments for heart failure include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, angiotensin II-receptor antagonists, and vasodilating agents. This review discusses the unique characteristics of CVD in African Americans and addresses the need for targeted treatments to reduce the excess burden found in this population.

  13. Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Children: Challenges and Opportunities for 2020 and Beyond: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Julia; Daniels, Stephen R; Hagberg, Nancy; Isasi, Carmen R; Kelly, Aaron S; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Pate, Russell R; Pratt, Charlotte; Shay, Christina M; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Urbina, Elaine; Van Horn, Linda V; Zachariah, Justin P

    2016-09-20

    This document provides a pediatric-focused companion to "Defining and Setting National Goals for Cardiovascular Health Promotion and Disease Reduction: The American Heart Association's Strategic Impact Goal Through 2020 and Beyond," focused on cardiovascular health promotion and disease reduction in adults and children. The principles detailed in the document reflect the American Heart Association's new dynamic and proactive goal to promote cardiovascular health throughout the life course. The primary focus is on adult cardiovascular health and disease prevention, but critical to achievement of this goal is maintenance of ideal cardiovascular health from birth through childhood to young adulthood and beyond. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles and metrics that define cardiovascular health in children for the clinical or research setting, and a balanced and critical appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of the cardiovascular health construct in children and adolescents is provided. Specifically, this document discusses 2 important factors: the promotion of ideal cardiovascular health in all children and the improvement of cardiovascular health metric scores in children currently classified as having poor or intermediate cardiovascular health. Other topics include the current status of cardiovascular health in US children, opportunities for the refinement of health metrics, improvement of health metric scores, and possibilities for promoting ideal cardiovascular health. Importantly, concerns about the suitability of using single thresholds to identify elevated cardiovascular risk throughout the childhood years and the limits of our current knowledge are noted, and suggestions for future directions and research are provided.

  14. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Hemphill, J. Claude; Anderson, Craig; Becker, Kyra; Broderick, Joseph P.; Connolly, E. Sander; Greenberg, Steven M.; Huang, James N.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Messe, Steven R.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Selim, Magdy; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this statement is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods A formal literature search of Medline was performed. Data were synthesized with the use of evidence tables. Writing committee members met by teleconference to discuss data derived recommendations. The American Heart Association Stroke Council’s Levels of Evidence grading algorithm was used to grade each recommendation. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Leadership Committee. It is intended that this guideline be fully updated in 3 years’ time. Results Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with ICH. The focus was sub-divided into diagnosis, hemostasis, blood pressure management, inpatient and nursing management, preventing medical comorbidities, surgical treatment, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, prevention of recurrence, and future considerations. Conclusions ICH is a serious medical condition where outcome can be impacted by early, aggressive care. The guidelines offer a framework for goal directed treatment of the ICH patient. PMID:20651276

  15. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  16. Depressive symptoms are associated with leukocyte telomere length in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Lin, Jue; Lee, Elisa T.; Cole, Shelley A.; Calhoun, Darren; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with depression have an increased risk for many aging-related disorders, but the biological mechanisms underlying this link remain to be determined. Here we examined the association between depressive symptoms and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a marker of biological aging, among 2,175 American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D), which was categorized into four levels: none (< 10), mild (10-15), moderate (16-24), and severe (> 24). LTL (T/S ratio) was quantified by qPCR. The association between depressive symptoms and LTL was examined by multivariate generalized estimating equation models, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors, and chronic conditions. Results showed that individuals with a higher level of depressive symptoms had shorter LTL. Specifically, LTL in participants reporting none, mild, moderate, and severe depressive symptoms were 1.000, 0.999, 0.988, and 0.966, respectively (P for trend = 0.0278). Moreover, gender appears to modulate the effect of reported depressive symptoms that fall in the severe range (CES-D > 24) on LTL (P for interaction = 0.0346). Our results suggest that depressive symptoms may accelerate biological aging through pathways beyond traditional risk factors in American Indians. PMID:27870638

  17. New cholesterol guidelines for the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: a comparison of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines with the 2014 National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Jacobson, Terry A

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and compares it with the 2014 National Lipid Association (NLA) Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia. The review discusses some of the distinctions between the guidelines, including how to determine a patient's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, the role of lipoprotein treatment targets, the importance of moderate- and high-intensity statin therapy, and the use of nonstatin therapy in light of the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial.

  18. Association of Cardiometabolic Genes with Arsenic Metabolism Biomarkers in American Indian Communities: The Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS)

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Franceschini, Nora; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Gribble, Matthew O.; Haack, Karin; Laston, Sandra; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; North, Kari E.; Lee, Elisa; Yracheta, Joseph; Best, Lyle G.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Kent, Jack; Cole, Shelley A.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) is subject to inter-individual variability, which is explained partly by genetic determinants. Objectives: We investigated the association of genetic variants with arsenic species and principal components of arsenic species in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). Methods: We examined variants previously associated with cardiometabolic traits (~ 200,000 from Illumina Cardio MetaboChip) or arsenic metabolism and toxicity (670) among 2,428 American Indian participants in the SHFS. Urine arsenic species were measured by high performance liquid chromatography–inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS), and percent arsenic species [iAs, monomethylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA), divided by their sum × 100] were logit transformed. We created two orthogonal principal components that summarized iAs, MMA, and DMA and were also phenotypes for genetic analyses. Linear regression was performed for each phenotype, dependent on allele dosage of the variant. Models accounted for familial relatedness and were adjusted for age, sex, total arsenic levels, and population stratification. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were stratified by study site and were meta-analyzed. Bonferroni correction was used to account for multiple testing. Results: Variants at 10q24 were statistically significant for all percent arsenic species and principal components of arsenic species. The index SNP for iAs%, MMA%, and DMA% (rs12768205) and for the principal components (rs3740394, rs3740393) were located near AS3MT, whose gene product catalyzes methylation of iAs to MMA and DMA. Among the candidate arsenic variant associations, functional SNPs in AS3MT and 10q24 were most significant (p < 9.33 × 10–5). Conclusions: This hypothesis-driven association study supports the role of common variants in arsenic metabolism, particularly AS3MT and 10q24. Citation: Balakrishnan P, Vaidya D, Franceschini N, Voruganti

  19. Gender differences in the association of visceral and subcutaneous adiposity with adiponectin in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adiponectin, paradoxically reduced in obesity and with lower levels in African Americans (AA), modulates several cardiometabolic risk factors. Because abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), known to be reduced in AA, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) compartments may confer differential metabolic risk profiles, we investigated the associations of VAT and SAT with serum adiponectin, separately by gender, with the hypothesis that VAT is more strongly inversely associated with adiponectin than SAT. Methods Participants from the Jackson Heart Study, an ongoing cohort of AA (n = 2,799; 64% women; mean age, 55 ± 11 years) underwent computer tomography assessment of SAT and VAT volumes, and had stored serum specimens analyzed for adiponectin levels. These levels were examined by gender in relation to increments of VAT and SAT. Results Compared to women, men had significantly lower mean levels of adiponectin (3.9 ± 3.0 μg/mL vs. 6.0 ± 4.4 μg/mL; p < 0.01) and mean volume of SAT (1,721 ± 803 cm3 vs. 2,668 ± 968 cm3; p < 0.01) but significantly higher mean volume of VAT (884 ± 416 cm3 vs. 801 ± 363 cm3; p < 0.01). Among women, a one standard deviation increment in VAT was inversely associated with adiponectin (β = − 0.13; p < 0.0001) after controlling for age, systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, education, pack-years of smoking and daily intake of alcohol. The statistically significant inverse association of VAT and adiponectin persisted after additionally adjusting for SAT, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), suggesting that VAT provides significant information above and beyond BMI and WC. Among men, after the same multivariable adjustment, there was a direct association of SAT and adiponectin (β = 0.18; p = 0.002) that persisted when controlling for BMI and WC, supporting a beneficial effect of

  20. Adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction is associated with bone health in older Puerto Ricans123

    PubMed Central

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share common pathophysiological mechanisms. It is possible that strategies to reduce CVD risk may also benefit bone health. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that adherence to the 2006 American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations (AHA-DLR) is associated with bone health. Design: We previously developed a unique diet and lifestyle score (American Heart Association Diet and Lifestyle Score; AHA-DLS) to assess adherence to the AHA-DLR. In a cross-sectional study of 933 Puerto Ricans aged 47–79 y, we modified the AHA-DLS to test associations with bone health. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck, trochanter, total hip, and lumbar spine (L2–L4) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: For every 5-unit increase in the modified AHA-DLS, BMD at the femoral neck, trochanter, total hip, and lumbar spine (L2–L4) was associated with a 0.005–0.008-g/cm2 (P < 0.05) higher value. No component of the AHA-DLR alone was responsible for the observed positive associations. For every 5-unit increase in the modified AHA-DLS, the odds for osteoporosis or osteopenia at the trochanter, total hip, and lumbar spine (L2–L4) were lower by 14% (OR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.92), 17% (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.92), and 9% (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99), respectively. Conclusions: Dietary guidelines for CVD risk reduction may also benefit bone health in this Hispanic cohort. Synchronizing dietary guidelines for these 2 common diseases may provide a simplified public health message. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01231958. PMID:24047918

  1. 78 FR 8345 - American Heart Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013 American Heart Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading... one is immune to heart disease, everyone can take steps to reduce their risk. During American...

  2. The role of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in patients with American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage B heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Bertram

    2012-04-01

    This article focuses on the potential role of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) in patients with stage B heart failure (HF) due to hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and/or visceral obesity with the metabolic syndrome. It briefly discusses the role of MRAs in patients with left ventricular dilatation due to nonischemic or ischemic cardiomyopathy and in those with a prior myocardial infarction but without left ventricular dilatation or evidence of HF.

  3. More than 10 million steps in the right direction: results from the first American Heart Association scientific sessions walking challenge.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Robert A; Arena, Ross; Després, Jean-Pierre; Ciarochi, Amy; Croll, Elizabeth; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Global Congress theme at the American Heart Association (AHA) Annual Scientific Sessions was Physical Activity (PA). As a key component of the Congress, iHealth working in collaboration with AHA provided a Bluetooth-enabled wireless PA and sleep tracker to up to 2,000 Scientific Sessions attendees. Approximately 1850 Scientific Sessions attendees registered for, received a PA tracker and participated in the Walking Challenge. More than 10 million steps were walked by participants (10,703,504) during the 2.5 days of the Walking Challenge. This translates into almost 6000 miles walked (5976.3 miles) and 656,716 calories burned by participants during the Challenge. The Global Congress of PA held at Scientific Sessions 2013 not only extensively reviewed the science of PA as a powerful/independent and, most importantly, modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, but it also provided evidence from a fun and entertaining challenge that PA as a risk behavior can be assessed and targeted. We just took 10 million steps in the right direction. Join us and make your steps count!

  4. 77 FR 5373 - American Heart Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8775 of January 31, 2012 American Heart Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every year, heart disease... the steps each of us can take to reduce the risk of heart disease and recommit to better heart...

  5. Perceived stress following race-based discrimination at work is associated with hypertension in African-Americans. The metro Atlanta heart disease study, 1999-2001.

    PubMed

    Din-Dzietham, Rebecca; Nembhard, Wendy N; Collins, Rakale; Davis, Sharon K

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing evidence of an association between stress related to job strain and hypertension. However little data exist on stress from racism and race-based discrimination at work (RBDW). The objective of this study was to investigate whether blood pressure (BP) outcomes are positively associated with stressful racism towards African-Americans from non-African-Americans as well as RBDW from other African-Americans. The metro Atlanta heart disease study was a population-based study which included 356 African-American men and women, aged >/=21 years, residing in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia during 1999-2001. Perceived stress was self-reported by 197 participants for racism from non-African-Americans and 95 for RBDW from other African-Americans. Sitting systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP were taken at a clinic visit and was the average of the last two of three BP measures. Hypertension was self-reported as physician-diagnosed high BP on 2 or more visits. Logistic and least-squares linear regression models were fit accordingly and separately for each type of stress, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and coping abilities. The likelihood of hypertension significantly increased with higher levels of perceived stress following racism from non-African-Americans, but not from RBDW from other African-Americans; adjusted odd ratios (95% CI) were 1.4 (1.0, 1.9) and 1.2 (0.8, 1.5) per unit increment of stress. The adjusted magnitude of SBP and DBP increase between low and very high level of stress, conversely, was greater when RBDW originated from African-Americans than racism from non-African-Americans. Stressful racism and RBDW encounters are associated with increased SBP and DBP and increased likelihood of hypertension in African-Americans. Future studies with a larger sample size are warranted to further explore these findings for mechanistic understanding and occupational policy consideration regarding stress risk reduction.

  6. Application of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guideline to the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1998 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Shin; Oh, Tae Jung; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline for the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends statin therapy for individuals at high risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The aim of this study was to investigate serial trends in the percentages of Korean adults considered eligible for statin therapy according to the new ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) I (1998, n=7,698), II (2001, n=5,654), III (2005, n=5,269), IV (2007 to 2009, n=15,727), and V (2010 to 2012, n=16,304), which used a stratified, multistage, probability sampling design, were used as representative of the entire Korean population. Results The percentage of adults eligible for statin therapy according to the ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline increased with time: 17.0%, 19.0%, 20.8%, 20.2%, and 22.0% in KNHANES I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively (P=0.022). The prevalence of ASCVD was 1.4% in KNHANES I and increased to 3.3% in KNHANES V. The percentage of diabetic patients aged 40 to 75 years with a low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of 70 to 189 mg/dL increased from 4.8% in KNHANES I to 6.1% in KNHANES V. People with an estimated 10-year ASCVD risk ≥7.5% and aged 40 to 75 years accounted for the largest percentage among the four statin benefit groups: 9.1% in KNHANES I and 11.0% in KNHANES V. Conclusion Application of the 2013 ACC/AHA guideline has found that the percentage of Korean adults in the statin benefit groups has increased over the past 15 years. PMID:28029013

  7. Beyond medications and diet: alternative approaches to lowering blood pressure: a scientific statement from the american heart association.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Appel, Lawrence J; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Bisognano, John D; Elliott, William J; Fuchs, Flavio D; Hughes, Joel W; Lackland, Daniel T; Staffileno, Beth A; Townsend, Raymond R; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Many antihypertensive medications and lifestyle changes are proven to reduce blood pressure. Over the past few decades, numerous additional modalities have been evaluated in regard to their potential blood pressure-lowering abilities. However, these nondietary, nondrug treatments, collectively called alternative approaches, have generally undergone fewer and less rigorous trials. This American Heart Association scientific statement aims to summarize the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of several alternative approaches and to provide a class of recommendation for their implementation in clinical practice based on the available level of evidence from the published literature. Among behavioral therapies, Transcendental Meditation (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B), other meditation techniques (Class III, Level of Evidence C), yoga (Class III, Level of Evidence C), other relaxation therapies (Class III, Level of Evidence B), and biofeedback approaches (Class IIB, Level of Evidence B) generally had modest, mixed, or no consistent evidence demonstrating their efficacy. Between the noninvasive procedures and devices evaluated, device-guided breathing (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B) had greater support than acupuncture (Class III, Level of Evidence B). Exercise-based regimens, including aerobic (Class I, Level of Evidence A), dynamic resistance (Class IIA, Level of Evidence B), and isometric handgrip (Class IIB, Level of Evidence C) modalities, had relatively stronger supporting evidence. It is the consensus of the writing group that it is reasonable for all individuals with blood pressure levels >120/80 mm Hg to consider trials of alternative approaches as adjuvant methods to help lower blood pressure when clinically appropriate. A suggested management algorithm is provided, along with recommendations for prioritizing the use of the individual approaches in clinical practice based on their level of evidence for blood pressure lowering, risk-to-benefit ratio, potential

  8. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-07

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  9. 75 FR 6085 - American Heart Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010 American Heart Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States... country. Although heart disease is one of our Nation's most costly and widespread health problems, it...

  10. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecule Read More ABTA News April 6, 2017 Chicago-Based American Brain Tumor Association’s Breakthrough for Brain ... Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain Tumor Association Phone: ...

  11. Announcement: American Heart Month - February 2017.

    PubMed

    2017-02-17

    Each February, the observance of American Heart Month helps raise awareness of ways to stay heart healthy and prevent heart disease. For 30 years, the number of deaths from heart disease, the number one killer of persons in the United States, declined. However, that progress has stalled in recent years, potentially because of high rates of obesity and hypertension, important risk factors for heart disease (1). With increased awareness and education, everyone can work together to prevent the conditions that lead to heart disease.

  12. Association of Aldosterone Synthase Polymorphism (CYP11B2 -344T>C) and Genetic Ancestry with Atrial Fibrillation and Serum Aldosterone in African Americans with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bress, Adam; Han, Jin; Patel, Shitalben R.; Desai, Ankit A.; Mansour, Ibrahim; Groo, Vicki; Progar, Kristin; Shah, Ebony; Stamos, Thomas D.; Wing, Coady; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Kittles, Rick; Cavallari, Larisa H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which aldosterone synthase genotype (CYP11B2) and genetic ancestry correlate with atrial fibrillation (AF) and serum aldosterone in African Americans with heart failure. Clinical data, echocardiographic measurements, and a genetic sample for determination of CYP11B2 -344T>C (rs1799998) genotype and genetic ancestry were collected from 194 self-reported African Americans with chronic, ambulatory heart failure. Genetic ancestry was determined using 105 autosomal ancestry informative markers. In a sub-set of patients (n = 126), serum was also collected for determination of circulating aldosterone. The CYP11B2 −344C allele frequency was 18% among the study population, and 19% of patients had AF. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the CYP11B2 −344CC genotype was a significant independent predictor of AF (OR 12.7, 95% CI 1.60–98.4, p = 0.0150, empirical p = 0.011) while holding multiple clinical factors, left atrial size, and percent European ancestry constant. Serum aldosterone was significantly higher among patients with AF (p = 0.036), whereas increased West African ancestry was inversely correlated with serum aldosterone (r = −0.19, p = 0.037). The CYP11B2 −344CC genotype was also overrepresented among patients with extreme aldosterone elevation (≥90th percentile, p = 0.0145). In this cohort of African Americans with chronic ambulatory heart failure, the CYP11B2 −344T>C genotype was a significant independent predictor of AF while holding clinical, echocardiographic predictors, and genetic ancestry constant. In addition, increased West African ancestry was associated with decreased serum aldosterone levels, potentially providing an explanation for the lower risk for AF observed among African Americans. PMID:23936266

  13. Cardiovascular evaluation and management of severely obese patients undergoing surgery: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Paul; Alpert, Martin A; Fleisher, Lee A; Thompson, Paul D; Sugerman, Harvey J; Burke, Lora E; Marceau, Picard; Franklin, Barry A

    2009-07-07

    Obesity is associated with comorbidities that may lead to disability and death. During the past 20 years, the number of individuals with a body mass index >30, 40, and 50 kg/m(2), respectively, has doubled, quadrupled, and quintupled in the United States. The risk of developing comorbid conditions rises with increasing body mass index. Possible cardiac symptoms such as exertional dyspnea and lower-extremity edema occur commonly and are nonspecific in obesity. The physical examination and electrocardiogram often underestimate cardiac dysfunction in obese patients. The risk of an adverse perioperative cardiac event in obese patients is related to the nature and severity of their underlying heart disease, associated comorbidities, and the type of surgery. Severe obesity has not been associated with increased mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery but has been associated with an increased length of hospital stay and with a greater likelihood of renal failure and prolonged assisted ventilation. Comorbidities that influence the preoperative cardiac risk assessment of severely obese patients include the presence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, heart failure, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension related to sleep apnea and hypoventilation, cardiac arrhythmias (primarily atrial fibrillation), and deep vein thrombosis. When preoperatively evaluating risk for surgery, the clinician should consider age, gender, cardiorespiratory fitness, electrolyte disorders, and heart failure as independent predictors for surgical morbidity and mortality. An obesity surgery mortality score for gastric bypass has also been proposed. Given the high prevalence of severely obese patients, this scientific advisory was developed to provide cardiologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other healthcare professionals with recommendations for the preoperative cardiovascular evaluation, intraoperative and perioperative management, and postoperative cardiovascular care of

  14. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (Fish Oil) Supplementation and the Prevention of Clinical Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Siscovick, David S; Barringer, Thomas A; Fretts, Amanda M; Wu, Jason H Y; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Costello, Rebecca B; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Jacobson, Terry A; Engler, Mary B; Alger, Heather M; Appel, Lawrence J; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-03-13

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the effects of supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, commonly called fish oils) on the occurrence of clinical cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of supplementation for the primary prevention of clinical cardiovascular events in the general population have not been examined, RCTs have assessed the role of supplementation in secondary prevention among patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and those with prevalent coronary heart disease. In this scientific advisory, we take a clinical approach and focus on common indications for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements related to the prevention of clinical cardiovascular events. We limited the scope of our review to large RCTs of supplementation with major clinical cardiovascular disease end points; meta-analyses were considered secondarily. We discuss the features of available RCTs and provide the rationale for our recommendations. We then use existing American Heart Association criteria to assess the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence. On the basis of our review of the cumulative evidence from RCTs designed to assess the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events, we update prior recommendations for patients with prevalent coronary heart disease, and we offer recommendations, when data are available, for patients with other clinical indications, including patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes and those with high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

  15. Occupational Health Services Shows Its Support for American Heart Month | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has recognized February as American Heart Month since President Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 proclamation made it an annual occurrence. Throughout the month, Occupational Health Services did its part to help educate NCI and Frederick National Lab employees about the dangers of heart disease.

  16. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  17. American Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Association American Medical Association AMA Store AMA Wire The JAMA Network AMA Journal of Ethics Become ... care Search the AMA Latest News from AMA Wire Ethics of physician well-being: What the AMA ...

  18. The Social Patterning of Sleep in African Americans: Associations of Socioeconomic Position and Neighborhood Characteristics with Sleep in the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dayna A.; Lisabeth, Lynda; Hickson, DeMarc; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Taylor, Herman; Diez Roux, Ana V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated cross-sectional associations of individual-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and neighborhood characteristics (social cohesion, violence, problems, disadvantage) with sleep duration and sleep quality in 5,301 African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study. Methods: All measures were self-reported. Sleep duration was assessed as hours of sleep; sleep quality was reported as poor (1) to excellent (5). SEP was measured by categorized years of education and income. Multinomial logistic and linear regression models were fit to examine the associations of SEP and neighborhood characteristics (modeled dichotomously and tertiles) with sleep duration (short vs. normal, long vs. normal) and continuous sleep duration and quality after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Results: The mean sleep duration was 6.4 ± 1.5 hours, 54% had a short (≤ 6 h) sleep duration, 5% reported long (≥ 9 h) sleep duration, and 24% reported fair to poor sleep quality. Lower education was associated with greater odds of long sleep (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.42, 3.38) and poorer sleep quality (β = −0.17, 95% CI = −0.27, −0.07) compared to higher education after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Findings were similar for income. High neighborhood violence was associated with shorter sleep duration (−9.82 minutes, 95% CI = −16.98, −2.66) and poorer sleep quality (β = −0.11, 95% CI = −0.20, 0.00) after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Results were similar for neighborhood problems. In secondary analyses adjusted for depressive symptoms in a subset of participants, most associations were attenuated and only associations of low SEP with higher odds of long sleep and higher neighborhood violence with poorer sleep quality remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Social and environmental characteristics are associated with sleep duration and quality in African Americans

  19. Surgery for aortic dilatation in patients with bicuspid aortic valves: A statement of clarification from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-04-01

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: The "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  20. Surgery for Aortic Dilatation in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Statement of Clarification From the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M; Halperin, Jonathan L; Levine, Glenn N; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Albert, Nancy M; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Birtcher, Kim K; Bozkurt, Biykem; Brindis, Ralph G; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Curtis, Lesley H; Fleisher, Lee A; Gentile, Federico; Gidding, Samuel; Hlatky, Mark A; Ikonomidis, John; Joglar, José; Kovacs, Richard J; Ohman, E Magnus; Pressler, Susan J; Sellke, Frank W; Shen, Win-Kuang; Wijeysundera, Duminda N

    2016-02-16

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: the "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (Circulation. 2010;121:e266-e369) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (Circulation. 2014;129:e521-e643). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  1. Surgery for Aortic Dilatation in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Statement of Clarification From the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-02-16

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: the "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  2. American Behcet's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awareness Day May 20th is Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about ... org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI 48308 Contact ...

  3. American Burn Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Journal's website MONTHLY HEADLINES from MSKTC (Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) The American Burn Association Web site contains general information for burn care professionals. The ABA Web site is not intended ...

  4. American Podiatric Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... at The National Learn More about The National Advertisement Advertisement @APMA Tweets by @APMA Follow @APMA Featured Webinars ... take advantage of early-bird rates! Register now! Advertisement © 2017 American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc. All rights ...

  5. American Sleep Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Disorders Book Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Changing Bad Sleep Habits Asthma and Sleep ...

  6. American Sleep Apnea Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself ...

  7. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation endorsed by the World Heart Federation and ...

  8. Socioeconomic Position Is Positively Associated With Blood Pressure Dipping Among African-American Adults: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Diez Roux, Ana V; Wyatt, Sharon B; Gebreab, Samson Y; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Sarpong, Daniel F; Taylor, Herman A; Wofford, Marion R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blunted nocturnal blood pressure (NBP) dipping is a significant predictor of cardiovascular events. Lower socioeconomic position (SEP) may be an important predictor of NBP dipping, especially in African Americans (AA). However, the determinants of NBP dipping are not fully understood. METHODS The cross-sectional associations of individual and neighborhood SEP with NBP dipping, assessed by 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, were examined among 837 AA adults (Mean age: 59.2 ± 10.7 years; 69.2% women), after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension status, body mass index (BMI), health behaviors, office, and 24-h systolic BP (SBP). RESULTS The mean hourly SBP was consistently lower among participants in the highest category of individual income compared to those in the lowest category, and these differences were most pronounced during sleeping hours. The odds of NBP dipping (defined as >10% decline in the mean asleep SBP compared to the mean awake SBP) increased by 31% (95% confidence interval: 13–53%) and 18% (95% confidence interval: 0–39%) for each s.d. increase in income and years of education, respectively, after multivariable adjustment. CONCLUSIONS NBP dipping is patterned by income and education in AA adults even after accounting for known risk factors. These results suggest that low SEP is a risk factor for insufficient NBP dipping in AA. PMID:21654853

  9. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Adolfo; Chen, Haiying; Lacy, Mary E.; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies on the association between hs-CRP and incident type 2 diabetes among African Americans have been inconclusive. We examined the association between hs-CRP and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort (Jackson Heart Study). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS hs-CRP was measured in 3,340 participants. Incident diabetes was defined by fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or A1C ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) at follow-up. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident diabetes, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes family history, alcohol, HDL, triglycerides, hypertension status, hypertension medications, physical activity, BMI, HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMAIR), and waist circumference. RESULTS Participants (63% women) were aged 53.3 ± 12.5 years. During a median follow-up of 7.5 years, 17.4% developed diabetes (23.1/1,000 person-years, 95% CI 21.3–25.1). After adjustment, the HR (hs-CRP third vs. first tertile) was 1.64 (95% CI 1.26–2.13). In separate models, further adjustment for BMI and waist circumference attenuated this association (HR 1.28 [95% CI 0.97–1.69] and 1.35 [95% CI 1.03–1.78, P < 0.05 for trend], respectively). Upon adding HOMAIR in the models, the association was no longer significant. In adjusted HOMAIR-stratified analysis, the hs-CRP–diabetes association appeared stronger in participants with HOMAIR <3.0 compared with HOMAIR ≥3.0 (P < 0.0001 for interaction). The association was also stronger among nonobese participants, although not significant when adjusted for HOMAIR. CONCLUSIONS Low-grade inflammation, as measured by hs-CRP level, may have an important role in the development of diabetes among African Americans with a lesser degree of insulin resistance. PMID:26068864

  10. Blood pressure differences associated with Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial for Heart Health (OMNIHEART)-like diet compared with a typical American Diet.

    PubMed

    Molitor, John; Brown, Ian J; Chan, Queenie; Papathomas, Michail; Liverani, Silvia; Molitor, NuooTing; Richardson, Sylvia; Van Horn, Linda; Daviglus, Martha L; Dyer, Alan; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-Sodium (DASH-Sodium) trial demonstrated beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) of the DASH diet with lower sodium intake when compared with typical American diet. The subsequent Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial for Heart Health (OMNIHEART) trial reported additional BP benefits from replacing carbohydrate in the DASH diet with either protein or monounsaturated fats. The primary aim of this study is to assess possible BP benefits of an OMNIHEART-like diet in free-living Americans using cross-sectional US population data of the International Study of Macronutrients, Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) study. The INTERMAP data include four 24-hour dietary recalls, 2 timed 24-hour urine collections, 8 BP readings for 2195 individuals aged 40 to 59 years from 8 US INTERMAP population samples. Analyses are conducted using 2 approaches: (1) regression of BP on a linear OMNIHEART nutrient score calculated for each individual and (2) a Bayesian approach comparing estimated BP levels of an OMNIHEART-like nutrient profile with a typical American nutrient profile. After adjustment for potential confounders, an OMNIHEART score higher by 1 point was associated with systolic/diastolic BP differences of -1.0/-0.5 mm Hg (both P<0.001). Mean systolic/diastolic BPs were 111.3/68.4 and 115.2/70.6 mm Hg for Bayesian OMNIHEART and Control profiles, respectively, after controlling for possible confounders, with BP differences of -3.9/-2.2 mm Hg, P(difference≤0)=0.98/0.96. Findings were comparable for men and women, for nonhypertensive participants, and with adjustment for antihypertensive treatment. Our findings from data on US population samples indicate broad generalizability of OMNIHEART results beyond the trial setting and support recommendations for an OMNIHEART-style diet for prevention/control of population-wide adverse BP levels.

  11. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert; Blair, Steven N; Arena, Ross; Church, Timothy S; Després, Jean-Pierre; Franklin, Barry A; Haskell, William L; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Levine, Benjamin D; Lavie, Carl J; Myers, Jonathan; Niebauer, Josef; Sallis, Robert; Sawada, Susumu S; Sui, Xuemei; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-12-13

    Mounting evidence has firmly established that low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and mortality rates attributable to various cancers. A growing body of epidemiological and clinical evidence demonstrates not only that CRF is a potentially stronger predictor of mortality than established risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but that the addition of CRF to traditional risk factors significantly improves the reclassification of risk for adverse outcomes. The purpose of this statement is to review current knowledge related to the association between CRF and health outcomes, increase awareness of the added value of CRF to improve risk prediction, and suggest future directions in research. Although the statement is not intended to be a comprehensive review, critical references that address important advances in the field are highlighted. The underlying premise of this statement is that the addition of CRF for risk classification presents health professionals with unique opportunities to improve patient management and to encourage lifestyle-based strategies designed to reduce cardiovascular risk. These opportunities must be realized to optimize the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease and hence meet the American Heart Association's 2020 goals.

  12. Cardiovascular function and treatment in β-thalassemia major: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Dudley J; Udelson, James E; Arai, Andrew E; Bozkurt, Biykem; Cohen, Alan R; Galanello, Renzo; Hoffman, Timothy M; Kiernan, Michael S; Lerakis, Stamatios; Piga, Antonio; Porter, John B; Walker, John Malcolm; Wood, John

    2013-07-16

    This aim of this statement is to report an expert consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac dysfunction in β-thalassemia major (TM). This consensus statement does not cover other hemoglobinopathies, including thalassemia intermedia and sickle cell anemia, in which a different spectrum of cardiovascular complications is typical. There are considerable uncertainties in this field, with a few randomized controlled trials relating to treatment of chronic myocardial siderosis but none relating to treatment of acute heart failure. The principles of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac iron loading in TM are directly relevant to other iron-overload conditions, including in particular Diamond-Blackfan anemia, sideroblastic anemia, and hereditary hemochromatosis. Heart failure is the most common cause of death in TM and primarily results from cardiac iron accumulation. The diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in TM patients differs from that in nonanemic patients because of the cardiovascular adaptation to chronic anemia in non-cardiac-loaded TM patients, which includes resting tachycardia, low blood pressure, enlarged end-diastolic volume, high ejection fraction, and high cardiac output. Chronic anemia also leads to background symptomatology such as dyspnea, which can mask the clinical diagnosis of cardiac dysfunction. Central to early identification of cardiac iron overload in TM is the estimation of cardiac iron by cardiac T2* magnetic resonance. Cardiac T2* <10 ms is the most important predictor of development of heart failure. Serum ferritin and liver iron concentration are not adequate surrogates for cardiac iron measurement. Assessment of cardiac function by noninvasive techniques can also be valuable clinically, but serial measurements to establish trends are usually required because interpretation of single absolute values is complicated by the abnormal cardiovascular hemodynamics in TM and measurement imprecision. Acute decompensated heart failure is a

  13. Native American Homeschooling Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozon, Gina

    2000-01-01

    The Native American Home School Association helps Native parents to provide a good education free from the assimilationist tendencies of public school and to transmit Native values and culture. Discusses various home schooling styles, the effectiveness of home schooling in terms of academic achievement and socialization, and the effectiveness of…

  14. Sleep Duration and Quality: Impact on Lifestyle Behaviors and Cardiometabolic Health: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Grandner, Michael A; Brown, Devin; Conroy, Molly B; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Coons, Michael; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2016-11-01

    Sleep is increasingly recognized as an important lifestyle contributor to health. However, this has not always been the case, and an increasing number of Americans choose to curtail sleep in favor of other social, leisure, or work-related activities. This has resulted in a decline in average sleep duration over time. Sleep duration, mostly short sleep, and sleep disorders have emerged as being related to adverse cardiometabolic risk, including obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the evidence relating sleep duration and sleep disorders to cardiometabolic risk and call for health organizations to include evidence-based sleep recommendations in their guidelines for optimal health.

  15. Resting Heart Rate and Long-Term Outcomes Among African Americans: Insights From the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Kishan S.; Greiner, Melissa A.; Suzuki, Takeki; DeVore, Adam D.; Blackshear, Chad; Maher, Joseph F.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; O’Brien, Emily C.; Mentz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Increased resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in studies of mostly white populations, but its significance is not well established in African Americans whose cardiac comorbidities and structural abnormalities differ. Objective We studied the prognostic utility of heart rate in a community-based African American cohort in Jackson, Mississippi. Design We included 5261 participants in the Jackson Heart Study. Baseline heart rate was assessed by quintiles and as a continuous variable. Study follow-up was greater than 7 years and started in 2000. Setting The Jackson Heart Study, a prospective, community-based study in Jackson, Mississippi. Participants All participants with baseline heart rate documented by 12-lead electrocardiogram without pacing or atrial fibrillation on their baseline Jackson Heart Study exam were included in our study. Main Outcomes and Measures We estimated unadjusted and adjusted associations between heart rate and all-cause mortality and heart failure hospitalization using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Median baseline heart rate was 63 bpm (interquartile range, 57–71 bpm). The highest heart rate quintile (73–118 bpm) included more women, higher rates of diabetes and hypertension, higher body mass index, less average activity, and lower β-blocker use compared with lower quintiles. Caffeine intake and ejection fraction were similar between groups. As a continuous variable, elevated heart rate was associated with increased mortality and heart failure hospitalizations with adjusted hazard ratios for every 5 bpm increase of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.10–1.19) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.05–1.16), respectively. Similar patterns were observed in comparisons between highest and lowest quintiles. Conclusions and Relevance Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased mortality and heart failure hospitalizations among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study. PMID:27681113

  16. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... my congenital heart … Read More Let's Talk About Love... BY Kelly DiMaggio Being in love and in a relationship is one of the ... are born they have … Read More Learning to Love the Scar BY Clare Almand I wrote about ...

  17. American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels C.; Cushman, Mary; Judd, Suzanne E.; McClure, Leslie A.; Lakoski, Susan G.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Safford, Monika M.; Zakai, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 metric is being used to track the population's cardiovascular health (CVH) toward a 2020 goal for improvement. The metric includes body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, physical activity (PA), cigarette smoking, and diet. We hypothesized a lower risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with favorable Life's Simple 7 scores. Methods and Results REGARDS recruited 30 239 black and white participants ≥45 years of age across the United States in 2003–2007. A 14‐point summary score for Life's Simple 7 classified participants into inadequate (0 to 4 points), average (5 to 9 points), and optimal (10 to 14 points) categories. Hazard ratios (HRs) of incident VTE were calculated for these categories, adjusting for age, sex, race, income, education, and region of residence. For comparison, HRs of VTE were calculated using the Framingham 10‐year coronary risk score. There were 263 incident VTE cases over 5.0 years of follow‐up; incidence rates per 1000 person‐years declined from 2.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3 to 3.7) among those in the inadequate category to 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.4) in the optimal category. Compared to the inadequate category, participants in the average category had a 38% lower VTE risk (95% CI, 11 to 57) and participants in the optimal category had a 44% lower risk (95% CI, 18 to 62). The individual score components related to lower VTE risk were ideal PA and BMI. There was no association of Framingham Score with VTE. Conclusions Life's Simple 7, a CVH metric, was associated with reduced VTE risk. Findings suggest that efforts to improve the population's CVH may reduce VTE incidence. PMID:25725088

  18. The Associations of Multiple Dimensions of Discrimination and Abdominal Fat in African American Adults: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tené T.; Liu, Jiankang; Mount, David L.; Younge, Sinead N.; Jenkins, William C.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Williams, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Discrimination may be adversely associated with abdominal obesity, but few studies have examined associations with abdominal fat. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether discrimination was independently associated with visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat and whether these associations differed by sex and age. Methods Participants self-reported experiences of everyday and lifetime discrimination. The main reason for and the coping response to these experiences were also reported. VAT and SAT were quantified by computed tomography. Results In fully adjusted models, higher reports of everyday discrimination were associated with greater SAT, but not VAT, volumes in men only: SAT increased by 3.6 (standard error = 1.8)cm3 for each unit increase in the everyday discrimination score. In women, higher reports of lifetime non-racial discrimination were associated with greater VAT (71.6±32.0, P<0.05) and SAT (212.6±83.6, P<0.05), but these relationships were attenuated after controlling for body mass index. Conclusions These cross-sectional findings do not fully support the independent hypothesis of discrimination and abdominal fat. Additional investigations involving longitudinal designs are warranted. PMID:22278393

  19. Guide to the assessment of physical activity: Clinical and research applications: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Ekelund, Ulf; Freedson, Patty S; Gary, Rebecca A; Richardson, Caroline R; Smith, Derek T; Swartz, Ann M

    2013-11-12

    The deleterious health consequences of physical inactivity are vast, and they are of paramount clinical and research importance. Risk identification, benchmarks, efficacy, and evaluation of physical activity behavior change initiatives for clinicians and researchers all require a clear understanding of how to assess physical activity. In the present report, we have provided a clear rationale for the importance of assessing physical activity levels, and we have documented key concepts in understanding the different dimensions, domains, and terminology associated with physical activity measurement. The assessment methods presented allow for a greater understanding of the vast number of options available to clinicians and researchers when trying to assess physical activity levels in their patients or participants. The primary outcome desired is the main determining factor in the choice of physical activity assessment method. In combination with issues of feasibility/practicality, the availability of resources, and administration considerations, the desired outcome guides the choice of an appropriate assessment tool. The decision matrix, along with the accompanying tables, provides a mechanism for this selection that takes all of these factors into account. Clearly, the assessment method adopted and implemented will vary depending on circumstances, because there is no single best instrument appropriate for every situation. In summary, physical activity assessment should be considered a vital health measure that is tracked regularly over time. All other major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking) are assessed routinely. Physical activity status should also be assessed regularly. Multiple physical activity assessment methods provide reasonably accurate outcome measures, with choices dependent on setting-specific resources and constraints. The present scientific statement provides a guide to

  20. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice ...

  1. AHA Scientific Statement Population Approaches to Improve Diet, Physical Activity, and Smoking Habits A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Afshin, Ashkan; Benowitz, Neal L.; Bittner, Vera; Daniels, Stephen R.; Franch, Harold A.; Jacobs, David R.; Kraus, William E.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Krummel, Debra A.; Popkin, Barry M.; Whitsel, Laurie P.; Zakai, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor lifestyle, including suboptimal diet, physical inactivity, and tobacco use are leading causes of preventable diseases globally. Although even modest population shifts in risk substantially alter health outcomes, the optimal population-level approaches to improve lifestyle are not well established. Methods and Results For this American Heart Association Scientific Statement, the writing group systematically reviewed and graded the current scientific evidence for effective population approaches to improve dietary habits, increase physical activity, and reduce tobacco use. Strategies were considered in 6 broad domains: (1) media and education campaigns; (2) labeling and consumer information; (3) taxation, subsidies, and other economic incentives; (4) school and workplace approaches; (5) local environmental changes; and (6) direct restrictions and mandates. The writing group also reviewed the potential contributions of healthcare systems and surveillance systems to behavior change efforts. Several specific population interventions that achieved a Class I or IIa recommendation with grade A or B evidence were identified, providing a set of specific evidence-based strategies that deserve close attention and prioritization for wider implementation. Effective interventions included specific approaches in all 6 domains evaluated for improving diet, increasing activity, and reducing tobacco use. The writing group also identified several specific interventions in each of these domains for which current evidence was less robust, as well as other inconsistencies and evidence gaps, informing the need for further rigorous and interdisciplinary approaches to evaluate population programs and policies. Conclusions This systematic review identified and graded the evidence for a range of population-based strategies to promote lifestyle change. The findings provide a framework for policy makers, advocacy groups, researchers, clinicians, communities, and other

  2. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  3. Assessing Level of Agreement for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Categorization Between Coronary Artery Calcium Score and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines and the Potential Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Isma'eel, Hussain; Min, David; Al-Shaar, Laila; Hachamovitch, Rory; Halliburton, Sandra; Gentry, James; Griffin, Brian; Schoenhagen, Paul; Phelan, Dermot

    2016-11-15

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cardiovascular prevention guidelines use a new pooled cohort equation (PCE) to predict 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events which form the basis of treatment recommendations. Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been proposed as a means to assess atherosclerotic risk. We sought to study the level of agreement in predicted ASCVD risk by CACS and PCE-calculated models and the potential impact on therapy of additional CACS testing. We studied 687 treatment naive, consecutive patients (mean age 53.5 years, 72% men) who had a CACS study at our institution. Clinical and imaging data were recorded. ASCVD risk was calculated using the published PCE-based algorithm. CACS-based risk was categorized by previously published recommendations. Risk stratification comparisons were made and level of agreement calculated. In the cohort, mean ASCVD PCE-calculated risk was 5.3 ± 5.2% and mean CACS was 80 ± 302 Agatston units (AU). Of the intermediate PCE-calculated risk (5% to <7.5%) cohort, 85% had CACS <100 AU. Of the cohort categorized as reasonable to treat per the ASCVD prevention guidelines, 40% had a CACS of 0 AU and an additional 44% had CACS >0 but <100 AU. The level of agreement between the new PCE model of ASCVD risk and demonstrable coronary artery calcium is low. CACS testing may be most beneficial in those with an intermediate risk of ASCVD (PCE-calculated risk of 5% to <7.5%) where, in approximately half of patients, CACS testing significantly refined risk assessment primarily into a very low-risk category.

  4. American Lung Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Americans live in counties with unhealthy levels of air pollution. Do you know the health risks? Learn more ... Americans live in counties with unhealthy levels of air pollution. Do you know the health risks? Learn more ...

  5. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    PubMed

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  6. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    PubMed

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  8. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  9. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Access to Care Survey Results Events for November 2016: View All Events Su M Tu W Th ... 18 19 Previous Week Next Week 11/17/2016 American Headache Society 2016 Scottsdale Headache Symposium 11/ ...

  10. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  11. Parenting Behaviors, Parent Heart Rate Variability, and Their Associations with Adolescent Heart Rate Variability.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rebecca A; Scott, Brandon G; Weems, Carl F

    2016-11-30

    Adolescence is a potentially important time in the development of emotion regulation and parenting behaviors may play a role. We examined associations among parenting behaviors, parent resting heart rate variability, adolescent resting heart rate variability and parenting behaviors as moderators of the association between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. Ninety-seven youth (11-17 years; 49.5 % female; 34 % African American, 37.1 % Euro-American, 22.6 % other/mixed ethnic background, and 7.2 % Hispanic) and their parents (n = 81) completed a physiological assessment and questionnaires assessing parenting behaviors. Inconsistent discipline and corporal punishment were negatively associated with adolescent resting heart rate variability, while positive parenting and parental involvement were positively associated. Inconsistent discipline and parental involvement moderated the relationship between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. The findings provide evidence for a role of parenting behaviors in shaping the development of adolescent resting heart rate variability with inconsistent discipline and parental involvement potentially influencing the entrainment of resting heart rate variability in parents and their children.

  12. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gandy, M.D., a cardiologist and chief medical marketing officer with the Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta ... and fill up with those rather than other foods,” he said. Dr. Gandy cautioned that even things that are ... Rate (Pulse) 8 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 9 Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  13. Storytelling: The Heart of American Indian Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Frances

    2006-01-01

    Recently some writers and scholars have complained that the academy, particularly American Indian Studies (AIS) programs, gives too much attention to American Indian literature while ignoring scholarly works that focus on the pressing needs of American Indian communities in the areas of economic development, social justice, and sovereignty, among…

  14. 76 FR 6303 - American Heart Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... lead to heart disease, including: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, physical... screenings include blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, and body mass index tests, as well as counseling...

  15. ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-09-27

    Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on

  16. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    PubMed

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  17. American Hospital Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitals & Health Networks H & HN Daily Trustee Research & Trends AHA Policy Research Health Research & Educational Trust AHA ... Associations unless otherwise indicated. AHA does not claim ownership of any content, including content incorporated by permission ...

  18. Being active after your heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines ( ... Infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ...

  19. Living with heart disease and angina

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines. ...

  20. Resistance exercise in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: 2007 update: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark A; Haskell, William L; Ades, Philip A; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Bittner, Vera; Franklin, Barry A; Gulanick, Meg; Laing, Susan T; Stewart, Kerry J

    2007-07-31

    Prescribed and supervised resistance training (RT) enhances muscular strength and endurance, functional capacity and independence, and quality of life while reducing disability in persons with and without cardiovascular disease. These benefits have made RT an accepted component of programs for health and fitness. The American Heart Association recommendations describing the rationale for participation in and considerations for prescribing RT were published in 2000. This update provides current information regarding the (1) health benefits of RT, (2) impact of RT on the cardiovascular system structure and function, (3) role of RT in modifying cardiovascular disease risk factors, (4) benefits in selected populations, (5) process of medical evaluation for participation in RT, and (6) prescriptive methods. The purpose of this update is to provide clinicians with recommendations to facilitate the use of this valuable modality.

  1. Healthy Lifestyle Interventions to Combat Noncommunicable Disease—A Novel Nonhierarchical Connectivity Model for Key Stakeholders: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale.

  2. Healthy lifestyle interventions to combat noncommunicable disease-a novel nonhierarchical connectivity model for key stakeholders: a policy statement from the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Cherie Franklin, Nina; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter; Arena, Ross; Berra, Kathy; Dengel, Donald; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Hivert, Marie-France; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Myers, Jonathan; Whitsel, Laurie; Williams, Mark; Corra, Ugo; Cosentino, Francesco; Dendale, Paul; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Gielen, Stephan; Guazzi, Marco; Halle, Martin; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Piepoli, Massimo F; Pinto, Fausto J; Guthrie, George; Lianov, Liana; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-14

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale.

  3. Use of isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine in African-Americans with heart failure 9 years after the African-American Heart Failure Trial.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith Copelin; Elkayam, Uri; Mancini, Donna; Ofili, Elizabeth; Piña, Ileana; Anand, Inder; Feldman, Arthur Michael; McNamara, Dennis; Leggett, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines recommend combined isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) and hydralazine to reduce mortality and morbidity for African-Americans with symptomatic heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction, currently receiving optimal medical therapy (class I, level A). Nitrates can alleviate HF symptoms, but continuous use is limited by tolerance. Hydralazine may mitigate nitrate tolerance, and the ISDN-hydralazine combination in the Vasodilators in Heart Failure Trial (V-HeFT) I improved survival and exercise tolerance in men with dilated cardiomyopathy or HF with reduced ejection fraction, most notably in self-identified black participants. In the subsequent V-HeFT II, survival was greater with enalapril than with ISDN-hydralazine in the overall cohort, but mortality rate was similar in the enalapril and ISDN-hydralazine groups in the self-identified black patients. Consequently, in the African-American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) in self-identified black patients with symptomatic HF, adding a fixed-dose combination ISDN-hydralazine to modern guideline-based care improved outcomes versus placebo, including all-cause mortality, and led to early trial termination. Hypertension underlies HF, especially in African-Americans; the A-HeFT and its substudies demonstrated not only improvements in echocardiographic parameters, morbidity, and mortality but also a decrease in hospitalizations, potentially affecting burgeoning HF health-care costs. Genetic characteristics may, therefore, determine response to ISDN-hydralazine, and the Genetic Risk Assessment in Heart Failure substudy demonstrated important hypothesis-generating pharmacogenetic data.

  4. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  5. Review: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachil

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects 5,700 000 people in the United States, with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) being responsible for between 30%-50% of acute admissions. Epidemiological studies and HF registries have found HFPEF patients to be older, hypertensive and to have a history of atrial fibrillation. These findings, however, may not be fully applicable to African Americans, as they have been poorly studied making up only a minority of the test subjects. This review article is intended to discuss the pathophysiology and epidemiology of HFPEF within African Americans, highlight the differences compared to Caucasian populations and review current treatment guidelines. Studies looking at African Americans in particular have shown them to be younger, female and have worse diastolic dysfunction compared to Caucasian populations. African Americans also have been shown to have a worse mortality outcome especially in patients without coronary artery disease. The treatment of HFPEF is primarily symptomatic with no survival benefit seen in randomized controlled trials. Mechanisms postulated for the worse prognosis in African Americans with HFPEF include: greater incidence of hypertension and diastolic dysfunction, undefined race-driven genetic predispositions or relative resistance to medications that treat HF in general. The biological predispositions may also be compounded by inequality of healthcare access; something still felt to exist today. Prospective studies and randomized controlled trials need to be conducted with particular emphasis on African American populations to fully elucidate this disease and to formulate race specific treatment outcomes for the future.

  6. American Psychological Association annual report.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Presents the 2009 American Psychological Association annual report. It highlights a very important year for APA and psychology by summarizing activities within each directorate. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology-and the unique skills of psychologists-to the attention of the public. This report aims to give insight into the contributions psychologists make to our communities and our country.

  7. Sexual counselling for individuals with cardiovascular disease and their partners: a consensus document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny; Barnason, Susan A; Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Dougherty, Cynthia M; Fridlund, Bengt; Kautz, Donald D; Mårtensson, Jan; Mosack, Victoria; Moser, Debra K

    2013-11-01

    After a cardiovascular event, patients and their families often cope with numerous changes in their lives, including dealing with consequences of the disease or its treatment on their daily lives and functioning. Coping poorly with both physical and psychological challenges may lead to impaired quality of life. Sexuality is one aspect of quality of life that is important for many patients and partners that may be adversely affected by a cardiac event. The World Health Organization defines sexual health as '… a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences ….'(1(p4)) The safety and timing of return to sexual activity after a cardiac event have been well addressed in an American Heart Association scientific statement, and decreased sexual activity among cardiac patients is frequently reported.(2) Rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among men with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are twice as high as those in the general population, with similar rates of sexual dysfunction in females with CVD.(3) ED and vaginal dryness may also be presenting signs of heart disease and may appear 1-3 years before the onset of angina pectoris. Estimates reflect that only a small percentage of those with sexual dysfunction seek medical care;(4) therefore, routine assessment of sexual problems and sexual counselling may be of benefit as part of effective management by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers.

  8. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, or peripheral arterial disease. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries (American Heart Association) What Is Heart Surgery? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Latest News Taking Statins May Boost Heart ...

  9. 75 FR 73076 - National Gas Supply Association, American Forest and Paper Association, Inc., American Public Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...., American Public Gas Association, Independent Petroleum Association of America, Process Gas Consumers Group... Petroleum Association of America, and Process Gas Consumers Group (collectively, the Associations), filed...

  10. 3 CFR 8929 - Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013. American Heart Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Heart Month, 2013 8929 Proclamation 8929 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8929 of January 31, 2013 Proc. 8929 American Heart Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American men and women, claiming well over...

  11. Predictive Validity of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Pooled Cohort Equations in Predicting All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease-Specific Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study of Adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-06-01

    The predictive validity of the Pooled Cohort risk (PCR) equations for cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific and all-cause mortality among a national sample of US adults has yet to be evaluated, which was this study's purpose. Data from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, with participants followed up through December 31, 2011, to ascertain mortality status via the National Death Index probabilistic algorithm. The analyzed sample included 11,171 CVD-free adults (40-79 years of age). The 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event was determined from the PCR equations. For the entire sample encompassing 849,202 person-months, we found an incidence rate of 1.00 (95% CI, 0.93-1.07) all-cause deaths per 1000 person-months and an incidence rate of 0.15 (95% CI, 0.12-0.17) CVD-specific deaths per 1000 person-months. The unweighted median follow-up duration was 72 months. For nearly all analyses (unadjusted and adjusted models with ASCVD expressed as a continuous variable as well as dichotomized at 7.5% and 20%), the ASCVD risk score was significantly associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality (P<.05). In the adjusted model, the increased all-cause mortality risk ranged from 47% to 77% based on an ASCVD risk of 20% or higher and 7.5% or higher, respectively. Those with an ASCVD score of 7.5% or higher had a 3-fold increased risk of CVD-specific mortality. The 10-year predicted risk of a first ASCVD event via the PCR equations was associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality among those free of CVD at baseline. In this American adult sample, the PCR equations provide evidence of predictive validity.

  12. American Heart Association’s Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics in Under-Represented Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Freda; Zhang, Guo; Davey, Adam; Tan, Yin; Ma, Grace X.

    2016-01-01

    The American Heart Association’s ideal cardiovascular health score is based on 7 cardiovascular health metrics to measure progress toward their Impact Goal of reducing cardiovascular disease by 20 % before 2020. This study applied this construct to assess cardiovascular health in a sample of Asian Americans. Convenience sampling methods were used to enroll self-identified Asian American’s over the age of 18 years who were attending community health fairs across the greater Philadelphia and urban areas of New Jersey. The heart health metrics of tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, and glucose were measured. In the greater sample (N = 541), 82 % were female, the mean age was 65.1 (SD = 15.5) years, 45 % were Vietnamese, 38 % were Chinese and 17 % were Korean. Prevalence of ideal heart health for the metrics of tobacco use (95 %) was high. Only 19.4 % achieved ideal levels of physical activity, 35.1 % for BMI, 28.9 % for glucose and 66 % for blood pressure. Dietary intake was ideal for 20.7 % of the sample. More years since migration and Korean race trended toward having a higher prevalence of poor health in some metrics. Most Asian Americans are not achieving ideal cardiovascular health for several of the metrics evaluated, with those residing in the United States for more than 13 years and Korean Americans being higher-risk groups. Targeted community based intervention approaches to improving and monitoring heart health in Asian American, and Asian American subgroups, are needed. PMID:27363824

  13. The heart of the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Abe, Augusto S; Andrade, Denis V; Nyengaard, Jens R; Wang, Tobias

    2010-09-01

    Most anatomical and physiological studies of the sauropsid heart have focused on species with extraordinary physiologies, and detailed anatomical descriptions of hearts from sauropsids with more common physiologies are therefore warranted. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the cardiac anatomy of the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus). The cardiovascular physiology of this species has been investigated in a number of studies, whereas only a few cursory studies exist on the cardiac anatomy of viperid snakes. The heart of C. durissus is typically squamate in many regards. Both atria are thin-walled sacs, and the right atrium is the most voluminous. The single ventricle contains three major septa; the vertical septum, the muscular ridge (MR), and the bulbuslamelle. These partially divide the ventricle into three chambers; the systemic and left-sided cavum arteriosum (CA), the pulmonary and right-sided cavum pulmonale, and the medial cavum venosum (CV). The MR is the most developed septum, and several additional and minor septa are found within the CA and CV. An extraordinary thin cortical layer encloses the ventricle, and it is irrigated by a remarkably rich arborization of coronary arteries. Previous studies show high degrees of blood flow separation in the Crotalus heart, and this can only be explained by the coordinated actions of the septa and the prominent atrioventricular valves.

  14. Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Predispose Youth to Accelerated Atherosclerosis and Early Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Matthews, Karen A; McIntyre, Roger S; Miller, Gregory E; Raghuveer, Geetha; Stoney, Catherine M; Wasiak, Hank; McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-09-08

    In the 2011 "Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents," several medical conditions among youth were identified that predispose to accelerated atherosclerosis and early cardiovascular disease (CVD), and risk stratification and management strategies for youth with these conditions were elaborated. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) among youth satisfy the criteria set for, and therefore merit inclusion among, Expert Panel tier II moderate-risk conditions. The combined prevalence of MDD and BD among adolescents in the United States is ≈10%, at least 10 times greater than the prevalence of the existing moderate-risk conditions combined. The high prevalence of MDD and BD underscores the importance of positioning these diseases alongside other pediatric diseases previously identified as moderate risk for CVD. The overall objective of this statement is to increase awareness and recognition of MDD and BD among youth as moderate-risk conditions for early CVD. To achieve this objective, the primary specific aims of this statement are to (1) summarize evidence that MDD and BD are tier II moderate-risk conditions associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and early CVD and (2) position MDD and BD as tier II moderate-risk conditions that require the application of risk stratification and management strategies in accordance with Expert Panel recommendations. In this scientific statement, there is an integration of the various factors that putatively underlie the association of MDD and BD with CVD, including pathophysiological mechanisms, traditional CVD risk factors, behavioral and environmental factors, and psychiatric medications.

  15. Resistant hypertension: diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. A scientific statement from the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Jones, Daniel; Textor, Stephen; Goff, David C; Murphy, Timothy P; Toto, Robert D; White, Anthony; Cushman, William C; White, William; Sica, Domenic; Ferdinand, Keith; Giles, Thomas D; Falkner, Bonita; Carey, Robert M

    2008-06-01

    Resistant hypertension is a common clinical problem faced by both primary care clinicians and specialists. While the exact prevalence of resistant hypertension is unknown, clinical trials suggest that it is not rare, involving perhaps 20% to 30% of study participants. As older age and obesity are 2 of the strongest risk factors for uncontrolled hypertension, the incidence of resistant hypertension will likely increase as the population becomes more elderly and heavier. The prognosis of resistant hypertension is unknown, but cardiovascular risk is undoubtedly increased as patients often have a history of long-standing, severe hypertension complicated by multiple other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. The diagnosis of resistant hypertension requires use of good blood pressure technique to confirm persistently elevated blood pressure levels. Pseudoresistance, including lack of blood pressure control secondary to poor medication adherence or white coat hypertension, must be excluded. Resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial in etiology. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors contributing to treatment resistance; diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension; and use of effective multidrug regimens. As a subgroup, patients with resistant hypertension have not been widely studied. Observational assessments have allowed for identification of demographic and lifestyle characteristics associated with resistant hypertension, and the role of secondary causes of hypertension in promoting treatment resistance is well documented; however, identification of broader mechanisms of treatment resistance is lacking. In particular, attempts to elucidate potential genetic causes of resistant hypertension have been limited. Recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of resistant hypertension remain largely empiric due to the lack of

  16. Resistant hypertension: diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Jones, Daniel; Textor, Stephen; Goff, David C; Murphy, Timothy P; Toto, Robert D; White, Anthony; Cushman, William C; White, William; Sica, Domenic; Ferdinand, Keith; Giles, Thomas D; Falkner, Bonita; Carey, Robert M

    2008-06-24

    Resistant hypertension is a common clinical problem faced by both primary care clinicians and specialists. While the exact prevalence of resistant hypertension is unknown, clinical trials suggest that it is not rare, involving perhaps 20% to 30% of study participants. As older age and obesity are 2 of the strongest risk factors for uncontrolled hypertension, the incidence of resistant hypertension will likely increase as the population becomes more elderly and heavier. The prognosis of resistant hypertension is unknown, but cardiovascular risk is undoubtedly increased as patients often have a history of long-standing, severe hypertension complicated by multiple other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. The diagnosis of resistant hypertension requires use of good blood pressure technique to confirm persistently elevated blood pressure levels. Pseudoresistance, including lack of blood pressure control secondary to poor medication adherence or white coat hypertension, must be excluded. Resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial in etiology. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors contributing to treatment resistance; diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension; and use of effective multidrug regimens. As a subgroup, patients with resistant hypertension have not been widely studied. Observational assessments have allowed for identification of demographic and lifestyle characteristics associated with resistant hypertension, and the role of secondary causes of hypertension in promoting treatment resistance is well documented; however, identification of broader mechanisms of treatment resistance is lacking. In particular, attempts to elucidate potential genetic causes of resistant hypertension have been limited. Recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of resistant hypertension remain largely empiric due to the lack of

  17. Prognostic Value of Stress Echocardiography in Patients With Low-Intermediate or High Short-Term (10 Years) Versus Low (<39%) or High (≥39%) Lifetime Predicted Risk of Cardiovascular Disease According to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 Cardiovascular Risk Calculator.

    PubMed

    Yao, Siu-Sun; Supariwala, Azhar; Yao, Amanda; Dukkipati, Sai Sreenija; Wyne, Jamshad; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the prognostic value of stress echocardiography (Secho) in short-term (10 years) and lifetime atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk-defined groups according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 cardiovascular risk calculator. The ideal risk assessment and management of patients with low-to-intermediate or high short-term versus low (<39%) or high (≥39%) lifetime CV risk is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of Secho in short-term and lifetime CV risk-defined groups. We evaluated 4,566 patients (60 ± 13 years; 46% men) who underwent Secho (41% treadmill and 59% dobutamine) with low-intermediate short-term (<20%) risk divided into low (<39%, n = 368) or high (≥39%, n = 661) lifetime CV risk and third group with high short-term risk (≥20%, n = 3,537). Follow-up (3.2 ± 1.5 years) for nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 102) and cardiac death (n = 140) were obtained. By univariate analysis, age (p <0.001) and ≥3 new ischemic wall motion abnormalities (WMAs, p <0.001) were significant predictors of cardiac events. Cumulative survival in patients was significantly worse in patients with ≥3 WMA versus <3 WMA in low-intermediate short-term and low (3.3% vs 0.3% per year, p <0.001) or high (2.0% vs 0% per year, p <0.001) lifetime risk and also in those with high short-term CV risk group (3.5% vs 1.0% per year, p <0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified ≥3 new ischemic WMAs as the strongest predictor of cardiac events (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 3.9, p <0.001). In conclusion, Secho results (absence or presence of ≥3 new ischemic segments) can further refine risk assessment in patients with low-intermediate or high short-term versus low or high lifetime cardiovascular risk. Event rate with normal Secho is low (≤1% per year) but higher in patients with high short-term CV risk by the American College of

  18. Incidence of Infective Endocarditis due to Viridans Group Streptococci Before and After the 2007 American Heart Association's Prevention Guidelines: An Extended Evaluation of the Olmsted County, Minnesota Population and Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Daniel C.; Tleyjeh, Imad M.; Correa de Sa, Daniel D.; Anavekar, Nandan S.; Lahr, Brian D.; Sohail, Muhammad R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Wilson, Walter R.; Baddour, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if the incidence of viridans group streptococcal infective endocarditis (VGS-IE) had increased following publication of the 2007 American Heart Association's IE prevention guidelines. Patients and Methods We performed a population-based survey of all adults (18 years and older) residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2013, to identify definite or possible cases of VGS-IE using the Rochester Epidemiology Project. The NIS hospital discharge database was examined to determine the number of VGS-IE cases in the United States between 2000 and 2011. Results Rates of incidence (per 100,000 person-years) during time intervals of 1999-2002, 2003-2006, 2007-2010, 2011-2013 were 3.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-5.9), 2.7 (95% CI, 0.9-4.4), 0.7 (95% CI, 0.0-1.6), and 1.5 (95% CI, 0.2-2.9), respectively, reflecting an overall significant decline (P=.03 from Poisson regression). Likewise, nationwide estimates of hospital discharges with a VGS-IE diagnosis trended downwards during 2000-2011, with an average number per year of 15,853 and 16,157 for 2000-2003 and 2004-2007, respectively and falling to 14,231 in 2008-2011 (P=.05 from linear regression using weighted least squares method). Conclusion Despite major reductions in the number of indications for antibiotic prophylaxis for invasive dental procedures espoused by the 2007 AHA IE prevention guidelines, both local and national data indicate that the incidence of VGS-IE has not increased. PMID:26141329

  19. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  20. The Lived Experience of African American Caregivers Caring for Adult African American Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Assistance from informal caregivers such as family members, friends, or neighbors is crucial to adequately managing the complex care of heart failure (HF) patients. This study examined the lived experience of African American caregivers caring for African American patients with HF. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 10 participants who were formally interviewed. The interviews, analyzed using Colaizzi's steps, revealed six themes: layers of support, realization of self-neglect, experiencing the "blues," connecting with healthcare providers, unmet financial needs, and perception of nonadherence. The information regarding the experience of African American caregivers of HF patients obtained through this research will inform the delivery of culturally competent support to caregivers, thereby improving quality of life for both the HF patients and their caregivers.

  1. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, and Outcomes of Kawasaki Disease Among Hospitalized Children in an Inner City Hospital Before and After Publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Heart Association Guidelines for Treatment of Kawasaki Disease: An 11-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Swati; Chen, Xinguang; Ang, Jocelyn Y

    2015-11-01

    The effect of 2004 Kawasaki disease (KD) guidelines on diagnosis and outcome of KD is lacking. We studied the epidemiology of KD in our region and compared the incidence, presentation, and outcome of KD before and after publication of the guidelines. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted with a diagnosis of KD. Demographics, laboratory data, and clinical data were collected. Comparison was made between 2 groups: prepublication (2000-2004) and postpublication (2005-2009) of guidelines. A total of 312 children were included; 64% were African American, 23% White, and 2% Asian; 61% were boys; 79% were complete KD, and 66% were in winter/spring. There was a significant increase in KD cases over the 11 years. There was no significant difference in clinical findings and outcome between the 2 groups. KD admissions in our region significantly increased during the postpublication period. There was no difference in clinical presentation, laboratory findings, or outcome between the 2 groups.

  2. Perceived Risks of Certain Types of Cancer and Heart Disease among Asian American Smokers and Non-Smokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Feeley, Rosemary M.; Thomas, Priya

    2002-01-01

    Assessed Asian Americans' knowledge levels regarding the health risks of tobacco use. Surveys of Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Cambodian smokers and nonsmokers indicated that most respondents recognized the association between smoking and increased risk for lung, mouth, throat, and esophageal cancer and heart disease. There were significant…

  3. 3 CFR 8477 - Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010. American Heart Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Heart Month, 2010 8477 Proclamation 8477 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8477 of February 1, 2010 Proc. 8477 American Heart Month, 2010By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Its victims are women and...

  4. Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Background Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lising, Mimi

    In keeping with its priority to reduce the disproportionate burden of heart, lung, and blood diseases in minority populations, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has established an outreach project called Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This background report provides an overview of the cardiovascular…

  5. The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-28

    28 MAR 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation 5a...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA),5301 Buckeystown Pike, Suite 350 ,Frederick,MD...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 What is A2LA? American Association for Laboratory Accreditation n Established in 1978 n Largest U.S. multi

  6. Fetal Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Young, American Heart Association Overview of congenital heart disease: Congenital heart disease is a problem that occurs with the baby's ... Find answers to common questions about children and heart disease. CHD Personal Stories ... and hope. Popular Articles ...

  7. Treatment of hypertension among African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Harman, Jane; Walker, Evelyn R; Charbonneau, Vicki; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Nelson, Cheryl; Wyatt, Sharon B

    2013-06-01

    Hypertension treatment regimens used by African American adults in the Jackson Heart Study were evaluated at the first two clinical examinations (2415 treated hypertensive persons at examination I [exam I], 2000-2004; 2577 at examination II [exam II], 2005-2008). Blood pressure (BP) was below 140/90 mm Hg for 66% and 70% of treated participants at exam I and exam II, respectively. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure treatment targets were met for 56% and 61% at exam I and exam II, respectively. Persons with diabetes or chronic kidney disease were less likely to have BP at target, as were men compared with women. Thiazide diuretics were the most commonly used antihypertensive medication, and persons taking a thiazide were more likely to have their BP controlled than persons not taking them; thiazides were used significantly less among men than women. Although calcium channel blockers are often considered to be effective monotherapy for African Americans, persons using calcium channel blocker monotherapy were significantly less likely to be at target BP than persons using thiazide monotherapy.

  8. A new dietary strategy for long-term treatment of the metabolic syndrome is compared with the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines: the MEtabolic Syndrome REduction in NAvarra (RESMENA) project.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Rocio; Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Abete, Itziar; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Forga, Luis; Martinez, J Alfredo; Zulet, M Angeles

    2014-02-01

    The long-term effects of dietary strategies designed to combat the metabolic syndrome (MetS) remain unknown. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a new dietary strategy based on macronutrient distribution, antioxidant capacity and meal frequency (MEtabolic Syndrome REduction in NAvarra (RESMENA) diet) for the treatment of the MetS when compared with the American Heart Association guidelines, used as Control. Subjects with the MetS (fifty-two men and forty-one women, age 49 (se 1) years, BMI 36·11 (se 0·5) kg/m²) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary groups. After a 2-month nutritional-learning intervention period, during which a nutritional assessment was made for the participants every 15 d, a 4-month self-control period began. No significant differences were found between the groups concerning anthropometry, but only the RESMENA group exhibited a significant decrease in body weight ( - 1·7%; P= 0·018), BMI ( - 1·7%; P= 0·019), waist circumference ( - 1·8%; P= 0·021), waist:hip ratio ( - 1·4%; P= 0·035) and android fat mass ( - 6·9%; P= 0·008). The RESMENA group exhibited a significant decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations ( - 26·8%; P= 0·008 and - 14·0%; P= 0·018, respectively), while the Control group exhibited a significant increase in glucose (7·9%; P= 0·011), AST (11·3%; P= 0·045) and uric acid (9·0%; P< 0·001) concentrations. LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations were increased (Control group: 34·4%; P< 0·001 and RESMENA group: 33·8%; P< 0·001), but interestingly so were the LDL-C:apoB ratio (Control group: 28·7%; P< 0·001, RESMENA group: 17·1%; P= 0·009) and HDL-cholesterol concentrations (Control group: 21·1%; P< 0·001, RESMENA group: 8·7; P= 0·001). Fibre was the dietary component that most contributed to the improvement of anthropometry, while body-weight loss explained changes in some biochemical markers. In conclusion, the RESMENA diet is a good

  9. The Contribution of Psychosocial Stressors to Sleep among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dayna A.; Lisabeth, Lynda; Lewis, Tené T.; Sims, Mario; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Taylor, Herman; Diez Roux, Ana V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Studies have shown that psychosocial stressors are related to poor sleep. However, studies of African Americans, who may be more vulnerable to the impact of psychosocial stressors, are lacking. Using the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) baseline data, we examined associations of psychosocial stressors with sleep in 4,863 African Americans. Methods: We examined cross-sectional associations between psychosocial stressors and sleep duration and quality in a large population sample of African Americans. Three measures of psychosocial stress were investigated: the Global Perceived Stress Scale (GPSS); Major Life Events (MLE); and the Weekly Stress Inventory (WSI). Sleep was assessed using self-reported hours of sleep and sleep quality rating (1 = poor; 5 = excellent). Multinomial logistic and linear regression models were used to examine the association of each stress measure (in quartiles) with continuous and categorical sleep duration (< 5 (“very short”), 5–6 h (“short”) and > 9 h (“long”) versus 7 or 8 h (“normal”); and with sleep quality after adjustment for demographics and risk factors (body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity). Results: Mean age of the sample was 54.6 years and 64% were female. Mean sleep duration was 6.4 + 1.5 hours, 54% had a short sleep duration, 5% had a long sleep duration, and 34% reported a “poor” or “fair” sleep quality. Persons in the highest GPSS quartile had higher odds of very short sleep (odds ratio: 2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.02, 4.08), higher odds of short sleep (1.72, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.12), shorter average sleep duration (Δ = −33.6 min (95% CI: −41.8, −25.4), and reported poorer sleep quality (Δ = −0.73 (95% CI: −0.83, −0.63) compared to those in the lowest quartile of GPSS after adjustment for covariates. Similar patterns were observed for WSI and MLE. Psychosocial stressors were not associated with long sleep. For WSI, effects of stress on sleep

  10. American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Five principles developed by American Evaluation Associ intended to guide professional practice of evaluators & to inform evaluation clients and the general public about principles they can expect to be upheld by professional evaluators.

  11. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  12. American Camping Association Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    Founded in 1910 as the Camp Directors' Association of America, the American Camping Association (ACA) is the largest organization serving the organized camping industry. Over 5,500 members come from all segments of the camp profession. This annual report for 1999 describes ACA activities in support of organizational commitments. These commitments…

  13. Markers of Inflammation, Metabolic Risk Factors, and Incident Heart Failure in American Indians: The Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Barac, Ana; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar M.; de Simone, Giovanni; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Umans, Jason G.; Best, Lyle G.; Yeh, Jeunliang; Dixon, Damon B.; Devereux, Richard B.; Howard, Barbara V.; Panza, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in increased risk of heart failure (HF) that is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), and diabetes. This study investigated associations between inflammatory markers, MS, and incident HF in a population with high prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and MS. The cohort consisted of 3098 American Indians, without prevalent cardiovascular disease who had C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen measured at the SHS Phase II exam. Independent associations between inflammatory markers, MS, and HF were analyzed by Cox hazard models. During mean follow-up of 11 years, 218 participants developed HF. After the adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, fibrinogen, (HR 1.36, 95% C.I.:1.15–1.59) but not CRP, (HR 1.25, 95% C.I.:0.97–1.32) remained significant HF predictor. In individuals without diabetes, concomitant presence of MS and elevated CRP or fibrinogen increased HF risk (for MS and CRP: HR 2.02, 95% C.I.: 0.95–4.31; for CRP and fibrinogen: HR 1.75, 95% C.I.:0.83–3.72). In a population with high prevalence of obesity, MS, and diabetes, elevated CRP and fibrinogen predict increased HF risk. These associations are attenuated by the adjustments for conventional risk factors suggesting that inflammation acts in concert with metabolic and clinical risk factors in increasing HF risk. PMID:22235819

  14. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  15. Spirituality, Religiosity, and Weight Management Among African American Adolescent Males: The Jackson Heart KIDS Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Marino A; Beech, Bettina M; Griffith, Derek M; Thorpe, Roland J

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality and religion have been identified as important determinants of health for adults; however, the impact of faith-oriented factors on health behaviors and outcomes among African American adolescent males has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between religiosity and spirituality and obesity-related behaviors among 12-19 year old African American males (N = 105) in the Jackson Heart KIDS Pilot Study. Key variables of interest are church attendance, prayer, daily spirituality, weight status, attempts to lose weight, nutrition, physical activity, and stress. Daily spirituality is associated with whether an individual attempts to lose weight. The results from logistic regression models suggest that daily spirituality increases the odds that African American male adolescents attempt to lose weight (OR = 1.22, CI: 1.07-1.41) and have a history of diet-focused weight management (OR = 1.13, CI: 1.02-1.26). Future studies are needed to further explore the association between religion, spirituality, and obesity-related behaviors.

  16. Heart Failure in African Americans: Unique Etiology and Pharmacologic Treatment Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Clyde W.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: After reading the article, “Heart Failure in African Americans: Unique Etiology and Pharmacologic Treatment Responses,” the learner should be able to complete the following quiz and evaluation questions. Accredidation: NMA is accredited by the Accredidation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. NMA designates this continuing medical education activity for one credit hour in category one of the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. The Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA) has been approved by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) as having educational content acceptable for five prescribed credit hours. This article has been approved for one credit hour. Term of approval is from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2003. Credit may be claimed for one year from date of individual use. Expiration: The quiz must be completed, postmarked and mailed by Feb. 25, 2003, for eligibility to receive continuing medical education credit for this CME activity. PMID:12656444

  17. Heritability of Lipid Phenotypes among African-Americans: Jackson Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determinants of serum lipid levels include both genetic and non-genetic components. More research is needed to determine the role each plays in serum lipid levels of African-Americans. The Jackson Heart Study Family Sub-Study (JHS, FSS) represents a cohort of African-American adults for which both ...

  18. Pharmacologic therapy for New York Heart Association class IV heart failure.

    PubMed

    Caccamo, Marco A; Eckman, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    As the incidence of heart failure increases, the number of patients with advanced heart failure is anticipated to grow. Substantial progress in the treatment of heart failure has been achieved over the past few decades. Several classes of medications have been studied and found effective, including beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, vasodilators, digoxin, and inotropes. The evidence base for the use of these medications in the treatment of patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure is reviewed.

  19. Update on the American Mosquito Control Association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Mosquito Control Association in a non-profit scientific organization dedicated to promoting the highest standard in professional mosquito control. It is comprised of more than 1300 members representing students, scientists, regulators, industry, mosquito control employees and many other...

  20. Institutional Racism and the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Jack; Senn, David J.

    1973-01-01

    Psychologists for Social Action showed how the American Psychological Association (APA) practices institutional racism by condoning employment practices of Lancaster Press, APA's major printer; a May 1973 postscript documents APA's continued hesitancy to influence its suppliers toward equal employment practices. (Author/JM)

  1. American Camping Association. Annual Report, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1985 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. The document is in the format of a calendar covering the period October 1985 through September 1986. Calendar pages, on which relevant camping events are noted, alternate with pages of text. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan…

  2. American Psychological Association: Annual Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the 2008 annual reports from the various directorates and offices of the American Psychological Association (APA). In 2008, APA continued to work on initiatives, programs, and products that lend value to the member's psychology career, support the future of their discipline, and serve the public. APA's goal is to strengthen…

  3. American Association of University Women 2013 Bylaws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of University Women, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The American Association of University Women (AAUW) Bylaws contain governance history, policies and procedures for managing the organization, and information to conduct AAUW's affairs. The 2013 bylaws are divided into the following articles: (1) Name and Office; (2) Purpose; (3) Use of Name; (4) Membership and Dues; (5) Nominations and Elections;…

  4. American Camping Association Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) is a community of camp professionals dedicated to enriching the lives of children and adults through the camp experience. This annual report describes ACA activities during 2000, grouped in five areas: (1) expansion of services and other development of ACA's 24 regional sections and partnerships with other…

  5. Obesity in American Indian and Mexican American Men and Women: Associations with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Autonomic Control

    PubMed Central

    Criado, José R.; Gilder, David A.; Kalafut, Mary A.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a serious public health problem, especially in some minority communities, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. While obesity is a serious health concern in both American Indian and Mexican American populations, the relationship between obesity and cardiac autonomic control in these two populations is not well understood. The present study in a selected sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans assessed associations between obesity, blood pressure (BP), and cardiovascular autonomic control. Cardiovascular autonomic control, systolic and diastolic mean BP, and body mass index were obtained from one hundred thirty-two American Indian and Mexican American men and women who are literate in English and are residing legally in San Diego County. Men had a significant greater systolic and diastolic BP and were more likely to develop systolic prehypertension and hypertension than women. Obese participants showed greater mean heart rate (HR) and systolic and diastolic BP than nonobese participants. Obese men also exhibited greater cardiac sympathetic activity and lower cardiovagal control than obese women. These results suggest that obesity and gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic control may contribute to risk for cardiovascular disorders in this sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans. PMID:24024026

  6. QTL mapping of leukocyte telomere length in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jue; Matsuguchi, Tet; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Best, Lyle G.; Lee, Elisa T.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Cole, Shelley A.; Zhao, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres play a central role in cellular senescence and are associated with a variety of age-related disorders such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Telomere length varies greatly among individuals of the same age, and is heritable. Here we performed a genome-wide linkage scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measured by quantitative PCR in 3,665 American Indians (aged 14 – 93 years) from 94 large, multi-generational families. All participants were recruited by the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS), a prospective study to identify genetic factors for cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in American Indians residing in Oklahoma, Arizona and Dakota. LTL heritability was estimated to be between 51% and 62%, suggesting a strong genetic predisposition to interindividual variation of LTL in this population. Significant QTLs were localized to chromosome 13 (Logarithm of odds score (LOD) = 3.9) at 13q12.11, to 18q22.2 (LOD = 3.2) and to 3p14.1 (LOD = 3.0) for Oklahoma. This is the first study to identify susceptibility loci influencing leukocyte telomere variation in American Indians, a minority group suffering from a disproportionately high rate of type 2 diabetes and other age-related disorders. PMID:24036517

  7. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors.

  8. Gravidity and parity in postmenopausal American Indian women: the Strong Heart Study.

    PubMed

    North, K E; MacCluer, J W; Cowan, L D; Howard, B V

    2000-06-01

    The fertility of a large sample of American Indian women participating in the Strong Heart Study was examined to determine which factors are associated with variation in completed fertility among women in this population. The Strong Heart Study (SHS) is a study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors in American Indians living in Arizona, Oklahoma, and the Dakotas. Data were derived from a baseline examination between 1989 and 1992 of approximately 1,500 men and women, aged 45-74, from each of the 3 SHS centers. A personal interview elicited demographic information, family health history, and information on several life-style variables. A total of 1,955 ever-married, postmenopausal women were considered in these analyses. Women were considered to be postmenopausal if their menstrual cycles had stopped completely for at least 12 months, either because of natural or surgical processes. The average number of pregnancies (gravidity) for all women was 5.9, whereas the mean number of live births (parity) was 5.3. Women living in Arizona (5.6) and the Dakotas (5.8) had higher parity than those in Oklahoma (4.6). Furthermore, there was lower completed fertility in younger women: When American Indian women from all 3 centers were considered together, women born between 1910 and 1919 had a mean parity of 5.3, whereas women born between 1940 and 1949 had a mean parity of 4.0. Although previous research has suggested a relationship between parity and CVD risk factors, no linear associations between CVD risk factors and fertility were indicated in this population. We also examined the relationship of contraception, level of education, and income to fertility. While no significant relationship between contraception and the level of fertility was identified, there was a significant inverse linear relationship of both education and income with fertility. In summary, fertility rates in American Indian women are high, but appear to be decreasing in younger generations

  9. Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease Allison L. Cirino , ... for developing the family’s heart condition. What Is Genetic Testing and What Can it Tell Me? Genetic ...

  10. Anxiety and Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    disability among women and men in the United States. By the year 2020, CHD is projected to be the number one cause of death worldwide.( American Heart Association , 2002...combined.( American Heart Association , 2002) The effect of various demographic (e.g., age, gender) and clinical (e.g., presence of comorbidities

  11. Intermittent Auscultation for Intrapartum Fetal Heart Rate Surveillance: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Fetal heart rate surveillance is a standard component of intrapartum care. The fetal heart rate can be evaluated using intermittent auscultation or electronic fetal monitoring. Research that has compared these 2 strategies found them to be equivalent with respect to long-term neonatal outcomes. The purpose of this clinical bulletin by the American College of Nurse-Midwives is to review the evidence for use of intermittent auscultation and provide recommendations for intermittent auscultation technique, interpretation, and documentation.

  12. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  13. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  14. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  15. Peer Training of Community Health Workers to Improve Heart Health Among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Willock, Robina Josiah; Mayberry, Robert M.; Yan, Fengxia; Daniels, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Training community health workers (CHWs) builds a workforce that is essential to addressing the chronic disease crisis. This article describes a highly replicable CHW training program that targets heart disease risk among African American women. Background African American women suffer disproportionately from heart disease mortality and morbidity. Well-trained CHWs are uniquely positioned to close this disparity gap. Method We used a Learning Circle approach to train CHWs in heart health education. The curriculum blended web-based, self-directed learning and in-person peer coaching. CHWs learned through (a) peer-to-peer sharing, (b) problem solving and brainstorming, and (c) leadership and experiential activities. Training evaluation measures were CHWs' (a) self-confidence, (b) heart health knowledge, (c) satisfaction with training, (d) training retention, and (e) replication of training within 90 days after training. Results This training resulted in appreciable effects on four of five outcome measures. Heart health knowledge increased significantly among experienced CHWs (p = .011). CHWs were satisfied with training and retention was 100%. CHWs initiated and subsequently delivered 122 person hours of community heart health education and CHW training in their communities. Discussion/Conclusion CHW heart health training using Learning Circles is a practical and replicable method of training CHWs and holds significant potential for building capacity in resource-poor community organizations. PMID:24891525

  16. The causal conundrum: the diet-heart debates and the management of uncertainty in American medicine.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Todd M

    2015-04-01

    Starting in the 1950s, physicians and researchers began to debate the exact nature of the relationship among blood cholesterol, diet, and cardiovascular risk. Using professional medical, public health, and scientific journals, this article examines the history of a series of intense and sustained debates regarding the credibility of the diet-heart hypothesis, which proposed that diet was causally linked to coronary artery disease. Brought about by intellectual disagreements and illuminated by personal quarrels, these debates created a profound professional rift among researchers who debated whether observational data could be used to prove that dietary intake caused heart disease and who sought to differentiate between "good" and "bad" science. But while the debate persisted into the early 1980s, Americans had begun to adopt the diet-heart hypothesis as public health truth as early as the 1960s, embracing cookbooks promoting "heart healthy" diets that promised to prevent coronary artery disease. Although critics and advocates of diet-heart continued to debate the theory's finer points, the widespread adoption of diet-heart in American homes meant that the debate had become almost moot by the time the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute officially endorsed the hypothesis in the 1980s.

  17. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children--American Samoa, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Amanda; Edison, Laura; Introcaso, Camille E; Goh, Lucy; Marrone, James; Mejia, Amelita; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-05-29

    Acute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative, immune-mediated consequence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat). Recurrent or severe acute rheumatic fever can cause permanent cardiac valve damage and rheumatic heart disease, which increases the risk for cardiac conditions (e.g., infective endocarditis, stroke, and congestive heart failure). Antibiotics can prevent acute rheumatic fever if administered no more than 9 days after symptom onset. Long-term benzathine penicillin G (BPG) injections are effective in preventing recurrent acute rheumatic fever attacks and are recommended to be administered every 3-4 weeks for 10 years or until age 21 years to children who receive a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. During August 2013, in response to anecdotal reports of increasing rates of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, CDC collaborated with the American Samoa Department of Health and the Lyndon B. Johnson Tropical Medical Center (the only hospital in American Samoa) to quantify the number of cases of pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in American Samoa and to assess the potential roles of missed pharyngitis diagnosis, lack of timely prophylaxis prescription, and compliance with prescribed BPG prophylaxis. Using data from medical records, acute rheumatic fever incidence was calculated as 1.1 and 1.5 cases per 1,000 children aged ≤18 years in 2011 and 2012, respectively; 49% of those with acute rheumatic fever subsequently received a diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease. Noncompliance with recommended prophylaxis with BPG after physician-diagnosed acute rheumatic fever was noted for 22 (34%) of 65 patients. Rheumatic heart disease point prevalence was 3.2 cases per 1,000 children in August 2013. Establishment of a coordinated acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease control program in American Samoa, likely would improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient compliance with BPG prophylaxis.

  18. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  19. The American Kinesiology Association Undergraduate Core Curriculum©

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the elements of the undergraduate core in kinesiology that have been established by the American Kinesiology Association. The American Kinesiology Association also describes a set of ten student-learning outcomes that emanate from the four core content elements. This information has been developed by the American Kinesiology…

  20. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  1. Americans by Heart: Undocumented Latino Students and the Promise of Higher Education. Multicultural Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, William

    2011-01-01

    "Americans by Heart" examines the plight of undocumented Latino students as they navigate the educational and legal tightrope presented by their immigration status. Many of these students are accepted to attend some of our best colleges and universities but cannot afford the tuition to do so because they are not eligible for financial aid or…

  2. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.

  3. Metabolic profiles of biological aging in American Indians: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinying; Zhu, Yun; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T; Yu, Tianwei; Lin, Jue; Matsuguchi, Tet; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Jones, Dean; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V

    2014-03-01

    Short telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with age-related metabolic disorders. Telomere attrition induces profound metabolic dysfunction in animal models, but no study has examined the metabolome of telomeric aging in human. Here we studied 423 apparently healthy American Indians participating in the Strong Family Heart Study. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) was measured by qPCR. Metabolites in fasting plasma were detected by untargeted LC/MS. Associations of LTL with each metabolite and their combined effects were examined using generalized estimating equation adjusting for chronological age and other aging-related factors. Multiple testing was corrected using the q-value method (q<0.05). Of the 1,364 distinct m/z features detected, nineteen metabolites in the classes of glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophosphocholines, glycerolipids, bile acids, isoprenoids, fatty amides, or L-carnitine ester were significantly associated with LTL, independent of chronological age and other aging-related factors. Participants with longer (top tertile) and shorter (bottom tertile) LTL were clearly separated into distinct groups using a multi-marker score comprising of all these metabolites, suggesting that these newly detected metabolites could be novel metabolic markers of biological aging. This is the first study to interrogate the human metabolome of telomeric aging. Our results provide initial evidence for a metabolic control of LTL and may reveal previously undescribed new roles of various lipids in the aging process.

  4. Languages of the heart: the biomedical and the metaphorical in American fiction.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Benjamin J; Jones, David S

    2014-01-01

    The role of heart disease in American fiction has received less attention from scholars of literature, history, and medicine than have portrayals of tuberculosis, cancer, or HIV/AIDS, despite the fact that heart disease topped mortality charts for most of the 20th century. This article surveys manifestations of coronary artery disease in popular works of 20th-century American fiction to trace how authors and their protagonists grappled with the disease while knowledge of pathophysiology and therapeutics evolved. Countering Susan Sontag's mechanistic vision of patient encounters-where disease is absent of metaphor-we pair popular fiction with concurrent historical analysis to show that the proliferation of technological narratives of cardiac therapeutics could not displace the deeply symbolic nature of characters' encounters with heart disease. Because of the limited ability of the biomedical narrative to convey the meanings of disease and treatments, doctors and patients need to communicate through the rich possibilities of metaphor.

  5. Prognostic Significance of Depression in African Americans With Heart Failure: Insights from HF-ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Babyak, Michael A.; Bittner, Vera; Fleg, Jerome L.; Keteyian, Steven J.; Swank, Ann M.; Piña, Ileana L.; Kraus, William E.; Whellan, David J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although studies have shown that depression is associated with worse outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients, most studies have been in White patients. The impact of depression on outcomes in African Americans (AAs) with HF has not been studied. Methods and Results We analyzed 747 AAs and 1,420 Whites enrolled in HF-ACTION, which randomized 2,331 patients with ejection fraction ≤35% to usual care with or without exercise training. We examined the association between depressive symptoms assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) at baseline and after 3 months with all-cause mortality/hospitalization. A race by baseline BDI-II interaction was observed (P=.003) in which elevated baseline scores were associated with worse outcomes in AAs versus Whites. In AAs, the association was non-linear with a hazard ratio of 1.44 (95% CI: 1.24-1.68) when comparing the 75th and 25th percentile of BDI-II (score of 15 and 5, respectively). No race interaction was observed for mortality (P=.34). There was no differential association between BDI-II change and outcomes in AAs vs. Whites. In AAs, an increase in BDI-II score from baseline to 3 months was associated with increased mortality/hospitalization (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.12-1.57 per 10 point increase), while a decrease was not related to outcomes. Conclusions In AAs with HF, baseline symptoms of depression and worsening of symptoms over time are associated with increased all-cause mortality/hospitalization. Routine assessment of depressive symptoms in AAs with HF may help guide management. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00047437. PMID:25901047

  6. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart.

  7. Gene expression changes associated with myocarditis and fibrosis in hearts of mice with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; de Lima, Ricardo Santana; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Iacobas, Sanda; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Iacobas, Dumitru Andrei; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Spray, David Conover

    2010-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure in Latin American countries. About 30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop this severe symptomatic form of the disease, characterized by intense inflammatory response accompanied by fibrosis in the heart. We performed an extensive microarray analysis of hearts from a mouse model of this disease and determined significant alterations in expression of ∼12% of the sampled genes. Extensive upregulations were associated with immune-inflammatory responses (chemokines, adhesion molecules, cathepsins and MHC molecules) and fibrosis (extracellular matrix components, lysyl oxidase and Timp-1). Our results indicate potentially relevant factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease that may provide new therapeutic targets in chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:20565256

  8. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY IN OKAPI (OKAPIA JOHNSTONI).

    PubMed

    Warren, Joshua D; Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Weldon, Alan D; Flanagan, Joseph P; Howard, Lauren L; Garner, Michael M; Citino, Scott B

    2017-03-01

    Acute signs associated with cardiovascular disease occurred in three pregnant okapi ( Okapia johnstoni ) during early to midgestation and progressed to congestive heart failure. Congestive heart failure was diagnosed antemortem using echocardiography and plasma cardiac troponin levels. Clinical signs included decreased activity, hyporexia, tachypnea, dyspnea, flared nostrils, and productive coughing with copious amounts of foamy nasal discharge. Parenteral and oral treatment with furosemide, enalapril, and spironolactone controlled clinical signs in the three okapi allowing each to carry out one pregnancy to term. Two okapi carried the first pregnancy to term after showing signs, while one okapi aborted the first calf and gave birth to a healthy calf in a subsequent pregnancy. Subsequent pregnancy in one okapi ended with abortion and associated dystocia and endometritis. Following parturition, clinical signs associated with heart failure resolved in all three individuals; serial echocardiography in two individuals showed improvement in fractional shortening and left atrial size and all three okapi showed markedly decreased pleural effusion and resolution of pulmonary edema. However, subsequent pregnancies in all three okapi induced respiratory distress and recurrence of congestive heart failure; one okapi died from congestive heart failure associated with subsequent pregnancy. This case series describes the clinical presentation and pathologic findings of congestive heart failure during pregnancy in adult okapi.

  9. 1980 Resolutions: National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This paper contains nineteen resolutions adopted by the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE). The resolutions concern (1) the maintenance of Asian/Pacific American linguistic and cultural traditions by educational institutions, (2) the support of Asian/Pacific American studies programs, (3) NAAPAE support of…

  10. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  11. Reorganized PKA-AKAP associations in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin-Thin; Soni, Siddarth; van Veen, Toon A B; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Cappadona, Salvatore; Varro, Andras; de Weger, Roel A; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Vos, Marc A; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2012-02-01

    Here we reveal that the characterization of large-scale re-arrangements of signaling scaffolds induced by heart failure can serve as a novel concept to identify more specific therapeutic targets. In the mammalian heart, the cAMP pathway, with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a central role, acts directly downstream of adrenergic receptors to mediate cardiac contractility and rhythm. Heart failure, characterized by severe alterations in adrenergic stimulation is, amongst other interventions, often treated with β-blockers. Contrasting results, however, have shown both beneficial and detrimental effects of decreased cAMP levels in failing hearts. We hypothesize that the origin of this behavior lies in the complex spatiotemporal organization of the regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-R), which associates tightly with various A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) to specifically localize PKA's activity. Using chemical proteomics directly applied to human patient and control heart tissue we demonstrate that the association profile of PKA-R with several AKAPs is severely altered in the failing heart, for instance effecting the interaction between PKA and the novel AKAP SPHKAP was 6-fold upregulated upon failing heart conditions. Also a significant increase in captured cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) was observed. The observed altered profiles can already explain many aspects of the aberrant cAMP-response in the failing human heart, validating that this dataset may provide a resource for several novel, more specific, treatment options. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes".

  12. The African-American Heart Failure Trial: background, rationale and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anne L.; Cohn, Jay N.; Worcel, Manuel; Franciosa, Joseph A.

    2002-01-01

    New treatments have improved outcomes in heart failure (HF), but applicability of these advances may be limited in African Americans. Analysis of previous trials has shown that a combination of hydralazine (H) plus isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) may be especially beneficial in African Americans with HF. The African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) is a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial in African American patients with stable NYHA Class III-IV HF while on standard therapy. Randomization to addition of BiDil, a fixed combination of H+ISDN, or placebo, will be stratified for beta-blocker usage, and all patients will be treated and followed until the last patient entered has completed six months of follow-up. The primary efficacy endpoint will be a composite score including quality of life, deaths, and hospitalizations for HF. At least 600 patients will be randomized. The first patient was randomized in June, 2001. Besides additional testing of H+ISDN in HF, A-HeFT will be the first HF trial aimed at a subgroup of African American patients, as well as the first to use a new composite HF score as its primary efficacy endpoint. PMID:12392039

  13. Creation of the American Board of Ophthalmology: The Role of the American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth D

    2016-09-01

    In the early 20th century, the American Medical Association (AMA), specifically its Section on Ophthalmology, played a central role in the founding of America's first medical specialty board, the American Board of Ophthalmology. With the American Ophthalmological Society and the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, the AMA's contributions to the formation of the American Board of Ophthalmology led to the establishment of sound educational standards for practicing ophthalmologists and helped to advance the culture of medical excellence within the profession that is synonymous with board certification today.

  14. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A.; Best, Lyle G.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  15. Countercontrols for the american educational research association

    PubMed Central

    Greer, R. Douglas

    1982-01-01

    Publications of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) maintain that years of research in education have failed to produce a useful technology for teachers. Little is said to be known about teaching children beyond the potential of new findings such as mastery learning, time on task, and features of an appropriate school climate. These latter conclusions are in stark contrast to the large body of useful findings in the behavior analysis literature. Several possible reasons are discussed for the discrepancy in views between behavior analysts and educational researchers. The lack of acknowledgement of behavior analysis is viewed as a serious problem because of the control that the educational research establishment exerts over federal funding of research and the training of teachers. There is a growing use of some of the aspects of behavior analysis by educational researchers; however, the derivation is not acknowledged and there is little enlightenment about radical behaviorism. It is suggested that ABA should countercontrol the influence of AERA by incorporating doctoral students in educational research as students of behavior analysis, teaching the complexity of behaviorism, teaching the positions of the opposing camp to behavior analysis students. ABA can take an aggressive role in countercontrolling AERA by forming committees to insure (a) quality of treatment, (b) funding representation in government, (c) protection and qualified review of untenured behavior analysts, (d) expansion of certification. PMID:22478558

  16. Population-based prevention of obesity: the need for comprehensive promotion of healthful eating, physical activity, and energy balance: a scientific statement from American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Interdisciplinary Committee for Prevention (formerly the expert panel on population and prevention science).

    PubMed

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K; Obarzanek, Eva; Stettler, Nicolas; Bell, Ronny; Field, Alison E; Fortmann, Stephen P; Franklin, Barry A; Gillman, Matthew W; Lewis, Cora E; Poston, Walker Carlos; Stevens, June; Hong, Yuling

    2008-07-22

    Obesity is a major influence on the development and course of cardiovascular diseases and affects physical and social functioning and quality of life. The importance of effective interventions to reduce obesity and related health risks has increased in recent decades because the number of adults and children who are obese has reached epidemic proportions. To prevent the development of overweight and obesity throughout the life course, population-based strategies that improve social and physical environmental contexts for healthful eating and physical activity are essential. Population-based approaches to obesity prevention are complementary to clinical preventive strategies and also to treatment programs for those who are already obese. This American Heart Association scientific statement aims: 1) to raise awareness of the importance of undertaking population-based initiatives specifically geared to the prevention of excess weight gain in adults and children; 2) to describe considerations for undertaking obesity prevention overall and in key risk subgroups; 3) to differentiate environmental and policy approaches to obesity prevention from those used in clinical prevention and obesity treatment; 4) to identify potential targets of environmental and policy change using an ecological model that includes multiple layers of influences on eating and physical activity across multiple societal sectors; and 5) to highlight the spectrum of potentially relevant interventions and the nature of evidence needed to inform population-based approaches. The evidence-based experience for population-wide approaches to obesity prevention is highlighted.

  17. Community Health Representatives: A Valuable Resource for Providing Coronary Heart Disease Health Education Activities for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Vicki L.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses select health issues of Native Americans, emphasizing coronary heart disease (CHD). The link between lifestyle and CHD is discussed. CHD risk data from a study of 67 Community Health Representatives is presented, and the role these paraprofessionals can play in health education among Native Americans is discussed. (IAH)

  18. Histopathological study on myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M

    1990-06-01

    The mode and causes of myocardial hypertrophy occurring in association with ischemic heart disease were studied. The investigation involved autopsied hearts (15 cases of subendocardial infarction, 27 of transmural infarction, 20 of non-infarcted three vessel disease and 17 controls) and biopsied materials obtained during coronary-aorta bypass graft surgery (23 patients with angina pectoris and 46 with myocardial infarction). The subendocardial infarction group showed most marked myocardial hypertrophy that reflected extensive infarction and fibrosis, dilatation of the left ventricular cavity and the loss of myocytes. Despite a marked decrease in the number of myocyte layers, the residual myocardium of the left ventricle was uniformly hypertrophic, accompanied by an increase in the heart weight. The larger the area of fibrosis, the more marked was myocardial hypertrophy irrespective of the luminal diameter of the responsible coronary artery. These findings indicate that myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease is enhanced by the compensatory mechanisms for a decrease in the contractile myocardium due to fibrosis.

  19. Contemporary treatment of heart failure: is there adequate evidence to support a unique strategy for African-Americans? Con position.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Serrano, Claudia C; Ferdinand, Daphne P

    2002-08-01

    Heart failure is a substantial cause of increased morbidity and mortality in the African-American population, with poorer prognosis versus white patients. Systolic heart failure is predominantly caused by poorly controlled hypertension in African-Americans. Overall, African-Americans remain underrepresented in morbidity and mortality heart failure trials, and further data are needed to confirm the potential benefit of present therapies and newer approaches to heart failure in African-Americans. Intensive blood pressure control and control of other risk factors, along with the appropriate application of evidence-based therapies including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and approved beta-blockers, are required to decrease racial disparities. Although some data suggest that contemporary treatment with ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers may be less effective in African-Americans in terms of reducing heart failure morbidity and mortality, there is not adequate evidence to support a unique strategy for this population. The use of evidence-based therapies should be equally applied to African-Americans as well as to other ethnic groups while awaiting further studies.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  1. Risk Behaviors Associated with Cigarette Use among Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Harry T.; Wang, Min Qi; Valmidiano, Lillian L.

    2005-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the United States. This study examined the association between several common youth risk behaviors, including cigarette use among Asian American adolescents, using data (N=408) from the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). The weighted univariate and multivariate logistic…

  2. American Kinesiology Association: A National Effort to Promote Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Thomas, Jerry R.

    2010-01-01

    The American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education (AAKPE) and The American Kinesiology Association (AKA) should work together to help kinesiology thrive. Data are provided about kinesiology that reflects its visibility in PubMed and Google. Survey data from AKA show the rapid growth of the undergraduate major and graduate programs. In…

  3. Association between oral variables and heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heart rate variability is a useful method to assess cardiac autonomic modulation in patients undergoing dental procedures, because knowledge of physiological conditions provides greater security to the professional as well as the possibility of a better plan treatment to patient benefit. The aim of our study was to describe the association between cardiac autonomic control and dental variables. We consulted the databases Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane, using the terms “autonomic”, “dentistry”, “heart rate variability”, “cardiovascular physiology.” The selected studies indicated a strong relationship between dental variables and HRV. There was an association between malocclusion, TMD, dental procedures cirugia and low HRV. Thus, they become more studies that relate to HRV in dental science, especially in clinical practice. PMID:24373329

  4. Association between oral variables and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; de Souza, Ana Cecilia Amorim; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2013-12-27

    The heart rate variability is a useful method to assess cardiac autonomic modulation in patients undergoing dental procedures, because knowledge of physiological conditions provides greater security to the professional as well as the possibility of a better plan treatment to patient benefit. The aim of our study was to describe the association between cardiac autonomic control and dental variables. We consulted the databases Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane, using the terms "autonomic", "dentistry", "heart rate variability", "cardiovascular physiology." The selected studies indicated a strong relationship between dental variables and HRV. There was an association between malocclusion, TMD, dental procedures cirugia and low HRV. Thus, they become more studies that relate to HRV in dental science, especially in clinical practice.

  5. Association of Heart Block with Uncommon Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  6. Anatomy of the heart in the North American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Bisaillon, A

    1982-01-01

    The gross anatomy of the heart of the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) is described following the dissection of nine specimens of both sexes ranging in body weight from 10 to 26 kg. The general characteristics of the beaver heart are similar to those of other mammals. However, variations in details of anatomy exist, especially for the right atrium. The right auricle is divided into 2 appendages, one on each side of the ascending aorta. The orifices of the 3 venae cavae are guarded by a well developed valvular system. Other variations in relative size and shape exist and for these points the heart of the beaver is more closely related to that of aquatic than to that of terrestrial mammals. The heart has the form of a widened cone being transversely broad and flat from one surface to the other. The apex of the organ is formed by both ventricles except in 2 specimens in which only the left ventricle participates in its formation. The right ventricle in the beaver being relatively long and narrow, its general proportions approximate those found in the seals.

  7. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  8. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; North, Kari E.; Pankow, James S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. Methods We studied in a cross-sectional design 4,970 participants aged 25 to 93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Results Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend <0.0001) adjusting for age, sex, family CHD risk group, energy intake, education, non-chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR=1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. Conclusions These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general population. PMID:20858571

  9. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey California Automobile Association Original: 1932 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey California Automobile Association Original: 1932 Re-photo: January 1940 CONVENTO - VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  10. Evaluating parents and adult caregivers as "agents of change" for treating obese children: evidence for parent behavior change strategies and research gaps: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Faith, Myles S; Van Horn, Linda; Appel, Lawrence J; Burke, Lora E; Carson, Jo Ann S; Franch, Harold A; Jakicic, John M; Kral, Tanja V E; Odoms-Young, Angela; Wansink, Brian; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2012-03-06

    This scientific statement addresses parents and adult caregivers (PACs) as "agents of change" for obese children, evaluating the strength of evidence that particular parenting strategies can leverage behavior change and reduce positive energy balance in obese youth. The statement has 3 specific aims. The first is to review core behavior change strategies for PACs as used in family-based treatment programs and to provide a resource list. The second is to evaluate the strength of evidence that greater parental "involvement" in treatment is associated with better reductions in child overweight. The third is to identify research gaps and new opportunities for the field. This review yielded limited and inconsistent evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials that greater PAC involvement necessarily is associated with better child outcomes. For example, only 17% of the intervention studies reported differential improvements in child overweight as a function of parental involvement in treatment. On the other hand, greater parental adherence with core behavior change strategies predicted better child weight outcomes after 2 and 5 years in some studies. Thus, the literature lacks conclusive evidence that one particular parenting strategy or approach causally is superior to others in which children have a greater focus in treatment. A number of research gaps were identified, including the assessment of refined parenting phenotypes, cultural tailoring of interventions, examination of family relationships, and incorporation of new technologies. A conceptual model is proposed to stimulate research identifying the determinants of PAC feeding and physical activity parenting practices, the results of which may inform new treatments. The statement addresses the need for innovative research to advance the scope and potency of PAC treatments for childhood obesity.

  11. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and American Heart Association. Skip footer links and go to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | ... OIG | CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  12. The Berlin Heart EXCOR Pediatric ventricular assist device: history, North American experience, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Charles D; Jaquiss, Robert D B

    2013-07-01

    Options for long-term mechanical circulatory support to sustain pediatric heart failure patients requiring cardiac transplantation while they wait for donor hearts have been unsatisfactory. The conventional approach has been to use extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), but its lack of feasibility for long-term use and the major complications associated with the technology have limited its use, especially in light of lengthy waiting lists for donor hearts. With the advent of the Berlin Heart EXCOR® Pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD), pediatric heart failure specialists have gained an important tool for helping this patient population survive until a donor heart can be identified. The EXCOR Pediatric VAD is designed to support pediatric patients of all age groups, from newborns to teenagers, and can be used successfully for many months. This paper describes the early experience with the EXCOR Pediatric VAD and the challenging journey undertaken to gain U.S. FDA approval, including successful completion of the first worldwide prospective clinical study of VADs in a pediatric population.

  13. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  14. Elevated resting heart rate is associated with the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Ori; Steinvil, Arie; Berliner, Shlomo; Cohen, Michael; Saar, Nili; Kliuk Ben-Bassat, Orit; Shapira, Itzhak

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased resting heart rate (RHR) may be associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. Our aim was to explore the possibility that increased RHR is associated with the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a sample of apparently healthy individuals and those with cardiovascular risk factors. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals who attended a general health screening program and agreed to participate in our survey. We analyzed a sample of 7706 individuals (5106 men and 2600 women) with 13.2% of men and 8.9% of the women fulfilling the criteria for the MetS. The participants were divided into quintiles of resting heart rate. Multiple adjusted odds ratio was calculated for having the MetS in each quintile compared to the first. Results The multi-adjusted odds for the presence of the MetS increased gradually from an arbitrarily defined figure of 1.0 in the lowest RHR quintile (<60 beats per minute (BPM) in men and <64 BPM in women) to 4.1 and 4.2 in men and women respectively in the highest one (≥80 BPM in men and ≥82 BPM in women). Conclusion Raised resting heart rate is significantly associated with the presence of MetS in a group of apparently healthy individuals and those with an atherothrombotic risk. The strength of this association supports the potential presence of one or more shared pathophysiological mechanisms for both RHR and the MetS. PMID:19828043

  15. A Model Partnership: The American Heart Association and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopulos, Diana; Hafner, Dudley H.

    1982-01-01

    For higher education, the increasing number of nonprofit managers represents a graduate-level audience that may be as significant as the audience of business managers who emerged from private industrial corporations at the turn of the century. Yet colleges and universities have responded slowly to the needs of the third sector. (MLW)

  16. Tobacco use and cardiovascular disease among American Indians: the strong heart study.

    PubMed

    Eichner, June E; Wang, Wenyu; Zhang, Ying; Lee, Elisa T; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-10-01

    Tobacco use among American Indians has a long and complicated history ranging from its utilization in spiritual ceremonies to its importance as an economic factor for survival. Despite this cultural tradition and long history, there are few studies of the health effects of tobacco in this population. The Strong Heart Study is a prospective observational study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 13 American Indian tribes in Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota with 4,549 participants. Baseline examinations were followed by two examinations at regular intervals and 16 years of morbidity and mortality follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for non-fatal CVD for current smokers vs. non-smokers after adjusting for other risk factors were significant in women (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.54 to 2.45) and men (HR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.18). Hazard ratios for fatal CVD for current smokers vs. non-smokers after adjusting for other risk factors were significant in women (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.58), but not in men. Individuals who smoked and who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or renal insufficiency were more likely to quit smoking than those without these conditions. On average, American Indians smoke fewer cigarettes per day than other racial/ethnic groups; nevertheless, the ill effects of habitual tobacco use are evident in this population.

  17. 2009 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2009. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology--and the unique skills of psychologists--to the attention of the public. This report aims…

  18. 2010 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued its efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological…

  19. Federal Legislative Policy of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL. Legislation Committee.

    The American Library Association's policy on federal legislation is based on its objectives of promoting and improving library service and librarianship. Representing those who use libraries as well as those who operate them, the Association is a source of information on libraries and information services for those concerned with formulating and…

  20. 2005 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2005. The examples provided in this report are a small sampling of all that APA is doing to advance the discipline of psychology in an ever-changing world.

  1. 1984 Annual Report of the American Camping Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1984 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. A preliminary message from ACA President Charles Kujawa recognizes the year's significant progress and indicates nine specific examples of success, including implementation of the Association Directions Study, approval of new camp standards,…

  2. Education Is Associated with Physical Activity among American Indian Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Craig N.; Bogart, Andy; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2008-01-01

    Although educational attainment and physical activity levels tend to be positively associated in majority populations, this relationship has not been investigated in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) elders. This study examined the association between education and physical activity among AI/AN elders (N = 107) using self-report and…

  3. Patterns of Heart Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    36 5.1 Pattern of gradually increasing occurrence of COPD .............................................. 37 5.2 Pattern of...deaths [1]. According to the Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2010 Update from the American Heart Association, the estimated annual incidence of MI...7]. The study combined the insurance claims from the Medicare and the Manitoba Health Services Commission claims database with hospitalization

  4. Neighborhood social and physical environments and type 2 diabetes mellitus in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Gebreab, Samson Y; Hickson, DeMarc A; Sims, Mario; Wyatt, Sharon B; Davis, Sharon K; Correa, Adolfo; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2017-01-01

    Using data from Jackson Heart Study, we investigated the associations of neighborhood social and physical environments with prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in African Americans (AA). Among non-diabetic participants at baseline (n=3670), 521 (14.2%) developed T2DM during a median follow-up of 7.3 years. Measures of neighborhood social environments, and food and physical activity resources were derived using survey-and GIS-based methods. Prevalence ratios (PR) and Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards models. Higher neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a 22% lower incidence of T2DM while higher density of unfavorable food stores was associated with a 34% higher incidence of T2DM after adjusting for individual-level risk factors (HR=0.78 [95% CI:0.62, 0.99] and HR=1.34 [1.12, 1.60], respectively). In addition, neighborhood problems was also associated with prevalence of T2DM (PR=1.12 [1.03, 1.21]) independent of individual-level risk factors. Our findings suggest that efforts to strengthen community ties or to attract healthy food retail outlets might be important strategies to consider for prevention of T2DM in AA.

  5. Associations of resting heart rate with endothelium-dependent vasodilation and shear rate.

    PubMed

    Laosiripisan, Jitanan; Parkhurst, Kristin L; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a hemodynamic factor that can modulate blood flow as it affects the frequency of shear stimuli acting on the arterial wall. However, the association between heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation remains highly controversial. We determined the association between heart rate at rest and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in 98 apparently healthy adults (18-63 years). The mild and positive association between heart rate and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was no longer significant when age and sex or baseline diameter were controlled for. The path analyses revealed that heart rate was not directly related to FMD but the association was indirectly mediated by shear rate, which was confirmed by a bias-corrected bootstrap 95% CIs (0.0157-0.1056). We concluded that even though heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation were associated with shear rate, there was no independent relation between heart rate and FMD.

  6. Association between Attention and Heart Rate Fluctuations in Pathological Worriers

    PubMed Central

    Gazzellini, Simone; Dettori, Maria; Amadori, Francesca; Paoli, Barbara; Napolitano, Antonio; Mancini, Francesco; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recent data suggests that several psychopathological conditions are associated with alterations in the variability of behavioral and physiological responses. Pathological worry, defined as the cognitive representation of a potential threat, has been associated with reduced variability of heart beat oscillations (i.e., decreased heart rate variability; HRV) and lapses of attention indexed by reaction times (RTs). Clinical populations with attention deficit show RTs oscillation around 0.05 and 0.01 Hz when performing a sustained attention task. We tested the hypothesis that people who are prone to worry do it in a predictable oscillating pattern revealed through recurrent lapses in attention and concomitant oscillating HRV. Sixty healthy young adults (50% women) were recruited: 30 exceeded the clinical cut-off on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ; High-Worry, HW); the remaining 30 constituted the Low-Worry (LW) group. After a diagnostic assessment, participants performed two 15-min sustained attention tasks, interspersed by a standardized worry-induction procedure. RTs, HRV and moods were assessed. The analyses of the frequency spectrum showed that the HW group presents a significant higher and constant peak of RTs oscillation around 0.01 Hz (period 100 s) after the induction of worry, in comparison with their baseline and with the LW group that was not responsive to the induction procedure. Physiologically, the induction significantly reduced high-frequency HRV and such reduction was associated with levels of self-reported worry. Results are coherent with the oscillatory nature of the default mode network (DMN) and further confirm an association between cognitive rigidity and autonomic nervous system inflexibility. PMID:28082881

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Agricultural and food biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Christine; Earl, Robert

    2006-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that agricultural and food biotechnology techniques can enhance the quality, safety, nutritional value, and variety of food available for human consumption and increase the efficiency of food production, food processing, food distribution, and environmental and waste management. The American Dietetic Association encourages the government, food manufacturers, food commodity groups, and qualified food and nutrition professionals to work together to inform consumers about this new technology and encourage the availability of these products in the marketplace.

  8. Psychometric Testing of the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale Among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Loustalot, Fleetwood; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Sims, Mario; Ellison, Christopher G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Underwood, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This study provided the first examination of the psychometric properties of the 6-item Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES) in a large African American sample, the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). The JHS included measures of spiritual (DSES) and religious practices. Internal reliability, dimensionality, fit indices, and correlation were assessed. DSES scores reflected frequent daily spiritual experiences (12.84 ± 4.72) and reliability scores were high (α = 0.85; 95% CI 0.84–0.86). The DSES loaded on a single factor, with significant goodness-of-fit scores (RMSEA = 0.094, P < 0.01). Moderate significant correlations were noted among DSES items. Our findings confirm that the 6-item DSES had excellent psychometric properties in this sample. PMID:19693673

  9. Racial differences in the association of coronary calcified plaque with left ventricular hypertrophy: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study and Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Arnett, Donna K; Province, Michael A; Lewis, Cora E; North, Kari; Carr, J Jeffrey; Pankow, James S; Hopkins, Paul N; Devereux, Richard B; Wilk, Jemma B; Wagenknecht, Lynne

    2006-05-15

    Studies have reported a lower burden of calcified atherosclerotic plaque in coronary arteries in African-Americans than in whites. Findings from autopsy studies of sudden cardiac death have suggested a link between left ventricular hypertrophy and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Echocardiograms and cardiac computed tomograms were analyzed in 334 African-American (84% hypertensive) and 196 white (66% hypertensive) adults with no history of coronary heart disease or revascularization procedures at study entry. The relation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) score to left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was assessed by Spearman's correlations and mixed linear models. Covariates included age, gender, field center, weight, height, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive medications, diabetes, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and current smoking and alcohol consumption. In African-Americans, a significant and independent association between CAC score and left ventricular mass or left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was present with the 2 analytic strategies. Spearman's correlation coefficients for CAC score with left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area were 0.14 (p = 0.015) and 0.13 (p = 0.025), respectively, after multivariable adjustment. In whites, the associations of CAC score with measurements of left ventricular mass were weaker and only marginally significant in mixed linear models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that CAC reflects a different risk burden between African-Americans and whites, and future studies examining the prognostic implications of CAC in African-Americans should consider the potential association between CAC and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  10. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harrison W; Gibbs, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made towards specific therapies for PH-LHD, and management focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the disease with supportive therapies, surgery and pharmacological treatments. Clinical trials of therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PH-LHD have thus far been limited and have provided disappointing or conflicting results. Robust, long-term clinical studies in appropriate target populations have the potential to improve the outlook for patients with PH-LHD. Herein, we discuss the knowledge gaps in our understanding of PH-LHD, and describe the current unmet needs and challenges that are faced by clinicians when identifying and managing patients with this disease.

  11. American Association of Physics Teachers Annual Report, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) mission is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching. Embracing the notion that physics understanding is critical to the wellbeing of society, AAPT is committed to serving its members and the larger community by promoting effectiveness in physics teaching for…

  12. Independent Consulting and the American Evaluation Association: Twenty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Deborah G.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of American Evaluation Association's (AEA) Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group (IC TIG). The TIG goes back a joint meeting held in San Francisco in 1984 of the Evaluation Network (ENet) and the Evaluation Research Society (ERS), two years before the organizations merged to become the AEA. On the fringes…

  13. Research on the History of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomison, Dennis

    A researcher on the history of the American Library Association (ALA) describes problems encountered on his project, important trends in ALA, weaknesses and benefits of ALA, and needs in the area of historical research. Some of the problems cited are the inadequacy of organization and housing of the ALA archives, the unevenness of the archival…

  14. Association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American school-aged children. Cross-sectional study using the baseline data from a cohort study. Mothers and children answered questions about the frequency and quantity of the child's consumption of soda, diet soda, other...

  15. Creation of an American Holistic Nurses Association research consultation program.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sue; Clingerman, Evelyn; Zahourek, Rothlyn P; Mariano, Carla; Lange, Bernadette

    2012-12-01

    A goal of the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) Research Committee is to prepare holistic nurses to conduct holistic nursing research. This article describes the creation of a Research Consultation Program and how the knowledge gained from the program will contribute to the development of a formal research mentor program.

  16. American Osteopathic Association Commitment to Quality and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunanidas, Amelia G.; Burkhart, Diane N.

    2005-01-01

    The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) initiated programs to enhance quality for 54, 000 doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs) practicing in the United States. Seven core competencies are required in undergraduate and graduate medical education standards. They include osteopathic philosophy and osteopathic manipulative medicine, medical…

  17. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  18. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  19. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2013 Membership Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to collect data regarding membership demographics as well as variables concerning the work environment for art therapists. These surveys can provide a detailed description of these characteristics and how they may change over time. This article statistically compares the…

  20. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2011 Membership Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to gather information on general demographics, employment-related characteristics, licensing, and professional affiliations. The surveys are used in the development of national media opportunities and public policy initiatives to help increase recognition for the field of…

  1. The American Psychiatric Association and the history of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Hirshbein, Laura

    2011-09-01

    The history committee within the American Psychiatric Association was actively involved in the history of psychiatry in the early decades of the twentieth century, as well as from 1942 to 2009.This paper explores the role of this committee in the context of changes in the psychiatric profession over the twentieth century.

  2. American Counseling Association Branch Journals: Viable, Scholarly Means for Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, A. Scott

    1994-01-01

    Outlines the efficacy of publishing research, theoretically based articles, and in-the-field articles in refereed, professional branch journals of American Counseling Association (ACA). Addresses means and ways of writing successfully for publication. Presents ACA branch journals as alternative means for publishing and to encourage professional…

  3. American Dental Education Association Annual Proceedings, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Reports activities of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) from the end of the 2001 Annual Session and Exposition (March 9, 2001) through the 2002 Annual Session and Exposition (March 7, 2002). Consists of: president's annual report, president-elect's address, executive director's report, proceedings of the 2002 House of Delegates,…

  4. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2009 Membership Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2010-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to obtain a general profile of current members that includes basic demographics and client populations served by member art therapists, as well as licensure and professional activities. The results of the 2009 survey presented in this report suggest that, overall, the work…

  5. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  6. Toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Baliu, C; Sanclemente, G; Cardona, M; Castel, M A; Perez-Villa, F; Moreno, A; Cervera, C

    2014-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations in immunosuppressed patients. Encephalitis and intracranial mass lesions are easily recognized as typical manifestations of toxoplasmosis. However, meningitis caused by T. gondii is a rare condition with very few cases described in the literature. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis. After an extensive review of the medical literature, we found only 1 case of meningitis in solid organ transplant recipients and <25 cases in immunosuppressed patients, such as patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus or those with Hodgkin's disease. In this report, we consider toxoplasmosis in the differential diagnosis of meningitis in immunocompromised individuals.

  7. Shock from heart device often triggers further health care needs

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Shock from heart device often triggers further health care needs American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report ... cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may trigger an increase in health care needs for many patients, regardless whether the shock ...

  8. Association of ideal cardiovascular health and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jeremy M.; Petrone, Andrew B.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Pankow, James S.; Hunt, Steven C.; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis; Gaziano, J. Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association (AHA) established recommendations based on 7 ideal health behaviors and factors with the goal of improving cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 20% by 2020. Few studies have investigated their association with subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine whether the 7 AHA CVH metrics were associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. Methods and Results In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1731 predominantly Caucasian men and women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study without prevalent CHD. Diet was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac CT. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of 100+ and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Mean age was 56.8 years and 41% were male. The median number of ideal CVH metrics was 3, and no participants met all 7. There was a strong inverse relationship between number of ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC of 100+ were 1.0 (reference), 0.37 (0.29–0.45), 0.35 (0.26–0.44), and 0.27 (0.20–0.36) among subjects with 0–1, 2, 3, and 4+ ideal CVH metrics, respectively (p for trend: 0.0001), adjusting for sex, age, field center, alcohol, income, education, and calorie consumption. Conclusions These data demonstrate a strong and graded inverse relationship between AHA ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. PMID:25728727

  9. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  10. 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued it's efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological science and expertise to pressing social issues, fulfill the goals of APA's new strategic plan, and increase the public's understanding of psychology as a science and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline.

  11. 77 FR 70446 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for Continuing CMS... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for continued recognition as a... determined by CMS. American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASFs)...

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association and American Society for Nutrition: obesity, reproduction, and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; King, Janet C

    2009-05-01

    Given the detrimental influence of maternal overweight and obesity on reproductive and pregnancy outcomes for the mother and child, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition that all overweight and obese women of reproductive age should receive counseling on the roles of diet and physical activity in reproductive health prior to pregnancy,during pregnancy, and in the inter conceptional period, in order to ameliorate these adverse outcomes. The effect of maternal nutritional status prior to pregnancy on reproduction and pregnancy outcomes is of great public health importance. Obesity in the United States and worldwide has grown to epidemic proportions, with an estimated 33% of US women classified as obese. This position paper has two objectives: (a) to help nutrition professionals become aware of the risks and possible complications of overweight and obesity for fertility,the course of pregnancy, birth outcomes, and short- and long-term maternal and child health outcomes;and (b) related to the commitment to research by the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition, to identify the gaps in research to improve our knowledge of the risks and complications associated with being overweight and obese before and during pregnancy.Only with an increased knowledge of these risks and complications can health care professionals develop effective strategies that can be implemented before and during pregnancy as well as during the inter conceptional period to ameliorate adverse outcomes.

  13. Greater case-fatality after myocardial infarction among Mexican Americans and women than among non-Hispanic whites and men. The Corpus Christi Heart Project.

    PubMed

    Goff, D C; Ramsey, D J; Labarthe, D R; Nichaman, M Z

    1994-03-01

    Age-adjusted 28-day case-fatality rates were higher among Mexican Americans than among non-Hispanic whites and higher among women than among men hospitalized for definite or possible myocardial infarction in Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, from May 1, 1988, through April 30, 1990. The authors therefore examined whether these higher case-fatality rates were associated with greater prevalence of previously diagnosed coronary heart disease or diabetes; with greater age, frequency of definite myocardial infarction, or congestive heart failure; with higher values of indicators of severity of infarction, including peak creatine phosphokinase levels and scales prognostic of early mortality after myocardial infarction; and with differences in receipt of in-hospital therapy. The overall 28-day case-fatality rate among 1,228 patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction during a 24-month period was 7.3%. After adjustment for age; diabetes; myocardial infarction class (definite vs. possible); congestive heart failure; the Norris and Peel severity indices; peak total creatine phosphokinase; and receipt of thrombolytic therapy, aspirin, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, anticoagulants, angioplasty, and bypass surgery, the risk of 28-day case-fatality for Mexican Americans in relation to non-Hispanic whites was 1.49 (95% confidence interval 0.92-2.40). The corresponding risk for women in relation to men was 1.80 (95% confidence interval 1.12-2.89). These findings should alert clinicians to the high-risk status of these groups of patients.

  14. Clinical factors associated with early readmission among acutely decompensated heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Pierre-Louis, Bredy; Rodriques, Shareen; Gorospe, Vanessa; Guddati, Achuta K.; Ahn, Chul; Wright, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a common cause of hospital readmission. Material and methods A retrospective study was conducted at Harlem Hospital in New York City. Data were collected for 685 consecutive adult patients admitted for decompensated CHF from March, 2009 to December, 2012. Variables including patient demographics, comorbidities, laboratory studies, and medical therapy were compared between CHF patient admissions resulting in early CHF readmission and not resulting in early CHF readmission. Results Clinical factors found to be independently significant for early CHF readmission included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio (OR) = 6.4), HIV infection (OR = 3.4), African-American ethnicity (OR = 2.2), systolic heart failure (OR = 1.9), atrial fibrillation (OR = 2.3), renal disease with glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/min (OR = 2.7), evidence of substance abuse (OR = 1.7), and absence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy after discharge (OR = 1.8). The ORs were used to develop a scoring system regarding the risk for early readmission. Conclusions Identifying patients with clinical factors associated with early CHF readmission after an index hospitalization for CHF using the proposed scoring system would allow for an early CHF readmission risk stratification protocol to target particularly high-risk patients. PMID:27279845

  15. Association of hyperglycemia with reduced heart rate variability (The Framingham Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Singh, J P; Larson, M G; O'Donnell, C J; Wilson, P F; Tsuji, H; Lloyd-Jones, D M; Levy, D

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the association of heart rate variability (HRV) with blood glucose levels in a large community-based population. Previous reports have shown HRV to be reduced in diabetics, suggesting the presence of abnormalities in neural regulatory mechanisms. There is scant information about HRV across the spectrum of blood glucose levels in a population-based cohort. One thousand nine hundred nineteen men and women from the Framingham Offspring Study, who underwent ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings at a routine examination, were eligible. HRV variables included the SD of normal RR intervals (SDNN), high-frequency (HF, 0.15 to 0.40 Hz) and low-frequency (LF, 0.04 to 0.15 Hz) power, and LF/HF ratio. Fasting plasma glucose levels were used to classify subjects as normal (<110 mg/dl; n = 1, 779), as having impaired fasting glucose levels (110 to 125 mg/dl; n = 56), and as having diabetes mellitus (DM >/=126 mg/dl or receiving therapy; n = 84). SDNN, LF and HF power, and LF/HF ratio were inversely related to plasma glucose levels (p <0.0001). SDNN and LF and HF powers were reduced in DM subjects (4.28 +/- 0.03, 6.03 +/- 0. 08, and 4.95 +/- 0.09) and in subjects with impaired fasting glucose levels (4.37 +/- 0.04, 6.26 +/- 0.10, and 5.06 +/- 0.11) compared with those with normal fasting glucose (4.51 +/- 0.01, 6.77 +/- 0.02, and 5.55 +/- 0.02, all p <0.005), respectively. After adjusting for covariates (age, sex, heart rate, body mass index, antihypertensive and cardiac medications, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, smoking, and alcohol and coffee consumption), LF power and LF/HF ratio were lower in DM subjects than in those with normal fasting glucose (p <0.005). HRV is inversely associated with plasma glucose levels and is reduced in diabetics as well as in subjects with impaired fasting glucose levels. Additional research is needed to determine if low HRV contributes to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

  16. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON THE ASSOCIATION OF TESTOSTERONE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Neil; Guay, Andre; Dandona, Paresh; Dhindsa, Sandeep; Faiman, Charles; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-09-01

    This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

  17. Sudden Visual Loss and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Paul B.; Chen, Allison J; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence and determinants of sudden visual loss (SVL) are unknown in African Americans (AAs). Since SVL can be cardiovascular disease (CVD) related and CVD is highly prevalent in AAs, we examined the prevalence of and CVD factors related to self-reported SVL lasting 24 hours or longer in the cohort of AAs enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). Methods The study population comprised of 5,301 participants enrolled from 2000–2004 in the metropolitan area of Jackson, MS. All participants who responded to the question “Have you ever had any sudden loss of vision or blurring, lasting 24 hours or longer?” on the baseline stroke questionnaire were included in the study. We estimated the prevalence of SVL and used regression modeling to identify CVD factors independently related to SVL. Results There were 5262 participants included, of which 63% (3334/5262) were female. The prevalence of SVL was 3.6% (193/5262) overall (4.4% in females and 2.4% in males) and 8.7% (84/965) in patients with DM. Factors independently related to SVL included coronary heart disease (OR, 1.69 [95%CI, 1.12–2.56]), cerebrovascular disease (OR, 2.81 [95%CI, 1.76–4.47]), diabetes (OR, 2.85 [95% CI, 2.05–3.94]), hypertension (OR, 1.64 [95%CI, 1.09–2.45]), female gender (OR, 1.82 [95%CI: 1.24–2.67]), and income less than $50,000 (OR, 2.05 [95%CI: 1.28–3.30]. Conclusions In this cohort of AAs, self-reported SVL lasting 24 hours or longer was highly prevalent in women and those with diabetes, and was independently related to gender, CVD, CVD risk factors and household income. PMID:25777311

  18. 2012 Annual report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Provides the 2012 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In 2012, APA celebrated its 120th anniversary. It has grown from its original 31 members to the largest association of psychologists in the United States and a worldwide leader within the discipline. This edition of the report introduces each directorate and office within APA and talks about their goals and objectives. the president of APA, Dr. Norman Anderson, also gives a brief report which updates you on the activities of the association during its 120th anniversary as the professional home for psychologists and an advocate for the discipline.

  19. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset: beyond depression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia E.; Hu, Chiyi; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José A.; Uda, Hidenori; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J.; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, nor taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Methods Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. Results After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3–1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology’s links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications. PMID:23993321

  20. Selected Papers from the 1990 Meeting of the American Journalism Historians' Association (Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, October 2-7, 1990): Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journalism Historians' Association.

    The following 12 papers, on a variety of topics, were given at the 1990 meeting of the American Journalism Historians' Association: (1) "'Let Jim Handle It': President Dwight D. Eisenhower's First Heart Attack and Jim Hagerty's Handling of the Media" (Joseph V. Trahan, III); (2) "Eisenhower's Pyrrhic Victory in 1956: Mixed Lessons…

  1. Association of Fetal Heart Rate Baseline Change and Neonatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Michael; Stout, Molly J; López, Julia D; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2017-03-16

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of baseline change within normal range during labor and its prediction of neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods This was a prospective cohort of singleton, nonanomalous, term neonates with continuous electronic fetal monitoring and normal baseline fetal heart rate throughout the last 2 hours of labor. We determined baseline in 10-minute segments using Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development criteria. We evaluated baseline changes of ≥ 20 and ≥ 30 bpm for association with acidemia (umbilical cord arterial pH ≤ 7.10) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Finally, we performed a sensitivity analysis of normal neonates, excluding those with acidemia, NICU admission, or 5-minute Apgar < 4. Results Among all neonates (n = 3,021), 1,267 (41.9%) had change ≥ 20 bpm; 272 (9.0%) had ≥ 30 bpm. Among normal neonates (n = 2,939), 1,221 (41.5%) had change ≥20 bpm. Acidemia was not associated with baseline change of any direction or magnitude. NICU admission was associated with decrease ≥ 20 bpm (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19 - 7.21) or any direction ≥ 20 bpm (aOR: 4.06; 95% CI: 1.46-11.29). For decrease ≥ 20 bpm, sensitivity and specificity were 40.0 and 81.7%; for any direction ≥ 20 bpm, 75.0 and 58.3%. Conclusion Changes of normal baseline are common in term labor and poorly predict morbidity, regardless of direction or magnitude.

  2. Health belief model perceptions, knowledge of heart disease, and its risk factors in educated African-American women: an exploration of the relationships of socioeconomic status and age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah E; Weaver, Michael T; Grimley, Diane; Appel, Susan J; Ard, Jamy

    2006-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African-American women in the United States. Although African-American women experience higher rates of heart disease with earlier onset and more severe consequences than White women do, they are not aware of their risk for the disease. The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been commonly used to guide preventive interventions in cardiovascular health. However, the HBM has not been evaluated for African-American women regarding its effectiveness. This study explored the perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, and the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), age, and knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors among 194 educated African-American women from the southern United States. Participants did not perceive themselves to be at high risk for developing heart disease while perceiving heart disease as serious. African-American women who were older perceived heart disease to be more serious than their younger counterparts did. Older women and those with higher SES knew more about heart disease and risk factors. Neither SES nor age moderated the relationship between knowledge and perceived susceptibility or seriousness.

  3. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention.

  4. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  5. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  6. Wave reflection effects in the central circulation of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis): what the heart sees.

    PubMed

    Syme, Douglas A; Gamperl, A Kurt; Braun, Marvin H; Jones, David R

    2006-10-01

    A large central compliance is thought to dominate the hemodynamics of all vertebrates except birds and mammals. Yet large crocodilians may adumbrate the avian and mammalian condition and set the stage for significant wave transmission (reflection) effects, with potentially detrimental impacts on cardiac performance. To investigate whether crocodilians exhibit wave reflection effects, pressures and flows were recorded from the right aorta, carotid artery, and femoral artery of six adult, anesthetized American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) during control conditions and after experimentally induced vasodilation and constriction. Hallmarks of wave reflection phenomena were observed, including marked differences between the measured profiles for flow and pressure, peaking of the femoral pressure pulse, and a diastolic wave in the right aortic pressure profile. Pulse wave velocity and peripheral input impedance increased with progressive constriction, and thus changes in both the timing and magnitude of reflections accounted for the altered reflection effects. Resolution of pressure and flow waves into incident and reflected components showed substantial reflection effects within the right aorta, with reflection coefficients at the first harmonic approaching 0.3 when constricted. Material properties measured from isolated segments of blood vessels revealed a major reflection site at the periphery and, surprisingly, at the junction of the truncus and right aorta. Thus, while our results clearly show that significant wave reflection phenomena are not restricted to birds and mammals, they also suggest that rather than cope with potential negative impacts of reflections, the crocodilian heart simply avoids them because of a large impedance mismatch at the truncus.

  7. 75 FR 51464 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Deeming Authority for... for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities' (AAAASF) request for continued recognition as a... granted to the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities on November...

  8. 77 FR 37678 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgery Facilities Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS... application from the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF)...

  9. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment.

  10. The IPA and the American Psychoanalytic Association: a perspective on the regional association agreement.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, R S

    1998-06-01

    Ever since 1938 the American Psychoanalytic Association has had a special autonomous relationship within the IPA accorded to no other component organisation. This Regional Association status has had two main features: (1) total internal control over training standards and membership criteria, with no accountability to the IPA; and (2) an 'exclusive franchise', so that the IPA was barred from recognising any other component within the United States. This unique Regional Association status reflected the resolution at the time (1938) of the long-standing controversy between the IPA and the American over the issue of 'lay analysis', and remained unaltered for half a century until, with the resolution of the 3 1/2-year long law-suit against the American (and secondarily against the IPA) in 1988, the Regional Association agreement was modified (but not totally abrogated) by the American's giving up the 'exclusive franchise' aspect (thus permitting IPA recognition of psychoanalytic groups in the US organised outside the American), but still retaining its internal full control over training and membership. The meanings and consequences for psychoanalysis of this special status of the American are explored.

  11. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marten E; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A; Silva, Claudia T; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G; de Mutsert, Renée; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F; Doney, Alex S F; Ellinor, Patrick T; Eppinga, Ruben N; Felix, Stephan B; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Heckbert, Susan R; Huang, Paul L; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kähönen, Mika; Kanters, Jørgen K; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; Macfarlane, Peter W; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D; Nelson, Christopher P; Orrú, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Spector, Timothy D; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Taylor, Kent D; Tobin, Martin D; Uitterlinden, André; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W; van der Meer, Peter; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Wouter Jukema, J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Samani, Nilesh J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James; Lubitz, Steven A; Kääb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J; Palmer, Colin N A; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I; Dörr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H; Munroe, Patricia B

    2017-04-03

    Background Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. GWAS analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation.Aim To discover new genetic loci associated with heart rate from Exome Chip meta-analyses.Methods Heart rate was measured from either elecrtrocardiograms or pulse recordings. We meta-analysed heart rate association results from 104,452 European-ancestry individuals from 30 cohorts, genotyped using the Exome Chip. Twenty-four variants were selected for follow-up in an independent dataset (UK Biobank, N = 134,251). Conditional and gene-based testing was undertaken, and variants were investigated with bioinformatics methods.Results We discovered five novel heart rate loci, and one new independent low-frequency non-synonymous variant in an established heart rate locus (KIAA1755). Lead variants in four of the novel loci are non-synonymous variants in the genes C10orf71, DALDR3, TESK2, SEC31B. The variant at SEC31B is significantly associated with SEC31B expression in heart and tibial nerve tissue. Further candidate genes were detected from long range regulatory chromatin interactions in heart tissue (SCD, SLF2, MAPK8). We observed significant enrichment in DNase I hypersensitive sites in fetal heart and lung. Moreover, enrichment was seen for the first time in human neuronal progenitor cells (derived from embryonic stem cells) and fetal muscle samples by including our novel variants.Conclusion Our findings advance the knowledge of the genetic architecture of heart rate, and indicate new candidate genes for follow-up functional studies.

  12. A genetic association study detects haplotypes associated with obstructive heart defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Cleves, Mario A; Mallick, Himel; Erickson, Stephen W; Tang, Xinyu; Nick, Todd G; Macleod, Stewart L; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2014-09-01

    The development of congenital heart defects (CHDs) involves a complex interplay between genetic variants, epigenetic variants, and environmental exposures. Previous studies have suggested that susceptibility to CHDs is associated with maternal genotypes, fetal genotypes, and maternal-fetal genotype (MFG) interactions. We conducted a haplotype-based genetic association study of obstructive heart defects (OHDs), aiming to detect the genetic effects of 877 SNPs involved in the homocysteine, folate, and transsulfuration pathways. Genotypes were available for 285 mother-offspring pairs with OHD-affected pregnancies and 868 mother-offspring pairs with unaffected pregnancies. A penalized logistic regression model was applied with an adaptive least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), which dissects the maternal effect, fetal effect, and MFG interaction effects associated with OHDs. By examining the association between 140 haplotype blocks, we identified 9 blocks that are potentially associated with OHD occurrence. Four haplotype blocks, located in genes MGMT, MTHFS, CBS, and DNMT3L, were statistically significant using a Bayesian false-discovery probability threshold of 0.8. Two blocks in MGMT and MTHFS appear to have significant fetal effects, while the CBS and DNMT3L genes may have significant MFG interaction effects.

  13. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Deal, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery.

  14. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery. PMID:27709096

  15. Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Value of Circulating miRNAs in Heart Failure Patients Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ali Sheikh, Md Sayed; Salma, Umme; Zhang, Baohai; Chen, Jimei; Zhuang, Jian; Ping, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem especially in the aging population (≥65 years old), affecting nearly 5 million Americans and 15 million European people. Effective management of heart failure (HF) depends on a correct and rapid diagnosis. Presently, BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) assay is generally accepted by the international community for diagnostic evaluation and risk stratification of patients with HF. However, regardless of its widespread clinical use, BNP is still encumbered by reduced specificity. As a result, diagnosis of heart failure remains challenging. Although significant improvement happened in the clinical management of HF over the last 2 decades, traditional treatments are ultimately ineffective in many patients who progress to advanced HF. Therefore, a novel diagnostic, prognostic biomarker and new therapeutic approach are required for clinical management of HF patients. Circulating miRNAs seem to be the right choice for novel noninvasive biomarkers as well as new treatment strategies for HF. In this review, we briefly discuss the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic role of circulating miRNAs in heart failure patients. We also mentioned our own technique of extraction of RNA and detection of circulating miRNAs from human plasma and oxidative stress associated miRNAs with HF. PMID:27379177

  16. 3 CFR 8344 - Proclamation 8344 of February 2, 2009. American Heart Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and diabetes. Practicing the following “Big Four” habits can help mitigate these risks: eating a heart healthy diet, getting regular physical activity, maintaining a healthy... commitment to promoting heart disease awareness. It is never too late to start protecting heart...

  17. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  18. Adiponectin is Associated with Increased Mortality and Heart Failure in Patients with Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Data from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Alexis L.; Zhang, Mary H.; Ku, Ivy A.; Na, Beeya; Schiller, Nelson B.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Serum adiponectin protects against incident ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, in patients with existing IHD, higher adiponectin levels are paradoxically associated with worse outcomes. We investigated this paradox by evaluating the relationship between adiponectin and cardiovascular events in patients with existing IHD. Methods We measured total serum adiponectin and cardiac disease severity by stress echocardiography in 981 outpatients with stable IHD who were recruited for the Heart and Soul Study between September 2000 and December 2002. Subsequent heart failure hospitalizations, myocardial infarction, and death were recorded. Results During an average of 7.1 years of follow-up, patients with adiponectin levels in the highest quartile were more likely than those in the lowest quartile to be hospitalized for heart failure (23% vs. 13%; demographics-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.56, p=0.03) or die (49% vs. 31%; HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.24–2.26, p<0.008), but not more likely to have a myocardial infarction (12% vs. 17%; HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.38–1.06, p=0.08). The combined outcome of myocardial infarction, heart failure, or death occurred in 56% (136/245) of participants in the highest quartile of adiponectin vs. 38% (94/246) of participants in the lowest quartile (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.31–2.21, p<0.002). Adjustment for left ventricular ejection fraction, diastolic dysfunction, inducible ischemia, C-reactive protein, and NT-proBNP attenuated the association between higher adiponectin and increased risk of subsequent events (HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.98–2.09 p=0.06). Conclusions Higher concentrations of adiponectin were associated with heart failure and mortality among patients with existing IHD. PMID:22196150

  19. Factors Associated with American Indian Cigarette Smoking in Rural Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Felicia; Nandy, Karabi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on the prevalence, factors and patterns of cigarette smoking among rural California American Indian (AI) adults. Methods: Thirteen Indian health clinic registries formed the random household survey sampling frame (N = 457). Measures included socio-demographics, age at smoking initiation, intention to quit, smoking usage, smoking during pregnancy, health effects of smoking, suicide attempts or ideation, history of physical abuse, neglect and the role of the environment (smoking at home and at work). Statistical tests included Chi Square and Fisher’s Exact test, as well as multiple logistic regression analysis among never, former, and current smokers. Results: Findings confirm high smoking prevalence among male and female participants (44% and 37% respectively). American Indians begin smoking in early adolescence (age 14.7). Also, 65% of current smokers are less than 50% Indian blood and 76% of current smokers have no intention to quit smoking. Current and former smokers are statistically more likely to report having suicidal ideation than those who never smoked. Current smokers also report being neglected and physically abused in childhood and adolescence, are statistically more likely to smoke ½ pack or less (39% vs. 10% who smoke 1+ pack), smoke during pregnancy, and have others who smoke in the house compared with former and never smokers. Conclusion: Understanding the factors associated with smoking will help to bring about policy changes and more effective programs to address the problem of high smoking rates among American Indians. PMID:21695023

  20. Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Carotid Plaques: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; FELSON, DAVID T.; ZHANG, YUQING

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of serum uric acid (SUA) with a marker of preclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), carotid atherosclerotic plaques (PLQ), where early evidence of risk may be evident, focusing on individuals without CV risk factors. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. PLQ were assessed with carotid ultrasound. We conducted sex-specific logistic regression to assess the association of SUA with presence of PLQ, including analyses among persons without risk factors related to both CVD and hyperuricemia. Results In total, 4866 participants had both SUA and carotid ultrasound assessed (54% women, mean age 52 yrs, mean body mass index 27.6). The association of SUA with PLQ increased with increasing SUA levels, demonstrating a dose-response relation for men [OR 1.0, 1.29, 1.61, 1.75, for SUA categories < 5 (reference), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively; p = 0.002]. Similar associations were found in men without CV risk factors. We found no relation of SUA with PLQ in women. Conclusion In this large study, SUA was associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaques in men. Results were similar in the absence of CV risk factors. These results suggest that SUA may have a pathophysiologic role in atherosclerosis in men. (J Rheumatol First Release Nov 15 2008; doi:10.3899/jrheum.080646) PMID:19012359

  1. Policing the social boundaries of the American Medical Association, 1847-70.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Douglas M

    2005-04-01

    In May 1870 the American Medical Association (AMA) voted to deny the admission of black delegates and their white colleagues to the national meeting in Washington, D.C. Historians of race and medicine have customarily viewed this decision as marking a crucial milestone in the formation of the nexus between racism and the development of the American medical profession in the era after the Civil War (1861-64). This study recasts this narrative by locating the 1870 decision in relation to the antebellum practices of the association and their social consequences for American medicine. It argues that the viability of the AMA as the national voice of the profession was critically dependent on rejecting racial equality. Indeed, at a moment when the question of the abolition of slavery polarized the nation, the AMA was founded in 1847 to create a voluntary professional organization, national in scope, dedicated to raising the standards of medical training and practice. To this end, the AMA elected presidents and selected host cities for annual meetings in the North, South, and West. Seven out of the fourteen meetings and six out of fourteen presidents were from slave and/or border states. These institutional practices together with the representation of blacks as different and enjoying an appropriate status as slaves grounded the national identity of the profession in black subordination. Similarly, the gendered discourses about healing and practices of female exclusion privileged medical authority as male by drawing on and reinforcing patriarchy. In the wake of the war, leaders hoped to restore the national character of the organization by resuming antebellum practices. In response to the new possibilities for blacks in medicine--as represented by the biracial National Medical Society--the AMA took steps to vigorously police the racial boundaries of the national profession. As this study will show, the 1870 decision reflected the logic of the racial politics at the heart

  2. Position of the American Dietetic Association: weight management.

    PubMed

    Seagle, Helen M; Strain, Gladys Witt; Makris, Angela; Reeves, Rebecca S

    2009-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that successful weight management to improve overall health for adults requires a lifelong commitment to healthful lifestyle behaviors emphasizing sustainable and enjoyable eating practices and daily physical activity. Given the increasing incidence of overweight and obesity along with the escalating health care costs associated with weight-related illnesses, health care providers must discover how to effectively treat this complex condition. Food and nutrition professionals should stay current and skilled in weight management to assist clients in preventing weight gain, optimizing individual weight loss interventions, and achieving long-term weight loss maintenance. Using the American Dietetic Association's Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for weight management. The evidence supporting the value of portion control, eating frequency, meal replacements, and very-low-energy diets are discussed as well as physical activity, behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Public policy changes to create environments that can assist all populations to achieve and sustain healthful lifestyle behaviors are also reviewed.

  3. Moebius syndrome associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jurko, A; Minarik, M; Misovicova, N; Jurko, A

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a newborn infant from the second pregnancy whose mother experienced influenza A infection in the first trimester. The birth was at term without complications, but 11 hours later, cyanosis and tachypnoe developed. The final diagnosis was hypoplastic left heart syndrome with simultaneous Moebius Syndrome. In conclusion the authors indicate that echocardiography is of great importance in the diagnosis of this complex heart disease as it helps to analyze in detail the options in the diagnosis of rare Moebius Syndrome (Fig. 2, Ref. 8).

  4. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals:...

  5. Hyponatremia Associated with Heart Failure: Pathological Role of Vasopressin-Dependent Impaired Water Excretion.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-05-08

    An exaggerated increase in circulatory blood volume is linked to congestive heart failure. Despite this increase, reduction of the "effective circulatory blood volume" in congestive heart failure is associated with decreased cardiac output, and can weaken the sensitivity of baroreceptors. Thereafter, tonic inhibition of the baroreceptor-mediated afferent pathway of vagal nerves is removed, providing an increase in non-osmotic release of arginine vasopressin (AVP). In the renal collecting duct, the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel is regulated by sustained elevation of AVP release, and this leads to augmented hydroosmotic action of AVP, that results in exaggerated water retention and dilutional hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is also a predictor for worsening heart failure in patients with known/new onset heart failure. Therefore, such a dilutional hyponatremia associated with organ damage is predictive of the short- and long-term outcome of heart failure.

  6. Associations between depression, distress tolerance, delay discounting, and alcohol-related problems in European American and African American college students.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Ashley A; Murphy, James G

    2011-12-01

    Although levels of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems are high in college students, there is significant variability in the number and type of problems experienced, even among students who drink heavily. African American students drink less and experience fewer alcohol-related problems than European American students, but are still at risk, and little research has investigated the potentially unique patterns and predictors of problems among these students. Depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting have been implicated in adult substance abuse and may be important predictors of alcohol problem severity among college students. We examined the relationship between these variables and alcohol-related problems among African American and European American students (N = 206; 53% female; 68% European American; 28% African American) who reported recent heavy drinking. In regression models that controlled for drinking level, depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting were associated with alcohol problems among African American students, but only depression was associated with alcohol problems among European American students. These results suggest that negative affect is a key risk factor for alcohol problems among college student drinkers. For African American students, the inability to tolerate negative emotions and to organize their behavior around future outcomes may also be especially relevant risk factors.

  7. American woodcock (Scolopax minor) mortality associated with a reovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Converse, K.A.; Hansen, W.R.; Norman, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    A virus isolate associated with a 1989-90 die-off in American woodcock (Scolopax minor) was identified as a reovirus. Emaciation was a consistent necropsy finding in the woodcock involved in this die-off. This reovirus infection appeared to be systemic, had the potential for fecal-oral virus transmission, and was associated with deterioration of body condition. To our knowledge this is the first report of a virus isolate from wild American woodcock. A survey conducted in 1990-92 indicated that this virus was not present at detectable levels in the woodcock breeding and wintering population. /// Un virus asociado con la mortalidad de becadas o perdices americanas (Scolopax minor) en 1989-1990-fue identificado como reovirus. La emaciaci??n fue un resultado com??n a la necropsia de las aves que murieron. Esta infecci??n por reovirus pareci?? ser sist??mica, ten?-a el potencial de transmisi??n fecal-oral y estuvo asociada con el deterioro del ave. Creemos que este sea el primer reporte de aislamiento viral a partir de becadas americanas. Una encuesta hecha entre 1990 y 1992 indic?? que este virus no estaba presente en los niveles detectables en los reproductores y en las aves invernales.

  8. 3 CFR 8625 - Proclamation 8625 of January 31, 2011. American Heart Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... healthier hearts for the next generation by addressing the factors that contribute to childhood obesity and...: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, tobacco use, and...

  9. 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Presents the 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In his introduction, President Barry Anton describes how 2015 was among APA's most challenging. Although 2015 ushered in an era of greater transparency within the association and enhanced communications to members and the public, it also required painful self-reflection stemming from the revelations of an independent review by an outside law firm. The review examined the question of whether APA played any role related to the Bush administration's use of abusive interrogation techniques during the war on terror. Anton's introduction also discusses (1) the APA convention, (2) representing APA at a White House meeting with health care providers and insurance companies, (3) APA's effort to increase the number of APA-accredited internships, (4) international activities, and (5) the global summit on psychology and integrated care. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Complete heart block associated with lupus in a dog.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Zunino, P; Hunt, G B

    2003-07-01

    A 5-year-old Poodle-cross was initially presented for exercise intolerance and difficulty in chewing and yawning. Some months later it acutely developed lethargy referable to complete heart block. Further investigations before and after permanent pacemaker implantation demonstrated Coombs-positive immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, presumptive masticatory myositis and hypoadrenocorticism, suggesting the possibility of multisystem auto-immune disease. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was made based on these findings and a positive anti-nuclear antibody titre. It was thought that immune-mediated destruction of cardiac conduction tissues was responsible for the development of atrioventricular conduction block. Glucocorticoid deficiency was corrected using cortisone replacement therapy. SLE was controlled successfully for 10 months using azathioprine monotherapy until signs, subsequently shown to be due to subacute bacterial endocarditis, resulted in the death of the patient. Lupus should be considered as a potential underlying aetiology in dogs that develop heart block.

  11. First North American 50 cc Total Artificial Heart Experience: Conversion from a 70 cc Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Kazui, Toshinobu; Ferng, Alice S; Connell, Alana; Tran, Phat L; Meyer, Mark; Rawashdeh, Badi; Smith, Richard G; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Friedman, Mark; Lick, Scott; Slepian, Marvin J; Copeland, Jack G

    2016-01-01

    The 70 cc total artificial heart (TAH) has been utilized as bridge to transplant (BTT) for biventricular failure. However, the utilization of 70 cc TAH has been limited to large patients for the low output from the pulmonary as well as systemic vein compression after chest closure. Therefore, the 50 cc TAH was developed by SynCardia (Tucson, AZ) to accommodate smaller chest cavity. We report the first TAH exchange from a 70 to 50 cc due to a fit difficulty. The patient failed to be closed with a 70 cc TAH, although the patient met the conventional 70 cc TAH fit criteria. We successfully closed the chest with a 50 cc TAH.

  12. Peer Associations and Coping: The Mediating Role of Ethnic Identity for Urban, African American Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Jeneka A; O'Neil, Maya E; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; McWhirter, Ellen H; Dishion, Thomas J

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between coping strategies and prosocial and deviant peer associations for urban, African American adolescents. In addition, the study analyzed the mediating role of ethnic identity for coping strategies and peer associations. Results of the African American models were then compared with models for European American adolescents. Results indicated that African American and European American adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were more likely to associate with prosocial peers, and those who reported using self-destruction strategies were less likely to associate with prosocial peers. Adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were less likely to associate with deviant peers, and adolescents who reported using self-destruction strategies were more likely to associate with deviant peers. Ethnic identity mediated the relationship between coping and prosocial peer association for African American adolescents. Limitations of the study and future research directions are also presented.

  13. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  14. Position of the American Dietetic association: fat replacers.

    PubMed

    2005-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the majority of fat replacers, when used in moderation by adults, can be safe and useful adjuncts to lowering the fat content of foods and may play a role in decreasing total dietary energy and fat intake. Moderate use of low-calorie, reduced-fat foods, combined with low total energy intake, could potentially promote dietary intake consistent with the objectives of Healthy People 2010 and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans . The obesity epidemic in the nation has been attributed to energy imbalance, mainly because of increased food consumption and/or sedentary lifestyle, or both. Evidence suggests that lowering total energy intake along with a reduction in total fat intake can have a substantial impact on body weight and risk of chronic diseases. Fat replacers are used to provide some or all of the functional properties of fat, while providing fewer calories than the fat being replaced, and are used in a variety of products, from baked goods to frozen desserts. Fat replacers can be effective only if they lower the total caloric content of the food and if the consumer uses these foods as part of a balanced meal plan. Consumers should not be led to believe that fat- and calorie-reduced products can be consumed in unlimited amounts. Fat replacers are most useful when they help with calorie control and when their use encourages the consumption of foods delivering important nutrients.

  15. Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

    2011-11-01

    Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1 ± 6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants.

  16. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-03-23

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were -6.15 ms and -5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF.

  17. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  18. Reduced Heart Rate Variability in Social Anxiety Disorder: Associations with Gender and Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Alvares, Gail A.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Kemp, Andrew H.; Van Zwieten, Anita; Balleine, Bernard W.; Hickie, Ian B.; Guastella, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyvagal theory emphasizes that autonomic nervous system functioning plays a key role in social behavior and emotion. The theory predicts that psychiatric disorders of social dysfunction are associated with reduced heart rate variability, an index of autonomic control, as well as social inhibition and avoidance. The purpose of this study was to examine whether heart rate variability was reduced in treatment-seeking patients diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, a disorder characterized by social fear and avoidance. Methods Social anxiety patients (n = 53) were recruited prior to receiving psychological therapy. Healthy volunteers were recruited through the University of Sydney and the general community and were matched by gender and age (n = 53). Heart rate variability was assessed during a five-minute recording at rest, with participants completing a range of self-report clinical symptom measures. Results Compared to controls, participants with social anxiety exhibited significant reductions across a number of heart rate variability measures. Reductions in heart rate variability were observed in females with social anxiety, compared to female controls, and in patients taking psychotropic medication compared to non-medicated patients. Finally, within the clinical group, we observed significant associations between reduced heart rate variability and increased social interaction anxiety, psychological distress, and harmful alcohol use. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that social anxiety disorder is associated with reduced heart rate variability. Resting state heart rate variability may therefore be considered a marker for social approach-related motivation and capacity for social engagement. Additionally, heart rate variability may provide a useful biomarker to explain underlying difficulties with social approach, impaired stress regulation, and behavioral inhibition, especially in disorders associated with significant impairments

  19. 67 th annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Colca, Jerry R

    2007-10-01

    The 67 th meeting of the American Diabetes Association was held in Chicago on 22 - 26 June. This annual meeting continues to grow in size and scope and is a unique combination of basic science and medical science but also incorporates all aspects of healthcare and pharmaceutical business relating to the treatment of diabetes. The meeting was composed of general sessions, symposia summarizing the status of various fields of study and medical practice, together with both oral and poster presentations of new, previously unpublished research. The abstracts are published in Diabetes and a collection of the information can be found online with very useful summaries from the final day. These contain personalized summaries of key findings of the meetings as seen by key researches in the field. In this Meeting Highlights article, the key take-away messages are summarized from the author's point of view.

  20. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    PubMed

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified.

  1. Analysis of Multicultural Counseling Articles Published by the American Counseling Association July 1980 to June 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Elide M.; Veach, Laura J.

    The purpose of this research was to assess and analyze the frequency and trends of multicultural counseling articles in thirteen journals published by the American Counseling Association (ACA) from 1980 to 1996, with specific focus on four racial and ethnic groups prevalent in the United States: African American, Asian American, Latino, and Native…

  2. The American Medical Association stake in the future of US health care: the American Medical Association plan for reform of the US health care system.

    PubMed

    Plested, William G

    2009-02-01

    This article discusses the need for health care reform. The American Medical Association has devised a plan that would allow all Americans to obtain health care coverage. This article discusses that plan and advocates for physicians and patients to demand meaningful health care reform from lawmakers.

  3. Associations between 'valentine' heart shape, atrial enlargement and cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Winter, Matthew D; Giglio, Robson F; Berry, Clifford R; Reese, David J; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2015-06-01

    'Valentine' heart shape is a common qualifier used in veterinary radiology to describe a cardiac silhouette with focal enlargement at the level of the base of the heart in feline patients. Anecdotally, this sign has been thought to be related to biatrial enlargement and also to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, to our knowledge, there has been no study performed to assess the association between cardiac chamber enlargement and cardiac disease with the 'valentine'-shaped heart. The aim of this study was to verify the association between the 'valentine' heart shape observed in ventrodorsal thoracic radiographs and the presence of singular or combined cardiac chamber enlargement, and also the presence and type of cardiomyopathy (CM) in cats. A search of the database of the Small Animal Veterinary Hospital of the University of Florida for cats with a radiology report of thoracic radiographs that contained the words 'valentine' and 'biatrial', and echocardiography performed within 1 week, was undertaken; 41 cases met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-two percent of the cats of the study sample had some form of CM. The 'valentine' heart shape was associated with biatrial enlargement in 41% of the patients in our study sample that had some form of CM and just 8% of cases diagnosed with HCM, suggesting that the 'valentine' heart shape has a low association with HCM or biatrial enlargement; however, it should be considered a sign of feline CM.

  4. 3 CFR 8775 - Proclamation 8775 of January 31, 2012. American Heart Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....gov. To secure our children’s heart health and end childhood obesity within a generation, First Lady... inactivity, obesity, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse are major risk factors that can be prevented...

  5. A Heavy Heart: The Association between Weight and Emotional Words

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueru; He, Xianyou; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    People often express emotion in language using weight (e.g., a heavy heart, light-hearted, light humor, or heavy-handed), but the question remains whether these expressions of emotion are rooted in the body. Six experiments used a priming paradigm to explore the metaphoric relation between weight perception and emotional words. Experiments 1 and 2 investigated the influence of weight perception on judgments of emotional words and the influence of emotional words on judgments of weight, respectively. A significant difference between the consistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to positive words and heaviness corresponds to negative words) and the inconsistent condition (e.g., lightness corresponds to negative words and heaviness corresponds to positive words) was found in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 were conducted to exclude potential confounds. Experiment 6 was a repeated-measures study that was conducted to verify the weight-emotion effect. The study confirmed that weight perception affected judgments of emotional words. The results contribute to the growing literature on conceptual metaphor theory and embodied cognition theory. PMID:27445893

  6. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and water safety.

    PubMed

    Gerald, Bonnie L; Perkin, Judy E

    2003-09-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the public has the right to a safe food and water supply. The Association supports collaboration among dietetics professionals, academics, representatives of the agriculture and food industries, and appropriate government agencies to ensure the safety of the food and water supply by providing education to the public and industry, promoting technologic innovation and applications, and supporting further research. Numerous bacterial, viral, and chemical food and water threats exist with certain populations such as the elderly, children, pregnant women, those in institutionalized settings, and the immune compromised being at high risk. Recent outbreaks of food and waterborne disease and threats of bioterrorism have focused attention on the safety of US food and water systems. The US government and other entities have developed programs to address challenges associated with maintaining food and water safety. Safety initiatives such as the Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis Critical Point (HACCP), revisions to the Food Code, and the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations provide a framework to evaluate current and future challenges to the safety of food and water systems. Dietetics professionals should take a proactive role in ensuring that appropriate food and water safety practices are followed and can also assume major roles in food and water safety education and research.

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Food and water safety.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Julie A; Nagy-Nero, Debe

    2009-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the public has the right to a safe food and water supply. The Association supports collaboration among food and nutrition professionals, academics, representatives of the agricultural and food industries, and appropriate government agencies to ensure the safety of the food and water supply by providing education to the public and industry, promoting technological innovation and applications, and supporting further research. New food and water safety issues evolve as the environment changes. Food and nutrition professionals should collaborate with food and agriculture industries and members of the medical community in a joint effort to address these issues. Recent food- and waterborne illnesses have occurred in new settings and/or unique foods not traditionally associated with foodborne illness outbreaks. New issues associated with food safety and security that have emerged support the need for continued education and research. Government programs have developed powerful tools such as FoodNet and PulseNet to detect food- and waterborne illness outbreaks in the United States. These government programs have provided the data to enhance public policy and educational programs such as FightBac! Mandatory and voluntary adoption of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points in the foodservice and processing industries have contributed to a decrease in foodborne illness outbreaks from traditional foods and some microorganisms usually associated with foodborne illnesses. Food and nutrition professionals are positioned to provide food and water safety education in community, clinical settings, and foodservice operations and food industries. With an aging population and an increased number of people at risk due to medical conditions for food- and waterborne illness, food and nutrition professionals should be involved in collaborative food and water safety issues in educational, research, and policy agenda settings. As

  8. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  9. Association of maternal chronic disease with risk of congenital heart disease in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Hsu; Chiou, Meng-Jiun; Liang, Fu-Wen; Chen, Lea-Hua; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Information about known risk factors for congenital heart disease is scarce. In this population-based study, we aimed to investigate the relation between maternal chronic disease and congenital heart disease in offspring. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 1 387 650 live births from 2004 to 2010. We identified chronic disease in mothers and mild and severe forms of congenital heart disease in their offspring from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance medical claims. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess the associations of all cases and specific types of congenital heart disease with various maternal chronic diseases. Results: For mothers with the following chronic diseases, the overall prevalence of congenital heart disease in their children was significantly higher than for mothers without these diseases: diabetes mellitus type 1 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66–3.25), diabetes mellitus type 2 (adjusted OR 2.85, 95% CI 2.60–3.12), hypertension (adjusted OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.69–2.07), congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.45–3.80), anemia (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.25–1.38), connective tissue disorders (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.19–1.62), epilepsy (adjusted OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.08–1.74) and mood disorders (adjusted OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11–1.41). The same pattern held for mild forms of congenital heart disease. A higher prevalence of severe congenital heart disease was seen only among offspring of mothers with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes. Interpretation: The children of women with several kinds of chronic disease appear to be at risk for congenital heart disease. Preconception counselling and optimum treatment of pregnant women with chronic disease would seem prudent. PMID:27729382

  10. Association of total cholesterol and HDL-C levels and outcome in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Li, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Li, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate associations of total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels with prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with heart failure (HF). Patients who were angiographical-diagnosis of CHD and echocardiographical-diagnosis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45% were enrolled. Baseline characteristics were collected and association of TC and HDL-C levels with rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality was assessed. A total of 118 patients were recruited. Mean age was 58.6 ± 10.9 years and male accounted for 65%. Mean LVEF was 39.5 ± 4.0%. Twenty-eight patients were rehospitalized for HF and 6 patients were dead. In patients with poor prognosis, lower body mass index (BMI), TC, HDL-C and albumin while higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) was observed. TC was positively correlated with BMI and albumin, and HDL-C was inversely correlated with Hs-CRP. The associations of TC level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were attenuated but consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with odds ratio (OR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92–0.99). Associations of HDL-C level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were also consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with OR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–0.98). Strength of association was attenuated prominently in model 3 after adjusted for Hs-CRP, and no change was observed after further adjusted for BMI and albumin. Higher baseline TC and HDL-C levels are associated with better outcome in CHD patients with HF. PMID:28248864

  11. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Heart Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, Suite 200 Mount Laurel, NJ 08054 Phone: ... of heart disease; these patients have no other choice. The best treatment for your heart failure will ...

  12. The Association between Childhood Physical Abuse and Heart Disease in Adulthood: Findings from a Representative Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Frank, John

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Although, the relationship between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease has been documented, very few studies have controlled for many of the known risk factors for heart disease. The objective of the current study, therefore, was to investigate the association between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease while…

  13. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Felix, Janine F.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Trompet, Stella; Wilk, Jemma B.; Gidlöf, Olof; Morley, Michael; Joehanes, Roby; Ligthart, Symen; Shan, Xiaoyin; Bis, Joshua C.; Sjögren, Marketa; Ngwa, Julius; Stott, David J.; Aguilar, David; Rice, Kenneth M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Demissie, Serkalem; Buckley, Brendan M.; Taylor, Kent D.; Ford, Ian; Yao, Chen; Liu, Chunyu; Sotoodehnia, Nona; van der Harst, Pim; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hofman, Albert; Moravec, Christine S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kellis, Manolis; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Dehghan, Abbas; Levy, Daniel; Olde, Björn; Psaty, Bruce M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Jukema, J. Wouter; Djousse, Luc; Franco, Oscar H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyer, Laurie A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Butler, Javed; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Smith, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% increased risk of death in subjects with heart failure (rs9885413, P = 2.7x10-9). We provide evidence from reporter gene assays, computational predictions and epigenomic marks that this polymorphism increases activity of an enhancer region active in multiple human tissues. The polymorphism was further reproducibly associated with a DNA methylation signature in whole blood (P = 4.5x10-40) that also associated with allergic sensitization and expression in blood of the cytokine TSLP (P = 1.1x10-4). Knockdown of the transcription factor predicted to bind the enhancer region (NHLH1) in a human cell line (HEK293) expressing NHLH1 resulted in lower TSLP expression. In addition, we observed evidence of recent positive selection acting on the risk allele in populations of African descent. Our findings provide novel genetic leads to factors that influence mortality in patients with heart failure. PMID:27149122

  14. Target Organ Complications and Cardiovascular Events Associated with Masked Hypertension and White Coat Hypertension: Analysis from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Tientcheu, Danielle; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R.; McGuire, Darren K.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Kaplan, Norman; Victor, Ronald; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple epidemiological studies from Europe and Asia have demonstrated increased cardiovascular risks associated with isolated elevation of home blood pressure (BP) or masked hypertension (MH). Previous studies have not addressed cardiovascular outcomes associated with MH and white coat hypertension (WCH) in the general population in the United States. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine hypertensive target organ damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with WCH (high clinic BP ≥140/90 mm Hg, normal home BP of <135/85 mm Hg), MH (high home BP ≥135/85 mm Hg, normal clinic BP <140/90 mm Hg), and sustained hypertension (SH, high home and clinic BP) in the Dallas Heart Study, a large, multiethnic probability-based population cohort. Methods We evaluated associations between WCH, MH, SH and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) by magnetic resonance imaging; urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR); and cystatin C at study baseline. Then, associations between WCH and MH with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9 years were assessed. Results The study cohort comprised 3,027 subjects (50% African Americans). The sample-weighted prevalence of WCH and MH were 3.3% and 17.8%, respectively. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased APWV, cystatin C, and UACR. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with higher cardiovascular events compared with the NT group, even after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted HR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.05 to 4.15 and adjusted HR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.36 to 3.03, respectively). Conclusions In a multiethnic U.S. population, both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased aortic stiffness, renal injury, and incident cardiovascular events. Because MH is common and associated with an adverse cardiovascular profile, home BP

  15. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  16. The American Association for Agricultural Education: Our Powerful Professional Organization Made Up of Remarkable Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Gregory Thompson presented the 2015 AAAE [American Association for Agricultural Education] Distinguished Lecture at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Agricultural Education in San Antonio, Texas in May, 2015. The article is a philosophical work based upon the author's experiences in the agricultural education profession.

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and nutrition misinformation.

    PubMed

    Ayoob, Keith-Thomas; Duyff, Roberta L; Quagliani, Diane

    2002-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that food and nutrition misinformation can have harmful effects on the health and economic status of consumers. It is the role of nationally credentialed dietetics professionals to advocate for and promote sound, science-based nutrition information to the public, function as primary nutrition educators to health professionals, and actively counter and correct food and nutrition misinformation. The federal government has recognized the strong link between nutrition and health in recent years. Consumers are taking greater responsibility for self-care and are hungry for food and nutrition information, creating opportunities for nutrition misinformation, health fraud, and quackery to flourish. The media are consumers' leading source of nutrition information, but news reports rarely provide enough context for consumers to interpret the advice given. Promoters turn preliminary findings into sales pitches with baseless claims, often for the sole purpose of economic gain. Effective nutrition communication is consumer focused and presented with sufficient context to allow consumers to weigh the information and determine whether it applies to his or her unique needs. Nationally credentialed dietetics professionals are best prepared to communicate sound advice and scientific advances about nutrition. These dietetics professionals have a responsibility to take an active role in providing accurate, easily understood food and nutrition information, interpreting emerging research for media and consumers and encouraging consumers to look for credentialed dietetics professionals as nutrition experts.

  18. Double Aneuploidy 48,XXY,+21 Associated with a Congenital Heart Defect in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shu, X; Zou, C; Shen, Z

    2013-01-01

    A neonate with a double aneuploidy associated with congenital heart defect (CHD) suffered from cyanosis after birth. He had typical features of Down syndrome (DS) including hypertelorism, slightly lowset ears with protruding pinna. Doppler echocardiography indicated complex congenital heart disease with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect, enlarged right ventricle, and mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. Further chromosomal analysis showed a karyotype of 48,XXY,+21: a double aneuploidy of DS and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). Until now, only seven cases of double aneuploidy associated with CHD defect have been reported. PMID:24778570

  19. 77 FR 11130 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued Recognition as a National Accreditation Organization for Accrediting Entities To Furnish Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training AGENCY: Centers for... the receipt of an application from the American Association of Diabetes Educators for...

  20. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Approval of Deeming Authority for Rural... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice...

  1. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in normal and failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Movsesian, M A; Smith, C J; Krall, J; Bristow, M R; Manganiello, V C

    1991-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was examined in microsomes prepared from the left ventricular myocardium of eight heart transplant recipients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and six unmatched organ donors with normal cardiac function. At cAMP concentrations less than or equal to 1.0 microM, sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was functionally homogeneous. cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was inhibited competitively by cGMP (Ki = 0.031 +/- 0.008 microM) and the cilostamide derivative OPC 3911 (Ki = 0.018 +/- 0.004 microM), but was essentially insensitive to rolipram. Vmax and Km were 781.7 +/- 109.2 nmol/mg per min and 0.188 +/- 0.031 microM, respectively, in microsomes prepared from nonfailing hearts and 793.9 +/- 68.9 nmol/mg per min and 0.150 +/- 0.027 microM in microsomes prepared from failing hearts. Microsomes prepared from nonfailing and failing hearts did not differ with respect to either the ratio of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation activity or the sensitivity of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to inhibition by OPC 3911. These data suggest that the diminished inotropic efficacy of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in failing human hearts does not result from changes in the level, kinetic properties, or pharmacologic sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:1647414

  2. The mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between harsh parental practices and externalizing and internalizing behaviors in Hispanic American, African American, and European American families.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Elif Dede; Roopnarine, Jaipaul L

    2015-07-01

    Using data from the add-on 5-year cohort of In-Home Longitudinal Study of preschool aged Children of the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS), we examined the mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between positive and harsh maternal practices and children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors. The sample consisted of 1,922 low-income Hispanic American, African American, and European American families. For European Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression and hostility and children's externalizing behaviors were direct. Similarly, for Hispanic Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression, physical assault, and hostility and externalizing behaviors were direct, as was the link between maternal physical assault and internalizing behaviors. For African Americans, maternal warmth partially mediated the links between maternal hostility and physical assault and externalizing behaviors. However, the associations between psychological aggression and externalizing and internalizing behaviors were direct. The data are discussed with respect to similarities in cultural pathways of influence between harsh maternal treatment and children's behavioral difficulties across ethnic groups.

  3. Dietary calcium is associated with body mass index and body fat in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Xu, Jiaqiong; Loria, Catherine; Mattil, Claudia; Goldbourt, Uri; Howard, Barbara V; Resnick, Helaine E

    2007-08-01

    American Indians have a high prevalence of obesity. Evidence supports a relationship between increased dietary calcium intake and lower body weight. This study was conducted to investigate the association between dietary calcium intake, BMI, and percentage of body fat (PBF) in American Indians (ages 47-79 y) in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) (2nd exam, 1992-1995). SHS data were compared with data for the general U.S. adult population from the NHANES III (1988-1994). BMI was calculated as kg/m(2). PBF was estimated by bioelectrical impedance using an equation based on total body water. The clinical examination included measures of blood chemistry. Dietary data were collected using a 24-h dietary recall. Calcium intake was significantly lower in SHS participants than in age-matched NHANES III participants. Mean calcium intake in the SHS was 680 mg/d (range: 103-4574 mg/d) for men and 610 mg/d (range: 71-4093 mg/d) for women (P < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, BMI and PBF were lower by 0.80 kg/m(2) (95% CI: -1.53 to -0.08, P = 0.046) and 1.28% (95% CI: -2.10 to -0.47, P = 0.011) in SHS participants with higher (> or = 873 mg/d in the 5th quintile) vs. lower calcium intake (<313 mg/d in the 1st quintile). No relation between calcium intake and BMI or PBF was observed in NHANES III participants. Our data may be used to develop nutritional interventions aimed at weight control in culturally appropriate clinical trials.

  4. Dietary Calcium is Associated with Body Mass Index and Body Fat in American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Xu, Jiaqiong; Loria, Catherine; Mattil, Claudia; Goldbourt, Uri; Howard, Barbara V.; Resnick, Helaine E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indians have a high prevalence of obesity. Evidence exists to support a relationship between increased dietary calcium intake and lower body weight. This study was conducted to investigate the association between dietary calcium intake, BMI, and percentage of body fat (PBF) in American Indians (ages 47–79 y) in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) (2nd exam: 1992–1995). SHS data were compared with data for the general U.S. adult population from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (1988–1994). BMI was calculated as weight (kg)/height (m2). PBF was estimated by bioelectrical impedance, using an equation based on total body water. The clinical examination included measures of blood chemistry. Dietary data were collected using a 24-h dietary recall. Calcium intake was significantly lower among SHS participants than among age-matched NHANES III participants. Mean calcium intake in the SHS was 680 mg/d (range: 103 – 4574 mg/d) for men and 610 mg/d (range: 71 – 4093 mg/d) for women (P < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, BMI and PBF were lower by 0.80 kg/m2 (95% CI: −1.53 to −0.08, P = 0.046) and 1.28% (95% CI: −2.10 to −0.47, P = 0.011) in SHS participants with higher (≥ 873 mg/d in the 5th quintile) versus lower calcium intake (< 313 mg/d in the 1st quintile). No relation between calcium intake and BMI or PBF was observed in NHANES III participants. Our data may be used to develop nutritional interventions aimed at weight control in culturally appropriate clinical trials. PMID:17634270

  5. Political Economy of American Education: Democratic Citizenship in the Heart of Empire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Thomas Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chief among the goals of American education is the cultivation of democratic citizens. Contrary to State catechism delivered through our schools, America was not born a democracy; rather it emerged as a republic with a distinct bias against democracy. Nonetheless we inherit a great demotic heritage. Abolition, the labor struggle, women's…

  6. "My Heart Beats in Two Places": Immigration Stories in Korean-American Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi, Joanne H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of immigration on Korean children through a content and literary analysis of 14 children's picture books. A majority of published children's literature dealing with the subject of Korean Americans or Korean immigration contains culturally specific themes common to the Korean immigration experience. These…

  7. A Preliminary Study of Potential Dietary Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease among Chinese American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Wei Yue; Chen, W. William

    1994-01-01

    This study compared dietary knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and patterns between Chinese American middle school students and their Chinese equivalents. Chinese students had less knowledge and less favorable attitudes but more positive behavioral factors affecting diet. They consumed less meat, dairy products, fat, sweets, and snacks and ate more…

  8. Congenital heart block associated with Sjögren syndrome: case report

    PubMed Central

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Shirlaw, Penelope J; Escudier, Michael P; Poate, Timothy WJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Congenital heart block is a rare complication of pregnancy associated with Sjögren Syndrome that may result in the death of the foetus or infant, or the need for pacing in the newborn or at a later stage. Case report The case is presented of a 64-year-old patient with primary Sjögren Syndrome and a history of having given birth to two sons with congenital heart block, both of whom required pacing several years later. Conclusion The literature relating to this association is discussed including the suggested mechanism, long-term outcome of mothers of children with congenital heart block and preventive treatment strategies. PMID:19638228

  9. The lived experience of middle-aged women with New York Heart Association class III heart failure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer Wayment; Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Lynch-Sauer, Judith

    2009-09-01

    Although heart failure (HF) is equally prevalent in men and women, women with HF are more likely to report decreased quality of life and are more likely to die of the disease compared with men. Moreover, HF has been studied less extensively in women and no study has specifically addressed women with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III HF using a qualitative method. This pilot study sought to gain insight into the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. Using a phenomenological approach, interviews obtained from 4 middle-aged women with NYHA class III HF were analyzed using the Giorgi method of data analysis. Five themes emerged: (1) developing a new conception of self, (2) conceding physical limitations, (3) enduring emotional heartache, (4) accepting support, and (5) rejuvenating through rest. This study provides a beginning to our understanding of the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. However, further exploration is needed to increase our knowledge of HF in women, particularly among diverse populations.

  10. Are urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons associated with adult hypertension, heart attack, and cancer? USA NHANES, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-11-01

    Links between environmental chemicals and human health have emerged over the last few decades, but the effects from polyaromatic hydrocarbons were less studied, compared to other commonly known environmental chemicals such as heavy metals, phthalates, arsenic, phenols and pesticides. Therefore, it was aimed to study the relationships of urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons and adult cardiovascular disease and cancer using human sample in a national and population-based study in recent years. Data was retrieved from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2011-2012, including demographics, self-reported health conditions and urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Statistical analyses included chi-square test, t test, survey-weighted logistic regression modeling and population attributable risk (PAR) estimation. Of 5560 American adults aged 20-80 and included in the statistical analysis, urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons (representatively in one-third sample) were observed to be higher in people with cardiovascular disease and total cancer. In particular, urinary 4-hydroxyphenanthrene was associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.76, P = 0.048, PAR 5.1%), urinary 1-hydroxypyrene was significantly associated with heart attack (OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.05-2.06, P = 0.027, PAR 1.7%), and urinary 2-hydroxynapthalene (2-naphthol) was associated with cancer (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.12-1.90, P = 0.008, PAR 3.9%). Urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons were associated with adult hypertension, heart attack and cancer, although the causality cannot be established. From the research perspective, future studies with a longitudinal or experimental approach would be suggested. From the law and public health perspectives, regulation on minimizing exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons might need to be considered in future health and environmental policies and intervention programs.

  11. Case report: an unusual heart rhythm associated with organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Can, Ilknur; Kusumoto, Fred M

    2012-09-01

    Organophosphate pesticides have emerged as a common cause of poisoning, particularly in developing countries. The most common electrocardiographic abnormalities observed in organophosphate poisoning are sinus tachycardia, QT interval prolongation, and, very rarely, ventricular arrhythmias. We report a case of organophosphate poisoning associated with atrial fibrillation, right bundle branch block, QT interval prolongation, and intermittent narrow QRS complexes that were most likely due to automaticity from the region of the left posterior fascicle.

  12. Congenital heart disease protein 5 associates with CASZ1 to maintain myocardial tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Stephen; Amin, Nirav M; Gibbs, Devin; Christine, Kathleen S; Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    The identification and characterization of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the differentiation and morphogenesis of specific cell types of the developing heart are crucial to understanding the process of cardiac development and the pathology associated with human congenital heart disease. Here, we show that the cardiac transcription factor CASTOR (CASZ1) directly interacts with congenital heart disease 5 protein (CHD5), which is also known as tryptophan-rich basic protein (WRB), a gene located on chromosome 21 in the proposed region responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with Down's syndrome. We demonstrate that loss of CHD5 in Xenopus leads to compromised myocardial integrity, improper deposition of basement membrane, and a resultant failure of hearts to undergo cell movements associated with cardiac formation. We further report that CHD5 is essential for CASZ1 function and that the CHD5-CASZ1 interaction is necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. Collectively, these results establish a role for CHD5 and CASZ1 in the early stages of vertebrate cardiac development.

  13. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food and nutrition misinformation.

    PubMed

    Wansink, Brian

    2006-04-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that food and nutrition misinformation can have harmful effects on the health, well-being, and economic status of consumers. Nationally credentialed dietetics professionals working in health care, academia, public health, the media, government, and the food industry are uniquely qualified to advocate for and promote science-based nutrition information to the public, function as primary nutrition educators to health professionals, and actively correct food and nutrition misinformation. Enormous scientific advances have been made in the area of food and nutrition, leading to a fine-tuning of recommendations about healthful eating. Consumers have become increasingly aware of the nutrition-health link and reliant on nutrition information to base their decisions, and have assumed partial responsibility for changing their eating behaviors. Unfortunately, these same trends also create opportunities for food and nutrition misinformation to flourish. News reports rarely provide enough context for consumers to interpret or apply the advice given, and preliminary findings often attract unmerited and misleading attention. Effective nutrition communication must be consumer-friendly and contain sufficient context to allow consumers to consider the information and determine whether it applies to their unique health and nutritional needs. Consistent with ADA's organizational vision that members "are the leading source of nutrition expertise," ADA recognizes its responsibility to help consumers identify food and nutrition misinformation in the following ways: (a) ADA members should provide consumers with sound, science-based nutrition information and help them to recognize misinformation; (b) ADA members need to be the primary source of sound, science-based nutrition information for the media and to inform them when misinformation is presented; and (c) ADA members should continue to diligently work with other health care

  14. Position of the American Dietetic Association: functional foods.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Clare M; Brown, Amy C

    2009-04-01

    All foods are functional at some physiological level, but it is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that functional foods that include whole foods and fortified, enriched, or enhanced foods have a potentially beneficial effect on health when consumed as part of a varied diet on a regular basis, at effective levels. ADA supports research to further define the health benefits and risks of individual functional foods and their physiologically active components. Health claims on food products, including functional foods, should be based on the significant scientific agreement standard of evidence and ADA supports label claims based on such strong scientific substantiation. Food and nutrition professionals will continue to work with the food industry, allied health professionals, the government, the scientific community, and the media to ensure that the public has accurate information regarding functional foods and thus should continue to educate themselves on this emerging area of food and nutrition science. Knowledge of the role of physiologically active food components, from plant, animal, and microbial food sources, has changed the role of diet in health. Functional foods have evolved as food and nutrition science has advanced beyond the treatment of deficiency syndromes to reduction of disease risk and health promotion. This position paper reviews the definition of functional foods, their regulation, and the scientific evidence supporting this evolving area of food and nutrition. Foods can no longer be evaluated only in terms of macronutrient and micronutrient content alone. Analyzing the content of other physiologically active components and evaluating their role in health promotion will be necessary. The availability of health-promoting functional foods in the US diet has the potential to help ensure a healthier population. However, each functional food should be evaluated on the basis of scientific evidence to ensure appropriate integration

  15. Position of the American Dietetic Association: food irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wood, O B; Bruhn, C M

    2000-02-01

    Food irradiation has been identified a sa safe technology to reduce the risk of foodborne illness as part of high-quality food production, processing, handling, and preparation. Food irradiation's history of scientific research , evaluation, and testing spans more than 40 countries around the world and it has been endorsed or support by numerous national and international food and organizations and professional groups. Food irradiation utilizes a source of ionizing energy that passes through food to destroy harmful bacteria and other organism. Often referred to as "cold pasteurization," food irradiation offers negligible loss of nutrients or sensory qualities in food as it does not substantially raise the temperature of the food during processing. Food irradiation does not replace proper food production, processing, handling, or preparation, nor can it enhance the quality of or prevent contact with foodborne bacteria after irradiation. In the United States, manufacturers are required to identify irradiated food sold to consumers with an international symbol (Radura) and and terminology describing the process on product labels. In addiction, food irradiation facilities are thoroughly regulated and monitored for worker and environmental safety. Members of The American Dietetic Association (ADA) and other food, nutrition, and health professionals have a responsibility to educate consumers, food processors, manufacturers and retailers about the safety and application of the technology. When consumers are educated about food irradiation, many prefer irradiated products because of their increased safety. It is the position of ADA that food irradiation enhances the safety and quality of the food supply and helps protect consumers from foodborne illness. The ADA encourages the government, food manufactures, food commodity groups, and qualified food and nutrition professionals to work together to educate consumers about this additional food safety tool and make this choice

  16. Association Between Toxoplasma gondii Exposure and Heart Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Salcedo-Jaquez, Misael; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Rabago-Sanchez, Elizabeth; Beristain-Garcia, Isabel; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Estrada-Martinez, Sergio; Perez-Alamos, Alma Rosa; Alvarado-Soto, Ediyair

    2016-01-01

    Background The parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes infections all around the world. Infections with T. gondii are systemic and the parasite can persist in the heart muscle. Very little is known about the impact of T. gondii on patients with heart disease. We determined the association between T. gondii exposure and patients suffering from heart diseases attending in a public hospital in Durango, Mexico; the association of T. gondii exposure with socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics of these patients was also investigated. Methods Through a case-control study, we examined the seroprevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in 400 patients with heart diseases and 400 age- and gender-matched controls using enzyme-linked immunoassays. In addition, we analyzed the association of patient characteristics as determined by a standardized questionnaire with T. gondii exposure by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Fifty-five (13.8%) of 400 patients and 32 (8.0%) of 400 controls had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies (odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15 - 2.90; P = 0.01). High anti-T. gondii IgG levels (> 150 IU/mL) were found in 28 (50.9%) of the 55 positive cases and in 14 (43.8%) of the 32 positive controls (P = 0.51). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in 13 (23.6%) of the 55 anti-T. gondii IgG positive patients and in 19 (59.4%) of 32 anti-T. gondii IgG positive controls (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.08 - 0.54; P = 0.0008). Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii exposure was positively associated with being born out of Durango State (OR = 2.93; 95% CI: 1.40 - 6.13; P = 0.004), and with consumption of alcohol (OR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.01 - 4.12; P = 0.04). Conclusions Results obtained in this study indicate that T. gondii infection is associated with heart disease, and suggest that heart disease might be related with a chronic infection. This is the first report of an association of T. gondii exposure with alcohol

  17. A case of prenatally diagnosed extrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation associated with a complex heart defect

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ba-Da; An, Suah; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lee, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are rare vascular anomalies of the lung, only a few cases of which have been diagnosed prenatally. The diagnostic clue for prenatal diagnosis was cardiomegaly with a particularly enlarged left atrium. All previous cases of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations diagnosed prenatally have been reported as an isolated anomaly or in association with simple heart defects. We here describe the first case of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation with a complex heart defect that was diagnosed prenatally at 21.0 weeks of gestation and confirmed by postmortem autopsy. PMID:27896260

  18. Yogurt consumption is associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile in American men and women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifen; Livingston, Kara A; Fox, Caroline S; Meigs, James B; Jacques, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The evidence-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends increasing the intake of fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. However, yogurt, a nutrient-dense milk product, has been understudied. This cross-sectional study examined whether yogurt consumption was associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile among adults (n = 6526) participating in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998-2001) and Third Generation (2002-2005) cohorts. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake, and the Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI) was used to measure overall diet quality. Standardized clinical examinations and laboratory tests were conducted. Generalized estimating equations examined the associations of yogurt consumption with diet quality and levels of metabolic factors. Approximately 64% of women (vs 41% of men) were yogurt consumers (ie, consumed >0 servings/week). Yogurt consumers had a higher DGAI score (ie, better diet quality) than nonconsumers. Adjusted for demographic and lifestyle factors and DGAI, yogurt consumers, compared with nonconsumers, had higher potassium intakes (difference, 0.12 g/d) and were 47%, 55%, 48%, 38%, and 34% less likely to have inadequate intakes (based on Dietary Reference Intake) of vitamins B2 and B12, calcium, magnesium, and zinc, respectively (all P ≤ .001). In addition, yogurt consumption was associated with lower levels of circulating triglycerides, glucose, and lower systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance (all P < .05). Yogurt is a good source of several micronutrients and may help to improve diet quality and maintain metabolic well-being as part of a healthy, energy-balanced dietary pattern.

  19. Association of Job Insecurity with Health Risk Factors and Poorer Health in American Workers.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H

    2017-04-01

    Perceived job insecurity and health risk factors have not been well studied in the United States (US) workforce. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of specific health risk factors and morbidities with perceived job insecurity in a large national random sample of working adults in the US. The National Health Interview Survey data were analyzed for this study. We computed the prevalence of perceived job insecurity by demographic characteristics and tested the relative association between perceived job insecurity and selected health risk factors using logistic regression analysis with adjusted odds ratios (AORs). A total of 17,441 working adults were included in the study: 75 % Whites, 51.5 % females, 73.3 % worked for a private company, and 82.6 % were 25-64 years of age. One in three (33 %) workers perceived their job to be insecure. Those who reported job insecurity had significantly higher odds of: being obese, sleeping less than 6 h/day, smoking every day, having work loss days >2 weeks, and worsening of general health in the past year. Job insecure individuals had a likelihood of serious mental illness within the past 30 days almost five times higher than those who were not job insecure. In addition, job insecure individuals were significantly more likely to report pain conditions (i.e. headaches, neck pain, and low back pain), and lifetime histories of having ulcers, diabetes, hypertension, angina pectoris, and coronary heart diseases. Job insecurity is associated with poor health and health risk behaviors in American adults. Potential interventions to address job insecurity and improve the health and well-being of working adults have been discussed based on study findings.

  20. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STRESS AND COPING AT 5 AND 10 YEARS AFTER HEART TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Kathleen L.; Wang, Edward; White-Williams, Connie; Naftel, David C.; Myers, Susan; Kirklin, James K.; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Young, James B.; Pelegrin, Dave; Kobashigawa, Jon; Higgins, Robert; Heroux, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart transplant-related stressors and coping are related to poor outcomes early after transplant. The purposes of our study were to (1) identify the most frequent and bothersome stressors and most used and effective coping strategies, and (2) compare the most frequent and bothersome stresses and most used and effective coping styles between patients at 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation. We also examined differences in coping styles by patient characteristics, and factors associated with frequency and intensity of stress at both 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation. Methods This report is a secondary analysis of data from a prospective, multi-site study of quality of life outcomes. Data are from 199 and 98 patients at 5 and 10 years after transplant, respectively. Patients completed the Heart Transplant Stressor Scale and Jalowiec Coping Scale. Statistical analyses included frequencies, measures of central tendency, t-tests, Chi-square and generalized linear models. Results At 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation, the most bothersome stressors were regarding work, school, and financial issues. Patients who were 10 years post transplant reported less stress, similar stress intensity, and less use and perceived effectiveness of negative coping than patients who were 5 years post transplant. Long-term after transplant, demographic characteristics, psychological problems, negative coping, and clinical factors were related to stress frequency and/or intensity. Conclusions Heart transplant-related stress occurs long-term after surgery. Types of transplant-related stress and factors related to stress confirm the importance of ongoing psychological and clinical support after heart transplantation. PMID:23498164

  1. Association of NT-proBNP and interleukin-17 levels with heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Li, X F; Pan, D; Zhang, W L; Zhou, J; Liang, J J

    2016-05-13

    Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) are involved in the pathophysiological processes of heart failure; however, the exact role of IL-17 is not clear. We explored the relationship between IL-17 and NT-proBNP, as a clinical parameter, in heart failure. The whole blood IL-17 and NT-proBNP levels and the readmission rates in 70 patients with chronic heart failure class III or IV according to the New York Heart Association and 35 patients with normal heart function (control group) were measured and compared. The left ventricle ejection fractions (LVEFs) and NT-proBNP and IL-17 levels in cardiac functional class III (40.38 ± 4.76%, 7780 ± 6393 pg/mL, 8.65 ± 3.05 pg/mL, respectively) and class IV (31.59 ± 4.31%, 13,704 ± 10,945, 21.10 ± 10.60 pg/mL, respectively) were higher than those in the control group (61.27 ± 5.66%, 420 ± 256 pg/mL, 3.53 ± 2.05 pg/mL, respectively). Compared to the cardiac functional class IV, class III showed significantly higher values for LVEF and NT-proBNP and IL-17 levels (P < 0.05). The readmission rates of the patients in cardiac functional class III at 3 and 6 months (15.7 and 34.4%, respectively) and cardiac functional class IV at 3 and 6 months (39.5 and 76.3%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the control group (0 and 5.7%, respectively) (P < 0.05). The NT-proBNP and IL-17 levels increased as the heart function worsened. NT-proBNP and IL-17 may play essential roles in the process of heart failure.

  2. Association between asthma and obesity among immigrant Asian Americans, California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Benjamin J; Scroggins, Christy M; Becerra, Monideepa B

    2014-11-26

    Our objective was to study the comorbidity of asthma and obesity among foreign-born Asian Americans, by subgroups. Public data from the California Health Interview Survey, 2001-2011, were analyzed by using independent logistic regressions, yielding the association between asthma and obesity (Asian and standard cutoffs for body mass index [BMIs]) of 19,841 Asian American immigrant respondents. Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, and Japanese immigrants had a positive association between lifetime asthma and obesity, whereas among Korean immigrants, a positive association was found between lifetime asthma and overweight status (standard BMI cutoffs). Routine screening for this comorbidity is warranted among immigrant Asian Americans.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Harley, M.D., Ph.D...September 2012 – 31 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus ( lupus ) is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately

  4. Years in the Life: Former Presidents Reflect on the American Association of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleazer, Jr., Edmund A.; Parnell, Dale; Pierce, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Pays tribute to the one hundred-year anniversary of the American community college. Presents the reflections of three former American Association of Community College presidents--Edmund Gleazer, Jr., Dale Parnell, and David Pierce--on history, leadership, and changes at the organization. (CJW)

  5. Years in the Life: Former Presidents Reflect on the American Association of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleazer, Edmund J., Jr.; Parnell, Dale; Pierce, David R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper offers the reflections of three past presidents of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) during the year of the American community college's 100th anniversary. President emeritus Edmund J. Gleazer, Jr., describes some of the changes that altered the AACC during the years 1951-1981. In 1951, when Gleazer was hired as…

  6. Are CRIS Cluster Patterns Differentially Associated with African American Enculturation and Social Distance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Korell, Shannon; Vandiver, Beverly J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether Black racial identity cluster patterns, using Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores, were differentially associated with preference for African American culture and social distance from various cultural groups. African American college students (N = 351) completed the CRIS, an enculturation scale, and a social…

  7. The relationships among stress, coping, social support, and weight class in premenopausal African American women at risk for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Ora Lea; Giger, Joyce Newman; Nelson, Michelle A; Davis, Claudia M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the relationships among stress, coping, social support, and weight class in premenopausal African American women as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Overweight and obesity are significant problems for African American women who are at an increased risk of weight-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Of these women, those who are premenopausal have a significantly higher coronary heart disease mortality rate than their white counterparts. There are gaps in current knowledge concerning the role that stress and other psychosocial factors play in weight control of premenopausal African American women. Data were obtained from 178 women with eligible data sets from a larger study of 236 subjects (Genetic Predictors of Coronary Heart Disease in Premenopausal African American Women). The measures for stress, coping, and social support included the Perceived Stress Scale, the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The weight class of the women was determined as: normal weight-body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-24.9 kg/m, overweight-BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m, or obese-BMI > or = 30 kg/m. Statistical analysis conducted included Spearman's rho, Chi-square, and regression analysis. Confrontive coping was shown to be used more often to a "high" degree in normal-weight African American women than in overweight and obese African American women (chi = 24.024; P = .0001). Confrontive coping was the only independent predictor of weight class in a regression model that included perceived stress, life events, social support, and optimistic, self-reliant, and evasive coping strategies. Therefore, African American women who use confrontive coping to a high degree were more likely to confront problems, such as weight control issues, than those who use this coping strategy to a low or medium degree.

  8. Transthyretin V122I (pV142I)* cardiac amyloidosis: an age-dependent autosomal dominant cardiomyopathy too common to be overlooked as a cause of significant heart disease in elderly African Americans.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Joel N; Ruberg, Frederick L

    2017-01-19

    Since the identification of a valine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 122 (TTR V122I; pV142I) in the transthyretin (TTR)-derived fibrils extracted from the heart of a patient with late-onset cardiac amyloidosis, it has become clear that the amyloidogenic mutation and the disease occur almost exclusively in individuals of identifiable African descent. In the United States, the amyloidogenic allele frequency is 0.0173 and is carried by 3.5% of community-dwelling African Americans. Genotyping across Africa indicates that the origin of the allele is in the West African countries that were the major source of the slave trade to North America. At autopsy, the allele was found to be associated with cardiac TTR amyloid deposition in all the carriers after age 65 years; however, the clinical penetrance varies, resulting in substantial heart disease in some carriers and few symptoms in others. The allele has been found in 10% of African Americans older than age 65 with severe congestive heart failure. At this time there are potential forms of therapy in clinical trials. The combination of a highly accurate genetic test and the potential for specific therapy demands a greater awareness of this autosomal dominant, age-dependent cardiac disease in the cardiology community.Genet Med advance online publication 19 January 2017Genetics in Medicine (2017); doi:10.1038/gim.2016.200.

  9. The Association between Neuroticism and Heart Rate Variability Is Not Fully Explained by Cardiovascular Disease and Depression.

    PubMed

    Čukić, Iva; Bates, Timothy C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroticism is associated with cardiovascular disease, autonomic reactivity, and depression. Here we address the extent to which neuroticism accounts for the excess heart disease risk associated with depression and test whether cardiac autonomic tone plays a role as mediator. Subjects were derived from a nationally representative sample (n = 1,255: mean age 54.5, SD = 11.5). Higher neuroticism was associated with reduced heart rate variability equally under rest and stress. The baseline structural equation model revealed significant paths from neuroticism to heart rate variability, cardiovascular disease and depression, and between depression and cardiovascular disease, controlling for age, sex, height, weight, and BMI. Dropping both the neuroticism to heart rate variability, and neuroticism to heart disease paths significantly reduced the model fit (p < .001 in each case). We conclude that neuroticism has independent associations with both autonomic reactivity and cardiovascular disease, over and above its associations with depression and other related variables.

  10. "Soldier's Heart": A Genetic Basis for Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk Associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Harvey B; Shivakumar, Chittari; Starr, Joshua; Eidelman, Ofer; Jacobowitz, David M; Dalgard, Clifton L; Srivastava, Meera; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    "Soldier's Heart," is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks. We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls. The top upstream drivers for these PTSD risk genes are predicted to be the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFA). We find that 37 of the PTSD candidate risk genes are also candidate independent risk genes for CVD. The association between PTSD and CVD is significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 3 × 10(-54)). We also find 15 PTSD risk genes that are independently associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM; also significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 1.8 × 10(-16)). Our findings offer quantitative evidence for a genetic link between post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular disease, Computationally, the common mechanism for this linkage between PTSD and CVD is innate immunity and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  11. Factors Associated with Successful Functioning in American Indian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silmere, Hile; Stiffman, Arlene Rubin

    2006-01-01

    This study examines environmental and cultural factors related to successful functioning in a stratified random sample of 401 American Indian youths. The success index included seven indicators: good mental health, being alcohol and drug free, absence of serious misbehavior, clean police record, good grades, positive psychosocial functioning, and…

  12. Heart rate variability in elite American track-and-field athletes.

    PubMed

    Berkoff, David J; Cairns, Charles B; Sanchez, Leon D; Moorman, Claude T

    2007-02-01

    Prolonged training leads to changes in autonomic cardiac balance. This sympathetic and parasympathetic balance can now be studied using heart rate variability (HRV). Studies have shown that endurance athletes have an elevated level of parasympathetic tone in comparison to sedentary people. The effect of resistance training on autonomic tone is less clear. We hypothesized a significant difference in HRV indices in endurance-trained vs. power-trained track-and-field athletes. One hundred forty-five athletes (58 women) were tested prior to the 2004 U.S.A. Olympic Trials. Heart rate variability data were collected using the Omegawave Sport Technology System. Subjects were grouped according to training emphasis and gender. The mean age of the athletes was 24.8 years in each group. There were significant (p < 0.01) differences by sex in selected frequency domain variables (HFnu, LFnu, LH, LHnu) and for PNN50 (p < 0.04) for the time domain variables. Two-factor analyses of variance showed differences for only the main effect of sex and not for any other grouping method or interaction. Elite athletes have been shown to have higher parasympathetic tone than recreational athletes and nonathletes. Our data show differences by sex, but not between aerobically and power-based athletes. Whether this is due to an aerobic component of resistance training, an overall prolonged training effect, or some genetic difference remains unclear. Further study is needed to assess the impact of resistance training programs on autonomic tone and cardiovascular fitness. This information will be valuable for the practitioner to use in assessing an athlete's response to a prescribed training regimen.

  13. A Heart and A Mind: Self-distancing Facilitates the Association Between Heart Rate Variability, and Wise Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Igor; Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac vagal tone (indexed via resting heart rate variability [HRV]) has been previously associated with superior executive functioning. Is HRV related to wiser reasoning and less biased judgments? Here we hypothesize that this will be the case when adopting a self-distanced (as opposed to a self-immersed) perspective, with self-distancing enabling individuals with higher HRV to overcome bias-promoting egocentric impulses and to reason wisely. However, higher HRV may not be associated with greater wisdom when adopting a self-immersed perspective. Participants were randomly assigned to reflect on societal issues from a self-distanced- or self-immersed perspective, with responses coded for reasoning quality. In a separate task, participants read about and evaluated a person performing morally ambiguous actions, with responses coded for dispositional vs. situational attributions. We simultaneously assessed resting cardiac recordings, obtaining six HRV indicators. As hypothesized, in the self-distanced condition, each HRV indicator was positively related to prevalence of wisdom-related reasoning (e.g., prevalence of recognition of limits of one’s knowledge, recognition that the world is in flux/change, consideration of others’ opinions and search for an integration of these opinions) and to balanced vs. biased attributions (recognition of situational and dispositional factors vs. focus on dispositional factors alone). In contrast, there was no relationship between these variables in the self-immersed condition. We discuss implications for research on psychophysiology, cognition, and wisdom. PMID:27092066

  14. Free Floating Right Heart Thrombus Associated with Acute Pulmonary Embolism: An Unsettled Therapeutic Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Nkoke, Clovis; Faucher, Olivier; Camus, Lise; Flork, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Free floating right heart thrombus is a rare phenomenon in the context of acute pulmonary embolism and it is associated with a poor outcome. The increased use of echocardiography has led to an increased detection of right heart thrombi. However, optimal management of free floating right heart thrombus remains controversial with no clear consensus. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea on minimal exertion which had developed over a period of 1 day. A computed tomography of the chest demonstrated massive bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism. A bedside transthoracic echocardiography performed showed a moderately dilated, poorly functioning right ventricle with visible highly mobile serpiginous thrombus moving to and fro across the tricuspid valve. Thrombolytic therapy was immediately initiated with tenecteplase which resulted in excellent results. Although there is no clear consensus for the management of right heart thrombus associated with pulmonary embolism, thrombolysis is readily available and can be effective in carefully selected patients. PMID:26078887

  15. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with altered heart rate asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Tonhajzerová, I; Ondrejka, I; Farský, I; Višňovcová, Z; Mešťaník, M; Javorka, M; Jurko, A; Čalkovská, A

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with complex neurocardiac integrity. We aimed to study heart rate time asymmetry as a nonlinear qualitative feature of heart rate variability indicating complexity of cardiac autonomic control at rest and in response to physiological stress (orthostasis) in children suffering from ADHD. Twenty boys with ADHD and 20 healthy age-matched boys at the age of 8 to 12 years were examined. The continuous ECG was recorded in a supine position and during postural change from lying to standing (orthostasis). Time irreversibility indices - Porta's (P%), Guzik's (G%) and Ehlers' (E) - were evaluated. Our analysis showed significantly reduced heart rate asymmetry indices at rest (P%: 49.8 % vs. 52.2 %; G%: 50.2 % vs. 53.2 %; p<0.02), and in response to orthostatic load (P%: 52.4 % vs. 54.5 %, G%: 52.3 % vs. 54.5 %; p<0.05) associated with tachycardia in ADHD children compared to controls. Concluding, our study firstly revealed the altered heart rate asymmetry pattern in children suffering from ADHD at rest as well as in response to posture change from lying to standing (orthostasis). These findings might reflect an abnormal complex cardiac regulatory system as a potential mechanism leading to later cardiac adverse outcomes in ADHD.

  16. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease: recommendations of the Cologne Consensus Conference 2016].

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, S; Lang, I M; Blindt, R; Bonderman, D; Bruch, L; Diller, G P; Felgendreher, R; Gerges, C; Hohenforst-Schmidt, W; Holt, S; Jung, C; Kindermann, I; Kramer, T; Kübler, W M; Mitrovic, V; Riedel, A; Rieth, A; Schmeisser, A; Wachter, R; Weil, J; Opitz, C

    2016-10-01

    The 2015 European Guidelines on Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension are also valid for Germany. While the guidelines contain detailed recommendations regarding pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), they contain only a relatively short paragraph on other, much more common forms of PH such as PH due to left heart disease. Despite the lack of data, targeted PAH treatments are increasingly being used for PH associated with left heart disease. This development is of concern because of limited ressources and the need to base treatments on scientific evidence. On the other hand, PH is a frequent problem that is highly relevant for morbidity and mortality in patients with left heart disease, representing an unmet need of targeted PH therapies. It that sense, the practical implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany requires the consideration of several specific issues and already existing novel data. This requires a detailed commentary to the guidelines, and in some aspects an update already appears necessary. In June 2016, a Consensus Conference organized by the PH working groups of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Respiratory Medicine (DGP) and the German Society of Pediatric Cardiology (DGPK) was held in Cologne, Germany. This conference aimed to solve practical and controversial issues surrounding the implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany. To this end, several working groups were initiated, one of which was specifically dedicated to PH associated with left heart disease. This article summarizes the results and recommendations of this working group.

  17. Linkage analysis followed by association show NRG1 associated with cannabis dependence in African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shizhong; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Kranzler, Henry R.; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background A genetic contribution to cannabis dependence (CaD) has been established, but susceptibility genes for CaD remain largely unknown. Methods We employed a multi-stage design to identify genetic variants underlying CaD. We first performed a genomewide linkage scan for CaD in 384 African-American (AA) and 354 European-American (EA) families ascertained for genetic studies of cocaine and opioid dependence. We then conducted association analysis under the linkage peak, first using data from a genomewide association study from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE), followed by replication studies of prioritized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in independent samples. Results We identified the strongest linkage evidence with CaD (lod=2.9) on chromosome 8p21.1 in AAs. In the association analysis of the SAGE sample under the linkage peak, we identified one SNP (rs17664708) associated with CaD in both AAs (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.02, OR=2.93, 95% CI=1.47–5.85, P=0.0022) and EAs (MAF=0.096, OR=1.38, 95% CI=1.05–1.81, P=0.02). This SNP, located at NRG1, a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia, was prioritized for further study. We replicated the association of rs17664708 with CaD in an independent sample of AAs (MAF=0.013, OR=2.81, 95% CI=1.23–6.45, P=0.0068). The joint analysis of the two AA samples demonstrated highly significant association between rs17664708 and CaD with adjustment for either global (OR=2.34, 95% CI=1.42–3.85, P=0.00044) or local ancestry (OR=2.33, 95% CI=1.39–3.91, P=0.00075). Conclusions Our study shows that NRG1 is probably a susceptibility gene for CaD, based on convergent evidence of linkage and replicated associations in two independent AA samples. PMID:22520967

  18. Cancer Antigen 125 is Associated with Length of Stay in Patients with Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Recep; Beton, Osman; Zorlu, Ali; Yucel, Hasan; Gunes, Hakan; Oguz, Didem; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-01-01

    Length of stay is the primary driver of heart-failure hospitalization costs. Because cancer antigen 125 has been associated with poor morbidity and mortality rates in heart failure, we investigated the relationship between admission cancer antigen 125 levels and lengths of stay in heart-failure patients. A total of 267 consecutive patients (184 men, 83 women) with acute decompensated heart failure were evaluated prospectively. The median length of stay was 4 days, and the patients were classified into 2 groups: those with lengths of stay ≤4 days and those with lengths of stay >4 days. Patients with longer lengths of stay had a significantly higher cancer antigen 125 level of 114 U/mL (range, 9–298 U/mL) than did those with a shorter length of stay (19 U/mL; range; 3–68) (P <0.001). The optimal cutoff level of cancer antigen 125 in the prediction of length of stay was >48 U/mL, with a specificity of 95.8% and a sensitivity of 96% (area under the curve, 0.979; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.953–0.992). In the multivariate logistic regression model, cancer antigen 125 >48 U/mL on admission (odds ratio=4.562; 95% CI, 1.826–11.398; P=0.001), sodium level (P<0.001), creatinine level (P=0.009), and atrial fibrillation (P=0.015) were also associated with a longer length of stay after adjustment for variables found to be statistically significant in univariate analysis and correlated with cancer antigen 125 level. In addition, it appears that in a cohort of patients with acute decompensated heart failure, cancer antigen 125 is independently associated with prolonged length of stay. PMID:28265209

  19. TODAY: EPA Administrator to Give Keynote Remarks at American Association of Port Authorities Spring Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will give keynote remarks at the Spring Meeting of the American Association of Port Authorities. Administrator McCarthy will discuss the benefits of pollution

  20. 2007 American Coal Ash Association membership directory as of June 21, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    A listing of names, addresses, contact numbers and websites is given for 101 members of the American Coal Ash Association. Honorary members are also named. Included are power generation companies, combustion by-product manufacturers and university departments.

  1. Modification of the American Public Health Association procedure for counting yeast and mold in cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Powers, E M; Ay, C C; Eckfeldt, G A; Rowley, D B

    1971-01-01

    The American Public Health Association method for counting low numbers of yeast and mold in cottage cheese was unsatisfactory due to altered pH of the culture medium. A modification of this method is presented.

  2. Associations between heart rate variability, metabolic syndrome risk factors, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Kiviniemi, Antti; Gill, Dawn P; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in heart rate variability (HRV) in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to determine associations between HRV parameters, MetS risk factors, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Participants (n = 220; aged 23-70 years) were assessed for MetS risk factors (waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and 5-min supine HRV (time and frequency domain and nonlinear). HRV was compared between those with 3 or more (MetS+) and those with 2 or fewer MetS risk factors (MetS-). Multiple linear regression models were built for each HRV parameter to investigate associations with MetS risk factors and HOMA-IR. Data with normal distribution are presented as means ± SD and those without as median [interquartile range]. In women, standard deviation of R-R intervals 38.0 [27.0] ms, 44.5 [29.3] ms; p = 0.020), low-frequency power (5.73 ± 1.06 ln ms(2), 6.13 ± 1.05 ln ms(2); p = 0.022), and the standard deviation of the length of the Poincaré plot (46.8 [31.6] ms, 58.4 [29.9] ms; p = 0.014) were lower and heart rate was higher (68 [13] beats/min, 64 [12] beats/min; p = 0. 018) in MetS+ compared with MetS-, with no differences in men. Waist circumference was most commonly associated with HRV, especially frequency domain parameters. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate. In conclusion, MetS+ women had a less favourable HRV profile than MetS- women, but there were no differences in men. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate, not HRV.

  3. Rare association of anophthalmia, complex congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension: case report.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Méndez, Raúl Enrique; Lozano Chinga, Michell Marola

    2016-10-07

    Clinical congenital anophthalmia is described as the uni- or bilateral absence of the eyeball that might occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome. It has a very low prevalence and its etiology is heterogeneous. Complex congenital cardiac malformations are also rare. The association of congenital anophthalmia and congenital heart disease is rarer still, and the etiology of those associations is not well understood yet. We report the case of a patient who had the very rare association of bilateral anophthalmia, multiple cardiac malformations and severe pulmonary hypertension.

  4. American Burn Association Practice Guidelines: Burn Shock Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    hypernatremia. • Administration of high-dose ascorbic acid may decrease overall fluid requirements, and is wor- thy of further study. OVERVIEW Purpose...The purpose of this guideline is to review the princi- ples of resuscitation after burn injury, including type and rate of fluid administration , and...organ dysfunction caused by inadequate resuscitation has become uncommon in modern American burn care. Instead, administration of fluid volumes well

  5. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  6. Long-term outcomes in patients with ambulatory new york heart association class III and IV heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, John; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Tedford, Ryan J; Baranowski, Bryan; Spragg, David; Cantillon, Daniel; Varma, Niraj; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ambulatory New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure were significantly underrepresented in clinical trials of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The natural long-term trajectory of survival free of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or heart transplant in patients with ambulatory class IV symptoms who underwent CRT has not been established. We extracted clinical data on 723 consecutive patients with NYHA class III or ambulatory class IV heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, and a QRS duration ≥120 ms who underwent CRT from September 30, 2003, to August 6, 2007. Chart notes immediately before CRT were reviewed to confirm NYHA class status before CRT. Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were constructed to determine long-term survival free of heart transplant and LVAD based on NYHA class status. Of the 723 patients, 52 had ambulatory class IV symptoms. Over a mean follow-up of 5.0 ± 2.5 years controlling for many possible confounders, ambulatory NYHA class IV status was independently associated with poor long-term outcomes. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival free of LVAD or heart transplant for class III versus ambulatory class IV patients was 92.0%, 84.0%, 75.0%, 68.1%, and 63.2% versus 75.0%, 61.5%, 52.0%, 45%, and 40.4%, respectively. Although patients with ambulatory class IV heart failure receiving CRT have inferior long-term outcomes compared with those with class III symptoms, survival in class IV patients continues to parallel class III patients over an extended follow-up. At 5 years, survival free of LVAD or heart transplant in ambulatory class IV patients receiving CRT is 40%.

  7. Ticagrelor Associated Heart Block: The Need for Close and Continued Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ticagrelor is an antiplatelet agent prescribed to prevent the development of adverse cardiac events after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). According to the PLATO trial, ticagrelor is associated with ventricular pauses in the first week of treatment; however, these episodes were felt to be asymptomatic and nonfatal to the patient. We present a case of ticagrelor related second-degree type II heart block causing severe dizziness and diaphoresis that resolved after discontinuation of the medication. PMID:28246559

  8. The association between noise exposure and blood pressure and ischemic heart disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    van Kempen, Elise E M M; Kruize, Hanneke; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Ameling, Caroline B; Staatsen, Brigit A M; de Hollander, Augustinus E M

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that noise exposure is associated with blood pressure changes and ischemic heart disease risk, but epidemiologic evidence is still limited. Furthermore, most reviews investigating these relations were not carried out in a systematic way, which makes them more prone to bias. We conducted a meta-analysis of 43 epidemiologic studies published between 1970 and 1999 that investigate the relation between noise exposure (both occupational and community) and blood pressure and/or ischemic heart disease (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes 410-414). We studied a wide range of effects, from blood pressure changes to a myocardial infarction. With respect to the association between noise exposure and blood pressure, small blood pressure differences were evident. Our meta-analysis showed a significant association for both occupational noise exposure and air traffic noise exposure and hypertension: We estimated relative risks per 5 dB(A) noise increase of 1.14 (1.01-1.29) and 1.26 (1.14-1.39), respectively. Air traffic noise exposure was positively associated with the consultation of a general practitioner or specialist, the use of cardiovascular medicines, and angina pectoris. In cross-sectional studies, road traffic noise exposure increases the risk of myocardial infarction and total ischemic heart disease. Although we can conclude that noise exposure can contribute to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, the evidence for a relation between noise exposure and ischemic heart disease is still inconclusive because of the limitations in exposure characterization, adjustment for important confounders, and the occurrence of publication bias. PMID:11882483

  9. Embolization of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformations Associated with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesekera, N. T. Padley, S. P.; Kazmi, F.; Davies, C. L.; McCall, J. M.

    2009-09-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare cause of vaginal bleeding and miscarriage. We report two cases of uterine AVMs in patients with a history of complex congenital heart disease, an association that has not been previously described. Both patients were treated by selective uterine artery embolization, a minimally invasive therapy that has revolutionized the management of uterine AVMs, thus offering an alternative to conventional hysterectomy.

  10. Executive Summary: European Heart Rhythm Association Consensus Document on the Management of Supraventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cosio, Francisco G; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Josephson, Mark E; Keegan, Roberto; Knight, Bradley P; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory YH; Malmborg, Helena; Oral, Hakan; Pappone, Carlo; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Wood, Kathryn A.; Young-Hoon, Kim; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an executive summary of the full European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on the management of supraventricular arrhythmias, published in Europace. It summarises developments in the field and provides recommendations for patient management, with particular emphasis on new advances since the previous European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The EHRA consensus document is available to read in full at http://europace.oxfordjournals.org PMID:28116087

  11. Association between Spirituality and Adherence to Management in Outpatients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Juglans Souto; Goldraich, Livia Adams; Nunes, Alice Hoefel; Zandavalli, Mônica Cristina Brugalli; Zandavalli, Rafaela Brugalli; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Rocha, Neusa Sica; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Clausell, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirituality may influence how patients cope with their illness. Objectives We assessed whether spirituality may influence adherence to management of outpatients with heart failure. Methods Cross sectional study enrolling consecutive ambulatory heart failure patients in whom adherence to multidisciplinary treatment was evaluated. Patients were assessed for quality of life, depression, religiosity and spirituality utilizing validated questionnaires. Correlations between adherence and psychosocial variables of interest were obtained. Logistic regression models explored independent predictors of adherence. Results One hundred and thirty patients (age 60 ± 13 years; 67% male) were interviewed. Adequate adherence score was observed in 38.5% of the patients. Neither depression nor religiosity was correlated to adherence, when assessed separately. Interestingly, spirituality, when assessed by both total score sum (r = 0.26; p = 0.003) and by all specific domains, was positively correlated to adherence. Finally, the combination of spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs was an independent predictor of adherence when adjusted for demographics, clinical characteristics and psychosocial instruments. Conclusion Spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs were the only variables consistently associated with compliance to medication in a cohort of outpatients with heart failure. Our data suggest that adequately addressing these aspects on patient’s care may lead to an improvement in adherence patterns in the complex heart failure management. PMID:27192385

  12. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  13. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Chambers, David A; Cloutier, Michelle M; Riekert, Kristin A; Rand, Cynthia S; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C; Wilson, Sandra R; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H; Okelo, Sande O; Mularski, Richard A; Nguyen, Huong Q; Patel, Minal R; Szefler, Stanley J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wilson, Kevin C; Freemer, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients' access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators' experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings.

  14. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e’ (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e’ (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). Conclusions Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  15. The association between heart rate, heart rate variability, endocrine and behavioural pain measures in horses suffering from laminitis.

    PubMed

    Rietmann, T R; Stauffacher, M; Bernasconi, P; Auer, J A; Weishaupt, M A

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the stress response of horses suffering from laminitis after short- and long-term treatment with the intent to evaluate power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) for pain monitoring. Data were collected from 19 horses with acute or chronic exacerbating laminitis without known primary disease before and after treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Recordings were carried out the day after admission to the equine hospital. Measurements were repeated on day 7 of the treatment. The recorded parameters included a clinical orthopaedic index (OLPI: Obel-grade plus hoof tester score), frequency of weight-shifting between contralateral limbs, mean beat-to-beat interval (R-R) duration, standard deviation of continuous R-R intervals, low- (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV, sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF), and plasma concentration of cortisol, adrenalin and noradrenalin. The LF represents mainly sympathetic influences on the heart whereas HF is mediated by the parasympathetic tone. Weight-shifting and OLPI decreased significantly with treatment. The LF normalized units (n.u.) decreased after NSAID from 60.41 +/- 21.42 to 51.12 +/- 19.81 and was 49.33 +/- 22.64 on day 7, whereas HF n.u. increased from 35.07 +/- 20.02 to 43.14 +/- 18.30 and was 45.98 +/- 23.00 on day 7. Hormone levels showed no tendency to change with treatment. The OLPI was only correlated with LF/HF, LF and HF (R = 0.57, 0.55 and -0.54 respectively). Significant negative correlations existed between HFn.u. and weight-shifting frequency (R = -0.37), HFn.u. and adrenalin (R = -0.47), and HFn.u. and noradrenalin (R = 0.33). The LFn.u. only correlated positively with adrenalin. Cortisol levels were poorly associated with the other parameters. Determination of the sympatho-vagal influences on cardiac function may offer complementary information for reliable assessment of pain and may represent a valuable alternative method

  16. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e' (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e' (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR.

  17. Cardiac ablation of Rheb1 induces impaired heart growth, endoplasmic reticulum-associated apoptosis and heart failure in infant mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunshan; Tao, Lichan; Shen, Shutong; Xiao, Junjie; Wu, Hang; Li, Beibei; Wu, Xiangqi; Luo, Wen; Xiao, Qi; Hu, Xiaoshan; Liu, Hailang; Nie, Junwei; Lu, Shuangshuang; Yuan, Baiyin; Han, Zhonglin; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Xinli

    2013-12-13

    Ras homologue enriched in brain 1 (Rheb1) plays an important role in a variety of cellular processes. In this study, we investigate the role of Rheb1 in the post-natal heart. We found that deletion of the gene responsible for production of Rheb1 from cardiomyocytes of post-natal mice resulted in malignant arrhythmias, heart failure, and premature death of these mice. In addition, heart growth impairment, aberrant metabolism relative gene expression, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis were observed in Rheb1-knockout mice prior to the development of heart failure and arrhythmias. Also, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling was enhanced in Rheb1-knockout mice, and removal of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) significantly prolonged the survival of Rheb1-knockouts. Furthermore, signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) was abolished and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were increased in Rheb1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Rheb1 is important for maintaining cardiac function in post-natal mice via regulation of mTORC1 activity and stress on the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, activation of Akt signaling helps to improve the survival of mice with advanced heart failure. Thus, this study provides direct evidence that Rheb1 performs multiple important functions in the heart of the post-natal mouse. Enhancing Akt activity improves the survival of infant mice with advanced heart failure.

  18. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: Comprehensive School Nutrition Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G.

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health,…

  19. Association between Six Minute Walk Test and All-Cause Mortality, Coronary Heart Disease-Specific Mortality, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanyar, Ali; Aziz, Michael M; Enright, Paul L; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Boudreau, Robert; Sutton-Tyrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis; Newman, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between six-minute walk test (6 MWT) performance and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and incident coronary heart disease in older adults. Methods We conducted a time-to-event analysis of 1,665 Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a 6 MWT and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results During a mean follow-up of 8 years, there were 305 incident coronary heart disease events, 504 deaths of which 100 were coronary heart disease-related deaths. The 6 MWT performance in the shortest two distance quintiles was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (290-338 meters: HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; <290 meters: HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). The adjusted risk of coronary heart disease mortality incident events among those with a 6 MWT <290 meters was not significant. Discussion Performance on the 6 MWT is independently associated with all-cause mortality and is of prognostic utility in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24695552

  20. Validation of the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF Risk Scores for Atrial Fibrillation in Hispanics, African-Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Eric; Kargoli, Faraj; Aagaard, Philip; Hoch, Ethan; Di Biase, Luigi; Fisher, John; Gross, Jay; Kim, Soo; Krumerman, Andrew; Ferrick, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A risk score for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been developed by the Framingham Heart Study and Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE)-AF consortium. However, validation of these risk scores in an inner-city population is uncertain. Thus, a validation model was built using the Framingham Risk Score for AF and CHARGE-AF covariates. An in and outpatient electrocardiographic database was interrogated from 2000 to 2013 for the development of AF. Patients were included if their age was >45 and <95 years, had <10-year follow-up, if their initial electrocardiogram was without AF, had ≥ 2 electrocardiograms, and declared a race and/or ethnicity as non-Hispanic white, African-American, or Hispanic. For the Framingham Heart Study, 49,599 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 4,860 developed AF. Discrimination analysis using area under the curve (AUC) for original risk equations: non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.712 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.694 to 0.731), African-American AUC = 0.733 (95% CI 0.716 to 0.751), and Hispanic AUC = 0.740 (95% CI 0.723 to 0.757). For the CHARGE-AF, 45,571 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 4,512 developed AF. Non-Hispanic white AUC = 0.673 (95% CI 0.652 to 0.694), African-American AUC = 0.706 (95% CI 0.685 to 0.727), and Hispanic AUC = 0.711 (95% CI 0.691 to 0.732). Calibration analysis showed qualitative similarities between cohorts. In conclusion, this is the first study to validate both the Framingham Heart Study and CHARGE-AF risk scores in both a Hispanic and African-American cohort. All models predicted AF well across all race and ethnic cohorts.

  1. Cluster Differentiating 36 (CD36) Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Mohamed; Tao, Huan; Fungwe, Thomas V.; Hajri, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Obesity is often associated with a state of oxidative stress and increased lipid deposition in the heart. More importantly, obesity increases lipid influx into the heart and induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to cell toxicity and metabolic dysfunction. Cluster differentiating 36 (CD36) protein is highly expressed in the heart and regulates lipid utilization but its role in obesity-associated oxidative stress is still not clear. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CD36 deficiency on cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and lipotoxicity associated with obesity. Methods and Results Studies were conducted in control (Lean), obese leptin-deficient (Lepob/ob) and leptin-CD36 double null (Lepob/obCD36-/-) mice. Compared to lean mice, cardiac steatosis, and fatty acid (FA) uptake and oxidation were increased in Lepob/ob mice, while glucose uptake and oxidation was reduced. Moreover, insulin resistance, oxidative stress markers and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production were markedly enhanced. This was associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase expression, and increased membrane-associated p47phox, p67phox and protein kinase C. Silencing CD36 in Lepob/ob mice prevented cardiac steatosis, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization, but reduced FA uptake and oxidation. Moreover, CD36 deficiency reduced NADPH oxidase activity and decreased NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CD36 deficiency reduced palmitate-induced ROS production and normalized NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusions CD36 deficiency prevented obesity-associated cardiac steatosis and insulin resistance, and reduced NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production. The study demonstrates that CD36 regulates NADPH oxidase activity and mediates FA-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27195707

  2. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen M; Grimm, Kevin J; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2014-11-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race been tested. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African American girls had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology.

  3. HPV Literacy and Associated Factors Among Hmong American Immigrants: Implications for Reducing Cervical Cancer Disparity.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Raiza; Simms, Tina; Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies show that certain minority and ethnic communities experience low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates despite a higher cervical cancer burden. HPV is known to be responsible for almost all cervical cancer cases. Hmong Americans, a growing Asian American population, appear to be at increased risk. The cervical cancer incidence rate among Hmong American women is three times higher than other Asian/Pacific Islanders and more than four times higher than Non-Hispanic Whites. Despite such alarming statistics, there is limited research focusing on HPV literacy and its associated factors in the Hmong American community. This study's objectives are to investigate: (1) the level of HPV knowledge among Hmong Americans; (2) HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates of Hmong Americans; and (3) factors associated with HPV literacy in the Hmong American community. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was used as the study's theoretical framework. A self-administered paper and online health survey was completed by192 Hmong Americans living in a major metropolitan area in Minnesota. Results revealed a mean score of 4.76 (SD 1.67) for the 7-item questionnaire measuring HPV knowledge. The HPV vaccination initiation rate was 46.3 % (n = 56), with 32.7 % completing the recommended three doses. Multiple regression analysis found that participants' level of education, number of doctor visits, and cervical cancer screening literacy were significantly associated with HPV knowledge. This study's results indicate the important role of health providers in educating Hmong Americans patients about HPV and cervical cancer prevention to decrease the cervical cancer burden in this high-risk population.

  4. Third-degree heart block associated with lyme carditis: review of published cases.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Mead, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Lyme carditis is an uncommon manifestation of Lyme disease that most commonly involves some degree of atrioventricular conduction blockade. Third-degree conduction block is the most severe form and can be fatal if untreated. Systematic review of the medical literature identified 45 published cases of third-degree conduction block associated with Lyme carditis in the United States. Median patient age was 32 years, 84% of patients were male, and 39% required temporary pacing. Recognizing patient groups more likely to develop third-degree heart block associated with Lyme carditis is essential to providing prompt and appropriate therapy.

  5. Cardiac mortality is associated with low levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the heart of cadavers with a history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Suwannahoi, Padiphat; Mahakranukrauh, Pasuk; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of omega-3 (ie, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 (ie, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid [AA]) fatty acids on reducing cardiac mortality are still debated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues are associated with low cardiac mortality in Thai cadavers. One hundred fresh cadavers were examined in this study. The cause of death, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and fish consumption habits were obtained from death certificates, cadaver medical record profiles, and a questionnaire to a person who lived with the subject before death. In each cadaver, biopsies of cardiac tissues were taken from the interventricular septum for measurement of fatty acid. Of the 100 cadavers (average age, 69 +/- 13 years), 60 were men. The frequency of fish consumption was directly associated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues (P < .01). History of CHD and cause of death (cardiac vs noncardiac) were not significantly associated with levels of omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. However, in cadavers with a history of CHD, high levels of omega-3 and omega-6, particularly DHA and AA, were associated with low cardiac mortality (P < .05). Fish consumption is associated with levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues. Although omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are not associated with cardiac mortality in the overall studied population, their low levels (especially DHA and AA) in heart tissues are associated with high cardiac mortality in cadavers with a history of CHD.

  6. [Advances in the Association between Apolipoprotein (a) Gene Polymorphisms and Coronary Heart Disease].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; L, Zhan; Song, Yong-yan

    2015-08-01

    Human apolipoprotein (a) (LPA) gene is highly polymorphic, and the polymorphic loci on this gene include the Kringle 4 subtype 2(KIV-2) repeat polymorphism, the pentanucleotide repeat (TTTTA)n polymorphism, and a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms. KIV-2 repeat polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with coronary heart disease(CHD), and the reducing number of KIV-2 repeats is a risk factor for CHD. Both the increase and decrease of the pentanucleotide repeat(TTTTA)n polymorphism repeats are possibly associated with CHD risk. In single nucleotide polymorphisms loci, the rs10455872 and rs3798220 loci were widely reported to be associated with CHD, while other loci were less reported. The association between LPA polymorphisms and CHD may be mediated by either the elevation of plasma LPA level or the change of LPA subtypes. This article reviews the association between the LPA polymorphisms and CHD and the underlying mechanisms.

  7. The maternal-age-associated risk of congenital heart disease is modifiable.

    PubMed

    Schulkey, Claire E; Regmi, Suk D; Magnan, Rachel A; Danzo, Megan T; Luther, Herman; Hutchinson, Alayna K; Panzer, Adam A; Grady, Mary M; Wilson, David B; Jay, Patrick Y

    2015-04-09

    Maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease even in the absence of any chromosomal abnormality in the newborn. Whether the basis of this risk resides with the mother or oocyte is unknown. The impact of maternal age on congenital heart disease can be modelled in mouse pups that harbour a mutation of the cardiac transcription factor gene Nkx2-5 (ref. 8). Here, reciprocal ovarian transplants between young and old mothers establish a maternal basis for the age-associated risk in mice. A high-fat diet does not accelerate the effect of maternal ageing, so hyperglycaemia and obesity do not simply explain the mechanism. The age-associated risk varies with the mother's strain background, making it a quantitative genetic trait. Most remarkably, voluntary exercise, whether begun by mothers at a young age or later in life, can mitigate the risk when they are older. Thus, even when the offspring carry a causal mutation, an intervention aimed at the mother can meaningfully reduce their risk of congenital heart disease.

  8. Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions in newborns.

    PubMed

    Tláskal, T; Chaloupecky, V; Marek, J; Hŭcín, B; Kostelka, M; Tax, P; Kucera, V; Janousek, J; Skovránek, J; Reich, O

    1997-04-01

    Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions was performed in 13 patients aged from 1 to 85 days. The surgery was performed through the midline sternotomy approach in extracorporeal circulation and deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest at 14 to 19 degrees C was used for reconstruction of the aortic arch. In all patients it was possible to perform a direct anastomosis between the ascendent and descendent aorta. At the same time closure of the ventricular septal defect was performed in 11 patients, closure of the atrial septal defect in 4, correction of persistent truncus arteriosus in 3, resection of subaortic stenosis in 2, arterial switch repair of transposition of the great arteries in 1, correction of double outlet right ventricle in 1 and patch closure of aortico-pulmonary window in 1 patient. Three (23.1%) newborns died in the early postoperative period: two from sepsis and one from multiple organ failure. Ten patients (76.9%) were followed up for 1 to 29 months postoperatively. All of them are in very good condition with a nonrestrictive aortic anastomosis. Primary one-stage repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions is preferred to the two-stage repair in all newborns with this critical congenital heart disease.

  9. Health and cost benefits associated with the use of metoprolol in heart attack patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Ibanez, Borja

    2014-11-01

    Heart attack (myocardial infarction) is a highly prevalent entity worldwide. Widespread implementation of reperfusion strategies has dramatically reduced the mortality associated with infarction. Paradoxically, the mortality reduction has significantly increased the incidence of chronic heart failure (HF). Treatment of HF, once present, represents a huge socioeconomic burden on individuals and healthcare systems. The possibility of preventing rather than treating post-infarction HF would be of paramount importance. Given that infarct size is the main determinant of adverse post-infarction outcomes (including chronic HF), therapies able to reduce infarct size are needed. The single administration of intravenous metoprolol before reperfusion has been recently shown to reduce infarct size and reduce the cases of chronic HF in a proof-of-concept trial. If confirmed in larger trials, this low-cost therapy is expected to have a major health and socioeconomic impact.

  10. Developing thyroid disorders is associated with poor prognosis factors in patient with stable chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Silva-Tinoco, Rubén; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Orozco-Gutiérrez, Juan José; Vázquez-Díaz, Oscar; Montaño-Hernández, Patricia; Flores-Rebollar, Armando; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo

    2011-03-03

    We sought to assess the developing of thyroid disorders in forty eight patients with chronic stable heart failure and without thyroid abnormalities during six months follow-up. Thyroid function disorders were observed in 27.1% of the subjects: sick euthyroid syndrome (12.5%), subclinical hypothyroidism (10.4%) and overt hypothyroidism (6.2%). Subjects with higher thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels at the end of the study had more hospitalizations. The developing of altered thyroid profile was related to lower hemoglobin levels, smaller phase angle with bioelectrical impedance method and more fatigue perception by the patients. This abnormal thyroid function behavior on stable chronic heart failure and was observed as part of the disease progress and was associated to worse prognosis factors as lower phase angle and anemia.

  11. Analysis of Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation in Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Among patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD), 45% to 60% present with atrial fibrillation (AF), which is associated with increased rates of thromboembolism, heart failure, and even death. The bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) combining with mitral valve procedure has been adopted in patients of AF associated with RHD, but evaluations about its effectiveness are still limited. Methods A total of 87 patients with RHD and long persistent AF who had accepted mitral valve replacement concomitant with BRFA were studied. Clinical data were collected to analyze the midterm results of BRFA and evaluate its efficiency. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the independent factors associated with late AF recurrence. Results Sixty-six (75.9%) patients maintained sinus rhythm after a mean follow-up of 13.4 ± 5.2 months. Late AF recurrence had been detected in 21 (24.1%) patients, 11 (12.6%) patients were confirmed to be AF, 8 (9.2%) patients were atrial flutter and 2 (2.3%) patients were junctional rhythm. In Multivariate logistic regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.756, 95% CI = 1.289–2.391, p = 0.000) and early AF recurrence (OR = 5.479, 95% CI = 1.189–25.254, p = 0.029) were independent predictors of late AF recurrence. In addition, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and New York Heart Association class showed a greater improvement in patients who maintained sinus rhythm than those who experienced late AF recurrence. Conclusion BRFA is an effective technique for the treatment of long persistent AF associated with RHD during mitral valve replacement. The BMI and early AF recurrence are independent predictors for late AF recurrence. Patients with long-term restoration of sinus rhythm experienced a greater improvement of left ventricular function after BRFA. PMID:26960188

  12. Serum Urate Is Not Associated with Coronary Artery Calcification: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; ZHANG, YUQING

    2011-01-01

    Objective Urate may have effects on vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis. We had shown an association between serum uric acid (SUA) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Inflammation and vascular remodeling in atherosclerosis promote coronary artery calcification (CAC), a preclinical marker for atherosclerosis. Here, we examined whether SUA is associated with CAC, using the same study sample and methods as for our previous carotid atherosclerosis study. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. Participants were recruited from population-based cohorts in the US states of Massachusetts, North Carolina, Minnesota, Utah, and Alabama. CAC was assessed with helical computed tomography (CT). We conducted sex-specific and family-cluster analyses, as well as additional analyses among persons without risk factors related to both cardiovascular disease and hyperuricemia, adjusting for potential confounders as we had in the previous study of carotid atherosclerosis. Results For the CAC study, 2412 subjects had both SUA and helical CT results available (55% women, age 58 ± 13 yrs, body mass index 27.6 ± 5.3). We found no association of SUA with CAC in men or women [OR in men: 1.0, 1.11, 0.86, 0.90; women: 1.0, 0.83, 1.00, 0.87 for increasing categories of SUA: < 5 (referent group), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively], nor in subgroup analyses. Conclusion Replicating the methods used to demonstrate an association of SUA with carotid atherosclerosis did not reveal any association between SUA and CAC, suggesting that SUA likely does not contribute to atherosclerosis through effects on arterial calcification. The possibility that urate has divergent pathophysiologic effects on atherosclerosis and artery calcification merits further study. PMID:20889594

  13. Fetal heart rate and motor activity associations with maternal organochlorine levels: results of an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    DiPietro, Janet A; Davis, Meghan F; Costigan, Kathleen A; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2014-01-01

    Contemporaneous associations between circulating maternal organochlorines (OCs) and measures of fetal heart rate and motor activity were evaluated. A panel of 47 OCs, including pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was analyzed from serum of 50 pregnant women at 36 weeks gestation. Data were empirically reduced into four factors and six individual compounds. All participants had detectable concentrations of at least one-quarter of the assayed OCs and, in general, higher socioeconomic level was associated with higher OC concentrations. Fetal heart rate measures were not consistently associated with maternal OCs. In contrast, one or more indicators of greater fetal motor activity were significantly associated with higher levels of the DDT and low chlorinated OC factors and five of the six individual compounds (heptachlor epoxide, trans nonachlor, oxychlordane, and PCBs 18 and 52). This preliminary demonstration of associations between fetal motor activity and maternal concentrations of persistent and pervasive environmental contaminants suggests that fetal assessment may be useful in ascertaining the potential early effects of these compounds on development.

  14. Fetal heart rate and motor activity associations with maternal organochlorine levels: Results of an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Davis, Meghan F.; Costigan, Kathleen A; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    Contemporaneous associations between circulating maternal organochlorines and measures of fetal heart rate and motor activity were evaluated. A panel of 47 organochlorines (OCs), including pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was analyzed from serum of 50 pregnant women at 36 weeks gestation. Data were empirically reduced into four factors and six individual compounds. All participants had detectable concentrations of at least one-quarter of the assayed OCs and, in general, higher socioeconomic level was associated with higher OC concentrations. Fetal heart rate measures were not consistently associated with maternal OCs. In contrast, one or more indicators of greater fetal motor activity were significantly associated with higher levels of the DDT and low chlorinated OC factors and five of the six individual compounds (heptachlor epoxide, trans nonachlor, oxychlordane, and PCBs 18 and 52). This preliminary demonstration of associations between fetal motor activity and maternal concentrations of persistent and pervasive environmental contaminants suggests that fetal assessment may be useful in ascertaining the potential early effects of these compounds on development. PMID:23591698

  15. Rates and factors associated with falls in older European Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, African-Americans, and Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Tappen, Ruth; Engstrom, Gabriella; da Costa, Bruno R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate rates and factors associated with older adult falls in different ethnic groups. Participants and methods Information on demographics, medical and falls history, and pain and physical activity levels was collected from 550 community-dwelling older adults (75±9 years old, 222 European Americans, 109 Afro-Caribbeans, 106 African-Americans, and 113 Hispanics). Results Taking medications for anxiety (risk ratio [RR] =1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.1–2.0), having incontinence (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.1–1.8, P=0.013), back pain (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.0–1.8), feet swelling (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.1–1.7), and age ≥75 years (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.0–1.6) were associated with falls. The associations were stronger for Afro-Caribbeans, but they presented approximately 40% lower prevalence of falls than the other groups. Conclusion Taking anxiety medication, incontinence, back pain, feet swelling, and age ≥75 years were associated with falls, and Afro-Caribbeans presented lower prevalence of falls. These findings need to be taken into consideration in clinical interventions in aging. PMID:26604718

  16. Association Between Valvular Surgery and Mortality Among Patients With Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Todd; Park, Lawrence; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Cortes, Claudia; Casillo, Roberta; Chu, Vivian; Delahaye, Francois; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Edathodu, Jameela; Falces, Carlos; Logar, Mateja; Miró, José M.; Naber, Christophe; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Murdoch, David R.; Moreillon, Philippe; Utili, Riccardo; Wang, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context Heart failure (HF) is the most common complication of infective endocarditis. However, clinical characteristics of HF in patients with infective endocarditis, use of surgical therapy, and their associations with patient outcome are not well described. Objectives To determine the clinical, echocardiographic, and microbiological variables associated with HF in patients with definite infective endocarditis and to examine variables independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality for patients with infective endocarditis and HF, including the use and association of surgery with outcome. Design, Setting, and Patients The International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, a prospective, multicenter study enrolling 4166 patients with definite native- or prosthetic-valve infective endocarditis from 61 centers in 28 countries between June 2000 and December 2006. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results Of 4075 patients with infective endocarditis and known HF status enrolled, 1359 (33.4% [95% CI, 31.9%–34.8%]) had HF, and 906 (66.7% [95% CI, 64.2%–69.2%]) were classified as having New York Heart Association class III or IV symptom status. Within the subset with HF, 839 (61.7% [95% CI, 59.2%–64.3%]) underwent valvular surgery during the index hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 29.7% (95% CI, 27.2%–32.1%) for the entire HF cohort, with lower mortality observed in patients undergoing valvular surgery compared with medical therapy alone (20.6% [95% CI, 17.9%–23.4%] vs 44.8% [95% CI, 40.4%–49.0%], respectively; P<.001). One-year mortality was 29.1% (95% CI, 26.0%–32.2%) in patients undergoing valvular surgery vs 58.4% (95% CI, 54.1%–62.6%) in those not undergoing surgery (P<.001). Cox proportional hazards modeling with propensity score adjustment for surgery showed that advanced age, diabetes mellitus, health care–associated infection, causative microorganism (Staphylococcus aureus or

  17. Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Asian American Students' Suicidal Ideation: A Multicampus, National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Y. Joel; Brownson, Chris; Schwing, Alison E.

    2011-01-01

    Risk and protective factors associated with suicidal ideation among 1,377 Asian American college students across 66 U.S. campuses were examined. The results indicated a variety of factors were associated with morbid thoughts: medication for mental health concerns, gender, GPA, undergraduate status, religious affiliation, living with a family…

  18. Longitudinal Associations between Experienced Racial Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Devin; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    While recent evidence has indicated that experienced racial discrimination is associated with increased depressive symptoms for African American adolescents, most studies rely on cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal research designs. As a result, the direction and persistence of this association across time remains unclear. This article…

  19. Different Approaches to Teaching the Mechanics of American Psychological Association Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Timothy M.; Spitzer, Tam M.

    2006-01-01

    Students have to learn two distinctly different tasks when writing research papers: a) creating and organizing prose, and b) formatting a manuscript according to the nuances and mechanics of a pre-determined format, such as Modern Language Association (MLA) or American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines. Two studies examined different…

  20. 77 FR 42229 - Gruma Corporation, Spina Bifida Association, March of Dimes Foundation, American Academy of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 172 Gruma Corporation, Spina Bifida Association... Corporation, Spina Bifida Association, March of Dimes Foundation, American Academy of Pediatrics, Royal DSM...

  1. 77 FR 59659 - Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated....S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA. The ] human remains were removed...

  2. 78 FR 25470 - Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated... Parkway has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, published in a Notice of Inventory Completion Correction in the Federal Register on April 1, 2005. This notice corrects...

  3. 77 FR 44255 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued Recognition as a National Accreditation Organization for Accrediting Entities To Furnish Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training AGENCY: Centers for... approval of an application from the American Association of Diabetes Educators for continued recognition...

  4. Social and Psychological Factors Associated with AIDS Risk Behaviors among Low Income, Urban, African American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Maureen M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studied factors associated with sexual intercourse and substance use among young, low income, African-American adolescents. Found that sexual activity was associated with parental conflict and having sexually active friends. Boys reported less parental monitoring and family and community support than girls and were more likely to report sexual…

  5. Faculty Status of Theological Librarians in the American Theological Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Ann L.

    This paper is the result of a survey of the institutional members of the American Theological Library Association. The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) defines faculty status as: (1) freedom to exercise independent judgment in performance of professional duties and a formal method of performance review, (2) adoption of an…

  6. American Association of Dental Schools 1998-99 Annual Proceedings (March 6, 1998-March 10, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools include the president's annual report, president-elect's and executive director's addresses, a summary of proceedings, the revised constitution, a list of competencies for entry into the dental hygiene profession, association bylaws, member administrators,…

  7. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  8. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  9. Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feifei; Myers, Valerie D.; Knezevic, Tijana; Wang, JuFang; Gao, Erhe; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tahrir, Farzaneh G.; Gupta, Manish K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Tilley, Douglas G.; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is an evolutionarily conserved protein expressed at high levels in the heart and the vasculature and in many cancers. While altered BAG3 expression has been associated with cardiac dysfunction, its role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that BAG3 protects the heart from reperfusion injury, in vivo cardiac function was measured in hearts infected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9–expressing (rAAV9-expressing) BAG3 or GFP and subjected to I/R. To elucidate molecular mechanisms by which BAG3 protects against I/R injury, neonatal mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (NMVCs) in which BAG3 levels were modified by adenovirus expressing (Ad-expressing) BAG3 or siBAG3 were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). H/R significantly reduced NMVC BAG3 levels, which were associated with enhanced expression of apoptosis markers, decreased expression of autophagy markers, and reduced autophagy flux. The deleterious effects of H/R on apoptosis and autophagy were recapitulated by knockdown of BAG3 with Ad-siBAG3 and were rescued by Ad-BAG3. In vivo, treatment of mice with rAAV9-BAG3 prior to I/R significantly decreased infarct size and improved left ventricular function when compared with mice receiving rAAV9-GFP and improved markers of autophagy and apoptosis. These findings suggest that BAG3 may provide a therapeutic target in patients undergoing reperfusion after myocardial infarction. PMID:27882354

  10. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  11. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGES

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; ...

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  12. American Indian Voluntary Associations in Greater Los Angeles: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramstedt, Wayne

    With its large and heterogeneous Indian population, the Los Angeles area offers an excellent opportunity to study patterns in the origin, growth, and structure of Indian voluntary associations, and the leisure time institutions. Since the 1920's more than 100 Indian voluntary associations formed in the area. Established groups influenced the…

  13. An examination of the association between demographic and educational factors and African American achievement in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottledge, Michael Christopher

    Objective of the Study: The objective of this research study was to investigate whether an association exists between teacher demographic factors (years of teaching experience and gender), 2 educational factors (certification type and certification pathway) and the percent passing rate of tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS. Answers to the following questions were sought: 1. Is there an association between teacher demographic factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? 2. Is there an association between teacher educational factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? 3. Is there an association between teacher demographic factors, educational factors and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African American male students on the 2010 science TAKS? Status of the Question: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), science and engineering jobs in the U.S. have increased steadily over recent years and by the year 2016 the number of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) jobs will have grown by more than 21 percent. This increase in science and engineering jobs will double the growth rate of all other workforce sectors combined. The BLS also reports that qualified minority applicants needed to fill these positions will be few and far between. African Americans, Latinos, and other minorities constitute 24 percent of the U.S. population but only 13 percent of college graduates and just 10 percent of people with college degrees who work in science and engineering (Education Trust, 2009). Drawing on the above information, I proposed the following hypotheses to the research questions: H01: There will be no significant statistical association between the demographic factors teacher gender and years of teaching experience and the percent passing rate of their tenth grade African

  14. Stroke prevention strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart valve abnormalities: perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben B; Madrid, Antonio; Dobreanu, Dan; Jędrzejczyk-Patej, Ewa; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Survey was to assess the perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation (AF) and management of AF patients with various heart valve abnormalities in daily clinical practice in European electrophysiology (EP) centres. Questionnaire survey was sent via the Internet to the EHRA-EP Research Network Centres. Of the 52 responding centres, 42 (80.8%) were university hospitals. Choosing the most comprehensive definition of valvular AF, a total of 49 centres (94.2%) encountered a mechanical prosthetic heart valve and significant rheumatic mitral stenosis, 35 centres (67.3%) also considered bioprosthetic valves, and 25 centres (48.1%) included any significant valvular heart disease, requiring surgical repair in the definition of valvular AF. Only three centres (5.8%) would define valvular AF as the presence of any (even mild) valvular abnormality. None of the centres would use non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in AF patients with mechanical prosthetic valves, only 5 centres (9.8%) would use NOACs in patients with significant mitral stenosis, 17 centres (32.7%) would consider the use of NOACs in patients with bioprosthetic valves, and 21 centres (41.2%) would use NOACs in patients with a non-recent transcatheter valve replacement/implantation, while 13 centres (25.5%) would never consider the use of NOACs in AF patients with even mild native heart valve abnormality. Our survey showed marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular AF and thromboprophylactic treatments, with the use of variable NOACs in patients with valvular heart disease other than prosthetic heart valves or significant mitral stenosis, indicating that this term may be misleading and should not be used.

  15. Leukocyte Populations are Associated with Heart Rate Variability After a Triathlon.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Germán Hernández; Orellana, José Naranjo; Taraco, Adrián Rosas; Colmenero, Blanca Rangel

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze cellular immune components and their association with heart rate variability in triathlon athletes. Twelve athletes were included (age 36.41 ± 5.57 years, body mass 81.84 ± 10.97 kg) and blood samples were taken one week before, immediately, at 2 and 48 hours, and one week after competition. Total lymphocytes and their subpopulations, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils and monocytes were analyzed. At the same time, heart rate variability was recorded for 30 minutes using Polar Team2®. A significant difference between lymphocyte subpopulations and heart rate variability was found in the different study periods. A positive correlation was found between total lymphocytes and rMSSD (r = .736, p <0.05), CD3+ and rMSSD (r = .785, p <0.05), and CD4+ and rMSSD (r = .795, p < 0.05) at the end of the competition. After one week of competition, a negative correlation was found between eosinophils and MRR, SDNN, pNN50, and rMSSD (p <0.01); and basophils and MRR, SDNN, pNN50, and rMSSD (p <0.01); while a positive correlation was found between CD19+ (B cells) and pNN50 (r = .678, p <0.05). Our results suggest that it is possible to predict the effect of training with regard to the athlete's performance.

  16. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  17. Leukocyte Populations are Associated with Heart Rate Variability After a Triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Germán Hernández; Orellana, José Naranjo; Taraco, Adrián Rosas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to analyze cellular immune components and their association with heart rate variability in triathlon athletes. Twelve athletes were included (age 36.41 ± 5.57 years, body mass 81.84 ± 10.97 kg) and blood samples were taken one week before, immediately, at 2 and 48 hours, and one week after competition. Total lymphocytes and their subpopulations, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils and monocytes were analyzed. At the same time, heart rate variability was recorded for 30 minutes using Polar Team2®. A significant difference between lymphocyte subpopulations and heart rate variability was found in the different study periods. A positive correlation was found between total lymphocytes and rMSSD (r = .736, p <0.05), CD3+ and rMSSD (r = .785, p <0.05), and CD4+ and rMSSD (r = .795, p < 0.05) at the end of the competition. After one week of competition, a negative correlation was found between eosinophils and MRR, SDNN, pNN50, and rMSSD (p <0.01); and basophils and MRR, SDNN, pNN50, and rMSSD (p <0.01); while a positive correlation was found between CD19+ (B cells) and pNN50 (r = .678, p <0.05). Our results suggest that it is possible to predict the effect of training with regard to the athlete's performance. PMID:28031757

  18. Association between household income and overweight of Korean and American children: trends and differences.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yongju; Oh, Sangwoo; Park, Sangshin; Park, Yongsoon

    2010-07-01

    The prevalence of overweight in children has been dramatically increasing worldwide, and socioeconomic status is an important risk factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that household income is negatively associated with overweight in Korean and American girls and boys. In the study, 2117 children 7 to 12 years of age from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2001 and 2007 and 3016 children from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2001 and 2006 were included. Overweight is defined as the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. Lower household income significantly increased the risk for overweight in Korean boys, irrespective of adjustments. The negative association between household income and overweight of American boys disappeared after adjusting for the frequency of dining out and TV viewing time. There was no significant association between household income and overweight of Korean and American girls. As household income increased, the intake of energy from protein was increased, but energy from carbohydrates was decreased in Korean boys. On the other hand, as household income increased, energy intake from carbohydrates was increased and energy intake from proteins decreased in American boys. In conclusion, positive association between household income and overweight was found in Korean boys, but not in Korean girls and American boys and girls. Effects solely targeting reduction in income disparities cannot effectively reduce sex disparities in overweight of children.

  19. Opportunity costs associated with caring for older Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H. Shelton; Herrera, Angelica P.; Angel, Jacqueline L.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term care use among older Mexican-Americans is poorly understood, despite the adverse effects on health and economic disadvantage in this vulnerable population. This study examines gender-based risk of long-term care use in 628 women and 391 men, age 70 and over in the 2000-01 and 2004-05 waves of the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly. Logistic regression models are employed to assess the impact of the opportunity cost implications of family support (kin availability and co-residence) relative to health care needs (quality-adjusted life years (QALY) weighted scores and functional limitations) on women's risk of entry into a nursing home. A small percentage (∼5%) of men and women had entered a long-term care facility. Women had lower weights for QALY weights and greater disability than men, but on average were more likely to live with or in closer proximity to an adult child. Higher disability rates (p < .01) increased the risk of institutionalization regardless of gender because disability increases time burdens. Families with fewer adult children faced higher time burdens per child in caring for elderly parents; particularly for elderly mothers. Demographic trends suggest that the number of adult children available to share the caregiving load may decrease long-term care use. PMID:23979263

  20. Opportunity costs associated with caring for older Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Brown, H Shelton; Herrera, Angelica P; Angel, Jacqueline L

    2013-09-01

    Long-term care use among older Mexican-Americans is poorly understood, despite the adverse effects on health and economic disadvantage in this vulnerable population. This study examines gender-based risk of long-term care use in 628 women and 391 men, age 70 and over in the 2000-2001 and 2004-2005 waves of the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly. Logistic regression models are employed to assess the impact of the opportunity cost implications of family support (kin availability and co-residence) relative to health care needs (quality-adjusted life years (QALY) weighted scores and functional limitations) on women's risk of entry into a nursing home. A small percentage (~5%) of men and women had entered a long-term care facility. Women had lower weights for QALY weights and greater disability than men, but on average were more likely to live with or in closer proximity to an adult child. Higher disability rates (p < 0.01) increased the risk of institutionalization regardless of gender because disability increases time burdens. Families with fewer adult children faced higher time burdens per child in caring for elderly parents; particularly for elderly mothers. Demographic trends suggest that the number of adult children available to share the caregiving load may decrease long-term care use.

  1. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual.

  2. Lack of association between folate receptor autoantibodies and conotruncal congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Laura B; Sanghavi, Darshak

    2013-03-01

    Conotruncal cardiac defects are partially prevented by maternal folic acid supplementation. However, the biochemical mechanism is unknown. Maternal autoantibodies to folate receptors, previously associated with increased risk for neural tube defects, also may account for this effect. This study aimed to examine the titers of folate receptor-blocking autoantibodies in mothers of children with conotruncal congenital heart defects and to compare them with those in the general population. Serum samples were obtained from 22 women whose pregnancies were complicated by conotruncal congenital heart malformations. Groups of samples were analyzed for autoantibodies against [(3)H] folic acid-labeled folate receptors, quantitative amounts of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM autoantibodies to the folate receptor, and for ability to block-bind folic acid to receptors. No elevated levels of antibodies binding to [(3)H] folic acid-labeled folate receptors were found. No difference was found in antifolate receptor alpha-IgG or IgM median levels between cases (261 vs. 240 μg/mL) and control subjects (773 vs. 924 μg/mL). There was no increased blocking of folic acid binding between cases [0.69 ng/mL; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.006-0.01] and control subjects (0.69 ng/mL; 95 % CI, 0.003-0.013). Although epidemiologic evidence suggests that periconceptual folic acid may prevent many conotruncal congenital heart defects, the current study suggests that this effect is unlikely to be explained by the presence of maternal autoantibodies to folate receptor. These data suggest that a strategy of screening women for such autoantibodies will not identify a high-risk group of women to target for supplemental folic acid to prevent congenital heart defects.

  3. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-11-19

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies.

  4. Prolonged Sitting is Associated with Attenuated Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Blue-Collar Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, David M; Sato, Tatiana; Kristiansen, Jesper; Gupta, Nidhi; Skotte, Jørgen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. However, research into the physiological determinants underlying this relationship is still in its infancy. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which occupational and leisure-time sitting are associated with nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) in blue-collar workers. The study included 138 blue-collar workers (mean age 45.5 (SD 9.4) years). Sitting-time was measured objectively for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) worn on the thigh and trunk. During the same period, a heart rate monitor (Actiheart) was used to sample R-R intervals from the electrocardiogram. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were only derived during nighttime sleep, and used as markers of cardiac autonomic modulation. Regression analyses with multiple adjustments (age, gender, body mass index, smoking, job-seniority, physical work-load, influence at work, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were used to investigate the association between sitting time and nocturnal HRV. We found that occupational sitting-time was negatively associated (p < 0.05) with time and frequency domain HRV indices. Sitting-time explained up to 6% of the variance in HRV, independent of the covariates. Leisure-time sitting was not significantly associated with any HRV indices (p > 0.05). In conclusion, objectively measured occupational sitting-time was associated with reduced nocturnal HRV in blue-collar workers. This indicates an attenuated cardiac autonomic regulation with increasing sitting-time at work regardless of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The implications of this association for cardiovascular disease risk warrant further investigation via long-term prospective studies and intervention studies. PMID:26610534

  5. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Results: Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Conclusion: Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. PMID:27759823

  6. Obstructive heart defects associated with candidate genes, maternal obesity, and folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A; Nick, Todd G; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M; Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1,644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity.

  7. Cardiovascular Aspects of Space Shuttle Flights: At the Heart of Three Decades of American Spaceflight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Space Shuttle era elevated cardiovascular deconditioning from a research topic in gravitational physiology to a concern with operational consequences during critical space mission phases. NASA has identified three primary cardiovascular risks associate with short-duration (less than 18 d) spaceflight: orthostatic intolerance; decreased maximal oxygen uptake; and cardiac arrhythmias. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was observed postflight in Mercury astronauts, studied in Gemini and Apollo astronauts, and tracked as it developed in-flight during Skylab missions. A putative hypotensive episode in the pilot during an early shuttle landing, and well documented postflight hypotension in a quarter of crewmembers, catalyzed NASA's research effort to understand its mechanisms and develop countermeasures. Shuttle investigations documented the onset of OH, tested mechanistic hypotheses, and demonstrated countermeasures both simple and complex. Similarly, decreased aerobic capacity in-flight threatened both extravehicular activity and post-landing emergency egress. In one study, peak oxygen uptake and peak power were significantly decreased following flights. Other studies tested hardware and protocols for aerobic conditioning that undergird both current practice on long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions and plans for interplanetary expeditions. Finally, several studies suggest that cardiac arrhythmias are of less concern during short-duration spaceflight than during long-duration spaceflight. Duration of the QT interval was unchanged and the frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions was actually shown to decrease during extravehicular activity. These investigations on short-duration Shuttle flights have paved the way for research aboard long-duration ISS missions and beyond. Efforts are already underway to study the effects of exploration class missions to asteroids and Mars.

  8. Racial influences associated with weight-related beliefs in African American and Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Malpede, Christie Z; Greene, Lori E; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L; Jefferson, Wendy K; Shewchuk, Richard M; Baskin, Monica L; Ard, Jamy D

    2007-01-01

    This study examines African American and Caucasian women's perception of how race affects their weight. Structured focus groups that used the nominal group technique (NGT) were conducted with four groups of African American women (n = 30) and four groups of Caucasian women (n = 30). Participants generated responses to the question, "How does being a Black/White woman affect your weight?" The African American groups generated 48 unique ideas, including unhealthy food preparation, poor food selection habits, lack of exercise, stress, increased risk of chronic diseases, and associated medical costs; the Caucasian groups produced 32 responses, including distorted expectations of perfect body type, success depended on thinness and beauty, social pressures, media, and men's preferences. Results suggest that the African American women focused on food choices and health consequences while the Caucasian women emphasized body size and aesthetics. The observed differences support a need for culturally specific interventions that promote good eating patterns and healthy body shapes.

  9. Anxiety, Alexithymia, and Depression as Mediators of the Association between Childhood Abuse and Eating Disordered Behavior in African American and European American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Williams, Larry J.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated structural equation models of the associations among family functioning, childhood abuse, depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and eating disorder symptomatology in a sample of 412 European American and 192 African American female undergraduates. Additionally, the specific roles of anxiety, depression, and alexithymia as…

  10. The association of serum magnesium and mortality outcomes in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Angkananard, Teeranan; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat; Eursiriwan, Sudarat; Gorelik, Oleg; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Thakkinstian, Ammarin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low serum magnesium (Mg) has been independently shown to increase risk of heart failure (HF), but data on the association between serum Mg concentration and the outcome of patients with HF are conflicting. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the prognostic effects of hypermagnesemia and hypomagnesemia on cardiovascular (CV) mortality and all-cause mortality (ACM) of patients with HF. Methods: Relevant studies were identified from Medline and Scopus databases. Included and excluded criteria were defined. Effects (i.e., log [risk ratio [RR

  11. Association between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of coronary heart disease patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensia, Rosy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an abnormal narrowing of heart arteries associated with local accumulation of lipids, in the form of cholesterol and triglycerides. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory that suggests link to the development of CHD. In periodontitis have been reported changes in lipid profile, include increased of cholesterol levels of blood. Objective: to analyse correlation between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of CHD and non CHD subjects. Methods: Periodontal status and blood cholesterol level of 60 CHD and 40 non CHD subjects was measured. Result: Blood cholesterol level in CHD subjects differs from non CHD subjects (p=0.032). Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.003) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) (p=0.000) in CHD subjects. Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.010) in non CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level and bleeding on probing (BOP) in CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level with BOP and CAL in non CHD subjects. Conclusion: Blood cholesterol level in control group is higher than CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.375) and CAL (r=0.450) in CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level is positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.404) in control group.

  12. Perception of binary acoustic events associated with the first heart sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The resolving power of the auditory apparatus permits discrete vibrations associated with cardiac activity to be perceived as one or more events. Irrespective of the vibratory combinations recorded by conventional phonocardiography, in normal adults and in most adult patients auscultators tend to discriminate only two discrete events associated with the first heart sound S1. It is stressed that the heart sound S4 may be present when a binary acoustic event associated with S1 occurs in the sequence 'low pitched sound preceding high pitched sound', i.e., its components are perceived by auscultation as 'dull-sharp'. The question of S4 audibility arises in those individuals, normal and diseased, in whom the major components of S1 ought to be, at least clinically, at their customary high pitch and indeed on the PCG appear as high frequency oscillations. It is revealed that the apparent audibility of recorded S4 is not related to P-R interval, P-S4 interval, or relative amplitude of S4. The significant S4-LFC (low frequency component of S1) differences can be related to acoustic modification of the early component of S1.

  13. Association between Copy Number Variation Losses and Alcohol Dependence across African American and European American Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Alvaro Emilio; Chen, Jiayu; Vergara, Victor Manuel; Calhoun, Vince; Liu, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs) are structural genetic mutations consisting of segmental gains or losses in DNA sequence. Although CNVs contribute substantially to genomic variation, few genetic and imaging studies report association of CNVs with alcohol dependence (AD). Our purpose is to find evidence of this association across ethnic populations and genders. This work is the first AD-CNV study across ethnic groups and the first to include the African American population. Methods This study considers two CNV datasets, one for discovery (2,345 samples) and the other for validation (239 samples), both including subjects with AD and healthy controls of European and African ancestry. Our analysis assesses the association between AD and CNV losses across ethnic groups and gender by examining the effect of overall losses across the whole genome, collective losses within individual cytogenetic bands and specific losses in CNV regions. Results Results from the discovery dataset showed an association between CNV losses within 16q12.2 and AD diagnosis (p = 4.53x10−3). An overlapping CNV region from the validation dataset exhibited the same direction of effect with respect to AD (p = 0.051). This CNV region affects the genes CES1p1 and CES1, which are members of the carboxylesterase (CES) family. The enzyme encoded by CES1 is a major liver enzyme that typically catalyzes the decomposition of ester into alcohol and carboxylic acid and is involved in drug or xenobiotics, fatty acid and cholesterol metabolisms. In addition, the most significantly associated CNV region was located at 9p21.2 (p = 1.9×10−3) in our discovery dataset. Although not observed in the validation dataset, probably due to small sample size, this result might hold potential connection to AD given its connection with neuronal death. In contrast, we did not find any association between AD and the overall total losses or the collective losses within individual cytogenetic bands. Conclusions

  14. Coronary heart disease and associated risk factors in Qazvin: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fakhrzadeh, H; Bandarian, F; Adibi, H; Samavat, T; Malekafzali, H; Hodjatzadeh, E; Larijani, B

    2008-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, 846 residents (425 men and 421 women) aged > or = 25 years were assessed for coronary heart disease and its associated risk factors comparing ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of possible myocardial infarction, ischaemic ECG changes and angina pectoris were 4.2%, 36.8% and 2.2% respectively. There was no difference in the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index between ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. There was a significant association between possible myocardial infarction and hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and smoking in women. There was also a significant association between ischaemic ECG changes and waist-hip ratio in women and between ischaemic ECG changes and hypertension in men.

  15. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S.; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Tang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10−8), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10−7). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10−6) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT. PMID:25552651

  16. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R; Tang, Weihong

    2015-04-15

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10(-8)), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10(-7)). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10(-6)) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT.

  17. Report of a National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute Workshop: heterogeneity in cardiometabolic risk in Asian Americans In the U.S. Opportunities for research.

    PubMed

    Narayan, K M Venkat; Aviles-Santa, Larissa; Oza-Frank, Reena; Pandey, Mona; Curb, J David; McNeely, Marguerite; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Palaniappan, Latha; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-03-09

    The Asian and Pacific Islander population (Asian Americans) in the U.S. has increased dramatically in the last few decades. Yet, data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in this population are scarce. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health conducted an Expert Workshop to: 1) assess the importance of studying CVD in Asian Americans in the U.S.; and 2) consider strategic options for further investigations of CVD in this population. There is considerable geographical, ethnic, cultural, and genetic diversity within this population. Limited data also suggest striking differences in the risk of CVD, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other CVD risk factors across the Asian-American population. The Asian-American population is a new diverse pool with less contemporary genetic and cultural admixture relative to groups that have lived in the U.S. for generations, plus it is diverse in lifestyle including culture, diet, and family structure. This diversity provides a window of opportunity for research on genes and gene-environment interactions and also to investigate how acculturation/assimilation to U.S. lifestyles affects health and CVD risk among relatively homogenous groups of recent immigrants. Given the heterogeneity in body weight, body size, and CVD risk, the Asian-American population in the U.S. offers a unique model to study the interaction and relationships between visceral adiposity and adipose tissue distribution and beta cell function, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis.

  18. Cadmium exposure in association with history of stroke and heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Junenette L.; Perlstein, Todd S.; Perry, Melissa J.; McNeely, Eileen; Weuve, Jennifer

    2010-02-15

    Background: It is unclear whether environmental cadmium exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease, although recent data suggest associations with myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of measured cadmium exposure with stroke and heart failure (HF) in the general population. Methods: We analyzed data from 12,049 participants, aged 30 years and older, in the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for whom information was available on body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: At their interviews, 492 persons reported a history of stroke, and 471 a history of HF. After adjusting for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, a 50% increase in blood cadmium corresponded to a 35% increased odds of prevalent stroke [OR: 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.65] and a 50% increase in urinary cadmium corresponded to a 9% increase in prevalent stroke [OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.00-1.19]. This association was higher among women [OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.11-1.72] than men [OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 0.93-1.79] (p-value for interaction=0.05). A 50% increase in blood cadmium corresponded to a 48% increased odds of prevalent HF [OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.17-1.87] and a 50% increase in urinary cadmium corresponded to a 12% increase in prevalent HF [OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20], with no difference in sex-specific associations. Conclusions: Environmental exposure to cadmium was associated with significantly increased stroke and heart failure prevalence. Cadmium exposure may increase these important manifestations of cardiovascular disease.

  19. American Nurses' Association considers endorsing presidential candidate in 1988 election.

    PubMed

    Schlepp, S

    1987-03-01

    Political action committees are a means for individuals to join together so they have some clout in the political process, Symons said. The most important function of ANA-PAC is that it "builds a perception of nurses being politically powerful," Symons said. "And that is more important than a single piece of legislation that ANA-PAC has been involved with." All funds used to contribute to political campaigns come from voluntary donations to ANA-PAC from members of state nurses' associations. Federal law prohibits ANA-PAC from soliciting funds from outside the state nurses' associations.

  20. A GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY GENES IN AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Caitrin W.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; An, S. Sandy; Cooke, Jessica N.; Hester, Jessica M.; Wing, Maria R.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Blevins, Rebecca A.; Lu, Lingyi; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 chip to identify genes associated with diabetic nephropathy in African Americans. Association analysis was performed adjusting for admixture in 965 type 2 diabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and in 1029 African Americans without type 2 diabetes or kidney disease as controls. The top 724 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with evidence of association to diabetic nephropathy were then genotyped in a replication sample of an additional 709 type 2 diabetes-ESRD patients and 690 controls. SNPs with evidence of association in both the original and replication studies were tested in additional African American cohorts consisting of 1246 patients with type 2 diabetes without kidney disease and 1216 with non-diabetic ESRD to differentiate candidate loci for type 2 diabetes-ESRD, type 2 diabetes, and/or all-cause ESRD. Twenty-five SNPs were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes-ESRD in the genome-wide association and initial replication. Although genome-wide significance with type 2 diabetes was not found for any of these 25 SNPs, several genes, including RPS12, LIMK2, and SFI1 are strong candidates for diabetic nephropathy. A combined analysis of all 2890 patients with ESRD showed significant association SNPs in LIMK2 and SFI1 suggesting that they also contribute to all-cause ESRD. Thus, our results suggest that multiple loci underlie susceptibility to kidney disease in African Americans with type 2 diabetes and some may also contribute to all-cause ESRD. PMID:21150874

  1. 2011 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    As we have throughout the association's history, we focused in 2011 on multiple initiatives--all designed to further, support, and communicate the important work that psychologists do. This year we had the benefit of APA's first-ever strategic plan as well as funding for the following seven initiatives that are specifically designed to execute the…

  2. VIP Gene Deletion in Mice Causes Cardiomyopathy Associated with Upregulation of Heart Failure Genes

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M.; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Smith, S. David; Benveniste, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), a pulmonary vasodilator and inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, is absent in pulmonary arteries of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We previously determined that targeted deletion of the VIP gene in mice leads to PAH with pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular (RV) dilatation. Whether the left ventricle is also affected by VIP gene deletion is unknown. In the current study, we examined if VIP knockout mice (VIP−/−) develop both right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) cardiomyopathy, manifested by LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction, as well as overexpression of genes conducive to heart failure. Methods We examined VIP−/−and wild type (WT) mice using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for evidence of cardiomyopathy associated with biventricular dilation and wall thickness changes. Lung tissue from VIP−/− and WT mice was subjected to whole-genome gene microarray analysis. Results Lungs from VIP−/− mice showed overexpression of cardiomyopathy genes: Myh1 was upregulated 224 times over WT, and Mylpf was increased 72 fold. Tnnt3 was increased 105 times and tnnc2 181 fold. Hearts were dilated in VIP−/− mice, with thinning of LV wall and increase in RV and LV chamber size, though RV enlargement varied. Weights of VIP−/− mice were consistently lower. Conclusions Critically-important heart failure-related genes are upregulated in VIP−/− mice associated with the spontaneous cardiomyopathy phenotype, involving both left and right ventricles, suggesting that loss of the VIP gene orchestrates a panoply of pathogenic genes which are detrimental to both left and right cardiac homeostasis. PMID:23700405

  3. Low resting heart rate is associated with violence in late adolescence: a prospective birth cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph; Hallal, Pedro C; Mielke, Gregore I; Raine, Adrian; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Youth violence is a major global public health problem. Three UK and Swedish studies suggest that low resting heart rate predicts male youth violence, but this has not been tested in other social settings nor for females. Methods: A prospective, population-based birth cohort study was conducted in Pelotas, Brazil. Heart rate was measured using a wrist monitor at ages 11, 15 and 18 years. Violent crime and non-violent crime were measured at age 18 in self-reports and official records (N = 3618). Confounding variables were assessed in the perinatal period and at age 11, in interviews with mothers and children. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between quartiles of heart rate at each age, and violent and non-violent crime at age 18, separately for males and females. Results: Lower resting heart rate was a robust correlate of violent and non-violent crime for males. Comparing males in the lowest and top quartiles of heart rate at age 15 years, adjusted odds ratios were 1.9 for violent crime [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–2.7] and 1.7 for non-violent crime (95% CI 1.1–2.6). For females, crime outcomes were associated only with low resting heart rate at age 18. Associations were generally linear across the four heart rate quartiles. There was no evidence that associations differed according to socioeconomic status at age 15. Conclusions: Low resting heart rate predicted violent and non-violent crime for males, and was cross-sectionally associated with crime for females. Biological factors may contribute to individual propensity to commit crime, even in a middle-income setting with high rates of violence. PMID:26822937

  4. Sex-related differences in habitat associations of wintering American Kestrels in California's Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pandolfino, E.R.; Herzog, M.P.; Smith, Z.

    2011-01-01

    We used roadside survey data collected from 19 routes over three consecutive winters from 200708 to 200910 to compare habitat associations of male and female American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) in the Central Valley of California to determine if segregation by sex was evident across this region. As a species, American Kestrels showed positive associations with alfalfa and other forage crops like hay and winter wheat, as well as grassland, irrigated pasture, and rice. Habitat associations of females were similar, with female densities in all these habitats except rice significantly higher than average. Male American Kestrels showed a positive association only with grassland and were present at densities well below those of females in alfalfa, other forage crops, and grassland. Males were present in higher densities than females in most habitats with negative associations for the species, such as orchards, urbanized areas, and oak savannah. The ratio of females to males for each route was positively correlated with the overall density of American Kestrels on that route. Our findings that females seem to occupy higher quality habitats in winter are consistent with observations from elsewhere in North America. ?? 2011 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  5. Does place of education matter? Contextualizing the education and health status association among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Walton, Emily; Takeuchi, David T; Herting, Jerald R; Alegría, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    The educational gradient in health is one of the most robust associations in social science research. Results of the current study indicate that, like the pattern observed among other racial and ethnic minority groups, the well-established educational gradient in health is attenuated among Asian Americans. We also show that the gradient association between educational attainment and self-rated health among Asian Americans depends on whether they receive the bulk of their education in the United States or abroad. Compared to the schooling received in the United States, being educated in a foreign country does not result in the same health payoffs for increasing educational attainment. Analysis of an extensive set of mediators indicates that a foreign education restricts economic opportunities, limits positive social interaction, and inhibits English language proficiency. We discuss the implications for Asian Americans, a group composed largely of immigrants who received their education outside the United States.

  6. Association between recognizing dementia as a mental illness and dementia knowledge among elderly Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether older Chinese Americans perceive dementia as a mental illness and the relationship between such perception and their general understanding of dementia remains unclear. Our study aims to understand this relationship and its future implication on improving dementia literacy among ethnic minorities. METHODS: Elderly Chinese American participants from the Greater Los Angeles were asked to complete an 11-item dementia questionnaire, following a community health seminar. Cross-sectional survey data was analyzed using standard statistical methods. RESULTS: The questionnaire received an 88.3% response rate. Among 316 responders, only 28.8% (n = 91) of elderly Chinese Americans identified dementia as a mental illness, and 71.2% (n = 225) did not recognize its mental disease origin. Furthermore, in comparison between these two groups, the first group demonstrated significantly higher level of baseline knowledge of the disease. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that only approximately 1 out of 4 older Chinese Americans recognized dementia as a mental illness, consistent with previous studies on Asian Americans. Our study however showed that when dementia was being perceived as a mental illness, such perception was associated with a higher level of baseline dementia understanding. The current study suggested the potential of improving older Chinese Americans dementia literacy by increasing awareness of its mental illness origin. PMID:27354966

  7. Dysregulation of Autonomic Nervous System in Chagas’ Heart Disease Is Associated with Altered Adipocytokines Levels

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Ferreira, João Marcos; Mady, Charles; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Lopes, Heno Ferreira; Ramires, Felix José Alvarez; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury; Grupi, Cesar José; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) induces autonomic dysfunction and inflammatory activity, which may promote metabolic abnormalities. We studied metabolism and his correlation with Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and inflammation in CD. Methods and Results Sixty subjects were divided into 4 groups: control group (CG), IF (indeterminate form) group; ECG group (ECG abnormalities and normal left ventricular systolic function), and LVD group (left ventricular sistolic dysfunction). Levels of adiponectin, leptin, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were assayed in serum samples by ELISA. ANS was assessed by heart rate variability in frequency domain in 24-hour Holter and postural tilt test (rest and orthostatic position). High frequency (HFr) component values were used to estimate parasympathetic activity and low frequency (LFr) component, sympathetic activity. Analyzes were made of the correlations of each of the metabolic parameters (leptin and adiponectin) with the inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and TNF- alpha) and with the ANS assessment measurements. No significant differences were observed in leptin and insulin levels. Adiponectin was higher in ECG and LVD groups: [CG = 4766.5 (5529.5), IF = 4003.5 (2482.5), ECG = 8376.5 (8388.5), LVD = 8798 (4188.0) ng/mL, p<0.001)]. IL-6 and TNF-alpha were higher in LVD group: [IL-6: CG = 1.85 (6.41); IF = 1.58 (1.91); ECG = 1.0 (1.57); LVD= 31.44 (72.19) pg/ml; p = 0.001. TNF-alpha: CG = 22.57 (88.2); IF = 19.31 (33.16); ECG = 12.45 (3.07); LVD = 75.15 (278.57) pg/ml; p = 0.04]. Adiponectin levels had a positive association with the HFr component (r = 0.539; p = 0.038) and an inverse association with the LFr component (r = - 0.539; p = 0.038) in ECG group. Leptin levels had a negative association with the HFr component (r= - 0.632; p = 0.011) and a positive association with the LFr component (r = 0.632; p = 0.011) in LVD group. Conclusions We found increased adiponectin levels in

  8. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely. Substantial growth in sales of foods attractive to vegetarians has occurred and these foods appear in many supermarkets. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine. A vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, use of fortified foods or supplements can be helpful in meeting recommendations for individual nutrients. Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life-cycle including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarian diets offer a number of nutritional benefits including lower levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein as well as higher levels of carbohydrates, fibre, magnesium, potassium, folate, antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and phytochemicals. Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than non-vegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer. While a number of federally funded and institutional feeding programs can accommodate vegetarians, few have foods suitable for vegans at this time. Because

  9. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: Vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Approximately 2.5% of adults in the United States and 4% of adults in Canada follow vegetarian diets. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat, fish, or fowl. Interest in vegetarianism appears to be increasing, with many restaurants and college foodservices offering vegetarian meals routinely. Substantial growth in sales of foods attractive to vegetarians has occurred, and these foods appear in many supermarkets. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians, including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine. A vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, use of fortified foods or supplements can be helpful in meeting recommendations for individual nutrients. Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Vegetarian diets offer a number of nutritional benefits, including lower levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and animal protein as well as higher levels of carbohydrates, fiber, magnesium, potassium, folate, and antioxidants such as vitamins C and E and phytochemicals. Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than nonvegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease; vegetarians also show lower blood cholesterol levels; lower blood pressure; and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer. Although a number of federally funded and institutional feeding programs can accommodate vegetarians, few have foods suitable

  10. Common occurrence of everolimus-associated aphthous stomatitis in Japanese heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, T; Kato, T S; Oda, N; Wada, K; Komamura, K; Asakura, M; Hashimura, K; Ishibashi-Ueda, H; Nakatani, T; Isobe, M; Kitakaze, M

    2010-11-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors display antiproliferative effects with less nephrotoxicity than calcineurin inhibitors. However, clinical use of mTOR inhibitors can be associated with a series of adverse events. We experienced cases of aphthous stomatitis associated with everolimus (EVL) in four Japanese heart transplant recipients treated at the target trough EVL blood level after a switch from mycophenolate mofetil between April and December 2007. All four patients developed aphthous stomatitis; three required reduction of the exposure and one, EVL discontinuation due to stomatitis as well as other side effects. All patients recovered from stomatitis after reduction or withdrawal of EVL. Thus, we considered that EVL-related stomatitis might occur commonly among the Japanese population. The proper dosage, effects, and frequency of the side effects of mTOR inhibitors may vary by ethnic population.

  11. Inaugural address of the 162nd president of the American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M

    2007-12-01

    On June 26, 2007, Ronald M. Davis, MD, was inaugurated as the 162nd president of the American Medical Association at an ornate ceremony in the Grand Ballroom of the Hilton Chicago Hotel. He is the first AMA president to be board-certified in preventive medicine. After Dr. Davis completed the Epidemic Intelligence Service program and the preventive medicine residency program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he served as director of CDC's Office on Smoking and Health and then as medical director of the Michigan Department of Public Health. Since 1995, he has served as director of the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. By tradition, the presidents of state medical societies and the leaders of a few other medical organizations sit on the dais during the AMA president's inaugural speech. Reflecting Dr. Davis's interest in strengthening the partnership between clinical medicine and public health, he invited leaders of seven preventive medicine and public health organizations to join him on the dais during his address: the Aerospace Medical Association, the American Association of Public Health Physicians, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the American Public Health Association, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, and the National Association of County and City Health Officials. Dr. Davis's inaugural address appears below, except for a portion at the beginning in which he gave tribute to many family members, friends, and colleagues for their support through the years. This portion of his speech can be found on the Journal's website at www.ajpm-online.net.

  12. Extracorporeal-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) During Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest is Associated with Improved Survival to Discharge: A Report from the American Heart Association’s Get With the Guidelines® - Resuscitation Registry (GWTG-R)

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Javier J.; Rogers, Rachel S.; Localio, Russell; Shults, Justine; Raymond, Tia; Gaies, Michael; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Laussen, Peter C.; Kilbaugh, Todd; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Topjian, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Background Although extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR) can result in survival after failed conventional CPR (C-CPR), no large, systematic comparison of pediatric E-CPR versus continued C-CPR has been reported. Methods and Results Consecutive patients <18 years old with CPR events ≥ 10 minutes duration reported to GWTG-R between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified. Hospitals were grouped by teaching status and location. Primary outcome was survival to discharge. Regression modeling was performed conditioning on hospital groups. A secondary analysis was performed using propensity-score matching. Of 3,756 evaluable patients, 591 (16%) received E-CPR and 3,165 (84%) received C-CPR only. Survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score of 1–3 or unchanged from admission) were greater for E-CPR [40% (237/591) and 27% (133/496)] versus C-CPR patients [27% (862/3,165) and 18% (512/2,840)]. Odds ratios for survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome were greater for E-CPR versus C-CPR. After adjusting for covariates, patients receiving E-CPR had higher odds of survival to discharge [OR 2.80, 95% CI 2.13–3.69, p <0.001] and survival with favorable neurologic outcome [OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.91–3.64, p < 0.001] than patient who received C-CPR. This association persisted when analyzed by propensity-score matched cohorts [OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.33–2.18, p < 0.001 and OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.31–2.41, p < 0.001 respectively]. Conclusions For children with in-hospital CPR ≥ 10 minutes duration, E-CPR was associated with improved survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome when compared to C-CPR. PMID:26635402

  13. Methylome-wide Association Study of Atrial Fibrillation in Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xie, Zhijun; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Larson, Martin G.; Ko, Darae; Magnani, Jared W.; Mendelson, Michael M.; Liu, Chunyu; McManus, David D.; Levy, Daniel; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms associated with AF arrhythmogenesis. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression and downstream biological processes. We hypothesize that DNA methylation might play an important role in the susceptibility to develop AF. A total of 2,639 participants from the Offspring Cohort of Framingham Heart Study were enrolled in the current study. These participants included 183 participants with prevalent AF and 220 with incident AF during up to 9 years follow up. Genome-wide methylation was profiled using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip on blood-derived DNA collected during the eighth examination cycle (2005–2008). Two CpG sites were significantly associated with prevalent AF, and five CpGs were associated with incident AF after correction for multiple testing (FDR < 0.05). Fourteen previously reported genome-wide significant AF-related SNP were each associated with at least one CpG site; the most significant association was rs6490029 at the CUX2 locus and cg10833066 (P = 9.5 × 10−279). In summary, we performed genome-wide methylation profiling in a community-based cohort and identified seven methylation signatures associated with AF. Our study suggests that DNA methylation might play an important role in AF arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28067321

  14. Summary of the American Camping Association Camp Ecological Training Project, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluchel, Robert W.; Gregory, Charles A.

    Briefly summarized is the American Camping Association's Camp Ecological Training Project, its goals, accomplishments, problems, and future potential as seen by the first two Itinerant Ecologists who participated in the project. Creation of an ecological awareness and conservation consciousness were the major goals of the project. To accomplish…

  15. Family Friendly Libraries vs. the American Library Association: A Test of Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinsburg, Jane D.

    1997-01-01

    To protect children from material it considers harmful, Family Friendly Libraries (FFL) seeks to limit access to information in public libraries. This article describes the conflict between the FFL and the American Library Association (ALA). Provides an overview of censorship and U.S. legislative history, presents the FFL position and the ALA…

  16. The Asian American Psychological Association: Parallels and Intersections with Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Alvin N.; Singh, Anneliese A.; Wu, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). A brief history is provided, followed by current status and resources, connections to counseling psychology, and implications for the Society of Counseling Psychology and for the future of the AAPA. AAPA was created in 1972 in response to psychology's neglect…

  17. University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities: Blended Learning Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU [American Association of State Colleges and…

  18. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  19. 78 FR 17677 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program for Continued CMS... commenting, please refer to file code CMS-3281-PN. Because of staff and resource limitations, we cannot... Services, Department of Health and Human Services, Attention: CMS-3281-PN, P.O. Box 8016, Baltimore,...

  20. Pressing Issues in College Counseling: A Survey of American College Counseling Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy B.; Dean, Brenda; Floyd, Suzanne; Silva, Christopher; Yamashita, Momoko; Durtschi, Jared; Heaps, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of members of the American College Counseling Association to ascertain the experiences and opinions of college counselors on several pressing issues within the college counseling profession. Survey results from 133 respondents indicated that counseling centers may benefit from increasing the number of group…

  1. Accreditation of Veterinary Medical Education: Part II--Influence of the American Veterinary Medical Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Elizabeth K.

    1975-01-01

    Traces the development, since its founding in 1863, of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) influence over the standards of training required in the veterinary profession. Attention is focused on the roles of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the military, and the land-grant colleges in that development. (JT)

  2. Developing a Measure of Stigma by Association with African American Adolescents Whose Mothers Have HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Sally; Berger, Barbara; Ferrans, Carol Estwing; Sultzman, Vickey; Fendrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: African American urban adolescents are one of the fastest growing groups of children affected by their mother's HIV status. These children experience HIV stigma by association with their HIV-positive mothers. Stigma may contribute to adverse outcomes for these teens. Methods: The authors describe a multistage process of scale…

  3. Educators' Perspectives on Culturally Relevant Programs for Academic Success: The American Excellence Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Taliaferro, Jocelyn DeVance; Greenfield, Derek

    2010-01-01

    This study examines educators' perspectives of the American Excellence Association (AEA). Using interviews with 16 educators (teachers, counselors, and principals) from 10 high schools, we explored their perceptions regarding AEA's impact on student participants as well as the potential for this type of culturally relevant programming for closing…

  4. Resiliency in American Library Association Award Winning Juvenile Fiction: A Correlational Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Michelle T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative content analysis was to determine whether there was a relationship between the age, gender, or race of protagonists in contemporary American Library Association award-winning juvenile literature and the representation of resilience by those characters. Award-winning juvenile fiction and biography books were…

  5. "Mens Sana": The Growth of Mental Health in the American College Health Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In 1910, the first college mental health service sought to help college students with personality development and building a healthy mind. In 1920, the meeting that founded the American College Health Association (ACHA) identified "mental hygiene" as important, although a separate Mental Health Section was not established in ACHA until 1957.…

  6. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  7. Agricultural Education Division, American Vocational Association Convention (Houston, Texas, December 3-8, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulloch, Rodney W.

    This document contains the abstract of each presentation (approximately 50) of the Agricultural Division, American Vocational Association Convention (1976). Topics covered include agricultural education research, teaching and administration of agricultural education, and teacher education in agriculture. The following are sample paper topics:…

  8. Position Papers of the American Association on Mental Deficiency 1973-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association on Mental Deficiency, Washington, DC.

    Presented are the American Association on Mental Deficiency's position papers regarding the rights of retarded persons. Included are statements on the following topics: basic rights (such as freedom of choice and the right to the least restrictive individually appropriate housing); work by residents in private and public institutions (including…

  9. Leadership in Legislation and Public Policy Development: The Case of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the federal legislative and information policy leadership roles of the American Library Association (ALA). Highlights include the ALA legislative policy structure today, lobbying in the public interest, resources for successful lobbying, effective lobbying techniques, lobbies and organizational theory, ALA lobbying style, and the White…

  10. Peer Status in an Ethnic Context: Associations with African American Adolescents' Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Patrick F.; Cole, Daphne J.; Houshyar, Shadi; Lythcott, Mawiyah; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examined the association between ethnic identity centrality and peer status for African American adolescents who represented a sizable proportion, yet numerical minority within a high school context. Initial analyses indicated that a traditional sociometric nomination procedure did not adequately characterize peer status for…

  11. Association of American Universities Policy Recommendations for President-Elect Obama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In this document, the Association of American Universities offers a series of research and technology policy recommendations that would help our nation to continue its global pre-eminence in science and high technology, improve the quality of life and national security of our citizens, and speed our nation's economic recovery. After policy…

  12. Problematic Situations Associated with Dating Experiences and Relationships among Urban African American Adolescents: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Erwin, Elizabeth H.; Helms, Sarah W.; Masho, Saba W.; Farrell, Albert D.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the identification of problem situations associated with adolescent dating experiences and relationships, including those that placed youth at risk for dating violence perpetration or victimization. Interviews were conducted with 44 African American middle and high school students in an urban school system.…

  13. ATLAS. Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies. [Newsletter] Volume 3, Number 1. October, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, Brooklyn, NY.

    The October 1973 issue of ATLAS, a newsletter for the Association of Teachers of Latin American Studies, is entered into the ERIC system on a one time basis to acquaint teachers with this resource. This issue reports summer activities and reviews new materials in this subject area. The events of the 1973 summer ATLAS-Fulbright Seminar to Mexico…

  14. The History and Development of the Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Mary Anne

    2007-01-01

    The Alabama Division of the American Rehabilitation Association is an organization committed to representing those counselors who work in the field of rehabilitation across the state. The division is focused on offering leadership within the field of rehabilitation counseling, promoting professional development opportunities for counselors, and…

  15. Attempted Suicide and Associated Health Risk Behaviors among Native American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Lana; Doshi, Sonal R.; Jones, Sherry Everett

    2004-01-01

    Suicide represents the second-leading cause of death among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth aged 15-24 years. Data from the 2001 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to examine the association between attempted suicide among high school students and unintentional injury and violence behaviors, sexual risk…

  16. An Examination of the Association between Demographic and Educational Factors and African American Achievement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottledge, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Objective of the Study: The objective of this research study was to investigate whether an association exists between teacher demographic factors (years of teaching experience and gender), 2 educational factors (certification type and certification pathway) and the percent passing rate of tenth grade African American male students on the 2010…

  17. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The purpose of this manual is to educate camp directors and camp personnel regarding government-recognized standard practices and procedures followed within the camp industry. These standards also provide a basis for voluntary accreditation of camps by the American Camping Association (ACA) beyond the minimum requirements of licensing. The manual…

  18. Evaluation Use: Results from a Survey of U.S. American Evaluation Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Dreolin N.; Christie, Christina A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a cross-sectional survey on evaluation use completed by 1,140 U.S. American Evaluation Association members. This study had three foci: evaluators' current attitudes, perceptions, and experiences related to evaluation use theory and practice, how these data are similar to those reported in a previous study…

  19. Convention Proceedings Digest: American Vocational Association (Atlanta, Georgia, November 30-December 5, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document is the fifth volume in an annual series of American Vocational Association (AVA) proceedings digests. It contains the reports of professional meetings, workshops, educational tours, speeches, and discussions, as well as the resolutions, elections, and other activities undertaken at the various meetings. The proceedings of meetings of…

  20. The American Debate Association: An Evaluation of Rules for Academic Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Frank

    Many of the American Debate Association (ADA) rules merely codify conventions which are almost universally practiced in ADA tournaments. Among them are such standards as who is eligible to debate and judge, what shall be debated and for how long, and restrictions on ballot submissions. Other rules come under the general heading of "which…

  1. The American Bar Association and Legislatively Mandated Treatment for Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallone, Nathanial J.

    1991-01-01

    Offers historical overview of "criminal sexual psychopath" legislation, which customarily prescribes confinement for treatment (rather than incarceration for punishment) for offenders whose sex crimes are attributed to sexual psychopathology. Discusses desire of American Bar Association and Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry to…

  2. American Association for Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy (General and Oral).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susi, Frank; Mundell, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Association for Dental Schools are presented. These guidelines were drawn up as an effort to provide a general criterion-referenced standard against which a school can measure its course content in histology. (MLW)

  3. Association of Financial Resources with Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment in African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald D.; Rodriguez, Antoinette U.; Seaton, Eleanor K.; Dominguez, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    The association of mothers' report of the adequacy of family financial resources with African American mothers' and adolescents' depressive symptoms was assessed. Findings for families with male adolescents revealed that mothers' report of the adequacy of families' financial resources was linked to mothers' and adolescents' depressive…

  4. Content Analysis of 32 Years of American Counseling Association Convention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helwig, Andrew A.; Schmidt, Lisa L. L.

    2011-01-01

    A content analysis of American Counseling Association convention sessions offered from 1977 to 2008 was conducted. The intent was to identify changes and trends in the counseling profession. Content of more than 15,000 sessions, including educational programs, keynote presentations, and training sessions, was assigned to 1 of 86 categories. A…

  5. Spirituality and Counselor Competence: A National Survey of American Counseling Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. Scott; Wiggins-Frame, Marsha; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2007-01-01

    A random sample of 505 American Counseling Association (ACA) members completed a questionnaire that evaluated respondents' ratings of the importance of 9 competencies developed at the Summit on Spirituality (G. Miller, 1999; "Summit Results," 1995) meetings to effectively address spiritual and religious issues in counseling practice. Results…

  6. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, leading through task force initiatives, working together to advance nursing education,…

  7. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, setting curriculum standards, working together to advance nursing education, pursuing…

  8. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  9. Nontenured Assistant Professors as American Counseling Association Division Presidents: The New Look of Leadership in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Dollarhide, Colette T.; McCallum, Leah J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the lived experiences of 6 nontenured assistant professors who were serving or had recently served as presidents-elect or presidents of American Counseling Association divisions. The participants described their motivation for serving in these capacities and shared the experiences of serving while faced with the traditional…

  10. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Guidance for Health Children Ages 2 to 11 Years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that children ages 2 to 11 years should achieve optimal physical and cognitive development, attain a healthy weight, enjoy food, and reduce the risk of chronic disease through appropriate eating habits and participation in regular physical acti...

  11. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses"…

  12. Longitudinal associations between social support and physical and mental health in African American adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African Americans report a greater number of modifiable risk factors, such as overweight/obesity, physical inactivity and poor dietary habits, putting them at increased risk of developing and dying from chronic diseases. These risk factors are also associated with poorer health-related quality of li...

  13. American Association for Health Education (AAHE) 2011 Membership Survey: Summary of Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Elizabeth H.; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Stellefson, Michael L.; Birch, David A.; Spear, Caile

    2012-01-01

    The American Association for Health Education (AAHE), a national health education organization with the mission of advancing the profession of health education, launched the 2011 AAHE membership survey between October 13, 2011 and November 1, 2011, under the leadership of the AAHE Board of Directors and AAHE Staff. The primary objective of the…

  14. American Association of Community Colleges 75th Annual Convention: Clinton Presidential Address. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This 60 minute videotape is a live satellite presentation of the American Association of Community Colleges' 75th Annual Convention in 1995. Speeches by former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich, and former Secretary of Education, Richard Riley, are followed by the presidential address to community colleges by former President Bill Clinton. He…

  15. The Association of Physical Maturation with Family Hassles among African American Adolescent Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Michael; Swanson, Dena Phillips; Spencer, Margaret Beale; Dupree, Davido

    2003-01-01

    Examines the relations between physical maturation and youths' perceptions of their family context and the associated daily stresses experienced. Results extend the literature on physical development and urban African American populations. Findings suggest that adolescent-perceived hassles are indications of parental monitoring and more adaptive…

  16. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  17. The Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with criticism of the NIH Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Crowley, William; Courtney, John; Jameson, Larry; Pardes, Herbert; Moskowitz, Jay; Orringer, Eugene; Rubenstein, Arthur; Wood, Alastair; Rettig, Richard; Ausiello, Dennis; Brenner, David; Collins, Francis; Elias, Jack; Greene, Warner; Horowitz, Ralph; Jameson, Larry; Kieff, Elliott; Thompson, Craig; Swain, Judith L

    2006-08-01

    As representatives of 50 leading academic medical centers focusing on clinical research and many of academic medicine's scientific leaders, the Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with the JCI's recent editorials on the NIH Roadmap, Elias Zerhouni's leadership, and the future directions of biomedical research.

  18. How Is Postsecondary Education Associated with Membership in the American Corporate Elite?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Molly C.

    2011-01-01

    This study contributes to the discussion around the value of a college degree and associated career advantages by considering how postsecondary education contributes to the attainment of the most powerful and prestigious positions in the American corporate world. Guided by a conceptual framework informed by status attainment, power elite, and…

  19. Is vitamin D deficiency associated with heart failure? A review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Megha; Phan, Anita; Willix, Robert; Barber, Mickey; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 1 billion people worldwide have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D. Even more alarming is the association of vitamin D deficiency with many types of diseases, particularly heart failure (HF). Hypovitaminosis D has been observed to be highly prevalent in the HF community with rates varying from approximately 80% to 95%. Higher rates of deficiency have been linked to winter months, in patients with protracted decompensated HF, darker skin pigmentation, and higher New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes. In fact, some data suggest vitamin D deficiency may even be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with HF. Traditionally obtained through UV exposure and activated in the liver and then the kidneys, vitamin D is classified as a vitamin but functions as a steroid hormone. The hormone acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, renal juxtaglomerular cells, and most interestingly, cardiac myocytes. Studies have shown that the association between vitamin D deficiency and HF often manifests in the structural components of cardiac myocytes and/or through alterations of the neurohormonal cascade. In addition, vitamin D may also act rapidly through intracellular nongenomic receptors that alter cardiac contractility. Unfortunately, prospective vitamin D supplementation trials show mixed results. In rat models, successful correction of deficiency was associated with reductions in ventricular hypertrophy. In humans, however, echocardiographic dimensions did not change significantly. These results bring into questions whether vitamin D is a risk factor for HF, a marker of HF disease severity, or has a true pathologic role. This article provides a thorough review of vitamin D deficiency etiology, prevalence, and possible pathophysiologic role in HF. Furthermore, we carefully review prospective trials on vitamin D therapy in HF. We believe more trials on vitamin D therapy in HF need to be

  20. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    by TeleEcho and confirmed 100% with follow-up conventional echocardiography. One patient diagnosed with Tetralogy of Fallot underwent heart surgery...having the heart defect Tetralogy of Fallot . She was then transferred to 13 Madigan via Air EVAC for stabilization and within 2 days and formal final