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  1. Addressing Cancer Disparities Among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer disparities and health equity research is a critical part of NCI’s research portfolio. The three researchers featured in this video receive funding from NCI to conduct research among American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

  2. 77 FR 61780 - Preparation of the 2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Preparation of the 2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report AGENCY... Indian Population and Labor Force Report. DATES: Written comments are due November 12, 2012. See the... and written comments concerning preparation of the 2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force...

  3. Religio-Spiritual Participation in Two American Indian Populations.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Anderson, Heather Orton; Nez-Henderson, Patricia; Croy, Calvin; Beals, Janette; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Thomas, Jacob; Manson, Spero M

    2014-03-01

    Following a previous investigation of religio-spiritual beliefs in American Indians, this article examined prevalence and correlates of religio-spiritual participation in two tribes in the Southwest and Northern Plains (N = 3,084). Analysis suggested a "religious profile" characterized by strong participation across three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. However, sociodemographic variables that have reliably predicted participation in the general American population, notably gender and age, frequently failed to achieve significance in multivariate analyses for each tradition. Religio-spiritual participation was strongly and significantly related to belief salience for all traditions. Findings suggest that correlates of religious participation may be unique among American Indians, consistent with their distinctive religious profile. Results promise to inform researchers' efforts to understand and theorize about religio-spiritual behavior. They also provide tribal communities with practical information that might assist them in harnessing social networks to confront collective challenges through community-based participatory research collaborations.

  4. Religio-Spiritual Participation in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Anderson, Heather Orton; Nez-Henderson, Patricia; Croy, Calvin; Beals, Janette; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Jacob; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a previous investigation of religio-spiritual beliefs in American Indians, this article examined prevalence and correlates of religio-spiritual participation in two tribes in the Southwest and Northern Plains (N = 3,084). Analysis suggested a “religious profile” characterized by strong participation across three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. However, sociodemographic variables that have reliably predicted participation in the general American population, notably gender and age, frequently failed to achieve significance in multivariate analyses for each tradition. Religio-spiritual participation was strongly and significantly related to belief salience for all traditions. Findings suggest that correlates of religious participation may be unique among American Indians, consistent with their distinctive religious profile. Results promise to inform researchers’ efforts to understand and theorize about religio-spiritual behavior. They also provide tribal communities with practical information that might assist them in harnessing social networks to confront collective challenges through community-based participatory research collaborations. PMID:26582964

  5. Religiosity and Spiritual Engagement in Two American Indian Populations.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva M; Beals, Janette; Keane, Ellen M; Kaufman, Carol; Spicer, Paul; Henderson, Jeff; Henderson, Patricia N; Mitchell, Christina M; Manson, Spero M

    2009-09-01

    Social scientific investigation into the religiospiritual characteristics of American Indians rarely includes analysis of quantitative data. After reviewing information from ethnographic and autobiographical sources, we present analyses of data from a large, population-based sample of two tribes (n = 3,084). We examine salience of belief in three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. We then investigate patterns in sociodemographic subgroups, determining the significant correlates of salience with other variables controlled. Finally, we examine frequency with which respondents assign high salience to only one tradition (exclusivity) or multiple traditions (nonexclusivity), again investigating subgroup variations. This first detailed, statistical portrait of American Indian religious and spiritual lives links work on tribal ethnic identity to theoretical work on America's "religious marketplace." Results may also inform social/behavioral interventions that incorporate religiospiritual elements.

  6. Religiosity and Spiritual Engagement in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva M.; Beals, Janette; Keane, Ellen M.; Kaufman, Carol; Spicer, Paul; Henderson, Jeff; Henderson, Patricia N.; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Social scientific investigation into the religiospiritual characteristics of American Indians rarely includes analysis of quantitative data. After reviewing information from ethnographic and autobiographical sources, we present analyses of data from a large, population-based sample of two tribes (n = 3,084). We examine salience of belief in three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. We then investigate patterns in sociodemographic subgroups, determining the significant correlates of salience with other variables controlled. Finally, we examine frequency with which respondents assign high salience to only one tradition (exclusivity) or multiple traditions (nonexclusivity), again investigating subgroup variations. This first detailed, statistical portrait of American Indian religious and spiritual lives links work on tribal ethnic identity to theoretical work on America’s “religious marketplace.” Results may also inform social/behavioral interventions that incorporate religiospiritual elements. PMID:26582963

  7. American Indians in California: Population, Education, Employment, Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Industrial Relations, San Francisco. Fair Employment Practices Commission.

    Analysis of 1960 census statistics reveals that American Indians in California had the highest growth rate of any ethnic group in the state from 1950 to 19 0. This is attributed to improved health practices plus an in-migration of Indians from other states. Educational attainment of the American Indian in California is low compared with other…

  8. [Statistical Profiles and Characteristics of the American Indian Population: 1980 Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    This packet includes six statistical profiles of American Indians and Alaska Natives based on the 1980 census, and a report on 1990 census plans for Native Americans. Three general profiles outline statistics on: (1) the American Indian population as a whole; (2) selected characteristics of American Indian men; and (3) selected characteristics of…

  9. Dermatology in the North American Indian/Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Okoye, Ginette A

    2016-02-01

    Dermatology is greatly understudied in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population. This topic deserves attention in light of the changing demographics of the United States and the healthcare disparities faced by AIAN, including access to dermatologic care. In this review, we discuss disorders that are more prevalent or otherwise important in the AIAN population, such as cutaneous malignancies, photodermatoses, acanthosis nigricans, connective tissue disorders, cutaneous infections, hypertrophic scar formation, and Heck's disease. We aim to provide an updated review and increase awareness of the dermatologic needs of the AIAN population.

  10. American Indians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    This paper reviews American Indian demography and the political and economic conditions on Indian reservations. After collapsing during the 19th century, the American Indian population grew gradually during the early 20th century, approaching 2 million in 1990. American Indians are heavily concentrated in the West, northern Midwest, and Oklahoma;…

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphism in North American, South American, and Mexican Indian populations.

    PubMed Central

    Goedde, H W; Agarwal, D P; Harada, S; Rothhammer, F; Whittaker, J O; Lisker, R

    1986-01-01

    While about 40% of the South American Indian populations (Atacameños, Mapuche, Shuara) were found to be deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme I (ALDH2 or E2), preliminary investigations showed very low incidence of isozyme deficiency among North American natives (Sioux, Navajo) and Mexican Indians (mestizo). Possible implications of such trait differences on cross-cultural behavioral response to alcohol drinking are discussed. PMID:3953578

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphism in North American, South American, and Mexican Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Goedde, H W; Agarwal, D P; Harada, S; Rothhammer, F; Whittaker, J O; Lisker, R

    1986-03-01

    While about 40% of the South American Indian populations (Atacameños, Mapuche, Shuara) were found to be deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme I (ALDH2 or E2), preliminary investigations showed very low incidence of isozyme deficiency among North American natives (Sioux, Navajo) and Mexican Indians (mestizo). Possible implications of such trait differences on cross-cultural behavioral response to alcohol drinking are discussed.

  13. Research with American Indian and Alaska Native populations: Measurement matters.

    PubMed

    Walls, Melissa L; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Barlow, Allison; Sarche, Michelle

    2017-04-25

    Research is an important tool in addressing myriad American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) health disparities; however, tensions exist between common empirical measurement approaches that facilitate cross-cultural comparisons and measurement specificity that may be more valid locally and/or culturally appropriate. The tremendous diversity of AIAN communities, small population sizes of distinct AIAN cultural groups, and varying cultural contexts and worldviews should influence measurement decisions in health research. We provide a framework for guiding measurement in collaboration with AIAN communities using examples from substance abuse research for illustration. Our goal is to build upon ongoing efforts to advance measurement validity for AIAN research by engaging community-researcher partnerships and critical thinking in the selection, adaptation, creation, and implementation of measures.

  14. Population, Ecology, and the American Indian: A Native American Curriculum Unit for Middle and High School. NATAM XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raveling, Ronald R.

    As one of the units on Native Americans developed by public school teachers enrolled in a University of Minnesota extension course on American Indian education, this middle- and high-school unit has as its overall objective to illustrate 2 concepts: (1) the need for careful population planning and (2) how the American Indian--a model of…

  15. A Statistical Profile of the American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut Populations for the United States: 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    Twenty graphs and charts provide a 1980 statistical profile of American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut populations for the United States. Data indicate the 1980 Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut population was 1,420,400, an increase of 592,132 since 1970; little population change by region occurred during the decade, with 49% still located in the West; states…

  16. Increasing incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever among the American Indian population in the United States.

    PubMed

    Holman, Robert C; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Haberling, Dana L; Cheek, James E

    2009-04-01

    To examine trends of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) incidence among American Indians compared with other race groups, a retrospective analysis of national RMSF surveillance data reported to the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance and the Tickborne Rickettsial Disease Case Report Forms system were used. The RMSF incidence for American Indians, which was comparable to those for other race groups during 1990-2000, increased at a disproportionate rate during 2001-2005. The average annual incidence of RMSF reported among American Indians for 2001-2005 was 16.8 per 1,000,000 persons compared with 4.2, 2.6, and 0.5 for white, black, and Asian/Pacific Islander persons, respectively. Most cases in American Indians were reported from Oklahoma (113.1 cases per 1,000,000), North Carolina (60.0), and Arizona (17.2). The incidence of RMSF increased dramatically among American Indians disproportionately to trends for other race groups. Education about tick-borne disease and prevention measures should be addressed for high-risk American Indian populations.

  17. The American Indian and Alaska Native Population: 2000. Census 2000 Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunwole, Stella U.

    This brief summarizes data from Census 2000 on the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population and discusses its distribution at national, regional, and state levels. This information is intended for all levels of government to use in implementing and evaluating programs related to education, employment, health care, job training, civil…

  18. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  19. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  20. Some thoughts about the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use among American Indian/Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert S; Joe, Jennie R

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have established that rates of alcohol and illicit drug use among American Indians/Alaska Natives vary by tribe, gender, and age group, making it difficult to get an accurate estimate of the actual extent of the problem of substance abuse within this population group. Although percentage rates of alcohol consumption are higher in non-Hispanic Whites, American Indians/Alaska Natives nevertheless have the highest alcohol-related mortality rates and rates of substance use and dependence of all ethnic groups. Alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents are especially high for American Indian/Alaska Natives. Similarly, illicit drug use is higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives across all age groups compared to non-Indians. Data indicate that American Indians/Alaska Natives have the highest rates of use for marijuana, cocaine, inhalants, hallucinogens, and non-medical use of psychotherapeutics compared to other ethnic groups. Anecdotally, use of amphetamine appears to be high within some American Indian/Alaska Native tribes and has become a serious concern for most American Indian/Alaska Native communities. The percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native women using illicit drugs is lower than that found in men, except in younger age groups, in which percentage rates of illicit drug use by women in some tribes are comparable to rates for men.

  1. Genetic variants and risk of asthma in an American Indian population.

    PubMed

    Best, Lyle G; Azure, Crystal; Segarra, Alexandre; Enright, Kendra J; Hamley, Shawn; Jerome, Dara; O'Leary, Marcia A; O'Leary, Rae A; Parisien, Ashley; Trottier, Kayana; Yracheta, Joseph M; Torgerson, Dara G

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is recognized as a complex, multifactorial disease with a genetic component that is well recognized. Certain genetic variants are associated with asthma in a number of populations. To determine whether the same variants increase the risk of asthma among American Indian children. The electronic medical records of an Indian Health Service facility identified all children between 6 and 17 years of age with case-defining criteria for asthma (n = 108). Control children (n = 216), matched for age, were also identified. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to genotype 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6 genetic loci. Genotypic distributions among cases and controls were evaluated by χ(2) and logistic regression methods. A variant at 5q22.1 revealed a statistically significant imbalance in the distribution of genotypes between case-control pairs (rs10056340, P < .001). In logistic regression analyses, the same variant at 5q22.1 and a variant at 17q21 were associated with asthma at P < .05 (rs10056340 and rs9303277). Inclusions of age, body mass index, and atopy in multivariate models revealed significant associations between rs10056340 (odds ratio, 2.020; 95% confidence interval, 1.283-3.180; P = .002) and all 5 17q21 SNPs and asthma in this population. In analyses restricted to atopic individuals, the association of rs10056340 was essentially unchanged, whereas among nonatopic individuals the trend was in the same direction but nonsignificant. The reverse was true for the 17q21 SNPs. These findings demonstrate that many variants commonly associated with asthma in other populations also accompany this condition among American Indian children. American Indian children also appear to have an increased risk of asthma associated with obesity. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder in two American Indian reservation populations.

    PubMed

    Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M; Croy, Calvin; Klein, Suzell A; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M

    2013-08-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be more common among American Indian populations than among other Americans. A complex diagnosis, the assessment methods for PTSD have varied across epidemiological studies, especially in terms of the trauma criteria. Here, we examined data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP) to estimate the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, using two formulas for calculating PTSD prevalence. The AI-SUPERPFP was a cross-sectional probability sample survey conducted between 1997 and 2000. Southwest (n = 1,446) and Northern Plains (n = 1,638) tribal members living on or near their reservations, aged 15-57 years at time of interview, were randomly sampled from tribal rolls. PTSD estimates were derived based on both the single worst and 3 worst traumas. Prevalence estimates varied by ascertainment method: single worst trauma (lifetime: 5.9% to 14.8%) versus 3 worst traumas (lifetime, 8.9% to 19.5%). Use of the 3-worst-event approach increased prevalence by 28.3% over the single-event method. PTSD was prevalent in these tribal communities. These results also serve to underscore the need to better understand the implications for PTSD prevalence with the current focus on a single worst event. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Lifetime Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Populations

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Croy, Calvin; Klein, Suzell A.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be more common among American Indian populations than among other Americans. A complex diagnosis, the assessment methods for PTSD have varied across epidemiological studies, especially in terms of the trauma criteria. Here, we examined data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP) to estimate the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, using two formulas for calculating PTSD prevalence. The AI-SUPERPFP was a cross-sectional probability sample survey conducted between 1997 and 2000. Southwest (n = 1,446) and Northern Plains (n = 1,638) tribal members living on or near their reservations, aged 15–57 years at time of interview, were randomly sampled from tribal rolls. PTSD estimates were derived based on both the single worst and 3 worst traumas. Prevalence estimates varied by ascertainment method: single worst trauma (lifetime: 5.9% to 14.8%) versus 3 worst traumas (lifetime, 8.9% to 19.5%). Use of the 3-worst-event approach increased prevalence by 28.3% over the single-event method. PTSD was prevalent in these tribal communities. These results also serve to underscore the need to better understand the implications for PTSD prevalence with the current focus on a single worst event. PMID:23900893

  4. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  5. Using Electronic Health Records to Examine Disease Risk in Small Populations: Obesity Among American Indian Children, Wisconsin, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tomayko, Emily J.; Weinert, Bethany A.; Godfrey, Liz; Adams, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tribe-based or reservation-based data consistently show disproportionately high obesity rates among American Indian children, but little is known about the approximately 75% of American Indian children living off-reservation. We examined obesity among American Indian children seeking care off-reservation by using a database of de-identified electronic health records linked to community-level census variables. Methods Data from electronic health records from American Indian children and a reference sample of non-Hispanic white children collected from 2007 through 2012 were abstracted to determine obesity prevalence. Related community-level and individual-level risk factors (eg, economic hardship, demographics) were examined using logistic regression. Results The obesity rate for American Indian children (n = 1,482) was double the rate among non-Hispanic white children (n = 81,042) (20.0% vs 10.6%, P < .001). American Indian children were less likely to have had a well-child visit (55.9% vs 67.1%, P < .001) during which body mass index (BMI) was measured, which may partially explain why BMI was more likely to be missing from American Indian records (18.3% vs 14.6%, P < .001). Logistic regression demonstrated significantly increased obesity risk among American Indian children (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.6–2.1) independent of age, sex, economic hardship, insurance status, and geographic designation. Conclusion An electronic health record data set demonstrated high obesity rates for nonreservation-based American Indian children, rates that had not been previously assessed. This low-cost method may be used for assessing health risk for other understudied populations and to plan and evaluate targeted interventions. PMID:26916900

  6. A Nationwide Population-Based Study Identifying Health Disparities Between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the General Populations Living in Select Urban Counties

    PubMed Central

    Castor, Mei L.; Smyser, Michael S.; Taualii, Maile M.; Park, Alice N.; Lawson, Shelley A.; Forquera, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Despite their increasing numbers, little is known about the health of American Indians/Alaska Natives living in urban areas. We examined the health status of American Indian/Alaska Native populations served by 34 federally funded urban Indian health organizations. Methods. We analyzed US census data and vital statistics data for the period 1990 to 2000. Results. Disparities were revealed in socioeconomic, maternal and child health, and mortality indicators between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the general populations in urban Indian health organization service areas and nationwide. American Indians/Alaska Natives were approximately twice as likely as these general populations to be poor, to be unemployed, and to not have a college degree. Similar differences were observed in births among mothers who received late or no prenatal care or consumed alcohol and in mortality attributed to sudden infant death syndrome, chronic liver disease, and alcohol consumption. Conclusions. We found health disparities between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the general populations living in selected urban areas and nationwide. Such disparities can be addressed through improvements in health care access, high-quality data collection, and policy initiatives designed to provide sufficient resources and a more unified vision of the health of urban American Indians/Alaska Natives. PMID:16571711

  7. Validation of the Sense of Coherence Scale in an American Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Albino, Judith; Shapiro, Allison L.B.; Henderson, William G.; Tiwari, Tamanna; Brega, Angela G.; Thomas, Jacob F.; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Braun, Patricia A.; Quissell, David O.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Sense of Coherence (SOC) Scale in the context of an oral health-related clinical trial conducted in an American Indian population – specifically, people of the Navajo Nation. Data were derived from baseline evaluations of parents (or caregivers) of Navajo children aged 3–5 from 52 Head Start classes enrolled in a trial of an intervention to prevent early childhood caries (ECC). A 190-item Basic Research Factors Questionnaire, which included the SOC, was administered to 1016 parents/caregivers. Assessment of internal reliability and convergent validity, and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between parents’ SOC and other potentially convergent measures. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine one- and three-factor solutions of the SOC scale. Higher SOC was significantly related to higher parental education and income, employment status, and higher scores for social support, internal oral health locus of control (OHLOC), self-efficacy, importance of oral health, oral health knowledge and behavior, and children’s oral health quality of life. Higher SOC also was related to lower reported distress and lower external OHLOC. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.84 for all SOC items, but lower for each of the three SOC subscales. Confirmatory factor analyses suggested a three-factor solution was superior to a one-factor solution. The SOC scale had good internal reliability and convergent validity in this American Indian population. PMID:26191608

  8. Role of Established Type 2 Diabetes–Susceptibility Genetic Variants in a High Prevalence American Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Rong; Kobes, Sayuko; Muller, Yunhua Li; Weil, E. Jennifer; Curtis, Jeffrey M.; Nelson, Robert G.; Baier, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been identified, but there is little information on their role in populations at high risk for T2DM. We genotyped SNPs at 63 T2DM loci in 3,421 individuals from a high-risk American Indian population. Nominally significant (P < 0.05) associations were observed at nine SNPs in a direction consistent with the established association. A genetic risk score derived from all loci was strongly associated with T2DM (odds ratio 1.05 per risk allele, P = 6.2 × 10−6) and, in 292 nondiabetic individuals, with lower insulin secretion (by 4% per copy, P = 4.1 × 10−6). Genetic distances between American Indians and HapMap populations at T2DM markers did not differ significantly from genomic expectations. Analysis of U.S. national survey data suggested that 66% of the difference in T2DM prevalence between African Americans and European Americans, but none of the difference between American Indians and European Americans, was attributable to allele frequency differences at these loci. These analyses suggest that, in general, established T2DM loci influence T2DM in American Indians and that risk is mediated in part through an effect on insulin secretion. However, differences in allele frequencies do not account for the high population prevalence of T2DM. PMID:25667308

  9. Influenza Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native People and in the United States General Population

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Bruce, Michael G.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bresee, Joseph; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have experienced a disproportionate burden of infectious disease morbidity compared with the general US population. We evaluated whether a disparity in influenza hospitalizations exists between AI/AN people and the general US population. Methods.  We used Indian Health Service hospital discharge data (2001–2011) for AI/AN people and 13 State Inpatient Databases (2001–2008) to provide a comparison to the US population. Hospitalization rates were calculated by respiratory year (July–June). Influenza-specific hospitalizations were defined as discharges with any influenza diagnoses. Influenza-associated hospitalizations were calculated using negative binomial regression models that incorporated hospitalization and influenza laboratory surveillance data. Results.  The mean influenza-specific hospitalization rate/100 000 persons/year during the 2001–2002 to 2007–2008 respiratory years was 18.6 for AI/AN people and 15.6 for the comparison US population. The age-adjusted influenza-associated hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (98.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.6–317.8) was similar to the comparison US population (58.2; CI, 34.7–172.2). By age, influenza-associated hospitalization rates were significantly higher among AI/AN infants (<1 year) (1070.7; CI, 640.7–2969.5) than the comparison US infant population (210.2; CI, 153.5–478.5). Conclusions.  American Indian/Alaska Native people had higher influenza-specific hospitalization rates than the comparison US population; a significant influenza-associated hospitalization rate disparity was detected only among AI/AN infants because of the wide CIs inherent to the model. Taken together, the influenza-specific and influenza-associated hospitalization rates suggest that AI/AN people might suffer disproportionately from influenza illness compared with the general US population. PMID:25734102

  10. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  11. Suicide in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    This book reviews present knowledge about suicidal behavior in American Indians, prevention efforts in Native communities, and recommendations for understanding suicidal behavior and developing suicide prevention efforts. Data from Canadian aboriginal groups is also included. Chapter 1 explains why suicide in American Indians is of concern to…

  12. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  13. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  14. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  15. The American Indian Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, George

    This guide provides a basic source of historical and contemporary Indian information from an American Indian perspective and includes study questions at the end of each section. The primary function of this guide is to be a quick-study reference handbook. Basic questions essential to understanding current problems and issues of American Indians…

  16. triADD: The Risk for Alcohol Abuse, Depression, and Diabetes Multimorbidity in the American Indian and Alaska Native Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tann, Sheila S.; Yabiku, Scott T.; Okamoto, Scott K.; Yanow, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the risk for alcoholism, diabetes, and depression (triADD) in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in the U.S. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a series of descriptive statistics and regression models were used to examine the interrelationships among these disorders in AI/AN populations.…

  17. Advancing community-based research with urban American Indian populations: multidisciplinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, William E; Wendt, Dennis C; Saftner, Melissa A; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    The US has witnessed significant growth among urban American Indian (AI) populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations.

  18. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  19. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  20. American Indian Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  1. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  2. American Indian Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of multicultural and diversity efforts suggests the need for incorporating into the discussion of librarianship an understanding of previously underrepresented populations such as the American Indian. American Indian Studies speaks from the American Indian perspective and addresses the contemporary condition of American Indians.…

  3. American Indian Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of multicultural and diversity efforts suggests the need for incorporating into the discussion of librarianship an understanding of previously underrepresented populations such as the American Indian. American Indian Studies speaks from the American Indian perspective and addresses the contemporary condition of American Indians.…

  4. Association of American Indian Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    Association of American Indian Physicians Apply Log In Facebook Twitter YouTube About Mission Board of Directors Staff ... of AAIP student programs. Join Renew Programs The Association of American Indian Physicians provides educational programs, health ...

  5. Tests for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ. Test Collection.

    The revised annotated bibliography describes 29 standardized tests appropriate for use with American Indians from preschool through high school levels, furnishing authors, copyright date, appropriate age level, physical format (microfiche), and publisher. A separate listing provides names, addresses, and telephone numbers of 11 major U.S.…

  6. English for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slager, William R., Ed.; Madsen, Betty M., Ed.

    The present issue of "English for American Indians" follows the format and approach of the Spring 1970 issue. (See ED 040 396.) In the lead article, Evelyn Hatch surveys some of the research in first language acquisition and points out its implications for second language teaching. Her main thesis is that with the best of intentions,…

  7. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  8. Risk factors for HIV disease progression in a rural southwest American Indian population.

    PubMed

    Iralu, Jonathan; Duran, Bonnie; Pearson, Cynthia R; Jiang, Yizhou; Foley, Kevin; Harrison, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression among American Indians (AIs) have been poorly characterized. We assessed the impact of socioeconomic factors and use of traditional healing on HIV disease progression in a rural AI community. From January 2004 through December 2006, we interviewed 36 HIV-positive AIs regarding their socioeconomic status, incarceration, and use of traditional healing. We also collected chart-abstracted adherence and substance-abuse data. Through bivariate analysis, we compared these factors with the CD4-cell counts and log HIV-1 viral loads (VLs). Using a simple regression model, we assessed interactions between the significant associations and the outcome. Participant characteristics included being male (58.3%), being transgender (13.9%), having ever been incarcerated (63.9%), having a household income of < $1,000/month (41.7%), being unemployed (61.1%), being diagnosed with alcohol abuse (50.0%), and using traditional medicine (27.8%) in the last 12 months. Higher VLs were associated with recent incarceration (p < 0.05), household income of < $1,000/month (p < 0.05), and provider-assessed alcohol abuse (p < 0.05). We found an interaction between incarceration and alcohol abuse, and alcohol abuse was the factor more strongly associated with higher VLs. A lower CD4 count was associated with recent incarceration (p < 0.05) and use of traditional medicine (p < 0.05). Alcohol abuse is an important contributor to HIV disease progression, and participants with lower CD4 counts were more likely to use traditional medicine. HIV care among this rural AI population should focus on addressing alcohol abuse and other socioeconomic risk factors and promote collaboration between Western medical and Navajo traditional practitioners.

  9. Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention as Standard Practice: Working with the American Indian/Native Alaskan Populations

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya), David A.; Duran, Bonnie; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Manning, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use and the resulting problems associated with high-risk drinking in the American Indian/Native Alaskan (AI/NA) population are well-documented, as alcohol misuse has taken an incredible toll on many AI/NA communities. Presently, both overall health issues and alcohol use occur disproportionately within this population. This article provides an updated overview of the impact of alcohol use in the United States and within AI/NA communities specifically. It also provides recommendations for an alcohol-related screening and brief intervention instrument that social workers can begin using in their practice and can be utilized within the AI/NA community. PMID:25580074

  10. The American Indian Development Bank?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottinger, Richard

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, the Indian Finance Corporation Act died in committee for lack of Indian support. A model for an American Indian Development Bank is proposed, based on the International Finance Corporation of the World Bank. Two case studies illustrate how this model can meet Indian economic development needs. (SV)

  11. Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Lisa; Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O'Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-05-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.

  12. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  13. Indian Season in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherford, Jack

    1991-01-01

    Reminds teachers that American Indians played a major role in shaping the modern world. Notes that the indigenous peoples of the Americas introduced European American settlers to a variety of foods and agricultural methods. Argues that American Indians also contributed to U.S. concepts of democracy and federalism. Provides guidelines for teaching…

  14. Indian Season in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherford, Jack

    1991-01-01

    Reminds teachers that American Indians played a major role in shaping the modern world. Notes that the indigenous peoples of the Americas introduced European American settlers to a variety of foods and agricultural methods. Argues that American Indians also contributed to U.S. concepts of democracy and federalism. Provides guidelines for teaching…

  15. Characteristics of American Indians by Tribes and Selected Areas: 1980. 1980 Census of Population. Volume 2 Subject Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    The 1980 census was the first census since 1910 to collect extensive data on American Indian tribes. This two-section report is based on the 1980 census sample (approximately 19% of housing units), and contains 27 extensive data tables describing demographic and economic characteristics of U.S. American Indian tribes. Tables estimate 1980 census…

  16. Indian Americans in Omaha and Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Arthur M.; And Others

    The study focuses on American Indians who have migrated to urban centers in an effort to escape conditions on the reservations and to find employment and seek a better life. Discussed in the study are 6 tribes which make up the majority of the Indian population in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska: Omaha, Winnebago, Santee Sioux, Iowa, Ponca, Sac, and…

  17. Molluscum Contagiosum in a Pediatric American Indian Population: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, Andrea M.; Holman, Robert C.; Hughes, Christine M.; Mehal, Jason M.; Folkema, Arianne M.; Redd, John T.; Cheek, James E.; Damon, Inger K.; Reynolds, Mary G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) causes an innocuous yet persistent skin infection in immunocompetent individuals and is spread by contact with lesions. Studies point to atopic dermatitis (AD) as a risk factor for MCV infection; however, there are no longitudinal studies that have evaluated this hypothesis. Methods Outpatient visit data from fiscal years 2001–2009 for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children were examined to describe the incidence of molluscum contagiosum (MC). We conducted a case-control study of patients <5 years old at an Indian Health Service (IHS) clinic to evaluate dermatological risk factors for infection. Results The incidence rate for MC in children <5 years old was highest in the West and East regions. MC cases were more likely to have a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema, eczema or dermatitis, impetigo, and scabies (p<0.05) compared to controls; 51.4% of MC cases had a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis. Conclusions The present study is the first demonstration of an association between AD and MC using a case-control study design. It is unknown if the concurrent high incidence of eczema and MC is related, and this association deserves further investigation. PMID:25072249

  18. Advancing Suicide Prevention Research With Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P.; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J.; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O’Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-01-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance’s prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond. PMID:25790403

  19. American Indians Today. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yinger, J. Milton, Ed.; Simpson, George Eaton, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of social change among American Indians and in the relationships of Indians to government and the larger society are examined in the collection of articles by 12 political and social scientists. Focusing on recent developments, this look at American Indians today encompasses rapid population growth, urbanization of the Indian population,…

  20. [Malaria in an outbreak zone in Oyapock (French Guiana): incidence of malaria attacks in the American Indian population of Camopi].

    PubMed

    Carme, B; Lecat, J; Lefebvre, P

    2005-01-01

    The Oyapock region is the second largest malaria outbreak area in French Guiana after Maroni. This area that has been less extensively studied that Maroni is characterized by the presence of an exclusively American Indian population on the French bank and by a high incidence of Plasmodium vivax associated with Plasmodium falciparum. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of malaria attacks in Camopi, a population center in which most inhabitants live in 15 small villages located along the middle part of the Oyapock River on the Brazilian border. Study involved diagnosis of malaria attacks (ongoing fever or reported fever within 48 hours and presence of asexual Plasmodium parasites with no other apparent etiology) and accurate estimation of its incidence as well as evaluation of the American Indian population. Study was carried out over the two-year period between April 2000 and March 2002. The mean annual incidence of malaria was 486 per 1000. Incidence was comparable for the two Plasmodium species: 248 p. 1000 for P. falciparum versus 259 p. 1000 for P. vivax but was much higher in children than adults (402 p. 1000 versus 92 p. 1000). The incidence of P. falciparum varied during the year and from one year to the next. Mixed infection documented by microscopic evidence was uncommon. With an annual incidence of around 500 p 1.000, the Oyapock area of French Guiana must be considered as a malaria hot spot.

  1. Alcohol, Stress, and Violence in American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Ronet; Straus, Murray A.

    This study examined the link between alcohol use and domestic violence in the American Indian population. A total of 204 American Indian families and 2,007 non-American Indian Whites were analyzed using the 1985 National Family Violence Resurvey. The rates of family violence were first calculated by ethnicity, and then compared to a sample of…

  2. Linkage disequilibrium and association analysis of alpha-synuclein and alcohol and drug dependence in two American Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Clarimon, Jordi; Gray, Rebecca R; Williams, Lindsey N; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Robin, Robert W; Albaugh, Bernard; Singleton, Andrew; Goldman, David; Mulligan, Connie J

    2007-04-01

    Alpha-synuclein is involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission and has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies, in humans and in rat and monkey models, have suggested that alpha-synuclein may play a role in the development and maintenance of certain addictive disorders. Fifteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) and 1 upstream microsatellite repeat (NACP-REP1) were assayed in Southwest (SW; n=514) and Plains (n=420) American Indian populations. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) at SNCA were determined for the 2 populations and compared with Caucasian, African, and Asian populations in the HapMap database (http://www.hapmap.org). Assayed alleles and constructed haplotypes in the study populations were tested for association with 4 clinical phenotypes [alcohol dependence, alcohol use disorders, drug dependence, and drug use disorders (lifetime diagnoses)] as well as with 2 symptom count phenotypes (all 18 questions and the 8 questions diagnostic for alcohol dependence). Patterns of LD at SNCA were similar in both Indian populations and were consistent with the LD structure in other populations as reflected in the HapMap database. Single allele tests revealed significant associations between 4 SNPs and drug dependence in the SW population and between 2 of those SNPs plus 2 other SNPs and drug dependence in SW males only. In the Plains population, a significant association was detected only in males between 2 SNPs and alcohol use disorders and between 1 SNP and alcohol dependence. In the SW population, 1 SNP was marginally significant with the total symptom count. However, in all cases, the support was modest and disappeared with correction for multiple comparisons. No association was found between constructed haplotypes and any of the phenotypes in either population. Despite modest support for association between multiple SNCA SNPs and several of the addictive

  3. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  4. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  5. A comparison of the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in two American Indian and a general population sample

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Shay-Lee; Elias, Brenda; Enns, Murray W.; Sareen, Jitender; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine whether the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts differ when comparing two American Indian reservation samples to the U.S. general population. Data were from the baseline nationally representative National Comorbidity Survey (N = 5,877) and the representative American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP; N = 3,084). Face-to-face interviews were conducted using the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. American Indians from these Northern Plains and Southwest tribes appeared significantly less likely to have suicidal thoughts in their lifetime when compared with the general population, odds ratio (OR) of 0.49 (99% CI [0.36, 0.66]) and 0.36 (99% CI [0.25, 0.51]), respectively. However, members of the Northern Plains tribe were more likely to have attempted suicide in their lifetime compared with the general population (OR=1.96, 99% CI [1.45, 2.65]). Suicide attempts without suicidal ideation were more common in the two American Indian samples than in the general population. In contrast, correlates of suicidal behavior appear quite similar when comparing the groups. Increased attention is needed to determine why rates of ideation and attempts may differ in American Indians when compared with the general population. PMID:24065607

  6. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  7. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  8. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  9. American Indian Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, John E., Ed.

    Assuming that the client is central to any service program, the American Indian Task Force examined a national sample of "grass roots" social service organizations and/or individuals and schools of social work to determine the capability of providing relevant social work education to American Indians. Accordingly, the highest priorities…

  10. Human Behavior and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Wynne DuBray; Eisenbise, Margaret DeOcampo

    Divided into five sections, the monograph is intended to make students aware that the practices customary to social work agencies are not relevant to the needs of most American Indian clientele. The first section provides an overview of the following historical, geographical, and cultural areas of American Indian tribes: California, Plateau, Great…

  11. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  12. Charter Schools for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielenberg, Brian

    An ethnographic study reports on the practices of a sixth grade American Indian teacher at an urban charter middle school for American Indians. The study used classroom observations, interviews, and informal conversations over a 3-week period to determine and understand the personal and institutional influences on her instructional practices. The…

  13. Food Insecurity among American Indians and Alaska Natives: A National Profile using the Current Population Survey–Food Security Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Huyser, Kimberly R.; Valdes, Jimmy; Simonds, Vanessa Watts

    2016-01-01

    Food insecurity increases the risk for obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer—conditions highly prevalent among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Using the Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement, we analyzed the food insecurity trends of AI/ANs compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the United States from 2000 to 2010. From 2000 to 2010, 25% of AI/ANs remained consistently food insecure and AI/ANs were twice as likely to be food insecure compared to whites. Urban AI/ANs were more likely to experience food insecurity than rural AI/ANs. Our findings highlight the need for national and tribal policies that expand food assistance programs; promote and support increased access to healthy foods and community food security, in both rural and urban areas; and reduce the burden of diet-related disparities on low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations. PMID:28491205

  14. Food Insecurity among American Indians and Alaska Natives: A National Profile using the Current Population Survey-Food Security Supplement.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Huyser, Kimberly R; Valdes, Jimmy; Simonds, Vanessa Watts

    2017-01-01

    Food insecurity increases the risk for obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer-conditions highly prevalent among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Using the Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement, we analyzed the food insecurity trends of AI/ANs compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the United States from 2000 to 2010. From 2000 to 2010, 25% of AI/ANs remained consistently food insecure and AI/ANs were twice as likely to be food insecure compared to whites. Urban AI/ANs were more likely to experience food insecurity than rural AI/ANs. Our findings highlight the need for national and tribal policies that expand food assistance programs; promote and support increased access to healthy foods and community food security, in both rural and urban areas; and reduce the burden of diet-related disparities on low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations.

  15. Implementing women's cancer screening programs in American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Paula M; Orians, Carlyn E; Liebow, Edward; Joe, Jennie R; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Erb, Julie; Kenyon, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides funding to tribes and tribal organizations to implement comprehensive cancer screening programs using a program model developed for state health departments. We conducted a multiple-site case study using a participatory research process to describe how 5 tribal programs implemented screening services, and to identify strategies used to address challenges in delivering services to American Indian and Alaska Native women. We analyzed data from semistructured interviews with 141 key informants, 16 focus groups with 132 program-eligible women, and program documents. Several challenges regarding the delivery of services were revealed, including implementing screening programs in busy acute-care environments, access to mammography, providing culturally sensitive care, and providing diagnostic/treatment services in rural and remote locations. Strategies perceived as successful in meeting program challenges included identifying a "champion" or main supporter of the program in each clinical setting, using mobile mammography, using female providers, and increasing the capacity to provide diagnostic services at screening sites. The results should be of interest to an international audience, including those who work with health-related programs targeting indigenous women or groups that are marginalized because of culture, geographic isolation, and/or socioeconomic position.

  16. Systematic Review of Health Disparities for Cardiovascular Diseases and Associated Factors among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Rebecca Newlin; Shin, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Background American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations experience significant health disparities compared to non-Hispanic white populations. Cardiovascular disease and related risk factors are increasingly recognized as growing indicators of global health disparities. However, comparative reports on disparities among this constellation of diseases for AI/AN populations have not been systematically reviewed. Objectives We performed a literature review on the prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; and associated morbidity and mortality among AI/AN. Data sources A total of 203 articles were reviewed, of which 31 met study criteria for inclusion. Searches were performed on PUBMED, MEDLINE, the CDC MMWR, and the Indian Health Services. Study eligibility criteria Published literature that were published within the last fifteen years and provided direct comparisons between AI/AN to non-AI/AN populations were included. Study appraisal and synthesis methods We abstracted data on study design, data source, AI/AN population, comparison group, and. outcome measures. A descriptive synthesis of primary findings is included. Results Rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome are clearly higher for AI/AN populations. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia differences are more equivocal. Our analysis also revealed that there are likely regional and gender differences in the degree of disparities observed. Limitations Studies using BRFSS telephone surveys administered in English may underestimate disparities. Many AI/AN do not have telephones and/or speak English. Regional variability makes national surveys difficult to interpret. Finally, studies using self-reported data may not be accurate. Conclusions and implications of key findings Profound health disparities in cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors for AI/AN populations persist, perhaps due to low

  17. Montana Schools of Promise: Addressing Equity in American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishbaugh, Mary Susan E.; Dugi, Rosemarie; Schmitz, Stevie

    2016-01-01

    The American Indian presence in Montana enriches the state's culture. Educationally, however, there are gross disparities between academic performance of American Indian students when compared with the student population as a whole and with various ethnic/cultural subgroups. Montana's educational data mirror the Bureau of Indian Education national…

  18. Montana Schools of Promise: Addressing Equity in American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishbaugh, Mary Susan E.; Dugi, Rosemarie; Schmitz, Stevie

    2016-01-01

    The American Indian presence in Montana enriches the state's culture. Educationally, however, there are gross disparities between academic performance of American Indian students when compared with the student population as a whole and with various ethnic/cultural subgroups. Montana's educational data mirror the Bureau of Indian Education national…

  19. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  20. Telepsychiatry for Treating Rural American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin, Daniel; Garry, Mark T.; Zuccaro, Paula; Novins, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Of all of the medical specialties, child and adolescent psychiatry has the most severe shortage of practitioners. This shortage is even more pronounced in economically disadvantaged and rural areas. The American Indian population is younger, more economically disadvantaged, and more rural than the general U.S. population (United States Census…

  1. Telepsychiatry for Treating Rural American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin, Daniel; Garry, Mark T.; Zuccaro, Paula; Novins, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Of all of the medical specialties, child and adolescent psychiatry has the most severe shortage of practitioners. This shortage is even more pronounced in economically disadvantaged and rural areas. The American Indian population is younger, more economically disadvantaged, and more rural than the general U.S. population (United States Census…

  2. Association of family income supplements in adolescence with development of psychiatric and substance use disorders in adulthood among an American Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Costello, E. Jane; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Angold, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Context In a natural experiment in which some families received income supplements, adolescent behavioral symptoms fell significantly. These adolescents are now young adults. Objective To examine the effects of income supplements in adolescence and adulthood on the prevalence of adult psychiatric disorders. Design Quasi-experimental, longitudinal. Population and setting A representative sample of 1420 children ages 9, 11, or 13 in 1993 (25%, n=349, American-Indian) were assessed for psychiatric and substance use disorders (SUD) through age 21 (1993–2006). From 1996, when a casino opened on the Indian reservation, every American-Indian but no Non-Indians received an annual income supplement that increased from $500 to around $9000. Main outcome measures Rates of adult psychiatric disorders and SUD based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders1 in 3 age cohorts, adjusted for age, sex, length of time in the family home, and number of Indian parents. Results As adults, significantly fewer Indians than non-Indians had a psychiatric disorder (Indians, 30.2%, non-Indians, 36.0%, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.46, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.30, 0.72, p=.001), particularly alcohol and cannabisabuse and/or dependence. The youngest age-cohort of Indian youth had the longest exposure to the family income. Interactions between race/ethnicity and age-cohort were significant. Planned comparisons showed that fewer of the youngest Indian age-cohort had any psychiatric disorder (31.4%) than the Indian middle cohort (41.7%, OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.24, 0.78, p=.005) or oldest cohort (41.4%, OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.51, 0.94, p=.012) or the youngest non-Indian cohort (37.1%, 0.66, 95% CI 0.48, 0.90 p=.008). Study hypotheses were not upheld for nicotine or other drugs, or emotional or behavioral disorders. The income supplement received in adulthood had no impact on adult psychopathology. Conclusions Lower rates of psychopathology in American-Indian youth following a family income

  3. Counseling with American Indians: Improving the Quality of Non-Indian Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauphinais, Paul; Rowe, Wayne

    Although many social indicators suggest that problems exist among the American Indian population for which counseling and mental health services should be provided, there are relatively few American Indian counselors in the conventional mental health system or in schools; therefore, the training of non-Indian counselors who work among American…

  4. Educational Reform and American Indian Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson

    For 500 years, European-Americans have attempted to change and assimilate American Indian peoples through various forms of education. Attempts by well-meaning groups to reform Indian education have generally ignored the cultural validation necessary for American Indian children to succeed in American schools. As a result, Indian children…

  5. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  6. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  7. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population.

    PubMed

    Foote, Eric M; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Holman, Robert C; Seeman, Sara M; Steiner, Claudia A; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998-2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006-2008. Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009-2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998-1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998-1999 to 2009-2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009-2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6-14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009-2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children.

  8. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population.

    PubMed

    Foote, Eric M; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Holman, Robert C; Seeman, Sara M; Steiner, Claudia A; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998-2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006-2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009-2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998-1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998-1999 to 2009-2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009-2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6-14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009-2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children.

  9. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  10. Association of family income supplements in adolescence with development of psychiatric and substance use disorders in adulthood among an American Indian population.

    PubMed

    Costello, E Jane; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Angold, Adrian

    2010-05-19

    . Lower prevalence of psychopathology in American Indian youth following a family income supplement, compared with the nonexposed, non-Indian population, persisted into adulthood.

  11. Adventure Therapy with American Indian Youth. AEE White Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Experiential Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Indian population is a young one; the median age is 28.0, with 34% under 18 years old. In contrast, the median age for the overall U.S. population is 35.3, with 26% younger than 18 (Hawkins, Cummins, & Marlatt, 2004). It is difficult to avoid resorting to statistical hyperbole when describing the problems facing American Indian and…

  12. Prevalence of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease in a Population-Based Registry of American Indian/Alaska Native People in 2007.

    PubMed

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Johnston, Janet M; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G; Lim, S Sam

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) in 2007 in the Indian Health Service (IHS) active clinical population from 3 regions of the US. The IHS Lupus Registry was designed to identify possible MCTD cases in addition to systemic lupus erythematosus cases. The population denominator for this report includes American Indian or Alaska Native adults within the IHS active clinical population in 2007, residing in select communities in 3 regions of the US. Potential MCTD cases were identified using a broad range of diagnostic codes and were confirmed by detailed medical record abstraction. Classification as MCTD for this analysis required both rheumatologist diagnosis of MCTD without diagnosis of other CTD, and documentation of the Alarcón-Segovia MCTD criteria in the medical record. Prevalence was also calculated using 2 alternate definitions of MCTD. The age-adjusted prevalence of MCTD using our primary definition was 6.4 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval 2.8-12.8). The prevalence was higher in women than in men using all 3 definitions of MCTD, and no men met the criteria for the primary definition of MCTD. The first population-based estimates of the prevalence of MCTD in the US American Indian/Alaska Native population show that the prevalence appears to be higher than in other populations. Additional population-based estimates are needed to better understand the epidemiology of MCTD. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Working with American Indians toward educational success.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E E

    2001-09-01

    Past research has focused on identifying barriers that American Indian college students experience in attempting to complete programs in higher educational systems. Recommendations to reduce these barriers have not significantly decreased attrition rates or increased the completion rates of this minority group. Nationally, nursing professionals recognize the shortage of minorities in the field of nursing. Likewise, the need for American Indian health care providers is growing in direct proportion to the number of health care issues facing this population. This grounded theory study focused on the enablers that supported educational success of American Indian baccalaureate nursing graduates between the years 1986 and 1995 in a western university. Through constant comparative analysis of 18 interviews, four core variables emerged. The interactive core variables are individual American Indian student, instructor, institutions (university and college of nursing), and external influences. This article focuses on the core variable individual American Indian student and the following seven properties that support success: focuses on goal, adjusts to dominant cultural, invests in self-assessment, develops assertive skills, establishes support community, socializes into roles of student and nurse, and masters content. This central core variable and properties create a gestalt that promotes educational success. The implications are that faculty, in their roles as advisor and instructor, can assist in the development and maintenance of these seven properties. This can be achieved through proactive culturally responsive advisement, creation of a culturally relevant environment, and use of humanistic andragogical approaches to teaching-learning processes.

  14. American Indians in Transition. Agricultural Economic Report No. 283.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen W.

    The American Indian population is in a period of transition. It is young, growing, and becoming more urban. There were some improvements in income, housing, education, and health in the 1960-70 decade, but Indians remain the most disadvantaged of the minority ethnic groups in the United States. By most of the above measures, Indians, especially…

  15. American Indian Urbanization. Institute Monograph Series Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Jack O.,; Watson, O. Michael

    The nine essays in this monograph represent an expanded outgrowth of "The American Indian in Urban Society" (1971) and an attempt at improvement. The essays are titled as follows: (1) "Federal Policy and the Urban Indian" (Federal policy affecting the urbanization of Indian populations); (2) "Urbanization in a Reservation…

  16. American Indian Capacity Building in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Don

    A 1996 research project in St. Paul, Minnesota, found high rates of poverty and unemployment in its American Indian population and a lack of connection between social service agencies and the Indian community. A follow-up project aimed to support the Indian community in identifying its own priorities for research and action. Eight focus groups…

  17. Resource Guide: Historical Trauma and Post-Colonial Stress in American Indian Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse; Deschenie, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies on historic and multi-generational trauma among Native people have assisted individuals and communities in dealing with the continuing aftereffects. Following in the footsteps of Native American elders and activists, social workers, mental health professionals, and scholars are seeking to revitalize cultural traditions to combat…

  18. Resource Guide: Historical Trauma and Post-Colonial Stress in American Indian Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse; Deschenie, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies on historic and multi-generational trauma among Native people have assisted individuals and communities in dealing with the continuing aftereffects. Following in the footsteps of Native American elders and activists, social workers, mental health professionals, and scholars are seeking to revitalize cultural traditions to combat…

  19. The West Indian Americans. The New Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henke, Holger

    This book, which is part of a series on new immigrant groups in the United States, captures the experiences of West Indian Americans who have arrived in the country since 1965. The seven chapters include: (1) "History of Jamaica and the English-Speaking Caribbean" (e.g., from plantation society to the third world and the Creolization of…

  20. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  1. The West Indian Americans. The New Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henke, Holger

    This book, which is part of a series on new immigrant groups in the United States, captures the experiences of West Indian Americans who have arrived in the country since 1965. The seven chapters include: (1) "History of Jamaica and the English-Speaking Caribbean" (e.g., from plantation society to the third world and the Creolization of…

  2. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  3. The association between substance use disorders and early and combined use of alcohol and marijuana in two American Indian populations

    PubMed Central

    O'CONNELL, JOAN M.; NOVINS, DOUGLAS K.; BEALS, JANETTE; WHITESELL, NANCY R.; SPICER, PAUL

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the relationships between early and combined use of alcohol and marijuana with diagnoses of alcohol and marijuana use disorders in two American Indian (AI) populations. Method Data were drawn from a psychiatric epidemiologic study of 3084 AIs living on or near two reservations. We analysed data for adults aged 18–54 years at the time of interview (n = 2739). Logistic regression models were estimated to examine associations between early and combined use of alcohol and marijuana with lifetime diagnoses of abuse and dependence. Results Overall, younger AIs (18–29 years old) were more likely than older AIs (40–54 years old) to initiate substance use early and initiate use with marijuana, with or without alcohol. Persons who initiated alcohol use before age 14 were more than twice as likely as those who initiated use at older ages to meet criteria for alcohol or marijuana use disorders (p < 0.01). The odds of abuse or dependence were two to five times higher among persons who reported combined use of alcohol and marijuana (p < 0.01) than among those who reported use of either substance. Conclusions These findings document the need to address both early and combined use of alcohol and marijuana in prevention and treatment programmes. PMID:26582968

  4. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  5. FastStats: Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Unintentional Injuries All Injuries Assault or Homicide Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health ...

  6. Advancing Community–Based Research with Urban American Indian Populations: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, William E.; Wendt, Dennis C.; Saftner, Melissa A.; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. has witnessed significant growth among urban AI populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  7. "Starting Stories" among Older Northern Plains American Indian Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indian adults have the highest smoking rate of any racial group in the nation. By the turn of the 21st century, smoking rates for the general adult population were reported to be 24%. Among adolescents in the United States, 34.8% of high school students reported they currently smoked in 1999. In comparison, American Indian adults report…

  8. "Starting Stories" among Older Northern Plains American Indian Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indian adults have the highest smoking rate of any racial group in the nation. By the turn of the 21st century, smoking rates for the general adult population were reported to be 24%. Among adolescents in the United States, 34.8% of high school students reported they currently smoked in 1999. In comparison, American Indian adults report…

  9. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  10. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  11. Influenza surveillance using electronic health records in the American Indian and Alaska Native population

    PubMed Central

    Keck, James W; Redd, John T; Cheek, James E; Layne, Larry J; Groom, Amy V; Kitka, Sassa; Bruce, Michael G; Suryaprasad, Anil; Amerson, Nancy L; Cullen, Theresa; Bryan, Ralph T; Hennessy, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs) provides new opportunities for public health surveillance. During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic, we developed a new EHR-based influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance system designed to be resource sparing, rapidly scalable, and flexible. 4 weeks after the first pandemic case, ILI data from Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities were being analyzed. Materials and methods The system defines ILI as a patient visit containing either an influenza-specific International Classification of Disease, V.9 (ICD-9) code or one or more of 24 ILI-related ICD-9 codes plus a documented temperature ≥100°F. EHR-based data are uploaded nightly. To validate results, ILI visits identified by the new system were compared to ILI visits found by medical record review, and the new system's results were compared with those of the traditional US ILI Surveillance Network. Results The system monitored ILI activity at an average of 60% of the 269 IHS electronic health databases. EHR-based surveillance detected ILI visits with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 97.8% based on chart review (N=2375) of visits at two facilities in September 2009. At the peak of the pandemic (week 41, October 17, 2009), the median time from an ILI visit to data transmission was 6 days, with a mode of 1 day. Discussion EHR-based ILI surveillance was accurate, timely, occurred at the majority of IHS facilities nationwide, and provided useful information for decision makers. EHRs thus offer the opportunity to transform public health surveillance. PMID:23744788

  12. AMERICAN INDIANS AND EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BASS, WILLARD P.; BURGER, HENRY G.

    MANY OF THE DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED FOR YEARS, BUT HAVE BEEN PERMITTED TO LAY DORMANT. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGEMENT IS EXHIBITED IN AREAS OF INCOME, UNEMPLOYMENT, SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE, EXPECTED LIFE SPAN, INFANT MORTALITY RATE, BIRTH RATE, AND HEALTH HISTORY. COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS BLOCK THE…

  13. American Indian Adolescent Inhalant Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Pamela Jumper; Green, Vicki A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of inhalant use among 87 American Indian boarding school students aged 10-18 found that inhalant use was negatively related to participation in traditional tribal activities for both males and females and was also related to measures of cognitive ability and cognitive egocentrism for males. (Contains 43 references.) (SV)

  14. American Indian - Past and Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, William

    Intended for seniors at all ability levels, the one-semester course outline aims to aid students to analyze the American Indian's role in the history of the United States, and to recognize the contributions they have made in the western hemisphere. The general content outline and suggested activities cover the periods before and after contact with…

  15. BIBLIOGRAPHIES OF AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TROIKE, RUDOLPH C., COMP.

    THE 12 BIBLIOGRAPHIES WHICH MAKE UP THIS COLLECTION WERE COMPILED BY MR. TROIKE'S STUDENTS IN A GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE IN AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, 1966-67. LANGUAGE FAMILIES INCLUDED ARE--(1) NA-DENE, (2) NAVAHO, (3) ALGONQUIAN, (4) UTO-AZTECAN, (5) SIOUAN, (6) IROQUIAN, (7) MAYAN, (8) MIXTEC, (9) QUECHUMARAN…

  16. Chronicles of American Indian Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Interracial Books for Children, Inc., New York, NY.

    More than 60 historical documents related to the struggle of American Indian nations to preserve their sovereignty from the first resistance to the European invasions of the Americas up to and including the present are contained in this chronicle. Covering the period from 1622 to 1978, this updated version is expanded to include documents…

  17. Do American Indian Mascots = American Indian People? Examining Implicit Bias towards American Indian People and American Indian Mascots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, John; Burke, Amanda; Burkley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Empirical examinations of American Indian (AI) mascots have only recently entered into the discourse of mainstream psychology. The present studies examined implicit attitudes of non-AI people towards AI mascots and the extent to which they are related to attitudes towards AI people. Significant concordance was observed between negative bias toward…

  18. American Indian Standards for Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.

    These American Indian standards for science education were developed in close alignment with the 1995 "National Science Education Standards," but tailored specifically for use in schools serving American Indian students. This document applies most of the science concepts of the U.S. national standards to American Indian life and issues,…

  19. Storytelling: The Heart of American Indian Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Frances

    2006-01-01

    Recently some writers and scholars have complained that the academy, particularly American Indian Studies (AIS) programs, gives too much attention to American Indian literature while ignoring scholarly works that focus on the pressing needs of American Indian communities in the areas of economic development, social justice, and sovereignty, among…

  20. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Stephen E.; Townshend-Bulson, Lisa J.; Bruden, Dana J. T.; Homan, Chriss E.; Gove, James E.; Plotnik, Julia N.; Simons, Brenna C.; Spradling, Philip R.; McMahon, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) population. Design In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results Sustained virologic response (SVR) with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18) and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37). Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%), including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%), 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5%) and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%). By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002), estimated duration of infection (p=0.034) and HCV genotype (p<0.0001). There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%). Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%). Conclusions We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1. PMID:27029671

  1. Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

    This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and…

  2. Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

    This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and…

  3. Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians: Can They Communicate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Clark S.

    A failure in communication between Anglo American, American Indian, and Mexican American communities exists because of the inadequate reporting of the events that occur within each of these groups. This speech outlines several basic ways in which communication can eventually be improved. First, it emphasizes that educators must recognize and…

  4. Best Practices for Effective Clinical Partnerships with Indigenous Populations of North America (American Indian, Alaska Native, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit).

    PubMed

    Haozous, Emily A; Neher, Charles

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a review of the literature to identify best practices for clinical partnerships with indigenous populations of North America, specifically American Indian/Alaska Native, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit of Canada. The authors have identified best practices and lessons learned from collaborating with indigenous populations, presented in 2 categories: conceptual guidelines and health care delivery guidelines. Major themes include the importance of trust and communication, the delivery of culturally congruent health care, and the necessity of working in partnership with tribal entities for successful delivery of health care. Best practices in health care delivery with indigenous populations are presented.

  5. American Indian Issues in Higher Education. Contemporary American Indian Issues Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center.

    A collection of 17 articles on American Indian issues in higher education contains Russell Thornton's introduction, "American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline: A Revisit," plus five major sections. "Purpose of American Indian Studies" covers relevancy of Indian Studies in higher education (Duchene); an alternative model…

  6. American Indian Issues in Higher Education. Contemporary American Indian Issues Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center.

    A collection of 17 articles on American Indian issues in higher education contains Russell Thornton's introduction, "American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline: A Revisit," plus five major sections. "Purpose of American Indian Studies" covers relevancy of Indian Studies in higher education (Duchene); an alternative model…

  7. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  8. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  9. American Indian Studies in West Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelt, H. Guillermo

    1986-01-01

    Interest in the American Indian in West Germany is high. Romantic notions, derived from the novels of 19th century German writer Karl May and American westerns shown on German television, combined with a subtle anti-Americanism might be responsible for the American Indian Movement (AIM) support groups that have been forming among students and…

  10. American Indian Education Opportunities Program. Supplement 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molin, Paulette F.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of the American Indian Educational Opportunities Program (AIEOP) at Hampton University for this reporting period included the establishment of a student chapter of the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), a move to new office space, hosting events on campus for visiting students from the American Indian Education Program of Oxon Hill, Maryland and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, New York, collaboration with the Multicultural Leadership Team at NASA Langley Research Center for a Native American elder to serve as a speaker, participation in Native American conferences and other events, and continuing efforts to recruit and retain American Indian students.

  11. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  12. The American Indians: Answers to 101 Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Presented in a simple and straightforward manner, this publication answers questions basic to an understanding of the American Indian and his socioeconomic position in the United States. The following identify major areas covered and representative questions: (1) The Indian People (Who is an Indian?); (2) The Legal Status of Indians (Are Indians…

  13. The American Indian: A Very Private People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carole; Hamby, John

    American Indian urban immigration has put between 33% and 50% of all Indians in urban settings where they invariably are subjected to an initial cultural shock. Leaving the reservation to improve their socioeconomic status, Indians find urban adjustment extremely difficult. The Anglo culture is inherently opposed to the "Indian Way", for it…

  14. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  15. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  16. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Designed to inform Indian students about health career opportunities, this handbook prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians describes the great need for more American Indians as health professionals and gives information on specific health fields, preparation for health professions, and assistance available (financial and other).…

  17. Congressional Social Darwinism and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinderman, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing a congressional report on civil and military treatment of American Indians, this article asserts that the social Darwinism of the day prevailed among all congressional committee members ("Even friends of the Indian... knew American expansionism, technology, and racial ideology would reduce the Indian to a pitiful remnant...) (JC)

  18. Congressional Social Darwinism and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinderman, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing a congressional report on civil and military treatment of American Indians, this article asserts that the social Darwinism of the day prevailed among all congressional committee members ("Even friends of the Indian... knew American expansionism, technology, and racial ideology would reduce the Indian to a pitiful remnant...) (JC)

  19. American Indian Standards for Mathematics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.

    These American Indian standards for mathematics were developed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) for use by classroom teachers of American Indian students. They have been closely aligned with the 1989 "Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics," national standards currently in use in many BIA-funded schools. Each…

  20. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Designed to inform Indian students about health career opportunities, this handbook prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians describes the great need for more American Indians as health professionals and gives information on specific health fields, preparation for health professions, and assistance available (financial and other).…

  1. American Indian Self-Image Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, Howard T.

    A self-image workshop manual for American Indians aims to help Indian people set goals and excel in whatever they plan in life. A section entitled "Are You an Eagle?" tells of the significance of eagles in traditional American Indian Culture, discusses those who merit an eagle feather for accomplishment, and lists characteristics of eagles (and…

  2. American Indian Self-Image Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, Howard T.

    A self-image workshop manual for American Indians aims to help Indian people set goals and excel in whatever they plan in life. A section entitled "Are You an Eagle?" tells of the significance of eagles in traditional American Indian Culture, discusses those who merit an eagle feather for accomplishment, and lists characteristics of eagles (and…

  3. Gaps in Survey Data on Cancer in American Indian and Alaska Native Populations: Examination of US Population Surveys, 1960–2010

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Tinka; Stimpson, Jim P.; Smith, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Population-based data are essential for quantifying the problems and measuring the progress made by comprehensive cancer control programs. However, cancer information specific to the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is not readily available. We identified major population-based surveys conducted in the United States that contain questions related to cancer, documented the AI/AN sample size in these surveys, and identified gaps in the types of cancer-related information these surveys collect. Methods We conducted an Internet query of US Department of Health and Human Services agency websites and a Medline search to identify population-based surveys conducted in the United States from 1960 through 2010 that contained information about cancer. We used a data extraction form to collect information about the purpose, sample size, data collection methods, and type of information covered in the surveys. Results Seventeen survey sources met the inclusion criteria. Information on access to and use of cancer treatment, follow-up care, and barriers to receiving timely and quality care was not consistently collected. Estimates specific to the AI/AN population were often lacking because of inadequate AI/AN sample size. For example, 9 national surveys reviewed reported an AI/AN sample size smaller than 500, and 10 had an AI/AN sample percentage less than 1.5%. Conclusion Continued efforts are needed to increase the overall number of AI/AN participants in these surveys, improve the quality of information on racial/ethnic background, and collect more information on treatment and survivorship. PMID:23517582

  4. Reconstructing Indian Population History

    PubMed Central

    Reich, David; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.; Singh, Lalji

    2009-01-01

    India has been underrepresented in genome-wide surveys of human variation. We analyze 25 diverse groups to provide strong evidence for two ancient populations, genetically divergent, that are ancestral to most Indians today. One, the “Ancestral North Indians” (ANI), is genetically close to Middle Easterners, Central Asians, and Europeans, while the other, the “Ancestral South Indians” (ASI), is as distinct from ANI and East Asians as they are from each other. By introducing methods that can estimate ancestry without accurate ancestral populations, we show that ANI ancestry ranges from 39-71% in India, and is higher in traditionally upper caste and Indo-European speakers. Groups with only ASI ancestry may no longer exist in mainland India. However, the Andamanese are an ASI-related group without ANI ancestry, showing that the peopling of the islands must have occurred before ANI-ASI gene flow on the mainland. Allele frequency differences between groups in India are larger than in Europe, reflecting strong founder effects whose signatures have been maintained for thousands of years due to endogamy. We therefore predict that there will be an excess of recessive diseases in India, different in each group, which should be possible to screen and map genetically. PMID:19779445

  5. The American Indian as Miscast Ecologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Calvin

    1981-01-01

    Refutes the notion of leaders of the 1960s ecology movement that American Indians could teach their land ethic to White Americans. Points to the differences in western cosmology and suggests that the land ethic is a comprehensive way of life to American Indians. (Author/KC)

  6. A Physical Activity Intervention and Changes in Body Mass Index at a Middle School With a Large American Indian Population, Oklahoma, 2004–2009

    PubMed Central

    Folorunso, Olakunle A.; Moore, William E.

    2016-01-01

    School-based interventions can reach children and adolescents and aid in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. A physical education class that engaged middle school students in a daily 1-mile walk or run and other team sports was developed in a rural school in southwestern Oklahoma with a large American Indian population. Body mass index z scores decreased among boys and were stable among girls in the intervention group compared with students who did not participate in the intervention. A daily required walk or run may help to establish a physical activity habit with all of its associated benefits. PMID:27906646

  7. A Physical Activity Intervention and Changes in Body Mass Index at a Middle School With a Large American Indian Population, Oklahoma, 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Eichner, June E; Folorunso, Olakunle A; Moore, William E

    2016-12-01

    School-based interventions can reach children and adolescents and aid in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. A physical education class that engaged middle school students in a daily 1-mile walk or run and other team sports was developed in a rural school in southwestern Oklahoma with a large American Indian population. Body mass index z scores decreased among boys and were stable among girls in the intervention group compared with students who did not participate in the intervention. A daily required walk or run may help to establish a physical activity habit with all of its associated benefits.

  8. The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies & Traditional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    This book presents an ethnohistorical examination of American Indian thinking and philosophy and strives to explain the complexity of the American Indian mind in its traditional cultural and natural environment and in contrast to the American mainstream linear world. It is argued that Indian thinking is visual; circular; concerned with the…

  9. The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies & Traditional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    This book presents an ethnohistorical examination of American Indian thinking and philosophy and strives to explain the complexity of the American Indian mind in its traditional cultural and natural environment and in contrast to the American mainstream linear world. It is argued that Indian thinking is visual; circular; concerned with the…

  10. Diabetes-specific genetic effects on obesity traits in American Indian populations: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; Almasy, Laura; MacCluer, Jean W; Göring, Harald H H; Cole, Shelley A; Diego, Vincent P; Laston, Sandra; Howard, Barbara V; Lee, Elisa T; Best, Lyle G; Fabsitz, Richard R; North, Kari E

    2008-10-14

    Body fat mass distribution and deposition are determined by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and type 2 diabetes. We previously identified evidence for genotype-by-diabetes interaction on obesity traits in Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) participants. To localize these genetic effects, we conducted genome-wide linkage scans of obesity traits in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes, and in the combined sample while modeling interaction with diabetes using maximum likelihood methods (SOLAR 2.1.4). SHFS recruited American Indians from Arizona, North and South Dakota, and Oklahoma. Anthropometric measures and diabetes status were obtained during a clinic visit. Marker allele frequencies were derived using maximum likelihood methods estimated from all individuals and multipoint identity by descent sharing was estimated using Loki. We used variance component linkage analysis to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influencing obesity traits. We tested for evidence of additive and QTL-specific genotype-by-diabetes interactions using the regions identified in the diabetes-stratified analyses. Among 245 diabetic and 704 non-diabetic American Indian individuals, we detected significant additive gene-by-diabetes interaction for weight and BMI (P < 0.02). In analysis accounting for QTL-specific interaction (P < 0.001), we detected a QTL for weight on chromosome 1 at 242 cM (LOD = 3.7). This chromosome region harbors the adiponectin receptor 1 gene, which has been previously associated with obesity. These results suggest distinct genetic effects on body mass in individuals with diabetes compared to those without diabetes, and a possible role for one or more genes on chromosome 1 in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  11. Diabetes-specific genetic effects on obesity traits in American Indian populations: the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Nora; Almasy, Laura; MacCluer, Jean W; Göring, Harald HH; Cole, Shelley A; Diego, Vincent P; Laston, Sandra; Howard, Barbara V; Lee, Elisa T; Best, Lyle G; Fabsitz, Richard R; North, Kari E

    2008-01-01

    Background Body fat mass distribution and deposition are determined by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and type 2 diabetes. We previously identified evidence for genotype-by-diabetes interaction on obesity traits in Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) participants. To localize these genetic effects, we conducted genome-wide linkage scans of obesity traits in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes, and in the combined sample while modeling interaction with diabetes using maximum likelihood methods (SOLAR 2.1.4). Methods SHFS recruited American Indians from Arizona, North and South Dakota, and Oklahoma. Anthropometric measures and diabetes status were obtained during a clinic visit. Marker allele frequencies were derived using maximum likelihood methods estimated from all individuals and multipoint identity by descent sharing was estimated using Loki. We used variance component linkage analysis to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influencing obesity traits. We tested for evidence of additive and QTL-specific genotype-by-diabetes interactions using the regions identified in the diabetes-stratified analyses. Results Among 245 diabetic and 704 non-diabetic American Indian individuals, we detected significant additive gene-by-diabetes interaction for weight and BMI (P < 0.02). In analysis accounting for QTL-specific interaction (P < 0.001), we detected a QTL for weight on chromosome 1 at 242 cM (LOD = 3.7). This chromosome region harbors the adiponectin receptor 1 gene, which has been previously associated with obesity. Conclusion These results suggest distinct genetic effects on body mass in individuals with diabetes compared to those without diabetes, and a possible role for one or more genes on chromosome 1 in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:18854016

  12. The Destruction of American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Steven, Ed.

    Responding to the need for a comprehensive source of information regarding the separation of American Indian children from their families, this book presents essays which: examine the Indian child-welfare crisis in contemporary, legal, and historical perspectives; document the human cost of the crisis to Indian parents, children, and communities;…

  13. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  14. A Contemporary Approach to American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, William J.

    The exigencies of contemporary native American education require a thorough review. Issues considered in establishing a viable conceptual framework are Indian control of education, role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Office of Indian Education, application of federal programs and appropriations, characteristics of the new generation of…

  15. State Responsibilities for American Indians -- Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Tom

    The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from…

  16. The Federal Role in American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Frank Anthony

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses federal legislation that concerns American Indian education. Examines contract schools, the Bureau of Indian Affairs school system, availability of public schools, sectarian mission schools, termination of tribal sovereignty, relocation to urban areas, and the Indian Education Act of 1972. (CT)

  17. School Management Options for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streiff, Paul R.

    In response to the Presidential/Secretarial Educational Objective of 1975 which called for a statement from American Indian communities relative to their educational management preferences, the Office of Indian Education Programs (OIEP) established a program for gathering and disseminating educational management options to Indian people. A seven…

  18. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  19. The Destruction of American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Steven, Ed.

    Responding to the need for a comprehensive source of information regarding the separation of American Indian children from their families, this book presents essays which: examine the Indian child-welfare crisis in contemporary, legal, and historical perspectives; document the human cost of the crisis to Indian parents, children, and communities;…

  20. Bilingual and Bicultural Education for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purley, Anthony F.

    Those concerned with American Indian education must recognize the value inherent in revitalization of the fundamental Indian "life" principles. To this end, a critical examination of present Indian bilingual and bicultural programs is sorely needed. To provide a favorable climate for valid research in the evaluation of special programs,…

  1. American Indian Perspectives of Euro-American Counseling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokken, Jayne M.; Twohey, Denise

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen American Indians participated in 17 counseling interviews with Euro-American counselors. The study analyzed interviews of American Indian participants using Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR). Counselor trustworthiness, which was increased by counselor empathy, genuineness, concern, self-disclosure, and slow pace of problem…

  2. Stereotypes of American Indians in Adolescent Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Nancy Lynn

    1988-01-01

    Reviews several adolescent novels by and about American Indians published in the 1970s and 1980s, including historical and contemporary fiction. Concludes that many books are available which do not stereotype Native Americans. (MM)

  3. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline utilization and cessation among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sydney A; Beebe, Laura A; Campbell, Janis E

    2015-01-01

    American Indians in Oklahoma have higher rates of tobacco use (29.2%) than any other racial group in the state. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline provides free cessation services to all Oklahomans and implements strategies specifically aimed at increasing the utilization and effectiveness of cessation services for American Indians. To explore Helpline utilization patterns as well as outcomes, such as participant satisfaction and success in quitting, for American Indians. The utilization patterns and outcomes for American Indians were compared to that of the white population from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, to determine whether the Helpline is equally effective among American Indians compared to whites. Helpline utilization data from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, were analyzed in the fall of 2013 to identify patterns and compare differences between American Indian and white Helpline registrants. Four- and 7-month follow-up survey data were used to compare outcomes related to satisfaction with services and quit rates. During the 3-year study period, 10.6% of registrants who enrolled in an intervention were American Indian (11,075) and 71.2% were white (74,493). At the 7-month follow-up survey, 31.7% of American Indians reported having used no tobacco in the past 30 days compared to 36.5% of whites, but the differences were not statistically significant between racial groups. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is equally effective for American Indian and white tobacco users who register for Helpline services. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How ... conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Breast cancer Cancer ...

  5. American Indians, Witchcraft, and Witch-hunting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Explores North American Indian beliefs about witchcraft and witch-hunting. Focuses on the ideas and actions of the Iroquois about witchcraft. Addresses the changes in ideas of North American Indians living in the nineteenth century. Notes the transition from men and women perceived as witches to mostly females. (CMK)

  6. A, B, C's the American Indian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Hawk, Richard

    This book, recommended for children from preschool through age 8, presents various facts about American Indians and American Indian culture and history. Using the alphabet, the book provides information on the Apache people of the southwestern United States; the Luiseno of southern California; the Modoc of northern California; the Navajo nation,…

  7. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  8. American Indian Standards for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.

    These American Indian standards for health education were developed in close alignment with the 1995 U.S. national standards. While the text of the actual "standards" is the same in both documents, the performance indicators in this material have been tailored specifically for use in schools serving American Indian students. Like the…

  9. American Indians, Witchcraft, and Witch-hunting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Explores North American Indian beliefs about witchcraft and witch-hunting. Focuses on the ideas and actions of the Iroquois about witchcraft. Addresses the changes in ideas of North American Indians living in the nineteenth century. Notes the transition from men and women perceived as witches to mostly females. (CMK)

  10. The American Indian: A Multimedia Encyclopedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Christina E.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "The American Indian: A Multimedia Encyclopedia," Version 1.0 (New York, Facts on File, Inc., 1993). This electronic product (compact disk) presents a great amount of material on American Indians from various formats, but its effectiveness is limited by the dated nature of some materials. Software design and searching features are…

  11. Teaching about Human Rights and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a flexible lesson plan integrating teaching about human rights into the existing curriculum about American Indians. Asserts that American Indians have the right to maintain their cultural ways and connects that subject to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Includes three lists of resources and references. (MJP)

  12. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  13. American Indian Gifted Children: Finding Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Elizabeth Ann

    This paper illuminates the physiological, socio-cultural, and linguistic obstacles which occur due to the interaction between American Indian cultures and the Anglo educational system and which make the identification of gifted and talented American Indian children difficult. It demonstrates the need for more culturally appropriate ways of…

  14. Denver American Indian Mental Health Needs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 374 Denver American Indians, mostly unemployed and low-income, examined substance abuse, psychological problems, and personal trauma for self and household; Native community mental health problems (including youth problems); counselor preferences; opinions about school testing of American Indian children; and Native community needs for…

  15. The American Indian Controlled Community College Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, David H.; Price, Floyd H.

    American Indian controlled community colleges emerged on the educational scene in the late 1960's and early 1970's. The first such college was created in 1968 and since this time ten additional colleges have been established with governing boards whose total membership is American Indian. The philosophy of the colleges emphasizes the interweaving…

  16. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  17. American Indian Cultural Resources: A Preservation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, Kathy

    Designed for use by American Indian tribes, archaeologists, law enforcement officials, local/state/federal administrators in charge of cultural resources management matters, and the general public, this handbook has been compiled to serve as a practical guide to protecting American Indian cultural resources in Oregon. The book brings together…

  18. Substance Abuse and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Willard E.

    This guide introduces concerns and problems resulting from the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs among American Indian youth and addresses intergenerational substance abuse effects. Alcohol abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives is the most visible effect of their cultural disruption and disorganization. Alcoholism among Native Americans…

  19. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  20. American Indian Victims of Campus Ethnoviolence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    A study examined ethnoviolence against American Indian students at Northern Arizona University. Surveys completed by 92 American Indian students indicated that while violent assaults were rare, daily harassment and verbal assaults were relatively common. Four strategies are suggested to create a more safe and welcoming college environment for…

  1. American Indian Cultural Resources: A Preservation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, Kathy

    Designed for use by American Indian tribes, archaeologists, law enforcement officials, local/state/federal administrators in charge of cultural resources management matters, and the general public, this handbook has been compiled to serve as a practical guide to protecting American Indian cultural resources in Oregon. The book brings together…

  2. Tribal Secrets: Recovering American Indian Intellectual Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrior, Robert Allen

    This book is a comparative interpretation of the works of Vine Deloria, Jr., (Standing Rock Sioux) and John Joseph Mathews (Osage), two American Indian intellectuals of this century. In bringing these two thinkers together, the book lays the groundwork for a discussion of several crucial issues in contemporary American Indian critical studies: (1)…

  3. American Indian Intellectualism and the New Indian Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Critically reviews modern writings about American Indians, focusing on Indian romance novels, children's stories, biographies, works by "urban mixed-bloods," and the "art for art's sake" stance. Views non-Native works as irrelevant and most Native writings as self-centered or escapist. Calls for Native intellectuals to…

  4. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline Utilization and Cessation Among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Sydney A.; Beebe, Laura A.; Campbell, Janis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background American Indians in Oklahoma have higher rates of tobacco use (29.2%) than any other racial group in the state. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline provides free cessation services to all Oklahomans and implements strategies specifically aimed at increasing the utilization and effectiveness of cessation services for American Indians. Purpose To explore Helpline utilization patterns as well as outcomes, such as participant satisfaction and success in quitting, for American Indians. The utilization patterns and outcomes for American Indians were compared to that of the white population from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, to determine whether the Helpline is equally effective among American Indians compared to whites. Methods Helpline utilization data from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, were analyzed in the fall of 2013 to identify patterns and compare differences between American Indian and white Helpline registrants. Four- and 7-month follow-up survey data were used to compare outcomes related to satisfaction with services and quit rates. Results During the 3-year study period, 10.6% of registrants who enrolled in an intervention were American Indian (11,075) and 71.2% were white (74,493). At the 7-month follow-up survey, 31.7% of American Indians reported having used no tobacco in the past 30 days compared to 36.5% of whites, but the differences were not statistically significant between racial groups. Conclusions The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is equally effective for American Indian and white tobacco users who register for Helpline services. PMID:25528707

  5. Review of American Indian veteran telemental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay; Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Brooks, Elizabeth; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Richardson, W J Buck; Floyd, James; Lowe, Jeff; Nagamoto, Herbert; Phares, Robert; Manson, Spero

    2012-03-01

    Rural American Indian veterans have unique healthcare needs and face numerous barriers to accessing healthcare services. Over the past decade, the Department of Veterans Affairs in conjunction with the University of Colorado Denver has turned to the promising field of telemental health to develop a series of videoconferencing-based clinics to reach this vulnerable population and improve mental healthcare services. The ongoing development, implementation, and expansion of these clinics have been assessed as part of a program improvement. The outcomes of these assessments have been documented in a series of published articles, controlled studies, program and case reports, and model descriptions. This article summarizes a decade of experience with the American Indian Telemental Health Clinics, the clinic model, and the literature arising from these clinics and presents lessons learned while establishing, maintaining, and evaluating these clinics. The ability to tailor the clinics to individual sites and cultures and to provide various services has been critical to the operation of the clinics. Culturally specific care through culturally knowledgeable providers, onsite tribal outreach workers, and collaboration with community services has proven essential in operating the clinics, as well as building rapport, trust, and engagement with the target patient population. It is hoped that the lessons learned and practices presented here can not only assist others working to improve the care for rural Native veterans but also serve as a model in the use of telemental health services for improving care and access to rural veteran and non-veteran populations.

  6. American Indian Education in the Chicago Public Schools: Another Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Branda

    This practicum paper uses previously unavailable data from the Chicago Board of Education and the 1990 census to update a 1992 study of Native American dropouts in Chicago public schools. An overview of Chicago's American Indian population focuses on the Uptown area, a low income neighborhood in which one fifth of the city's Native Americans…

  7. Assessing accuracy of genotype imputation in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Alka; Kobes, Sayuko; Bogardus, Clifton; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Hanson, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Genotype imputation is commonly used in genetic association studies to test untyped variants using information on linkage disequilibrium (LD) with typed markers. Imputing genotypes requires a suitable reference population in which the LD pattern is known, most often one selected from HapMap. However, some populations, such as American Indians, are not represented in HapMap. In the present study, we assessed accuracy of imputation using HapMap reference populations in a genome-wide association study in Pima Indians. Data from six randomly selected chromosomes were used. Genotypes in the study population were masked (either 1% or 20% of SNPs available for a given chromosome). The masked genotypes were then imputed using the software Markov Chain Haplotyping Algorithm. Using four HapMap reference populations, average genotype error rates ranged from 7.86% for Mexican Americans to 22.30% for Yoruba. In contrast, use of the original Pima Indian data as a reference resulted in an average error rate of 1.73%. Our results suggest that the use of HapMap reference populations results in substantial inaccuracy in the imputation of genotypes in American Indians. A possible solution would be to densely genotype or sequence a reference American Indian population.

  8. Estimates of Resident Indian Population by State and Reservation: March 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The document gives estimates of resident American Indian population by state and Indian Reservation for March 1972. The term resident Indian means Indians enrolled in a tribe recognized by the United States Government living on or near reservations. It also includes Indians living in former reservation areas of Oklahoma, and all Alaskan Indians…

  9. The Costs of Treating American Indian Adults With Diabetes Within the Indian Health Service

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Joan M.; Wilson, Charlton; Manson, Spero M.; Acton, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the costs of treating American Indian adults with diabetes within the Indian Health Service (IHS). Methods. We extracted demographic and health service utilization data from the IHS electronic medical reporting system for 32 052 American Indian adults in central Arizona in 2004 and 2005. We derived treatment cost estimates from an IHS facility–specific cost report. We examined chronic condition prevalence, medical service utilization, and treatment costs for American Indians with and without diabetes. Results. IHS treatment costs for the 10.9% of American Indian adults with diabetes accounted for 37.0% of all adult treatment costs. Persons with diabetes accounted for nearly half of all hospital days (excluding days for obstetrical care). Hospital inpatient service costs for those with diabetes accounted for 32.2% of all costs. Conclusions. In this first study of treatment costs within the IHS, costs for American Indians with diabetes were found to consume a significant proportion of IHS resources. The findings give federal agencies and tribes critical information for resource allocation and policy formulation to reduce and eventually eliminate diabetes-related disparities between American Indians and Alaska Natives and other racial/ethnic populations. PMID:22390444

  10. Impact of genetic ancestry and sociodemographic status on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus in American Indian-European populations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elena; Rasmussen, Astrid; Riba, Laura; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo; Kelly, Jennifer A; Langefeld, Carl D; Williams, Adrianne H; Ziegler, Julie T; Comeau, Mary E; Marion, Miranda C; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A; Cardiel, Mario H; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moctezuma, José Francisco; Miranda, Pedro; Perandones, Carlos E; Castel, Cecilia; Laborde, Hugo A; Alba, Paula; Musuruana, Jorge L; Goecke, I Annelise; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Vilá, Luis M; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gilkeson, Gary S; Niewold, Timothy B; Martín, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J; Boackle, Susan A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Scofield, R Hal; Petri, Michelle; Merrill, Joan T; Reveille, John D; Tsao, Betty P; Orozco, Lorena; Baca, Vicente; Moser, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; James, Judith A; Harley, John B; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Jacob, Chaim O; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2012-11-01

    American Indian-Europeans, Asians, and African Americans have an excess morbidity from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a higher prevalence of lupus nephritis than do Caucasians. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features in a large cohort of American Indian-European SLE patients. A total of 2,116 SLE patients of American Indian-European origin and 4,001 SLE patients of European descent for whom we had clinical data were included in the study. Genotyping of 253 continental ancestry-informative markers was performed on the Illumina platform. Structure and Admixture software were used to determine genetic ancestry proportions of each individual. Logistic regression was used to test the association between genetic ancestry and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). The average American Indian genetic ancestry of 2,116 SLE patients was 40.7%. American Indian genetic ancestry conferred increased risks of renal involvement (P < 0.0001, OR 3.50 [95% CI 2.63- 4.63]) and early age at onset (P < 0.0001). American Indian ancestry protected against photosensitivity (P < 0.0001, OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.44-0.76]), oral ulcers (P < 0.0001, OR 0.55 [95% CI 0.42-0.72]), and serositis (P < 0.0001, OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.41-0.75]) after adjustment for age, sex, and age at onset. However, age and sex had stronger effects than genetic ancestry on malar rash, discoid rash, arthritis, and neurologic involvement. In general, American Indian genetic ancestry correlates with lower sociodemographic status and increases the risk of developing renal involvement and SLE at an earlier age. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Comorbidity among Older American Indians: The Native Elder Care Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilkerton, Courtney S.

    2011-01-01

    Comorbidity is a growing challenge and the older adult population is most at risk of developing comorbid conditions. Comorbidity is associated with increased risk of mortality, increased hospitalizations, increased doctor visits, increased prescription medications, nursing home placement, poorer mental health, and physical disability. American Indians experience some of the highest rates of chronic conditions, but to date there have been only two published studies on the subject of comorbidity in this population. With a community-based sample of 505 American Indians aged 55 years or older, this study identified the most prevalent chronic conditions, described comorbidity, and identified socio-demographic, functional limitations, and psychosocial correlates of comorbidity. Results indicated that older American Indians experience higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, back pain, and vision loss compared to national statistics of older adults. Two-thirds of the sample experienced some degree of comorbidity according to the scale used. Older age, poorer physical functioning, more depressive symptomatology, and lower personal mastery were all correlates of higher comorbidity scores. Despite medical advances increasing life expectancy, morbidity and mortality statistics suggest that the health of older American Indians lags behind the majority population. These findings highlight the importance of supporting chronic care and management services for the older American Indian population. PMID:20532973

  12. Repertoire, Authenticity, and Instruction: The Presentation of American Indian Music in Oklahoma's Elementary Schools. Native Americans: Interdisciplinary Perspectives--A Garland Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damm, Robert J.

    This book examines the presentation of American Indian music by elementary music educators in Oklahoma, which has the largest American Indian population of any state. A literature review covers an historical profile of multicultural music education, ethnomusicological studies of American Indian music, dissertations pertaining to American Indian…

  13. American Indian Men’s Perceptions of Breast Cancer Screening for American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Melissa K.; Pacheco, Joseph; James, Aimee S.; Brown, Travis; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Choi, Won S.; Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, especially screening mammography, is vital for decreasing breast cancer incidence and mortality. Screening rates in American Indian women are low compared to other racial/ethnic groups. In addition, American Indian women are diagnosed at more advanced stages and have lower 5-year survival rate than others. To better address the screening rates of American Indian women, focus groups (N=8) were conducted with American Indian men (N=42) to explore their perceptions of breast cancer screening for American Indian women. Our intent was to understand men’s support level toward screening. Using a community-based participatory approach, focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a text analysis approach developed by our team. Topics discussed included breast cancer and screening knowledge, barriers to screening, and suggestions to improve screening rates. These findings can guide strategies to improve knowledge and awareness, communication among families and health care providers, and screening rates in American Indian communities. PMID:25995972

  14. American Indian Studies: A Bibliographic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This book lists sources of information available on Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Some sources also include information on native Hawaiians, Indians of Mexico, and Indians of Central and South America. The purpose of the guide is to provide researchers with direction and organization for selecting and using the best…

  15. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, and community leaders with the programs available to Indians through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this brochure provides information on program benefits, application procedures, and who to contact for further information for 49 programs in the areas of agriculture, community…

  16. Indian Peace Medals in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prucha, Francis Paul

    Silver medals played an important role in American Indian policy for more than a century. Following a practice of the French, Spanish, and British in the New World, the United States government presented Indian peace medals to important chiefs and warriors as symbols of attachment to the new nation. In addition, the medals were marks of rank…

  17. State Responsibilities for American Indians -- Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, George V.; Finn, Skip

    It is important to remeber that American Indians are citizens of both the nation and the state in which they reside and are entitled, therefore, to share in all privileges of such citizenship. The 1924 Citizenship Act was meant to pave the way for gradual termination of Federal responsibility for Indians. However, in Minnesota Public Law (PL) 280…

  18. Child Abuse and Neglect in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.

    Child abuse and neglect among American Indians is a political as well as a clinical problem, as the victims belong to one cultural group and health professionls who detect maltreatment generally belong to another. Reluctance to diagnose and report child abuse, although universal, is probably more significant in Indian communities for several…

  19. Special Needs of American Indian College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Billie Jane

    Weak academic background, cultural shock, inadequate support services, English deficiency and other needs have been identified as reasons why only 10% of American Indian college freshmen graduate from college. A review of the literature shows that harmony and pride present a cultural conflict in adjusting to exposure to non-Indian society. Value…

  20. Special Needs of American Indian College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Billie Jane

    Weak academic background, cultural shock, inadequate support services, English deficiency and other needs have been identified as reasons why only 10% of American Indian college freshmen graduate from college. A review of the literature shows that harmony and pride present a cultural conflict in adjusting to exposure to non-Indian society. Value…

  1. Genome-wide linkage scan for plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-1 and triglyceride variation among American Indian populations: the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Monda, KL.; Göring, HHH; Haack, K; Cole, SA; Diego, VP; Almasy, L; Laston, S; Howard, BV; Shara, NM; Lee, ET; Best, LG; Fabsitz, RR; MacCluer, JW; North, KE

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have identified chromosomal regions linked to variation in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein A-1 (Apo A-1) and triglyceride (TG), although results have been inconsistent and previous studies of American Indian populations are limited Objective In an attempt to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influencing HDL-C, Apo A-1 and TG, we conducted genome-wide linkage scans of subjects of the Strong Heart Family Study. Methods We implemented analyses in 3484 men and women aged 18 years or older, at three study centers. Results With adjustment for age, sex and center, we detected a QTL influencing both HDL-C (LOD = 4.4, genome-wide P = 0.001) and Apo A-1 (LOD = 3.2, genome-wide P = 0.020) nearest marker D6S289 at 6p23 in the Arizona sample. Another QTL influencing Apo A-1 was found nearest marker D9S287 at 9q22.2 (LOD = 3.0, genome-wide P = 0.033) in the North and South Dakotas. We detected a QTL influencing TG nearest marker D15S153 at 15q22.31 (LOD = 4.5 in the overall sample and LOD = 3.8 in the Dakotas sample, genome-wide P = 0.0044) and when additionally adjusted for waist, current smoking, current alcohol, current estrogen, lipid treatment, impaired fasting glucose, and diabetes, nearest marker D10S217 at 10q26.2 (LOD = 3.7, genome-wide P = 0.0058) in the Arizona population. Conclusions The replication of QTLs in regions of the genome that harbor well-known candidate genes suggest that chromosomes 6p, 9q and 15q warrant further investigation with fine mapping for causative polymorphisms in American Indians. PMID:19429595

  2. Contributions of Black Americans, Indian Americans, Mexican Americans and Asian Americans to American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The teacher resource guide for grades K through 12 was developed by a multi ethnic committee of educators to comply with the California Education code. "Instruction in the social sciences shall include the early history of California and a study of the role and contributions of American Negroes, American Indians, Mexicans, and other ethnic…

  3. Effects of Alcohol Use and Anti-American Indian Attitudes on Domestic-Violence Culpability Decisions for American Indian and Euro-American Actors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Hack, Lori; Tehee, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the unique issues surrounding American Indian violence. Yet American Indian women are at high risk for domestic abuse, and domestic violence has been identified as the most important issue for American Indians now and in the future by the National Congress of American Indians. American Indian women suffer from domestic…

  4. Effects of Alcohol Use and Anti-American Indian Attitudes on Domestic-Violence Culpability Decisions for American Indian and Euro-American Actors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Hack, Lori; Tehee, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the unique issues surrounding American Indian violence. Yet American Indian women are at high risk for domestic abuse, and domestic violence has been identified as the most important issue for American Indians now and in the future by the National Congress of American Indians. American Indian women suffer from domestic…

  5. Childhood exposure to adversity and risk of substance-use disorder in two American Indian populations: the meditational role of early substance-use initiation.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Beals, Janette; Mitchell, Christina M; Manson, Spero M; Turner, R Jay

    2009-11-01

    We examined the relationship of childhood exposure to adversity and risk of substance-use disorder in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, exploring both the role of early initiation of substance use in mediating this relationship and variation in risk across types of adversity exposure. The American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project provided data from 2,927 American Indians on the occurrence and age at onset of adversities, substance use, and substance-use-disorder symptoms. The risk of substance-use disorder associated with early adversity was explained partially by early initiation of substance use. Three types of adversity (major childhood events, traumas, and witnessed violence) were associated with early onset of substance use and increased risk of substance-use disorder. Gender and tribe were also related to variation in both early substance use and substance-use disorder. Early exposure to adverse events was associated with early substance use and the subsequent development of substance-use disorders among American Indians. public health initiatives targeting substance use and substance-use disorders in American Indian communities should include efforts to help children in these communities cope with adversities they encounter.

  6. Childhood Exposure to Adversity and Risk of Substance-Use Disorder in Two American Indian Populations: The Meditational Role of Early Substance-Use Initiation*

    PubMed Central

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Beals, Janette; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.; Turner, R. Jay

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We examined the relationship of childhood exposure to adversity and risk of substance-use disorder in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, exploring both the role of early initiation of substance use in mediating this relationship and variation in risk across types of adversity exposure. Method: The American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project provided data from 2,927 American Indians on the occurrence and age at onset of adversities, substance use, and substance-use-disorder symptoms. Results: The risk of substance-use disorder associated with early adversity was explained partially by early initiation of substance use. Three types of adversity (major childhood events, traumas, and witnessed violence) were associated with early onset of substance use and increased risk of substance-use disorder. Gender and tribe were also related to variation in both early substance use and substance-use disorder. Conclusions: Early exposure to adverse events was associated with early substance use and the subsequent development of substance-use disorders among American Indians. Public health initiatives targeting substance use and substance-use disorders in American Indian communities should include efforts to help children in these communities cope with adversities they encounter. PMID:19895776

  7. Teaching English to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    Many practices in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools were negative, but this paper emphasizes the positive efforts that were made throughout their history, especially in regard to teaching English. The Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879, encouraged the use of English through an English language student newspaper and frequently…

  8. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  9. Changes in Cancer Incidence Patterns among a Northeastern American Indian Population: 1955-1969 versus 1990-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Martin C.; Va, Puthiery; Stevens, Adrian; Kahn, Amy R.; Michalek, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This manuscript examines shifts in patterns of cancer incidence among the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) for the interval 1955-1969 compared to 1990-2004. Methods: A retrospective cohort design was used to examine cancer incidence among the SNI during 2 time intervals: 1955-1969 and 1990-2004. Person-years at risk were multiplied by…

  10. Changes in Cancer Incidence Patterns among a Northeastern American Indian Population: 1955-1969 versus 1990-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Martin C.; Va, Puthiery; Stevens, Adrian; Kahn, Amy R.; Michalek, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This manuscript examines shifts in patterns of cancer incidence among the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) for the interval 1955-1969 compared to 1990-2004. Methods: A retrospective cohort design was used to examine cancer incidence among the SNI during 2 time intervals: 1955-1969 and 1990-2004. Person-years at risk were multiplied by…

  11. American Indians in South Dakota: A Profile. Update Series C229, No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Linda L.; Bennett, Mary A.

    Life is changing for the American Indians of South Dakota and the United States. Nationally, the population is young, growing, and becoming more urban. The South Dakota population exhibits these same traits, except that it remains predominantly rural. In South Dakota, American Indians combat poverty, unemployment, underemployment, and inadequate…

  12. American Indians: A Study Guide and Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Lynn P.

    As one of four volumes in a series on American minorities, this study/resource guide on American Indians is designed for secondary teachers and students and employs an interdisciplinary approach focusing on the following themes: (1) Identity; (2) Conflict; and (3) Integration vs Nationalism. Each thematic section presents a study outline which is…

  13. American Indians: Hands-On Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethlefsen, Ann Lyle

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the teaching methods she uses to teach how different American Indian groups lived in different regions of the North American continent. Her lessons include a number of projects: (1) Practicing symbolic writing; (2) Creating a personal timeline; (3) Studying winter counts and creating a personalized…

  14. American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2011-01-01

    When American Indian/Native American studies (AI/NAS) programs began to emerge in the halls of academia during the late 1960s and early 1970s, some who served as faculty and staff questioned whether they would be one-generation phenomena. Would the programs survive, would they continue to draw students, and could they make an impact on…

  15. The Sacred Pipe in American Indian Religions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Paul B.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliographic essay covers all significant literature on the Sacred Pipe among the North American tribes. Organizes over 130 references dating from 1843 to 1980 under topics such as American Indian attitudes toward the pipe, sacramental and ceremonial uses of the pipe, and the pipe as symbolic man. (JHZ)

  16. American Indians: Hands-On Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethlefsen, Ann Lyle

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the teaching methods she uses to teach how different American Indian groups lived in different regions of the North American continent. Her lessons include a number of projects: (1) Practicing symbolic writing; (2) Creating a personal timeline; (3) Studying winter counts and creating a personalized…

  17. American Indian Enrichment Activities. Mini-Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosnick, Sally

    Focusing on American Indians, this annotated bibliography covers a variety of resources for enriching multicultural education in the elementary classroom and includes limited information about Mexican Americans, Blacks, and other cultural groups. Each of the 26 entries provides a descriptive annotation and indicates where the material can be…

  18. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  19. American Indian Studies as an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2011-01-01

    When American Indian/Native American studies (AI/NAS) programs began to emerge in the halls of academia during the late 1960s and early 1970s, some who served as faculty and staff questioned whether they would be one-generation phenomena. Would the programs survive, would they continue to draw students, and could they make an impact on…

  20. Trends in otitis media and myringtomy with tube placement among American Indian/Alaska native children and the US general population of children.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Rosalyn J; Holman, Robert C; Plant, Randall; Yorita, Krista L; Holve, Steve; Paisano, Edna L; Cheek, James E

    2009-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) morbidity in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children is historically higher than that in other US children. Outpatient visits and hospitalizations listing OM as a diagnosis and outpatient visits listing myringotomy with insertion of tubes as a procedure among AI/AN children <5 years of age from the Indian Health Service National Patient Information Reporting system for 2003-2005 were analyzed. Outpatient visits and hospitalizations with OM for the general US child population were analyzed using the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care and National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys for 2003-2005, and the 2003 Kids' Inpatient Database, respectively. The OM-associated outpatient visit rate for AI/AN children <5 years of age (89 per 100 children/yr) for 2003-2005 was less than that reported for 1994-1996 (138); however, the rate increased for Alaska region (158 to 181). The OM outpatient visit and myringotomy with insertion of tubes rates (181 and 2.6 per 100 children/yr, respectively) for AI/AN children in Alaska were higher than rates for children in each of the other IHS regions and rates for US children (63 and 1.8 per 100 children/yr, respectively). The OM outpatient visit rates for AI/AN infants (184), especially in the Alaska region (334), were higher than the rate for US infants (84). The OM-associated outpatient visit rate in AI/AN children <5 years of age has decreased but remains higher than that of the US general child population; however, the rate increased in the Alaska region, where a limited decline in invasive pneumococcal disease has been demonstrated. The ongoing disparity in OM outpatient visit rates among AI/AN children, especially Alaska Native children, indicates a need for new prevention measures, including expanded-valency pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, to reduce OM morbidity.

  1. The Persistence of American Indian Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  2. Practicing participatory research in American Indian communities1–3

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M; Reid, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the historical issues that affect research in American Indian communities and examine the implications of these issues as they relate to culturally sensitive, respectful, and appropriate research with this population. Methods include review and analysis of the literature and examination of our collective experience and that of our colleagues. Recommendations are given for conducting culturally sensitive, participatory research. We conclude that research efforts must build on the establishment of partnerships between investigators and American Indian communities to ensure accurate findings and analyses and to implement culturally relevant benefits. PMID:10195598

  3. The Prevalence of Suicidal Behaviors Among Northern Plains American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMaster, Pamela L.; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K.; Manson, Spero M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of suicidal behaviors among 1,638 Northern Plains American Indians ages 15?57. Age and gender patterns were investigated as was comorbidity with psychiatric and substance use disorders. Data from a population-based survey indicated that suicidal behaviors were more frequently reported among females than males and…

  4. Identifying Outstanding Talent in American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Carolyn M.; McIntire, Jay A.

    This report reviews and synthesizes the most promising practices used to identify exceptionally talented students from the Native American population. Preliminary information includes an Indian Student Bill of Rights, discussion of the problem of talent identification, and discussion of special issues including diversity within the Native American…

  5. Barriers to diabetes prevention and control among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ronny A

    2011-01-01

    North Carolina's American Indian population experiences a disproportionate diabetes burden, in terms of both a high prevalence of the disease and excess diabetes-related death and disability. Concerted efforts need to be made to provide culturally appropriate and easily accessible education, health care, and health-promoting resources in these vulnerable communities.

  6. Adult caregiving among American Indians: the role of cultural factors.

    PubMed

    Goins, R Turner; Spencer, S Melinda; McGuire, Lisa C; Goldberg, Jack; Wen, Yang; Henderson, Jeffrey A

    2011-06-01

    With a sample of American Indian adults, we estimated the prevalence of adult caregiving, assessed the demographic and cultural profile of caregivers, and examined the association between cultural factors and being a caregiver. This is the first such study conducted with American Indians. Data came from a cross-sectional study of 5,207 American Indian adults residing on 2 closely related Lakota Sioux reservations in the Northern Plains and one American Indian community in the Southwest. Cultural factors included measures of cultural identity and traditional healing practices. Seventeen percent of our sample reported being caregivers. In both the Northern Plains and Southwest, caregiving was positively correlated with younger age, being a woman, larger household size, attending and participating in Native events, and endorsement of traditional healing practices. In both regions, attendance and participation in Native events and engagement in traditional healing practices were associated with increased odds of caregiving after adjusting for covariates. Only in the Northern Plains did we find that speaking some Native language at home was associated with increased odds of being a caregiver. Examination of interaction terms indicated some sex differences in the association between cultural factors and caregiving in the Northern Plains but not in the Southwest. Our findings indicate that greater cultural identity and engagement in traditional healing practices are related to caregiving in American Indian populations. Caregiving research, intervention efforts, and caregiving programs and services in Native communities should pay special attention to the dynamics of culture and caregiving.

  7. Non-ceremonial tobacco use among southwestern rural American Indians: the New Mexico American Indian Behavioural Risk Factor Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, F.; Mahler, R.; Davis, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To ascertain non-ceremonial tobacco use among rural American Indians in New Mexico (United States).
DESIGN—A geographically targeted telephone survey.
SETTING—Rural New Mexico.
PARTICIPANTS—American Indian residents aged 18 years and older.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Prevalence of ever-smokers and current smokers of cigarettes and ever-users and current users of smokeless tobacco, number of cigarettes smoked, and prevalence of cigarette smoking quitting behaviour.
RESULTS—Of the 1266 respondents, 38.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 34.5% to 42.1%) reported ever smoking, and 16.3% (95% CI = 13.5% to 19.0%) reported being current smokers. Current smokers averaged 7.6 (95% CI = 6.0 to 9.3) cigarettes per day. Current smoking prevalence was highest among men and lowest among college graduates. Prevalence of smokeless tobacco use was 24.1% for ever-use and 7.2% for current use and showed a strong male predominance of use.
CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of current smokers among rural American Indians in New Mexico was lower than among American Indians of other regions in the United States, all New Mexicans, and the national population as a whole. Although smoking prevalence was lower among American Indians in New Mexico, variation by sex and education followed the same patterns as reported among American Indians of other regions.


Keywords: American Indians; tobacco use; smokeless tobacco PMID:9789934

  8. Assessing American Indian Needs in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence; And Others

    This paper focuses on New Mexico's high-risk Indian children and programs. Specifically, Western New Mexico University has been involved with the Gallup/McKinley public school district, the largest school district (5,000 square miles) in the United States (larger than New Jersey) with a school population that is 73% Indian. This paper examines…

  9. "Close-knit" defines a healthy Native American Indian family.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donna; Yurkovich, Eleanor

    2014-02-01

    In the United States, the most significant health disparities occur among members of the American Indian and Alaskan Native populations. Because their health beliefs, values, and cultural practices are learned within a family system, this study used a focused ethnography to explore American Indians' perceptions of a healthy family. Seventeen interviews were performed with 21 adults residing on a reservation on the Northern Plains of the United States. Participant observation was conducted during 100 hr of fieldwork. All informants identified a healthy family as being "close-knit," indicating that the major defining feature of these families is the degree of connectedness among members, immediate and extended. In this paper, we present adult tribal members' descriptions of a healthy family. It is evident that culturally appropriate programs, which consider American Indians' values/beliefs and build on community assets, are urgently needed to reduce health disparities.

  10. Paracetamol metabolism in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Pabba, Santosh K; Bolla, Sambamurthy; Kandhagatla, Rajnarayana; Chaluvadi, Madhusudana R; Krishna, Devarakonda R

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the profile of paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2, Calpol) metabolism in Indian population and to compare with the profiles of studies conducted in other populations, a study was conducted in 100 healthy male human volunteers. After an overnight fast, the volunteers were administered an oral dose of 1 g of paracetamol, urine was collected up to 8 h and samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography for the estimation of urinary recovery of paracetamol and its metabolites, i.e. sulphate, glucuronide, cysteine and mercapturate conjugates. 25.29 +/- 5.5 (mean +/- S.D.)% of sulphate conjugate, 60.55 +/- 8.5% of glucuronide conjugate, 5.05 +/- 2.1% of unchanged paracetamol, 2.76 +/- 2.4% of cysteine conjugate and 6.37 +/- 3.8% of mercapturate conjugate were recovered. The mean combined recovery of glutathione conjugates (9.13%) in Indians is found to be very high and is equal to that in Caucasians of Scotland (9.3%), which indicates that Indians are equally predisposed to hepatotoxicity as Caucasians.

  11. Access in Theory and Practice: American Indians in Philosophy History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Katy Gray; Brown, Michael Patterson

    2003-01-01

    The American Indian Philosophical Association (AIPA) was created in May of 1998 by a group of American Indian philosophers; it grew out of the American Philosophical Association's (APA) Committee to Advance the Status of American Indians in Philosophy. It is associated with the APA but remains an autonomous organization dedicated to the…

  12. Diabetes and Kidney Disease in American Indians: Potential Role of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages.

    PubMed

    Yracheta, Joseph M; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Le, MyPhuong T; Abdelmalak, Manal F; Alfonso, Javier; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Since the early 20th century, a marked increase in obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease has occurred in the American Indian population, especially the Pima Indians of the Southwest. Here, we review the current epidemic and attempt to identify remediable causes. A search was performed using PubMed and the search terms American Indian and obesity, American Indian and diabetes, American Indian and chronic kidney disease, and American Indian and sugar or fructose, Native American, Alaska Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, Amerind, and Amerindian for American Indian for articles linking American Indians with diabetes, obesity, chronic kidney disease, and sugar; additional references were identified in these publications traced to 1900 and articles were reviewed if they were directly discussing these topics. Multiple factors are involved in the increased risk for diabetes and kidney disease in the American Indian population, including poverty, overnutrition, poor health care, high intake of sugar, and genetic mechanisms. Genetic factors may be especially important in the Pima, as historical records suggest that this group was predisposed to obesity before exposure to Western culture and diet. Exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages may also be involved in the increased risk for chronic kidney disease. In these small populations in severe health crisis, we recommend further studies to investigate the role of excess added sugar, especially sugar-sweetened beverages, as a potentially remediable risk factor.

  13. The Power of American Indian Parents and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watahomigie, Lucille

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role that schools, communities, and parents can play in transmitting American Indian culture and language to Indian children, focusing on the experiences of the Hualapai Indians and Peach Springs School District in Arizona. (three references) (MDM)

  14. The Power of American Indian Parents and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watahomigie, Lucille

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role that schools, communities, and parents can play in transmitting American Indian culture and language to Indian children, focusing on the experiences of the Hualapai Indians and Peach Springs School District in Arizona. (three references) (MDM)

  15. Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurien, Prema A.

    2006-01-01

    How non-Christian religious groups should be politically recognized within Western multicultural societies has proved to be a pressing contemporary issue. This article examines some ways in which American policies regarding religion and multiculturalism have shaped Hindu Indian American organizations, forms of public expression and activism.…

  16. Multiculturalism and "American" Religion: The Case of Hindu Indian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurien, Prema A.

    2006-01-01

    How non-Christian religious groups should be politically recognized within Western multicultural societies has proved to be a pressing contemporary issue. This article examines some ways in which American policies regarding religion and multiculturalism have shaped Hindu Indian American organizations, forms of public expression and activism.…

  17. Depression Literacy Among American Indian Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Roh, Soonhee; Brown-Rice, Kathleen; Pope, Natalie D; Lee, Kyoung Hag; Lee, Yeon-Shim; Newland, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Older American Indians experience high rates of depression and other psychological disorders, yet little research exist on the depression literacy of this group. Depression literacy is fundamental for individuals seeking help for depression in a timely and appropriate manner. In the present study the authors examine levels and predictors of knowledge of depression symptoms in a sample of rural older American Indians (N = 227) living in the Midwestern United States. Data from self-administered questionnaires indicate limited knowledge of depression and negative attitudes toward seeking help for mental health problems. Additional findings and implications for social work practice and policy are discussed.

  18. Initial Report of the American Indian Leaders Advisory Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Of major concern to American Indians are: government to government communications; development of Indian owned energy resources; federal budget changes as they affect the American Indian; preservation, protection, and quantification of inherent and reserved Indian water rights; preservation of treaty obligations; respect for tribal sovereignty;…

  19. Two Variants of the C-Reactive Protein Gene Are Associated with Risk of Pre-Eclampsia in an American Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G.; Saxena, Richa; Anderson, Cindy M.; Barnes, Michael R.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Falcon, Gilbert; Martin, Candelaria; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Karumanchi, Ananth; Keplin, Kylie; Pearson, Nichole; Lamb, Felicia; Bercier, Shellee; Keating, Brendan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) is unknown; but it is accepted that normal pregnancy represents a distinctive challenge to the maternal immune system. C-reactive protein is a prominent component of the innate immune system; and we previously reported an association between PE and the CRP polymorphism, rs1205. Our aim was to explore the effects of additional CRP variants. The IBC (Cardiochip) genotyping microarray focuses on candidate genes and pathways related to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Methods This study recruited 140 cases of PE and 270 matched controls, of which 95 cases met criteria as severe PE, from an American Indian community. IBC array genotypes from 10 suitable CRP SNPs were analyzed. A replication sample of 178 cases and 427 controls of European ancestry was also genotyped. Results A nominally significant difference (p value <0.05) was seen in the distribution of discordant matched pairs for rs3093068; and Bonferroni corrected differences (P<0.005) were seen for rs876538, rs2794521, and rs3091244. Univariate conditional logistic regression odds ratios (OR) were nominally significant for rs3093068 and rs876538 models only. Multivariate logistic models with adjustment for mother's age, nulliparity and BMI attenuated the effect (OR 1.58, P = 0.066, 95% CI 0.97–2.58) for rs876538 and (OR 2.59, P = 0.050, 95% CI 1.00–6.68) for rs3093068. An additive risk score of the above two risk genotypes shows a multivariate adjusted OR of 2.04 (P = 0.013, 95% CI 1.16–3.56). The replication sample also demonstrated significant association between PE and the rs876538 allele (OR = 1.55, P = 0.01, 95% CI 2.16–1.10). We also show putative functionality for the rs876538 and rs3093068 CRP variants. Conclusion The CRP variants, rs876538 and rs3093068, previously associated with other cardiovascular disease phenotypes, show suggestive association with PE in this American Indian population, further supporting a

  20. Premature mortality patterns among American Indians in South Dakota, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mathew; Kightlinger, Lon

    2013-05-01

    American Indians in South Dakota have the highest mortality rates in the nation compared to other racial and ethnic groups and American Indians in other states. Cause-related and age-specific mortality patterns among American Indians in South Dakota are identified to guide prevention planning and policy efforts designed to reduce mortality within this population, in both South Dakota and other parts of the U.S. Death certificate data from South Dakota (2000-2010), on 5738 American Indians and 70,580 whites, were used to calculate age-specific mortality rates and rate ratios. These values were examined in order to identify patterns among the leading causes of death. Analyses were completed in 2011 and 2012. Within the South Dakota population, 70% of American Indians died before reaching age 70 years, compared to 25% of whites. Fatal injuries and chronic diseases were the leading causes of premature mortality. Nine leading causes of death showed consistent patterns of mortality disparity between American Indians and whites, with American Indians having significantly higher rates of mortality at lower ages. Premature mortality among American Indians in South Dakota is a serious public health problem. Unified efforts at the federal, tribal, state, and local levels are needed to reduce premature death within this population. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Honoring the Ways of American Indian Women: A Group Therapy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Paula T.; Robbins, Rockey; Vaughn, Karen; Youngbull, Natalie; Burks, Derek; Willmon-Haque, Sadie; Schuetz, Suzan; Brandes, Joyce A.; Nael, Andrea Zainab Omidy

    2010-01-01

    A culturally grounded group intervention for a typically underserved population of urban American Indian women is described. The intervention is designed to increase interpersonal connection, improve inter-tribal acceptance and trust, and enhance psychological well being of marginalized urban American Indian women. Topics used to structure the…

  2. Alcohol and Suicide Death among American Indians of New Mexico: 1980-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.; Van Winkle, Nancy W.; Williams, Mary B.; McFeeley, Patricia J.; DeBruyn, Lemyra M.; Serna, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Explores the relationship between alcohol use prior to suicide among American Indian decedents in New Mexico for the years 1980 through 1998. Alcohol was detected in 69% of all suicides of American Indians with some variance by major tribal cultural groups. This is higher than in suicides among the overall New Mexico population (44.3%). (Contains…

  3. Promoting School Achievement among American Indian Students throughout the School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    American Indian students as a population are not achieving high academic standards. Yet school failure appears to be acquired rather than inherent at the onset of schooling. Many researchers have reported that American Indian children function at an average range academically until the 4th grade; but by 10th grade, however, they are, on average,…

  4. In Pursuit of a Computing Degree: Cultural Implications for American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodaseet, Glenda G.; Varma, Roli

    2012-01-01

    While a number of challenges contribute to the American Indian population's disconnect from information technology (IT), the most glaring is the low number of American Indian students pursuing computer science (CS) studies--a degree essential to IT's entry into and diffusion across communities. Yet, research is scant on factors that contribute to…

  5. Honoring the Ways of American Indian Women: A Group Therapy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Paula T.; Robbins, Rockey; Vaughn, Karen; Youngbull, Natalie; Burks, Derek; Willmon-Haque, Sadie; Schuetz, Suzan; Brandes, Joyce A.; Nael, Andrea Zainab Omidy

    2010-01-01

    A culturally grounded group intervention for a typically underserved population of urban American Indian women is described. The intervention is designed to increase interpersonal connection, improve inter-tribal acceptance and trust, and enhance psychological well being of marginalized urban American Indian women. Topics used to structure the…

  6. American Indian Unemployment: Confronting a Distressing Reality. A First Friday Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Full Employment Action Council, Washington, DC.

    The devastation caused by unemployment among the nation's approximately 2 million American Indians is great. Analysis of January 1985 state unemployment rates reveals an enormous disparity between average state rates and the rates for the state American Indian populations. While the official unemployment rate in 28 states ranged from 5.8% to…

  7. In Pursuit of a Computing Degree: Cultural Implications for American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodaseet, Glenda G.; Varma, Roli

    2012-01-01

    While a number of challenges contribute to the American Indian population's disconnect from information technology (IT), the most glaring is the low number of American Indian students pursuing computer science (CS) studies--a degree essential to IT's entry into and diffusion across communities. Yet, research is scant on factors that contribute to…

  8. How Schools Can Help Heal American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Don Trent

    Historical trauma may be a significant cause of the well-documented disparities between the health of American Indians and the general population. The inability to resolve past injustices against American Indians may continue to have health consequences as long as this history continues to repeat itself. Schools can play a role in healing American…

  9. American Indians in Higher Education: The Community College Experience. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, D. Michael; Colby, Anita Y.

    The educational approaches, programs, and services developed for American Indians at both tribal colleges and non-tribal community colleges can be used as models by other institutions seeking to serve minority populations better. The community college is an important avenue for American Indians pursuing postsecondary degrees; in 1988, 50,400 of…

  10. Supporting the Career Aspirations of American Indian Youth. CURA Reporter, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliman-Brissett, Annette E; Turner, Sherri L.

    2005-01-01

    Dropout rates among American Indian young people are greater than 50% in some places in the country, and the rate of unemployment and underemployment among American Indians still far exceeds that of the majority population, despite affirmative action and other parity-seeking policies. In addition, U.S. Census trends indicate an influx of American…

  11. Physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Berg, Carla J; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Kinlacheeny, J B; Ashley, Amber; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Greiner, K Allen; Choi, Won S

    2012-02-01

    The American Indian population has among the highest rates of obesity in the United States. Thus, it is critical to understand factors related to this epidemic (e.g., physical activity, nutrition) among this ethnic minority population. The current study examined factors related to engaging in at least 4 days of physical activity (PA) per week and factors related to consuming at least 5 fruits and vegetables (FV) per day among a sample of American Indians in the Midwest. We used multiple methods to recruit participants for this study, including recruitment at pow wows, focus groups, health fairs, new student orientation for American Indian students, and other venues. A total of 998 American Indians (76% participation rate) completed a survey assessing sociodemographics, physical activity level, fruit and vegetable intake, and perceptions regarding the recommendations for physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Factors associated with exercising ≥4 days in the past week (44.77% of the sample) include being younger (P = .002), being male (P < .001), having at least some college education (P = .048), eating ≥5 FV per day, and higher perceived number of days of PA recommended (P < .001). Factors associated with eating ≥5 servings of FV per day (37.01% of the sample) included exercising ≥4 days in the past week (P < .001) and higher perceived number of servings of FV recommended (P < .001). These findings highlight the importance of education in enhancing engagement in positive weight control behaviors and the importance of addressing both physical activity and nutrition among the American Indian population.

  12. American Indian Stereotypes: The Truth Behind the Hype. An Indian Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stutzman, Esther

    This curriculum guide dispels the stereotypes of American Indians that humiliate and degrade real Indian culture and add fuel to the fire of racism and prejudice. It begins with a timeline of American Indian history from 15,000 B.C. to the present, and compares it to a historical timeline of Europe-Asia. The stereotype of the savage Indian is…

  13. American Indian History and Writing from Home: Constructing an Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    If the typical premise of American Indian history is actually the history of Indian-white relations, then the "other" side of the coin must be turned over for understanding an Indian point of view and what is called "writing from home." Conceptually, "writing from home" is the challenge of historians who are American Indian and who write history…

  14. Tuberculosis among American Indians of the contiguous United States.

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, H L

    1989-01-01

    Paleopathologic findings provide strong evidence for the existence of tuberculosis in Andean populations of pre-Columbian America. Indirect evidence is available also to suggest its possible endemicity among some American Indian tribes who lived within the present-day contiguous United States before the arrival of Europeans. The available data suggest that tuberculosis became a major health problem in some tribes with increased population density and cultural changes after increased contact with European civilization, paralleling the deterioration in living conditions after relocation of the tribes to reservations. By 1900, tuberculosis had become one of the most serious health problems among North American Indians. Tuberculosis control was hampered by the lack of a specific treatment, and only the advent of specific chemotherapy in an ambulatory setting brought a breakthrough. Mortality, morbidity, and risk of infection have all sharply decreased over the past three decades. However, tuberculosis incidence rates among American Indians remain well above rates in the white population. An intensified effort to identify those with tuberculosis and those at risk of tuberculosis as well as to develop compliance-enhancing strategies with treatment regimens will be necessary to eliminate tuberculosis from Indian reservations. PMID:2511601

  15. [Identifying Gifted American Indian Students.] What Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Karen

    1997-01-01

    In Hardin (Montana) schools, where 55% of students are American Indians, the same identification methods are used to identify gifted students among all cultural groups. These methods include nonverbal standardized tests and subjective recommendations based on the Frasier Talent Assessment Profile. Other equitable practices include equal…

  16. American Indian Grandmothers: Traditions and Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Marjorie M., Ed.

    American Indian grandmothers are almost universally occupied with child care and child rearing at some time in their lives, but cultural variables influence the definition, role, and status of grandmothers in different tribes. This book contains nine chapters that blend documentary history, oral history, and ethnographic observation to illuminate…

  17. The Future of American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apodaca, Paul

    2011-01-01

    American Indian studies celebrates forty years at a conference in conjunction with a campuswide effort to recognize the development of interdisciplinary studies programs in the second half of the twentieth century. Interdisciplinary programs (IDPs) are a major aspect of the progress of academics in the United States. The author's point at the…

  18. Elder Abuse in American Indian Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisko, Briana

    2009-01-01

    Although the many American Indian tribes of the United States are unique in their own customs, languages, and histories, a common thread throughout their traditions and cultural lifestyles is that they are of a culture that reveres the elder in their communities. Elders are the carriers of the culture/history; they are the storytellers, holders of…

  19. Hemispheric Dominance of Native American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellern, John; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines language and spatial lateralization of 49 elementary American Indian students using a cognitive-manual dual task model and psychoeducational assessment techniques. All students were found to be left-hemisphere dominant for language and some were lateralized to the left hemisphere for spatial function. Contradicts evidence of right-brain…

  20. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  1. The Political Economy of North American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John H., Ed.

    This book presents 12 papers that proceed from the idea that Native American history in the United States and Canada is best understood not as an Indian-European cultural conflict but as an economic conflict between communal and capitalist modes of production. Three chapters are of particular educational interest. "Political Economy in…

  2. Honoring Their Way: Counseling American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chee, Christine; Sand, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors review current literature on issues facing American Indian (AI) women and discuss implications for providing culturally sensitive counseling with these women. A case study of a Dine (Navajo) woman living within mainstream society and holding true to her traditional cultural beliefs illustrates how a culturally responsive approach to…

  3. Life Satisfaction of the Elderly American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Freddie L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examines generally high life satisfaction of 58 elderly reservation American Indians and its relationship to selected internal and external environmental factors. Suggests that internal environmental variables may be useful indicators of life satisfaction and that subjective measures of life satisfaction may be more predictive of mental health…

  4. American Indian Adolescents and Disordered Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.

    2010-01-01

    School counselors play an important role in identifying and intervening with students struggling with disordered eating (e.g., Bardick et al., 2004). Research has shown that American Indian adolescents report higher rates of certain disordered eating behaviors than other racial groups. The literature on the prevalence and etiology of disordered…

  5. Literature of the American Indian. Abridged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Thomas E.; Peek, Walter W.

    From ancient stories of creation to contemporary poetry and prose, this volume ranges through thousands of years of the literature of the American Indian. Chapter One of the book deals with pre-Columbian religions and features accounts of the Creation by the Cheyenne, Navajo, Omaha, Yakima, Zuni, and Uitoto. Chapter Two has as its theme folk…

  6. The North American Indian and the Eskimo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    This is a selected bibliography of some good and some outstanding audio-visual educational materials in the library of the Educational Materials Bureau, Audio-Visual Education Section, that may be considered of particular interest in the study of the North American Indian, the Eskimo, and in the fields of ethnology and anthropology. The…

  7. American Indian Perspectives on Addiction and Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Christine T.

    1998-01-01

    Components of healing are spiritual, relational, and intergenerational. This narrative report reaches beyond an intellectual understanding for a "healing spirit" for American Indian women in recovery. Four intersecting circles of spiritual and cultural understanding speak to balance and wellness, the colonization experience and addiction…

  8. American Indian Women: The Double Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Linda Sue

    This study investigated the relationship between variables of ethnic and sex-role stereotype and job satisfaction based on Festinger's dissonance avoidance theory and Bruner and Tagirui's implicit personality theory. The respondents were 114 American Indian female supervisors, out of a representative sample of 200. The data were collected using a…

  9. American Indian Adolescents and Disordered Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.

    2010-01-01

    School counselors play an important role in identifying and intervening with students struggling with disordered eating (e.g., Bardick et al., 2004). Research has shown that American Indian adolescents report higher rates of certain disordered eating behaviors than other racial groups. The literature on the prevalence and etiology of disordered…

  10. The Future of American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apodaca, Paul

    2011-01-01

    American Indian studies celebrates forty years at a conference in conjunction with a campuswide effort to recognize the development of interdisciplinary studies programs in the second half of the twentieth century. Interdisciplinary programs (IDPs) are a major aspect of the progress of academics in the United States. The author's point at the…

  11. A Portfolio of Outstanding Contemporary American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Theodore E. B.

    The portfolio contains 24 portraits with biographical sketches of outstanding contemporary American Indians. Representing several tribes, occupations, and points of view, the subjects are: Henry Adams, Louis W. Ballard, Robert L. Bennett, George Blue Spruce, Jarrett Blythe, Louis R. Bruce, Leon Cook, Ada Deer, Vine Deloria, Jr., James Gladstone,…

  12. Literature of the American Indian. Abridged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Thomas E.; Peek, Walter W.

    From ancient stories of creation to contemporary poetry and prose, this volume ranges through thousands of years of the literature of the American Indian. Chapter One of the book deals with pre-Columbian religions and features accounts of the Creation by the Cheyenne, Navajo, Omaha, Yakima, Zuni, and Uitoto. Chapter Two has as its theme folk…

  13. A Filmography for American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carroll Warner; Bird, Gloria

    The filmography on American Indian education lists existing films in current distribution. The introduction explains the purpose of the guide, the procedure used to compile it, samples of questionnaires used, films as audiovisual classroom aids, the classification of films for classroom use, the relation of film use to individual curricula, some…

  14. American Indian Perspectives on Addiction and Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Christine T.

    1998-01-01

    Components of healing are spiritual, relational, and intergenerational. This narrative report reaches beyond an intellectual understanding for a "healing spirit" for American Indian women in recovery. Four intersecting circles of spiritual and cultural understanding speak to balance and wellness, the colonization experience and addiction…

  15. American Indian Languages: Cultural and Social Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Shirley; Miller, Wick R.

    This book introduces the general reader to the mosaic of American Indian languages and cultures as they exist in time and space, and supplies limited technical linguistic orientation to encourage further exploration of language interrelationships, cultures, and other ways of knowing. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the status, diversity, and…

  16. A Portfolio of Outstanding Contemporary American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Theodore E. B.

    The portfolio contains 24 portraits with biographical sketches of outstanding contemporary American Indians. Representing several tribes, occupations, and points of view, the subjects are: Henry Adams, Louis W. Ballard, Robert L. Bennett, George Blue Spruce, Jarrett Blythe, Louis R. Bruce, Leon Cook, Ada Deer, Vine Deloria, Jr., James Gladstone,…

  17. Preface: [Research in American Indian Education].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    1997-01-01

    Current critical research in American-Indian education, grounded in self-determination and cultural integrity, offers insights into the kinds of research directions and questions required to assess educational success from a local perspective. While research based on cultural strengths has yielded significant sustainable results for some Indian…

  18. American Indian Languages: Cultural and Social Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Shirley; Miller, Wick R.

    This book introduces the general reader to the mosaic of American Indian languages and cultures as they exist in time and space, and supplies limited technical linguistic orientation to encourage further exploration of language interrelationships, cultures, and other ways of knowing. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the status, diversity, and…

  19. American Indian Grandmothers: Traditions and Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Marjorie M., Ed.

    American Indian grandmothers are almost universally occupied with child care and child rearing at some time in their lives, but cultural variables influence the definition, role, and status of grandmothers in different tribes. This book contains nine chapters that blend documentary history, oral history, and ethnographic observation to illuminate…

  20. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Second Edition, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP), this handbook provides information relative to American Indian health careers in terms of need, opportunity, preparation, and information sources. Designed to encourage American Indian youth to seek careers in the health professions, this handbook describes the enormous need for…

  1. A Curriculum Guide to Learning about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Murton L.

    This guide provides information and suggestions for teachers planning an American Indian study unit or American Indian Day activities. The first section lists contributions of American Indians in the form of foods, words, art, music, law, government, and traditional values. The second section provides ideas for classroom discussions concerning…

  2. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  3. In Search of Theory and Method in American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2007-01-01

    American Indian studies should have a theoretical and methodological focus sufficient to organize an academic discipline. A primary focus of American Indian studies as a discipline is to conceptualize, research, and explain patterns of American Indian individual and collective community choices and strategies when confronted with relations with…

  4. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in...

  5. American Indian Students Speak out: What's Good Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Leisa A.; Chiodo, John J.

    2008-01-01

    For much of our country's history, citizenship has eluded American Indian people. With this in mind, the authors conducted a study to determine the perceptions of eighth and eleventh grade American Indian students regarding citizenship. We wanted to find out what American Indian students believe are the attributes of a good citizen; what…

  6. Field-Dependence Factors in American Indian and Caucasian Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    Compared urban obese and nonobese American Indians and Caucasians on the Group Embedded Figures Test (N=160). Results indicated an apparent relationship between obesity and field-independence for Caucasians, but not for American Indians. American Indians were more field-dependent, which implies a social conformity factor. (JAC)

  7. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the...

  8. 34 CFR 361.30 - Services to American Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Services to American Indians. 361.30 Section 361.30... Services to American Indians. The State plan must assure that the designated State agency provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the...

  9. In Search of Theory and Method in American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    2007-01-01

    American Indian studies should have a theoretical and methodological focus sufficient to organize an academic discipline. A primary focus of American Indian studies as a discipline is to conceptualize, research, and explain patterns of American Indian individual and collective community choices and strategies when confronted with relations with…

  10. Bilingual Resources. [American Indian Education Special Double Issue].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilingual Resources, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The double issue of the journal, "Bilingual Resources," presents nine articles pertaining to American Indian education in various perspectives, poetry by four American Indian poets, and identifies 27 publications about American Indians. Subjects of articles include: evaluation and recognition of narrative competence within peer group…

  11. The Association Between Diabetes Mellitus Among American Indian/Alaska Native Populations with Preterm Birth in Eight US States from 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Haley; Srinath, Meghna; Rockhill, Karilynn; Hogue, Carol

    2015-11-01

    Assess risk of preterm birth associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) among American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), a population with increased risk of DM and preterm birth, and examine whether this association differed by state of residence. We used surveillance data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 12,400 AI/AN respondents with singleton births in Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Utah, and Washington from 2004-2011. We conducted multivariable logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratio adjusted for maternal age and prepregnancy BMI with all observations and then stratified by state. DM was reported in 5.92 % of the study population and preterm birth occurred in 8.95 % of births. Women with DM had 1.92 times higher odds of having a preterm birth than women without DM [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.21-2.78]. After stratifying on state, women with DM in Nebraska had the greatest odds of preterm birth [aOR 6.63, (95 % CI 3.80-11.6)] while women in Alaska saw a protective effect from DM [aOR 0.17, (95 % CI 0.07-0.42)] compared to women without DM. Overall, AI/AN women with DM had significantly greater odds of preterm birth compared to AI/AN women without DM across states. Substantial differences in this association between states calls for increased public health efforts in high-risk areas as well as further research to assess whether differences are attributable to diagnosis, reporting, tribal, healthcare or lifestyle factors.

  12. Perinatal Disparities Between American Indians and Alaska Natives and Other US Populations: Comparative Changes in Fetal and First Day Mortality, 1995-2008.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Martha S; Barfield, Wanda D; Smith, Ruben A; Petrini, Joann

    2015-08-01

    To compare fetal and first day outcomes of American Indian and Alaskan Natives (AIAN) with non-AIAN populations. Singleton deliveries to AIAN and non-AIAN populations were selected from live birth-infant death cohort and fetal deaths files from 1995-1998 and 2005-2008. We examined changes over time in maternal characteristics of deliveries and disparities and changes in risks of fetal, first day (<24 h), and cause-specific deaths. We calculated descriptive statistics, odds ratios and confidence intervals, and ratio of odds ratios (RORs) to indicate changes in disparities. Along with black mothers, AIANs exhibited the highest proportion of risk factors including the highest proportion of diabetes in both time periods (4.6 and 6.5 %). Over time, late fetal death for AIANs decreased 17 % (aOR = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.72-0.97), but we noted a 47 % increased risk over time for Hispanics (aOR = 1.47, 95 % CI 1.40-1.55). Our data indicated no change over time among AIANs for first day death. For AIANs compared to whites, increased risks and disparities persisted for mortality due to congenital anomalies (ROR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.03-1.60). For blacks compared to AIANs, the increased risks of fetal death (2005-2008: aOR = 0.60, 95 % CI 0.53-0.68) persisted. For Hispanics, lower risks compared to AIANs persisted, but protective effect declined over time. Disparities between AIAN and other groups persist, but there is variability by race/ethnicity in improvement of perinatal outcomes over time. Variability in access to care and pregnancy management should be considered in relation to health equity for fetal and early infant deaths.

  13. Nations Within. American Indian Scholar Karen Gayton Swisher Envisions Effective Education for All Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Rosa Hernandez

    1997-01-01

    An interview with American Indian educator Karen Gayton Swisher explores the learning styles of American Indian children and the application of ideas about these learning styles in the programs at Haskell Indian Nations University. Native American children should be taught from a constructivist, rather than a deficit, point of view. (SLD)

  14. President Nixon Sets New Indian Policies and Goals: A New Era for the American Indians; The American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Richard M.

    The July 8, 1970 President's Message to the United States Congress on the American Indians is presented in this paper. The speech covered self-determination without termination, the repeal of the termination law, Indian directed programs, the restoration of Blue Lake to Taos Pueblo, local school control, economic development legislation, Indian…

  15. Adult social roles and alcohol use among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David

    2014-09-01

    American Indians are disproportionately burdened by alcohol-related problems. Yet, research exploring predictors of alcohol use among American Indians has been limited by cross-sectional designs and reservation-based samples. Guided by a life course developmental perspective, the current study used a subsample of American Indians (n=927) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to explore alcohol use (current drinking, usual number of drinks, and binge drinking) among this population. We examined whether adult social roles (i.e., cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, college enrollment, and full-time work) were linked to the rise and fall of alcohol use. Multi-level models demonstrated that adult social roles were linked to alcohol use at the within- and between-person levels. Becoming a parent was linked to a lower likelihood of being a current drinker, fewer alcoholic drinks, and less frequent binge drinking. Transitioning to full-time work was associated with a higher likelihood of being a current drinker and more frequent binge drinking. Results point to the importance of exploring within-group trajectories of alcohol use and highlight the protective and risky nature of adult social roles among American Indians.

  16. General Strain Theory and Substance Use among American Indian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Eitle, David; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established finding that American Indian adolescents are at a greater risk of illicit substance use and abuse than the general population, few generalist explanations of deviance have been extended to American Indian substance use. Using a popular generalist explanation of deviance, General Strain Theory, we explore the predictive utility of this model with a subsample of American Indian adolescents from waves one and two of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add-Health). Overall, we find mixed support for the utility of General Strain Theory to account for American Indian adolescent substance use. While exposure to recent life events, a common measure of stress exposure, was found to be a robust indicator of substance use, we found mixed support for the thesis that negative affect plays a key role in mediating the link between strain and substance use. However, we did find evidence that personal and social resources serve to condition the link between stress exposure and substance use, with parental control, self-restraint, religiosity, and exposure to substance using peers each serving to moderate the association between strain and substance use, albeit in more complex ways than expected. PMID:23826511

  17. Findings from American Indian Needs Assessments.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Ragan, Kathleen; Kaur, Judith Salmon; Marsh, Vickie; Painter, Dewey

    2017-02-18

    Because of decreased access and dismal survival rates, strategies need to be developed to increase cancer awareness and facilitate cancer prevention, early detection, and screening activities within American Indian (AI) populations. The purpose of this study was to develop a locally tailored needs assessment to collect cancer prevention, control, and risk factor information and knowledge, attitude, and perceived behavior (hereafter referred to as "needs assessment") data from 500 community members living in 3 geographically diverse settings: the Southeastern USA, the Rocky Mountain region, and the Northern Plains. Needs assessment data helped identify local health priorities and create a pilot cancer prevention and early detection education intervention. There were two versions of common items of the instrument: short (~35 items) and long (55 items), and each partner added items that were recommended by their local AI Advisory Committee. Each partner collaborated with local AI organizations to identify and recruit participants at community venues. During the sessions, facilitators used Power Point® slides and ARS equipment and software to anonymously collect participants' responses. The partners collected needs assessment data from 677 community members over a 4-year period. Cancer education knowledge was low, barriers to accessing timely cancer screening and care services were excessive, tobacco use was excessive, and daily physical activity was insufficient for most participants. ARS was an effective way to collect needs assessment information. During discussions following the data collection, community members requested more cancer education opportunities, access to patient navigation services, and cultural competency training for healthcare providers.

  18. IndianAmerican contributions to psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by IndianAmerican psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  19. Adult Caregiving Among American Indians: The Role of Cultural Factors

    PubMed Central

    Goins, R. Turner; Spencer, S. Melinda; McGuire, Lisa C.; Goldberg, Jack; Wen, Yang; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With a sample of American Indian adults, we estimated the prevalence of adult caregiving, assessed the demographic and cultural profile of caregivers, and examined the association between cultural factors and being a caregiver. This is the first such study conducted with American Indians. Design and Methods: Data came from a cross-sectional study of 5,207 American Indian adults residing on 2 closely related Lakota Sioux reservations in the Northern Plains and one American Indian community in the Southwest. Cultural factors included measures of cultural identity and traditional healing practices. Results: Seventeen percent of our sample reported being caregivers. In both the Northern Plains and Southwest, caregiving was positively correlated with younger age, being a woman, larger household size, attending and participating in Native events, and endorsement of traditional healing practices. In both regions, attendance and participation in Native events and engagement in traditional healing practices were associated with increased odds of caregiving after adjusting for covariates. Only in the Northern Plains did we find that speaking some Native language at home was associated with increased odds of being a caregiver. Examination of interaction terms indicated some sex differences in the association between cultural factors and caregiving in the Northern Plains but not in the Southwest. Implications: Our findings indicate that greater cultural identity and engagement in traditional healing practices are related to caregiving in American Indian populations. Caregiving research, intervention efforts, and caregiving programs and services in Native communities should pay special attention to the dynamics of culture and caregiving. PMID:21148253

  20. Substance dependency among homeless American Indians.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Susan; Vaughan, Margaret Mortensen

    2003-01-01

    Extensive qualitative research in the San Francisco Bay Area in California and in Tucson, Arizona, indicates strong associations between substance abuse and homelessness among American Indians. This article takes a comparative approach to describe and analyze precipitating factors and survival patterns of those who are both homeless and who suffer from substance dependency. Possible precipitating factors presented through case studies consider the complex interaction of childhood fostering or adoption into non-Native families, different types of involuntary institutionalization during youth, and the personal impact of accident, trauma and loss. Coping strategies and keys to survival are examined, including the role of the extended family and close friendships, American Indian and mainstream organizations that offer formal and informal services, the existence of anchor or key households, the helping relationships and sobriety groups among homeless individuals, spirituality, and cultural resiliency.

  1. Panic attacks and panic disorder in the American Indian community.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Craig N; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Noonan, Carolyn; Craner, Julia R; Goldberg, Jack; Manson, Spero; Buchwald, Dedra

    2017-05-01

    Panic disorder is a common mental health condition, but little is known about panic disorder in non-Caucasian populations. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology, clinical features, and comorbidities of panic attacks and panic disorder in two large American Indian (AI) tribes (N=3084). A culturally-adapted version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview assessed panic attacks, panic disorder, and various psychiatric comorbidities. After adjusting for age, gender, and tribe, linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare AIs with panic disorder to those with panic attacks only on clinical characteristics and panic symptoms. Approximately 8.5% (N=234) of American Indians reported a lifetime history of panic attacks. Among individuals with panic attacks, comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder was higher in females (p=0.03) and comorbid alcohol-related disorders were higher in males (p≤0.001). The prevalence and clinical features of panic attacks and panic disorder in American Indians were similar to epidemiologic studies with majority populations. However, in contrast to earlier research, panic symptoms were similar in both males and females, and different patterns of comorbidity emerged. Future research should examine the availability and accessibility of evidence-based panic treatments for this traditionally underserved population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing Diabetes Risk in American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janice L.; Allen, Peg; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Qualls, Clifford; Whyte, Ayn N.; Wolfe, Venita K.; Herman, Carla J.

    2008-01-01

    Background American Indians experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. The impact of low-intensity interventions on diabetes risk among young American Indian women is unknown. Design Randomized controlled trial Setting/Participants Community-based; participants were 200 young urban American Indian women who were block-randomized on fasting blood glucose (FBG) into intervention and control groups. Inclusion criteria included self-reported identity, aged 18–40 years, not pregnant, willingness to stay in urban area for 2 years, and not having type 2 diabetes. Measures were taken at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data were gathered 2002–2006 and analyzed 2006–2007. Intervention Five discussion group sessions (one meeting per month for five months) were held focusing on healthful eating, physical activity, goal-setting, and social support.. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included dietary fat and vegetable consumption and self-reported physical activity. Secondary outcomes included cardiorespiratory fitness, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, lipid profiles, percent body fat, BMI, intake of fruit, total sugar and sweetened beverages, FBG, and television viewing. Results Mean vegetable and fruit intake increased significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group over time (group by visit interaction, p=0.02 and p=0.002, respectively). Both groups had significant increases in percent body fat and decreases in waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, blood cholesterol, LDL, television viewing, and total intakes of energy, saturated fat, sugar, and sweetened beverages. Conclusions A culturally influenced, low-intensity lifestyle intervention can improve self-reported intakes of vegetables and fruit over 18 months in young, urban American Indian women. PMID:18312806

  3. Our Children's Songs: American Indian Students and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Thomas; Albert, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    A study examined American Indian students' perceptions of why schools are failing to meet their needs. Thirty-six American Indian high school students from Minnesota participated in three interviews that explored their background and experiences, instructional and non-instructional issues that affect the education of Indian students, and their…

  4. Defaming the American Indian in the Parliament of 1777

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willy, Todd G.

    1977-01-01

    Stories of American Indian atrocities were perpetrated by the American colonists to defame the British soldiers who were using Indians on their side; records of the British Parliament of 1777 indicate the British bought the idea, for there is evidence that some parliamentarians felt the Indians were undermining British morality. (JC)

  5. Cultural Disintegration Perpetuated through Substance Abuse among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence Armand

    Alcohol, perhaps more than any other factor, symbolizes the degree of cultural disintegration experienced by American Indians today. It has been recognized as a symptom of the numerous cultural adjustments forced upon American Indians since white contact. Indeed, alcohol among Indian groups was prohibited for a far longer period than the…

  6. Selling Indian Education: Fundraising and American Indian Identities at Bacone College, 1880-1941

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, American Indian education in the United States was inextricably linked to Euro-American colonialism. By the late nineteenth century, many Euro-Americans thought Native Americans were a "vanishing race," and schools for Indians incorporated this belief into their design. In the United States, the large number and variety of…

  7. The Trail of Tears Continues: Dispossession and Genocide of the Native American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Albert M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the high cultural level of native American Indian populations at the time of conquest. Illustrates how cultural breakdown and demographic decimation have resulted from systematic policies that focused on exploiting natural resources at the expense of native peoples. (GC)

  8. The Trail of Tears Continues: Dispossession and Genocide of the Native American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Albert M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the high cultural level of native American Indian populations at the time of conquest. Illustrates how cultural breakdown and demographic decimation have resulted from systematic policies that focused on exploiting natural resources at the expense of native peoples. (GC)

  9. Comparative craniofacial variation in Navajo Indians and North American Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Phipps, G S; German, R Z; Smith, R J

    1988-06-01

    Landmarks digitized from lateral cephalometric radiographs of 107 Navajo Indians between 10 and 12 years of age were analyzed to determine coefficients of variation or standard deviations for 38 cephalometric measurements. These values were compared with the same measures of variation for identical measurements on North American whites derived from the Michigan and Philadelphia Growth Studies. For the majority of variables, there were no differences between groups. Variation for the genetically and environmentally isolated Navajo Indians was the same as that of the highly diverse Caucasian samples. However, measurements of upper, lower, and total anterior facial height (N-ANS, ANS-Me, and N-Me, respectively) indicate that these features are substantially less variable in Navajo Indians relative to the Michigan and Philadelphia populations.

  10. Exploring Indigenous Identities of Urban American Indian Youth of the Southwest

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Stephen; Wagaman, M. Alex; Tso, Crescentia; Brown, Eddie F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the indigenous identities of urban American Indian youth using measures related to three theoretical dimensions of Markstrom's identity model: identification (tribal and ethnic heritage), connection (reservation ties), and involvement in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Data came from self-administered questionnaires completed by 142 urban American Indian middle school students in a southwestern metropolitan area with the largest urban American Indian population in the United States. Using both quantitative and qualitative measures, descriptive statistics showed most youth were connected to all three dimensions of indigenous identity. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that youth with the strongest sense of American Indian ethnic identity had native fathers and were heavily involved in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Although urban American Indians may face challenges in maintaining their tribal identities, the youth in this study appeared strongly moored to their native indigenous heritage. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:23766553

  11. Exploring Indigenous Identities of Urban American Indian Youth of the Southwest.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Stephen; Wagaman, M Alex; Tso, Crescentia; Brown, Eddie F

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the indigenous identities of urban American Indian youth using measures related to three theoretical dimensions of Markstrom's identity model: identification (tribal and ethnic heritage), connection (reservation ties), and involvement in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Data came from self-administered questionnaires completed by 142 urban American Indian middle school students in a southwestern metropolitan area with the largest urban American Indian population in the United States. Using both quantitative and qualitative measures, descriptive statistics showed most youth were connected to all three dimensions of indigenous identity. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that youth with the strongest sense of American Indian ethnic identity had native fathers and were heavily involved in traditional cultural practices and spirituality. Although urban American Indians may face challenges in maintaining their tribal identities, the youth in this study appeared strongly moored to their native indigenous heritage. Implications for future research are discussed.

  12. Contexts of tobacco use and perspectives on smoking cessation among a sample of urban American Indians.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Feldman, Robert; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Kanamori, Mariano; Chen, Lu; Roth, Susan

    2010-05-01

    American Indians have the highest prevalence of cigarette use in the United States, but there is a shortage of knowledge about American Indians' own perspectives on smoking and cessation. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to obtain information on American Indians' views that would be useful for subsequent intervention planning and development. Four focus groups were conducted with urban American Indians living in Maryland to explore the sociocultural contexts of tobacco use and their perspectives on various mainstream and culturally-specific smoking cessation strategies and service delivery models. Tobacco interventions targeting American Indians should increase service access, address negative experiences with medications, emphasize empowerment for behavior change, explicitly distinguish ceremonial tobacco from cigarette use, and send culturally-relevant messages. Smoking cessation programs and health promotion efforts may be perceived as more relevant by the target population if they incorporate an understanding of the social and cultural facets of smoking behavior.

  13. The American Indian and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1969. A Study, with Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephy, Alvin M., Jr.

    An overview of Federal-Indian relations is presented, with the role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) being examined in terms of management of these relations. The objectives of this study were to provide understanding of the fears the American Indians have regarding termination motives attached to present Federal programs for Indians and also…

  14. Social, Economic and Health Characteristics of Older American Indians (Part 2 of 2). Statistical Reports on Older Americans, June 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Blanch S.

    In 1970 the Indian population of all ages was 763,000; 148,600 were 45 years of age or older and 43,800 were 65 years of age or older. Two-thirds of all older American Indian women and slightly more than one-third of the older men were either single, widowed, or divorced. Half of the older Indians received incomes below $1,408; this was 24% below…

  15. New Directions in Indian Purpose: Reflections on the American Indian Chicago Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Educational Services, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The "Declaration of Indian Purpose" produced by the American Indian Chicago Conference in 1961 needs to be recognized and extended to meet the needs and common political concerns of American Indians today. This publication provides the complete text and the appendices to this earlier document, and includes papers in which Indian…

  16. Strategies for Preventing Substance Abuse with American Indian Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinke, Steven Paul; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Suggests strategies for assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation of substance abuse prevention programs with American Indian youth. Illustrates use of each strategy with examples from drug abuse prevention activities in Northwest Indian communities. (JHZ)

  17. American Indian identity in mental health services utilization data from a rural midwestern sample.

    PubMed

    Hack, Samantha M; Larrison, Christopher R; Gone, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    The governing bodies for psychiatry, psychology, and social work all publicly support culturally competent mental health care and have called for increased awareness of the importance of racial, ethnic, and cultural identity in mental health treatment and outcomes. However, since 1960 the population of people identifying as American Indian in the United States has grown faster than can be explained by birth rates, raising questions about the personal meaning of identity for newly self-designated American Indians. For this research, interviews were conducted with 14 self-identified American Indian clients receiving rural mental health care services in the Midwest. The goal was to assess clients' cultural connection to their racial identity and to understand what impact their American Indian identity had on their mental health care experiences. A modified Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) method was used to develop the interview protocol and code responses. Interview data revealed that clients primarily based their racial identity on family stories of an American Indian ancestor and the majority did not feel their identification as American Indian was relevant to their mental health care. Regardless of lack of cultural connection, participants often reported feeling personal pride associated with identifying as American Indian. Implications for both researchers collecting self-reported race data and for mental health practitioners who might serve self-identified American Indian clients are discussed.

  18. Children's safety on American Indian farms: information and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Gilmore, Karen; Benally, Jeannie

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 1.2 million youth younger than age 20 live on farms; American Indian children constitute an important but understudied subset of this at-risk group. Despite documented risks of injuries and death among children who live and work on farms and a descending trend in the overall reported fatalities among youth who live and/or work on farms, very little is known about the agriculture-related injury and fatality experience of American Indian youth. Limited data indicate that drowning, motor vehicles, and poisonings are leading causes of unintentional mortality and morbidity for this group, although the attribution to agricultural exposure is not evident. The scant available data indicate a need to look more closely at agricultural work, bystander exposures, and other farm events that put American Indian youth at risk of illness, injury, or death compared to factors more fully reported for majority youth in the agriculture population, in order to guide intervention and prevention programs that are appropriate and acceptable to this vulnerable population.

  19. End-of-life treatment decision making: American Indians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Colclough, Yoshiko Yamashita; Brown, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    This study explored American Indians' end-of-life experiences in treatment decision making. Scarce knowledge about this population's perspective regarding end-of-life treatments has resulted in health care providers (HCPs) functioning at less than optimum levels. Using a community-based participatory research approach, open-ended interview data were collected and analyzed using a grounded theory method. Patient and family participants generally stated that the physicians made the treatment decisions for them, while HCPs believed that patients participated in informed autonomous treatment decision making. Both parties (HCPs and patients and families) were not aware of American Indian's psychological aspect that interfered with the exercise of the right of informed consent. This additional understanding would benefit them in order to result in ethically and legally sound practice of patient's autonomous treatment decision making. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Oral health literacy comparisons between Indigenous Australians and American Indians.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, L M; Divaris, K; Parker, E J; Lee, J Y

    2013-03-01

    To compare oral health literacy (OHL) levels between two profoundly disadvantaged groups, Indigenous Australians and American Indians, and to explore differences in socio-demographic, dental service utilisation, self-reported oral health indicators, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) correlates of OHL among the above. OHL was measured using REALD-30 among convenience samples of 468 Indigenous Australians (aged 17-72 years, 63% female) and 254 female American Indians (aged 18-57 years). Covariates included socio-demography, dental utilisation, self-reported oral health status (OHS), perceived treatment needs and OHRQoL (prevalence, severity and extent of OHIP-14 'impacts'). Descriptive and bivariate methods were used for data presentation and analysis, and between-sample comparisons relied upon empirical contrasts of sample-specific estimates and correlation coefficients. OHL scores were: Indigenous Australians - 15.0 (95% CL=14.2, 15.8) and American Indians--13.7 (95% CL=13.1, 14.4). In both populations, OHL strongly correlated with educational attainment, and was lower among participants with infrequent dental attendance and perceived restorative treatment needs. A significant inverse association between OHL and prevalence of OHRQoL impacts was found among American Indians (rho=-0.23; 95% CL = -0.34, -0.12) but not among Indigenous Australians. Our findings indicate that OHL levels were comparable between the two groups and lower compared to previously reported estimates among diverse populations. Although the patterns of association of OHL with most examined domains of correlates were similar between the two groups, this study found evidence of heterogeneity in the domains of self-reported OHS and OHRQoL.

  1. Some Elements of American Indian Pedagogy from an Anishinaabe Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Lawrence W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005 the author published an article discussing the teaching method teachers used for an introduction to American Indian studies course at Iowa State University. In his previous piece, the author did not delineate the elements that go into an American Indian pedagogy. In this article, the author discusses some elements of American Indian…

  2. American Indian College Students' Ethnic Identity and Beliefs about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okagaki, Lynn; Helling, Mary Kay; Bingham, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-seven American Indian and 96 European-American undergraduate students responded to questions about their educational and ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their mother's and father's support for education. The American Indian participants completed some additional items regarding their ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their…

  3. Some Elements of American Indian Pedagogy from an Anishinaabe Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Lawrence W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005 the author published an article discussing the teaching method teachers used for an introduction to American Indian studies course at Iowa State University. In his previous piece, the author did not delineate the elements that go into an American Indian pedagogy. In this article, the author discusses some elements of American Indian…

  4. American Indian College Students' Ethnic Identity and Beliefs about Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okagaki, Lynn; Helling, Mary Kay; Bingham, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-seven American Indian and 96 European-American undergraduate students responded to questions about their educational and ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their mother's and father's support for education. The American Indian participants completed some additional items regarding their ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their…

  5. American Indian Studies: Intellectual Navel Gazing or Academic Discipline?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2009-01-01

    The academic field of Native American/American Indian studies (NAS/AIS) has been and largely remains a product of political forces at the national level and now at the tribal level. The very recognition of American Indians as a unique group by the U.S. government is a political statement of survival. In this article, the author revisits the…

  6. All Chiefs, No Indians: What Children's Books Say about American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Laura

    1974-01-01

    Discusses many of the common misconceptions and stereotypes of Indians presented in children's literature. Also briefly discusses several of the less discriminatory and biased books dealing with American Indians and their culture both past and present. (TO)

  7. Reforming American Indian/Alaska Native Health Care Financing: The Role of Medicaid

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Chronic underfunding of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) health care by the federal government has weakened the capacity of the Indian Health Service, tribal governments, and the urban Indian health delivery system to meet the health care needs of the AIAN population. I describe the current role of Medicaid in financing health care services for American Indians/Alaska Natives and offer 3 suggestions for reforming Medicaid financing of AIAN health care: (1) apply a 100% federal matching rate to the cost of Medicaid services furnished by urban Indian health programs; (2) apply a 100% federal matching rate to the cost of Medicaid services furnished by referral to AIAN patients of hospitals or clinics operated by the Indian Health Service, tribes, tribal organizations, or urban Indian health programs; and (3) exempt AIAN Medicaid beneficiaries who receive services from such hospitals or clinics from state reductions in Medicaid eligibility and benefits. PMID:15855449

  8. Indian Sports Nicknames/Logos: Affective Difference between American Indian and Non-Indian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocque, Angela R.; McDonald, J. Douglas; Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Ferraro, F. Richard

    2011-01-01

    The use of American Indian (AI) words and images in athletic teams' nicknames, logos, and mascots remains a controversial issue. This study investigated the emotional impact of the University of North Dakota's "Fighting Sioux" nickname/logo on 33 AI and 36 majority culture (MC) students enrolled at the university. Participants completed…

  9. Cigarette Smoking Among Urban American Indian Adults - Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota, 2011.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jean; Poupart, John; Rhodes, Kristine; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Lamont, Genelle; D'Silva, Joanne; Erickson, Darin

    2016-06-03

    In 2013, it was estimated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among American Indians was 36.5%, the highest of all racial/ethnic groups in the continental United States (1). Among American Indians, considerable cultural and geographic variation in cigarette smoking exists. Smoking prevalence among American Indians is lowest in the Southwest and highest in the Upper Midwest/Northern Plains (2). Little information is available about tobacco use among urban American Indians, who might not have ever lived on a reservation or be enrolled in or affiliated with a tribe. In Minnesota, a significant proportion of American Indians reside in urban areas. Among Minnesota's residents who identify as American Indian alone or in combination with another race, 30% live in Hennepin County and Ramsey County, which encompass Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively (collectively known as the Twin Cities). The predominant tribes (Ojibwe [Chippewa] and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota [Sioux]) traditionally have used locally grown tobacco (Nicotiana rustica), red willow, and other plants for religious ceremonies, although nonceremonial tobacco is often substituted for traditional plants. To assess prevalence of cigarette smoking among this population, it is important to distinguish ceremonial tobacco use (smoked or used in other ways) from nonceremonial tobacco use. To obtain estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence among American Indians in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, the American Indian Adult Tobacco Survey was administered to 964 American Indian residents in 2011, using respondent-driven sampling. Among all participants, 59% were current smokers, 19% were former smokers, and 22% had never smoked. Approximately 40% of employed participants reported that someone smoked in their workplace area during the preceding week. High prevalences of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among urban American Indians in Minnesota underscores the need for a comprehensive and culturally

  10. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... and Certified Nurse Anesthetists who will provide services to AI/AN people. Nursing program..., prohibits smoking in certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of the facility) in which regular or... the American people. Dated: July 8, 2013. Yvette Roubideaux, Acting Director, Indian Health Service...

  11. The Effects of Reading Recovery™ on the American Indian/Non-American Indian Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the attention being paid to the achievement gap of minorities, the regulations and laws being enacted, the research being conducted, and the funding made available to narrow the achievement gap, there is evidence that shows it still exists for American Indians. This study examined the effects of Reading Recovery, an early literacy…

  12. "Edu-Tourism" and Immersion in American Indian Culture: American Indian Elderhostel Programs in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dick

    1993-01-01

    Describes Elderhostel programs for adults aged 60 and older that immerse participants in American Indian culture and daily life and include formal cultural education. Includes two examples: the Hopi Mesa program sponsored by Yavapai College (Arizona), and Navajo programs sponsored by Northern Arizona University. (SV)

  13. The Effects of Reading Recovery™ on the American Indian/Non-American Indian Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the attention being paid to the achievement gap of minorities, the regulations and laws being enacted, the research being conducted, and the funding made available to narrow the achievement gap, there is evidence that shows it still exists for American Indians. This study examined the effects of Reading Recovery, an early literacy…

  14. De-Indianizing the American Indian: An Essay on the Education of the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, David B., Jr.

    Included in this essay is a historical review of Federal policy and practice in Indian education from 1500 to 1970. The earliest period, the missionary period, is representative of the religious zeal of the 16th and 17th centuries wherein the missionaries had as their responsibility the education of the Indian--including the dual effort of…

  15. Facts & Figures on 199 Colleges & Universities for American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winds of Change, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides statistical data on 199 colleges that have an American Indian community to provide student support and that graduate a good percentage of their Indian undergraduates. Includes enrollment; affiliations; costs; data on all students, faculty, and entering freshmen; data on Indian students and graduates; and financial, academic, and support…

  16. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  17. American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    "American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty" is a study of knowledge and power, as it relates to Indian affairs, in the early republic. It details the interactions, exchanges, and networks through which linguistic and racial ideas were produced and it examines the effect of those ideas on Indian administration. First…

  18. American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    "American Languages: Indians, Ethnology, and the Empire for Liberty" is a study of knowledge and power, as it relates to Indian affairs, in the early republic. It details the interactions, exchanges, and networks through which linguistic and racial ideas were produced and it examines the effect of those ideas on Indian administration. First…

  19. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  20. Committee opinion no. 515: Health care for urban American Indian and Alaska Native women.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Sixty percent of American Indian and Alaska Native women live in metropolitan areas. Most are not eligible for health care provided by the federal Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS partly funds 34 Urban Indian Health Organizations, which vary in size and services. Some are small informational and referral sites that are limited even in the scope of outpatient services provided. Compared with other urban populations, urban American Indian and Alaska Native women have higher rates of teenaged pregnancy, late or no prenatal care, and alcohol and tobacco use in pregnancy. Their infants have higher rates of preterm birth, mortality, and sudden infant death syndrome than infants in the general population. Barriers to care experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native women should be addressed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages Fellows to be aware of the risk profile of their urban American Indian and Alaska Native patients and understand that they often are not eligible for IHS coverage and may need assistance in gaining access to other forms of coverage. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists also recommends that Fellows encourage their federal legislators to support adequate funding for the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, permanently authorized as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  1. Office of Management and Budget racial categories and implications for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, L; Satter, D E

    2000-01-01

    This commentary provides a brief overview of American Indian and Alaskan populations in the United States and selected data issues. The focus of this commentary is an excerpt of recommendations related to Office of Management and Budget Directive 15 (racial categories) and American Indians and Alaska Natives. Of paramount concern is not only that all federal, state, and local agencies collect data on American Indians and Alaska Natives, but also that reports, findings, and peer-reviewed publications include data on American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is of no use to recruit American Indians and Alaska Natives into studies and projects if their race/ethnicity-specific data are not disseminated. Collapsing racial/ethnic categories, such as Asians, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians and Alaska Natives, into a single racial category of "other" is of no benefit to public health policymakers, researchers, and tribal planners. Likewise, tribal affiliation should be collected whenever it is feasible to do so. Insufficient inclusion and inaccurate identification of American Indians and Alaska Natives in national surveys has also resulted in a dearth of baseline data in significant reports such as Healthy People 2010. PMID:11076238

  2. American-Indian diabetes mortality in the Great Plains Region 2002–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Allyson; Giroux, Jennifer; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Bob; Wallace, Debra; Bell, Ronny; Morrison, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare American-Indian and Caucasian mortality rates from diabetes among tribal Contract Health Service Delivery Areas (CHSDAs) in the Great Plains Region (GPR) and describe the disparities observed. Research design and methods Mortality data from the National Center for Vital Statistics and Seer*STAT were used to identify diabetes as the underlying cause of death for each decedent in the GPR from 2002 to 2010. Mortality data were abstracted and aggregated for American-Indians and Caucasians for 25 reservation CHSDAs in the GPR. Rate ratios (RR) with 95% CIs were used and SEER*Stat V.8.0.4 software calculated age-adjusted diabetes mortality rates. Results Age-adjusted mortality rates for American-Indians were significantly higher than those for Caucasians during the 8-year period. In the GPR, American-Indians were 3.44 times more likely to die from diabetes than Caucasians. South Dakota had the highest RR (5.47 times that of Caucasians), and Iowa had the lowest RR, (1.1). Reservation CHSDA RR ranged from 1.78 to 10.25. Conclusions American-Indians in the GPR have higher diabetes mortality rates than Caucasians in the GPR. Mortality rates among American-Indians persist despite special programs and initiatives aimed at reducing diabetes in these populations. Effective and immediate efforts are needed to address premature diabetes mortality among American-Indians in the GPR. PMID:25926992

  3. Joining, Leaving, and Staying in the American Indian/Alaska Native Race Category between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Liebler, Carolyn A.; Bhaskar, Renuka; Porter (née Rastogi), Sonya R.

    2017-01-01

    Conceptualizing and operationalizing American Indian populations is challenging. Each census for decades has seen the American Indian population increase substantially more than expected, with indirect and qualitative evidence that this is due to changes in individuals' race responses. We apply uniquely suited (but not nationally representative) linked data from the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses (N= 3.1 million) and the 2006–2010 American Community Survey (N = 188,131) to address three research questions. First, to what extent do American Indian people have different race responses across data sources? We find considerable race response change, especially among multiple-race and/or Hispanic American Indians. Second, how are people who change responses different from or similar to those who do not? We find three sets of American Indians: those who (1) had the same race and Hispanic responses in 2000 and 2010, (2) moved between single-race and multiple-race American Indian responses, and (3) added or dropped the American Indian response, thus joining or leaving the enumerated American Indian population. People in groups (1) and (2) were relatively likely to report a tribe, live in an American Indian area, report American Indian ancestry, and live in the West. Third, how are people who join a group different from or similar to those who leave it? Multivariate models show general similarity between joiners and leavers in group (1) and in group (2). Population turnover is hidden in cross-sectional comparisons; people joining each subpopulation of American Indians are similar in number and characteristics to those who leave it. PMID:26988712

  4. Joining, Leaving, and Staying in the American Indian/Alaska Native Race Category Between 2000 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Carolyn A; Bhaskar, Renuka; Porter, Sonya R

    2016-04-01

    Conceptualizing and operationalizing American Indian populations is challenging. Each census for decades has seen the American Indian population increase substantially more than expected, with indirect and qualitative evidence that this is due to changes in individuals' race responses. We apply uniquely suited (but not nationally representative) linked data from the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses (N = 3.1 million) and the 2006-2010 American Community Survey (N = 188,131) to address three research questions. First, to what extent do American Indian people have different race responses across data sources? We find considerable race response change, especially among multiple-race and/or Hispanic American Indians. Second, how are people who change responses different from or similar to those who do not? We find three sets of American Indians: those who (1) had the same race and Hispanic responses in 2000 and 2010, (2) moved between single-race and multiple-race American Indian responses, and (3) added or dropped the American Indian response, thus joining or leaving the enumerated American Indian population. People in groups (1) and (2) were relatively likely to report a tribe, live in an American Indian area, report American Indian ancestry, and live in the West. Third, how are people who join a group different from or similar to those who leave it? Multivariate models show general similarity between joiners and leavers in group (1) and in group (2). Population turnover is hidden in cross-sectional comparisons; people joining each subpopulation of American Indians are similar in number and characteristics to those who leave it.

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF THE Rh FACTOR IN AMERICAN INDIANS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, Karl; Wiener, Alexander S.; Matson, G. Albin

    1942-01-01

    Erythrocytes from 120 full blooded American Indians and 155 Indians of mixed ancestry were tested for the Rh agglutinogen. Only a single blood among the full blooded Indians appeared to lack this factor, and in the Indians known not to be full blooded, the distribution of this (and other) blood properties was found to be intermediate between that for whites and pure Indians according to expectation. A variant of Rh demonstrable by a special human serum was more than twice as frequent in full blooded Indians as in white individuals. PMID:19871221

  6. The Indian Health Service approach to alcoholism among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, E R; Mason, R D; Eddy, P; Smith, E M; Burns, T R

    1988-01-01

    The transfer to the Indian Health Service (IHS) of 158 alcohol treatment programs that had been administered by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism began in 1978. Today, approximately 300 alcohol and substance abuse treatment programs offer services to American Indians, among them primary residential treatment, halfway houses, outreach, and aftercare. This system provides a national network upon which additional activities may be established. Along with increasing its attention to health promotion and disease prevention, the IHS has moved toward the prevention of alcoholism. A variety of preventive programs are in place that emphasize improved self-image, value and attitude clarification, decision-making, and physical and emotional effects of alcohol and substance abuse. Many begin as Head Start programs and continue through adulthood. In 1986, after consulting with both academic and tribal experts, the IHS devised a strategic plan for alcoholism control that stresses comprehensive care and prevention activities; it serves as a guide for further program development. The Secretary of Health and Human Services created a Task Force on Indian Alcoholism in 1986 to serve as a coordinating body for activities carried out by the IHS and other agencies and units of the Department. Passage of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act in 1986 added resources for the development of adolescent treatment centers and, more importantly, for community-based pre- and post-residential care for youths and their families. Concomitant with these initiatives have been several instances of increased attention by various tribes to the problem of alcoholism. The IHS strategic plan, together with the Secretary's initiative, the Anti-Drug Act, and tribal actions, has added substantial momentum to efforts directed at controlling alcoholism among American Indians. Although the mortality rate from alcoholism is about four times greater for the American Indian population than for the entire U

  7. Exaggerated insulin secretion in Pima Indians and African-Americans but higher insulin resistance in Pima Indians compared to African-Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Stefan, N; Stumvoll, M; Weyer, C; Bogardus, C; Tataranni, P A; Pratley, R E

    2004-10-01

    African-Americans have a higher prevalence of Type 2 diabetes than Caucasians, but a lower prevalence than Pima Indians. Studies suggest that both African-Americans and Pima Indians are more insulin resistant and have higher acute insulin secretory responses to glucose than Caucasians; however, a direct comparison between these three populations is lacking. We measured insulin secretory responses to intravenous glucose (acute insulin response, AIR, 25 g ivGTT); insulin action at physiological (M-low) and supra-physiological (M-high) levels of hyperinsulinaemia (2-step hyperinsulinaemic clamp); basal and insulin-suppressed endogenous glucose production in 30 African-Americans, 30 Pima Indians and 30 Caucasians with normal glucose tolerance who were carefully matched for age, sex, and body fat (hydrodensitometry or DEXA). A subgroup of 24 subjects from each group additionally underwent a standardized mixed meal test. M-low was lower in Pima Indians (0.50 +/- 0.03) compared to Caucasians (0.59 +/- 0.02, P = 0.02) and African-Americans [0.58 +/- 0.03 mg/kgEMBS/min, log10 (means +/- SE), P = 0.03] but was not different between African-Americans and Caucasians. Basal endogenous glucose production was lower in Pima Indians (2.43 +/- 0.06) compared to African-Americans (2.70 +/- 0.06, P = 0.02) and was not different between Pima Indians and Caucasians (2.59 +/- 0.09 mg/kgEMBS/min) or African-Americans and Caucasians (all P > 0.18). Insulin-suppressed endogenous glucose production during the clamp was not different among the groups (all P > 0.40). AIR was higher in both African-Americans (13.51 +/- 0.26) and Pima Indians (13.72 +/- 0.27) compared to Caucasians (12.33 +/- 0.25 pM, log10, both P < 0.01). The areas under the curve for glucose in response to the oral glucose tolerance test and mixed meal test were higher in Pima Indians compared to African-Americans (P = 0.03 and P = 0.03, respectively) and Caucasians (P = 0.01, mixed meal test), but not different between

  8. Ohoyo Makachi: Words of Today's American Indian Women. A First Collection of Oratory by American Indian/Alaska Native Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verble, Sedelta, Ed.

    The volume presents a collection of 39 conference speeches symbolizing an effort by American Indian and Alaska Native women to speak for themselves, about themselves and to each other. Topics of speeches presented at Tahlequah consist of: past positives and present problems of Indian women; squaw image stereotyping; status of Indian women in…

  9. American Indian Music for the Classroom: An Indian Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stutzman, Esther

    This teaching guide, produced in cooperation with Indian parents, students and teachers, offers classroom material on the complex culture and history of American Indians. The guide suggests youngsters be taught that, contrary to stereotypes, there was a wide variation of Indian tribal groups and cultures in North America. A list of 14…

  10. American Indian Music for the Classroom: An Indian Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stutzman, Esther

    This teaching guide, produced in cooperation with Indian parents, students and teachers, offers classroom material on the complex culture and history of American Indians. The guide suggests youngsters be taught that, contrary to stereotypes, there was a wide variation of Indian tribal groups and cultures in North America. A list of 14…

  11. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and... Z. Gould, Federal Register Liaison Officer, Indian Health Service. BILLING CODE 4165-16-M...

  12. Indian Health Service: A Comprehensive Health Care Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    Comprehensive health care (preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and environmental) for more than 930,000 eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives is the responsibility of the Indian Health Service (IHS). Since 1955, this agency of the U.S. Public Health Service has made notable progress in raising the health status of Indians and Alaska…

  13. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    The brochure, designed to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, community leaders, and individuals with more than 50 programs available to American Indians and Alaska Natives, lists benefits, application procedures, and field contact points for United States Department of Agriculture program agencies. The nine sponsoring agencies…

  14. Protecting Urban American Indian Young People from Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettingell, Sandra L.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Skay, Carol L.; Resnick, Michael D.; Potthoff, Sandra K.; Eichhorn, John

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the likelihood of a past suicide attempt for urban American Indian boys and girls, given salient risk and protective factors. Methods: Survey data from 569 urban American Indian, ages 9-15, in-school youths. Logistic regression determined probabilities of past suicide attempts. Results: For girls, suicidal histories were…

  15. Suicide, Homicide, and Alcoholism Among American Indians: Guidelines for Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, Calvin J., Comp.; And Others

    Designed to help alleviate some of the health problems among American Indians and Eskimos, this booklet covers suicide, homicide, and alcoholism. It can be used to provide: (1) "how-to" guidelines which describe ways for recognizing, handling, and preventing possible suicides among American Indians; and (2) survey data and literature for use as a…

  16. American Indian/Alaska Native College Student Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study examining the similarities and differences between American Indian/Alaska Native student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to American Indian/Alaska Native students…

  17. The National Museum of the American Indian: Sharing the Gift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Amanda J.

    2005-01-01

    Over twenty-five thousand American Indians from over five hundred Indigenous nations journeyed from their homes to the National Mall in Washington DC to witness the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) on September 25, 2005. They journeyed to participate in the largest gathering of Native peoples in modern history, to…

  18. Circles of Women: Professional Skills Training with American Indian Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.

    This manual is a resource guide for organizing leadership training workshops for American Indian women at various levels of professional training. The resources and ideas for training were supplied by American Indian women who participated in such workshops. Section 1 of the manual presents an overview of critical issues in the professionalization…

  19. Head Start Directory: American Indian Programs Branch, Region XI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Univ., Norman. American Indian Inst.

    This directory lists personnel and contact information for American Indian Head Start programs and related agencies. Related agencies, institutions, and organizations listed include the American Indian Programs Branch, Region XI, of the Administration for Children and Families (Department of Health and Human Services); Region XI regional…

  20. American Indian Studies. Library Research Guide. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This guide to sources for San Diego (California) State University students doing library research on topics related to American Indian Studies begins by noting that information on North American Indians can be found in a variety of subject disciplines including history, anthropology, education, sociology, health care, law, business, and politics.…

  1. Trajectories of Cognitive Development among American Indian Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christina M.; Croy, Calvin; Spicer, Paul; Frankel, Karen; Emde, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Children who begin kindergarten with stronger skills learn faster than do those who enter with lower skills. Minority children tend to enter kindergarten already at a disadvantage, and the gap widens across time. However, little is known about cognitive development among American Indian young children. In this study, 110 American Indian infants…

  2. Using Mental Map Principles to Interpret American Indian Cartography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of maps drawn or significantly influenced by American Indians fosters critical thinking, cultural diversity, and awareness of a much-neglected topic in cartography. Line styles, scale depiction, and the sizing of individual entities are discussed in the context of applying principles from mental maps to American Indian maps and…

  3. American Indian Literature. A Selected Bibliography for Iowa Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataille, Gretchen Mueller

    Avoidance of stereotypes and realistic portrayal of American Indian life are among the criteria used for the references included in this annotated bibliography. The volume is intended to assist Iowa teachers, particularly of language arts and social studies, in correcting misconceptions about American Indians by identifying materials and resources…

  4. Culture and Self in Career Development: Working with American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juntunen, Cindy L.; Cline, Kara

    2010-01-01

    The career development concerns of American Indians continue to receive limited attention in the vocational or career literature. To address this deficit, the current article will apply the cultural formulation approach to career counseling with American Indians. This article presents information on factors related to cultural and self-identity…

  5. American Indian Imagery and the Miseducation of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staurowsky, Ellen J.

    1999-01-01

    Examines cultural fallout related to the issue of American Indian imagery in school athletics as it has been perpetuated by school districts and communities, suggesting that it is symptomatic of cultural illiteracy and noting that these images contribute not only to a hostile culture and classroom climate for American Indians but also miseducate…

  6. Protecting Urban American Indian Young People from Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettingell, Sandra L.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Skay, Carol L.; Resnick, Michael D.; Potthoff, Sandra K.; Eichhorn, John

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the likelihood of a past suicide attempt for urban American Indian boys and girls, given salient risk and protective factors. Methods: Survey data from 569 urban American Indian, ages 9-15, in-school youths. Logistic regression determined probabilities of past suicide attempts. Results: For girls, suicidal histories were…

  7. Guide to Financial Aid for American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Hanna J., Ed.; Thomason, Timothy C., Ed.

    This directory compiles information on college financial aid for American Indian and Alaska Native students. Information is provided on approximately 175 programs exclusively for American Indian and Alaska Native students, including private scholarships and fellowships, school-specific programs and scholarships, state financial aid, tribal…

  8. Adult Caregiving among American Indians: The Role of Cultural Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Spencer, S. Melinda; McGuire, Lisa C.; Goldberg, Jack; Wen, Yang; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With a sample of American Indian adults, we estimated the prevalence of adult caregiving, assessed the demographic and cultural profile of caregivers, and examined the association between cultural factors and being a caregiver. This is the first such study conducted with American Indians. Design and Methods: Data came from a…

  9. Culture and Self in Career Development: Working with American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juntunen, Cindy L.; Cline, Kara

    2010-01-01

    The career development concerns of American Indians continue to receive limited attention in the vocational or career literature. To address this deficit, the current article will apply the cultural formulation approach to career counseling with American Indians. This article presents information on factors related to cultural and self-identity…

  10. Multicultural Training Intervention to Address American Indian Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Steinfeldt, Matthew Clint

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a multicultural training intervention that addresses American Indian stereotypes perpetuated through the use of American Indians and corresponding imagery as mascots by schools and athletic teams. With the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development's tripartite model of multicultural competence (awareness,…

  11. Using Mental Map Principles to Interpret American Indian Cartography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of maps drawn or significantly influenced by American Indians fosters critical thinking, cultural diversity, and awareness of a much-neglected topic in cartography. Line styles, scale depiction, and the sizing of individual entities are discussed in the context of applying principles from mental maps to American Indian maps and…

  12. Colonial Instillations in American Indian Boarding School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rockey; Colmant, Steven; Dorton, Julie; Schultz, Lahoma; Colmant, Yevette; Ciali, Peter

    2006-01-01

    There is a general knowledge about the United States governments' deliberate attempts to destroy American Indian cultures. History books tell of American Indian students being locked in week long routines to keep them out of mischief, underfed to break down resistance and being given deadening rounds of simple, repetitious chores bereft of…

  13. Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed.

    This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity…

  14. Resources from the National Museum of the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Educators face many challenges in figuring out how and what to teach about Native American cultures. One critical element to remember is that Indian cultures and people are still living and thriving in today's world, including at the National Museum of the American Indian. Furthermore, this paper presents three inaugural exhibitions that were…

  15. American Indians and Native Alaskans. Prevention Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelo, Dora Beatriz

    This guide presents information on research and prevention of substance abuse among American Indians and Native Alaskans. Facts and figures representing findings from key government reports and research studies indicate the wide spread use of alcohol and drugs among American Indians and Native Alaskans. A list of prevention materials and curricula…

  16. Adult Caregiving among American Indians: The Role of Cultural Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Spencer, S. Melinda; McGuire, Lisa C.; Goldberg, Jack; Wen, Yang; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With a sample of American Indian adults, we estimated the prevalence of adult caregiving, assessed the demographic and cultural profile of caregivers, and examined the association between cultural factors and being a caregiver. This is the first such study conducted with American Indians. Design and Methods: Data came from a…

  17. Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary C.

    This study of the attitudes and status of West Indian immigrants in the United States, based on interviews with 59 West Indian immigrants, 83 adolescent and young adult children of immigrants, 27 African Americans, 25 White Americans, and 6 coworkers of immigrants shows the changes that occur as immigrants confront the realities of U.S. life. West…

  18. Multicultural Training Intervention to Address American Indian Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Steinfeldt, Matthew Clint

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a multicultural training intervention that addresses American Indian stereotypes perpetuated through the use of American Indians and corresponding imagery as mascots by schools and athletic teams. With the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development's tripartite model of multicultural competence (awareness,…

  19. Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed.

    This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity…

  20. Sex Role Attributions of American-Indian Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sex role attributes of American-Indian women as compared to a predominately White normative group using the short form of the Bem Sex Role Inventory. Results indicate a significant difference on the masculine subscale between the two groups with American-Indian women having higher scores. Provides implications for mental health…

  1. The Sky Clears; Poetry of the American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, A. Grove

    More than 200 authentic poems and lyrics of North American Indians are compiled in this anthology. The poetry was translated from tribal languages into English over the past 100 years by students of Indian language, lore, and life. The poems, taken from about 40 North American tribes, include songs of Eskimos of the Arctic coasts, totem-pole…

  2. The East Indian Family in American City and Suburb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandan, Yash

    The East Indian family in the United States may be understood in terms of its ethnicity and the international character of its migration. East Indians, like other immigrants, possess certain experiential traits that make them vulnerable to "Anglo-conformity." Indo Americans participate in American society, while retaining ethnic/cultural identity…

  3. Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary C.

    This study of the attitudes and status of West Indian immigrants in the United States, based on interviews with 59 West Indian immigrants, 83 adolescent and young adult children of immigrants, 27 African Americans, 25 White Americans, and 6 coworkers of immigrants shows the changes that occur as immigrants confront the realities of U.S. life. West…

  4. The Sky Clears; Poetry of the American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, A. Grove

    More than 200 authentic poems and lyrics of North American Indians are compiled in this anthology. The poetry was translated from tribal languages into English over the past 100 years by students of Indian language, lore, and life. The poems, taken from about 40 North American tribes, include songs of Eskimos of the Arctic coasts, totem-pole…

  5. Reducing weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people.

    PubMed

    Bearinger, Linda H; Pettingell, Sandra L; Resnick, Michael D; Potthoff, Sandra J

    2010-07-01

    To examine the likelihood of weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people, given the presence of salient risk and protective factors. The study used data from a confidential, self-report Urban Indian Youth Health Survey with 200 forced-choice items examining risk and protective factors and social, contextual, and demographic information. Between 1995 and 1998, 569 American Indian youths, aged 9-15 years, completed surveys administered in public schools and an after-school program. Using logistic regression, probability profiles compared the likelihood of weapon-carrying, given the combinations of salient risk and protective factors. In the final models, weapon-carrying was associated significantly with one risk factor (substance use) and two protective factors (school connectedness, perceiving peers as having prosocial behavior attitudes/norms). With one risk factor and two protective factors, in various combinations in the models, the likelihood of weapon carrying ranged from 4% (with two protective factors and no risk factor in the model) to 80% of youth (with the risk factor and no protective factors in the model). Even in the presence of the risk factor, the two protective factors decreased the likelihood of weapon-carrying to 25%. This analysis highlights the importance of protective factors in comprehensive assessments and interventions for vulnerable youth. In that the risk factor and two protective factors significantly related to weapon-carrying are amenable to intervention at both individual and population-focused levels, study findings offer a guide for prioritizing strategies for decreasing weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people. Copyright (c) 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Black-white unions: West Indians and African Americans compared.

    PubMed

    Model, S; Fisher, G

    2001-05-01

    In this research we use 1990 PUMS data to compare the propensity for unions between African Americans and native whites with the propensity for unions between British West Indians and native whites. In addition, we distinguish women and men. Descriptive statistics indicate that West Indians, with the exception of men who arrived as adults, are more likely than African Americans to have white partners. After the introduction of controls for several correlates of intermarriage, however, West Indian men of any generation have lower exogamy rates than African American men, while exogamy rates are higher among West Indian women who arrived as children or who were born in the United States than among African American women. Thus we find no consistent evidence of greater exogamy for British West Indians than for African Americans.

  7. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes among american indians and alaska natives.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Youth-onset type 2 diabetes has emerged as a significant public health concern for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Data from the National Institutes of Health longitudinal epidemiological study among the Pima Indians of southern Arizona and the Indian Health Service continue to document a rising incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes among American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Although national trends related to lack of physical activity and to unhealthy nutrition behaviors have contributed to the epidemic, the adverse conditions created by poverty, social injustice, trauma, and cultural disruption are also important in understanding the underlying causes for this public health crisis. This adverse environment is likely to provide little support for healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviors as well as other diabetes self-care behaviors. Known risk factors from the Pima Indian studies, such as intrauterine exposure to diabetes, bottle-feeding, and obesity, provide a basis for worthwhile intervention strategies. In this article, the author will review the current literature on the epidemiology of youth-onset type 2 diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives, discuss causes for the diabetes epidemic among American Indians and Alaska Natives, review risk factors for youth-onset type 2 diabetes in this population, and share promising youth physical activity promotion programs created and implemented specifically for American Indian and Alaska Native youth. However, more research on interventions to address the Native communities' psychosocial issues and concerns around youth-onset type 2 diabetes is urgently needed.

  8. Pulmonary thromboembolism in American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Kayali, Fadi; Olson, Ronald E; Milford, Creagh E

    2004-09-13

    The rate of diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism (collectively, venous thromboembolism: VTE) among patients discharged from Indian Health Service hospital care from 1980 through 1996 was considerably lower than rates reported in African Americans or whites. Expansion of the national census in 1990 to include American Indians and Alaskan Natives permits a more in-depth examination of this issue. Combined data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (nonfederal hospitals) and the Indian Health Service (federal hospitals) from 1996 through 2001 were used to evaluate the rate of diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives. The diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives, based on combined data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey and the Indian Health Service was 71 per 100,000 per year compared with 155 per 100,000 per year in African Americans (P<.001) and 131 per 100,000 per year in whites (P<.001). The rate ratio comparing the rate of diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives with African Americans was 0.46 (95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.47) and comparing American Indians and Alaskan Natives with whites it was 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.55). The observed relatively low incidence of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives would seem to be due to as yet undetermined genetic factors. The possibility that American Indians and Alaskan Natives have different lifestyles that affect the rate of diagnosis of VTE cannot be excluded.

  9. The Forgotten Minority: An Analysis of American Indian Employment Patterns in State and Local Governments, 1991-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Valerie H.; Kerr, Brinck; Ketcher, Linda K.; Murphy, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address a gap in the empirical literature by analyzing levels of proportional representation of American Indians over time in state and local government bureaucracies in key states. The authors limit their analysis to six states with the largest percentages of American Indian populations in 2000: Alaska, Arizona,…

  10. The Forgotten Minority: An Analysis of American Indian Employment Patterns in State and Local Governments, 1991-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Valerie H.; Kerr, Brinck; Ketcher, Linda K.; Murphy, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address a gap in the empirical literature by analyzing levels of proportional representation of American Indians over time in state and local government bureaucracies in key states. The authors limit their analysis to six states with the largest percentages of American Indian populations in 2000: Alaska, Arizona,…

  11. Expanding the Circle: Decreasing American Indian Mental Health Disparities through Culturally Competent Teaching about American Indian Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Vickie M.; Gallardo, Miguel; Shorter-Gooden, Kumea; Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Smith, Monique; McClure, Faith; Puri, Siddarth; Methot, Laurel; Ahhaitty, Glenda

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing that there has been a lack of systematic teaching about the unique mental health experiences of urban American Indians, this article examines data from national studies and specific case studies to illustrate some issues regarding the mental health of American Indians in urban areas. Some studies have reported that when American…

  12. Expanding the Circle: Decreasing American Indian Mental Health Disparities through Culturally Competent Teaching about American Indian Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Vickie M.; Gallardo, Miguel; Shorter-Gooden, Kumea; Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Smith, Monique; McClure, Faith; Puri, Siddarth; Methot, Laurel; Ahhaitty, Glenda

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing that there has been a lack of systematic teaching about the unique mental health experiences of urban American Indians, this article examines data from national studies and specific case studies to illustrate some issues regarding the mental health of American Indians in urban areas. Some studies have reported that when American…

  13. Chicago Indians: The Effects of Urban Migration. The National Study of American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neog, Prafulla; And Others

    This study reviews the characteristics and service activities of all clients of the St. Augustine's Center for American Indians in Chicago in 1968 and compares them with the clients of 1967. This center focused its attention upon intensive counseling, emergency assistance, and referrals of Indian American in Chicago, or other urban settings. Data…

  14. Delay Discounting of Different Outcomes in a Sample of American Indian and Non-Indian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; McDonald, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Delay discounting occurs when an individual prefers a lesser amount of an outcome that is available immediately, rather than waiting for the full amount. The present study was a preliminary investigation into delay discounting in a yet unstudied population, American Indians (AIs). AI college students completed a delay-discounting task that…

  15. Establishing survey validity and reliability for American Indians through "think aloud" and test-retest methods.

    PubMed

    Hauge, Cindy Horst; Jacobs-Knight, Jacque; Jensen, Jamie L; Burgess, Katherine M; Puumala, Susan E; Wilton, Georgiana; Hanson, Jessica D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a mixed-methods approach to determine the validity and reliability of measurements used within an alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program for American Indian women. To develop validity, content experts provided input into the survey measures, and a "think aloud" methodology was conducted with 23 American Indian women. After revising the measurements based on this input, a test-retest was conducted with 79 American Indian women who were randomized to complete either the original measurements or the new, modified measurements. The test-retest revealed that some of the questions performed better for the modified version, whereas others appeared to be more reliable for the original version. The mixed-methods approach was a useful methodology for gathering feedback on survey measurements from American Indian participants and in indicating specific survey questions that needed to be modified for this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Predictors of Wellness and American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Felicia S.; Nandy, Karabi

    2012-01-01

    Wellness is an important American Indian (AI) concept, understood as being in balance with one’s body, mind, and environment. Wellness predictors are reported in this paper within the context of health. A cross-sectional randomized household survey of 457 AI adults at 13 rural health care sites in California was conducted. Measures included wellness perceptions, barriers, health status/health conditions, spirituality, cultural connectivity, high-risk behaviors and abuse history. Statistical analysis obtained the best predictive model for wellness. Predictors of wellness were general health status perception, participation in AI cultural practices and suicide ideation. Significant differences in wellness status were observed depending on experience of adverse events in childhood and adulthood (neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse). Cultural connectivity (speaking tribal language, participating in AI practices, and feeling connected to community) was also associated with perceptions of wellness. Recommendations are for culturally-appropriate education and interventions emphasizing community and cultural connectivity for improving wellness status. PMID:21841279

  17. Predictors of wellness and American Indians.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Felicia S; Nandy, Karabi

    2011-08-01

    Wellness is an important American Indian (AI) concept, understood as being in balance with one's body, mind, and environment. Wellness predictors are reported in this paper within the context of health. A cross-sectional randomized household survey of 457 AI adults at 13 rural health care sites in California was conducted. Measures included wellness perceptions, barriers, health status/health conditions, spirituality, cultural connectivity, high-risk behaviors and abuse history. Statistical analysis obtained the best predictive model for wellness. Predictors of wellness were general health status perception, participation in AI cultural practices and suicide ideation. Significant differences in wellness status were observed depending on experience of adverse events in childhood and adulthood (neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse). Cultural connectivity (speaking tribal language, participating in AI practices, and feeling connected to community) was also associated with perceptions of wellness. Recommendations are for culturally-appropriate education and interventions emphasizing community and cultural connectivity for improving wellness status.

  18. American Indian working women: correlates of subclinical depression among American Indian women.

    PubMed

    Napholz, L

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which role conflict, life satisfaction, self-esteem, instrumentality, expressiveness, age and education predicts ambulatory depression among a community based sample of urban American Indian working women. The convenience sample consisted of a total of 148 Midwestern American Indian working women, ranging in age from 18 to 65 years. Participants completed five instruments assessing gender-related traits of instrumentality and expressiveness, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, role conflict, and socio-demographic information. A forced entry stepwise multiple regression was conducted which included all the designated predictor variables. The significant negative Beta in Step 1 indicated that women scoring on the Masculinity (instrumentality) sub-scale were less likely to have a high depression score. The prediction of depression by the Masculinity sub-scale was no longer significant after the life satisfaction and self-esteem variables were added to the equation in Step 2. There was a significant inverse relationship for life satisfaction and self-esteem in predicting the criterion variable, depression. Thirty-two percent of the variance in the prediction of the dependent variable (depression scores) was accounted for by the six variables. In counselling urban American Indian women, supporting instrumentality, enhancing self-esteem and life satisfaction, can positively impact on ambulatory dysphoria.

  19. Obesity in American Indian and Mexican American Men and Women: Associations with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Autonomic Control

    PubMed Central

    Criado, José R.; Gilder, David A.; Kalafut, Mary A.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a serious public health problem, especially in some minority communities, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. While obesity is a serious health concern in both American Indian and Mexican American populations, the relationship between obesity and cardiac autonomic control in these two populations is not well understood. The present study in a selected sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans assessed associations between obesity, blood pressure (BP), and cardiovascular autonomic control. Cardiovascular autonomic control, systolic and diastolic mean BP, and body mass index were obtained from one hundred thirty-two American Indian and Mexican American men and women who are literate in English and are residing legally in San Diego County. Men had a significant greater systolic and diastolic BP and were more likely to develop systolic prehypertension and hypertension than women. Obese participants showed greater mean heart rate (HR) and systolic and diastolic BP than nonobese participants. Obese men also exhibited greater cardiac sympathetic activity and lower cardiovagal control than obese women. These results suggest that obesity and gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic control may contribute to risk for cardiovascular disorders in this sample of American Indians and Mexican Americans. PMID:24024026

  20. Comparison of diets of urban American Indian and non-Hispanic whites: populations with a disparity for biliary tract cancer rates.

    PubMed

    Glew, Robert H; Wold, Rosemary S; VanderJagt, Dorothy J

    2012-01-01

    The incidnece of biliary tract cancer (BTC) is many-fold higher for American Indians (AI) relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHW). Neither gallstones nor genetics can account for this difference. There is speculation that certain fatty acids in bile may play a role in preventing BTC. Since diet may influence composition of bile, we compared the dietary intakes of urban AI and NHW adult women in New Mexico. Design, a cross- sectional study of the diets of lactating AI and NHW women was conducted. Setting, the University of New Mexico Hospital. Participants, healthy lactating women 18 to 39 years of age were recruited. Main outcome measures, a three-day diet record for each participant was analyzed. The AI women consumed less calcium (p = 0.04) and significantly less short and intermediate chain-length fatty acids (C4-C12), but nearly twice as much proinflammatory arachidonic acid as the NHWs (p < 0.01). The intake of dairy products by AI women was less than NHW women (p = 0.01) while the intake of processed meat products was higher (p < 0.01). Dietary factors may account for the difference in the risk of BTC between AI and NHW women.

  1. Cancer Screening and Risk Factor Rates Among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Judith; Breen, Nancy; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Satter, Delight E.; Davis, William W.; McNeel, Timothy; Snipp, C. Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We examined cancer screening and risk factor patterns in California using 4 different statistical tabulations of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations. Methods. We used the 2001 California Health Interview Survey to compare cancer screening and risk factor data across 4 different tabulation approaches. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates by gender and race/ethnicity for cancer screening and risk factors, sociodemographic characteristics, and access to care variables. We compared AIAN men and women with members of other racial groups and examined outcomes among AIAN men and women using the 4 tabulation methods. Results. Although some differences were small, in general, screening and risk factor rates among American Indians/Alaska Natives were most similar to rates among Whites when the most inclusive multiracial tabulation approach was used and least similar when the more exclusive US census “single-race” approach was used. Conclusions. Racial misclassification and undercounting are among the most difficult obstacles to obtaining accurate and informative data on the AIAN population. Our analysis suggests some guidelines for overcoming these obstacles. PMID:16380573

  2. American Indians in New York State. Program Brief No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkell, A. Garry; Ceresia, Charles S.

    According to the 1970 census, New York State has the tenth largest Indian population in the United States; 1978 tribal enrollment was 12,500--up about 25% over 1970. The nine Indian reservations are owned and occupied by Iroquois, Poospatuck, and Shinnecock Indians, all of whom are indigenous to New York State. Enrollment in the Iroquois…

  3. American Indian Voluntary Associations in Greater Los Angeles: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramstedt, Wayne

    With its large and heterogeneous Indian population, the Los Angeles area offers an excellent opportunity to study patterns in the origin, growth, and structure of Indian voluntary associations, and the leisure time institutions. Since the 1920's more than 100 Indian voluntary associations formed in the area. Established groups influenced the…

  4. Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Elderly American Indians: Design, Methods, and Implementation of the Cerebrovascular Disease and Its Consequences in American Indians Study.

    PubMed

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Shibata, Dean; Best, Lyle G; Verney, Steven P; Longstreth, William T; Lee, Elisa T; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard; O'Leary, Marcia; Ali, Tauqeer; Jensen, Paul N; Muller, Clemma; Nelson, Lonnie A; Rhoades, Everett; Madhyastha, Tara; Grabowski, Thomas J; Beauchamp, Norman; Umans, Jason G; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    The Cerebrovascular Disease and its Consequences in American Indians (CDCAI) Study recruited surviving members of a 20-year, longitudinal, population-based cohort of American Indians focused on cardiovascular disease, its risk factors, and its consequences. The goal of the CDCAI Study is to characterize the burden, risk factors, and manifestations of vascular brain injury identified on cranial MRI. The CDCAI Study investigators enrolled 1,033 participants aged 60 and older from 11 American Indian communities and tribes in the Northern Plains, Southern Plains, and Southwestern United States. In addition to cranial MRI performed according to standardized protocols, participants underwent extensive medical interview, clinical examination, neurocognitive testing, physical function evaluation, electrocardiogram, and provided blood and urine specimens. Participants also self-administered questionnaires covering demographics, quality of life, and medical history. This report describes the design, implementation, and some of the unique challenges of this study and data collection. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elderly American Indians: Design, methods, and implementation of the Cerebrovascular Disease and its Consequences in American Indians Study

    PubMed Central

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M.; Shibata, Dean; Best, Lyle G.; Verney, Steven P.; Longstreth, W.T.; Lee, Elisa T.; Okin, Peter M.; Devereux, Richard; O’Leary, Marcia; Ali, Tauqeer; Jensen, Paul N.; Muller, Clemma; Nelson, Lonnie A.; Rhoades, Everett; Madhyastha, Tara; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Beauchamp, Norman; Umans, Jason G.; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    The Cerebrovascular Disease and Its Consequences in American Indians (CDCAI) Study recruited surviving members of a 20-year, longitudinal, population-based cohort of American Indians focused on cardiovascular disease, its risk factors, and its consequences. The goal of CDCAI Study is to characterize the burden, risk factors, and manifestations of vascular brain injury identified on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CDCAI Study investigators enrolled 1,033 participants aged 60 years and older from 11 American Indian communities and tribes in the Northern Plains, Southern Plains, and Southwestern U.S. In addition to cranial MRI performed according to standardized protocols, participants underwent extensive medical interview, clinical examination, neurocognitive testing, physical function evaluation, electrocardiogram, and provided blood and urine specimens. Participants also self-administered questionnaires covering demographics, quality of life, and medical history. This report describes the design, implementation, and some of the unique challenges of this study and data collection. PMID:27603047

  6. Nicotine dependence and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities in a sample of American Indian male veterans.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Daniel L; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Canive, Jose; Thuras, Paul; Westermeyer, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest rates of nicotine dependence in the U.S. However, studies analyzing associations between nicotine dependence and psychiatric and substance use disorders in these groups have been limited. This study analyzes the co-occurrence of current and lifetime DSM-III-R nicotine dependence with psychiatric and substance use disorders in a community sample of 480 American Indian male veterans. Lifetime nicotine dependence (23.3%) was associated with all lifetime disorders studied, including alcohol use and drug use disorders, affective and anxiety disorders, PTSD, pathological gambling and antisocial personality disorder. Current nicotine dependence was present in 19% of the sample and significantly associated with current affective and gambling disorder. Substantial co-morbidity exists between nicotine dependence and other substance abuse and psychiatric disorders among this sample of American Indian male veterans, particularly for lifetime diagnoses. Screening for all psychiatric disorders among American Indian/Alaska Native smokers may be warranted. Although these results are similar to those observed among the general U.S. population, unique risk factors exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives which may require further attention. Specific public health and clinical interventions to reduce the rate of nicotine dependence among American Indians/Alaska Natives are recommended.

  7. Community-Responsive Interventions to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Jared B.; Adams, Alexandra K.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Karanja, Njeri; Lee, Elisa T.; Walters, Karina L.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations bear a heavy burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and they have the highest rates of risk factors for CVD, such as cigarette smoking, obesity, and diabetes, of any U.S. population group. Yet, few randomized controlled trials have been launched to test potential preventive interventions in…

  8. Community-Responsive Interventions to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Jared B.; Adams, Alexandra K.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Karanja, Njeri; Lee, Elisa T.; Walters, Karina L.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations bear a heavy burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and they have the highest rates of risk factors for CVD, such as cigarette smoking, obesity, and diabetes, of any U.S. population group. Yet, few randomized controlled trials have been launched to test potential preventive interventions in…

  9. American Indian Elderly: A National Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    The first research effort undertaken to document conditions of life of older Indian and Alaskan Native people (aged 45 and older) nationwide was completed by the National Indian Council on Aging in 1980. Data were derived from results of a detailed survey administered to a random sample of 712 older Indians and Alaskan Natives from urban and rural…

  10. Making Education Work for the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiago, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Education has been used as the primary weapon in the White man's arsenal toward changing Indian tribal cultures. Indians are often treated in the classroom as an almost mythical group of people. Textbooks which contain incorrect or stereotypical information often cause Indian children to develop negative self-perceptions. (JN)

  11. Preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancy among an American Indian/Alaska Native population: effect of a screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment intervention.

    PubMed

    Montag, Annika C; Brodine, Stephanie K; Alcaraz, John E; Clapp, John D; Allison, Matthew A; Calac, Daniel J; Hull, Andrew D; Gorman, Jessica R; Jones, Kenneth L; Chambers, Christina D

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are the result of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) and believed to be the leading known cause of developmental disabilities in the United States. Our objective was to determine whether a culturally targeted Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) intervention may reduce risky drinking and vulnerability to AEP among American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) women in Southern California. Southern California AIAN women of childbearing age who completed a survey including questions regarding alcohol consumption and contraceptive use were randomized into intervention or treatment as usual groups where the former group completed an online SBIRT intervention, and were followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months postintervention. Of 263 women recruited and 247 with follow-up data, one-third were at high risk of having an AEP at baseline. Both treatment groups decreased self-reported risky drinking behavior (drinks per week, p < 0.001; frequency of heavy episodic [binge] drinking episodes per 2 weeks, p = 0.017 and risk of AEP p < 0.001 at 6 months postintervention) in the follow-up period. There was no difference between treatment groups. Baseline factors associated with decreased risk of an AEP at follow-up included the perception that other women in their peer group consumed a greater number of drinks per week, having reported a greater number of binge episodes in the past 2 weeks, and depression/impaired functionality. Participation in assessment alone may have been sufficient to encourage behavioral change even without the web-based SBIRT intervention. Randomization to the SBIRT did not result in a significantly different change in risky drinking behaviors. The importance of perception of other women's drinking and one's own depression/functionality may have implications for future interventions. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. Development of a media campaign on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders for Northern Plains American Indian communities.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jessica D; Winberg, Austin; Elliott, Amy

    2012-11-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancies are especially of concern for American Indians. The Indian Health Service reported that 47% to 56% of pregnant patients admitted to drinking alcohol during their pregnancy. In addition, rates of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome are estimated to be as high as 3.9 to 9.0 per 1,000 live births among American Indians in the Northern Plains, making prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies an important public health effort for this population. The goal of this article is to add to the literature on universal prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum disorders by describing the development, dissemination, and evaluation of a media campaign on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders that was created by and for American Indian communities in the Northern Plains.

  13. Commentary: Cultural Perspectives on Research among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Horse, John; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Recommends directions for American Indian health-related research, including a national baseline study examining regional differences in Indian health beliefs, attitudes, and behavior; introduction of social conservation models that draw on critical cultural and life circumstances; and investigation of relationships among quality of care, health…

  14. American Indian Adolescent Girls: Vulnerability to Sex Trafficking, Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center offers harm reduction programming to at-risk adolescent American Indian girls, including outreach, case management, advocacy, healthy sexuality education, and support groups. To evaluate program impact, participants are assessed at intake and every 6 months afterward for current vulnerability to…

  15. Legacy of the American Indian: Lessons for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Anita, Ed.; Cardwell, Guyneth, Ed.

    This resource guide presents curriculum materials that focus on American Indians and their culture. The materials were compiled at a national workshop that brought together educators from the United States and Canada to develop authentic cultural materials to enhance the educational experience of Indian students. The guide contains lessons in…

  16. Speech Communication Education and the American Indian: Challenges and Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Lynn R.

    The author examines the peculiarly crucial role played by spoken communication in the development and advancement of Indian cultures, with special attention to the challenges and contrasts the American Indian student presents for the speech communication educator. Three specific aspects of traditional speech communication behavior, unique to the…

  17. Trends in the Use of Inhalants among American Indian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauvais, Fred; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A survey of four large samples of Native American adolescents, conducted since 1975, shows that inhalant use is much higher for Indian than for non-Indian youth, is increasing, begins at an early age, is often associated with use of other drugs, and is influenced by peer and family attitudes. (JHZ)

  18. Maria Tallchief: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E.

    Maria Tallchief has earned a lasting place in the history of dance as one of the world's greatest ballerinas. She is also an American Indian. She was born in 1925 in Fairfax, Oklahoma; her father was a full-blooded Osage Indian, her mother was of Scotch-Irish and Dutch ancestry. Discovery of oil on the Osage Reservation had brought wealth to all…

  19. Economic Development and Employment Opportunities for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandefur, Gary D.

    American Indian unemployment remains high despite efforts by tribes and the federal government to improve employment opportunities. Persistently high unemployment among Indians has resulted in low family incomes and high poverty rates relative to Whites. Particularly serious on reservations, these continuing problems are related in part to low…

  20. The Nonverbal American Indian Child in the Classroom: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilmet, George M.

    A review of anthropological, psychological, and educational research pertaining to the quiet manner of American Indian students in classroom situations is presented. This phenomenon has been explained using the research perspectives of the learning style theory and interference theory. The learning style theory states that Indian children behave…

  1. A History and Foundation of American Indian Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juneau, Stan

    The educational system in Montana is not working for its American Indian students. Dropout rates continue to be extremely high, standardized tests scores are mostly below the state benchmark, curriculum and instruction are not oriented toward promoting Indian culture and history, and the local Board of Trustee system still does not promote…

  2. Ethnic Identity Development of Second-Generation Indian American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maira, Sunaina

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 7 second-generation Indian American students between 17 and 21 years of age to study their ethnic identity formation. Respondents were college students who came from families that represented the earlier waves of post-1965 Indian immigrants, highly educated middle- and upper-class professionals. The…

  3. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Resource Guide of American Indian and Alaska Native Women, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Owanah P., Comp.; Verble, Sedelta D., Comp.

    A resource listing of 678 prominent American Indian and Alaska Native women representing 159 tribes throughout the United States provides the following information: name, address, date and place of birth, tribal membership, field of interest, current occupation, Indian activities, women's advocacy, educational background and professional interest.…

  5. Creating Meaningful Study Abroad Programs for American Indian Postsecondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, J. Anne; Wildcat, David; Annett, Cynthia; Pierotti, Raymond; Griswold, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    A study-abroad exchange program for American Indian students at Haskell Indian Nations University (Kansas) and indigenous Altaian students at a Siberian university studied water quality issues common to both countries. Connectedness with the global Indigenous community was enhanced by comparing traditional knowledge. Mentoring and traveling as a…

  6. Creating Meaningful Study Abroad Programs for American Indian Postsecondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, J. Anne; Wildcat, David; Annett, Cynthia; Pierotti, Raymond; Griswold, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    A study-abroad exchange program for American Indian students at Haskell Indian Nations University (Kansas) and indigenous Altaian students at a Siberian university studied water quality issues common to both countries. Connectedness with the global Indigenous community was enhanced by comparing traditional knowledge. Mentoring and traveling as a…

  7. Federal Policies and Programs for American Indians. Staff Report #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muskrat, Joseph; And Others

    The document presents Federal government policies and programs for American Indians, and the history of the Federal government-Indian relationship. Topics discussed are: (1) land management and industrial development; (2) employment programs; (3) education; (4) welfare programs; (5) other Federal programs (housing, transportation, and public…

  8. Maria Tallchief: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E.

    Maria Tallchief has earned a lasting place in the history of dance as one of the world's greatest ballerinas. She is also an American Indian. She was born in 1925 in Fairfax, Oklahoma; her father was a full-blooded Osage Indian, her mother was of Scotch-Irish and Dutch ancestry. Discovery of oil on the Osage Reservation had brought wealth to all…

  9. Who Supports Urban American Indian Students in Public Community Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Quarterly, 2003

    2003-01-01

    In 1977 a group of urban American Indian organizations got together to protest the leveling of rental housing for urban renewal; then they learned that a community college was going up to replace that housing, right in the middle of the Indian community. Realizing the opportunities for jobs, education, and training, the community leaders decided…

  10. SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THE AMERICAN INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OSBORN, LYNN R.

    A 5-DAY CONFERENCE, COSPONSORED BY KANSAS UNIVERSITY'S COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER AND SOUTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY'S INSTITUTE FOR INDIAN STUDIES, WAS HELD IN MAY 1967 TO DISCUSS THE TEACHING OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION TO AMERICAN INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. THIS REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE CONTAINS THREE POSITION STATEMENTS, DRAFTED BY THE CONFEREES,…

  11. Economic Development in American Indian Reservations. Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar, Ed.

    A collection of 13 scholarly articles and essays, this book makes available hard-to-find information and theories about American Indian economic development. Part I, "The Land and the People", emphasizes cultural traditions and beliefs of Indian people and traces the development of the concept of sovereignty and its applicability to…

  12. American Indians and Federal Aid. Brookings Studies in Social Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorkin, Alan L.

    "American Indians are the poorest of any nonwhite minority in the United States. Life on the reservation offers them few opportunities: if they move to the city, they face problems of adjustment that can prove insurmountable. What is being done--what more could be done--to help Indians satisfy their needs in a largely alien society? To develop the…

  13. Who Supports Urban American Indian Students in Public Community Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Quarterly, 2003

    2003-01-01

    In 1977 a group of urban American Indian organizations got together to protest the leveling of rental housing for urban renewal; then they learned that a community college was going up to replace that housing, right in the middle of the Indian community. Realizing the opportunities for jobs, education, and training, the community leaders decided…

  14. Barriers to Health Care: The Unique Problems Facing American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Everett R.

    1977-01-01

    Poverty, discrimination, and physical and cultural isolation are among the problems which prevent American Indians from receiving adequate health care. The Federal government has special responsibilities and legal obligations to the Indian people. To meet these responsibilities and obligations, the government must improve the access to and…

  15. Economic Development in American Indian Reservations. Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar, Ed.

    A collection of 13 scholarly articles and essays, this book makes available hard-to-find information and theories about American Indian economic development. Part I, "The Land and the People", emphasizes cultural traditions and beliefs of Indian people and traces the development of the concept of sovereignty and its applicability to…

  16. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. Encephalitis-Associated Hospitalizations among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    PubMed Central

    Mehal, Jason M.; Holman, Robert C.; Vora, Neil M.; Blanton, Jesse; Gordon, Paul H.; Cheek, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Encephalitis produces considerable morbidity in the United States, but morbidity rates among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have not been described. Hospitalization records listing an encephalitis diagnosis were analyzed by using Indian Health Service direct/contract inpatient data. For 1998–2010, there were 436 encephalitis-associated hospitalizations among AI/AN people, an average annual age-adjusted hospitalization rate of 3.1/100,000 population. The rate for infants (11.9) was more than double that for any other age group. Death occurred for 4.1% of hospitalizations. Consistent with reports for the general U.S. population, the rate was high among infants and most (53.9%) hospitalizations were of unexplained etiology. The average annual rate during the study period appeared lower than for the general U.S. population, due particularly to lower rates in the elderly. Future community-based surveillance and mortality studies are needed to confirm these findings and examine reasons underlying the low rates of encephalitis in AI/AN people. PMID:24515941

  18. At what cost? The social impact of American Indian gaming.

    PubMed

    Peacock, T D; Day, P A; Peacock, R B

    1999-01-01

    American Indian gaming has been called the "new buffalo." It has the potential to greatly influence cultural traditions on American Indian reservations. This study looks at the social impact that American Indian gaming is having on one reservation in northern Minnesota. Tribal members share strong feelings, both positive and negative, about the issue. Concerns about gaming include an increase in gambling abuse and addiction; a lack of appropriate child care; and concern that gaming is replacing traditional social activities. Some express concern that American Indian values are being replaced by materialism. Supporters of gaming point out that gaming provides tribal members with an opportunity to learn job skills and have gainful employment. Implications for social policy are given.

  19. HIV/AIDS Protective Factors among Urban American Indian Youths

    PubMed Central

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Nieri, Tanya; Stiffman, Arlene Rubin

    2011-01-01

    This research examined how family and individual factors influence three HIV/AIDS risk behaviors: having more than one sexual partner in the last three months, substance use at last sexual intercourse, and condom non-use at last sexual intercourse. The sample includes 89 sexually active American Indian adolescents living in a large Southwestern city. Logistic regression results revealed that family communication acts as a protective factor against HIV risk through a lower reported substance use during last sexual intercourse, but it did not appear to affect the number of multiple recent sex partners. Family and personal involvement in American Indian cultural activities, both low on average, had no effect on the outcomes. This study helps to fill the gap in knowledge on sexual health risk and protective factors among American Indian adolescents, an understudied group, and provides implications for intervention with American Indian youths and their families. PMID:17242528

  20. American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Governments Sectors (NAICS 921150)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory information for Tribal Governments Sectors. Learn about American Indian Tribal laws and regulations, tribal drinking water programs, as well as greenhouse gas programs and NESHAPs for boilers and landfills

  1. Intersocietal Relationships by Evolutionary Levels among North American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Extends use of evolutionary theory in understanding developmental processes within societies for examining patterns occuring between societies. Emphasizes North American Indian situations. Examines four degrees of intersocietal integration: first contact, low, medium and high. (MH)

  2. Stress Burden and Diabetes in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Roubideaux, Yvette; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Whitesell, Nancy R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between psychosocial stress and diabetes in two American Indian reservation communities (Northern Plains and Southwest). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The American Indian Services Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP), a cross-sectional probability sample survey, interviewed 3,084 randomly selected members of two American Indian tribal groups. Included were a psychiatric epidemiological interview, a physical health problems checklist, and an extensive sociodemographic section. RESULTS Stress was common in these reservation communities, and the stress burden was greater among those with diabetes. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, early-life interpersonal trauma and community family dysfunction were significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes in the Northern Plains, while discrimination and community addiction problems were significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes in the Southwest. CONCLUSIONS A number of psychosocial stresses were significantly associated with increased odds of self-reported diabetes in these two American Indian communities. PMID:18070997

  3. Final priorities; Rehabilitation Services Administration--Capacity Building Program for Traditionally Underserved Populations--vocational rehabilitation training institute for the preparation of personnel in American Indian Vocation Rehabilitation Services projects. Final priorities.

    PubMed

    2014-08-14

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces two priorities under the Capacity Building Program for Traditionally Underserved Populations administered by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. Priority 1 establishes a new vocational rehabilitation (VR) training institute for the preparation of personnel in American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) projects (the Institute). Priority 2 requires a partnership between a four-year institution of higher education (IHE) and a two-year community college or tribal college. This partnership is designed to successfully implement the VR training Institute established in Priority 1. In addition, the partnership agreement required under Priority 2 provides a brief description of how the partnership will be managed, the partners' roles and responsibilities and a strategy for sustaining the partnership after the Federal investment ends.

  4. Dog bite injuries among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Adam; Holman, Robert C; Callinan, Laura S; Hennessy, Thomas W; Cheek, James E; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2013-06-01

    To examine dog bites among American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) children visiting Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities. We retrospectively analyzed hospitalizations and outpatient visits with a diagnosis of dog bite between 2001 and 2008 in AI/AN children aged <20 years. Rates of dog bite hospitalizations and outpatient visits were estimated by age group, sex, region, and number and location of open wounds using Indian Health Service data. Analyses of hospitalizations for the general US population aged<20 years used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The average annual dog bite hospitalization rate was higher among AI/AN children in Alaska (6.1/100,000 population) and the Southwest region (5.3/100,000) compared with the general US child population (3.1/100,000; 95% CI, 2.9-3.3/100,000). The average annual outpatient visit rate in AI/AN children was highest in the Alaska (596.4/100,000), Southwest (540.0/100,000), and Northern Plains West (537.6/100,000) regions. The hospitalization rate was highest in both AI/AN and US males aged<5 years, and outpatient visit rates were highest in AI/AN males aged 5-9 years. Open wounds diagnoses were most commonly seen on the head, neck, and face in hospitalized children (45.5% of open wounds in AI/AN children, 59.3% in US children; SE, 1.0%) and on the leg in AI/AN outpatients (35.6%). Dog bites represent a significant public health threat in AI/AN children in the Alaska, the Southwest, and Northern Plains West regions of the US. Enhanced animal control and education efforts should reduce dog bite injuries and associated problems with pets and stray dogs, such as emerging infectious diseases. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  5. American Indian Tribal Values: A Critical Consideration in the Education of American Indians/Alaska Natives Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippeconnic, John W., III; Tippeconnic Fox, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The education of American Indians and Alaska Natives has increasingly become more complex given the differences in tribal languages and cultures, especially as changing demographics and issues of Indian identity are considered. There are over 200 languages and vast cultural differences between and within the 565 federally recognized tribes in…

  6. What Can Tribes Do? Strategies and Institutions in American Indian Economic Development. American Indian Manual and Handbook Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Stephen, Ed.; Kalt, Joseph P., Ed.

    This collection of research papers focuses on conditions that affect self-determined economic development on American Indian reservations. Topics include obstacles that Indian nations face as they pursue their development goals; development of economic development corporations; effective tribal judicial systems; a model for processing land-use…

  7. American Indian Tribal Values: A Critical Consideration in the Education of American Indians/Alaska Natives Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippeconnic, John W., III; Tippeconnic Fox, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The education of American Indians and Alaska Natives has increasingly become more complex given the differences in tribal languages and cultures, especially as changing demographics and issues of Indian identity are considered. There are over 200 languages and vast cultural differences between and within the 565 federally recognized tribes in…

  8. The Tribally Controlled Indian Colleges: The Beginnings of Self Determination in American Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppelt, Norman T.

    This book examines tribally controlled Indian colleges established since the early 1960s and provides perspectives on their educational philosophy, history, and present status. Chapter 1 is an overview of four centuries of abortive efforts by churches and the federal government to provide higher education for American Indians, including profiles…

  9. "I'm Not Indian Anymore": The Challenge of Providing Culturally Sensitive Services to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Susan

    This report documents observations and findings from a site visit to Southern Hills Developmental Services (SHDS), an agency providing services to people with disabilities in the South Dakota community of Hot Springs. Half of the people using the services are American Indians. The report discusses the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and traditions…

  10. Implementation of NAIWA (Native American Indian Womens Association) Recommendations. Bureau of Indian Affairs Report 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Responses derived from 152 of 219 schools and dormitories operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are presented in this assessment of the Native American Indian Women's Association recommendations considered by the Assistant Area Directors for Education to be immediately implementable. Each report is presented in terms of a code…

  11. Indian Treaties: Two Centuries of Dishonor. American Indian Reader: Current Affairs, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costo, Rupert; Henry, Jeannette

    Today self-determination, economy, tribal jurisdiction, taxation, water and resource rights, and other aspects of American Indian affairs are affected by issues raised through the treaties and agreements made with Indian nations and tribes, and through the executive orders and statutes. Government policy has been influenced by the pressure brought…

  12. The Extent and Significance of Suicide Among American Indians Today. National Study of American Indian Education, Series III, No. 1, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havighurst, Robert J.

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document presents data related to suicides among Indians. Its purpose is to contribute to a better understanding of the problems of Indians in this society. An overall comparison of Indian and non-Indian suicide rates indicates no difference with reference to…

  13. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Tracey R; Hanson, Jessica D; Griese, Emily R; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-07-03

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

  14. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed. PMID:26550005

  15. Higher Education Opportunities for American Indians, 1971-1972. A Consortium of Haskell Indian Junior College (Lawrence, Kansas); Institute of American Indian Arts (Santa Fe, New Mexico); Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (Albuquerque, New Mexico); Chilocco Indian School (Chilocco, Oklahoma).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Education Programs.

    Designed to assist American Indian youth in the school selection process, this directory of American Indian secondary and post secondary educational opportunities details programs and philosophies for five institutions. Specifically, this directory presents the following: (1) Post-High School Education and Training Programs Offered by the Bureau…

  16. Traditional and western healing practices for alcoholism in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P J

    1998-11-01

    The American Indian and Alaska Native population is a culturally diverse population with a current census of 1,959,000. Prior to White contact, there was historically little use of alcoholic beverages except for American Indians in the Southwest. After White contact, use and misuse of alcohol escalated rapidly; however, the prevalence, patterns, and problems of drinking alcoholic beverages vary enormously even in tribes closely linked geographically. American Indians and Alaska Natives have preserved and revitalized a number of traditional healing practices and applied these to the treatment of alcohol-related problems. These healing practices include the following: nativistic movements, sacred dances, sweat lodges, talking circle, four circles, and cultural enhancement programs. Additionally, Western treatment approaches have been applied in the treatment of problems related to alcohol, such as medication for detoxification, disulfiram (Antabuse), Alcoholics Anonymous, and behavioral interventions. Several investigators have completed a small number of naturalistic follow-up studies, but no one has undertaken a randomized controlled trial looking at specific methods of alcohol treatment in American Indians or Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native communities have adapted and integrated both Traditional and Western approaches to fit their own unique sociocultural needs.

  17. Use of online health information resources by American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Geana, Mugur V; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Cully, Lance; Etheridge, Jesse; Bledowski, Caroline; Choi, Won S; Greiner, K Allen

    2012-08-01

    According to the Office of Minority Health, an estimated 4.9 million people living in the United States consider themselves American Indian or Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more races/ethnicities. American Indians or Alaska Natives comprise a racial/ethnic group experiencing serious health disparities, with little if any improvement in health outcomes over the past several decades. This study was designed to explore use of the Internet as a health information source among American Indians in the Central Plains region of the United States. The authors recruited 998 Natives in the region from May 2008 to December 2009 at powwows, health fairs, focus groups, career fairs and conferences, and other social and cultural events, and asked them to complete a self-administered survey. Although compared with data from the general population, American Indians or Alaska Natives in this sample may seem to be more frequent Internet users, their use of modern wireless devices is limited, and their use of the Internet to access health information is lower in comparison with the adult U.S. population. Natives living in the Central Plains region face generational differences in general and health-related use of the Internet. Inadequate availability of culturally appropriate health information websites may drive American Indians or Alaska Natives toward search engines and general information websites.

  18. Community Mobilization Project: A Strategic Plan for American Indians in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Indian Nations, Inc., Oakland, CA.

    The Community Mobilization Project was a 3-year, grassroots strategic planning process by American Indians in the San Francisco Bay Area. As a result of Bureau of Indian Affairs policies that relocated reservation Indians to the Bay Area in the 1950s-70s, over 40,000 American Indians now live in the 10-county area. However, the Indian population…

  19. BIA Profile: The Bureau of Indian Affairs and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is profiled from its inception in 1834 to 1980. Beginning with the trust relationship between tribes and the U.S. government, particularly as relates to natural resources, various ways in which reservation economies have developed are discussed. Tribal governments' new authority and renewed ambitions for…

  20. Osceola. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Proctor

    Osceola was the guiding spirit and moving force behind the Second Seminole War. In 1830, when it became the official policy of the United States government to move all the Eastern Indians to a new Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, the Seminoles resisted. Under Osceola's leadership, a thousand Seminole warriors held off the entire…

  1. Answers to Your Questions About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Many of the frequent questions which arise concerning the relationship between Indians and the Federal Government are answered in this document. These questions and answers, in general, relate to Indians with whom the Federal government still retains a special relationship. Questions and answers pertain to the following areas: (1) the Indian…

  2. The American Indian and Environmental Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costo, Rupert

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of federal-Indian relations as a prelude to current Indian environmental issues. Illustrates the exploitation of reservation economies by energy corporations and the federal government, especially in the area of water rights. Notes problems within tribal governments as they attempt to coexist with the 20th century. (SB)

  3. Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Human Services Indian Health Service Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention http://www.ihs.gov/medicalprograms/diabetes June 2012 ... and Human Services Indian Health Service Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention http://www.ihs.gov/medicalprograms/diabetes June 2012 ...

  4. Osceola. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Proctor

    Osceola was the guiding spirit and moving force behind the Second Seminole War. In 1830, when it became the official policy of the United States government to move all the Eastern Indians to a new Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, the Seminoles resisted. Under Osceola's leadership, a thousand Seminole warriors held off the entire…

  5. Contemporary American Indian Women: Careers And Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellanger, Patricia; Reese, Lillian

    Biographies of 77 Indian women highlight professional and personal accomplishments as well as contributions to the Indian community. Biographies are arranged by area of professional achievement in eight chapters: tribal government and politics, law, administration, education, communications, special fields (the arts, armed forces, and independent…

  6. The American Indian and Environmental Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costo, Rupert

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of federal-Indian relations as a prelude to current Indian environmental issues. Illustrates the exploitation of reservation economies by energy corporations and the federal government, especially in the area of water rights. Notes problems within tribal governments as they attempt to coexist with the 20th century. (SB)

  7. Characteristics of American Indian light smokers

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Niaman; Bevil, Bambi; Pacheco, Christina M.; Faseru, Babalola; McCloskey, Charlotte; Greiner, K. Allen; Choi, Won S.; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2013-01-01

    Introduction American Indians (AI) have the highest smoking rates of any racial/ethnic group in the U.S. and have more difficulty quitting smoking. Little is known about the smoking characteristics of AI smokers. The present study compared the demographic and smoking characteristics of light (≤10 cigarettes per day; N = 206) and moderate/heavy (11+ cigarettes per day; N = 86) AI smokers participating in a cross-sectional survey about smoking and health. Methods Multiple methods were used to recruit participants in attendance at powwows, health and career fairs, and conferences. A total of 998 AI (76% cooperation rate) completed a survey assessing general health, sociodemographics, traditional and commercial tobacco use, knowledge and attitudes related to cancer, source of health information and care and other health-related behaviors. Results AI light smokers were younger and less likely to be married or living with a partner compared to moderate/heavy smokers. AI light smokers were less dependent on smoking and more likely to have home smoking restrictions. There were no differences with respect to number of quit attempts in the past year or the average length of their most recent quit attempt by light vs. moderate/heavy smoking. In addition, a similar proportion of light and heavy smokers reported using tobacco for traditional purposes such as ceremonial, spiritual and prayer. Conclusions These findings highlight important differences between AI light and heavier smokers. Differences related to smoking characteristics such as level of dependence and home smoking restrictions have important implications for the treatment of AI smokers. PMID:24157425

  8. Smoking Abstinence-related Expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and Women: Potential Mechanisms of Tobacco-related Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Peter S.; Westmaas, J. Lee; Park, Van M. Ta; Thorne, Christopher B.; Wood, Sabrina B.; Baker, Majel R.; Lawler, R. Marsh; Hooper, Monica Webb; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Research has documented tobacco-related health disparities by race and gender. Prior research, however, has not examined expectancies about the smoking cessation process (i.e., abstinence-related expectancies) as potential contributors to tobacco-related disparities in special populations. This cross-sectional study compared abstinence-related expectancies between American Indian (n = 87), African American (n = 151), and White (n = 185) smokers, and between women (n = 231) and men (n = 270) smokers. Abstinence-related expectancies also were examined as mediators of race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self-efficacy. Results indicated that American Indians and African Americans were less likely than Whites to expect withdrawal effects, and more likely to expect that quitting would be unproblematic. African Americans also were less likely than Whites to expect smoking cessation interventions to be effective. Compared to men, women were more likely to expect withdrawal effects and weight gain.These expectancy differences mediated race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self-efficacy. Findings emphasize potential mechanisms underlying tobacco-related health disparities among American Indians, African Americans, and women, and suggest a number of specific approaches for targeting tobacco dependence interventions to these populations. PMID:23528192

  9. Smoking abstinence-related expectancies among American Indians, African Americans, and women: potential mechanisms of tobacco-related disparities.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Peter S; Westmaas, J Lee; Ta Park, Van M; Thorne, Christopher B; Wood, Sabrina B; Baker, Majel R; Lawler, R Marsh; Webb Hooper, Monica; Delucchi, Kevin L; Hall, Sharon M

    2014-03-01

    Research has documented tobacco-related health disparities by race and gender. Prior research, however, has not examined expectancies about the smoking cessation process (i.e., abstinence-related expectancies) as potential contributors to tobacco-related disparities in special populations. This cross-sectional study compared abstinence-related expectancies between American Indian (n = 87), African American (n = 151), and White (n = 185) smokers, and between women (n = 231) and men (n = 270) smokers. Abstinence-related expectancies also were examined as mediators of race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self efficacy. Results indicated that American Indians and African Americans were less likely than Whites to expect withdrawal effects, and more likely to expect that quitting would be unproblematic. African Americans also were less likely than Whites to expect smoking cessation interventions to be effective. Compared with men, women were more likely to expect withdrawal effects and weight gain. These expectancy differences mediated race and gender relationships with motivation to quit and abstinence self-efficacy. Findings emphasize potential mechanisms underlying tobacco-related health disparities among American Indians, African Americans, and women and suggest a number of specific approaches for targeting tobacco dependence interventions to these populations.

  10. An assessment of American Indian women's mammography experiences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mortality from breast cancer has increased among American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) women. Despite this alarming reality, AI/AN women have some of the lowest breast cancer screening rates. Only 37% of eligible AI/AN women report a mammogram within the last year and 52% report a mammogram within the last two years compared to 57% and 72% for White women. The experiences and satisfaction surrounding mammography for AI/AN women likely are different from that of women of other racial/ethnic groups, due to cultural differences and limited access to Indian Health Service sponsored mammography units. The overall goals of this study are to identify and understand the mammography experiences and experiential elements that relate to satisfaction or dissatisfaction with mammography services in an AI/AN population and to develop a culturally-tailored AI/AN mammography satisfaction survey. Methods and Design The three project aims that will be used to guide this work are: 1) To compare the mammography experiences and satisfaction with mammography services of Native American/Alaska Native women with that of Non-Hispanic White, Hispanic, and Black women, 2) To develop and validate the psychometric properties of an American Indian Mammography Survey, and 3) To assess variation among AI/AN women's assessments of their mammography experiences and mammography service satisfaction. Evaluations of racial/ethnic differences in mammography patient satisfaction have received little study, particularly among AI/AN women. As such, qualitative study is uniquely suited for an initial examination of their experiences because it will allow for a rich and in-depth identification and exploration of satisfaction elements. Discussion This formative research is an essential step in the development of a validated and culturally tailored AI/AN mammography satisfaction assessment. Results from this project will provide a springboard from which a maximally effective breast cancer

  11. The conceptualization of mistreatment by older American Indians.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Lori L; Sconzert-Hall, William; The Shielding American Indian Elders Project Team

    2017-01-01

    The problem of how to conceptualize elder mistreatment goes back several decades, and is especially important for ethnic minority populations, who may have perspectives that differ from the dominant society. This community-based participatory research study, which examined perceptions of mistreatment by family among 100 urban and rural older American Indians, permits a rare glimpse into how Native elders themselves understand this issue. Here, good treatment was conceptualized in terms of being taken care of, having one's needs met, and being respected. We found relatively high standards for how elders should be treated-such as the belief that an elder's needs should be anticipated and met without the elder needing to ask-in the face of widespread accounts of the mistreatment of elders within the community, largely through various acts of financial exploitation and neglect. Substance abuse and culture loss were blamed formuch of the elder mistreatment occurring in contemporary Native communities.

  12. The conceptualization of mistreatment by older American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Jervis, Lori L.; Sconzert-Hall, William

    2017-01-01

    The problem of how to conceptualize elder mistreatment goes back several decades, and is especially important for ethnic minority populations, who may have perspectives that differ from the dominant society. This community-based participatory research study, which examined perceptions of mistreatment by family among 100 urban and rural older American Indians, permits a rare glimpse into how Native elders themselves understand this issue. Here, good treatment was conceptualized in terms of being taken care of, having one’s needs met, and being respected. We found relatively high standards for how elders should be treated —such as the belief that an elder’s needs should be anticipated and met without the elder needing to ask—in the face of widespread accounts of the mistreatment of elders within the community, largely through various acts of financial exploitation and neglect. Substance abuse and culture loss were blamed for much of the elder mistreatment occurring in contemporary Native communities. PMID:27779448

  13. 8 CFR 289.3 - Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Indians born in Canada. 289.3 Section 289.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AMERICAN INDIANS BORN IN CANADA § 289.3 Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada. The lawful admission for permanent residence of an American Indian born in...

  14. 8 CFR 289.3 - Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Indians born in Canada. 289.3 Section 289.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AMERICAN INDIANS BORN IN CANADA § 289.3 Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada. The lawful admission for permanent residence of an American Indian born in...

  15. 8 CFR 289.3 - Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Indians born in Canada. 289.3 Section 289.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AMERICAN INDIANS BORN IN CANADA § 289.3 Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada. The lawful admission for permanent residence of an American Indian born in...

  16. 8 CFR 289.3 - Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Indians born in Canada. 289.3 Section 289.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AMERICAN INDIANS BORN IN CANADA § 289.3 Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada. The lawful admission for permanent residence of an American Indian born in...

  17. 8 CFR 289.3 - Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Indians born in Canada. 289.3 Section 289.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AMERICAN INDIANS BORN IN CANADA § 289.3 Recording the entry of certain American Indians born in Canada. The lawful admission for permanent residence of an American Indian born in...

  18. Motivations of North American Indians in Athletic Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesavento, Wilma J.

    This is a report on the motives of North American Indians in holding their athletic games. Data were researched from "Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology" published between 1881 and 1933. Anthropologists, artifact collectors, artist-writers, and historians provided primary evidential sources for athletic game motivation.…

  19. Some Concepts of Sacred Space Among North American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, John T.; Irby, Charles C.

    Since sacred space is revealed in the symbolism of the center, and sacred time is revealed in traditional Native American cosmogony (according to Mircea Eliade), the symbols of the center and the myths of origin were analyzed for the: Naskapi; Pomo; Paiute; Navajo; Ojibwa; and Delaware American Indians. Analysis revealed the following: (1) for the…

  20. Standardized Testing of American Indian Students. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, William; Fortune, Jim C.

    The testing of many American Indian children using standardized exams (achievement, aptitude, ability, and intelligence tests) developed for the majority American society represents a case of cross-cultural testing which is likely to produce invalid results in the form of underestimation of student performance. Requirements for obtaining accurate…

  1. William Warren -- The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Will

    Part of a series on the American Indian, the book presents the biography of William Whipple Warren, Ojibway (Chippewa) historian. Although he led an extraordinary life, Warren is a little-known historical figure. The son of an American fur trapper and a mother of French and Ojibway descent, he was born in 1825 on an island in Lake Superior. Later…

  2. Some Concepts of Sacred Space Among North American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, John T.; Irby, Charles C.

    Since sacred space is revealed in the symbolism of the center, and sacred time is revealed in traditional Native American cosmogony (according to Mircea Eliade), the symbols of the center and the myths of origin were analyzed for the: Naskapi; Pomo; Paiute; Navajo; Ojibwa; and Delaware American Indians. Analysis revealed the following: (1) for the…

  3. Early Childhood Education in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Alice S.

    The expansion of early childhood education for American Indians and Alaska Natives has reflected the trend in the larger society. While efforts are being made to improve early childhood care and education for all children, deeper issues must be considered by Native Americans. First among them is the long history of forced assimilation and…

  4. Growing Up And Feeling Powerful As An American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Velma Garcia; Baker, George

    Prepared for American Indian school children in grades 4-8, this booklet is a reading resource on drug abuse prevention. The material is based on a concept of primary drug abuse prevention developed by Native American experts involved in various drug abuse programs: "primary prevention is a process of recognition and respect for Native cultural…

  5. American Indians, Place Meanings and the Old/New West

    Treesearch

    Leo McAvoy

    2002-01-01

    The American West includes millions of acres of national parks, forests and other protected lands. These landscapes are often associated with sense of place and place meanings for those who live there and for people who go there for recreation and tourism. American Indian place meanings regarding national parks and protected areas are often very different from those of...

  6. Energy Resources Technical Training and Development Programs for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roy E.; White, W. Sedgefield

    Programs concerning environmental energy and energy-resource development were designed and implemented by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide information, training, and technical assistance to Native American tribes. Conducted on reservations in an attempt to partially meet the needs and concerns of American Indians regarding the…

  7. A Bridge Program for Educationally Disadvantaged Indian and African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risku, Michael

    The University of Minnesota, Morris campus, developed a bridge program called the Gateway Program to meet the special concerns of African American and American Indian incoming freshmen. The program initially prepares students for higher education through a 4-week summer program that includes an umbrella course in math, computer literacy, and…

  8. Patterns of Cigarette Smoking Initiation in Two Culturally Distinct American Indian Tribes

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Shalini; Wen, Yang; Buchwald, Dedra; Goldberg, Jack; Choi, Won; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To better understand patterns of initiation among American Indians we examined age-related patterns of smoking initiation during adolescence and young adulthood in 2 American Indian tribes. Methods. We used log-rank comparison and a Cox proportional hazard regression model to analyze data from a population-based study of Southwest and Northern Plains American Indians aged 18 to 95 years who initiated smoking by age 18 years or younger. Results. The cumulative incidence of smoking initiation was much higher among the Northern Plains Indians (47%) than among the Southwest Indians (28%; P < .01). In the Southwest, men were more likely than women to initiate smoking at a younger age (P < .01); there was no such difference in the Northern Plains sample. Northern Plains men and women in more recent birth cohorts initiated smoking at an earlier age than did those born in older birth cohorts. Southwest men and women differed in the pattern of smoking initiation across birth cohorts as evidenced by the significant test for interaction (P = .01). Conclusion. Our findings underscore the need to implement tobacco prevention and control measures within American Indian communities. PMID:19820215

  9. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease.

  10. Prevalence of smoking among adult American Indian clinic users in northern California.

    PubMed

    Hodge, F S; Cummings, S; Fredericks, L; Kipnis, P; Williams, M; Teehee, K

    1995-09-01

    The American Indian Cancer Control Project is a 5-year program funded by the National Cancer Institute designed to promote smoking cessation among adult Indians living in Northern California. This article describes the result of our smoking prevalence survey. Our Indian-specific program combines the physician's anti-smoking message with the efforts of Indian Community Health Representatives, who have access to the Indian patients' families and communities. The study sites consist of 4 urban and 14 rural American Indian clinics in Northern California. This article reports on the results of the smoking prevalence study conducted in the first phase of the project. A total of 1,369 adult Northern California Indian patients at 18 Indian health clinics completed a questionnaire designed to assess smoking rates and patterns as well as health problems. Participants were adult American Indians attending 1 of 18 Indian health care clinics in Northern California during 1991. The participants included patients waiting for appointments with the clinic physician, dentist, and nurses. Forty percent (37.35, 42.64; 95% confidence interval) of the adult population in the sample smoke cigarettes; they hold lenient attitudes toward smoking and began smoking at an early age. These patients rate obesity as the No. 1 health problem, followed by high blood pressure, arthritis/rheumatism, and problems with alcohol. The survey also found that the highest smoking rate was among the Sioux (62%), a non-California tribe. This was followed by high rates among native California tribes: Maidu (46%), Pit River (39%), Pomo (38%), Hupa (37%), and Yurok (32%).

  11. Increased Prevalence of Moderate and Severe Peripheral Arterial Disease in the American Indian (AI)/Alaskan Native (AN) Population; a Study of 96,000 AI/AN.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Jacobowitz, Glenn R; Guo, Yu; Maldonado, Thomas; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffery S; Rockman, Caron B

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) disproportionally affects racial groups in the United States. Few studies have analyzed the rates of PAD in the American Indian (AI)/Alaskan Native (AN) population. In this article, we compare the prevalence of PAD in the AI/AN as compared with white and nonwhite Americans. The study data were provided by Life Line Screening (Independence, OH). The cohort consists of self-referred individuals who paid for vascular screening tests. Mild-to-moderate and severe PAD were defined as having an ankle-brachial index (ABI) in at least one extremity of < 0.9 and < 0.5, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare the rates of PAD between AI/AN, Caucasians, and nonwhites. The original sample for which this study was obtained included 3,444,272 people. Of this group there was a predominance of females 64.5% (2,221,555) compared with 35.5% (1,222,716) males. The Native American/AN population was 2.8% of the sample (96,440). In our univariate analysis AI/AN had the highest rates of mild-moderate and severe PAD when compared with whites (odds ratio [OR] 1.78 and 2.14, respectively) and nonwhites (OR 1.52 and 1.82, respectively). We then controlled for atherosclerotic risk factors in our multivariate analysis, and the AI/NA cohort had persistently higher rates of both moderate and severe PAD compared with whites (OR 1.32 and 1.40) but not compared with nonwhites (OR 0.95 and 0.92). Here we present the largest epidemiology study of PAD in AI/AN to date. AI/NA people have disproportionately high rates of both mild to-moderate and severe PAD when compared with whites and nonwhite Americans. After controlling for atherosclerotic risk factors the rates of PAD remain high for AI/NA when compared with whites but not when compared with nonwhites. While it is possible that a combination of diet and lifestyle choices are responsible for the high rates of PAD in this population, genetic factors may be involved as well

  12. American Indians' response to physical pain: functional limitations and help-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cross, Suzanne L; Day, Angelique G

    2015-01-01

    Seventy-five American Indians, ages 25 to 84, representing 14 tribal nations, participated in this study. The historical, cultural, and behavioral responses to physical pain were examined. Data were collected over a 7-month period with a survey instrument that included the Universal Pain Scale, activities of daily living, causes of pain, cultural beliefs, and self-help-seeking behaviors. Also, recommendations for Western biomedical health care professionals are offered to improve services for the American Indian population. Findings demonstrate that culture plays a crucial role in wellness and significantly affects help-seeking behaviors, treatment regimens, responses to pain, and pain management.

  13. Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Background Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lising, Mimi

    In keeping with its priority to reduce the disproportionate burden of heart, lung, and blood diseases in minority populations, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has established an outreach project called Building Healthy Hearts for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This background report provides an overview of the cardiovascular…

  14. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  15. Adaptation and Implementation of Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools with American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; LaNoue, Marianna D.; Milford, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    American Indian adolescents experience higher rates of suicide and psychological distress than the overall U.S. adolescent population, and research suggests that these disparities are related to higher rates of violence and trauma exposure. Despite elevated risk, there is limited empirical information to guide culturally appropriate treatment of…

  16. Advocacy for Native American Indian and Alaska Native Clients and Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Roger

    Helping professionals need to be more informed and more active advocates for proactive counseling strategies with Native American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. The paper discusses the major advocacy needs of these populations. The negative impact of historical and contemporary discriminatory policies and practices on Native peoples has…

  17. Developmental Disabilities Prevention and the Distribution of Risk among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendola, Pauline; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared to the U.S. general population, American Indian children experience a smaller proportion of genetic and congenital anomalies associated with developmental disabilities and greater risk associated with prenatal exposure to alcohol and tobacco, maternal diabetes, and disabling sequelae of accidents and otitis media. Prevention efforts…

  18. Adaptation and Implementation of Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools with American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; LaNoue, Marianna D.; Milford, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    American Indian adolescents experience higher rates of suicide and psychological distress than the overall U.S. adolescent population, and research suggests that these disparities are related to higher rates of violence and trauma exposure. Despite elevated risk, there is limited empirical information to guide culturally appropriate treatment of…

  19. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  20. Tailoring a Web-Based Weight Maintenance Intervention for Northern Plains American Indian Public University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmingson, Kaitlyn; Lucchesi, Roxanne; Droke, Elizabeth; Kattelmann, Kendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High levels of obesity-related health disparities are common among US American Indian (AI) populations. AI public university students often face unique challenges that may contribute to weight gain and related consequences. Few weight maintenance interventions have been developed that meet the needs of AI public university students. The…