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Sample records for american naturalist highlights

  1. Highlights of American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Carl

    Intended for high-intermediate/advanced level students of English as a foreign language, this book contains selections from the wide range of American literature, from its beginnings to the modern period. Each section begins with a general introduction to the literary period, and then presents essays about individual authors, selections from the…

  2. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  3. Great American Smokeout Highlights the Importance of Smoking Cessation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Occupational Health Services (OHS) recently took part in the 41st Great American Smokeout, an event that highlights the dangers of smoking and encourages smokers to make a plan to quit. Tobacco smoking is the single most preventable cause of chronic disease and death.

  4. Great American Smokeout Highlights the Importance of Smoking Cessation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Occupational Health Services (OHS) recently took part in the 41st Great American Smokeout, an event that highlights the dangers of smoking and encourages smokers to make a plan to quit. Tobacco smoking is the single most preventable cause of chronic disease and death.

  5. Naturalistic Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    1979-01-01

    Contrasts the naturalistic research paradigm with the scientific model, noting that the naturalistic paradigm assumes multiple reality, subject-object interrelatedness, and contextuality. Skills required for the pursuit of naturalistic inquiry are described. (JEG)

  6. Interpretive signs designed to trigger naturalist intelligence at two American zoos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Martha

    An investigation of interpretive graphics was conducted in 2005 at two mid-sized AZA-accredited zoos, Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida and Knoxville Zoo, Knoxville, Tennessee. The Lowry Park Zoo study investigated signs at a red-tailed hawk and sandhill crane exhibit. Combination signs and wordless signs were more effective helping visitors see animals, increasing holding time, and number of engagements than treatments of no signs, or signs with words only. A second study, at Knoxville Zoo, tested combination and wordless signs in a children's zoo, investigating 31 signs at a 3.5-acre exhibit. Comparisons of visitors seeing the animals/using interactive exhibit elements, holding time, and engagement activities, showed wordless signs were more effective than combination signs. Differences in gender ratio, age, group size, and other demographics were not significant. Visit motivation differed between zoos, with visitors from Lowry Park Zoo more often articulating reason for a visit as wanting to see animals. Visitors at Knoxville Zoo most often said they wanted to spend time with family and friends. Differences in potential for naturalist intelligence were probably related to local practices rather than to innate differences in naturalist intelligence. The number of communities in Florida that regulate pet ownership and provide lawn service could account for the lower number of people who have pets and plants. At both institutions, behaviors supported educational theories. The importance of signs as advanced organizers was shown where signs were removed at the bird exhibit at Lowry Park Zoo, with fewer visitors seeing the animals. Social interaction was noted at both zoos, with intra- and inter-group conversations observed. If naturalist intelligence is necessary to see animals, visitors run a continuum. Some are unable to see animals with signs and assistance from other visitors; others see animals with little difficulty. The importance of honing naturalist

  7. Revisiting Paine’s 1966 sea star removal experiment, the most-cited empirical article in the American Naturalist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Suchanek, Tom

    2016-01-01

    “Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity” (Paine 1966) is the most-cited empirical article published in the American Naturalist. In short, Paine removed predatory sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) from the rocky intertidal and watched the key prey species, mussels (Mytilus californianus), crowd out seven subordinate primary space-holding species. However, because these mussels are a foundational species, they provide three-dimensional habitat for over 300 associated species inhabiting the mussel beds; thus, removing sea stars significantly increases community-wide diversity. In any case, most ecologists cite Paine (1966) to support a statement that predators increase diversity by interfering with competition. Although detractors remained skeptical of top-down effects and keystone concepts, the paradigm that predation increases diversity spread. By 1991, “Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity” was considered a classic ecological paper, and after 50 years it continues to influence ecological theory and conservation biology.

  8. North American Regional Reanalysis: Evaluation Highlights and Early Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, F.; Dimego, G.; Kalnay, E.; Shafran, P.; Ebisuzaki, W.; Jovic, D.; Mitchell, K.; Berbery, H.; Fan, Y.; Higgins, W.; Lin, Y.; Shi, W.

    2005-05-01

    Following an about a 6-year development and production effort, the NCEP 25-year (1979-2003) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) has been completed. It is continued in near-real time as a Regional Climate Data Assimilation System, R-CDAS. Done for a domain including all of the North American continent and considerable parts of the adjacent oceans, with a 32 km/ 45 layers resolution, the NARR has resulted in a consistent high resolution climate dataset suitable for numerous applications. As aimed for, comparisons against the available NCEP/NCAR Global Reanalysis (GR) show that its accuracy is generally considerably higher than that of the GR. This is demonstrated by looking at rms fits to rawinsonde observations (raobs), as well as fits to surface data. Assimilation of analyzed precipitation resulted in precipitation fields that to a very high degree replicate the analyzed fields, a feature boding well when it comes to land-surface and hydrology applications. Several lessons that should be useful in planning future reanalyses are mentioned. Early usage of the NARR datasets as reported on at the recent NARR Users Workshop, San Diego, CA, is summarized. It includes additional validation work, uses for water and energy budget assessments in relation to predictability and climate variability issues, efforts at identification of useful severe weather predictors, North American monsoon studies, use for driving regional climate simulations, and more.

  9. Highlights from the 2015 North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Ong, Thida; Daines, Cori L; Dellon, Elisabeth P; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Esther, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The 29th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference was held in Phoenix, Arizona on October 8-10, 2015. Abstracts were published in a supplement to Pediatric Pulmonology.(1) In this review, we summarize presentations in several of the topic areas addressed at the conference. Our goal is to provide an overview of presentations with relevance to emerging or changing concepts in several areas rather than a comprehensive review. Citations from the conference are by first author and abstract number or symposium number, as designated in the supplement. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:650-657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Naturalistic Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    1987-01-01

    Two forms of naturalistic evaluation have appeared within the past decade: (1) a collection of qualitative techniques that are complimentary with conventional quantitative methods; and (2) an alternative paradigm that emphasizes the negotiation of multiple socially constructed realities, interdependence of facts and values, and the emergent…

  11. Genetic association analysis highlights new loci that modulate hematological trait variation in Caucasians and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ken Sin; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie A.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Galarneau, Geneviève; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Keating, Brendan J.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Mohler, Emile R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Tang, Weihong; Tracy, Russell P.

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet measures, including their count, sub-type and volume, are important diagnostic and prognostic clinical parameters for several human diseases. To identify novel loci associated with hematological traits, and compare the architecture of these phenotypes between ethnic groups, the CARe Project genotyped 49,094 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ~2,100 candidate genes in DNA of 23,439 Caucasians and 7,112 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We found strong novel associations between erythrocyte phenotypes and the glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) A-allele in African Americans (rs1050828, P < 2.0 × 10−13, T-allele associated with lower red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and higher mean corpuscular volume), and between platelet count and a SNP at the tropomyosin-4 (TPM4) locus (rs8109288, P = 3.0 × 10−7 in Caucasians; P = 3.0 × 10−7 in African Americans, T-allele associated with lower platelet count). We strongly replicated many genetic associations to blood cell phenotypes previously established in Caucasians. A common variant of the α-globin (HBA2-HBA1) locus was associated with red blood cell traits in African Americans, but not in Caucasians (rs1211375, P < 7 × 10−8, A-allele associated with lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume). Our results show similarities but also differences in the genetic regulation of hematological traits in European- and African-derived populations, and highlight the role of natural selection in shaping these differences. PMID:21153663

  12. Highlights from the 1st ISCB Latin American Student Council Symposium 2014

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the first edition of the Latin American Symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Third Latin American conference from the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB-LA 2014) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on October 27, 2014. PMID:25955751

  13. Highlights of the hotline sessions presented at the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Möllmann, Helge; Nef, Holger; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summaries and commentaries on trials presented at the hotline sessions of the scientific sessions 2008 of the American Heart Association in New Orleans have been generated from the oral presentations and the webcasts of the American Heart Association. The following papers are discussed: APPROACH, ATLAS, BACH, BICC, HF-ACTION, I-PRESERVE, JPAD, JUPITER, Mass-DAC, Physicians' Health Study II, SEARCH, tailored clopidogrel loading to prevent stent thrombosis, and TIMACS.

  14. Influence of domestic livestock grazing on American Pika (Ochotona princeps) forage and haypiling behavior in the Great Basin. Western North American Naturalist.

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar

    2011-01-01

    In a pilot study, I observed a relationship between domestic livestock grazing and location of American pika (Ochotona princeps) haypiles in the eastern Sierra Nevada and several Great Basin mountain ranges. Where vegetation communities adjacent to talus bases (forefields) were grazed, mean distance from the talus borders to the closest fresh...

  15. Astronomical Highlights of the Collections in the National Museum of American History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Debra Jean

    An overview of the history of antique telescopes and the holdings of the National Museum of American History. Discussed are: Henry Fitz, Albert Ingalls, John Brashear, Porter, Armand Spitz, Zeiss, Carl Pulfrich, Maria Mitchell, Samuel P. Langley, Rutherford, Bernard Schmidt and Martin Rasmussen.

  16. Highlights from Drug Use Among American High School Students 1975-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    The current prevalence of drug use among American high school seniors and the trends in use since 1975 are the two major topics treated. Also reported are prevailing attitudes and beliefs among seniors concerning various types of drug use. Eleven separate classes of drugs are distinguished: marihuana (including hashish), inhalants, hallucinogens,…

  17. A Survey of American Voter Attitudes Concerning Child Care Services: Highlights and Key Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttila & Kiley, Inc., Boston, MA.

    A national telephone survey of a representative sample of 901 voters was conducted to measure voter attitudes toward child care and, in particular, the Act for Better Child Care Services (ABC). The survey also explored attitudes toward parental leave. Findings indicated that: (1) a majority of Americans think of child care as an urgent need and…

  18. A golden anniversary: highlights of the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McVie, Gordon; Nailor, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology showed a shift in the culture of cancer research, moving towards multidisciplinary, integrated, and patient-centric work. Hormone-sensitive cancers were particularly highlighted at this meeting, and impressive strides were made in the previously underserved areas of the lung and thyroid cancer. Interestingly, immunotherapy was one of the strongest themes to emerge. PMID:25075218

  19. Highlights of the 28(th) North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference 2014.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Chinedu E C

    2015-10-01

    This is a selection of papers presented at the 28(th) North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference held in Atlanta in October 2014. The papers discussed are thought to be of particular interest to CF caregivers in the UK. Topics discussed include recent progress in the modification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the potential of OligoG, a novel inhaled alginate mucolytic, and the changing approach to cystic fibrosis-related diabetes screening.

  20. Mothers' attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding highlight barriers to exclusive breastfeeding in American Samoa.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Nicola L; Rosen, Rochelle K; Strait, E Ashton; Raffucci, Gabriela; Holmdahl, Inga; Freeman, Joshua R; Muasau-Howard, Bethel T; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2015-09-01

    In American Samoa, initiation of breastfeeding is almost universal but exclusive breastfeeding, a promising target for obesity prevention, is short in duration. (1) To examine American Samoan mothers' feeding experiences and attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding and (2) to identify potential barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with American Samoan mothers at 16-32 days postpartum. Interviews focused on mother's knowledge and beliefs about infant feeding, how their infants were fed, why the mother had chosen this mode of infant feeding, and how decisions about feeding were made within her social surroundings. A thematic qualitative analysis was conducted to identify salient themes in the data. Intention to exclusively breastfeed did not predict practice; most women supplemented with formula despite intending to exclusively breastfeed. The benefits of breastfeeding were well-recognized, but the importance of exclusivity was missed. Formula-use was not preferred but considered an innocuous "back-up option" where breastfeeding was not possible or not sufficient for infant satiety. Identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding included: the convenience of formula; perceptions among mothers that they were not producing enough breast milk; and pain while breastfeeding. The important support role of family for infant feeding could be utilized in intervention design. This study identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding that can be immediately addressed by providers of breastfeeding support services. Further research is needed to address the common perception of insufficient milk in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Raising the profile of worker safety: highlights of the 2013 North American Agricultural Safety Summit.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William J; Heiberger, Scott; Lee, Barbara C

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North American Agricultural Safety Summit, an unprecedented gathering of industry leaders and safety experts, was held September 25-27 in Minneapolis, MN. Hosted by the industry-led Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA), there were 250 attendees, 82 speakers, 76 abstracts with poster presentations, along with "best practices" videos, genius bars sessions, learning stations, exhibits, breakfast roundtable topics, and receptions. The event was a mix of knowledge, inspiration and networking to enable participants to influence the adoption of safety practices in their home/work settings. Given the agriculture industry's commitment to feed nine billion people, the projected world population by 2050, it is imperative that producers and agribusiness strive to do it safely, humanely and sustainably. Evaluation feedback was very positive, indicating ASHCA's original objectives for the Summit were achieved.

  2. RAD sequencing highlights polygenic discrimination of habitat ecotypes in the panmictic American eel.

    PubMed

    Pavey, Scott A; Gaudin, Jérémy; Normandeau, Eric; Dionne, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-06-15

    The two primary ways that species respond to heterogeneous environments is through local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. The American eel (Anguilla rostrata) presents a paradox; despite inhabiting drastically different environments [1], the species is panmictic [2, 3]. Spawning takes place only in the southern Sargasso Sea in the Atlantic Ocean [1]. Then, the planktonic larvae (leptocephali) disperse to rearing locations from Cuba to Greenland, and juveniles colonize either freshwater or brackish/saltwater habitats, where they spend 3-25 years before returning to the Sargasso Sea to spawn as a panmictic species. Depending on rearing habitat, individuals exhibit drastically different ecotypes [4-6]. In particular, individuals rearing in freshwater tend to grow slowly and mature older and are more likely to be female in comparison to individuals that rear in brackish/saltwater [4, 6]. The hypothesis that phenotypic plasticity alone can account for all of the differences was not supported by three independent controlled experiments [7-10]. Here, we present a genome-wide association study that demonstrates a polygenic basis that discriminates these habitat-specific ecotypes belonging to the same panmictic population. We found that 331 co-varying loci out of 42,424 initially considered were associated with the divergent ecotypes, allowing a reclassification of 89.6%. These 331 SNPs are associated with 101 genes that represent vascular and morphological development, calcium ion regulation, growth and transcription factors, and olfactory receptors. Our results are consistent with divergent natural selection of phenotypes and/or genotype-dependent habitat choice by individuals that results in these genetic differences between habitats, occurring every generation anew in this panmictic species.

  3. A systematic review of naturalistic interventions in refugee populations.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Sierra; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2014-10-01

    Naturalistic interventions with refugee populations examine outcomes following mental health interventions in existing refugee service organisations. The current review aimed to examine outcomes of naturalistic interventions and quality of the naturalistic intervention literature in refugee populations with the view to highlight the strengths and limitations of naturalistic intervention studies. Database search was conducted using the search terms 'refugee', 'asylum seeker', 'treatment', 'therapy' and 'intervention. No date limitations were applied, but searches were limited to articles written in English. Seven studies were identified that assessed the outcome of naturalistic interventions on adult refugees or asylum seekers in a country of resettlement using quantitative outcome measures. Results showed significant variation in the outcomes of naturalistic intervention studies, with a trend towards showing decreased symptomatology at post-intervention. However, conclusions are limited by methodological problems of the studies reviewed, particularly poor documentation of intervention methods and lack of control in the design of naturalistic intervention studies. Further examination of outcomes following naturalistic interventions is needed with studies which focus on increasing the rigour of the outcome assessment process.

  4. A future of cancer prevention and cures: highlights of the Centennial Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Cho, W C

    2008-02-01

    The Centennial Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) was held from 14-18 April 2007 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. This meeting brought together a diverse group of over 18 000 researchers working in the fields of basic and applied cancer sciences, and explored how cancer research could be used most effectively to prevent and cure cancer at the earliest possible stage. The goal of the AACR Annual Meeting was to stimulate the dialog between basic and clinical researchers so that the translation of new discoveries might be speeded up for the benefit of cancer patients. Advances in the clinical application of genomics, epigenomics and proteomics to diagnose, monitor and prognosticate cancer development led to a dramatic increase in the number of presentations with a translational focus at this year's meeting. Several remarkable areas were particularly highlighted in this report, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, cancer stem cells, microRNA and siRNA, targeted therapy and individualized treatment. This article tries to bring attention to some hot topics in the program that are both new and noteworthy. For those who did not attend the meeting, this report may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting.

  5. Naturalist Writers and Environmental Sentiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine; Bennett, Kristin R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces naturalist writers who discuss environments and natural resources, the issue of human population growth and its impact on the environments, and the nature and history of science. Includes activities addressing the interpretation of naturalist writing geographically, chronologically, and by the environment. (KHR)

  6. Naturalistic Inquiry: Paradigm and Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Linda S.

    Despite the rhetoric acclaiming it as a new paradigm, educational researchers have tended to treat naturalistic inquiry as a new or alternative method employed within the dominant, rationalistic paradigm. Spokespersons for naturalistic inquiry tend to concentrate on what one does differently rather than how one perceives what one is doing…

  7. Naturalist Writers and Environmental Sentiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine; Bennett, Kristin R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces naturalist writers who discuss environments and natural resources, the issue of human population growth and its impact on the environments, and the nature and history of science. Includes activities addressing the interpretation of naturalist writing geographically, chronologically, and by the environment. (KHR)

  8. Texting, Textese and Literacy Abilities: A Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Driver, Brent

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined texting behaviours, text message characteristics (textese) of actual sent text messages and the relationships between texting, textese and literacy abilities in a sample of 183 American undergraduates. As compared to previous naturalistic and experimental studies with English-speaking adults, both texting frequency and…

  9. Texting, Textese and Literacy Abilities: A Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Driver, Brent

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined texting behaviours, text message characteristics (textese) of actual sent text messages and the relationships between texting, textese and literacy abilities in a sample of 183 American undergraduates. As compared to previous naturalistic and experimental studies with English-speaking adults, both texting frequency and…

  10. Reverend Paley's naturalist revival.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Peter

    2008-03-01

    This paper analyzes the remarkable popularity of William Paley's argument from design among contemporary naturalists in biology and the philosophy of science. In philosophy of science Elliott Sober has argued that creationism should be excluded from the schools not because it is not science but because it is 'less likely' than evolution according to fairly standard confirmation theory. Creationism is said to have been a plausible scientific option as presented by Paley but no longer to be acceptable according to the same standards that once approved it. In biology C. G. Williams and Richard Dawkins have seen in Paley a proto-adaptationist. This paper shows that the historical assumptions of Sober's arguments are wrong and that the philosophical arguments themselves take alternatives to science to be alternatives in science and conflate the null hypothesis, chance, with a competing explanatory hypothesis. It is also shown that the similarity of Paley's adaptationism to that of contemporary biology is not what it is made out to be.

  11. The relation of antipsychotic and antidepressant medication with baseline symptoms and symptom progression: A naturalistic study of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Sample

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elaine F.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Addington, Jean; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Woods, Scott W.; Heinssen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A substantial number of patients who meet criteria for a prodromal syndrome for first psychosis are treated with antipsychotic and/or antidepressant medications. There is suggestive evidence that both classes of medication may reduce prodromal symptoms. This longitudinal study examined the relation of antipsychotic and antidepressant medication with prodromal symptom severity at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Participants met Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) criteria for the prodrome, and were evaluated at eight centers as part of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS).Symptom ratings (positive, negative, disorganized and general) and data on antipsychotics, SSRIs, and other antidepressant medications were obtained at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Analyses revealed that all symptom dimensions declined in severity over time, but there were differences in the magnitude of the decline as a function of antipsychotic medication. Those never on antipsychotics showed less reduction in positive and disorganized symptoms over time. SSRIs and other antidepressants were not linked with declines in symptom severity. Consistent with findings from small-sample, clinical trials, the present results suggest that atypical antipsychotics may be effective in reducing the severity of attenuated positive symptoms associated with the prodrome to psychotic disorders. Limitations of the present study are noted, including the fact that it is not a randomized trial, and data on duration and dosage of medication and 2-year follow-up were not available for most participants. The results are discussed in light of the relative risks and benefits of preventive interventions, both medication and cognitive therapies, and the importance of future clinical trials. PMID:19709859

  12. Highlights/Best Practices of San Francisco’s Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART)

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, Stephen J.; Nguyen, Tung T.; Mock, Jeremiah; Nguyen, Thoa; Lam, Hy

    2006-01-01

    The Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training in San Francisco (AANCART-SF) consists of two distinct entities, working in cooperation to advance cancer awareness, research, and training among Asian Americans: a university-based group with expertise in the Vietnamese community and a community-based health plan with expertise in the Chinese community. In addition to the goals shared with other AANCART sites, AANCART-SF is a unique effort in capacity building in that it aims to expand and export community-academic research expertise from one Asian population, the Vietnamese, to other Asian populations. It also aims to build the research capability of those serving the Chinese community through a health plan. PMID:16270324

  13. The naturalistic fallacy is modern.

    PubMed

    Daston, Lorraine

    2014-09-01

    The naturalistic fallacy appears to be ubiquitous and irresistible. The avant-garde and the rearguard, the devout and the secular, the learned elite and the lay public all seem to want to enlist nature on their side, everywhere and always. Yet a closer look at the history of the term "naturalistic fallacy" and its associated arguments suggests that this way of understanding (and criticizing) appeals to nature's authority in human affairs is of relatively modern origin. To apply this category cross-historically masks considerable variability and naturalizes our own assumptions about the natural and the human.

  14. Highlights from the 58th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 1-6 December 2016, San Diego, USA.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The recent 58th Annual American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in San Diego shed light on the usual mixture of groundbreaking basic and translational science and the recent practice-changing clinical trials. Recurrent themes this year were the use of recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to perfect prognostic stratification and disease monitoring. Newer prospects on the role of metabolism in normal and malignant haemopoiesis and mature data on long-awaited trials on immunotherapy and CAR-T cells in lymphoid neoplasms were also discussed.

  15. From bench to bedside: successful translational nanomedicine: highlights of the Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chiming; Liu, Nanhai; Xu, Pingyi; Heller, Mike; Tomalia, Donald A; Haynie, Donald T; Chang, Esther H; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Bawa, Raj; Tian, Ryan; Hanes, Justin; Pun, Suzie; Meiners, Jens-Christian; Guo, Peixuan

    2007-12-01

    The Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) was held at the University of California San Diego, in San Diego, California during September 7-8, 2007. The meeting was focused on successful translational nanomedicine: from bench to bedside. There were four keynote lectures and eight scientific symposiums in this meeting. The researchers and investigators reported the results and process of current nanomedicine research and approaches to clinical applications. The meeting provided exciting information for nanomedicine clinical-related researches and strategy for further development of nanomedicine research which will be benefits to clinical practice.

  16. Highlights from the 58th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 1–6 December 2016, San Diego, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The recent 58th Annual American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in San Diego shed light on the usual mixture of groundbreaking basic and translational science and the recent practice-changing clinical trials. Recurrent themes this year were the use of recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to perfect prognostic stratification and disease monitoring. Newer prospects on the role of metabolism in normal and malignant haemopoiesis and mature data on long-awaited trials on immunotherapy and CAR-T cells in lymphoid neoplasms were also discussed. PMID:28386295

  17. Learning and Teaching through the Naturalist Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Maggie

    1998-01-01

    Howard Gardner defines naturalists as persons who recognize flora and fauna and other consequential distinctions in the natural world and use this ability productively. A sixth-grade teacher discusses Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, specifically the naturalist intelligence, and suggests ways to teach the naturalist intelligence through…

  18. What Have We Learned about Naturalistic Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    1987-01-01

    Definitions of and approaches to naturalistic evaluation are discussed. The qualitative aspects of the discipline are reviewed; and use of naturalistic evaluation in descriptions, illustrations, explications, hypothesis testing, and assessment of public spending are defined. A new paradigm for naturalistic evaluation is proposed. (TJH)

  19. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in women: highlights for the clinician of the 2011 American Heart Association Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Nanette K

    2013-09-01

    The 2011 Update to the American Heart Association Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women is designed to assist women and health professionals in understanding the cardiovascular disease risk for women and undertaking the most effective preventive interventions. Although coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality for women in the United States, cardiovascular mortality among U.S. women has decreased dramatically each year since 2000, with the decline in mortality being steeper for women than for men. Nonetheless, since 1984, more women than men continue to die annually from cardiovascular disease. Half of the decrement in cardiovascular mortality for women since 2000 reflects the improved management of their established cardiovascular disease; the other half is attributable to reductions in their major coronary risk factors, hence the importance of this prevention guideline. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent advances in nephrology: highlights from the 35th annual meeting of the American society of nephrology.

    PubMed

    Cases, Aleix

    2002-12-01

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States (October 30 to November 4, 2002) presented the newest advances in basic and clinical nephrology science. Several presentations and symposia discussed the effects of various interventions and risk factors in clinical outcomes in dialysis patients. The recent evidences of pure red cell aplasia secondary to neutralizing antibodies against erythropoietin were also extensively discussed in a special symposium. Recent advances in the management of calcium phosphorus metabolism and secondary hyperparathyroidism, such as the clinical efficacy and safety of AMG-073, a new calcimimetic agent in the control of hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease patients, or the use of sevelamer or lanthanum carbonate as phosphate binders, were presented. The results in animal models on improved sparing of renal function with rapamycin versus cyclosporin A represent a promising advance in renal transplantation. Finally, the recent discoveries with the newly identified disease gene PKHD1, which causes autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, were also presented at the meeting. (c) 2002 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  1. Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Levy, Eric; Ribeiro dos Santos, Andre M.; Yang, Hai; Hibberd, Martin L.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Harismendy, Olivier; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Burns, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS) from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous), predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6), which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1) intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329), that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262) had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease–common variant and common disease–rare variant hypotheses. PMID:28151979

  2. "No More Mr. Nice Guy": Preservice Teachers' Conflict with Classroom Management in a Predominantly African-American Urban Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Karen M.; Moule, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Using methods of naturalistic inquiry, this study examines preservice teachers' conflict with classroom management strategies used in a predominantly African-American urban elementary school. It highlights the theory/practice dilemma, focusing on the tensions between the democratic strategies taught in university classes and the more authoritarian…

  3. Research Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Melbourne.

    This report presents highlights of the research activities of the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). The ACER is a national independent research body that specializes in collecting and interpreting information to shape strategic decision making. In addition to being a national center for educational policy research and advice,…

  4. Naturalistic Misunderstanding of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKerrow, K. Kelly; McKerrow, Joan E.

    1991-01-01

    The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, which concerns the effect of observation upon what is observed, is proper to the field of quantum physics, but has been mistakenly adopted and wrongly applied in the realm of naturalistic observation. Discusses the misuse of the principle in the current literature on naturalistic research. (DM)

  5. Naturalistic Decision Making for Power System Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin; Robinson, Marck; Ey, Pamela

    2010-02-01

    Motivation – Investigations of large-scale outages in the North American interconnected electric system often attribute the causes to three T’s: Trees, Training and Tools. To document and understand the mental processes used by expert operators when making critical decisions, a naturalistic decision making (NDM) model was developed. Transcripts of conversations were analyzed to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. Findings/Design – An item analysis indicated that the operators’ Situation Awareness Levels, mental models, and mental simulations can be mapped at different points in the training scenario. This may identify improved training methods or analytical/ visualization tools. Originality/Value – This study applies for the first time, the concepts of Recognition Primed Decision Making, Situation Awareness Levels and Cognitive Task Analysis to training of electric power system operators. Take away message – The NDM approach provides a viable framework for systematic training management to accelerate learning in simulator-based training scenarios for power system operators and teams.

  6. Naturalistic Decision Making For Power System Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin; Robinson, Marck; Ey, Pamela

    2009-06-23

    Abstract: Motivation -- As indicated by the Blackout of 2003, the North American interconnected electric system is vulnerable to cascading outages and widespread blackouts. Investigations of large scale outages often attribute the causes to the three T’s: Trees, Training and Tools. A systematic approach has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The approach has been developed and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine naturalistic decision making (NDM) processes, transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations are analyzed to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. Findings/Design -- The results of the study indicate that we can map the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify clearly what mental models and mental simulations are being performed at different points in the scenario. As a result of this research we expect that we can identify improved training methods and improved analytical and visualization tools for power system operators. Originality/Value -- The research applies for the first time, the concepts of Recognition Primed Decision Making, Situation Awareness Levels and Cognitive Task Analysis to training of electric power system operators. Take away message -- The NDM approach provides an ideal framework for systematic training management and mitigation to accelerate learning in team-based training scenarios with high-fidelity power grid simulators.

  7. Latest discoveries and trends in translational cancer research: highlights of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Cho, William C S

    2008-08-01

    The Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's largest and most comprehensive gathering of cancer researchers. At the 2008 AACR Annual Meeting, innovative research approaches, novel technologies, potentially life-saving therapies in the pipeline, late-breaking clinical trial findings, and new approaches to cancer prevention were presented by top scientists. Reflecting the global state of cancer research with an eye toward future trends, several areas of great science and discovery in the cancer field were shared in this report, which include cancer biomarkers, the role of microRNAs in cancer research, cancer stem cells, tumor microenvironment, targeted therapy, and cancer prevention. This article presents an overview of hot topics discussed at the 2008 AACR Annual Meeting and recapitulates some scientific sessions geared toward new technologies, recent progress, and current challenges reported by cancer researchers. For those who did not attend the meeting, this report may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting.

  8. Primate Visual Perception: Motivated Attention in Naturalistic Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David W.; Sabatinelli, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Research has consistently revealed enhanced neural activation corresponding to attended cues coupled with suppression to unattended cues. This attention effect depends both on the spatial features of stimuli and internal task goals. However, a large majority of research supporting this effect involves circumscribed tasks that possess few ecologically relevant characteristics. By comparison, natural scenes have the potential to engage an evolved attention system, which may be characterized by supplemental neural processing and integration compared to mechanisms engaged during reduced experimental paradigms. Here, we describe recent animal and human studies of naturalistic scene viewing to highlight the specific impact of social and affective processes on the neural mechanisms of attention modulation. PMID:28265250

  9. "An aristocracy of talent": the South Carolina physician-naturalists and their times.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S; Whitehead, A Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook ("father of American herpetology"), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged to an "aristocracy of talent" as distinguished from the "aristocracy of wealth" of lowcountry planters, who probably did more than any other group to perpetuate slavery and propel the South toward a disastrous civil war. None of the physician-naturalists actively opposed slavery or secession, a reminder that we are all prisoners of the prevailing paradigms and prejudices of our times.

  10. “An Aristocracy of Talent”: The South Carolina Physician-Naturalists and their Times

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Charles S.; Whitehead, A. Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook (“father of American herpetology”), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged to an “aristocracy of talent” as distinguished from the “aristocracy of wealth” of lowcountry planters, who probably did more than any other group to perpetuate slavery and propel the South toward a disastrous civil war. None of the physician-naturalists actively opposed slavery or secession, a reminder that we are all prisoners of the prevailing paradigms and prejudices of our times. PMID:25125748

  11. Naturalistic drive cycle synthesis for pickup trucks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zifan; Ivanco, Andrej; Filipi, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    Future pick-up trucks are meeting much stricter fuel economy and exhaust emission standards. Design tradeoffs will have to be carefully evaluated to satisfy consumer expectations within the regulatory and cost constraints. Boundary conditions will obviously be critical for decision making: thus, the understanding of how customers are driving in naturalistic settings is indispensable. Federal driving schedules, while critical for certification, do not capture the richness of naturalistic cycles, particularly the aggressive maneuvers that often shape consumer perception of performance. While there are databases with large number of drive cycles, applying all of them directly in the design process is impractical. Therefore, representative drive cycles that capture the essence of the naturalistic driving should be synthesized from naturalistic driving data. Naturalistic drive cycles are firstly categorized by investigating their micro-trip components, defined as driving activities between successive stops. Micro-trips are expected to characterize underlying local traffic conditions, and separate different driving patterns. Next, the transitions from one vehicle state to another vehicle state in each cycle category are captured with Transition Probability Matrix (TPM). Candidate drive cycles can subsequently be synthesized using Markov Chain based on TPMs for each category. Finally, representative synthetic drive cycles are selected through assessment of significant cycle metrics to identify the ones with smallest errors. This paper provides a framework for synthesis of representative drive cycles from naturalistic driving data, which can subsequently be used for efficient optimization of design or control of pick-up truck powertrains. Manufacturers will benefit from representative drive cycles in several aspects, including quick assessments of vehicle performance and energy consumption in simulations, component sizing and design, optimization of control strategies, and

  12. Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0099 TITLE: Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0099 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Center (SPRC) conducts human and animal  studies  in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep  research at Washington State

  13. Naturalistic Text Comprehension. Advances in Discourse Processes, Volume LIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostendorp, Herrre van, Ed.; Zwaah, Rolf A., Ed.

    A collection of essays on the comprehension of text brings together perspectives of different disciplines on discourse. Articles include: "Naturalistic Texts and Naturalistic Tasks" (Herre van Oostendorp, Rolf A. Zwaan); "Psychological Studies of Naturalistic Text" (Arthur C. Graesser, Joseph P. Magliano, Karl Haberlandt);…

  14. Methodological Rigor in Naturalistic Inquiry: Some Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Robert G.

    Three issues must be addressed when discussing the standards needed to judge the methodological rigor of naturalistic approaches to administrative research. The first issue involves defining naturalistic inquiry. In contrast to the scientific paradigm, naturalistic inquiry emphasizes, first, the inseparability of variables or events from their…

  15. Special report: highlights of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Summer Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Denver, Colorado, June 26-28, 2008.

    PubMed

    Trepman, Elly; Thordarson, David B; Ross, Steven D K; Pinney, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The Twenty-Fourth Annual Summer Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) was held 26-28 June 2008 at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver, Colorado. There were 442 registrants in attendance, including 81 individuals from 21 countries outside the United States. There were 176 abstracts submitted, and 46 (26%) abstracts were accepted for podium presentation.

  16. Mechanisms of Mind: Highlights of the 17th Annual Meeting of the American Neuropsychiatric Association, February 18-21, 2006, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Miles G; Sewell, R Andrew; Price, Bruce H

    2006-01-01

    Points of interest from the 17th Annual American Neuropsychiatric Association are reviewed, including several cognitive neuroscience frameworks that have been proposed to account for the neural basis of moral cognition. Also discussed are the brain mechanisms behind creative innovation, and an overview is presented of several of this year's outstanding contributions to clinical and basic neuroscience.

  17. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  18. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  19. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  20. Criteria for Assessing Naturalistic Inquiries as Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Guba, Egon G.

    Research on the assessment of naturalistic inquiries is reviewed, and criteria for assessment are outlined. Criteria reviewed include early foundational and non-foundational criteria, trustworthiness criteria, axiomatic criteria, rhetorical criteria, action criteria, and application/transferability criteria. Case studies that are reports of…

  1. Writing & Drawing in the Naturalist's Journal: Reviving the Tradition of the Naturalist's Journal as an Effective Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirnberger, Joseph M.; McCullagh, Steven; Howick, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The naturalist's journal is a collection of writings and sketches that captures selected thoughts or observations of nature and represents both immediate learning and raw material that is available for more polished work. This article talks about a naturalist's journal as an effective teaching and learning tool. Creating a naturalist's journals…

  2. [An unpublished manuscript of naturalist Manuel Ferreira da Câmara: "a note on extraction from the mines of the Principality of Transylvania" (1796)].

    PubMed

    Varela, Alex Gonçalves

    2010-03-01

    Manuel Ferreira da Câmara was one of the exponents of Luso-american Enlightenment. The historiography has highlighted his activities as an administrator, employee and politician, neglecting to incorporate his dimension as a naturalist. By resurrecting this facet of a student of the natural world, we find in the archives and libraries various texts by the author that remain unpublished. One of these manuscripts is entitled "A note on extraction from the mines of the Principality of Transylvania written in Zalathna on March 5, 1796", produced during a trip through several countries of Central and Northern Europe at the request of the Portuguese government. Given the reflection elaborated by Câmara on the Transylvania region and the policy of administering the mines implemented there, its publication is highly relevant.

  3. Highlights from the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (June 3-7, 2016 - Chicago, Illinois, USA).

    PubMed

    Kibble, A; Al-Shamahi, A; Kuennemann, K; Marqués, F; Tremosa, L; Cole, P

    2016-07-01

    The theme of the 52nd Annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, 'Collective Wisdom', was intended to represent the importance of consolidating clinical advances with expertise in areas such as health informatics, pathology and economics in order to improve the role of practice providers in delivering cancer patients every component of quality care. As expected, immunotherapy and precision medicine featured heavily in the 2016 program. Gathering 30,000 oncology professionals in Chicago, educational and science sessions gave the attendees the opportunity to discuss and view ground-breaking research. Copyright 2016 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  4. Relative contributions of naturalistic and constructed support: two studies of women with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Manuel; Toobert, Deborah J; Strycker, Lisa A

    2014-02-01

    Do distinct sources of social support have differential effects on health? Although previous research has contrasted family and friend support (naturalistic support), research on the relative effects of naturalistic support and constructed support (e.g., support groups) is extremely rare. Two studies of women with type 2 diabetes were conducted that assessed the independent effects of naturalistic and constructed support on physical activity and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Participants were women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes from the intervention arms of two randomized controlled trials: primarily European American women (Study 1; N = 163) and exclusively Hispanic women (Study 2; N = 142). Measures assessed physical activity, HbA1c, and friend and family support at baseline and at 6 months, as well as group support after 6 months of intervention. In Study 1, only group support was related to increases in physical activity (ΔR(2) = .036). In Study 2, group support and family support showed independent effects on increases in physical activity (ΔR(2) = .047 and .060, respectively). Also, group support was related to decreases in HbA1c in Study 1 (ΔR(2) = .031) and Study 2 (ΔR(2) = .065). Overall, constructed (group) support was related to outcomes most consistently, but naturalistic (family) support showed some independent relation to physical activity improvement.

  5. New technology and clinical applications of nanomedicine: highlights of the second annual meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (Part I).

    PubMed

    Wei, Chiming; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Ghandehari, Hamid; Hanes, Justin; Stebe, Kathleen J; Mao, Hai-Quan; Haynie, Donald T; Tomalia, Donald A; Foldvari, Marianna; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy; Simeonova, Petia; Nie, Shuming; Mori, Hidezo; Gilbert, Susan P; Needham, David

    2006-12-01

    The Second Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) was held at the National Academy of Science Building in Washington, DC, September 9-10, 2006. The program included two Nobel Prize Laureate Lectures, two Keynote Lectures, and 123 invited outstanding State-in-Art lectures presenting in 23 special concurrent symposia. In addition, there were 22 poster presentations in the meeting addressing different areas in nanomedicine research. All of the presenters at the meeting are outstanding investigators and researchers in the field. The Second Annual Meeting of the AANM was a great success. The meeting provides investigators from different world areas a forum and an opportunity for discussion. We believe that nanomedicine research will develop rapidly in the future. The AANM invites basic and clinical researchers from the world to join this exciting research.

  6. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

  7. Ethical issues in naturalistic versus controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Helmchen, Hanfried

    2011-01-01

    Ethical core issues in research with human subjects are related to informed consent and risk-benefit assessment. This is valid for all types of studies. However, there has been much greater focus of ethical considerations on controlled clinical trials than on naturalistic trials, probably because the former are interventional in nature and may have unknown and perhaps severe somatic risks, whereas naturalistic studies seem not to intervene but only to observe, and therefore are assumed to have fewer or almost no risks. However, there are also ethical implications in naturalistic trials, although their weight is differently accentuated, more with potential, more with potential psychological burdens of the observational procedures and more with potential physical risks in interventional trials. This will be elaborated with examples of placebo-controlled trials and of incidental findings in screenings, of marketing influences on observational studies, and of psychological burdens by survey interviews. The ethical implications wilt be analyzed within a more general framework, Finally, recommendations will be offered. PMID:21842614

  8. Assessment of dietary intake in an inner-city African American population and development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to highlight foods and nutrients for a nutritional invention.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sangita; Cao, Xia; Arcan, Chrisa; Mattingly, Megan; Jennings, Sharla; Song, Hee-Jung; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the diets of low-income inner-city African Americans to develop a population-specific quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) that will be used to highlight foods and nutrients for a nutritional intervention program aimed at reducing the risk of chronic disease and to evaluate the program. A cross-sectional survey conducted in inner-city Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were collected in 91 low-income African Americans aged between 18 and 74 years. The average daily energy intake was approximately 2,165 kcal for women and 2,509 kcal for men. The percentages of energy from fat were approximately 34% and 33% for women and men, respectively. Sodas were the main contributor to energy and sugar intake. A 113-item QFFQ was developed. The results highlighted specific foods and nutrients that would be targeted in the nutritional intervention. The QFFQ developed is culturally appropriate and specific for low-income African Americans in inner-city Baltimore.

  9. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27–28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R.; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient’s quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined. PMID:27610198

  10. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27-28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient's quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined.

  11. Highlights From the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/ International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion: From the Bench to the Bedside - Clinical Pharmacology Considerations.

    PubMed

    Ronaldson, P T; Bauer, B; El-Kattan, A F; Shen, H; Salphati, L; Louie, S W

    2016-11-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion was held with the objective of discussing innovative advances in transporter pharmacology. Specific topics included (i) transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB); (ii) emerging transport proteins; (iii) recent advances in achieving hepatoselectivity and optimizing clearance for organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates; (iv) utility of animal models for transporter studies; and (v) clinical correlation of transporter polymorphisms. Here, we present state-of-the-art highlights from this workshop in these key areas of focus.

  12. Cultural Tailoring for an Afro-Caribbean Community: A Naturalistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to discover ways to tailor health care interventions to fit the cultural identity of a minority group of people in order to reduce health disparity. Design/Analysis A naturalistic approach was used to interview four self-identified Afro-Caribbean Americans about their experiences of living on the margin. Through content analysis, categories emerged from the transcription revealed embracing, non-entitlement, enduring disrespect, and caring for self. Conclusion Afro-Caribbean Americans have strong values, healthy intentions, and appropriate attitude which are critical combinations for successfully tailoring interventions. Implications are discussed. PMID:22288207

  13. Mind-wandering and alterations to default mode network connectivity when listening to naturalistic versus artificial sounds

    PubMed Central

    Gould van Praag, Cassandra D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Sparasci, Oliver; Mees, Alex; Philippides, Andrew O.; Ware, Mark; Ottaviani, Cristina; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2017-01-01

    Naturalistic environments have been demonstrated to promote relaxation and wellbeing. We assess opposing theoretical accounts for these effects through investigation of autonomic arousal and alterations of activation and functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) of the brain while participants listened to sounds from artificial and natural environments. We found no evidence for increased DMN activity in the naturalistic compared to artificial or control condition, however, seed based functional connectivity showed a shift from anterior to posterior midline functional coupling in the naturalistic condition. These changes were accompanied by an increase in peak high frequency heart rate variability, indicating an increase in parasympathetic activity in the naturalistic condition in line with the Stress Recovery Theory of nature exposure. Changes in heart rate and the peak high frequency were correlated with baseline functional connectivity within the DMN and baseline parasympathetic tone respectively, highlighting the importance of individual neural and autonomic differences in the response to nature exposure. Our findings may help explain reported health benefits of exposure to natural environments, through identification of alterations to autonomic activity and functional coupling within the DMN when listening to naturalistic sounds. PMID:28345604

  14. Mind-wandering and alterations to default mode network connectivity when listening to naturalistic versus artificial sounds.

    PubMed

    Gould van Praag, Cassandra D; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Sparasci, Oliver; Mees, Alex; Philippides, Andrew O; Ware, Mark; Ottaviani, Cristina; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-03-27

    Naturalistic environments have been demonstrated to promote relaxation and wellbeing. We assess opposing theoretical accounts for these effects through investigation of autonomic arousal and alterations of activation and functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) of the brain while participants listened to sounds from artificial and natural environments. We found no evidence for increased DMN activity in the naturalistic compared to artificial or control condition, however, seed based functional connectivity showed a shift from anterior to posterior midline functional coupling in the naturalistic condition. These changes were accompanied by an increase in peak high frequency heart rate variability, indicating an increase in parasympathetic activity in the naturalistic condition in line with the Stress Recovery Theory of nature exposure. Changes in heart rate and the peak high frequency were correlated with baseline functional connectivity within the DMN and baseline parasympathetic tone respectively, highlighting the importance of individual neural and autonomic differences in the response to nature exposure. Our findings may help explain reported health benefits of exposure to natural environments, through identification of alterations to autonomic activity and functional coupling within the DMN when listening to naturalistic sounds.

  15. From farm and family to career naturalist: the apprenticeship of Vernon Bailey.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Robert E

    2008-03-01

    How are scientists made? How, as young adults, have they discovered a scientific vocation and career? Through formal schooling, typically; but in the field sciences also through practical apprenticeship--through work. This essay presents the story of a frontier farm lad who became a career naturalist as a hired collector of animal specimens in the American West. Family and work are the leitmotifs of Vernon Bailey's story. It was family farming--bringing in the hay and finding the cows--that connected Bailey's love of skilled outdoor work with a desire to know nature scientifically. Traveling and working with professional naturalists, he came to see himself as a professional as well. His socialization was less a replacement than a layering of two identities, family and career.

  16. Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    sleep  opportunity and creating acute and chronic  sleep  loss   Mathematical models combined with quantitative cognitive  architecture  are  useful for...Violanti, Cecil Burchfiel, Bryan  Vila, and Michael E. Andrew. (2008) “Waiting Time Distributions of  Actigraphy   Measured  Sleep .” Open  Sleep  Journal 2...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0099 TITLE: Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and

  17. Philosophy of biology: naturalistic or transcendental?

    PubMed

    Kolen, Filip; Van de Vijver, Gertrudis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to clarify the meaning of a naturalistic position within philosophy of biology, against the background of an alternative view, founded on the basic insights of transcendental philosophy. It is argued that the apparently minimal and neutral constraints naturalism imposes on philosophy of science turn out to involve a quite heavily constraining metaphysics, due to the naturalism's fundamental neglect of its own perspective. Because of its intrinsic sensitivity to perspectivity and historicity, transcendental philosophy can avoid this type of hidden metaphysics.

  18. Naturalistic Decision Making: Implications for Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    V I If! H I si r » Figure 3. The Harassing F-4s: Decision flow diagram. How People Make Decisions in Naturalistic Settings 27 mind...D 0 0 - J~D| 0 0 V G 0 0 E D 1 r D E I H F Common Goals across Incidents 1. Cue inventories across like goals 2. Strategy used in...AKnuie(ie«»r 8500 wvv iSPY-D MB A\\ V «mcal A/S flpmi 󈧄 BMIIIII 27: tan.)( ,m.lf s

  19. 1999 NCCS Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Jerome (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) is a high-performance scientific computing facility operated, maintained and managed by the Earth and Space Data Computing Division (ESDCD) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Earth Sciences Directorate. The mission of the NCCS is to advance leading-edge science by providing the best people, computers, and data storage systems to NASA's Earth and space sciences programs and those of other U.S. Government agencies, universities, and private institutions. Among the many computationally demanding Earth science research efforts supported by the NCCS in Fiscal Year 1999 (FY99) are the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission, Earth gravitational model development efforts, the National Weather Service's North American Observing System program, Data Assimilation Office studies, a NASA-sponsored project at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, a NASA-sponsored microgravity project conducted by researchers at the City University of New York and the University of Pennsylvania, the completion of a satellite-derived global climate data set, simulations of a new geodynamo model, and studies of Earth's torque. This document presents highlights of these research efforts and an overview of the NCCS, its facilities, and its people.

  20. Do naturalistic enclosures provide suitable environments for zoo animals?

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, María C; Guillén-Salazar, Federico; Garcés-Narro, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Zoo visitors perceive naturalistic enclosures (i.e. those attempting to replicate identifiable parts of the landscape of the species' habitat) as those that best satisfy the biological needs of the animals, and ensure therefore their welfare. However, the provision of a suitable environment with the resources that will allow the animals to satisfy their main biological needs in naturalistic enclosures has never been systematically explored; instead, it has been assumed. In this study we provide evidence that supports the general idea that naturalistic designs provide suitable environments for the animals. For that purpose, we analyzed 1,381 naturalistic and non-naturalistic enclosures in 63 Spanish zoological parks. In order to assess the suitability of the environment provided within each enclosure, a number of aspects related to the animals' main biological requirements were analyzed. We found a relationship between naturalistic designs and the suitability of the environment for the species housed. Most naturalistic enclosures (77.8%) provided suitable environments for their inhabitants. Non-naturalistic ones also had suitable environments, but in a lower percentage (39.7%). These results should be taken into account during zoo inspection and accreditation appointments, where enclosure suitability must be assessed in an accurate and fast manner. In this regard, a naturalistic design can be used as an adjunct indicator of enclosure suitability, but not exclusively, as not every naturalistic enclosure was suitable for the animals, neither as an indispensable one, given that near 40% of non-naturalistic ones were appropriate for the species housed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Awareness of naturalistic action errors in dementia.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Tania; Libon, David J; Hart, Tessa

    2002-07-01

    Unawareness of deficit is a common feature of degenerative dementia. The present study explored awareness and correction of naturalistic action errors in 54 dementia participants and 10 healthy controls while they performed a series of everyday tasks, such as toast preparation and gift-wrapping. Awareness for everyday task performance and cognitive functioning was also assessed with questionnaire discrepancy scores, and a neuropsychological test protocol was administered. Dementia participants were aware of and corrected a significantly smaller proportion of errors compared to controls (z = -4.59, p < .001). Awareness and correction of action errors was not significantly correlated with the number of naturalistic errors committed, questionnaire discrepancy scores, or neuropsychological test data. Within-group analyses showed awareness differed across error types, such that participants were aware of a greater proportion of substitution and sequence errors compared to omissions, perseverations, and action addition (i.e., utilization behavior) errors (z < or = -3.2, p < or = .002 for all analyses). Taken together these data suggest that error awareness and correction during the course of action is not related to error production or awareness measured via questionnaire discrepancy scores. Rather, direct assessment of error detection and correction may provide novel information about behavioral monitoring that can not be extrapolated from measures of dementia severity or traditional neuropsychological assessment.

  2. Temporal Integration Windows for Naturalistic Visual Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Scott L.; Albi, Angela; Melcher, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the brain possesses mechanisms to integrate incoming sensory information as it unfolds over time-periods of 2–3 seconds. The ubiquity of this mechanism across modalities, tasks, perception and production has led to the proposal that it may underlie our experience of the subjective present. A critical test of this claim is that this phenomenon should be apparent in naturalistic visual experiences. We tested this using movie-clips as a surrogate for our day-to-day experience, temporally scrambling them to require (re-) integration within and beyond the hypothesized 2–3 second interval. Two independent experiments demonstrate a step-wise increase in the difficulty to follow stimuli at the hypothesized 2–3 second scrambling condition. Moreover, only this difference could not be accounted for by low-level visual properties. This provides the first evidence that this 2–3 second integration window extends to complex, naturalistic visual sequences more consistent with our experience of the subjective present. PMID:25010517

  3. Coaching Parents to Use Naturalistic Language and Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akamoglu, Yusuf; Dinnebeil, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Naturalistic language and communication strategies (i.e., naturalistic teaching strategies) refer to practices that are used to promote the child's language and communication skills either through verbal (e.g., spoken words) or nonverbal (e.g., gestures, signs) interactions between an adult (e.g., parent, teacher) and a child. Use of naturalistic…

  4. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storkerson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to…

  5. An exemplar of naturalistic inquiry in general practice research.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-01-23

    Background Before beginning any research project, novice researchers must consider which methodological approach will best address their research questions. The paucity of literature describing a practical application of naturalistic inquiry adds to the difficulty they may experience. Aim To provide a practical example of how naturalistic inquiry was applied to a qualitative study exploring collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners working in Australian general practice. Discussion Naturalistic inquiry is not without its critics and limitations. However, by applying the axioms and operational characteristics of naturalistic inquiry, the authors captured a detailed 'snapshot' of collaboration in general practice in the time and context that it occurred. Conclusion Using qualitative methods, naturalistic inquiry provides the scope to construct a comprehensive and contextual understanding of a phenomenon. No individual positivist paradigm could provide the level of detail achieved in a naturalistic inquiry. Implications for practice This paper presents a practical example of naturalistic inquiry for the novice researcher. It shows that naturalistic inquiry is appropriate when the researcher seeks a rich and contextual understanding of a phenomenon as it exists in its natural setting.

  6. Speciation, Ecological Opportunity, and Latitude (American Society of Naturalists Address).

    PubMed

    Schluter, Dolph

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses to explain the greater numbers of species in the tropics than the temperate zone include greater age and area, higher temperature and metabolic rates, and greater ecological opportunity. These ideas make contrasting predictions about the relationship between speciation processes and latitude, which I elaborate and evaluate. Available data suggest that per capita speciation rates are currently highest in the temperate zone and that diversification rates (speciation minus extinction) are similar between latitudes. In contrast, clades whose oldest analyzed dates precede the Eocene thermal maximum, when the extent of the tropics was much greater than today, tend to show highest speciation and diversification rates in the tropics. These findings are consistent with age and area, which is alone among hypotheses in predicting a time trend. Higher recent speciation rates in the temperate zone than the tropics suggest an additional response to high ecological opportunity associated with low species diversity. These broad patterns are compelling but provide limited insights into underlying mechanisms, arguing that studies of speciation processes along the latitudinal gradient will be vital. Using threespine stickleback in depauperate northern lakes as an example, I show how high ecological opportunity can lead to rapid speciation. The results support a role for ecological opportunity in speciation, but its importance in the evolution of the latitudinal gradient remains uncertain. I conclude that per capita evolutionary rates are no longer higher in the tropics than the temperate zone. Nevertheless, the vast numbers of species that have already accumulated in the tropics ensure that total rate of species production remains highest there. Thus, tropical evolutionary momentum helps to perpetuate the steep latitudinal biodiversity gradient.

  7. Phenotypic evolution: the ongoing synthesis (American Society of Naturalists address).

    PubMed

    Arnold, Stevan J

    2014-06-01

    I explore the proposition that evolutionary biology is currently in the midst of its greatest period of synthesis. This period, which I call the Ongoing Synthesis, began in 1963 and continues at the present time. I use analysis of citations, conduct, and content to compare the Ongoing Synthesis to widely recognized periods of synthesis in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. To compare content, I focus on phenotypic evolution and compare current efforts with George Gaylord Simpson's struggle to understand evolution in deep geological time. The essence of current effort is captured by the question, What is the best model for phenotypic evolution? Although many investigators are actively engaged in answering this question, I single out two examples of my own collaborative work for emphasis here. These two studies share three important characteristics: diagnosis of evolutionary pattern using massive data sets, validation of model parameter values using compilations of estimates (e.g., heritability, stabilizing selection, distance to an intermediate optimum), and identification of evolutionary process using alternative models of stochastic evolution. Our primary findings (discovery of the blunderbuss pattern and the result that rare bursts of evolution carry lineages out of established adaptive zones) compare favorably with important insights from the Modern Synthesis.

  8. Use of synchrotron tomography to image naturalistic anatomy in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socha, John J.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the morphology of anatomical structures is a cornerstone of biology. For small animals, classical methods such as histology have provided a wealth of data, but such techniques can be problematic due to destruction of the sample. More importantly, fixation and physical slicing can cause deformation of anatomy, a critical limitation when precise three-dimensional data are required. Modern techniques such as confocal microscopy, MRI, and tabletop x-ray microCT provide effective non-invasive methods, but each of these tools each has limitations including sample size constraints, resolution limits, and difficulty visualizing soft tissue. Our research group at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) studies physiological processes in insects, focusing on the dynamics of breathing and feeding. To determine the size, shape, and relative location of internal anatomy in insects, we use synchrotron microtomography at the beamline 2-BM to image structures including tracheal tubes, muscles, and gut. Because obtaining naturalistic, undeformed anatomical information is a key component of our studies, we have developed methods to image fresh and non-fixed whole animals and tissues. Although motion artifacts remain a problem, we have successfully imaged multiple species including beetles, ants, fruit flies, and butterflies. Here we discuss advances in biological imaging and highlight key findings in insect morphology.

  9. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  10. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  11. Much Ado about Something: Naturalistic Inquiry and the Paradigm Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Two recent books that confront the questions and assumptions of traditional and new paradigms for studying education are discussed: "Organizational Theory and Inquiry: The Paradigm Revolution" (Yvonna Lincoln, editor) and "Naturalistic Inquiry" (Y. Lincoln and Egon Guba). (MSE)

  12. Greene's Dialectics of Freedom and Dewey's Naturalistic Existential Metaphysics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This article attempts to develop the Deweyan naturalistic existential metaphysics which underlies Maxine Greene's diverse dialectics. Also included are reflections on the implications of the dialectic of freedom and Dewey's metaphysics for education and the arts. (IAH)

  13. Naturalistic Assessment of Novice Teenage Crash Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suzanne E.; Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, Sheila E.; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crash risk is highest during the first months after licensure. Current knowledge about teenagers’ driving exposure and the factors increasing their crash risk is based on self-reported data and crash database analyses. While these research tools are useful, new developments in naturalistic technologies have allowed researchers to examine newly-licensed teenagers’ exposure and crash risk factors in greater detail. The Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study (NTDS) described in this paper is the first study to follow a group of newly-licensed teenagers continuously for 18 months after licensure. The goals of this paper are to compare the crash and near-crash experience of drivers in the NTDS to national trends, to describe the methods and lessons learned in the NTDS, and to provide initial data on driving exposure for these drivers. Methods A data acquisition system was installed in the vehicles of 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers 16 years of age during their first 18 months of independent driving. It consisted of cameras, sensors (accelerometers, GPS, yaw, front radar, lane position, and various sensors obtained via the vehicle network), and a computer with removable hard drive. Data on the driving of participating parents was also collected when they drove the instrumented vehicle. Findings The primary findings after 18 months included the following: (1) crash and near-crash rates among teenage participants were significantly higher during the first six months of the study than the final 12 months, mirroring the national trends; (2) crash and near-crash rates were significantly higher for teenage than adult (parent) participants, also reflecting national trends; (3) teenaged driving exposure averaged between 507-710 kilometers (315-441 miles) per month over the study period, but varied substantially between participants with standard errors representing 8-14 percent of the mean; and (4) crash and near-crash types were very similar for male and female

  14. Focus: the peculiar persistence of the naturalistic fallacy. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Milam, Erika Lorraine

    2014-09-01

    Although "naturalistic fallacy" is a term coined in the twentieth century, scholars have long voiced myriad anxieties over the mechanisms by which their contemporaries have derived moral, social, and political lessons from natural phenomena--often as gambits for advancing their own alternative explanations. The essays in this Focus section explore five episodes in the history of such concerns with naturalistic reasoning in order to shed new light on the persistence of naturalism itself.

  15. Into the field: naturalistic education and the future of conservation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Mark A

    2009-10-01

    Some educational psychologists and researchers have argued that there are multiple ways of being intelligent. In the early 1980s, Howard Gardner presented a theory of multiple intelligences by proposing that humans can be described not by a single kind of intelligence, or intelligence quotient score, but rather by a variety of kinds of intelligence. This idea of considering multiple views of intelligence has helped educators look at intelligence from a less rigid, more expansive perspective. I considered how the relatively new concept of naturalistic intelligence, which is the cognitive potential to process information that is exhibited by expert naturalists, might influence the design of undergraduate biology curricula. Naturalistic intelligence can be fostered in undergraduate biology students by emphasizing the need for well-rounded scientific naturalists; developing curricula that involves students in outdoor inquiry-based projects; and helping students learn how to observe both the natural world and their own learning, skills that are essential to developing expert naturalistic knowledge. Professors, graduate students, and administrators can improve the naturalistic intelligence of undergraduate biology students by giving these students opportunities to be involved in outdoor research. Time spent outdoors alone and among people with expertise in natural history, ecology, and conservation biology will have important influences on the knowledge and skills biology undergraduates learn, the careers they pursue, and the contributions they make to conserving Earth's biodiversity.

  16. Naturalistically observed conflict and youth asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Erin T; Kane, Heidi S; Saleh, Daniel J; Naar-King, Sylvie; Poowuttikul, Pavadee; Secord, Elizabeth; Pierantoni, Wayne; Simon, Valerie A; Slatcher, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the links between naturalistically observed conflict, self-reported caregiver-youth conflict, and youth asthma symptoms. Fifty-four youth with asthma (age range: 10-17 years) wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) for a 4-day period to assess interpersonal conflict and caregiver-youth conflict as they occur in daily life. Conflict also was assessed with baseline self-report questionnaires and daily diaries completed by youth participants and their caregivers. Asthma symptoms were assessed using daily diaries, baseline self-reports, and wheezing, as coded from the EAR. EAR-observed measures of conflict were strongly associated with self-reported asthma symptoms (both baseline and daily diaries) and wheezing coded from the EAR. Further, when entered together in regression analyses, youth daily reports of negative caregiver-youth interactions and EAR-observed conflict uniquely predicted asthma symptoms; only EAR-observed conflict was associated with EAR-observed wheezing. These findings demonstrate the potential impact of daily conflict on youth asthma symptoms and the importance of assessing conflict as it occurs in everyday life. More broadly, they point to the importance of formulating a clear picture of family interactions outside of the lab, which is essential for understanding how family relationships "get under the skin" to affect youth health. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Temporal eye movement strategies during naturalistic viewing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helena X.; Freeman, Jeremy; Merriam, Elisha P.; Hasson, Uri; Heeger, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The deployment of eye movements to complex spatiotemporal stimuli likely involves a variety of cognitive factors. However, eye movements to movies are surprisingly reliable both within and across observers. We exploited and manipulated that reliability to characterize observers’ temporal viewing strategies. Introducing cuts and scrambling the temporal order of the resulting clips systematically changed eye movement reliability. We developed a computational model that exhibited this behavior and provided an excellent fit to the measured eye movement reliability. The model assumed that observers searched for, found, and tracked a point-of-interest, and that this process reset when there was a cut. The model did not require that eye movements depend on temporal context in any other way, and it managed to describe eye movements consistently across different observers and two movie sequences. Thus, we found no evidence for the integration of information over long time scales (greater than a second). The results are consistent with the idea that observers employ a simple tracking strategy even while viewing complex, engaging naturalistic stimuli. PMID:22262911

  18. Nonlinear circuits for naturalistic visual motion estimation

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, James E; Clark, Damon A

    2015-01-01

    Many animals use visual signals to estimate motion. Canonical models suppose that animals estimate motion by cross-correlating pairs of spatiotemporally separated visual signals, but recent experiments indicate that humans and flies perceive motion from higher-order correlations that signify motion in natural environments. Here we show how biologically plausible processing motifs in neural circuits could be tuned to extract this information. We emphasize how known aspects of Drosophila's visual circuitry could embody this tuning and predict fly behavior. We find that segregating motion signals into ON/OFF channels can enhance estimation accuracy by accounting for natural light/dark asymmetries. Furthermore, a diversity of inputs to motion detecting neurons can provide access to more complex higher-order correlations. Collectively, these results illustrate how non-canonical computations improve motion estimation with naturalistic inputs. This argues that the complexity of the fly's motion computations, implemented in its elaborate circuits, represents a valuable feature of its visual motion estimator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09123.001 PMID:26499494

  19. Energy Research Highlights-2

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-26

    Highlights the research NETL is doing in the following fields: Clean Coal, Gasification, Carbon Sequestration, and Hydrogen. This video was featured in the lobby of the Forrestal building in Washington, D.C.

  20. Highlights, predictions, and changes.

    PubMed

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-15

    Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding "hot" retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  1. Langley test highlights, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Significant aircraft tests which were performed are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities. The conributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  2. Highlights from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    DISCUSSION by CHAIRMAN: P.J. ODDONE, Scientific Secretaries: W. Fisher, A. Holzner Note from Publisher: The Slides of the Lecture: "Highlights from Fermilab" can be found at http://www.ccsem.infn.it/issp2007/

  3. "This Bird Can't Do It 'Cause This Bird Doesn't Swim in Water": Sibling Teaching during Naturalistic Home Observations in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Nina; Della Porta, Sandra; Recchia, Holly; Funamoto, Allyson; Ross, Hildy

    2015-01-01

    Social-constructivist models of learning highlight that cognitive development is embedded within the context of social relationships characterized by closeness and intimacy (Vygotsky, 1978). Therefore, in contrast to prior research employing semistructured paradigms, naturalistic sibling-directed teaching was examined during ongoing interactions…

  4. "This Bird Can't Do It 'Cause This Bird Doesn't Swim in Water": Sibling Teaching during Naturalistic Home Observations in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Nina; Della Porta, Sandra; Recchia, Holly; Funamoto, Allyson; Ross, Hildy

    2015-01-01

    Social-constructivist models of learning highlight that cognitive development is embedded within the context of social relationships characterized by closeness and intimacy (Vygotsky, 1978). Therefore, in contrast to prior research employing semistructured paradigms, naturalistic sibling-directed teaching was examined during ongoing interactions…

  5. Does mirtazapine interfere with naturalistic diabetes treatment?

    PubMed

    Song, Hoo Rim; Woo, Young Sup; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Shim, In-Hee; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    Mirtazapine is known to induce weight gain and possibly leads to exacerbation of diabetic profiles. However, many cases of diabetic patients, who complained of insomnia and depression, were treated with mirtazapine in the clinical situations. Thus, this study aimed to assess any negative effects that treatment with mirtazapine may incur in diabetic patients.This study included 33 patients enrolled in naturalistic diabetes treatment that had also been diagnosed with depression and prescribed mirtazapine for at least 6 months. Another 33 diabetic patients who had not taken any psychiatric medicines were included as a control group. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.The dose of mirtazapine at baseline was 24.3 ± 14.0 mg/d in the mirtazapine group, and the 2 groups did not differ in any baseline characteristics except for total cholesterol levels. Body mass index increased in both groups, and the change in the mirtazapine group (1.0 ± 0.6 kg/m) was significantly greater than that in the control group (0.3 ± 0.4 kg/m, P < 0.001) at 6 months. Only the control group exhibited a decrease in fasting plasma glucose, whereas both groups showed a decrease in HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, an increase in high-density lipoprotein, and no change in triglyceride levels. None of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.In conclusion, mirtazapine increased the weight gain of diabetic patients; however, other diabetic and lipid markers generally did not worsen during the 6-month treatment period. These results suggest that, at least in the short term, mirtazapine is safe for diabetic patients in a stable state and are undergoing appropriate diabetic treatment.

  6. 2005 AACC Convention Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    More than 2,500 community college professionals participated in the 85th annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges in Boston, Massachusetts, April 9-12. Attendees took part in numerous workshops, forums, sessions, and roundtables and were witness to special presentations from Martin Luther King III, Senator Edward Kennedy,…

  7. 2004 AACC Convention Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Over 2,000 community college professionals participated in the 84th annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 24-27, 2004. Attendees were witness to a special appearance by President George W. Bush and were treated to presentations from NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, "Washington Post"…

  8. 2004 AACC Convention Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Over 2,000 community college professionals participated in the 84th annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 24-27, 2004. Attendees were witness to a special appearance by President George W. Bush and were treated to presentations from NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, "Washington Post"…

  9. 2005 AACC Convention Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    More than 2,500 community college professionals participated in the 85th annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges in Boston, Massachusetts, April 9-12. Attendees took part in numerous workshops, forums, sessions, and roundtables and were witness to special presentations from Martin Luther King III, Senator Edward Kennedy,…

  10. NASA Langley Highlights, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  11. Collegiate Athletics Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Highlights 15 trends/events in black college athletics, including championship coaches, Black Coaches Association, eligibility issues, disclosure of athlete graduation rates, athletics resource allocation, early adoption of professional athlete status, success of the Women's National Basketball Association, lack of black access to certain sports,…

  12. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  13. NASA highlights, 1986 - 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA research from 1986 to 1988 are discussed. Topics covered include Space Shuttle flights, understanding the Universe and its origins, understanding the Earth and its environment, air and space transportation, using space to make America more competitive, using space technology an Earth, strengthening America's education in science and technology, the space station, and human exploration of the solar system.

  14. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  15. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  16. Highlighting our Tiniest Neighbors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-08

    This image shows our own back yard, astronomically speaking, from a vantage point about 30 light-years away from the sun. It highlights the population of tiny brown dwarfs recently discovered by NASA WISE. The image simulates actual positions of stars.

  17. NASA Langley Highlights, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. A color electronic version of this report is available at URL http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1998/.

  18. Highlights from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Axel

    2016-12-01

    This talk presents highlights from the PHENIX experiment. These include results from the beam energy scan at √{sNN} = 7.7 to 200 GeV, yield and anisotropy of low pT direct photon emission in Au+Au, results on the e+e- pair continuum measured with the hadron blind detector (HBD), separation of charm and bottom energy loss using the PHENIX vertex tracker (VTX), and evidence for strongly coupled matter in small systems.

  19. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F.

    2016-01-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective. PMID:27730202

  20. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Annema, Jouke T; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F

    2016-07-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  1. Science Highlights from SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Erick T.

    2017-06-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR to provide infrared and sub-millimeter observing capabilities to the worldwide astronomical community. With a wide range of instruments that cover both imaging and spectroscopy, SOFIA has produced unique scientific results that could not be obtained with a ground-based facility. In this talk, I will describe highlights from a range of areas in astronomy. A particular strength of SOFIA is high resolution spectroscopy. In the mid-infrared, the instrument EXES has enabled velocity-resolved observations of solar system, interstellar, and star forming regions. The heterodyne spectrometer GREAT has been a particularly productive instrument on SOFIA, with high resolution studies of the gas in the interstellar medium. With its extremely high spectral resolution, GREAT has allowed dynamical studies of clouds and their interactions. I will highlight observations that demonstrate the infall of material in star-forming regions. SOFIA can go to where the science is. This mobility is important for localized events such as occultations. Results from the recent Pluto occultation campaign will be discussed.

  2. ERIC/ECTJ Annual Review Paper: Criteria for Assessing the Trustworthiness of Naturalistic Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    1981-01-01

    Addresses the criteria for judging the credibility of inquiries conducted within the naturalistic inquiry paradigm, defines naturalistic inquiry, explicates how the proposed criteria are dealt with in conventional inquiry, and outlines a mode for dealing with them within the naturalistic paradigm. Twenty-six sources are listed. (FM)

  3. Who gives to whom? Testing the support gap hypothesis with naturalistic observations of couple interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wen; Repetti, Rena L

    2016-06-01

    We examined sex differences in explicitly supportive behavior exchanges between husbands and wives using naturalistic video-recordings of everyday couple interactions inside the home. Thirty dual-earner, middle class, heterosexual couples with school-age children were recorded in their homes over 4 days. Specific instances of face-to-face explicit couple support in the video-recordings were identified, and the support role assumed by each partner (recipient vs. provider), the method of support initiation (solicitations vs. offers), and the type of support (instrumental vs. emotional) in each interaction were coded. Paired samples t tests examined sex differences in husbands' and wives' supportive behavior, and bivariate correlations tested the associations among spouses' support initiation behaviors. Findings counter prior research that has largely found a "support gap" favoring husbands as support recipients. Instead, results indicate that wives received significantly more support of an instrumental nature from husbands (than husbands did from wives), a finding driven by wives' active support-soliciting behavior. Among husbands, a tendency to be the solicitor of support was positively correlated with a tendency to offer support. Within couples, rates of offers of support by 1 spouse were correlated with offers by the partner. Naturalistic observations highlight processes that may not be detected by self-reports or laboratory data, in an ecologically valid context in which social behavior reflects the natural rhythms and pulls of everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The role of the amygdala in naturalistic mentalising in typical development and in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosenblau, Gabriela; Kliemann, Dorit; Lemme, Benjamin; Walter, Henrik; Heekeren, Hauke R; Dziobek, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    The substantial discrepancy between mentalising in experimental settings v. real-life social interactions hinders the understanding of the neural basis of real-life social cognition and of social impairments in psychiatric disorders. To determine the neural mechanisms underlying naturalistic mentalising in individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder. We investigated mentalising with a new video-based functional magnetic resonance imaging task in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorder and 22 matched healthy controls. Naturalistic mentalising implicated regions of the traditional mentalising network (medial prefrontal cortex, temporoparietal junction), and additionally the insula and amygdala. Moreover, amygdala activity predicted implicit mentalising performance on an independent behavioural task. Compared with controls, the autism spectrum disorder group did not show differences in neural activity within classical mentalising regions. They did, however, show reduced amygdala activity and a reduced correlation between amygdala activity and mentalising accuracy on the behavioural task, compared with controls. These findings highlight the crucial role of the amygdala in making accurate implicit mental state inferences in typical development and in the social cognitive impairments of individuals with autism spectrum disorder. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  5. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Scientific Highlights from ROMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2017-04-01

    The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF) has launched a research initiative in 2013/2014 called ROMIC (Role of the Middle Atmosphere in Climate). The aim of ROMIC is to improve our understanding of long term variations in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere and to investigate their potential role for climate changes in the troposphere. This includes to study coupling mechanisms between various layers and the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural forcing, e. g., by the Sun. Scientists at a total of 15 research institutes in Germany are involved and cover a large range of experimental and theoretical topics relevant for ROMIC. Some scientific highlights from the research projects within ROMIC will be presented.

  7. LibTech Highlights from ALA Midwinter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hane, Paula J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite lower attendance than in the past and blustery, cold weather, the American Library Association's Midwinter Meeting in Denver in January offered lots of news from industry vendors and lots of opportunities to discuss important issues and trends. In this report, the author highlights some of the most important product announcements with a…

  8. LibTech Highlights from ALA Midwinter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hane, Paula J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite lower attendance than in the past and blustery, cold weather, the American Library Association's Midwinter Meeting in Denver in January offered lots of news from industry vendors and lots of opportunities to discuss important issues and trends. In this report, the author highlights some of the most important product announcements with a…

  9. Resistances to Naturalistic Observation in a Geriatric Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Wilbur H.

    1979-01-01

    One stationary camera with an audio-video taping system permitted systematic comparisons of staff-initiated touching in relation to naturalistic variations in the physical appearances of patients, and the sex, age, and social statuses of interaction partners at a home for the Jewish aged. This procedure is discussed with regard to the…

  10. A Case for Naturalistic Assessment of Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a historical overview of the introduction of the major reading comprehension assessments, showing that the predominant approaches were shaped by the prevailing educational measurement milieu and were implemented largely in response to public pressure. Argues in favor of a naturalistic reading comprehension assessment for evaluating those…

  11. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  12. Interaction in a Rural Science Class. A Naturalistic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jessica P.

    The positivist paradigm has dominated the shape and direction of research in education. Traditionally the scientific method is adhered to, variables are strictly controlled, statistics are compiled, and conclusions are reached. In the post-positivist paradigm, studies conducted using naturalistic inquiry take place in the natural setting and do…

  13. Couples' Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boisvert, Marie-Michele; Wright, John; Tremblay, Nadine; McDuff, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Understanding couples' relationship problems is fundamental to couple therapy. Although research has documented common relationship problems, no study has used open-ended questions to explore problems in couples seeking therapy in naturalistic settings. The present study used a reliable coding system to explore the relationship problems reported…

  14. A Naturalistic Alcohol Availability Experiment: Effects on Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraushaar, Kevin; Alsop, Brent

    Previous investigators have looked at many types of criminal offenses in order to determine alcohol involvement in crime. This longitudinal (4-year) naturalistic experimental and control designed study examined the effects of change in alcohol availability on rates of offending in a small provincial region of New Zealand following the closure of…

  15. Is Love the Answer? A Commentary on Naturalistic Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Yvonna Lincoln and Egon Guba's challenge to the traditional positivist approach to social science research, naturalistic inquiry, is seen as posing ethical dilemmas of its own. Greater awareness of problems of over-idealizing "special relationships" in research practices and in focusing too much on individual rather than systemic…

  16. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  17. Evaluating Evolution: Naturalistic Inquiry and the Perseus Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Delia

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Perseus Project, a Harvard University-based effort to develop a hypermedia library of text and images concerning classical Greece. Explores the role of naturalistic inquiry (NI) in the Project. Reports that NI has helped researchers uncover unanticipated demands upon instructors, students, and developers in working with hypermedia.…

  18. A Brief Coaching Intervention for Teaching Naturalistic Strategies to Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Justin D.; Ledford, Jennifer R.; Shepley, Collin; Mataras, Theologia K.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Davis, Alicia B.

    2016-01-01

    Coaching parents to implement evidence-based strategies is one method for increasing the number of hours young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) access intervention services. The purpose of this study was to teach parents of young children with ASD to implement naturalistic strategies during play in a clinic setting. Results indicate a…

  19. Counting Fidgets: Teaching the Complexity of Naturalistic Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beins, Bernard C.

    This paper outlines a classroom technique that conveys to students some of the complexities of naturalistic and systematic observation. Most research methods textbooks devote only a single chapter to all of the descriptive techniques of research. This activity involves students in the observation and recording of "fidgets" during a five-minute…

  20. Conducting Naturalistic Research on Teaching: Some Procedural Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikunoff, William J.; Ward, Beatrice A.

    1980-01-01

    Defines naturalistic research as research that occurs in a field setting and that emphasizes hypothesis generation rather than hypothesis testing. Discusses essential characteristics and requirements of such research, the utilization of quantitative and qualitative data, establishment of validity of research procedures and data generated, and the…

  1. A Naturalistic Alcohol Availability Experiment: Effects on Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraushaar, Kevin; Alsop, Brent

    Previous investigators have looked at many types of criminal offenses in order to determine alcohol involvement in crime. This longitudinal (4-year) naturalistic experimental and control designed study examined the effects of change in alcohol availability on rates of offending in a small provincial region of New Zealand following the closure of…

  2. A Brief Coaching Intervention for Teaching Naturalistic Strategies to Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Justin D.; Ledford, Jennifer R.; Shepley, Collin; Mataras, Theologia K.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Davis, Alicia B.

    2016-01-01

    Coaching parents to implement evidence-based strategies is one method for increasing the number of hours young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) access intervention services. The purpose of this study was to teach parents of young children with ASD to implement naturalistic strategies during play in a clinic setting. Results indicate a…

  3. A Path to Formative Assessment through Naturalistic Inputs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan; Leroux, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a system in which naturalistic inputs are collected by a web-based e-reader and, in combination with a measurement of readers' comprehension of that text, are analyzed by a neural network to determine the nature of the relationship between the annotations and comprehension. Results showed that neural…

  4. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  5. [Enter the World of the Naturalist.] Nature. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taragan, Barbara

    This curriculum guide was developed for use with public television's Nature series. The materials in the guide are designed to help students actively participate in the study and experience of nature. Students are encouraged to view the programs as naturalists would, observing animals in their environment, noting their behavior, and drawing…

  6. A naturalistic inquiry into the social world of whitewater kayakers

    Treesearch

    Jason W. Whiting; Katharine A. Pawelko

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory research focused on kayakers at whitewater kayaking parks; the social and recreational characteristics of this specific user group had not previously been studied from a managerial and theoretical standpoint. Twelve kayakers were interviewed at whitewater kayaking parks in Colorado and Utah. The interviewers utilized naturalistic methodology with a...

  7. Constructivism: a naturalistic methodology for nursing inquiry.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J V; King, L

    1997-12-01

    This article will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the constructivist research paradigm. Despite its increasing popularity in evaluative health research studies there is limited recognition of constructivism in popular research texts. Lincoln and Guba's original approach to constructivist methodology is outlined and a detailed framework for nursing research is offered. Fundamental issues and concerns surrounding this methodology are debated and differences between method and methodology are highlighted.

  8. FY 1986 budget highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    The FY 1986 budget request for DOE supports the energy, general science and defense missions of the Department in a comprehensive manner, while being responsive to the President's directive to all Federal agencies to freeze or reduce Government spending wherever possible to reduce the Federal deficit. The discussion displays the budget in a format designed to emphasize the varied activities of DOE. ''Research and Development'' describes the nature of the scientific and technical effort which underlies the Department's programs in a number of areas, such as energy, general science, and weapons research, which previously appeared in three distinct sections of our budget presentation. ''Defense Production and Support'' highlights a significant element of our defense activities which have production, whether of weapons or materials, as a common thread. ''Waste Activities'' combines programs from the civilian and defense areas to bring attention to a major effort of DOE ''Business Enterprises'' focuses attention on the fact that a number of the Department's activities are operated like businesses, marketing products and generating revenues. ''Grants and Other Energy Functions'' is how we group non-research and development grant programs and such essential activities as energy information and regulation. Finally, ''Department Management'' includes the various ''overhead'' organizations which keep the Department functioning at headquarters and in the field.

  9. Voyager: Neptune Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Voyager encounter data are presented in computer animation (CA) and real (R) animation. The highlights include a view of 2 full rotations of Neptune. It shows spacecraft trajectory 'diving' over Neptune and intercepting Triton's orbit, depicting radiation and occulation zones. Also shown are a renegade orbit of Triton and Voyager's encounter with Neptune's Magnetopause. A model of the spacecraft's complex maneuvers during close encounters of Neptune and Triton is presented. A view from Earth of Neptune's occulation experiment is is shown as well as a recreation of Voyager's final pass. There is detail of Voyager's Image Compensation technique which produces Voyager images. Eighteen images were produced on June 22 - 23, 1989, from 57 million miles away. A 68 day sequence which provides a stroboscopic view - colorization approximates what is seen by the human eye. Real time images recorded live from Voyager on 8/24/89 are presented. Photoclinometry produced the topography of Triton. Three images are used to create a sequence of Neptune's rings. The globe of Neptune and 2 views of the south pole are shown as well as Neptune rotating. The rotation of a scooter is frozen in images showing differential motion. There is a view of rotation of the Great Dark Spot about its own axis. Photoclinometry provides a 3-dimensional perspective using a color mosaic of Triton images. The globe is used to indicate the orientation of Neptune's crescent. The east and west plumes on Triton are shown.

  10. Highlighting Titan's Hazes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-11

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft looks toward the night side of Saturn's moon Titan in a view that highlights the extended, hazy nature of the moon's atmosphere. During its long mission at Saturn, Cassini has frequently observed Titan at viewing angles like this, where the atmosphere is backlit by the Sun, in order to make visible the structure of the hazes. Titan's high-altitude haze layer appears blue here, whereas the main atmospheric haze is orange. The difference in color could be due to particle sizes in the haze. The blue haze likely consists of smaller particles than the orange haze. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural-color view. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 29, 2017. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 5 miles (9 kilometers) per pixel. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21625

  11. Recent Highlights from VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, R.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    VERITAS is a ground-based gamma-ray observatory consisting of an array of four atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located in southern Arizona, USA. VERITAS carries out an extensive observation program of the gamma-ray sky at energies above 0.1 TeV. Observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources in the TeV band are sensitive probes of the highly energetic processes occurring in these objects. Observations by VERITAS of the Galactic center and nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies provide constraints on particle dark matter with masses above a few hundred GeV. VERITAS observations also provide constraints on fundamental physics and cosmology, such as probing the history of galaxy formation and studying Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). The majority of the sources detected by VERITAS are active galactic nuclei (AGN), with gamma-ray emission originating in their relativistic jets. TeV observations of AGN help us constrain models of particle acceleration and energy dissipation in relativistic jets, and the size and location of the gamma-ray emission region. Galactic sources at TeV energies include supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, and binary systems, and TeV emission is a key diagnostic of the highly energetic particles in these objects. VERITAS observations provide important clues on the origin of cosmic rays and on particle acceleration in supernova blast shocks and relativistic pulsar wind-termination shocks. In this article I will present some highlights of particle-astrophysics measurements made with VERITAS.

  12. 2012 Ground Testing Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholz, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program and a collaborative effort with Boeing, and Lockheed Martin this past year a series of sonic boom test were completed in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). One of the goals was to develop new test techniques and hardware for measuring sonic boom signatures in the transonic and supersonic regimes. Data for various model designs and configurations were collected and will be used to validate CFD predictions of sonic boom signatures. Reactivation of the NASA Ames Mitsubishi compressor system was completed this past year. The compressor is intended to replace and augment the existing UPWT Clark Compressor as the primary Make Up Air (MUA) source. The MUA system provides air and vacuum pumping capability to the Ames UPWT. It will improve productivity and reliability of the UPWT as a vital testing and research facility for the U.S. aerospace industry and NASA. Funding for this task was provided from the American Recovery Investment Act (ARRA). Installation and validation of a Noncontact Stress Monitoring System (NSMS) for the 3-stage compressor was completed at the 11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The system, originally developed at AEDC, consists of 36 pairs of LED light sources with optic beam send and receive probes along a 1-per rev signal. The new system allows for continuous monitoring and recording of compressor blade bending and torsion stress during normal test operations. A very unusual test was completed in the 11 FT TWT to acquire aerodynamic and flow field data for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to validate CFD methods and tools. Surface pressure distribution measurements and velocity measurements in the wake of the command module back to the drogues parachute location were acquired. Testing methods included Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP), Schlieren Infrared Imaging (IR) and boundary layer survey and skin friction.

  13. STS-70 Mission Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The highlights of the STS-70 mission are presented in this video. The flight crew consisted of Cmdr. Tom Henricks, Pilot Kevin Kregel, Flight Engineer Nancy Currie, and Mission Specialists Dr. Don Thomas and Dr. Mary Ellen Weber. The mission's primary objective was the deployment of the 7th Tracking Data and Relay Satellite (TDRS), which will provide a communication, tracking, telemetry, data acquisition, and command services space-based network system essential to low Earth orbital spacecraft. Secondary mission objectives included activating and studying the Physiological and Anatomical Rodent Experiment/National Institutes of Health-Rodents (PARE/NIH-R), The Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS), the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG) studies, the Space Tissue Loss/National Institutes of Health-Cells (STL/NIH-C) experiment, the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) experiment, Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment-2 (SAREX-2), the Visual Function Tester-4 (VFT-4), the Hand-Held, Earth Oriented, Real-Time, Cooperative, User-Friendly, Location-Targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES), the Microcapsules in Space-B (MIS-B) experiment, the Windows Experiment (WINDEX), the Radiation Monitoring Equipment-3 (RME-3), and the Military Applications of Ship Tracks (MAST) experiment. There was an in-orbit dedication ceremony by the spacecrew and the newly Integrated Mission Control Center to commemorate the Center's integration. The STS-70 mission was the first mission monitored by this new control center. Earth views included the Earth's atmosphere, a sunrise over the Earth's horizon, several views of various land masses, some B/W lightning shots, some cloud cover, and a tropical storm.

  14. CITE 3 meteorological highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipham, Mark C.; Bachmeier, A. Scott; Anderson, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Meteorological highlights from the third NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (GTE/CITE 3) are presented. During August and September 1989, research flights were conducted from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, and included airborne sampling of air masses over adjacent regions of the Atlantic Ocean. Isentropic backward trajectory calculations, wind vector/streamline fields, rawinsonde data, and GOES and METEOSAT satellite imagery are utilized to examine the meteorological conditions for each flight and to determine the transport paths of the sampled air masses. Some aspects of the chemical signatures of the sampled air are also discussed. During the series of flights based at Wallops Island, Virginia, the flow into the experiment area was governed primarily by the position of the North Atlantic subtropical anticyclone. The large-scale tropospheric circulation switched from primarily a marine flow during flights 1-4, to a predominantly offshore mid-latitude continental flow during flights 5-10. During these later flights, the regional influences of large eastern U.S. cities along with vertical mixing by typical summertime convective activity strongly influenced the chemical characteristics of the sampled air. During the series of flights based at Natal, Brazil, the dominant synoptic feature was the South Atlantic subtropical anticyclone which generally transported air across the tropical Atlantic toward eastern Brazil. Pronounced subsidence and a well-defined trade wind inversion often characterized the lower and middle troposphere over the Natal region. Some high-altitude recirculation of air from South America was observed, as was cross-equatorial transport which had come from northern Africa. Biomass burning plumes were observed on segments of all of the flights, the source region being the central and southern savannah regions of Africa.

  15. Highlights of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  16. A Video Ethnography Approach for Linking Naturalistic Behaviors to Research Constructs of Neurocognition in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Elizabeth; Adams, Gail Fox; Brekke, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Few methods are available to explore the impact of neurocognition in schizophrenia on behaviors performed in usual contexts. The authors developed a video ethnography approach to examine the relationship between naturalistic behaviors and research constructs of neurocognition. Video ethnographers accompanied subjects through usual routines gathering continuous video data. Researchers developed codes to measure four behavioral domains observed on video. This paper describes the psychometric characteristics to be considered in the development of observational approaches. It also highlights differences between behaviors performed in usual environments and neuropsychological constructs. The authors demonstrate that everyday behaviors that have been shown to correspond to neurocognitive skills in a pilot feasibility study1 can be identified and rated. They further suggest that observational methods could provide novel strategies for linking research findings and clinical concerns. PMID:22772661

  17. Naturalistic and Experimental Analyses of Word Frequency and Neighborhood Density Effects in Slips of the Ear*

    PubMed Central

    Vitevitch, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of the lexical characteristics of 88 auditory misperceptions (i.e., slips of the ear) showed no difference in word-frequency, neighborhood density, and neighborhood frequency between the actual and the perceived utterances. Another comparison of slip of the ear tokens (i.e., actual and perceived utterances) and words in general (i.e., randomly selected from the lexicon) showed that slip of the ear tokens had denser neighborhoods and higher neighborhood frequency than words in general, as predicted from laboratory studies. Contrary to prediction, slip of the ear tokens were higher in frequency of occurrence than words in general. Additional laboratory-based investigations examined the possible source of the contradictory word frequency finding, highlighting the importance of using naturalistic and experimental data to develop models of spoken language processing. PMID:12866911

  18. ESO Highlights in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  19. Greco-Roman ethics and the naturalistic fantasy.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Brooke

    2014-09-01

    To modern scholars, the naturalistic fallacy looks out of place in Greco-Roman antiquity owing to the robust associations between nature, especially human nature, and moral norms. Yet nature was understood by ancient authors not only as a norm but also as a form of necessity. The Greco-Roman philosophical schools grappled with how to reconcile the idea that human nature is given with the idea that it is a goal to be reached. This essay looks at the Stoic concept of oikeiōsis as one strategy for effecting such a reconciliation. Drawing on natural history, these Stoic sources used examples of animal behavior to illustrate a process whereby nature "entrusts" all animals, including humans, with the care of their own survival. Nature is thus both what is given to the animal and what the animal achieves in a powerful but also problematic synthesis here called the "naturalistic fantasy".

  20. Foundations of Naturalistic Inquiry: Developing a Theory Base for Understanding Individual Interpretations of Reality. Research and Theory Division Symposium: Naturalistic Methodologies for Deriving Individual Meanings from Visuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koetting, J. Randall

    This symposium paper looks at three paradigms for naturalistic research on visuals: the positivistic, the interpretive, and the critical approaches. Discussion centers on questions of epistemology, such as "What do you mean?" and "How do you know?" The place of naturalistic inquiry within this discussion is indicated, and…

  1. Evaluating environmental education, citizen science, and stewardship through naturalist programs.

    PubMed

    Merenlender, Adina M; Crall, Alycia W; Drill, Sabrina; Prysby, Michelle; Ballard, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    Amateur naturalists have played an important role in the study and conservation of nature since the 17th century. Today, naturalist groups make important contributions to bridge the gap between conservation science and practice around the world. We examined data from 2 regional naturalist programs to understand participant motivations, barriers, and perspectives as well as the actions they take to advance science, stewardship, and community engagement. These programs provide certification-based natural history and conservation science training for adults that is followed by volunteer service in citizen science, education, and stewardship. Studies in California and Virginia include quantitative and qualitative evaluation data collected through pre- and postcourse surveys, interviews, and long-term tracking of volunteer hours. Motivations of participants focused on learning about the local environment and plants and animals, connecting with nature, becoming certified, and spending time with people who have similar interests. Over half the participants surveyed were over 50 years old, two-thirds were women, and a majority reported household incomes of over $50,000 (60% in California, 85% in Virginia), and <20% of those surveyed in both states described themselves as nonwhite. Thus, these programs need to improve participation by a wider spectrum of the public. We interviewed younger and underrepresented adults to examine barriers to participation in citizen science. The primary barrier was lack of time due to the need to work and focus on career advancement. Survey data revealed that participants' ecological knowledge, scientific skills, and belief in their ability to address environmental issues increased after training. Documented conservation actions taken by the participants include invasive plant management, habitat restoration, and cleanups of natural areas and streams. Long-term data from Virginia on volunteer hours dedicated to environmental citizen science

  2. American Pharmacists Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Booklet A tour booklet on the American Pharmacists Association headquarters. MORE Spotlight Highlight: Erica Tolle, PharmD Each ... Booklet A tour booklet on the American Pharmacists Association headquarters. MORE Popular Links APhM - American Pharmacists Month ...

  3. Human mesostriatal response tracks motivational tendencies under naturalistic goal conflict

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Tal; Soreq, Eyal; Eldar, Eran; Ben-Simon, Eti; Raz, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Goal conflict situations, involving the simultaneous presence of reward and punishment, occur commonly in real life, and reflect well-known individual differences in the behavioral tendency to approach or avoid. However, despite accumulating neural depiction of motivational processing, the investigation of naturalistic approach behavior and its interplay with individual tendencies is remarkably lacking. We developed a novel ecological interactive scenario which triggers motivational behavior under high or low goal conflict conditions. Fifty-five healthy subjects played the game during a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. A machine-learning approach was applied to classify approach/avoidance behaviors during the game. To achieve an independent measure of individual tendencies, an integrative profile was composed from three established theoretical models. Results demonstrated that approach under high relative to low conflict involved increased activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), peri-aquaductal gray, ventral striatum (VS) and precuneus. Notably, only VS and VTA activations during high conflict discriminated between approach/avoidance personality profiles, suggesting that the relationship between individual personality and naturalistic motivational tendencies is uniquely associated with the mesostriatal pathway. VTA–VS further demonstrated stronger coupling during high vs low conflict. These findings are the first to unravel the multilevel relationship among personality profile, approach tendencies in naturalistic set-up and their underlying neural manifestation, thus enabling new avenues for investigating approach-related psychopathologies. PMID:26833917

  4. The Need for a Cognitive Neuroscience of Naturalistic Social Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Jamil; Ochsner, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the minds of others is one of the great challenges humans face. Accordingly, much work in cognitive neuroscience has explored the brain systems engaged when perceivers share and make inferences about the internal states of social targets. These studies, however, typically use divergent and highly simplified stimuli and methods, and as a consequence have produced largely non-overlapping sets of results that have motivated artificially constrained theories about the processes involved in perceivers' abilities to understand targets. Here we suggest that these difficulties may stem from two main sources: the lack of meaningful behavioral data about the brain bases of perceivers' actual accuracy in inferring target states, and qualitative differences between the social stimuli used in neuroimaging paradigms and the social information perceivers encounter in the real world. We advocate more focus on studies of naturalistic social cognition, which could overcome these limitations and complement current approaches, and discuss work in our lab that has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of such paradigms. Finally, we discuss the relevance of naturalistic social cognition to diagnosing and treating autism spectrum disorder. Overall, using naturalistic paradigms in neuroimaging will be critical to modeling the way the brain actually understands other minds. PMID:19580548

  5. Highlighting Your Science to NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, C.

    2003-12-01

    An effort is underway to provide greater visibility within NASA headquarters, and to those who provide funding to NASA, of the outstanding work that is being performed by scientists involved in the Solar System Exploration Research and Analysis Programs, most of whom are DPS members. In support of this effort, a new feature has been developed for the NASA Headquarters Solar System Exploration Division web site whereby researchers can provide a synopsis of their current research results. The site (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/spotlight/ - Username: your email address Password: sse) is an online submission area where NASA-funded scientists can upload the results of their research. There they provide their contact information, briefly describe their research, and upload any associated images or graphics. The information is available to a limited number of reviewers and writers at JPL. Each month, one researcher's work will be chosen as a science spotlight. After a writer interviews the scientist, a brief Power Point presentation that encapsulates their work will be given to Dr. Colleen Hartman at NASA headquarters. She will then present the exciting findings to Associate Administrator for Space Science, Dr. Ed Weiler. The information from some of these highlights can serve as a basis to bring Principal Investigators to NASA Headquarters for exposure to media through Space Science Updates on NASA television. In addition, the science results may also be incorporated into briefing material for the Office of Management and Budget and congressional staffers. Some spotlights will also be converted into feature stories for the Solar System Exploration website so the public, too, can learn about exciting new research. The site, http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/, is one of NASA's most visited. Over the past decade, there has been a trend of flat budgets for Research and Analysis activities. By giving more visibility to results of Solar System research, our goal is to encourage

  6. Highlights.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    BELGIUM ITALY Coordonnateur AGARD VSL • Aeronautica Militare Etat-Major de la Force Airienne Ufficio del Delegato Nazionale all’AGARD Quartier Reine...past ten years. Medico /clinical aspects. - Physiology/psychophysiology aspects. * 33 *- Engineering/crash worthiness aspects. - Life support/escape...aspects. - Medico -legal/pathology aspects. It is anticipated that the audience will be operational staff, both general officers and field grade officers

  7. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are "The Teaching of Euclid" by Bertrand Russell, an article on integrals by G. H. Hardy, "An Address on Relativity" by A. S. Eddington, "The Food of the Gods" by Prof. E. H. Neville, and "Simplicity and Truthfulness in Arithmetic" by W. Hope-Jones. (CT)

  8. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are "The Teaching of Euclid" by Bertrand Russell, an article on integrals by G. H. Hardy, "An Address on Relativity" by A. S. Eddington, "The Food of the Gods" by Prof. E. H. Neville, and "Simplicity and Truthfulness in Arithmetic" by W. Hope-Jones. (CT)

  9. Parkinson's disease compromises the appraisal of action meanings evoked by naturalistic texts.

    PubMed

    García, Adolfo M; Bocanegra, Yamile; Herrera, Elena; Moreno, Leonardo; Carmona, Jairo; Baena, Ana; Lopera, Francisco; Pineda, David; Melloni, Margherita; Legaz, Agustina; Muñoz, Edinson; Sedeño, Lucas; Baez, Sandra; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2017-07-17

    The linguistic profile of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by difficulties in processing units which denote bodily movements. However, the available evidence has low ecological validity, as it stems from atomistic tasks which are never encountered in real life. Here, we assessed whether such deficits also occur for meanings evoked by context-rich narratives, considering patients with and without mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI and PD-nMCI, respectively) and matched controls for each group. Participants read two naturalistic stories (an action text and a neutral text) and responded to questions tapping the appraisal of verb-related and circumstantial information. In PD-MCI, impairments in the appraisal of action meanings emerged alongside difficulties in other categories, but they were unique in their independence from general cognitive dysfunction. However, in PD-nMCI, deficits were observed only for action meanings, irrespective of the patients' domain-general skills (executive functions and general cognitive state). Also, using multiple group discriminant function analyses, we found that appraisal of action meanings was the only discourse-level variable that robustly contributed to classifying PD-MCI patients from controls (with an accuracy of 88% for all participants and for each sample separately). Moreover, this variable actually superseded a sensitive executive battery in discriminating between PD-nMCI and controls (with a combined accuracy of 83% for all participants, correctly classifying 79.2% of patients and 87.5% of controls). In sum, action appraisal deficits seem to constitute both a hallmark of naturalistic discourse processing in PD and a sensitive subject-level marker for patients with and without MCI. Such findings highlight the relevance of ecological measures of embodied cognitive functions in the assessment of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On the Influence of Naturalism on American Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaofen

    2010-01-01

    Naturalism was first proposed and formulated by French novelist Emile Zola, and it was introduced to America by American novelist Frank Norris. It is a new and harsher realism. It is a theory in literature emphasizing scientific observation of life without idealism or avoidance of the ugly. American literature naturalists dismissed the validity of…

  11. Recording and automated analysis of naturalistic bioptic driving

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Purpose People with moderate central vision loss are legally permitted to drive with a bioptic telescope in 39 US states and the Netherlands, but the safety of bioptic driving remains highly controversial. There is no scientific evidence about bioptic use and its impact on safety. We propose searching for evidence by recording naturalistic driving activities in patients' cars. Methods In a pilot study we used an analogue video system to record two bioptic drivers' daily driving activities for 10 and 5 days, respectively. In this technical report, we also describe our novel digital system that collects vehicle maneuver information and enables recording over more extended periods, and discuss our approach to analyzing the vast amount of data. Results Our observations of telescope use by the pilot subjects were quite different from their reports in a previous survey. One subject used the telescope only 7 times in nearly 6 hours of driving. For the other subject, the average interval between telescope use was about 2 minutes, and cell phone use in one trip extended the interval to almost 5 minutes. We demonstrate that computerized analysis of lengthy recordings based on video, GPS, acceleration, and black box data can be used to select informative segments for efficient off-line review of naturalistic driving behaviors. Conclusions The inconsistency between self reports and objective data as well as infrequent telescope use underscores the importance of recording bioptic driving behaviors in naturalistic conditions over extended periods. We argue that the new recording system is important for understanding bioptic use behaviors and bioptic driving safety. PMID:21410498

  12. Affective State Level Recognition in Naturalistic Facial and Vocal Expressions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongying; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2014-03-01

    Naturalistic affective expressions change at a rate much slower than the typical rate at which video or audio is recorded. This increases the probability that consecutive recorded instants of expressions represent the same affective content. In this paper, we exploit such a relationship to improve the recognition performance of continuous naturalistic affective expressions. Using datasets of naturalistic affective expressions (AVEC 2011 audio and video dataset, PAINFUL video dataset) continuously labeled over time and over different dimensions, we analyze the transitions between levels of those dimensions (e.g., transitions in pain intensity level). We use an information theory approach to show that the transitions occur very slowly and hence suggest modeling them as first-order Markov models. The dimension levels are considered to be the hidden states in the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework. Their discrete transition and emission matrices are trained by using the labels provided with the training set. The recognition problem is converted into a best path-finding problem to obtain the best hidden states sequence in HMMs. This is a key difference from previous use of HMMs as classifiers. Modeling of the transitions between dimension levels is integrated in a multistage approach, where the first level performs a mapping between the affective expression features and a soft decision value (e.g., an affective dimension level), and further classification stages are modeled as HMMs that refine that mapping by taking into account the temporal relationships between the output decision labels. The experimental results for each of the unimodal datasets show overall performance to be significantly above that of a standard classification system that does not take into account temporal relationships. In particular, the results on the AVEC 2011 audio dataset outperform all other systems presented at the international competition.

  13. Recording and automated analysis of naturalistic bioptic driving.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2011-05-01

    People with moderate central vision loss are legally permitted to drive with a bioptic telescope in 39 US states and the Netherlands, but the safety of bioptic driving remains highly controversial. There is no scientific evidence about bioptic use and its impact on safety. We propose searching for evidence by recording naturalistic driving activities in patients' cars. In a pilot study we used an analogue video system to record two bioptic drivers' daily driving activities for 10 and 5 days, respectively. In this technical report, we also describe our novel digital system that collects vehicle manoeuvre information and enables recording over more extended periods, and discuss our approach to analyzing the vast amount of data. Our observations of telescope use by the pilot subjects were quite different from their reports in a previous survey. One subject used the telescope only seven times in nearly 6 h of driving. For the other subject, the average interval between telescope use was about 2 min, and Mobile (cell) phone use in one trip extended the interval to almost 5 min. We demonstrate that computerized analysis of lengthy recordings based on video, GPS, acceleration, and black box data can be used to select informative segments for efficient off-line review of naturalistic driving behaviours. The inconsistency between self reports and objective data as well as infrequent telescope use underscores the importance of recording bioptic driving behaviours in naturalistic conditions over extended periods. We argue that the new recording system is important for understanding bioptic use behaviours and bioptic driving safety. © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  14. Imperial science: a naturalist in the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Schefke, Brian

    2008-09-01

    British imperial expansion opened up new worlds for naturalists to collect and catalogue many species of plants and animals unknown in Europe. David Douglas' travels to the northwest region of North America in the 1820s exemplified, in many ways, the science of empire. Under the aegis of the Hudson's Bay Company, the main representative of British influence in the Northwest, Douglas was able to journey throughout the region and collect a significant number of plants that found their way into British gardens. Yet Douglas was not only a collector aided by imperial institutions, but also, through his expertise, an agent of imperialism.

  15. From ought to is physics and the naturalistic fallacy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries there were many attempts to justify political and social systems on the basis of physics and astronomy. By the early twentieth century such moves increasingly also integrated the life and social sciences. The physical sciences gradually became less appealing as a sole source for sociopolitical thought. The details of this transition help explain the contemporary reluctance to capitalize on an ostensibly rich opportunity for naturalistic social reasoning: the anthropic principle in cosmology, which deals with the apparent "fine-tuning" of the universe for life.

  16. Clinical Trials Update: CAPRICORN, COPERNICUS, MIRACLE, STAF, RITZ-2, RECOVER and RENAISSANCE and cachexia and cholesterol in heart failure. Highlights of the Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology, 2001.

    PubMed

    Louis, A; Cleland, J G; Crabbe, S; Ford, S; Thackray, S; Houghton, T; Clark, A

    2001-06-01

    This is a synopsis of presentations made at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) in 2001 summarising recent research developments relating to heart failure. Clinical studies of particular interest to physicians with an interest in heart failure and its prevention are reviewed. The COPERNICUS trial lends further support to the use of the beta-blocker, carvedilol, in severe heart failure and the CAPRICORN trial to its use in patients with post-infarction left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The MIRACLE study reinforces the evidence from three smaller trials that cardiac resynchronisation therapy is an effective treatment for the relief of symptoms in patients with severe heart failure and cardiac dyssynchrony. The STAF trial casts further doubt on the wisdom of cardioversion as a routine strategy for the management of chronic atrial fibrillation. The RITZ-2 trial suggests that an intravenous, non-selective endothelin antagonist is effective in improving haemodynamics and symptoms and possibly in reducing morbidity in severe heart failure. Observational studies in heart failure suggest that a moderate excess of body fat and elevated blood cholesterol may be desirable in patients with heart failure, challenging the current non-evidenced-based vogue for cholesterol lowering therapy in heart failure. The RENAISSANCE and RECOVER outcome studies of etanercept, a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor analogue that blocks the effect of TNF, were stopped because of lack of evidence of benefit shortly after the ACC.

  17. On the use of naturalistic methods to examine safety-relevant behaviours amongst children and evaluate a cycling education program.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, J; Dozza, M; Patton, D A; Maharaj, P; Boufous, S; Eveston, T

    2017-11-01

    School-based cycling education programs aim to improve cycling safety and participation amongst children. Available research suggests that typical programs, which focus on bicycle manoeuvring skills, have limited effects on behaviour observed on a track or planned route. The current study uses theoretically more valid, naturalistic cycling data, to evaluate Safe Cycle, a program that incorporates hazard and self-awareness training. Soon after Safe Cycle was delivered at treatment schools, research bicycles instrumented with a rearward- and a forward-facing camera were loaned to six children from treatment schools and six children from (waitlist) control schools. In each group half the children were in Year 6, and half were in Year 7/8. Each child was instructed to ride the research bicycle instead of their own bicycle for the 1-2 weeks that they had a research bicycle. Video data were reduced using a purpose-designed coding scheme that identified whether participants performed specific safety-relevant behaviours in appropriate circumstances. While the participants controlled their bicycles well, gave way appropriately to traffic at intersections, and stopped at red lights, participants frequently removed one or both hands from the handlebars, and seldom signalled turns, conducted over-shoulder-checks when changing lanes, or looked in multiple directions at intersections (except when crossing a road). While aspects of design and small sample sizes limited evaluation findings, this research demonstrated the feasibility and potential of naturalistic data to support cycling education program evaluation. Further, the study substantially extended available naturalistic study of children's cycling behaviour to highlight behaviours which might be targeted by cycling safety initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Naturalistic measures of prospective memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Delprado, Jacinta; Kinsella, Glynda; Ong, Ben; Pike, Kerryn

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have now reported that individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are impaired on laboratory-based measures of prospective memory (PM). However, the age-PM paradox has revealed that impairment observed in the laboratory does not necessarily reflect functioning in day-to-day life. The current study examined naturalistic measures of PM by comparing participants with aMCI to healthy older adults on experimenter-introduced PM tasks (Experiment 1) and on participants' own, self-generated PM tasks (Experiment 2). Individuals with aMCI were found to be globally impaired on each of the naturalistic measures of PM Strategy use was found to be a distinguishing feature between the two groups with healthy older adults using more written strategies, whereas individuals with aMCI relied more on another person providing a reminder. Also of note was that both groups only used strategies around half the time for their own PM tasks. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for interventions and the day-to-day functioning of individuals with aMCI, a population that is struggling to maintain independence in the community. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Naturalistic rapid deceleration data: Drivers aged 75 years and older.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Anna; Chevalier, Aran John; Clarke, Elizabeth; Coxon, Kristy; Brown, Julie; Rogers, Kris; Boufous, Soufiane; Ivers, Rebecca; Keay, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research manuscript "Predictors of older drivers' involvement in rapid deceleration events", which investigates potential predictors of older drivers' involvement in rapid deceleration events including measures of vision, cognitive function and driving confidence (A. Chevalier et al., 2016) [1]. In naturalistic driving studies such as this, when sample size is not large enough to allow crashes to be used to investigate driver safety, rapid deceleration events may be used as a surrogate safety measure. Naturalistic driving data were collected for up to 52 weeks from 182 volunteer drivers aged 75-94 years (median 80 years, 52% male) living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Accelerometer data were recorded 32 times per second and Global Positioning System (GPS) data each second. To measure rapid deceleration behavior, rapid deceleration events (RDEs) were defined as having at least one data point at or above the deceleration threshold of 750 milli-g (7.35 m/s(2)). All events were constrained to a maximum 5 s duration. The dataset provided with this article contains 473 events, with a row per RDE. This article also contains information about data processing, treatment and quality control. The methods and data presented here may assist with planning and analysis of future studies into rapid deceleration behaviour using in-vehicle monitoring.

  20. Naturalistic Enactment to Elicit and Recognize Caregiver State Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Darien; Favela, Jesus; Ibarra, Catalina; Cruz, Netzahualcoyotl

    2016-09-01

    Caring for people with dementia imposes significant stress on family members and caregivers. Often, these informal caregivers have no coping strategy to deal with these behaviors. Anxiety and stress episodes are often triggered by problematic behaviors exhibited by the person who suffers from dementia. Detecting these behaviors could help them in dealing with them and reduce caregiver burden. However, work on anxiety detection using physiological signals has mostly been done under controlled conditions. In this paper we describe an experiment aimed at inducing anxiety among caregivers of people with dementia under naturalistic conditions. We report an experiment, using the naturalistic enactment technique, in which 10 subjects were asked to care for an older adult who acts as if she experiences dementia. We record physiological signals from the participants (GSR, HR, EEG) during the sessions that lasted for approximately 30 min. We explain how we obtained ground truth from self-report and observation data. We conducted two different tests using the Support Vector Machine technique. We obtained an average precision of 77.8 % and 38.1 % recall when classifying two different possible states: "Anxious" and "Not anxious". Analysis of the data provides evidence that the experiment elicits state anxiety and that it can be detected using wearable sensors. Furthermore, if episodes of problematic behaviors can also be detected, the recognition of anxiety in the caregiver can be improved, leading to the enactment of appropriate interventions to help caregivers cope with anxiety episodes.

  1. Measuring mimicry: general corticospinal facilitation during observation of naturalistic behaviour.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, J E; Sacheli, L M; Bekkering, H; Toni, I; Aglioti, S M

    2017-07-01

    Mimicry of others' postures and behaviours forms an implicit yet indispensable component of social interactions. However, whereas numerous behavioural studies have investigated the occurrence of mimicry and its social sensitivity, the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure corticospinal facilitation during a naturalistic behaviour observation task adapted from the behavioural mimicry literature. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in participants' right hands were measured as they observed stimulus videos of a confederate describing photographs. MEPs were recorded while confederates were and were not carrying out hand and leg behaviours that also differed in spatial extent (i.e. large behaviours: face rubbing and leg crossing; small behaviours: finger tapping and foot bouncing). Importantly, the cover task instructions did not refer to the behaviours but instead required participants to focus on the confederates' photograph descriptions in order to later perform a recognition test. A general arousal effect was found, with higher MEPs during stimulus video observation than during a fixation-cross baseline, regardless of whether or not the confederate was carrying out a behaviour at the time of the pulse. When controlling for this general arousal effect, results showed that MEPs during observation of the larger two behaviours were significantly higher than the smaller two behaviours, irrespective of effector. Thus, using a controlled yet naturalistic paradigm, this study suggests that general sensorimotor arousal during social interactions could play a role in implicit behavioural mimicry. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Defining and screening crash surrogate events using naturalistic driving data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun-Feng; Jovanis, Paul P

    2013-12-01

    Naturalistic driving studies provide an excellent opportunity to better understand crash causality and to supplement crash observations with a much larger number of near crash events. The goal of this research is the development of a set of diagnostic procedures to define, screen, and identify crash and near crash events that can be used in enhanced safety analyses. A way to better understand crash occurrence and identify potential countermeasures to improve safety is to learn from and use near crash events, particularly those near crashes that have a common etiology to crash outcomes. This paper demonstrates that a multi-stage modeling framework can be used to search through naturalistic driving data, extracting statistically similar crashes and near crashes. The procedure is tested using data from the VTTI 100-car study for road departure events. A total of 63 events are included in this application. While the sample size is limited in this empirical study, the authors believe the procedure is ready for testing in other applications.

  3. On a naturalist theory of health: a critique.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J David

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines the most influential naturalist theory of health, Christopher Boorse's 'biostatistical theory' (BST). I argue that the BST is an unsuitable candidate for the rôle that Boorse has cast it to play, namely, to underpin medicine with a theoretical, value-free science of health and disease. Following the literature, I distinguish between "real" changes and "mere Cambridge changes" in terms of the difference between an individual's intrinsic and relational properties and argue that the framework of the BST essentially implies a Cambridge-change criterion. The examination reveals that this implicit criterion commits the BST to the troubling view that an individual could go from being diseased to healthy, or vice versa, without any physiological change in that individual. Two problems follow: (1) the current framework of the BST is ill-equipped to formally embrace Cambridge changes and (2) it is theoretically dubious. The arguments advanced here are not limited to the BST; I suggest they extend to any naturalist claim to underpin medical practice with a value-free theory of health and disease defined in terms of an evolutionary view of biological fitness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A qualified defence of a naturalist theory of health.

    PubMed

    Schramme, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The paper contrasts Lennart Nordenfelt's normative theory of health with the naturalists' point of view, especially in the version developed by Christopher Boorse. In the first part it defends Boorse's analysis of disease against the charge that it falls short of its own standards by not being descriptive. The second part of the paper sets out to analyse the positive concept of health and introduces a distinction between a positive definition of health ('health' is not defined as absence of disease but in positive terms) and a positive conception of health (health is seen as an ideal). An objection against Nordenfelt's account is developed by making use of a specific example of an ambitious athlete. It is stated that Nordenfelt's conceptualisation includes too many phenomena under the umbrella of ill health. An ideal conception of health like Nordenfelt's is in danger of supporting medicalization. In conclusion, although Nordenfelt's theory is not altogether rejected and even seen in congruence with Boorse's account, it is claimed that the naturalistic framework should obtain conceptual priority.

  5. Atmospheric Research 2011 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of Atmospheric Research. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  6. Guba as a Vanguard of Naturalistic Inquiry: A Harbinger of the Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoong, Suan

    Egon G. Guba and Yvonna S. Lincoln were among the first to develop a set of extensive criteria for establishing naturalistic inquiry as a disciplined research methodology. The naturalistic paradigm--also called post-positivist, ethnographic, phenomenological, and qualitative--has gained acceptance as a legitimate alternative to the previously…

  7. Naturalistic Inquiry and the Assessment of Young Handicapped Children and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L.; Shuster, Susan K.

    1986-01-01

    Naturalistic inquiry is an alternative to traditional assessment and experimental methodologies for measuring the effects of early intervention programs with young handicapped children. Discussion focuses on (1) the inductive nature of the naturalistic method; (2) potential strengths and weaknesses; (3) procedures for data collection. (Author/JW)

  8. A Preliminary Guide for Conducting Naturalistic Evaluation in Studying Museum Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Robert L.; Tymitz, Barbara L.

    This document presents guidelines for use by museum staff members as they evaluate their institutional capabilities and programs. Guidelines are based on a new evaluation perspective--naturalistic evaluation--which can help museum staff assess their programs in a more interpretative, less judgmental way. Naturalistic evaluation is characterized by…

  9. Clinical trials update: highlights of the scientific sessions of the American Heart Association year 2000: Val HeFT, COPERNICUS, MERIT, CIBIS-II, BEST, AMIOVIRT, V-MAC, BREATHE, HEAT, MIRACL, FLORIDA, VIVA and the first human cardiac skeletal muscle myoblast transfer for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Thackray, S D; Witte, K K; Khand, A; Dunn, A; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-01-01

    This article continues a series of reports summarising recent research developments pertinent to the topic of heart failure. This is a summary of presentations made at scientific sessions of the American Heart Association in November 2000. Clinical studies of particular interest to people caring for patients with heart failure include Val-HeFT, AMIOVIRT and V-MAC. New data from beta-blockers trials are reviewed, highlights from some important developments in post-infarction care, including MIRACL and FLORIDA, discussed and results of some early studies of gene therapy reported.

  10. Identities and motives of naturalist development program attendees and their relation to professional careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mraz, Jennifer Arin

    In recent years, there has been much concern over the decline of biologists who actually identify themselves to be naturalists, which negatively impacts the field of conservation and the study of biology as a whole. This could result in a decrease in individuals who participate in naturalist-like activities, such as informal environmental education and environmental volunteerism. The purpose of my study was to determine what discourse identities were held by naturalist development program participants, how these discourse identities related to their volunteer motives in environmental settings, and how discourse identity related to professional careers. I defined identity through the lens of discourse-identity, which describes a person's identity as being conveyed through that individual's communication and actions. I conducted individual interviews or used an online questionnaire to ask questions to naturalist development program attendees about their workshop experience, relationship with nature, volunteer motives and activities, as well as professional career or career aspiration. Volunteer motives were quantitatively measured in both types of program participants using the published Volunteer Motivation Questionnaire. Overall, I found that 100 study participants had six discourse identities: naturalist (n = 27), aspiring naturalist ( n = 32), nature steward (n = 5), outreach volunteer (n = 6), casual nature observer (n = 22), and recreational nature user (n = 8). Naturalist development programs should focus on developing more naturalist-like discourse identities in their participants to help encourage participation in naturalist activities. Volunteer motives were ranked by importance to participants in the following order: helping the environment, learning, user, project organization, values and esteem, social, and career. The majority of Master Naturalist Program study participants that stated a career were in non-STEM careers; however, the majority of

  11. Science of the Particular: An Advocacy of Naturalistic Case Study in Health Research.

    PubMed

    Abma, Tineke A; Stake, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Case studies can provide us with in-depth understanding of a single demarcated entity. Cases can be corporations and clinics, but are usually people. There are several approaches to case study. Naturalistic case study constitutes the science of the particular. The aim of naturalistic case study is to understand with minimum intervention the particularity of a case in its ordinary situation from multiple perspectives. Naturalistic case study relies on a humanistic commitment to study the world from the human perspective. The purpose here is to illuminate how five key features of naturalistic case study can be used in health research. Case studies are of use in various disciplines. In this article we show that the naturalistic case study can have extraordinary value in health research, and is useful from a variety of perspectives. We do so by presenting a case report of a 92-year-old resident moving to a care center.

  12. LGBT survey highlights regional divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2016-05-01

    A third of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) members of the physics community have considered quitting their workplace or university in the last year, according to a report by the American Physical Society (APS).

  13. Informal schooling and problem-solving skills in second-grade science: A naturalistic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Georgia Inez Hunt

    The influence of informal schooling on the problem solving skills of urban elementary school children is unclear. The relationship between culture and problem solving can be studied using subjective methodologies, particularly when investigating problem solving strategies that are culturally situated. Yet, little research has been conducted to investigate how informal learning of African American children are integrated as part of the problem solving used in school. This study has been designed to expand the existing literature in this area. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore how 15 African American children attending school in Southwest Philadelphia solve problems presented to them in second grade science. This was accomplished by assessing their ability to observe, classify, recall, and perceive space/time relationships. Think-aloud protocols were used for this examination. A naturalistic approach to the investigation was implemented. Individual children were selected because he or she exhibited unique and subjective characteristics associated with individual approaches to problem solving. Children responded to three tasks: interviews of their parents, an essay on community gardens, and a group diorama collaboratively designed. Content analysis was used to infer themes that were evident in the children's work and that revealed the extent to which informal schooling influenced solutions to a community garden problem. The investigations did increase the researcher's ability to understand and build upon the understanding of African American children in their indigenous community. The study also demonstrated how these same strategies can be used to involve parents in the science curriculum. Additionally, the researcher gained insight on how to bridge the gap between home, community, and school.

  14. Coding Early Naturalists' Accounts into Long-Term Fish Community Changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800–2000)

    PubMed Central

    Fortibuoni, Tomaso; Libralato, Simone; Raicevich, Saša; Giovanardi, Otello; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of fish communities' changes over the past centuries has important implications for conservation policy and marine resource management. However, reconstructing these changes is difficult because information on marine communities before the second half of the 20th century is, in most cases, anecdotal and merely qualitative. Therefore, historical qualitative records and modern quantitative data are not directly comparable, and their integration for long-term analyses is not straightforward. We developed a methodology that allows the coding of qualitative information provided by early naturalists into semi-quantitative information through an intercalibration with landing proportions. This approach allowed us to reconstruct and quantitatively analyze a 200-year-long time series of fish community structure indicators in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea). Our analysis provides evidence of long-term changes in fish community structure, including the decline of Chondrichthyes, large-sized and late-maturing species. This work highlights the importance of broadening the time-frame through which we look at marine ecosystem changes and provides a methodology to exploit, in a quantitative framework, historical qualitative sources. To the purpose, naturalists' eyewitness accounts proved to be useful for extending the analysis on fish community back in the past, well before the onset of field-based monitoring programs. PMID:21103349

  15. Children's Environmental Health 2008 Highlights

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, eighth in an annual series from the Office of Children's Health Protection and Environmental Education, highlights the Agency's recent work on protecting the health of children by addressing the environments where they live, learn and play.

  16. GHGRP Yearly Overview Data Highlights

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  17. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  18. Research and technology highlights, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities supported by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. This report also describes some of the Center's most important research and testing facilities.

  19. Crew collaboration in space: a naturalistic decision-making perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Successful long-duration space missions will depend on the ability of crewmembers to respond promptly and effectively to unanticipated problems that arise under highly stressful conditions. Naturalistic decision making (NDM) exploits the knowledge and experience of decision makers in meaningful work domains, especially complex sociotechnical systems, including aviation and space. Decision making in these ambiguous, dynamic, high-risk environments is a complex task that involves defining the nature of the problem and crafting a response to achieve one's goals. Goal conflicts, time pressures, and uncertain outcomes may further complicate the process. This paper reviews theory and research pertaining to the NDM model and traces some of the implications for space crews and other groups that perform meaningful work in extreme environments. It concludes with specific recommendations for preparing exploration crews to use NDM effectively.

  20. A naturalistic decision making model for simulated human combatants

    SciTech Connect

    HUNTER,KEITH O.; HART,WILLIAM E.; FORSYTHE,JAMES C.

    2000-05-01

    The authors describe a naturalistic behavioral model for the simulation of small unit combat. This model, Klein's recognition-primed decision making (RPD) model, is driven by situational awareness rather than a rational process of selecting from a set of action options. They argue that simulated combatants modeled with RPD will have more flexible and realistic responses to a broad range of small-scale combat scenarios. Furthermore, they note that the predictability of a simulation using an RPD framework can be easily controlled to provide multiple evaluations of a given combat scenario. Finally, they discuss computational issues for building an RPD-based behavior engine for fully automated combatants in small conflict scenarios, which are being investigated within Sandia's Next Generation Site Security project.

  1. Developmental changes in infant brain activity during naturalistic social experiences.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily J H; Venema, Kaitlin; Lowy, Rachel; Earl, Rachel K; Webb, Sara Jane

    2015-11-01

    Between 6 and 12 months, typically developing infants undergo a socio-cognitive "revolution." The Interactive Specialization (IS) theory of brain development predicts that these behavioral changes will be underpinned by developmental increases in the power and topographic extent of socially selective cortical responses. To test this hypothesis, we used EEG to examine developmental changes in cortical selectivity for ecologically valid dynamic social versus non-social stimuli in a large cohort of 6- and 12-month-old infants. Consistent with the Interactive Specialization model, results showed that differences in EEG Θ activity between social and non-social stimuli became more pronounced and widespread with age. Differences in EEG activity were most clearly elicited by a live naturalistic interaction, suggesting that measuring brain activity in ecologically valid contexts is central to mapping social brain development in infancy.

  2. Crew collaboration in space: a naturalistic decision-making perspective.

    PubMed

    Orasanu, Judith

    2005-06-01

    Successful long-duration space missions will depend on the ability of crewmembers to respond promptly and effectively to unanticipated problems that arise under highly stressful conditions. Naturalistic decision making (NDM) exploits the knowledge and experience of decision makers in meaningful work domains, especially complex sociotechnical systems, including aviation and space. Decision making in these ambiguous, dynamic, high-risk environments is a complex task that involves defining the nature of the problem and crafting a response to achieve one's goals. Goal conflicts, time pressures, and uncertain outcomes may further complicate the process. This paper reviews theory and research pertaining to the NDM model and traces some of the implications for space crews and other groups that perform meaningful work in extreme environments. It concludes with specific recommendations for preparing exploration crews to use NDM effectively.

  3. On the number of perceivable blur levels in naturalistic images.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher Patrick; Bex, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Blur is a useful cue for depth. Natural images contain objects at a range of depths whose depth can be signaled by their perceived blur. Here, to evaluate the usefulness of blur as a depth cue, we estimate the number blur levels that observers can perceive simultaneously. To estimate this value, observers discriminated and classified dead leaves patterns that contained a controlled distribution of blur levels but are more complex or naturalistic than stimuli typically used in blur research. We used a 2-IFC discrimination task, in which observers reported the interval that contained more blur levels and a classification task, in which observers reported the number of perceived blur levels. In both tasks, observers could not discriminate or classify more than four levels of blur in the stimulus reliably. In isolation from other cues, blur may provide only a coarse cue to depth and add limited depth information when present in natural scenes with complex distributions of blur and multiple depth cues.

  4. Adolescent Eating Disorders: Treatment and Response in a Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Boisseau, Christina L.; Satir, Dana A.

    2014-01-01

    This naturalistic study investigated the treatment and outcome of adolescents with eating disorders (EDs) in the community. Clinicians from a practice-research network provided data on ED symptoms, global functioning, comorbidity, treatment, and outcome for 120 adolescents with EDs. ED “not otherwise specified” was the most common ED diagnosed. After an average of 8 months of treatment, about one third of patients had recovered, with patients with anorexia nervosa showing the most improvement. Clinicians utilized a range of psychotherapy interventions and two thirds of the patients had received adjunct psychoactive medication. Although CBT showed the strongest association with outcome in a subsample characterized by poor relational/personality functioning, dynamic therapy was associated with better global outcome in the overall sample. PMID:19938166

  5. [Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878) physician and passionate naturalist].

    PubMed

    van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2010-01-01

    Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878), born in a modest family, made his career as a naturalist and military physician in the Dutch East Indies (1842-1860). He maintained a lively correspondence with Auguste Duméril (Paris). Many scientific museums were eagerly looking forward to receiving parts of his splendid collections of tropical fishes. His "Atlas Ichthyologique des Indes Orientales Néerlandaises" was published between 1862 and 1877. His efforts, in the field of ichthyology and tropical medicine, rendered him two doctorates honoris causa (Leyden University--1846; Utrecht University--1849). In 1855 he was elected member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1856 he was elected correspondent of the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (Paris). In January 1864 he received the knighthood of the "Légion d'honneur" of the French empire.

  6. Crew collaboration in space: a naturalistic decision-making perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Successful long-duration space missions will depend on the ability of crewmembers to respond promptly and effectively to unanticipated problems that arise under highly stressful conditions. Naturalistic decision making (NDM) exploits the knowledge and experience of decision makers in meaningful work domains, especially complex sociotechnical systems, including aviation and space. Decision making in these ambiguous, dynamic, high-risk environments is a complex task that involves defining the nature of the problem and crafting a response to achieve one's goals. Goal conflicts, time pressures, and uncertain outcomes may further complicate the process. This paper reviews theory and research pertaining to the NDM model and traces some of the implications for space crews and other groups that perform meaningful work in extreme environments. It concludes with specific recommendations for preparing exploration crews to use NDM effectively.

  7. Adolescent eating disorders: treatment and response in a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Boisseau, Christina L; Satir, Dana A

    2010-03-01

    This naturalistic study investigated the treatment and outcome of adolescents with eating disorders (EDs) in the community. Clinicians from a practice-research network provided data on ED symptoms, global functioning, comorbidity, treatment, and outcome for 120 adolescents with EDs. ED "not otherwise specified" was the most common ED diagnosed. After an average of 8 months of treatment, about one third of patients had recovered, with patients with anorexia nervosa showing the most improvement. Clinicians utilized a range of psychotherapy interventions and two thirds of the patients had received adjunct psychoactive medication. Although CBT showed the strongest association with outcome in a subsample characterized by poor relational/personality functioning, dynamic therapy was associated with better global outcome in the overall sample. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Foot placement during error and pedal applications in naturalistic driving.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqing; Boyle, Linda Ng; McGehee, Daniel; Roe, Cheryl A; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Foley, James

    2017-02-01

    Data from a naturalistic driving study was used to examine foot placement during routine foot pedal movements and possible pedal misapplications. The study included four weeks of observations from 30 drivers, where pedal responses were recorded and categorized. The foot movements associated with pedal misapplications and errors were the focus of the analyses. A random forest algorithm was used to predict the pedal application types based the video observations, foot placements, drivers' characteristics, drivers' cognitive function levels and anthropometric measurements. A repeated multinomial logit model was then used to estimate the likelihood of the foot placement given various driver characteristics and driving scenarios. The findings showed that prior foot location, the drivers' seat position, and the drive sequence were all associated with incorrect foot placement during an event. The study showed that there is a potential to develop a driver assistance system that can reduce the likelihood of a pedal error.

  9. Naturalistic assessment of demand for cigarettes, snus, and nicotine gum.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jeffrey S; Wilson, A George; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Judd, Michael C; Bickel, Warren K

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral economic measures of demand provide estimates of tobacco product abuse liability and may predict effects of policy-related price regulation on consumption of existing and emerging tobacco products. In the present study, we examined demand for snus, a smokeless tobacco product, in comparison to both cigarettes and medicinal nicotine. We used both a naturalistic method in which participants purchased these products for use outside the laboratory, as well as laboratory-based self-administration procedures. Cigarette smokers (N = 42) used an experimental income to purchase their usual brand of cigarettes and either snus or gum (only one product available per session) across a range of prices, while receiving all products they purchased from one randomly selected price. In a separate portion of the study, participants self-administered these products during laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions. Demand elasticity (sensitivity of purchasing to price) was significantly greater for snus than cigarettes. Elasticity for gum was intermediate between snus and cigarettes but was not significantly different than either. Demand intensity (purchasing unconstrained by price) was significantly lower for gum compared to cigarettes, with no significant difference observed between snus and cigarettes. Results of the laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions were generally discordant with measures of demand elasticity, with significantly higher "breakpoints" for cigarettes compared to gum and no significant differences between other study products. Moreover, breakpoints and product purchasing were generally uncorrelated across tasks. Under naturalistic conditions, snus appears more sensitive to price manipulation than either cigarettes or nicotine gum in existing smokers.

  10. Individual differences in functional connectivity during naturalistic viewing conditions.

    PubMed

    Vanderwal, Tamara; Eilbott, Jeffrey; Finn, Emily S; Craddock, R Cameron; Turnbull, Adam; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2017-08-15

    Naturalistic viewing paradigms such as movies have been shown to reduce participant head motion and improve arousal during fMRI scanning relative to task-free rest, and have been used to study both functional connectivity and stimulus-evoked BOLD-signal changes. These task-based hemodynamic changes are synchronized across subjects and involve large areas of the cortex, and it is unclear whether individual differences in functional connectivity are enhanced or diminished under such naturalistic conditions. This work first aims to characterize variability in BOLD-signal based functional connectivity (FC) across 2 distinct movie conditions and eyes-open rest (n=31 healthy adults, 2 scan sessions each). We found that movies have higher within- and between-subject correlations in cluster-wise FC relative to rest. The anatomical distribution of inter-individual variability was similar across conditions, with higher variability occurring at the lateral prefrontal lobes and temporoparietal junctions. Second, we used an unsupervised test-retest matching algorithm that identifies individual subjects from within a group based on FC patterns, quantifying the accuracy of the algorithm across the three conditions. The movies and resting state all enabled identification of individual subjects based on FC matrices, with accuracies between 61% and 100%. Overall, pairings involving movies outperformed rest, and the social, faster-paced movie attained 100% accuracy. When the parcellation resolution, scan duration, and number of edges used were increased, accuracies improved across conditions, and the pattern of movies>rest was preserved. These results suggest that using dynamic stimuli such as movies enhances the detection of FC patterns that are unique at the individual level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Road Test and Naturalistic Driving Performance in Healthy and Cognitively Impaired Older Adults: Does Environment Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer D.; Papandonatos, George D.; Miller, Lindsay A.; Hewitt, Scott D.; Festa, Elena K.; Heindel, William C.; Ott, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives The road test is regarded as the gold standard for determining driving competence in older adults, but it is unclear how well the road test relates to naturalistic driving. The study objective was to relate the standardized road test to video recordings of naturalistic driving in older adults with a range of cognitive impairment. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting Academic medical center memory disorders clinic. Participants 103 older drivers (44 healthy and 59 with cognitive impairment) who passed a road test. Measurements Error rate and global ratings of safety (pass with and without recommendations, marginal with restrictions or training, or fail) made by a professional driving instructor. Results There was fair agreement between global ratings on the road test and naturalistic driving. More errors were detected in the naturalistic environment, but this did not impact global ratings. Error scores between settings were significantly correlated, and the types of errors made were similar. History of crashes corrected for miles driven per week was related to road test error scores, but not naturalistic driving error scores. Global cognition (MMSE) was correlated with both road test and naturalistic driving errors. In the healthy older adults, younger age was correlated with fewer errors on the road test and greater errors in naturalistic driving. Conclusion Road test performance is a reasonable proxy for estimating fitness to drive in older individuals’ typical driving environments. The differences between performance assessed by these two methods, however, remain poorly understood and deserve further study. PMID:23110378

  12. Learning phonemic vowel length from naturalistic recordings of Japanese infant-directed speech.

    PubMed

    Bion, Ricardo A H; Miyazawa, Kouki; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    In Japanese, vowel duration can distinguish the meaning of words. In order for infants to learn this phonemic contrast using simple distributional analyses, there should be reliable differences in the duration of short and long vowels, and the frequency distribution of vowels must make these differences salient enough in the input. In this study, we evaluate these requirements of phonemic learning by analyzing the duration of vowels from over 11 hours of Japanese infant-directed speech. We found that long vowels are substantially longer than short vowels in the input directed to infants, for each of the five oral vowels. However, we also found that learning phonemic length from the overall distribution of vowel duration is not going to be easy for a simple distributional learner, because of the large base-rate effect (i.e., 94% of vowels are short), and because of the many factors that influence vowel duration (e.g., intonational phrase boundaries, word boundaries, and vowel height). Therefore, a successful learner would need to take into account additional factors such as prosodic and lexical cues in order to discover that duration can contrast the meaning of words in Japanese. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account the naturalistic distributions of lexicons and acoustic cues when modeling early phonemic learning.

  13. Learning Phonemic Vowel Length from Naturalistic Recordings of Japanese Infant-Directed Speech

    PubMed Central

    Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Miyazawa, Kouki; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Mazuka, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    In Japanese, vowel duration can distinguish the meaning of words. In order for infants to learn this phonemic contrast using simple distributional analyses, there should be reliable differences in the duration of short and long vowels, and the frequency distribution of vowels must make these differences salient enough in the input. In this study, we evaluate these requirements of phonemic learning by analyzing the duration of vowels from over 11 hours of Japanese infant-directed speech. We found that long vowels are substantially longer than short vowels in the input directed to infants, for each of the five oral vowels. However, we also found that learning phonemic length from the overall distribution of vowel duration is not going to be easy for a simple distributional learner, because of the large base-rate effect (i.e., 94% of vowels are short), and because of the many factors that influence vowel duration (e.g., intonational phrase boundaries, word boundaries, and vowel height). Therefore, a successful learner would need to take into account additional factors such as prosodic and lexical cues in order to discover that duration can contrast the meaning of words in Japanese. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account the naturalistic distributions of lexicons and acoustic cues when modeling early phonemic learning. PMID:23437036

  14. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  15. ASTD's 1974 Conference--Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training and Development Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Highlights of speeches presented at the 30th ASTD National Conference in San Francisco are given: S.I. Hayakawa outlined developments in higher education during the 1970's; Joe Batten called for life enrichment, not just job enrichment; and Dorothy Jongeward discussed transactional analysis as a tool for more effective interpersonal relationships.…

  16. Southeast Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Treesearch

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2004-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent southeast Alaska inventory and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). Southeast Alaska has about 22.9 million acres, of which two-thirds are vegetated. Almost 11 million acres are forest land and about 4 million acres have nonforest...

  17. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century.

  18. The identification of family members' contribution to patients' care in the intensive care unit: a naturalistic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M A

    2005-01-01

    The admission of a patient to an intensive care unit (ICU) is recognized as being a stressful experience for their families. Many studies have focused on the needs of families within ICU, but few have highlighted the unique contribution that family members make towards patient care and recovery. Using a naturalistic approach, data were collected through observation, video recording, in-depth interviewing and reflective video analysis to explore the processes and factors underpinning families' contribution to patient care. The findings can be grouped into three themes: getting to know the patient through the family, family contribution to care and the nurses' role in supporting families of ICU patients. Families can have a very positive influence on the patient's care and recovery from ICU, but both the family members, and in turn the nursing staff, need to be supported appropriately if this valuable contribution to patient care is to be maximized and maintained.

  19. Historical Highlights in the Education of Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spraggins, Tinsley

    This booklet shows the continuity, from 1619 to the present, of movements in the education of black people in the United States. Material presented in the booklet is aimed at increasing understanding and stimulating efforts to reach a just solution in the struggle for school integration and equality of opportunity. Chapters focus on: the African…

  20. Drugs and American High School Students 1975-1983. Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    This report is the seventh in an annual series reporting the drug use and related attitudes of America's high school seniors; the findings come from an ongoing national research and reporting program, "Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of Lifestyles and Values of Youth," also known as the High School Senior Survey. Data on two major topics…

  1. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The role of NASA-Langley is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests are highlighted which were performed during 1990 in the NASA-Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1990 are described in Research and Technology 1990 Langley Research Center.

  2. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The role of the NASA Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests that were performed during calendar year 1989 in the NASA Langley Research Center test facilities are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the NASA Langley Research Center are illustrated along with the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1989 are described in Research and Technology 1989 - Langley Research Center.

  3. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1985 in Langley test facilities, are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research, are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1985 are described in Research and Technology-1985 Annual Report of the Langley Research Center.

  4. Research and technology highlights, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year are presented. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of research and technology (R&T) activities supported by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. Some of the Center's most important research and testing facilities are also described.

  5. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS. PMID:27429744

  6. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. PMID:22129781

  7. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PsyGlass: Capitalizing on Google Glass for naturalistic data collection.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Kevin; Dale, Rick

    2015-09-01

    As commercial technology moves further into wearable technologies, cognitive and psychological scientists can capitalize on these devices to facilitate naturalistic research designs while still maintaining strong experimental control. One such wearable technology is Google Glass (Google, Inc.: www.google.com/glass), which can present wearers with audio and visual stimuli while tracking a host of multimodal data. In this article, we introduce PsyGlass, a framework for incorporating Google Glass into experimental work that is freely available for download and community improvement over time (www.github.com/a-paxton/PsyGlass). As a proof of concept, we use this framework to investigate dual-task pressures on naturalistic interaction. The preliminary study demonstrates how designs from classic experimental psychology may be integrated in naturalistic interactive designs with emerging technologies. We close with a series of recommendations for using PsyGlass and a discussion of how wearable technology more broadly may contribute to new or adapted naturalistic research designs.

  9. Mind the gap: bridging economic and naturalistic risk-taking with cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Schonberg, Tom; Fox, Craig R; Poldrack, Russell A

    2011-01-01

    Economists define risk in terms of the variability of possible outcomes, whereas clinicians and laypeople generally view risk as exposure to possible loss or harm. Neuroeconomic studies using relatively simple behavioral tasks have identified a network of brain regions that respond to economic risk, but these studies have had limited success predicting naturalistic risk-taking. By contrast, more complex behavioral tasks developed by clinicians (e.g. Balloon Analogue Risk Task and Iowa Gambling Task) correlate with naturalistic risk-taking but resist decomposition into distinct cognitive constructs. We propose here that to bridge this gap and better understand neural substrates of naturalistic risk-taking, new tasks are needed that: are decomposable into basic cognitive and/or economic constructs; predict naturalistic risk-taking; and engender dynamic, affective engagement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Environmental Education and National Parks: The World Conservation Strategy, Values and Naturalist Interpretive Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Daniel H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with environmental education aspects of national parks in terms of the World Conservation Strategy, values, and naturalist interpretive activities. Definitions of terms and details of interpretive activities and national park values are provided. (CW)

  11. Research and Technology Highlights 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of research and technology (R&T) activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. An electronic version of the report is available at URL http://techreports.larc.nasa.gov/RandT95. This color version allows viewing, retrieving, and printing of the highlights, searching and browsing through the sections, and access to an on-line directory of Langley researchers.

  12. Older driver distraction: a naturalistic study of behaviour at intersections.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Judith L; Catchlove, Matthew; Scully, Michelle; Koppel, Sjaan; Newstead, Stuart

    2013-09-01

    This study examined older driver engagement in distracting behaviours (secondary activities) at intersections using naturalistic driving data from a larger study based in Melbourne, Australia. Of interest was whether engagement in secondary activities at intersections was influenced by factors such as driver gender and situational variables, in particular, those relating to the complexity of the driving environment. Specifically we expected that when making left/right turns, older drivers would reduce the proportion of time engaged in secondary behaviours at intersections which required gap judgements (partly controlled or uncontrolled) compared with intersections that were fully controlled by traffic signals. Consideration was given to engagement in secondary activity with hands off the wheel and when the vehicle was moving versus stationary. Older drivers aged between 65 and 83 years drove an instrumented vehicle (IV) on their regular trips for approximately two weeks. The IV was equipped with a video camera system, enabling recording of the road environment and driver and a data acquisition unit, enabling recording of trip distance, vehicle speed, braking, accelerating, steering and indicator use. Driving experience and demographics were collected and functional abilities were assessed using the Useful Field of View (UFOV), Trail Making Test B, Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. The study yielded a total of 371 trips with 4493 km (99.8 h) of naturalistic driving data including 1396 left and right turns. Trips were randomly selected from the dataset and in-depth analysis was conducted on 200 intersection manoeuvres (approximately 50% left turns, 50% right turns). The most frequently observed secondary activities were scratching/grooming (42.5%), talking/singing (30.2%) and manipulating the vehicle control panel (12.2%). Glances "off road" 2s or longer were associated with reading, reaching and manipulation of the

  13. Investigations of Naturalistic Decision Making and the Recognition-Primed Decision Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    develop a Recognition-Primed Decision (RPD) model of decicion making . This model contrasts w-th current nor- mative and prescriptive models of decision...ARI Research Note 90-59 / .Lh FiLE COPY Investigations of Naturalistic Decision Making and the Recognition-Primed Decision Model Gary A. Klein and...exandria, VA 22333-5600 6110’_B 74F TITLE (include Security Classification) vestigations of Naturalistic Decision Making and the Recognition-Primed cision

  14. Jefferson Lab phenomenology: selected highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Wolodymyr Melnitchouk

    2005-07-07

    An overview of recent experimental highlights from Jefferson Lab is presented. We review the status of baryon spectroscopy, including the search for pentaquarks, as well as measurements of electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, featuring the proton G{sub E}/G{sub M} ratio and the determination of the strangeness form factors. In inclusive scattering, we describe recent studies of quark-hadron duality in structure functions in the resonance-scaling transition region, and outline future physics plans at an energy upgraded 12 GeV facility.

  15. Recent Highlights of ATVB Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic studies over the past decades using in vitro systems, animal models, and human tissues have highlighted the complexity of pathophysiological processes of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia, as one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, is still the focus of many mechanistic studies and the major therapeutic target of atherosclerosis. Although there is a dire need to validate many experimental findings in humans, there is a large number of approaches that have been showing promise for contributing to future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25717174

  16. Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study: Findings and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, Sheila G.; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Guo, Feng; Albert, Paul S.; Lee, Suzanne E.; Ehsani, Johnathon P.; Pradhan, Anuj K.; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Problem This paper summarizes the findings on novice teenage driving outcomes (e.g., crashes and risky driving behaviors) from the Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study. Method Survey and driving data from a data acquisition system (Global Positioning System, accelerometers, cameras) were collected from 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers and their parents during the first 18 months of teenage licensure; stress responsivity was also measured in teenagers. Result Overall teenage crash and near crash (CNC) rates declined over time, but were >4 times higher among teenagers than adults. Contributing factors to teenage CNC rates included secondary task engagement (e.g., distraction), kinematic risky driving, low stress responsivity, and risky social norms. Conclusion The data support the contention that the high novice teenage CNC risk is due both to inexperience and risky driving behavior, particularly kinematic risky driving and secondary task engagement. Practical Applications Graduated driver licensing policy and other prevention efforts should focus on kinematic risky driving, secondary task engagement, and risky social norms. PMID:26403899

  17. Orienting towards social features in naturalistic scenes is reflexive.

    PubMed

    Rösler, Lara; End, Albert; Gamer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Saliency-based models of visual attention postulate that, when a scene is freely viewed, attention is predominantly allocated to those elements that stand out in terms of their physical properties. However, eye-tracking studies have shown that saliency models fail to predict gaze behavior accurately when social information is included in an image. Notably, gaze pattern analyses revealed that depictions of human beings are heavily prioritized independent of their low-level physical saliency. What remains unknown, however, is whether the prioritization of such social features is a reflexive or a voluntary process. To investigate the early stages of social attention in more detail, participants viewed photographs of naturalistic scenes with and without social features (i.e., human heads or bodies) for 200 ms while their eye movements were being recorded. We observed significantly more first eye movements to regions containing social features than would be expected from a chance level distribution of saccades. Additionally, a generalized linear mixed model analysis revealed that the social content of a region better predicted first saccade direction than its saliency suggesting that social features partially override the impact of low-level physical saliency on gaze patterns. Given the brief image presentation time that precluded visual exploration, our results provide compelling evidence for a reflexive component in social attention. Moreover, the present study emphasizes the importance of considering social influences for a more coherent understanding of human attentional selection.

  18. Aesthetic perception and its minimal content: a naturalistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Xenakis, Ioannis; Arnellos, Argyris

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic perception is one of the most interesting topics for philosophers and scientists who investigate how it influences our interactions with objects and states of affairs. Over the last few years, several studies have attempted to determine “how aesthetics is represented in an object,” and how a specific feature of an object could evoke the respective feelings during perception. Despite the vast number of approaches and models, we believe that these explanations do not resolve the problem concerning the conditions under which aesthetic perception occurs, and what constitutes the content of these perceptions. Adopting a naturalistic perspective, we here view aesthetic perception as a normative process that enables agents to enhance their interactions with physical and socio-cultural environments. Considering perception as an anticipatory and preparatory process of detection and evaluation of indications of potential interactions (what we call “interactive affordances”), we argue that the minimal content of aesthetic perception is an emotionally valued indication of interaction potentiality. Aesthetic perception allows an agent to normatively anticipate interaction potentialities, thus increasing sense making and reducing the uncertainty of interaction. This conception of aesthetic perception is compatible with contemporary evidence from neuroscience, experimental aesthetics, and interaction design. The proposed model overcomes several problems of transcendental, art-centered, and objective aesthetics as it offers an alternative to the idea of aesthetic objects that carry inherent values by explaining “the aesthetic” as emergent in perception within a context of uncertain interaction. PMID:25285084

  19. Naturalistically-Observed Conflict and Youth Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Erin T.; Kane, Heidi S.; Saleh, Daniel J.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Poowuttikul, Pavadee; Secord, Elizabeth; Pierantoni, Wayne; Simon, Valerie; Slatcher, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the links between naturalistically-observed conflict, self-reported caregiver-youth conflict, and youth asthma symptoms. Method Fifty-four youth with asthma (aged 10-17) wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) for a 4-day period to assess interpersonal conflict and caregiver-youth conflict as they occur in daily life. Conflict also was assessed with baseline self-report questionnaires and daily diaries completed by the youth participants and their caregiver. Asthma symptoms were assessed via daily diaries and baseline self-reports and wheezing as coded from the EAR. Results EAR-observed measures of conflict were strongly associated with self-reported asthma symptoms (both baseline and daily diaries) and wheezing coded from the EAR. Further, when entered together in regression analyses, youth daily reports of negative caregiver-youth interactions and EAR-observed conflict uniquely predicted asthma symptoms; only EAR-observed conflict was associated with EAR-observed wheezing. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the potential impact of daily conflict on youth asthma symptoms and the importance of assessing conflict as it occurs in everyday life. More broadly, they point to the importance of formulating a clear picture of family interactions outside of the lab, which is essential for understanding how family relationships “get under the skin” to affect youth health. PMID:25222090

  20. Beyond the tangent point: gaze targets in naturalistic driving.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Otto; Lehtonen, Esko; Pekkanen, Jami; Itkonen, Teemu

    2013-11-12

    Moving in natural environments is guided by looking where you are going. When entering a bend, car drivers direct their gaze toward the inside of the curve, in the region of the curve apex. This behavior has been analyzed in terms of both "tangent point models," which posit that drivers are looking at the tangent point (TP), and "future path models," which posit that drivers are visually targeting a point on the desired trajectory or future path (FP). This issue remains unresolved, partly due to the challenge of representing the changing visual projection of the trajectory into the driver's field of view. This paper reports a study of naturalistic driving, in which the FP in the field of view is explicitly modeled, and the TP and reference points on the FP are simultaneously analyzed as potential gaze targets. We argue that traditional area-of-interest methods commonly interpreted as supporting the TP hypothesis are problematic when the interest is contrasting multiple gaze targets. This prompts a critical reassessment of the empirical case for the ubiquity of looking at the TP and the generality of the TP hypothesis as an account of where people look when they steer. As a basis for representing driver gaze behavior, the FP is an equally valid point of departure. There are no overwhelming theoretical or empirical reasons for favoring the TP models over the FP models.

  1. Naturalistic Usability Testing of Inpatient Medication Reconciliation Software.

    PubMed

    Lesselroth, Blake; Adams, Kathleen; Tallett, Stephanie; Ong, Lindsay; Bliss, Susan; Ragland, Scott; Tran, Hanna; Church, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Medication history errors are common at admission, but can be mitigated through the implementation of medication reconciliation (MR). We designed multi-media software to assist clinicians with collection of an admission history. This manuscript describes a naturalistic usability study conducted on the hospital wards. Our goals were to 1) estimate the impact of our workflow upon departmental productivity and 2) determine the ability of our software to detect discrepancies. We furnished clinical pharmacists with our application on a tablet PC and asked them to collect a bedside history. We used 1) time-motion analysis to estimate cycle-time and 2) chart reviews to estimate error detection rates. Our intervention detected an average of 7.7 discrepancies per admission (11.7 per pharmacy-shift). A panel rated 67% of these discrepancies as 'high' or 'very high' risk. The cycle-time per admission was slightly longer than usual care processes (20.5 min vs. 17.9 min), but included a bedside interview. In general, pharmacists agreed that the technology improved the completeness and accuracy of a medication history. However, workflow leveling strategies are important to implementing a durable process. In conclusion, a pharmacist-mediated, patient-centered technology holds promise for improving the quality of MR and overall clinical performance.

  2. Automated analysis of child phonetic production using naturalistic recordings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongxin; Richards, Jeffrey A; Gilkerson, Jill

    2014-10-01

    Conventional resource-intensive methods for child phonetic development studies are often impractical for sampling and analyzing child vocalizations in sufficient quantity. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on early language development by an automated analysis of child phonetic production using naturalistic recordings. The new approach was evaluated relative to conventional manual transcription methods. Its effectiveness was demonstrated by a case study with 106 children with typical development (TD) ages 8-48 months, 71 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ages 16-48 months, and 49 children with language delay (LD) not related to ASD ages 10-44 months. A small digital recorder in the chest pocket of clothing captured full-day natural child vocalizations, which were automatically identified into consonant, vowel, nonspeech, and silence, producing the average count per utterance (ACPU) for consonant and vowel. Clear child utterances were identified with above 72% accuracy. Correlations between machine-estimated and human-transcribed ACPUs were above 0.82. Children with TD produced significantly more consonants and vowels per utterance than did other children. Children with LD produced significantly more consonants but not vowels than did children with ASD. The authors provide new information on typical and atypical language development in children with TD, ASD, and LD using an automated computational approach.

  3. Victorian naturalists in China: science and informal empire.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fa-ti

    2003-03-01

    This paper discusses the research of British naturalists in China during the period between the Opium War and the collapse of the Qing dynasty (1839-1911). China was defeated in the Opium War and forced to open treaty ports for trade with the Westerners. The foreign powers, particularly Britain, imposed upon the Qing government treaties, concession leases, favourable trade conditions, legal privileges and so on to reduce its political autonomy. In the shadow of the informal empire, not only did the British have more freedom to travel in China, first at the treaty ports and later in the interior, but they successively established diplomatic , commercial and missionary institutions in dozens of Chinese cities. The most important of them - the British Consular Service, the Chinese Maritime Customs and the Protestant missionary organizations - provided the talent and infrastructure for natural historical research and became networks for scientific information. The research into China's natural history epitomized the characteristics of British research on China in general: it engaged in collecting and circulating an ever-increasing amount of information and aimed at producing 'factual' and 'useful' knowledge about China. The paper modified current literature on scientific imperialism, which has dealt primarily with the colonial context, by examining the role of nineteenth-century British imperial science in the context of informal empire.

  4. Naturalistic distraction and driving safety in older drivers

    PubMed Central

    Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Emerson, Jamie L.; Yu, Lixi; Uc, Ergun Y.; Anderson, Steven W.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to quantify and compare performance of middle-aged and older drivers during a naturalistic distraction paradigm (visual search for roadside targets) and predict older driver performance given functioning in visual, motor, and cognitive domains. Background Distracted driving can imperil healthy adults and may disproportionally affect the safety of older drivers with visual, motor, and cognitive decline. Methods Two hundred and three drivers, 120 healthy older (61 men and 59 women, ages 65 years or greater) and 83 middle-aged drivers (38 men and 45 women, ages 40–64 years), participated in an on-road test in an instrumented vehicle. Outcome measures included performance in roadside target identification (traffic signs and restaurants) and concurrent driver safety. Differences in visual, motor, and cognitive functioning served as predictors. Results Older drivers identified fewer landmarks and drove slower but committed more safety errors than middle-aged drivers. Greater familiarity with local roads benefited performance of middle-aged but not older drivers. Visual cognition predicted both traffic sign identification and safety errors while executive function predicted traffic sign identification over and above vision. Conclusion Older adults are susceptible to driving safety errors while distracted by common secondary visual search tasks that are inherent to driving. The findings underscore that age-related cognitive decline affects older driver management of driving tasks at multiple levels, and can help inform the design of on-road tests and interventions for older drivers. PMID:23964422

  5. Naturalistic speeding data: Drivers aged 75 years and older.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Anna; Chevalier, Aran John; Clarke, Elizabeth; Wall, John; Coxon, Kristy; Brown, Julie; Ivers, Rebecca; Keay, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "A longitudinal investigation of the predictors of older drivers׳ speeding behavior" (Chevalier et al., 2016) [1], wherein these speed events were used to investigate older drivers speeding behavior and the influence of cognition, vision, functional decline, and self-reported citations and crashes on speeding behavior over a year of driving. Naturalistic speeding behavior data were collected for up to 52 weeks from volunteer drivers aged 75-94 years (median 80 years, 52% male) living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Global Positioning System (GPS) data were recorded at each second and determined driving speed through triangulation of satellite collected location data. Driving speed data were linked with mapped speed zone data based on a service-provider database. To measure speeding behavior, speed events were defined as driving 1 km/h or more, with a 3% tolerance, above a single speed limit, averaged over 30 s. The data contains a row per 124,374 speed events. This article contains information about data processing and quality control.

  6. The Networked Naturalist - Mobile devices for Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, D.; Graham, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Citizen science projects engage individual volunteers or groups to observe, measure, and contribute data to scientific studies. CENS is developing mobile phone and web-based tools for formal and informal observation of ecosystems. We are collaborating with national environmental education campaigns, such as Project BudBurst, and with the National Park Service to increase participation in citizen scientist campaigns and to support park service personnel in day to day data gathering. The overarching goals of the Networked Naturalist set of projects are to enhance participatory learning experiences through citizen science campaigns and to facilitate scientific and environmental data collection. Our experience with volunteers at UCLA and at the National Park Service has demonstrated that mobile phones are an efficient, effective and engaging method for collecting environmental and location data and hold great potential for both raising public awareness of environmental issues and collecting data that is valuable for both ecosystem management and research. CENS is an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center and this project represents collaboration among ecologists, computer scientist, and statisticians. Our mobile applications are free for download on Android and iPhone App stores and the source code is made available through open source licenses.

  7. Safety implications of infotainment system use in naturalistic driving.

    PubMed

    Perez, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The use of a radio while driving has long been considered a "threshold" of distraction that is socially acceptable although it may be a factor in some crashes and near crashes. This "social acceptance" has prompted the use of radio tasks, specifically radio tuning, as "references" that should not be exceeded by other secondary and tertiary tasks that make their way into the vehicle. As new functions make their way into vehicle radios (or more advanced infotainment systems), however, it is possible that radio tasks may become distracting to a level that surpasses current driver expectations. This investigation examines the naturalistic usage of several advanced infotainment systems and examines whether usage is associated first with changes in near crash occurrence and second with changes in driving behavior. Little association was found with near crashes: 5 of 46 near crash events observed in the dataset exhibited infotainment system use. Drivers involved in infotainment system use during near crashes, however, did exhibit distinct glance behaviors, generally suggesting lower levels of awareness about their driving environment. Initial analyses of a larger dataset appear to confirm these findings.

  8. On the number of perceivable blur levels in naturalistic images

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher Patrick; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Blur is a useful cue for depth. Natural images contain objects at a range of depths whose depth can be signaled by their perceived blur. Here, to evaluate the usefulness of blur as a depth cue, we estimate the number blur levels that observers can perceive simultaneously. To estimate this value, observers discriminated and classified dead leaves patterns that contained a controlled distribution of blur levels but are more complex or naturalistic than stimuli typically used in blur research. We used a 2-IFC discrimination task, in which observers reported the interval that contained more blur levels and a classification task, in which observers reported the number of perceived blur levels. In both tasks, observers could not discriminate or classify more than four levels of blur in the stimulus reliably. In isolation from other cues, blur may provide only a coarse cue to depth and add limited depth information when present in natural scenes with complex distributions of blur and multiple depth cues. PMID:25743077

  9. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation. PMID:27843642

  10. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  11. A Functional Description of SELF in American Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Past studies have identified the function of SELF as a canonical reflexive pronoun in American Sign Language (ASL). This study examines the use of SELF with fifteen hours of naturalistic ASL discourse framed by the cognitive-functionalist approach. The analysis reveals that the category of SELF is expressed in three phonological forms and exhibits…

  12. Native American Perceptions of the National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics: In Their Own Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Plemons, Bradford W.; Starr, Edward; Reyes, Raymond; Fleming, Candace; Latimer, Anna; Trimble, Joseph E.

    The National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics (NANACOA) initiated a strategy in 1995 to evaluate their programs and prevention efforts. The design and methodology of the project incorporated a "naturalistic" approach to help preserve cultural integrity and respect multiple perspectives. Data were gathered from…

  13. Langley aerospace test highlights - 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. This report highlights some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1986 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. The report illustrates both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  14. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1988 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  15. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  16. Highlighting inconsistencies regarding metal biosorption.

    PubMed

    Robalds, Artis; Naja, Ghinwa Melodie; Klavins, Maris

    2016-03-05

    Thousands of articles have been devoted to examine different types of biosorbents and their use in cleaning polluted waters. An important objective of some studies has been the identification of the biosorption mechanisms. This type of investigation is not always performed, as it can only be done if scientists are aware of all mechanisms that, at least theoretically, control the removal of the target substances. Mistakes are often made, even in highly cited review articles, where biosorption mechanisms are named and/or grouped. The aim of this article is to highlight errors and inaccuracies as well as to discuss different classification systems of the biosorption mechanisms. This article serves as a guide, as well as a platform for discussion among researchers involved in the investigation of biosorbents, in an effort to avoid reproducing errors in subsequent articles.

  17. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  18. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  19. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  20. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  1. Highlights from Student Drug Use in America 1975-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    This report presents findings from a national survey of the 1975-80 high school classes, focusing on drug use and related attitudes of American high school seniors. The materials highlight data on grade of first use, usage trends at earlier grade levels, intensity of drug use, attitudes and beliefs about various types of drug use, and students'…

  2. Common use of dietary supplements for bipolar disorder: a naturalistic, self-reported study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Glenn, Tasha; Conell, Jörn; Rasgon, Natalie; Marsh, Wendy; Sagduyu, Kemal; Munoz, Rodrigo; Lewitzka, Ute; Bauer, Rita; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Monteith, Scott; Whybrow, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Dietary supplements are taken by about half of Americans. Knowledge of dietary supplement use is important because they may interact with prescription drugs or other supplements, cause adverse reactions including psychiatric symptoms, or contain inherently toxic ingredients or contaminants. This study explores the use of dietary supplements by patients with bipolar disorder in the US. Data were obtained from an ongoing, naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder who received pharmacological treatment as usual. The patients self-reported their daily mood, sleep, and medications taken, including all drugs prescribed for bipolar disorder or that the patient felt impacted their mood. These included other prescribed drugs, over-the-counter drugs and dietary supplements. Drugs that received premarketing approval from the FDA were not included as dietary supplements. Patient demographics and daily medication use were characterized. Data were available from 348 patients in the US who returned a mean 249.5 days of data. In addition to prescribed psychiatric drugs, 101 of the 348 patients (29 %) used a dietary supplement for at least 7 days and 69 (20 %) used a supplement long term (for at least 50 % of days). Of the 101 supplement users, 72 (71.3 %) took one supplement daily. The 101 patients tried over 40 different supplements, and the long-term users took 19 different supplements. The most commonly taken supplements for both groups were fish oil, B vitamins, melatonin, and multivitamins. Patients using supplements were more likely to be white (p < 0.001), older (p = 0.009), and ill for more years (p = 0.025). Many patients with bipolar disorder use dietary supplements in addition to prescribed drugs. Physicians should obtain detailed information about all dietary supplements taken by patients with bipolar disorder.

  3. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent.

  4. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, SY; Hengge, CR

    2015-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent. PMID:26438508

  5. Naturalistic FMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception.

    PubMed

    Lahnakoski, Juha M; Glerean, Enrico; Salmi, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Hari, Riitta; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (approximately 16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech) and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action, and non-human sounds) lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: (1) a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, (2) a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion, and pain, (3) a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction, and speech, and (4) a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the pSTS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  6. Quality of life in schizophrenia: a multicenter, randomized, naturalistic, controlled trial comparing olanzapine to first-generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Silva de Lima, Maurício; de Jesus Mari, Jair; Breier, Alan; Maria Costa, Anna; Pondé de Sena, Eduardo; Hotopf, Matthew

    2005-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of olanzapine for treating schizophrenia and to assess if olanzapine promotes a better quality of life than first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Multicenter, naturalistic, randomized controlled study, comparing olanzapine with FGAs, at hospitalization and during a 9-month follow-up. Outcome assessors were blind to the allocated drug. The dose of antipsychotic was determined by doctors according to their clinical practice routines. Data collection was performed from April 1999 to August 2001. 197 patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed schizophrenia were allocated to olanzapine (N = 104) and FGA (N = 93). Patients taking olanzapine showed greater improvements in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative symptoms (mean difference = 2.3, 95% CI = 0.6 to 4.1) and general psychopathology (mean difference = 4.0, 95% CI = 0.8 to 7.2) sub-scales and fewer incidences of tardive dyskinesia (RR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.4 to 4.2, p < .0001). Olanzapine was also associated with greater improvement in a number of health-related quality-of-life outcomes on the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, including physical functioning (mean difference = 6.6, 95% CI = 1.2 to 11.9), physical role limitations (mean difference = 13.7, 95% CI = 3.0 to 24.3), and emotional role limitations (mean difference = 12.1, 95% CI = 0.7 to 23.5). Patients taking olanzapine gained significantly more weight during the trial than patients taking FGAs, with a correspondent endpoint increase in the body mass index (BMI) of 28.7 versus 25.3 (p < .001). Compared with FGAs, olanzapine has advantages in terms of improvements of negative symptoms and quality of life. It is also associated with fewer incidences of tardive dyskinesia and greater increases in weight and BMI. These findings are highlighted by the naturalistic approach adopted in this trial.

  7. Naturalistic fMRI Mapping Reveals Superior Temporal Sulcus as the Hub for the Distributed Brain Network for Social Perception

    PubMed Central

    Lahnakoski, Juha M.; Glerean, Enrico; Salmi, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Sams, Mikko; Hari, Riitta; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (approximately 16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech) and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action, and non-human sounds) lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: (1) a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, (2) a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion, and pain, (3) a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction, and speech, and (4) a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the pSTS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life. PMID:22905026

  8. Training for Aviation Decision Making: The Naturalistic Decision Making Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implications of a naturalistic decision making (NDM) perspective for training air crews to make flight-related decisions. The implications are based on two types of analyses: (a) identification of distinctive features that serve as a basis for classifying a diverse set of decision events actually encountered by flight crews, and (b) performance strategies that distinguished more from less effective crews flying full-mission simulators, as well as performance analyses from NTSB accident investigations. Six training recommendations are offered: (1) Because of the diversity of decision situations, crews need to be aware that different strategies may be appropriate for different problems; (2) Given that situation assessment is essential to making a good decision, it is important to train specific content knowledge needed to recognize critical conditions, to assess risks and available time, and to develop strategies to verify or diagnose the problem; (3) Tendencies to oversimplify problems may be overcome by training to evaluate options in terms of goals, constraints, consequences, and prevailing conditions; (4) In order to provide the time to gather information and consider options, it is essential to manage the situation, which includes managing crew workload, prioritizing tasks, contingency planning, buying time (e.g., requesting holding or vectors), and using low workload periods to prepare for high workload; (5) Evaluating resource requirements ("What do I need?") and capabilities ("'What do I have?" ) are essential to making good decisions. Using resources to meet requirements may involve the cabin crew, ATC, dispatchers, and maintenance personnel; (6) Given that decisions must often be made under high risk, time pressure, and workload, train under realistic flight conditions to promote the development of robust decision skills.

  9. The statistics of local motion signals in naturalistic movies.

    PubMed

    Nitzany, Eyal I; Victor, Jonathan D

    2014-04-14

    Extraction of motion from visual input plays an important role in many visual tasks, such as separation of figure from ground and navigation through space. Several kinds of local motion signals have been distinguished based on mathematical and computational considerations (e.g., motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of luminance, and motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of flicker), but little is known about the prevalence of these different kinds of signals in the real world. To address this question, we first note that different kinds of local motion signals (e.g., Fourier, non-Fourier, and glider) are characterized by second- and higher-order correlations in slanted spatiotemporal regions. The prevalence of local motion signals in natural scenes can thus be estimated by measuring the extent to which each of these correlations are present in space-time patches and whether they are coherent across spatiotemporal scales. We apply this technique to several popular movies. The results show that all three kinds of local motion signals are present in natural movies. While the balance of the different kinds of motion signals varies from segment to segment during the course of each movie, the overall pattern of prevalence of the different kinds of motion and their subtypes, and the correlations between them, is strikingly similar across movies (but is absent from white noise movies). In sum, naturalistic movies contain a diversity of local motion signals that occur with a consistent prevalence and pattern of covariation, indicating a substantial regularity of their high-order spatiotemporal image statistics.

  10. The statistics of local motion signals in naturalistic movies

    PubMed Central

    Nitzany, Eyal I.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of motion from visual input plays an important role in many visual tasks, such as separation of figure from ground and navigation through space. Several kinds of local motion signals have been distinguished based on mathematical and computational considerations (e.g., motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of luminance, and motion based on spatiotemporal correlation of flicker), but little is known about the prevalence of these different kinds of signals in the real world. To address this question, we first note that different kinds of local motion signals (e.g., Fourier, non-Fourier, and glider) are characterized by second- and higher-order correlations in slanted spatiotemporal regions. The prevalence of local motion signals in natural scenes can thus be estimated by measuring the extent to which each of these correlations are present in space-time patches and whether they are coherent across spatiotemporal scales. We apply this technique to several popular movies. The results show that all three kinds of local motion signals are present in natural movies. While the balance of the different kinds of motion signals varies from segment to segment during the course of each movie, the overall pattern of prevalence of the different kinds of motion and their subtypes, and the correlations between them, is strikingly similar across movies (but is absent from white noise movies). In sum, naturalistic movies contain a diversity of local motion signals that occur with a consistent prevalence and pattern of covariation, indicating a substantial regularity of their high-order spatiotemporal image statistics. PMID:24732243

  11. Bayesian-based integration of multisensory naturalistic perithreshold stimuli.

    PubMed

    Regenbogen, Christina; Johansson, Emilia; Andersson, Patrik; Olsson, Mats J; Lundström, Johan N

    2016-07-29

    Most studies exploring multisensory integration have used clearly perceivable stimuli. According to the principle of inverse effectiveness, the added neural and behavioral benefit of integrating clear stimuli is reduced in comparison to stimuli with degraded and less salient unisensory information. Traditionally, speed and accuracy measures have been analyzed separately with few studies merging these to gain an understanding of speed-accuracy trade-offs in multisensory integration. In two separate experiments, we assessed multisensory integration of naturalistic audio-visual objects consisting of individually-tailored perithreshold dynamic visual and auditory stimuli, presented within a multiple-choice task, using a Bayesian Hierarchical Drift Diffusion Model that combines response time and accuracy. For both experiments, unisensory stimuli were degraded to reach a 75% identification accuracy level for all individuals and stimuli to promote multisensory binding. In Experiment 1, we subsequently presented uni- and their respective bimodal stimuli followed by a 5-alternative-forced-choice task. In Experiment 2, we controlled for low-level integration and attentional differences. Both experiments demonstrated significant superadditive multisensory integration of bimodal perithreshold dynamic information. We present evidence that the use of degraded sensory stimuli may provide a link between previous findings of inverse effectiveness on a single neuron level and overt behavior. We further suggest that a combined measure of accuracy and reaction time may be a more valid and holistic approach of studying multisensory integration and propose the application of drift diffusion models for studying behavioral correlates as well as brain-behavior relationships of multisensory integration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Color constancy in a naturalistic, goal-directed task.

    PubMed

    Radonjic, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Brainard, David H

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, we use color information to select objects that will best serve a particular goal (e.g., pick the best-tasting fruit or avoid spoiled food). This is challenging when judgments must be made across changes in illumination as the spectrum reflected from an object to the eye varies with the illumination. Color constancy mechanisms serve to partially stabilize object color appearance across illumination changes, but whether and to what degree constancy supports accurate cross-illumination object selection is not well understood. To get closer to understanding how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a paradigm in which subjects engage in a goal-directed task for which color is instrumental. Specifically, in each trial, subjects re-created an arrangement of colored blocks (the model) across a change in illumination. By analyzing the re-creations, we were able to infer and quantify the degree of color constancy that mediated subjects' performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, we used our paradigm to characterize constancy for two different sets of block reflectances, two different illuminant changes, and two different groups of subjects. On average, constancy was good in our naturalistic task, but it varied considerably across subjects. In Experiment 3, we tested whether varying scene complexity and the validity of local contrast as a cue to the illumination change modulated constancy. Increasing complexity did not lead to improved constancy; silencing local contrast significantly reduced constancy. Our results establish a novel goal-directed task that enables us to approach color constancy as it emerges in real life.

  13. Assessment of naturalistic use patterns of advanced infotainment systems.

    PubMed

    Perez, Miguel A; Angell, Linda S; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to examine naturalistic usage of infotainment systems to assess use characteristics and patterns. Infotainment systems continue to evolve in terms of their capabilities and information availability, raising concerns about their distraction potential. Assessing potential distraction requires understanding how challenging different tasks are and how frequently they occur during driving. High-end infotainment system use was observed across 17 participants over a period of approximately 4 weeks each. One of two different infotainment systems was provided to participants. Audio, video, and driving performance data were collected and observed by trained reductionists. The two infotainment systems integrated iPod™, satellite radio, CD/DVD/MP3 playback, AM/FM, and, in one case, navigation functionalities. Systems differed in their vehicle integration and advanced infotainment features offered. The median participant interacted with the infotainment systems once every 4 hr (90th percentile: 6.1 interactions/hr). More than 50% of these interactions involved adjusting the volume. Although there were a few lengthy interactions, the median duration was 2.2 s (90th percentile: 24.6 s), which required measurable visual involvement when compared to a matched baseline. The median total eyes-off-road time across interactions was 1 s (90th percentile: 11.4 s) and differed significantly across type of system interaction. Longer interactions tended to occur when the vehicle was stationary. Drivers habitually interact with infotainment systems while driving; this includes advanced functions. Some self-regulation was observed. These data provide a comparison basis for use in examining driver interactions with future infotainment systems. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. Color constancy in a naturalistic, goal-directed task

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, we use color information to select objects that will best serve a particular goal (e.g., pick the best-tasting fruit or avoid spoiled food). This is challenging when judgments must be made across changes in illumination as the spectrum reflected from an object to the eye varies with the illumination. Color constancy mechanisms serve to partially stabilize object color appearance across illumination changes, but whether and to what degree constancy supports accurate cross-illumination object selection is not well understood. To get closer to understanding how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a paradigm in which subjects engage in a goal-directed task for which color is instrumental. Specifically, in each trial, subjects re-created an arrangement of colored blocks (the model) across a change in illumination. By analyzing the re-creations, we were able to infer and quantify the degree of color constancy that mediated subjects' performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, we used our paradigm to characterize constancy for two different sets of block reflectances, two different illuminant changes, and two different groups of subjects. On average, constancy was good in our naturalistic task, but it varied considerably across subjects. In Experiment 3, we tested whether varying scene complexity and the validity of local contrast as a cue to the illumination change modulated constancy. Increasing complexity did not lead to improved constancy; silencing local contrast significantly reduced constancy. Our results establish a novel goal-directed task that enables us to approach color constancy as it emerges in real life. PMID:26381834

  15. Computer vision and driver distraction: developing a behaviour-flagging protocol for naturalistic driving data.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonny; Koppel, Sjaan; Charlton, Judith L; Rudin-Brown, Christina M

    2014-11-01

    Naturalistic driving studies (NDS) allow researchers to discreetly observe everyday, real-world driving to better understand the risk factors that contribute to hazardous situations. In particular, NDS designs provide high ecological validity in the study of driver distraction. With increasing dataset sizes, current best practice of manually reviewing videos to classify the occurrence of driving behaviours, including those that are indicative of distraction, is becoming increasingly impractical. Current statistical solutions underutilise available data and create further epistemic problems. Similarly, technical solutions such as eye-tracking often require dedicated hardware that is not readily accessible or feasible to use. A computer vision solution based on open-source software was developed and tested to improve the accuracy and speed of processing NDS video data for the purpose of quantifying the occurrence of driver distraction. Using classifier cascades, manually-reviewed video data from a previously published NDS was reanalysed and used as a benchmark of current best practice for performance comparison. Two software coding systems were developed - one based on hierarchical clustering (HC), and one based on gender differences (MF). Compared to manual video coding, HC achieved 86 percent concordance, 55 percent reduction in processing time, and classified an additional 69 percent of target behaviour not previously identified through manual review. MF achieved 67 percent concordance, a 75 percent reduction in processing time, and classified an additional 35 percent of target behaviour not identified through manual review. The findings highlight the improvements in processing speed and correctly classifying target behaviours achievable through the use of custom developed computer vision solutions. Suggestions for improved system performance and wider implementation are discussed.

  16. Highlights of Coastal Waves 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David P.; Dorman, Clive E.; Edwards, Kathleen A.; Brooks, Ian M.; Melville, W. Kendall; Burk, Stephen D.; Thompson, William T.; Holt, Teddy; Ström, Linda M.; Tjernström, Michael; Grisogono, Branko; Bane, John M.; Nuss, Wendell A.; Morley, Bruce M.; Schanot, Allen J.

    1998-07-01

    Some of the highlights of an experiment designed to study coastal atmospheric phenomena along the California coast (Coastal Waves 1996 experiment) are described. This study was designed to address several problems, including the cross-shore variability and turbulent structure of the marine boundary layer, the influence of the coast on the development of the marine layer and clouds, the ageostrophy of the flow, the dynamics of trapped events, the parameterization of surface fluxes, and the supercriticality of the marine layer.Based in Monterey, California, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 Hercules and the University of North Carolina Piper Seneca obtained a comprehensive set of measurements on the structure of the marine layer. The study focused on the effects of prominent topographic features on the wind. Downstream of capes and points, narrow bands of high winds are frequently encountered. The NCAR-designed Scanning Aerosol Backscatter Lidar (SABL) provided a unique opportunity to connect changes in the depth of the boundary layer with specific features in the dynamics of the flow field.An integral part of the experiment was the use of numerical models as forecast and diagnostic tools. The Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model System (COAMPS) provided high-resolution forecasts of the wind field in the vicinity of capes and points, which aided the deployment of the aircraft. Subsequently, this model and the MIUU (University of Uppsala) numerical model were used to support the analysis of the field data.These are some of the most comprehensive measurements of the topographically forced marine layer that have been collected. SABL proved to be an exceptionally useful tool to resolve the small-scale structure of the boundary layer and, combined with in situ turbulence measurements, provides new insight into the structure of the marine atmosphere. Measurements were made sufficiently far offshore to distinguish between the

  17. "My appointment received the sanction of the Admiralty": why Charles Darwin really was the naturalist on HMS Beagle.

    PubMed

    van Wyhe, John

    2013-09-01

    For decades historians of science and science writers in general have maintained that Charles Darwin was not the 'naturalist' or 'official naturalist' during the 1831-1836 surveying voyage of HMS Beagle but instead Captain Robert FitzRoy's 'companion', 'gentleman companion' or 'dining companion'. That is, Darwin was primarily the captain's social companion and only secondarily and unofficially naturalist. Instead, it is usually maintained, the ship's surgeon Robert McCormick was the official naturalist because this was the default or official practice at the time. Although these views have been repeated in countless accounts of Darwin's life, this essay aims to show that they are incorrect.

  18. VGP highlights of Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    Two special events of interest to Union and VGP section members will take place on Tuesday afternoon, May 25, during AGU's Spring Meeting in Baltimore.R. A. Daly Lecture: Every section of AGU has an established “Bowie Lecture” named after a distinguished scientist associated with the work of the section. These lectures are delivered by special invitation during the annual AGU Spring or Fall meetings and are highlighted in the program. The VGP lecture is named for Reginald A. Daly, but it has never been given. Its inauguration at this year's Spring Meeting celebrates the distinguished career of this famous Harvard professor and author of the seminal Igneous Rocks and the Depths of the Earth (1914, 1933). Most fittingly, the inaugural lecture will be given by David Walker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory after a day-long Union session on discontinuities in the mantle. Dave's lecture, “Errors in Earth Evolution,” will start at 4:45 P.M. We can expect to hear an original and provocative talk that features exciting, new data.

  19. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Montecchia, F.; Incicchitti, A.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-11-01

    The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM) particle component(s) in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes) as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles) have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  20. Female nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) space use in a naturalistic exhibit.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Tracy E; Waterman, Jane M; Kuhar, Christopher W; Bettinger, Tammie L

    2012-01-01

    Zoological institutions provide naturalistic exhibits for their animals in order to offer a more appealing look for visitors and give the animal the opportunity to engage in more natural behaviors. Examining space use of the animals in the naturalistic exhibit may aid in the management of these animals and inform future naturalistic exhibit design. The hippopotamus is an amphibious ungulate that spends much of its days in the wild in the water but may be found along the banks of the rivers basking in the sun. Our objective was to determine how captive female hippos utilize their exhibit by examining whether hippos selected for certain areas of a naturalistic exhibit. Scan sample data were collected on a group of nine captive female hippos housed at Disney's Animal Kingdom®. Using ArcView, the data were analyzed to determine distribution of hippos in the exhibit and their utilization of depth categories while in the water. Hippos were found to aggregate in preferred areas of the exhibit, mostly water, and selected most for water depths of 0.6-1.0 m. These results will aid in the understanding of hippopotamus space use and may aid zoological institutions in the design of naturalistic exhibits for hippos. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bridging naturalistic and laboratory assessment of memory: the Baycrest mask fit test.

    PubMed

    Armson, Michael J; Abdi, Hervé; Levine, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Autobiographical memory tests provide a naturalistic counterpoint to the artificiality of laboratory research methods, yet autobiographical events are uncontrolled and, in most cases, unverifiable. In this study, we capitalised on a scripted, complex naturalistic event - the mask fit test (MFT), a standardised procedure required of hospital employees - to bridge the gap between naturalistic and laboratory memory assessment. We created a test of recognition memory for the MFT and administered it to 135 hospital employees who had undertaken the MFT at various points over the past five years. Multivariate analysis revealed two dimensions defined by accuracy and response bias. Accuracy scores showed the expected relationship to encoding-test delay, supporting the validity of this measure. Relative to younger adults, older adults' memory for this naturalistic event was better than would be predicted from the cognitive ageing literature, a result consistent with the notion that older adults' memory performance is enhanced when stimuli are naturalistic and personally relevant. These results demonstrate that testing recognition memory for a scripted event is a viable method of studying autobiographical memory.

  2. ESO PR Highlights in 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    new interesting scientific results on the basis of data from ESO telescopes, including several results from the unmatched interferometer mode of the VLT, the VLTI, some of which were highlighted in ESO Press Releases. Certainly worth noting is the possible first ever bona-fide image of an exoplanet and the discovery of the lightest known exoplanet . At the beginning of the year, Paranal welcomed the first Auxiliary Telescope, while on the instrument side as well, 2004 was a good year: we saw the arrival of SINFONI on the VLT, of AMBER on the VLTI, and the installation at the NACO Adaptive Optics instrument of the " Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI)" to detect exoplanets. And the first prototype of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory was able to provide unprecedented results on the existence of Type-2 quasars by discovering an entire population of obscured, powerful supermassive black holes. Many of these developments are described in ESO's Press Releases, most with Press Photos, cf. the 2004 PR Index. Some of last year's ESO PR highlights may be accessed directly via the clickable image above.

  3. ESO PR Highlights in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    2005 was the year of Physics. It was thus also in part the year of astronomy and this is clearly illustrated by the numerous breakthroughs that were achieved, in particular using ESO's telescopes. One of the highlights was without any doubt the confirmation of the first image of an exoplanet , around the star 2M1207 (see ESO PR 12/05). ESO's telescopes also found a Neptune-mass exoplanet around a small star ( PR 30/05) - a discovery that proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems, and imaged a tiny companion in the close vicinity of the star GQ Lupi, a very young object still surrounded by a disc, with an age between 100,000 and 2 million years ( PR 09/05). Moreover, using a new high-contrast adaptive optics camera on the VLT, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI, astronomers were able for the first time to image a companion 120 times fainter than its star , very near the star AB Doradus A. This companion appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be ( PR 02/05). ESO's telescopes proved very useful in helping to solve a 30-year old puzzle . Astronomers have for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars ( PR 26/05). Additional evidence came from witnessing another event with the VLT ( PR 32/05). Also in this field, astronomers found the farthest known gamma-ray burst with ESO's VLT, observing an object with a redshift 6.3, i.e. that is seen when the Universe was less than 900 million years old ( PR 22/05). On July 4, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft plunged onto Comet 9P/Tempel 1 with the aim to create a crater and expose pristine material from beneath the surface. For two days before and six days after, all major ESO telescopes have been observing the comet, in a coordinated fashion and in

  4. The well-temperatured biologist. (American Society of Naturalists Presidential Address).

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Joel G

    2009-12-01

    Temperature provides a powerful theme for exploring environmental adaptation at all levels of biological organization, from molecular kinetics to organismal fitness to global biogeography. First, the thermodynamic properties that underlie biochemical kinetics and protein stability determine the overall thermal sensitivity of rate processes. Consequently, a single quantitative framework can assess variation in thermal sensitivity of ectotherms in terms of single amino acid substitutions, quantitative genetics, and interspecific differences. Thermodynamic considerations predict that higher optimal temperatures will result in greater maximal fitness at the optimum, a pattern seen both in interspecific comparisons and in within-population genotypic variation. Second, the temperature-size rule (increased developmental temperature causes decreased adult body size) is a common pattern of phenotypic plasticity in ectotherms. Mechanistic models can correctly predict the rule in some taxa, but lab and field studies show that rapid evolution can weaken or even break the rule. Third, phenotypic and evolutionary models for thermal sensitivity can be combined to explore potential fitness consequences of climate warming for terrestrial ectotherms. Recent analyses suggest that climate change will have greater negative fitness consequences for tropical than for temperate ectotherms, because many tropical species have relatively narrow thermal breadths and smaller thermal safety margins.

  5. Highlights of Astronomy, Volume 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2007-08-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  6. Laterality of hand function in naturalistically housed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alison W; Weghorst, Jennifer A

    2005-05-01

    Studies of laterality of hand function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have the potential to tell us about the origins of handedness in Homo sapiens. However, the data are confusing, with discrepancies present between studies done in the field and the laboratory: the former show wild chimpanzees to be unlateralised at the population level, while the latter show captive chimpanzees as lateralised at the population level. This study of 26 semi-free ranging chimpanzees of Chester Zoo, UK, aimed to investigate a situation between the wild and captivity and provided ethological data for 43 categories of spontaneous manual use and 14 categories of tool use. Other variables recorded were subordinate hand activity, whether the subject was arboreal or terrestrial, and the identity of the subject. Using switching focal subject sampling, 23,978 bouts of hand use and 1,090 bouts of tool use were recorded. No population-level handedness was present for manual non-tool use activities in the naturalistically housed chimpanzees of Chester Zoo in a similar way to studies of wild chimpanzees. However, about half of the individuals were lateralised to one side or the other for the foraging behaviours of pick up, eat, and pluck. Using a modified version of McGrew and Marchant's (1997) Laterality Framework, these results are comparable to some wild and captive populations for similar foraging tasks. Bimanuality was rare and thus prevented comparison with captive experimental studies that have reported population right handedness. Behaviour involving contact with water elicited stronger lateralisation. Chester chimpanzees were more likely to exhibit hand preferences for manual tasks with increasing age but there were no effects of sex or rearing history on hand specialisations in adult individuals. Lateralisation was biased in tool use, which evoked significant left hand preferences in half the individuals, with no effect of age. Results are discussed comparatively with reference to

  7. Sympathetic science: Charles Darwin, Joseph Hooker, and the passions of Victorian naturalists.

    PubMed

    Endersby, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the complex tangle of emotional and scientific attachments that linked Darwin and botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. Analyzing their roles as husbands, fathers, and novel readers demonstrates that possessing and expressing sympathy was as important for Victorian naturalists as it was for Victorian husbands. Sympathy was a scientific skill that Victorian naturalists regarded as necessary to fully understand the living world; although sympathy became increasingly gendered as feminine over the course of the century, its importance to male naturalists requires us to rethink the ways gender roles were negotiated in Victorian Britain. Botany was, for men like Darwin and Hooker, an acceptably masculine pursuit that nevertheless allowed--and even required--them to be sensitive and sympathetic.

  8. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Earth Sciences Division in atmospheric science research. Figure 1.1 shows the 20-year record of peer-reviewed publications and proposals among the various Laboratories. This data shows that the scientific work being conducted in the Laboratories is competitive with the work being done elsewhere in universities and other government agencies. The office of Deputy Director for Atmospheric Research will strive to maintain this record by rigorously monitoring and promoting quality while emphasizing coordination and integration among atmospheric disciplines. Also, an appropriate balance will be maintained between the scientists' responsibility for large collaborative projects and missions and their need to carry out active science research as a principal investigator. This balance allows members of the Laboratories to improve their scientific credentials, and develop leadership potentials. Interdisciplinary research is carried out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other government agencies. Members of the Laboratories interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratories raise the public's awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Atmosphere Laboratories make substantial efforts to attract and recruit new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA's mission, provides highlights of our research scope and activities, and summarizes our scientists' major

  9. Highlights in breast cancer from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the highlights in breast cancer research from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing studies reported at the meeting, in the advanced breast cancer setting several important confirmatory studies on the use of CDK inhibitors, and studies on using data on oestrogen receptor mutations to guide choices of endocrine therapy are discussed. The PHEREXA trial, in which a combination trastuzumab and pertuzumab was studied in the advanced setting is also considered. In the early breast cancer setting, the KRISTINE and ADAPT studies evaluated the potential of dual blockade in HER2-positive tumours. In HER2-negative early breast cancer several trials are also discussed with respect to types of adjuvant chemotherapy. The results of the MA.17R trial, which considered extending the duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy, are also discussed. The potential role of immunotherapy in breast cancer therapy is briefly mentioned. PMID:27900208

  10. Enhancing the Alternative and Augmentative Communication Use of a Child with Autism through a Parent-Implemented Naturalistic Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Debora; Hanline, Mary Frances

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a parent-implemented naturalistic intervention on the communication skills of a 4-year-old boy with autism using an alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) system were investigated. The child's mother was taught to use 4 naturalistic teaching strategies that incorporated a picture communication system during 2 typical home…

  11. ESO PR Highlights in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Another great year went by for ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere. From 1 January 2007, with the official joining of the Czech Republic, ESO has 13 member states, and since September, ESO has a new Director General, Tim de Zeeuw (ESO 03/07 and 38/07). Many scientific discoveries were made possible with ESO's telescopes. Arguably, the most important is the discovery of the first Earth-like planet in the habitable zone of a low-mass red dwarf (ESO 22/07). If there is water on this planet, then it should be liquid! ESO PR Highlights 2007 This is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2007. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2007 page. In our own Solar System also, astronomers made stunning breakthroughs with ESO's telescopes, observing the effect of the light from the Sun on an asteroid's rotation (ESO 11/07), describing in unprecedented detail the double asteroid Antiope (ESO 18/07), peering at the rings of Uranus (ESO 37/07), discovering a warm south pole on Neptune (ESO 41/07), showing a widespread and persistent morning drizzle of methane over the western foothills of Titan's major continent (ESO 47/07), and studying in the greatest details the wonderful Comet McNaught (ESO 05/07 and 07/07). In the study of objects slightly more massive than planets, the VLT found that brown dwarfs form in a similar manner to normal stars (ESO 24/07). The VLT made it also possible to measure the age of a fossil star that was clearly born at the dawn of time (ESO 23/07). Other discoveries included reconstructing the site of a flare on a solar-like star (ESO 53/07), catching a star smoking (ESO 34/07), revealing a reservoir of dust around an elderly star (ESO 43/07), uncovering a flat, nearly edge-on disc of silicates in the heart of the magnificent Ant Nebula (ESO 42/07), finding material around a star before it exploded (ESO 31/07), fingerprinting the Milky Way (ESO 15/07), revealing a rich

  12. Communicative and Analytic Strategies in Naturalistic Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strage, Amy A.

    The interaction of two elementary-age American children with their bilingual mother and French-speaking peers was monitored to determine learning strategies in a natural French immersion situation. Seven strategies were discovered, each of which provided the necessary ingredients of processible input, practice, and feedback to the language…

  13. Using naturalistic driving films as a design tool for investigating driver requirements in HMI design for ADAS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjuan; Sun, Dong; Chen, Fang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there are many naturalistic driving projects have been conducted, such as the 100-Car Project (Naturalistic Driving study in United State), EuroFOT(European Large-Scale Field Operational Tests on Vehicle Systems), SeMi- FOT(Sweden Michigan Naturalistic Field Operational Test and etc. However, those valuable naturalistic driving data hasn't been applied into Human-machine Interaction (HMI) design for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), a good HMI design for ADAS requires a deep understanding of drive environment and the interactions between the driving car and other road users in different situations. The results demonstrated the benefits of using naturalistic driving films as a mean for enhancing focus group discussion for better understanding driver's needs and traffic environment constraints. It provided an efficient tool for designers to have inside knowledge about drive and the needs for information presentation; The recommendations for how to apply this method is discussed in the paper.

  14. Facilitating pictorial comprehension with color highlighting.

    PubMed

    McDougald, Brannan R; Wogalter, Michael S

    2014-09-01

    Pictorials can aid in communicating warning information, but viewers may not always correctly comprehend them. Two experiments focused on whether the use of relevant highlighting could benefit pictorial comprehension. A set of warning-related pictorials were manipulated according to three-color highlighting conditions: highlighting areas more relevant to correct comprehension, highlighting areas less relevant to comprehension, and no highlighting. Participants were asked to describe the purpose and meaning of each pictorial presented to them. The findings from both experiments indicate that comprehension of warning pictorials is higher for the relevant highlighting condition than the other two conditions. The highlighting of less relevant areas reduced comprehension compared to no highlighting. Use of appropriately placed highlighting could benefit the design of a complex symbol by pointing out pertinent areas to aid in determining its intended conceptual meaning.

  15. The Differential Effect of Three Naturalistic Language Interventions on Language Use in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Naturalistic interventions show promise for improving language in children with autism. Specific interventions differ in direct elicitation of child language and indirect language stimulation, and thus may produce different language outcomes. This study compared the effects of responsive interaction, milieu teaching, and a combined intervention on…

  16. A Naturalistic Research Design for the Study of Factors Affecting Teachers' Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koech, Barbara Garner

    The study of teachers as decision-makers is a recent paradigm in educational research. This decision-making approach considers the teacher as an active professional engaged in various decision-making activities prior to and during instruction. This paper describes a naturalistic research design employed in a recent dissertation that investigated…

  17. A Naturalistic Inquiry of a Distance Learning University TESOL Program for In-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers-Rocha, Lonna

    2015-01-01

    In this naturalistic inquiry, I explore a professional development program which provided Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) graduate coursework from a university in Northeast Kansas to in-service teachers in Southwest Kansas through distance learning. Data sources included interviews, participant observation, and document and…

  18. Counting Birds at the Grassroots: Making a Census into "Citizen Science," Naturalists Share Their Findings Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, James

    2001-01-01

    The Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are promoting various "citizen science" projects in which amateur naturalists make local observations of birds, butterflies, or natural phenomena and report their observations to interactive databases on the World Wide Web. Events such as the Great Backyard Bird Count motivate people…

  19. The Practice of Poetry among a Group of Heroin Addicts in India: Naturalistic Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhand, Amar

    2006-01-01

    As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, this paper aims to consider the practice of poetry, "sher-o-shayari", as naturalistic peer learning among a group of heroin addicts in Yamuna Bazaar, New Delhi. By examining meanings given to "sher-o-shayari" and experiences of participating in the practice, this article makes the claim…

  20. A Naturalistic Study of Referred Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca; Arcangeli, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To report on clinical features, comorbidity, and response to pharmacotherapy in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) naturalistically followed and treated with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Method: A consecutive series of 94 patients (65 males, 29 females, age 13.6 [+ or -] 2.8 years), referred in…

  1. A Collaborative Naturalistic Service Delivery Program for Enhancing Pragmatic Language and Participation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchick, Barbara B.; Day, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a speech-language pathology and occupational therapy service delivery program for preschoolers with developmental delays and communication and related impairments. Key features included interprofessional collaboration; parent professional partnerships; naturalistic environment; opportunities for choice and control; use of a…

  2. Toward a Methodology of Naturalistic Inquiry in Educational Evaluation. CSE Monograph Series in Evaluation, 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    Evaluation is viewed as essential to decision making and social policy development. Since conventional methods have been disappointing or inadequate, naturalistic inquiry (N/I) differs from conventional science in minimizing constraints on antecedent conditions (controls) and on output (dependent variables). N/I is phenomenological rather than…

  3. Hugh Mehan's "Learning Lessons" Reconsidered: On the Differences between Naturalistic and Critical Analysis of Classroom Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macbeth, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Hugh Mehan's "Learning Lessons" in the development of the naturalistic study of classroom discourse studies and considers the emergence of an alternative program for classroom discourse studies in critical discourse analysis. Critiques some studies of classroom discourse and analyzes a fourth-grade lesson on fractions to show how the…

  4. Crossmodal Semantic Priming by Naturalistic Sounds and Spoken Words Enhances Visual Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Spence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multisensory framework based on Glaser and Glaser's (1989) general reading-naming interference model to account for the semantic priming effect by naturalistic sounds and spoken words on visual picture sensitivity. Four experiments were designed to investigate two key issues: First, can auditory stimuli enhance visual sensitivity when…

  5. "Our Beloved Cherokee": A Naturalistic Study of Cherokee Preschool Language Immersion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Lizette

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to our knowledge of endangered language revitalization by offering a case study of a Cherokee Nation (CN) preschool immersion program named Tsalagi Ageyui, "Our Beloved Cherokee." A naturalistic inquiry into the micro- and macrosociocultural dimensions of reversing Cherokee language shift reveals that, of all CN language…

  6. Mammal Silhouettes No. 1, The Kansas School Naturalist, Volume 19 Number 1, October, 1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Robert J., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    An insert in this issue of Nature Study,'' this quarterly periodical ( The Kansas School Naturalist'') is free of charge to Kansas school personnel, conservationists, youth leaders, and other adults interested in nature education. This issue focuses on mammals and contains general information about the moose, elk, muskox, camel, walrus, etc. (LK)

  7. A Collaborative Naturalistic Service Delivery Program for Enhancing Pragmatic Language and Participation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchick, Barbara B.; Day, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a speech-language pathology and occupational therapy service delivery program for preschoolers with developmental delays and communication and related impairments. Key features included interprofessional collaboration; parent professional partnerships; naturalistic environment; opportunities for choice and control; use of a…

  8. Individualized Autism Intervention for Young Children: Blending Discrete Trial and Naturalistic Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2011-01-01

    Discrete trial instruction or naturalistic, incidental teaching: How do you choose which approach to use with young children with autism? Now there's no need to "pick a side"--this groundbreaking book helps professionals skillfully blend the best of both behavioral approaches to respond to "each child's individual needs". Developed by one of the…

  9. Michael Peters' Lyotardian Account of Postmodernism and Education: Some Epistemic Problems and Naturalistic Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Postmodernism has established a significant hold in educational thought and some of the most important ideas are to be found in the writings of Michael Peters. This paper examines his postmodern stance and use of Lyotard's account of knowledge, and from a naturalist point of view raises a number of objections centred on science as a metanarrative,…

  10. Hemispheric Interaction, Task Complexity, and Emotional Valence: Evidence from Naturalistic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Andrew J.; Rutherford, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments extend the ecological validity of tests of hemispheric interaction in three novel ways. First, we present a broad class of naturalistic stimuli that have not yet been used in tests of hemispheric interaction. Second, we test whether probable differences in complexity within the class of stimuli are supported by outcomes from…

  11. Assessment and Evaluation of the Utah Master Naturalist Program: Implications for Targeting Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larese-Casanova, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Utah Master Naturalist Program trains citizens who provide education, outreach, and service to promote citizen stewardship of natural resources within their communities. In 2007-2008, the Watersheds module of the program was evaluated for program success, and participant knowledge was assessed. Assessment and evaluation results indicated that…

  12. Mammal Silhouettes No. 1, The Kansas School Naturalist, Volume 19 Number 1, October, 1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Robert J., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    An insert in this issue of Nature Study,'' this quarterly periodical ( The Kansas School Naturalist'') is free of charge to Kansas school personnel, conservationists, youth leaders, and other adults interested in nature education. This issue focuses on mammals and contains general information about the moose, elk, muskox, camel, walrus, etc. (LK)

  13. A Naturalistic Study of Referred Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca; Arcangeli, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To report on clinical features, comorbidity, and response to pharmacotherapy in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) naturalistically followed and treated with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Method: A consecutive series of 94 patients (65 males, 29 females, age 13.6 [+ or -] 2.8 years), referred in…

  14. The Practice of Poetry among a Group of Heroin Addicts in India: Naturalistic Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhand, Amar

    2006-01-01

    As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, this paper aims to consider the practice of poetry, "sher-o-shayari", as naturalistic peer learning among a group of heroin addicts in Yamuna Bazaar, New Delhi. By examining meanings given to "sher-o-shayari" and experiences of participating in the practice, this article makes the claim…

  15. Effects of Game Type on Children's Gender-Based Peer Preferences: A Naturalistic Observational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyatzis, Chris J.; Mallis, Michael; Leon, Ileana

    1999-01-01

    Used naturalistic observation to study 242 first- to third- graders playing two games that varied in physicality and competitiveness. As predicted, children interacted more often with same-sex peers. Findings support the necessity of investigating social context as an influence on children's own-sex favoritism. (SLD)

  16. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  17. Hemispheric Interaction, Task Complexity, and Emotional Valence: Evidence from Naturalistic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Andrew J.; Rutherford, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments extend the ecological validity of tests of hemispheric interaction in three novel ways. First, we present a broad class of naturalistic stimuli that have not yet been used in tests of hemispheric interaction. Second, we test whether probable differences in complexity within the class of stimuli are supported by outcomes from…

  18. An Analysis of Naturalistic Interventions for Increasing Spontaneous Expressive Language in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Justin D.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca; Gast, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify naturalistic language interventions for increasing spontaneous expressive language (defined in this review as absence of verbal prompt or other verbalization from adults or peers) in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Also, the methodological rigor and effectiveness of each study were evaluated…

  19. Naturalistic Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beail, Nigel; Warden, Sharon; Morsley, Kim; Newman, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: Despite repeated calls for research on the efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities there has been little progress in this area. This paper reports a naturalistic study of the effectiveness of individual psychodynamic psychotherapy provided in routine clinical practice. Method: The study…

  20. A Naturalistic Inquiry of a Distance Learning University TESOL Program for In-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers-Rocha, Lonna

    2015-01-01

    In this naturalistic inquiry, I explore a professional development program which provided Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) graduate coursework from a university in Northeast Kansas to in-service teachers in Southwest Kansas through distance learning. Data sources included interviews, participant observation, and document and…

  1. A Method for Naturalistic Observation of the Childbirth Environment: With Application to Theory Building and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Joanne; Standley, Kay

    An instrument for naturalistic observation in the childbirth environment is presented. Observable features of the parturient woman's physical state, stimulus contact she experiences, and themes of conversations with the woman are recorded using a system of categories to time-sample in cycles of 30 seconds for observing followed by 30 seconds for…

  2. A Naturalistic Study of Executive Function and Mathematical Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Lee, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Our goal in this research was to understand the specific challenges middle-school students face when engaging in mathematical problem-solving by using executive function (i.e., shifting, updating, and inhibiting) of working memory as a functional construct for the analysis. Using modified talk-aloud protocols, real-time naturalistic analysis of…

  3. Functional Hemispheric Differences for the Categorization of Global and Local Information in Naturalistic Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubner, Ronald; Studer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Up to now functional hemispheric asymmetries for global/local processing have mainly been investigated with hierarchical letters as stimuli. In the present study, three experiments were conducted to examine whether corresponding visual-field (VF) effects can also be obtained with more naturalistic stimuli. To this end, images of animals with a…

  4. Jackson County Teachers and the Combined Classroom Experience: A Naturalistic Inquiry of Combination Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobham, Christina A.

    Seven combined or multi-grade classes, ranging from grades 2 to 5, were the focus of a qualitative, naturalistic inquiry. In each of the four elementary schools visited for the study, the decision to have combined classes had been made shortly before school started for administrative reasons. The study sought to determine the manner in which the…

  5. Association of Alcohol Consumption with Perception of Attractiveness in a Naturalistic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Olivia M.; Skinner, Andrew L.; Troy, David M.; Attwood, Angela S.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate the relationship between objectively-assessed alcohol consumption and perception of attractiveness in naturalistic drinking environments, and to determine the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a large-scale study in these environments. Methods Observational study conducted simultaneously across three public houses in Bristol, UK. Participants were required to rate the attractiveness of male and female face stimuli and landscape stimuli administered via an Android tablet computer application, after which their expired breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) was measured. Results Linear regression revealed no clear evidence for relationships between alcohol consumption and either overall perception of attractiveness for stimuli, for faces specifically, or for opposite-sex faces. The naturalistic research methodology was feasible, with high levels of participant engagement and enjoyment. Conclusions We found no evidence for a relationship between alcohol consumption and perception of attractiveness in our large-scale naturalistic study. Our study is important given the large sample size, the successful translation of an experimental, laboratory-based paradigm to a naturalistic drinking environment and the high level of public engagement with the study. Future studies should use similarly ecologically-valid methodologies to further explore the conditions under which this effect may be observed and identify the mechanisms underlying any relationships. PMID:26282686

  6. Michael Peters' Lyotardian Account of Postmodernism and Education: Some Epistemic Problems and Naturalistic Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Postmodernism has established a significant hold in educational thought and some of the most important ideas are to be found in the writings of Michael Peters. This paper examines his postmodern stance and use of Lyotard's account of knowledge, and from a naturalist point of view raises a number of objections centred on science as a metanarrative,…

  7. Naturalistic stimulation changes the dynamic response of action potential encoding in a mechanoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Keram; French, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Naturalistic signals were created from vibrations made by locusts walking on a Sansevieria plant. Both naturalistic and Gaussian noise signals were used to mechanically stimulate VS-3 slit-sense mechanoreceptor neurons of the spider, Cupiennius salei, with stimulus amplitudes adjusted to give similar firing rates for either stimulus. Intracellular microelectrodes recorded action potentials, receptor potential, and receptor current, using current clamp and voltage clamp. Frequency response analysis showed that naturalistic stimulation contained relatively more power at low frequencies, and caused increased neuronal sensitivity to higher frequencies. In contrast, varying the amplitude of Gaussian stimulation did not change neuronal dynamics. Naturalistic stimulation contained less entropy than Gaussian, but signal entropy was higher than stimulus in the resultant receptor current, indicating addition of uncorrelated noise during transduction. The presence of added noise was supported by measuring linear information capacity in the receptor current. Total entropy and information capacity in action potentials produced by either stimulus were much lower than in earlier stages, and limited to the maximum entropy of binary signals. We conclude that the dynamics of action potential encoding in VS-3 neurons are sensitive to the form of stimulation, but entropy and information capacity of action potentials are limited by firing rate. PMID:26578975

  8. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  9. Toward a Methodology of Naturalistic Inquiry in Educational Evaluation. CSE Monograph Series in Evaluation, 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guba, Egon G.

    Evaluation is viewed as essential to decision making and social policy development. Since conventional methods have been disappointing or inadequate, naturalistic inquiry (N/I) differs from conventional science in minimizing constraints on antecedent conditions (controls) and on output (dependent variables). N/I is phenomenological rather than…

  10. A Naturalistic Study of Executive Function and Mathematical Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Lee, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Our goal in this research was to understand the specific challenges middle-school students face when engaging in mathematical problem-solving by using executive function (i.e., shifting, updating, and inhibiting) of working memory as a functional construct for the analysis. Using modified talk-aloud protocols, real-time naturalistic analysis of…

  11. A Naturalistic Observation of Social Behaviours during Preschool Drop-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Jessica S.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study utilised naturalistic observation to assess the impact of parental departure during daily drop-off at preschool on children's settling into daily preschool routines. Forty-six 3-5-year-old children and their parents/caregivers were observed during morning drop-off at preschool. Longer latencies of parent/caregiver leaving were…

  12. A Naturalistic Experiment on Alcohol Availability Patterns of Consumption and the Context for Drinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraushaar, Kevin; Alsop, Brent

    Reduced alcohol availability following the closure of the sole hotels in two rural towns afforded a naturalistic experiment to study the effects of alcohol availability and context for drinking on consumption. Measures of consumption derived from interviews, total dollars of liquor sales, and police drink-driving data were compared across two…

  13. Attachment Behavior of Day-Care Children: Naturalistic and Laboratory Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozin, Arlene S.

    1980-01-01

    Relationships between day care and attachment were assessed with alternative procedures: (1) hypothesized normal patterns of attachment were tested naturalistically in day-care centers; (2) day-care and home-reared children were compared in a laboratory setting. (Author/MP)

  14. Attachment behavior of day-care children: naturalistic and laboratory observations.

    PubMed

    Ragozin, A S

    1980-06-01

    Relationships between day care and attachment were assessed with alternative procedures: (1) hypothesized normal patterns of attachment were tested naturalistically in day-care centers; (2) day-care and home-reared children were compared in a laboratory setting. Naturalistic observations were conducted on 20 middle-class day-care children, 17--38 months of age. 14 of the day-care children were compared with 14 matched home-reared children in a strange-situation procedure. Naturalistic data confirmed hypothesized patterns of attachment behavior. Preference for mother over familiar caregivers was demonstrated both in a comparison constructed to bias results against mother and in a less stringent test. Expected heightening of attachment behaviors following all-day separations, and predicted age trends also were found. In the strange situation, there were very few rearing group differences in children's behavior to mother; the day-care group, however, interacted less with the stranger. Complementary findings from naturalistic and laboratory situations indicate that day care is compatible with normal patterns of attachment behavior.

  15. An Approach to Naturalistic Evaluation: A Study of the Social Implications of an International Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Rebecca A.; Shute, J. C. M.

    1991-01-01

    A naturalistic approach to evaluation is illustrated through the description of the evaluation of a small-scale agricultural project in a village in Mali, West Africa. The evaluation considered program impact as well as the quality of the conclusions drawn using the illuminative model of evaluation. (SLD)

  16. Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions: Empirically Validated Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreibman, Laura; Dawson, Geraldine; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Landa, Rebecca; Rogers, Sally J.; McGee, Gail G.; Kasari, Connie; Ingersoll, Brooke; Kaiser, Ann P.; Bruinsma, Yvonne; McNerney, Erin; Wetherby, Amy; Halladay, Alycia

    2015-01-01

    Earlier autism diagnosis, the importance of early intervention, and development of specific interventions for young children have contributed to the emergence of similar, empirically supported, autism interventions that represent the merging of applied behavioral and developmental sciences. "Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions…

  17. Early Intervention in 208 Swedish Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder. A Prospective Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernell, Elisabeth; Hedvall, Asa; Westerlund, Joakim; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Eriksson, Mats; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Holm, Anette; Norrelgen, Fritjof; Kjellmer, Liselotte; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Early intervention has been reported to improve outcome in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Several studies in the field have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was to assess ASD outcome in a large naturalistic study. Two hundred and eight children, aged 20-54 months, with a clinical diagnosis of ASD…

  18. Using Developmental Theme Metaphors with Children in Trance: Traditional and Naturalistic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousell, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Presents two case studies of children in which developmental themes were used as therapeutic metaphors for behavioral change. The first illustrates use of a traditional hypnotic induction with a behavioral prescription. The second illustrates a naturalistic trance induction with indirect/imbedded suggestions. Emphasizes advantage of using…

  19. The Effects of Prospective Naturalistic Contact on the Stigma of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Shannon M.; Penn, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether naturalistic, interpersonal contact with persons with a severe mental illness (SMI) could reduce stigma. Participants from the agency Compeer (which pairs volunteers with people with SMI) were compared to volunteers from a control agency and to nonvolunteer participants from the community on…

  20. The Tense-Aspect System in Pidgins and Naturalistically Learned L2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, J. Clancy

    2003-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of wider or narrower definitions of "pidginization" and "pidgin" are reviewed to determine the differences between pidgins and naturalistically learned second languages (L2s). It is argued that a wider definition is preferred because it avoids problematic counterexamples and captures…

  1. Individualized Autism Intervention for Young Children: Blending Discrete Trial and Naturalistic Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2011-01-01

    Discrete trial instruction or naturalistic, incidental teaching: How do you choose which approach to use with young children with autism? Now there's no need to "pick a side"--this groundbreaking book helps professionals skillfully blend the best of both behavioral approaches to respond to "each child's individual needs". Developed by one of the…

  2. The Effects of Teacher-Implemented Naturalistic Intervention on the Communication of Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harjusola-Webb, Sanna M.; Robbins, Sandra Hess

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a teacher training package on the teacher-delivered naturalistic communication-promoting intervention and the expressive communication of three preschool-aged boys with autism spectrum disorders. Growing numbers of children with disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders, attend community-based and…

  3. Crossmodal Semantic Priming by Naturalistic Sounds and Spoken Words Enhances Visual Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Spence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multisensory framework based on Glaser and Glaser's (1989) general reading-naming interference model to account for the semantic priming effect by naturalistic sounds and spoken words on visual picture sensitivity. Four experiments were designed to investigate two key issues: First, can auditory stimuli enhance visual sensitivity when…

  4. Analysis and Comparison of Naturalistic Themes in Iranian and Britain Modern Children's Poems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Shayesteh; Saljeghe, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Today, children's literature given the concept of childhood, has gained a special status in the studies of humanities. Children's poetry is one of the branches of this type of literature. Naturalistic themes have the highest frequency among the themes of children poems in two countries. The population of this research consists of collections that…

  5. A Naturalistic Method for Assessing the Learning of Arithmatic from Computer-Aided Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira

    1986-01-01

    A study used the naturalistic method of inquiry in order to investigate the CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) contribution to students' performance in arithmetic and to identify possible problems. The study was aimed at understanding the holistic environment of students' individualized drill in arithmetic with the computer. (BS)

  6. How Not to Conduct a Naturalistic Evaluation: Rueful Reminiscences of a Museum Evaluator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyskowski, Gloria

    While evaluating the effectiveness of a portion of the public information system at the Toledo Art Museum, nonclassical approaches to data-gathering presented problems in measuring program aspects which are not easily quantified. There is a necessity to clarify what kinds of information can validly be gathered with naturalistic techniques for an…

  7. Early Intervention in 208 Swedish Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder. A Prospective Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernell, Elisabeth; Hedvall, Asa; Westerlund, Joakim; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Eriksson, Mats; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Holm, Anette; Norrelgen, Fritjof; Kjellmer, Liselotte; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Early intervention has been reported to improve outcome in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Several studies in the field have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was to assess ASD outcome in a large naturalistic study. Two hundred and eight children, aged 20-54 months, with a clinical diagnosis of ASD…

  8. Counting Birds at the Grassroots: Making a Census into "Citizen Science," Naturalists Share Their Findings Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, James

    2001-01-01

    The Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are promoting various "citizen science" projects in which amateur naturalists make local observations of birds, butterflies, or natural phenomena and report their observations to interactive databases on the World Wide Web. Events such as the Great Backyard Bird Count motivate people…

  9. Naturalistic Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beail, Nigel; Warden, Sharon; Morsley, Kim; Newman, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: Despite repeated calls for research on the efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities there has been little progress in this area. This paper reports a naturalistic study of the effectiveness of individual psychodynamic psychotherapy provided in routine clinical practice. Method: The study…

  10. The Differential Effect of Three Naturalistic Language Interventions on Language Use in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Naturalistic interventions show promise for improving language in children with autism. Specific interventions differ in direct elicitation of child language and indirect language stimulation, and thus may produce different language outcomes. This study compared the effects of responsive interaction, milieu teaching, and a combined intervention on…

  11. Using Developmental Theme Metaphors with Children in Trance: Traditional and Naturalistic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousell, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Presents two case studies of children in which developmental themes were used as therapeutic metaphors for behavioral change. The first illustrates use of a traditional hypnotic induction with a behavioral prescription. The second illustrates a naturalistic trance induction with indirect/imbedded suggestions. Emphasizes advantage of using…

  12. Assessment and Evaluation of the Utah Master Naturalist Program: Implications for Targeting Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larese-Casanova, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Utah Master Naturalist Program trains citizens who provide education, outreach, and service to promote citizen stewardship of natural resources within their communities. In 2007-2008, the Watersheds module of the program was evaluated for program success, and participant knowledge was assessed. Assessment and evaluation results indicated that…

  13. The Effects of Teacher-Implemented Naturalistic Intervention on the Communication of Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harjusola-Webb, Sanna M.; Robbins, Sandra Hess

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a teacher training package on the teacher-delivered naturalistic communication-promoting intervention and the expressive communication of three preschool-aged boys with autism spectrum disorders. Growing numbers of children with disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders, attend community-based and…

  14. The Effect of Naturalistic Behavior Strategies on the Quality of Social Interactions for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Autism is primarily a social disorder and deficits in social-orienting may be responsible for the failure of children with autism to initiate critical social behaviors. The purpose of this research was to improve the quality of social interactions of children with autism by implementing naturalistic behavior strategies intervention utilizing a…

  15. The Effect of Naturalistic Behavior Strategies on the Quality of Social Interactions for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Autism is primarily a social disorder and deficits in social-orienting may be responsible for the failure of children with autism to initiate critical social behaviors. The purpose of this research was to improve the quality of social interactions of children with autism by implementing naturalistic behavior strategies intervention utilizing a…

  16. The Development of Intrinsic Criteria for Authenticity: A Model for Trust in Naturalistic Researches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    This paper presents criteria for establishing the trustworthiness of naturalistic inquiries, and specific techniques to facilitate their achievement or determine the degree of their achievement. The following criteria are briefly described: fairness; and ontological, educative, catalytic and tactical authenticity. Explored in greater detail,…

  17. 'Naturalistic vs reductionistic approaches to health-related practice: opposing dichotomy or symbiotic partnership?'.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, D

    2000-08-01

    Complementary therapies, within Health Service arenas, have traditionally been associated with 'naturalistic' approaches to health care provision rather than with 'reductionist' practices. Evidence does exist, however, that certain approaches to complementary therapies can exist comfortably within both camps. Subsequent debates within nursing literature, surrounding the place and validity of reductionist approaches to health care provision and their relationship with the 'counter-part' naturalistic (i.e. empowerment) approaches to health care, have existed for some time now. Naturalistic (inductive and interpretive) and reductionistic (deductive and fixed) classifications of health care provision have continued to be viewed, by many health care professionals, as apposite, divided and allopathic. This appears to be even more so recently where elements of reductionist health care have been portrayed in terms that serve to undervalue and undermine its contribution. This is whilst naturalistic approaches, in far more favourable terms, have gone on to be 'championed' by many health professions. This account sets out to investigate how this situation impacts upon the discipline of complementary therapies. It seeks to do so by defining the nature and purpose of these differing approaches - particularly within the boundaries of health promotion activities. It goes on to suggest that our current practices/viewpoints, related to these particular approaches, could be considered in themselves to be flawed, limiting and reductionist with a potential to unwittingly create a counterproductive practice ethic. As an alternative to this situation, it is suggested that by identifying the strengths and weaknesses of both stances it is possible to find common ground which marries together the more favourable aspects of these approaches. This can subsequently provide a clearer and more productive consensus for complementary therapies and other naturalistic-based practices to move

  18. A naturalistic study of changes in pharmacological prescription for borderline personality disorder in clinical practice: from APA to NICE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Juan C; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Soler, Joaquim; Ferrer, Alicia; Tiana, Thais; Alvarez, Enrique; Pérez, Víctor

    2010-11-01

    Although no psychotropic agents are specifically licensed for the management of borderline personality disorder (BPD), pharmacological treatment appears to be common. This study aimed to examine the drug prescriptions for patients with BPD in clinical practice, analyze the prescription patterns from the appearance of the American Psychiatric Association guidelines in 2001 until the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines in 2009, and identify the factors associated with such prescription of each type of drug. Naturalistic study on 226 consecutive BPD patients admitted to an outpatient BPD program. Socio-demographic, clinical and pharmacological treatment information was collected; factors associated with drug prescription were examined using logistic regression analyses for dichotomous outcomes measures. Changes in prescription patterns over time were also evaluated. Patients received an average of 2.7 drugs; only 6% were drug-free; 56% were taking ≥3 drugs and 30% ≥4 drugs. Over the past 8 years, prescription of antidepressants has remained stable; there has been a significant reduction in prescription of benzodiazepines and an increase in the use of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics. Comorbidity with Axis I disorders was the main factor associated with drug prescription. Drug prescription and polypharmacy are common in the management of BPD in clinical practice.

  19. Latin American Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsunce, Cesar A. Garcia

    1983-01-01

    Examination of the situation of archives in four Latin American countries--Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Costa Rica--highlights national systems, buildings, staff, processing of documents, accessibility and services to the public and publications and extension services. (EJS)

  20. Micro-analysis of infant looking in a naturalistic social setting: insights from biologically based models of attention.

    PubMed

    de Barbaro, Kaya; Chiba, Andrea; Deák, Gedeon O

    2011-09-01

    A current theory of attention posits that several micro-indices of attentional vigilance are dependent on activation of the locus coeruleus, a brainstem nucleus that regulates cortical norepinephrine activity (Aston-Jones et al., 1999). This theory may account for many findings in the infant literature, while highlighting important new areas for research and theory on infant attention. We examined the visual behaviors of n = 16 infants (6-7 months) while they attended to multiple spatially distributed targets in a naturalistic environment. We coded four measures of attentional vigilance, adapted from studies of norepinergic modulation of animal attention: rate of fixations, duration of fixations, latency to reorientation, and target 'hits'. These measures showed a high degree of coherence in individual infants, in parallel with findings from animal studies. Results also suggest that less vigilant infants showed greater habituation to the trial structure and more attentiveness to less salient stimuli during periods of high attentional competition. This pattern of results is predicted by the Aston-Jones model of attention, but could not be explained by the standard information processing model.

  1. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  2. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  3. Darwin's historical sketch - an American predecessor: C.S. Rafinesque.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, C T

    2010-01-01

    When early reviewers of Darwin's "On the origin of species" chided him for neglecting to mention predecessors to his theory of evolution, he added an "historical sketch" in later editions. Among the predecessors he cited was a French émigré to American named Constantine Samuel Rafinesque, who in the mid-1830s had written about the emergence of new species at a time when most naturalists (including Darwin initially) accepted the biblical story of creation and assumed the immutability of species. Rafinesque discovered and named thousands of new plants and animals in his American travels and flooded the taxonomic literature with reports, which seemed incomplete, confusing, and excessive to other naturalists. He alienated many who later dismissed his findings and excluded them from the biological literature. Soon after Rafinesque's death in 1840, Asa Gray, the young American botanist, wrote a damning critique of his work and suggested it be ignored. How Darwin learned of Rafinesque and his views on species is the focus of this essay, which also mentions briefly the two other American naturalists cited by Darwin in his sketch. Gray seems the likely informant through his correspondence with Darwin or his close associates.

  4. African American Women Principals in Urban Schools: Realities, (Re)constructions, and Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Collette M.; Erlandson, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Using a naturalistic inquiry approach, analysis of indepth interviews reveals portraits of three African American women administrators emerging from their visible absences, illusionary opportunities, and imaginary schools with stories of strength, identity formation, and a collective consciousness in working for and with the black community in…

  5. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  6. Naturaliste Plateau volcanic province: the 'smoking gun' for onset of the Kerguelen Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Direen, N. G.; Crawford, A. J.; Cohen, B. E.; Coffin, M. F.; Whittaker, J. M.; Maas, R.; Meffre, S.; Vasconcelos, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Naturaliste Plateau, offshore Western Australia, has been previously linked to the Kerguelen Large Igneous Province (LIP), together with small volumes of volcanic rocks on the Australian mainland (Bunbury Basalts), Broken Ridge (Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1141 and 1142), India (Rajmahal Traps), and Tibet (Comei and Cona Basalts). A major uncertainty in many models for the Kerguelen LIP is the discrepancy between the early dates of the onshore rocks, which cluster at 132 Ma, and the apparently younger onset of the volcanism that produced the major eruptive edifice of the Southern Kerguelen Plateau, at around 119 Ma. Here we present new geochemical and geochronological data from nine new dredge sites on the southern margin of Naturaliste Plateau which strongly link the plateau's volcanic carapace to the smaller volume but contemporaneous and geochemically similar lavas on the adjacent Western Australian margin and in Tibet, and attest to the onset of the Kerguelen plume and LIP formation in Hauterivian time.

  7. Behavioral Language Interventions for Children with Autism: Comparing Applied Verbal Behavior and Naturalistic Teaching Approaches

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Linda A; Esch, John; Sidener, Tina M; Firth, Amanda M

    2006-01-01

    Several important behavioral intervention models have been developed for teaching language to children with autism and two are compared in this paper. Professionals adhering to Skinner's conceptualization of language refer to their curriculum and intervention programming as applied verbal behavior (AVB). Those primarily focused on developing and using strategies embedded in natural settings that promote generalization refer to their interventions as naturalistic teaching approaches (NTAs). The purpose of this paper is to describe each approach and discuss similarities and differences in terms of relevant dimensions of stimulus control. The discussion includes potential barriers to translation of terminology between the two approaches that we feel can be overcome to allow better communication and collaboration between the two communities. Common naturalistic teaching procedures are described and a Skinnerian conceptualization of these learning events is provided. PMID:22477343

  8. Mapping species distributions: a comparison of skilled naturalist and lay citizen science recording.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, René; Anderson, Helen; Robinson, Annie; Sharma, Nirwan; Mellish, Chris; Roberts, Stuart; Darvill, Ben; Siddharthan, Advaith

    2015-11-01

    To assess the ability of traditional biological recording schemes and lay citizen science approaches to gather data on species distributions and changes therein, we examined bumblebee records from the UK's national repository (National Biodiversity Network) and from BeeWatch. The two recording approaches revealed similar relative abundances of bumblebee species but different geographical distributions. For the widespread common carder (Bombus pascuorum), traditional recording scheme data were patchy, both spatially and temporally, reflecting active record centre rather than species distribution. Lay citizen science records displayed more extensive geographic coverage, reflecting human population density, thus offering better opportunities to account for recording effort. For the rapidly spreading tree bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum), both recording approaches revealed similar distributions due to a dedicated mapping project which overcame the patchy nature of naturalist records. We recommend, where possible, complementing skilled naturalist recording with lay citizen science programmes to obtain a nation-wide capability, and stress the need for timely uploading of data to the national repository.

  9. Multisensory processing of naturalistic objects in motion: a high-density electrical mapping and source estimation study.

    PubMed

    Senkowski, Daniel; Saint-Amour, Dave; Kelly, Simon P; Foxe, John J

    2007-07-01

    In everyday life, we continuously and effortlessly integrate the multiple sensory inputs from objects in motion. For instance, the sound and the visual percept of vehicles in traffic provide us with complementary information about the location and motion of vehicles. Here, we used high-density electrical mapping and local auto-regressive average (LAURA) source estimation to study the integration of multisensory objects in motion as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs). A randomized stream of naturalistic multisensory-audiovisual (AV), unisensory-auditory (A), and unisensory-visual (V) "splash" clips (i.e., a drop falling and hitting a water surface) was presented among non-naturalistic abstract motion stimuli. The visual clip onset preceded the "splash" onset by 100 ms for multisensory stimuli. For naturalistic objects early multisensory integration effects beginning 120-140 ms after sound onset were observed over posterior scalp, with distributed sources localized to occipital cortex, temporal lobule, insular, and medial frontal gyrus (MFG). These effects, together with longer latency interactions (210-250 and 300-350 ms) found in a widespread network of occipital, temporal, and frontal areas, suggest that naturalistic objects in motion are processed at multiple stages of multisensory integration. The pattern of integration effects differed considerably for non-naturalistic stimuli. Unlike naturalistic objects, no early interactions were found for non-naturalistic objects. The earliest integration effects for non-naturalistic stimuli were observed 210-250 ms after sound onset including large portions of the inferior parietal cortex (IPC). As such, there were clear differences in the cortical networks activated by multisensory motion stimuli as a consequence of the semantic relatedness (or lack thereof) of the constituent sensory elements.

  10. Cocaine behavioral economics: From the naturalistic environment to the controlled laboratory setting

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K.; Steinmiller, Caren L.

    2017-01-01

    Background We previously observed that behavioral economic factors predict naturalistic heroin seeking behavior that correlates with opioid seeking in the experimental laboratory. The present study sought to replicate and extend these prior findings with regular cocaine users. Methods Participants (N = 83) completed a semi-structured interview to establish income-generating and cocaine-purchasing/use repertoire during the past month. Questions addressed sources/amounts of income and expenditures; price (money and time) per purchase; and frequency/amounts of cocaine purchased and consumed. Naturalistic cocaine purchasing and use patterns were: (1) analyzed as a function of income quartile, (2) perturbed by hypothetical changes in cost factors to assess changes in purchasing/use habits, and (3) correlated with experimental cocaine seeking. Results Income was positively related to naturalistic cocaine seeking/use pattern (i.e., income elastic), and behaviors were cost-efficient and sensitive to supply chain. Income was unrelated to proportional expenditure on cocaine (≈55%) but inversely related to food expenditure. In all hypothetical scenarios (changes in income or dealer, loss of income assistance from government or family/friends, and increasing arrest risk when purchasing), the high-income group reported they would continue to use more cocaine daily than other groups. Number of laboratory cocaine choices significantly correlated with cocaine purchase time (positively) and purity of cocaine (negatively) in the naturalistic setting. Conclusions These results replicate and extend findings with regular heroin users, demonstrate the importance of income, cost-efficiency and supply-mindedness in cocaine seeking/use, and suggest that this interview-based approach has good external validity. PMID:24878248

  11. fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task

    PubMed Central

    Noah, J. Adam; Ono, Yumie; Nomoto, Yasunori; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Zhang, Xian; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning. PMID:26132365

  12. Cocaine behavioral economics: from the naturalistic environment to the controlled laboratory setting.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Mark K; Steinmiller, Caren L

    2014-08-01

    We previously observed that behavioral economic factors predict naturalistic heroin seeking behavior that correlates with opioid seeking in the experimental laboratory. The present study sought to replicate and extend these prior findings with regular cocaine users. Participants (N=83) completed a semi-structured interview to establish income-generating and cocaine-purchasing/use repertoire during the past month. Questions addressed sources/amounts of income and expenditures; price (money and time) per purchase; and frequency/amounts of cocaine purchased and consumed. Naturalistic cocaine purchasing and use patterns were: (1) analyzed as a function of income quartile, (2) perturbed by hypothetical changes in cost factors to assess changes in purchasing/use habits, and (3) correlated with experimental cocaine seeking. Income was positively related to naturalistic cocaine seeking/use pattern (i.e., income elastic), and behaviors were cost-efficient and sensitive to supply chain. Income was unrelated to proportional expenditure on cocaine (≈55%) but inversely related to food expenditure. In all hypothetical scenarios (changes in income or dealer, loss of income assistance from government or family/friends, and increasing arrest risk when purchasing), the high-income group reported they would continue to use more cocaine daily than other groups. Number of laboratory cocaine choices significantly correlated with cocaine purchase time (positively) and purity of cocaine (negatively) in the naturalistic setting. These results replicate and extend findings with regular heroin users, demonstrate the importance of income, cost-efficiency and supply-mindedness in cocaine seeking/use, and suggest that this interview-based approach has good external validity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2005 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Technical highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  14. Laboratory for Atmospheres: 2006 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, are highlighted in this report.

  15. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2007 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  16. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2009 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  17. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2010 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  18. Re-evaluating concepts of biological function in clinical medicine: towards a new naturalistic theory of disease.

    PubMed

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin; Upshur, Ross E G

    2017-08-01

    Naturalistic theories of disease appeal to concepts of biological function, and use the notion of dysfunction as the basis of their definitions. Debates in the philosophy of biology demonstrate how attributing functions in organisms and establishing the function-dysfunction distinction is by no means straightforward. This problematization of functional ascription has undermined naturalistic theories and led some authors to abandon the concept of dysfunction, favoring instead definitions based in normative criteria or phenomenological approaches. Although this work has enhanced our understanding of disease and illness, we need not necessarily abandon naturalistic concepts of function and dysfunction in the disease debate. This article attempts to move towards a new naturalistic theory of disease that overcomes the limitations of previous definitions and offers advantages in the clinical setting. Our approach involves a re-evaluation of concepts of biological function employed by naturalistic theories. Drawing on recent insights from the philosophy of biology, we develop a contextual and evaluative account of function that is better suited to clinical medicine and remains consistent with contemporary naturalism. We also show how an updated naturalistic view shares important affinities with normativist and phenomenological positions, suggesting a possibility for consilience in the disease debate.

  19. Paliperidone Palmitate Treatment in Outpatient Care Setting: A Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cameli, Michela; Bolondi, Marisa; Landi, Giulia; Moretti, Valentina; Piemonte, Chiara; Pollutri, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate paliperidone palmitate (PP) effectiveness, safety and adherence to treatment. Methods We collected data of all patients (n = 50) affected by Schizophrenia Disorders, treated with PP for a 3 month minimum period in the outpatient setting of Mental Health Department in Modena, from 01/01/2014 to 31/01/2015. We evaluated reasons and modality for PP implementation, improvement in symptom and functioning scales, adverse effects, discontinuations and relapses. We statistically correlated socio-demographic and clinical variables of our sample with PP therapeutic variables. Results We registered an improvement in all scales, with a superior percentage in PANSS positive subscale. The mean PP dose in some patients was lower than official indications, although our sample was clinically severe. Illness relapses affected 60% and dropout 18% of patients. PP was well tolerated and in just a few cases adverse events required treatment interruption. The risk factors for discontinuation were represented by “lack of therapeutic compliance” (HR = 4.11, p < 0.0001) and “inefficacy” (HR = 1.67, p < 0.0001). Conclusions With limitations of observational design, this research highlights that PP was well tolerated and effective in improving both psychotic symptoms and functioning, but moderately effective in preventing relapse, probably due to clinical severity of our patients associated with extremely cautious and flexible PP prescriptions. PMID:27738372

  20. Preferential Processing of Social Features and Their Interplay with Physical Saliency in Complex Naturalistic Scenes

    PubMed Central

    End, Albert; Gamer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    According to so-called saliency-based attention models, attention during free viewing of visual scenes is particularly allocated to physically salient image regions. In the present study, we assumed that social features in complex naturalistic scenes would be processed preferentially irrespective of their physical saliency. Therefore, we expected worse prediction of gazing behavior by saliency-based attention models when social information is present in the visual field. To test this hypothesis, participants freely viewed color photographs of complex naturalistic social (e.g., including heads, bodies) and non-social (e.g., including landscapes, objects) scenes while their eye movements were recorded. In agreement with our hypothesis, we found that social features (especially heads) were heavily prioritized during visual exploration. Correspondingly, the presence of social information weakened the influence of low-level saliency on gazing behavior. Importantly, this pattern was most pronounced for the earliest fixations indicating automatic attentional processes. These findings were further corroborated by a linear mixed model approach showing that social features (especially heads) add substantially to the prediction of fixations beyond physical saliency. Taken together, the current study indicates gazing behavior for naturalistic scenes to be better predicted by the interplay of social and physically salient features than by low-level saliency alone. These findings strongly challenge the generalizability of saliency-based attention models and demonstrate the importance of considering social influences when investigating the driving factors of human visual attention. PMID:28424635

  1. The life and viper of Dr Patrick Russell MD FRS (1727-1805): physician and naturalist.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, B J

    1994-11-01

    It is nearly two hundred years since the publication in 1796 of An Account of Indian Serpents collected on the Coast of Coromandel by Patrick Russell. Within the folio is a drawing and description of the venomous snake called Katuka Rekula Poda in the local Telugu language, whose venom was shown experimentally by Dr Russell to be nearly as lethal as that of Cobra de Capello. The snake is now known as Vipera russelli or Russell's viper. Dr Russell was representative of the naturalistic tendency of British medicine in the late 18th century. He was a keen observer and skilled doctor in clinical practice, particularly in Aleppo, Syria, during an outbreak of the plague, and indefatigable in his study of plant and animal life both in Aleppo and later in the Madras Province of India. As a physician as well as Naturalist to the East India Company in the Carnatic he was concerned with the problem of snakebite. His first aim was to find a means whereby the non-specialist could distinguish between poisonous and harmless snakes and so combat the terrible notion that all bites were mortal. His writing, encompassing social and natural histories and climaxed by a study of snakes, has left a rich legacy. Dr Patrick Russell was a man of the highest integrity and ability, a physician and naturalist par excellence.

  2. Home improvement: C57BL/6J mice given more naturalistic nesting materials build better nests.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sarah E; Rohr, Stephanie; Dufour, Brett D; Gaskill, Brianna N; Pajor, Edmond A; Garner, Joseph P

    2008-11-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory mice can improve the quality of research, but debate arises over the means of enrichment and its ability to be used in a sterile environment. One important form of enrichment is nesting material. Mice in the wild build dome-shaped, complex, multilayered nests, but this behavior is not seen in the laboratory, perhaps due to inappropriate nesting material rather than the nest-building ability of the mice. Here we focus on the use of naturalistic nesting materials to test whether they improve nest quality through the use of a 'naturalistic nest score' system; we also focus on materials that can be sterilized and easily used in existing housing systems. We first determined whether C57BL/6J mice build naturalistic nests when given shredded paper strips. We then compared these shredded paper strips with other commonly used nesting enrichments (facial tissues and compressed cotton squares). Nests were scored for 6 d. We found that the shredded paper strips allowed the mice to build higher quality nests than those built with any of the other materials. Nests built with tissues were of intermediate quality, and nests built with compressed cotton squares were of poor quality, similar to those built by the control group. These results suggest that C57BL/6J mice given appropriate nesting materials can build nests similar to those built by their wild counterparts.

  3. Eliciting naturalistic cortical responses with a sensory prosthesis via optimized microstimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, John S.; Brockmeier, Austin J.; McNiel, David B.; von Kraus, Lee M.; Príncipe, José C.; Francis, Joseph T.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Lost sensations, such as touch, could one day be restored by electrical stimulation along the sensory neural pathways. Such stimulation, when informed by electronic sensors, could provide naturalistic cutaneous and proprioceptive feedback to the user. Perceptually, microstimulation of somatosensory brain regions produces localized, modality-specific sensations, and several spatiotemporal parameters have been studied for their discernibility. However, systematic methods for encoding a wide array of naturally occurring stimuli into biomimetic percepts via multi-channel microstimulation are lacking. More specifically, generating spatiotemporal patterns for explicitly evoking naturalistic neural activation has not yet been explored. Approach. We address this problem by first modeling the dynamical input-output relationship between multichannel microstimulation and downstream neural responses, and then optimizing the input pattern to reproduce naturally occurring touch responses as closely as possible. Main results. Here we show that such optimization produces responses in the S1 cortex of the anesthetized rat that are highly similar to natural, tactile-stimulus-evoked counterparts. Furthermore, information on both pressure and location of the touch stimulus was found to be highly preserved. Significance. Our results suggest that the currently presented stimulus optimization approach holds great promise for restoring naturalistic levels of sensation.

  4. Naturalistic Validation of an On-Road Driving Test of Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brian R.; Papandonatos, George D.; Davis, Jennifer D.; Barco, Peggy P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare a standardized road test to naturalistic driving by older people who may have cognitive impairment to define improvements that could potentially enhance the validity of road testing in this population. Background Road testing has been widely adapted as a tool to assess driving competence of older people who may be at risk for unsafe driving because of dementia; however, the validity of this approach has not been rigorously evaluated. Method For 2 weeks, 80 older drivers (38 healthy elders and 42 with cognitive impairment) who passed a standardized road test were video recorded in their own vehicles. Using a standardized rating scale, 4 hr of video was rated by a driving instructor. The authors examine weighting of individual road test items to form global impressions and to compare road test and naturalistic driving using factor analyses of these two assessments. Results The road test score was unidimensional, reflecting a major factor related to awareness of signage and traffic behavior. Naturalistic driving reflected two factors related to lane keeping as well as traffic behavior. Conclusion Maintenance of proper lane is an important dimension of driving safety that appears to be relatively underemphasized during the highly supervised procedures of the standardized road test. Application Road testing in this population could be improved by standardized designs that emphasize lane keeping and that include self-directed driving. Additional information should be sought from observers in the community as well as crash evidence when advising older drivers who may be cognitively impaired. PMID:22908688

  5. Spontaneously Emerging Patterns in Human Visual Cortex Reflect Responses to Naturalistic Sensory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Meytal; Strappini, Francesca; Golan, Tal; Hahamy, Avital; Harel, Michal; Malach, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of stimulus or task, the cortex spontaneously generates rich and consistent functional connectivity patterns (termed resting state networks) which are evident even within individual cortical areas. We and others have previously hypothesized that habitual cortical network activations during daily life contribute to the shaping of these connectivity patterns. Here we tested this hypothesis by comparing, using blood oxygen level-dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging, the connectivity patterns that spontaneously emerge during rest in retinotopic visual areas to the patterns generated by naturalistic visual stimuli (repeated movie segments). These were then compared with connectivity patterns produced by more standard retinotopic mapping stimuli (polar and eccentricity mapping). Our results reveal that the movie-driven patterns were significantly more similar to the spontaneously emerging patterns, compared with the connectivity patterns of either eccentricity or polar mapping stimuli. Intentional visual imagery of naturalistic stimuli was unlikely to underlie these results, since they were duplicated when participants were engaged in an auditory task. Our results suggest that the connectivity patterns that appear during rest better reflect naturalistic activations rather than controlled, artificially designed stimuli. The results are compatible with the hypothesis that the spontaneous connectivity patterns in human retinotopic areas reflect the statistics of cortical coactivations during natural vision. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome.

  7. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli. PMID:27598534

  8. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H; Shinkareva, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli.

  9. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    PubMed

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  10. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C.; Busey, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure. PMID:26744839

  11. Exploring multimodal semantic control impairments in semantic aphasia: evidence from naturalistic object use.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Faye; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon

    2009-11-01

    Semantic processing can break down in qualitatively distinct ways in different neuropsychological populations. Previous studies have shown that patients with multimodal semantic impairments following stroke - referred to as semantic aphasia (SA) - show deficits on a range of conceptual tasks due to a failure of semantic control processes in the context of prefrontal and/or temporoparietal infarction. Although a deficit of semantic control would be expected to impair performance in all modalities in parallel, most previous research in this patient group has focussed primarily on tasks employing words. This study explored the consequences of deregulated semantic cognition for an indisputably non-verbal task-naturalistic object use. Patients with SA performed more poorly than control participants on a range of everyday tasks assessed by the Naturalistic Action Test (NAT, Schwartz, M. F., Buxbaum, L. J., Ferraro, M., Veramonti, T., & Segal, M. (2002). Naturalistic action test. Thames Valley Test Company). Moreover, their scores on this assessment correlated with those obtained on language-based semantic tasks, suggesting that a common deficit could underlie the impairment in both modalities. As previously observed in the verbal domain, performance on the NAT was poorer when control processes were taxed by dual-task situations and the inclusion of semantically related distracting objects. A number of characteristics of the patients' action sequences were specifically indicative of deregulated semantic cognition. Their everyday action sequences were highly fragmented by a tendency to abandon subtasks before their completion and engage, instead, in extended periods of aimless "toying" with objects. The patient group also exhibited recurrent perseverative behaviour. These findings parallel the performance of a recurrent connectionist model of naturalistic action developed by Botvinick and Plaut [Botvinick, M. & Plaut, D. C. (2004). Doing without schema hierarchies: A

  12. Highlight area inpainting guided by illumination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Zhiguo; Shi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a two-step algorithm based on the combination of the exemplar-based algorithm and the illumination model to deal with specular images, especially those contain saturated pixels in the highlight areas. First the proposed modified exemplar-based algorithm is employed to process the unsaturated specular pixels under the supervision of illumination model. Then we inpaint the rest regions in which the pixels are saturated with original exemplar-based algorithm to obtain the final result. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs better on the images with saturated pixels in the highlight areas compared with classical highlight removal and image inpainting algorithms.

  13. Highlights from NNSA's Decade of Success

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    On April 28, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration celebrated its 10-year anniversary with a series of events aimed at highlighting a decade of success across the nuclear security enterprise. This slideshow features images from the past 10 years.

  14. Wood machining highlights, 1972 and 1973

    Treesearch

    Charles W. Mcmillin

    1975-01-01

    Important wood machining research published during 1972 and 1973 is highlighted to provide the reader with a concise summary of activity in 17 fields of endeavor. The review is based on 427 references and contains 154 citations.

  15. Wood Machining Highlights, 1972 and 1973

    Treesearch

    C.W. McMillin

    1975-01-01

    Important wood machining research published during 1972 and 1973 is highlighted to provide the reader with a concise summary of activity in 17 fields of endeavor. The review is based on 427 references and contains 154 citations.

  16. Highlights of the 2009 Hurricane Season

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Picture yourself sitting in space watching the highlights of the 2009's Atlantic Ocean hurricane season in fast-forward. This latest animation from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm...

  17. Highlights from NNSA's Decade of Success

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-28

    On April 28, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration celebrated its 10-year anniversary with a series of events aimed at highlighting a decade of success across the nuclear security enterprise. This slideshow features images from the past 10 years.

  18. Role of intraglomerular circuits in shaping temporally structured responses to naturalistic inhalation-driven sensory input to the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Sherwood, William Erik; Shipley, Michael T.; Borisyuk, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction in mammals is a dynamic process driven by the inhalation of air through the nasal cavity. Inhalation determines the temporal structure of sensory neuron responses and shapes the neural dynamics underlying central olfactory processing. Inhalation-linked bursts of activity among olfactory bulb (OB) output neurons [mitral/tufted cells (MCs)] are temporally transformed relative to those of sensory neurons. We investigated how OB circuits shape inhalation-driven dynamics in MCs using a modeling approach that was highly constrained by experimental results. First, we constructed models of canonical OB circuits that included mono- and disynaptic feedforward excitation, recurrent inhibition and feedforward inhibition of the MC. We then used experimental data to drive inputs to the models and to tune parameters; inputs were derived from sensory neuron responses during natural odorant sampling (sniffing) in awake rats, and model output was compared with recordings of MC responses to odorants sampled with the same sniff waveforms. This approach allowed us to identify OB circuit features underlying the temporal transformation of sensory inputs into inhalation-linked patterns of MC spike output. We found that realistic input-output transformations can be achieved independently by multiple circuits, including feedforward inhibition with slow onset and decay kinetics and parallel feedforward MC excitation mediated by external tufted cells. We also found that recurrent and feedforward inhibition had differential impacts on MC firing rates and on inhalation-linked response dynamics. These results highlight the importance of investigating neural circuits in a naturalistic context and provide a framework for further explorations of signal processing by OB networks. PMID:25717156

  19. Role of intraglomerular circuits in shaping temporally structured responses to naturalistic inhalation-driven sensory input to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ryan M; Sherwood, William Erik; Shipley, Michael T; Borisyuk, Alla; Wachowiak, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Olfaction in mammals is a dynamic process driven by the inhalation of air through the nasal cavity. Inhalation determines the temporal structure of sensory neuron responses and shapes the neural dynamics underlying central olfactory processing. Inhalation-linked bursts of activity among olfactory bulb (OB) output neurons [mitral/tufted cells (MCs)] are temporally transformed relative to those of sensory neurons. We investigated how OB circuits shape inhalation-driven dynamics in MCs using a modeling approach that was highly constrained by experimental results. First, we constructed models of canonical OB circuits that included mono- and disynaptic feedforward excitation, recurrent inhibition and feedforward inhibition of the MC. We then used experimental data to drive inputs to the models and to tune parameters; inputs were derived from sensory neuron responses during natural odorant sampling (sniffing) in awake rats, and model output was compared with recordings of MC responses to odorants sampled with the same sniff waveforms. This approach allowed us to identify OB circuit features underlying the temporal transformation of sensory inputs into inhalation-linked patterns of MC spike output. We found that realistic input-output transformations can be achieved independently by multiple circuits, including feedforward inhibition with slow onset and decay kinetics and parallel feedforward MC excitation mediated by external tufted cells. We also found that recurrent and feedforward inhibition had differential impacts on MC firing rates and on inhalation-linked response dynamics. These results highlight the importance of investigating neural circuits in a naturalistic context and provide a framework for further explorations of signal processing by OB networks.

  20. A Phenomenological Study to Engage African-American Youth Voice in Deliberations Regarding Their Response to Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    To examine disparities in education, the researcher utilized a naturalistic approach to uncover how youth think, talk, and feel about their response to schooling. Findings are based on in-depth conversations with 12 inner city African-American kids enrolled in Urban, USA middle and high schools, rarely heard from in the scholarly literature.…

  1. Highlight detection and removal from spectral image.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Pesal; Pant, Paras; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2011-11-01

    We present a constrained spectral unmixing method to remove highlight from a single spectral image. In the constrained spectral unmixing method, the constraints have been imposed so that all the fractions of diffuse and highlight reflection sum up to 1 and are positive. As a result, the spectra of the diffuse image are always positive. The spectral power distribution (SPD) of the light source has been used as the pure highlight spectrum. The pure diffuse spectrum of the measured spectrum has been chosen from the set of diffuse spectra. The pure diffuse spectrum has a minimum angle among the angles calculated between spectra from a set of diffuse spectra and the measured spectrum projected onto the subspace orthogonal to the SPD of the light source. The set of diffuse spectra has been collected by an automated target generation program from the diffuse part in the image. Constrained energy minimization in a finite impulse response linear filter has been used to detect the highlight and diffuse parts in the image. Results by constrained spectral unmixing have been compared with results by the orthogonal subspace projection (OSP) method [Proceedings of International Conference on Pattern Recognition (2006), pp. 812-815] and probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) [Proceedings of the 4th WSEAS International Conference on Signal Processing, Robotics and Automation (2005), paper 15]. Constrained spectral unmixing outperforms OSP and PPCA in the visual assessment of the diffuse results. The highlight removal method by constrained spectral unmixing is suitable for spectral images.

  2. Highlighting: A Mechanism Relevant for Word Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hanako; Burling, Joseph Michael

    2012-01-01

    What we attend to at any moment determines what we learn at that moment, and this also depends on our past learning. This focused conceptual paper concentrates on a single well-documented attention mechanism – highlighting. This phenomenon – well studied in non-linguistic but not in linguistic contexts – should be highly relevant to language learning because it is a process that (1) specifically protects past learning from being disrupted by new (and potentially spurious) associations in the learning environment, and (2) strongly constrains new learning to new information. Within the language learning context, highlighting may disambiguate ambiguous references and may be related to processes of lexical competition that are known to be critical to on-line sentence comprehension. The main sections of the paper will address (1) the highlighting phenomenon in the literature; (2) its relevancy to language learning; (3) the highlighting effect in children; (4) developmental studies concerning the effect in different contexts; and (5) a developmental mechanism for highlighting in language learning. PMID:22912620

  3. 2015 SNMMI Highlights Lecture: Oncology, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    From the Newsline Editor: The Highlights Lecture, presented at the closing session of each SNMMI Annual Meeting, was originated and delivered for more than 30 years by Henry N. Wagner, Jr., MD. Beginning in 2010, the duties of summarizing selected significant presentations at the meeting were divided annually among 4 distinguished nuclear and molecular medicine subject matter experts. The 2015 Highlights Lectures were delivered on June 10 at the SNMMI Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Umar Mahmood, MD, PhD, a professor of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), spoke on oncology highlights from the meeting’s sessions. Because of its length, the oncology presentation will be divided between 2 Newsline issues. Note that in the following summary, numerals in brackets represent abstract numbers as published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine [2015;56:suppl 3). PMID:26526798

  4. Implementing SCANS. Highlight Zone: Research @ Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Arnold C.; Brainard, Scott

    Foremost among efforts over the last decade to improve the work-related skills required of all young people to meet the demands of American's workplaces was the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills Commission (SCANS). Integral to SCANS were its three-part foundation (basic skills, thinking skills, and personal qualities) and these…

  5. The Working Conditions Program Assessment: Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gerald T.; Birmingham, Kathryn M.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Working Connections Program, a program funded by Microsoft Corporation and administered by American Association of Community Colleges. Describes the program as being created to assist community colleges in the development and implementation of information technology (IT) programs that are designed to train skilled IT workers. (NB)

  6. American Red Cross: A History And Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT AMERICAN RED CROSS: A HISTORY AND ANALYSIS December......detailed history and highlight current operations of the American National Red Cross (ANRC). We analyze the organization’s mission, purpose

  7. Increasing communicative interactions of young children with autism using a voice output communication aid and naturalistic teaching.

    PubMed Central

    Schepis, M M; Reid, D H; Behrmann, M M; Sutton, K A

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a voice output communication aid (VOCA) and naturalistic teaching procedures on the communicative interactions of young children with autism. A teacher and three assistants were taught to use naturalistic teaching strategies to provide opportunities for VOCA use in the context of regularly occurring classroom routines. Naturalistic teaching procedures and VOCA use were introduced in multiple probe fashion across 4 children and two classroom routines (snack and play). As the procedures were implemented, all children showed increases in communicative interactions using VOCAs. Also, there was no apparent reductive effect of VOCA use within the naturalistic teaching paradigm on other communicative behaviors. Teachers' ratings of children's VOCA communication, as well as ratings of a person unfamiliar with the children, supported the contextual appropriateness of the VOCA. Probes likewise indicated that the children used the VOCAs for a variety of different messages including requests, yes and no responses, statements, and social comments. Results are discussed in regard to the potential benefits of a VOCA when combined with naturalistic teaching procedures. Future research needs are also discussed, focusing on more precise identification of the attributes of VOCA use for children with autism, as well as for their support personnel. PMID:9891394

  8. Display format, highlight validity, and highlight method: Their effects on search performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim D.; Obrien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. Responses to valid applications of highlight were significantly faster than responses to non or invalidly highlighted applications. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. A separate within-subject analysis of variance of display format, highlight validity, and several highlight methods did not reveal a main effect of highlight method. In addition, observed display search times were compared to search time predicted by Tullis' Display Analysis Program. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  9. Cancer Conversations in Context: Naturalistic Observation of Couples Coping with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Megan L.; López, Ana María; Weihs, Karen L.; Mehl, Matthias R.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and potentials of a naturalistic observation approach to studying dyadic coping in everyday life. Specifically, it examined the natural context and content of the spontaneous cancer conversations of couples coping with cancer, and how they relate to patients’ and spouses’ psychological adjustment. Fifty-six women with breast cancer and their spouses wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR), an unobtrusive observation method that periodically records snippets of ambient sounds, over one weekend to observe the couples’ cancer conversations in their natural context. Both patients and spouses completed self-reported measures of psychological adjustment at baseline and at a two-month follow-up. Cancer was a topic of approximately 5% of couples’ conversations. Cancer conversations occurred more often within the couple than with friends and family, and they were more often informational than emotional or supportive. Consistent with research on the Social Cognitive Processing model (Lepore & Revenson, 2007), spouses’ engagement in emotional disclosure and informational conversation with patients predicted better patient adjustment. This first naturalistic observation study of dyadic coping revealed that the EAR method can be implemented with high compliance and relatively low obtrusiveness within the sensitive context of couples coping with cancer, and having a spouse who discussed cancer in an emotional or informational way predicted better patient adjustment. As a complement to in-lab and other momentary assessment methods, a naturalistic observation approach with a method such as the EAR can contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the role that communication processes play in coping with cancer. PMID:24730380

  10. Young adult smokers' perceptions of plain packaging: a pilot naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Crawford; Mackintosh, Anne Marie; Hastings, Gerard; Ford, Allison

    2011-09-01

    To explore the impact, if any, that using plain (non-branded) cigarette packs in real-life settings has on young adult smokers. Naturalistic-type research was employed, where smokers used brown 'plain' packs for 2 weeks and their regular packs for 2 weeks, in real-life settings. Participants were recruited in Glasgow, Scotland. Of the 140 smokers aged 18-35 years who participated in the naturalistic study, 48 correctly completed and returned all questionnaires. Over the 4-week study period, participants completed a questionnaire twice a week assessing pack perceptions and feelings, feelings about smoking, salience of health warnings and smoking-related behaviours. A subsample of 18 participated in a post-study interview, which employed a semistructured topic guide to assess perceptions and experiences of using plain packs. Trends in the data show that in comparison with branded packaging, plain packaging increased negative perceptions and feelings about the pack and about smoking. Plain packaging also increased avoidant behaviour (hiding the pack, covering the pack), certain smoking cessation behaviours, such as smoking less around others and forgoing cigarettes, and thinking about quitting. Almost half (n=8) of those in the post-study interview, predominantly women (n=6), reported that the use of plain packs had either increased avoidant behaviour or reduced consumption. This pilot naturalistic study suggests that plain packaging could potentially help reduce tobacco consumption among some young adult smokers, and women in particular. Employing an innovative research methodology, the findings of this study are consistent with, and indeed support, past plain packaging research.

  11. Data Integration and Evaluation: Essential Components of Family-Centered Systems Reform. Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Research and Education Foundation's Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., September 17, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elena; Ooms, Theodora

    This briefing report on program evaluation notes that the new wave of family-centered, integrated services is forcing the field to rethink its methodology, and that the move towards outcome-driven reforms requires carefully defined outcomes and ways to measure them. Highlights of a seminar meeting held to explore these issues are included. The…

  12. Who qualifies for deep brain stimulation for OCD? Data from a naturalistic clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Garnaat, Sarah L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Sibrava, Nicholas J; Goodman, Wayne K; Mancebo, Maria C; Eisen, Jane L; Rasmussen, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    A few patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) remain severely impaired despite exhausting best-practice treatments. For them, neurosurgery (stereotactic ablation or deep brain stimulation) might be considered. The authors investigated the proportion of treatment-seeking OCD patients, in a naturalistic clinical sample, who met contemporary neurosurgery selection criteria. Using comprehensive baseline data on diagnosis, severity, and treatment history for adult patients from the NIMH-supported Brown Longitudinal OCD Study, only 2 of 325 patients met screening criteria for neurosurgery. This finding prompts consideration of new models for clinical trials with limited samples as well as methods of refining entry criteria for such invasive treatments.

  13. Quantitative naturalistic methods for detecting change points in psychotherapy research: an illustration with alliance ruptures.

    PubMed

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Gorman, Bernard S; Muran, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of change points in psychotherapy process could increase our understanding of mechanisms of change. In particular, naturalistic change point detection methods that identify turning points or breakpoints in time series data could enhance our ability to identify and study alliance ruptures and resolutions. This paper presents four categories of statistical methods for detecting change points in psychotherapy process: criterion-based methods, control chart methods, partitioning methods, and regression methods. Each method's utility for identifying shifts in the alliance is illustrated using a case example from the Beth Israel Psychotherapy Research program. Advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed.

  14. Creation of the Naturalistic Engagement in Secondary Tasks (NEST) distracted driving dataset.

    PubMed

    Owens, Justin M; Angell, Linda; Hankey, Jonathan M; Foley, James; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2015-09-01

    Distracted driving has become a topic of critical importance to driving safety research over the past several decades. Naturalistic driving data offer a unique opportunity to study how drivers engage with secondary tasks in real-world driving; however, the complexities involved with identifying and coding relevant epochs of naturalistic data have limited its accessibility to the general research community. This project was developed to help address this problem by creating an accessible dataset of driver behavior and situational factors observed during distraction-related safety-critical events and baseline driving epochs, using the Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) naturalistic dataset. The new NEST (Naturalistic Engagement in Secondary Tasks) dataset was created using crashes and near-crashes from the SHRP2 dataset that were identified as including secondary task engagement as a potential contributing factor. Data coding included frame-by-frame video analysis of secondary task and hands-on-wheel activity, as well as summary event information. In addition, information about each secondary task engagement within the trip prior to the crash/near-crash was coded at a higher level. Data were also coded for four baseline epochs and trips per safety-critical event. 1,180 events and baseline epochs were coded, and a dataset was constructed. The project team is currently working to determine the most useful way to allow broad public access to the dataset. We anticipate that the NEST dataset will be extraordinarily useful in allowing qualified researchers access to timely, real-world data concerning how drivers interact with secondary tasks during safety-critical events and baseline driving. The coded dataset developed for this project will allow future researchers to have access to detailed data on driver secondary task engagement in the real world. It will be useful for standalone research, as well as for integration with additional SHRP2 data to enable the

  15. Modelling the firing pattern of bullfrog vestibular neurons responding to naturalistic stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a neural system identification method for fitting models to stimulus-response data, where the response is a spike train. The method involves using a general nonlinear optimisation procedure to fit models in the time domain. We have applied the method to model bullfrog semicircular canal afferent neuron responses during naturalistic, broad-band head rotations. These neurons respond in diverse ways, but a simple four parameter class of models elegantly accounts for the various types of responses observed. c1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Highlights on DESD Progress to Date

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This brief report, delivered after the completion of the 1st year of the United Nations (UN) Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) (2005-2014), highlights the recent developments regarding the Decade (2005). It reports on the documents prepared, the regional and national launches of the Decade held so far and presents relevant…

  17. Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2011", the OECD's flagship compendium of education…

  18. Highlights from AQMEII Phase 2 & Next Steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) that was completed in May 2014. Activities in this phase were focused on the application and evaluation of coupled meteorology-chemistry models ...

  19. Highlights: 1985 Recent College Graduates Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Joanell T.

    Highlights of a survey of 1983 and 1984 college graduates at the bachelor's or master's degree level are presented. Information is provided on types of jobs and starting salaries of degree recipients, with comparisons by sex, along with data on newly qualified and beginning teachers. The survey, which was conducted by the Center for Education…

  20. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  1. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  2. Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2011", the OECD's flagship compendium of education…

  3. The Nation's Report Card: Reading Highlights, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This report highlights the results of the 2002 NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) fourth-, eighth-, and twelfth-grade reading assessment for the nation. Results in 2002 are compared to previous NAEP reading assessments. It describes assessment content; presents major findings as average scale scores and percentages of students…

  4. 2016 Summer Series Highlights - Inspire the Imagination

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-20

    Highlights of the 2016 Summer Series of lectures at NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley. Sponsored by the Ames Office of the Chief Scientist, the talks are designed to generate innovative discussion, as well as inspire and catalyze scientific progress.

  5. Highlights from AQMEII Phase 2 & Next Steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) that was completed in May 2014. Activities in this phase were focused on the application and evaluation of coupled meteorology-chemistry models ...

  6. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  7. Highlights of Good Manufacturing Practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Morita, K

    1990-01-01

    Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in the pharmaceutical industry originated in the United States. Japan, having absorbed many things from the U.S., is actively seeking to establish Good Manufacturing Practice to match the pharmaceutical manufacturing climate in Japan. Several of the themes which highlight Japanese GMP efforts are presented below.

  8. The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics Highlights, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This issue of The Nation's Report Card highlights mathematics in 2003. It includes sections on Average Scale Scores, Students Reaching NAEP Achievement Levels, Percentile Results, 2003 Assessment Design, State Results, Subgroup Results, Sample Mathematics Questions, Technical Notes, Additional Data Tables, and NAEP on the Web. (AMT)

  9. Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2012", the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics. However, it…

  10. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Treesearch

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  11. Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2012", the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics. However, it…

  12. Highlights from Education at a Glance 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Highlights from Education at a Glance 2010" is a companion publication to the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics, Education at a Glance. It provides easily accessible data on key topics in education today, including: education levels and student numbers, economic and social benefits of education, education spending, the school…

  13. Teaching Literature to Highlight Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cnaan, Ram A.

    1989-01-01

    A second-year elective course for graduate social work students in which twentieth-century novels are used to highlight social issues is described. The relationships between art and social realities and literature's usefulness for social policy analysis are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  14. Obtaining Feedback for Indexing from Highlighted Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarroel, Miguel; Fuente, Pablo de la; Pedrero, Alberto; Vegas, Jesus; Adiego, Joaquin

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of weighted index terms in information retrieval focuses on a method for adjusting index weights by processing text in digital libraries that has been highlighted by users. Considers weights in query processing; feedback sources; active reading while accessing digital documents; collaborative information retrieval; and improving index…

  15. It takes the whole brain to make a cup of coffee: the neuropsychology of naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Karoline; Goldenberg, Georg; Daumüller, Maike; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Left hemisphere dominance has been established for use of single familiar tools and tool/object pairs, but everyday action in natural environment frequently affords multi-step actions with more or less novel technical devices. One purpose of our study was to find out whether left hemisphere dominance extends to such naturalistic action. Another aim was to analyze the cognitive components contributing to success or failure. Patients with LBD and aphasia, patients with RBD, and healthy controls were examined on experimental tests assessing retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, inference of function from structure, and solution of mechanical and non-mechanical multi-step problems, and were confronted with two naturalistic tasks involving technical devices: preparing coffee with a drip coffee maker and fixing a cassette recorder. Both patient groups were about equally impaired on both naturalistic actions. Analysis of the experimental tests and their correlations to naturalistic actions suggested that different cognitive deficits caused failure in both patient groups, and that in LBD patients there were also different causes for failure on both naturalistic actions. The main difficulty of RBD patients seemed to reside in the demand to keep track of multi-step actions. In aphasic LBD patients difficulties with making coffee but not the cassette recorder were correlated with aphasia and defective retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, whereas the cassette recorder correlated more strongly with a test probing solution of multi-step mechanical problems. Inference of function from structure which had been shown to be important for use of single familiar tools or tool/objects pairs [Goldenberg, G., Hagmann, S. (1998). AT Tool use and mechanical problem solving in apraxia. Neuropsychologia, 36, 581-589] appeared to play only a subordinate role for naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

  16. Highlights from H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Ryan C. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this proceeding, we briefly highlight the contributions to the 6th International Symposium on High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy that were on behalf of the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, with particular focus given to those results shown publicly for the first time at this symposium. Many of these new results were made possible by the improved capabilities of the H.E.S.S. II telescope array, namely its increased sensitivity to γ-rays and lower energy threshold. Other important results capitalized on the very large datasets accumulated by H.E.S.S. I observations over the last 12 years. Prominent highlights cover a diverse range of topics and astronomical objects: the Galactic center, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, shell-type supernova remnants, γ-ray binaries, unidentified sources, flat-spectrum radio quasars, blazars, gamma-ray bursts, fast radio bursts, neutrino event follow-up, and Lorentz invariance violation.

  17. Naturalistic outcomes of minor and subsyndromal depression in older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Lyness, Jeffrey M

    2008-08-01

    To review the literature regarding the naturalistic outcomes of minor and subsyndromal depression ('Min/SSD') in older primary care patients, synthesizing and critiquing findings and discussing avenues for future research. The author obtained relevant articles from repeated computer-assisted literature searches over the past 15 years, and by reviewing the reference citations of the articles so obtained. A variety of relevant outcome domains were identified, as were important putative predictors, moderators, and mediators of outcome. In general, minor and subsyndromal depression each have comparable outcomes, outcomes that are clearly worse than non-depressed subjects, with substantially elevated risk of worsening into major depression, albeit not as poor as those with major depression. Min/SSD is common and of real clinical importance in primary care seniors. Several definitions of SSD may be used, each with overlapping but distinguishable utility in identifying patients. While the evidence base has expanded greatly in the past decade, considerable work remains to be done. Naturalistic studies of several outcome domains are needed, focusing on the predictive, moderating, and mediating roles of a wide range of psychopathological, medical, functional, and psychosocial factors. Such work will complement interventions and biomarker research approaches.

  18. Topical Review: Families Coping With Child Trauma: A Naturalistic Observation Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Anna; Bowles, Peter; Conroy, Rowena; Mehl, Matthias R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To introduce a novel, naturalistic observational methodology (the Electronically Activated Recorder; EAR) as an opportunity to better understand the central role of the family environment in children’s recovery from trauma. Methods Discussion of current research methods and a systematic literature review of EAR studies on health and well-being. Results Surveys, experience sampling, and the EAR method each provide different opportunities and challenges for studying family interactions. We identified 17 articles describing relevant EAR studies. These investigated questions of emotional well-being, communicative behaviors, and interpersonal relationships, predominantly in adults. 5 articles reported innovative research in children, triangulating EAR-observed behavioral data (e.g., on child conflict at home) with neuroendocrine assay, sociodemographic information, and parent report. Finally, we discussed psychometric, practical, and ethical considerations for conducting EAR research with children and families. Conclusions Naturalistic observation methods such as the EAR have potential for pediatric psychology studies regarding trauma and the family environment. PMID:25797943

  19. Ventral premotor to primary motor cortical interactions during noxious and naturalistic action observation.

    PubMed

    Lago, Angel; Koch, Giacomo; Cheeran, Binith; Márquez, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Jose Andrés; Ezquerro, Milagros; Giraldez, Manolo; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Within the motor system, cortical areas such as the primary motor cortex (M1) and the ventral premotor cortex (PMv), are thought to be activated during the observation of actions performed by others. However, it is not known how the connections between these areas become active during action observation or whether these connections are modulated by the volitional component induced by the action observed. In this study, using a paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) method, we evaluated the excitability of PMv-M1 connections during the observation of videos showing a human hand reaching to grasp a ball (naturalistic grasping video) or a switched on soldering iron (noxious grasping video). The results show that the observation of the naturalistic grasping action increased the M1 excitability and changed the strength of the PMv-M1 connections. The observation of the noxious grasping action did not induce any change in the excitability of the PMv-M1 connections throughout the video, but the strength of PMv-M1 connectivity was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PMv-M1 connections are modulated differently depending on whether the action observed would or would not be performed in real life. 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual Differences in Infant Oculomotor Behavior During the Viewing of Complex Naturalistic Scenes.

    PubMed

    Wass, Sam V; Smith, Tim J

    2014-07-01

    Little research hitherto has examined how individual differences in attention, as assessed using standard experimental paradigms, relate to individual differences in how attention is spontaneously allocated in more naturalistic contexts. Here, we analyzed the time intervals between refoveating eye movements (fixation durations) while typically developing 11-month-old infants viewed a 90-min battery ranging from complex dynamic to noncomplex static materials. The same infants also completed experimental assessments of cognitive control, psychomotor reaction times (RT), processing speed (indexed via peak look during habituation), and arousal (indexed via tonic pupil size). High test-retest reliability was found for fixation duration, across testing sessions and across types of viewing material. Increased cognitive control and increased arousal were associated with reduced variability in fixation duration. For fixations to dynamic stimuli, in which a large proportion of saccades may be exogenously cued, we found that psychomotor RT measures were most predictive of mean fixation duration; for fixations to static stimuli, in contrast, in which there is less exogenous attentional capture, we found that psychomotor RT did not predict performance, but that measures of cognitive control and arousal did. The implications of these findings for understanding the development of attentional control in naturalistic settings are discussed.

  1. Effects of naturalistic stressors on cognitive flexibility and working memory task performance.

    PubMed

    Renner, Katherine H; Beversdorf, David Q

    2010-08-01

    Experimental stressors impair performance on tasks requiring certain types of cognitive flexibility, an effect that may be mediated by the noradrenergic system. The goal of this experiment was to examine the effects of psychological stress on cognitive flexibility in problem solving and immediate memory with a more naturalistic psychological stressor, and examine the interaction between subject ability and the cognitive effects of psychological stress. Twenty subjects performed the compound remote associates task (CRA) and a number series recall task after watching the first 30 minutes of 'Saving Private Ryan' and after the first 30 minutes of 'Shrek', with condition order and test version order counterbalanced. An interaction effect was observed between stress and subject ability for the CRA, with performance on the CRA significantly worse after the stress film among those performing well on the task. No effects were found on the memory task. Therefore, the naturalistic stressor impairs cognitive flexibility in a manner dependent upon how much difficulty the subject has with these types of tasks. Further work will be necessary to better understand the pharmacological mechanism of the effects of these types of stressors, and the clinical implications of this effect.

  2. Hangar talk survey: using stories as a naturalistic method of informing threat and error management training.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Suzanne K; Sutton, Jennifer E

    2013-04-01

    The current study developed an online hangar talk survey (HTS) to solicit narratives describing challenging scenarios that professional pilots encountered during the hours-building phase of their career. The predicted pilot shortage will effectively reduce the minimum flying hours required for pilots to be hired at an airline, resulting in less opportunity to develop nontechnical skills naturalistically. To compensate, threat and error data from the hours-building phase of a pilot's career are required to inform training development. Pilots often share stories of such experiences, colloquially termed "hangar talk". The HTS gathered 132 narrative descriptions of general aviation (GA) events from pilots along with the event's impact and whether the pilots would react differently if the scenario were encountered again. The distribution of threats reported by GA pilots was similar to that reported at the airline level. Logistic regression analysis revealed that decision-making errors were associated with recognition of the need to react differently in the future, and decision-making errors and proficiency errors were associated with greater perceived impact on skill development. The current HTS solicited an array of data similar to the findings of airline-based threat and error observations. Pilots perceive decision-making and proficiency errors as impactful on skill development. An HTS can be used to gather naturalistic threat and error data and to create a database of operational stories that can be used to develop nontechnical training based on narrative thought.

  3. Studying the impact of plating on ratings of the food served in a naturalistic dining context.

    PubMed

    Michel, Charles; Velasco, Carlos; Fraemohs, Paul; Spence, Charles

    2015-07-01

    An experiment conducted in a naturalistic dining context is reported, in which the impact of different styles of plating on diners' experience of the food was assessed. A hundred and sixty three diners were separated into two groups during a luncheon event held in a large dining room. Each group of diners was served the same menu, with a variation in the visual presentation of the ingredients on the plate. The results revealed that the diners were willing to pay significantly more for the appetizer (a salad), when arranged in an artistically-inspired manner (M = £5.94 vs. £4.10). The main course was liked more, and considered more artistic, when the various elements were presented in the centre of the plate, rather than placed off to one side. The participants also reported being willing to pay significantly more for the centred than for the offset plating (M = £15.35 vs. £11.65). These results are consistent with the claim that people "eat first with their eyes", and that a diner's experience of the very same ingredients can be significantly enhanced (or diminished) simply by changing the visual layout of the food elements of the dish. Results such as these suggest that theories regarding the perception of food can potentially be confirmed (or disconfirmed) outside of the confines of the laboratory (i.e., in naturalistic dining settings).

  4. High-throughput screening of brief naturalistic stress-responsive cytokines in university students taking examinations.

    PubMed

    Katsuura, Sakurako; Kamezaki, Yoshiko; Tominaga, Kumiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Kensei; Yamamoto, Yuta; Takeo, Keiko; Yamagishi, Naoko; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawai, Tomoko; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to prospectively examine the impact of a brief naturalistic stressor (academic examination) on salivary/serum cortisol, measures of anxiety and depressive mood, and 50 circulating immune mediators assessed 7 days before, the first day of, and 2 days after the first term examination period (5 days) among 20 male and 6 female medical students (19.7+/-3.1 years, mean+/-SD). Of 42 serum factors detected, repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc testing indicated that concentrations of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3, and beta-nerve growth factor (beta-NGF) were significantly decreased 2 days after finishing examinations, compared with the levels on the first day of examinations (p<0.05) in association with a concomitant post-examination decreases (p<0.05) in anxiety and salivary cortisol levels. In contrast, interleukin (IL)-16 was reciprocally increased between the two time points (p<0.05). However, after correction for multiple comparisons, only changes in MIF were significant (p<0.05/42=0.00119), and MIF levels peaked on the first day of examinations was significantly higher than those measured both 7 days before and 2 days after the examination. The present high-throughput analysis with multiplex cytokine panels reconfirms the impact of brief naturalistic stressors on immune outcomes, and suggests a potential role of MIF in the acute stress response.

  5. Olanzapine orally-disintegrating tablet in severe psychotic agitation: a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J C; Pérez, V; Martín, J L R; Safont, G; Puigdemont, D; Alvarez, E

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine effectiveness and safety of olanzapine in patients with severe agitation. A naturalistic, open-label study in 80 acutely agitated psychotic patients visited in our psychiatric emergency department. Patients received either a 20-mg olanzapine orally-disintegrating tablet or conventional treatment depending on attending psychiatrist's preference. Efficacy was assessed by the Excitement Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC), the Agitation-Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES) and pragmatic variables (second pharmacological intervention and need for physical restraints). 60 % patients completed a 6 hour trial. Both groups showed a significant reduction in mean PANSS-EC score. The olanzapine-treated group showed statistically significant improvements: PANSS-EC (F=122.9; df=2.4; p=0.000), ACES (F=68.2; df=2.8; p=0.000). Treatment was well-tolerated and no serious side-effects were observed. In this naturalistic study in patients with severe agitation, 20-mg oral olanzapine was effective, rapid and safe.

  6. Back to basics: a naturalistic assessment of the experience and regulation of emotion.

    PubMed

    Heiy, Jane E; Cheavens, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Emotion regulation research links regulatory responding to important outcomes in psychological well-being, physical health, and interpersonal relations, but several fundamental questions remain. As much of the previous research has addressed generalized regulatory habits, far less is known about the ways in which individuals respond to emotions in daily life. The literature is particularly sparse in explorations of positive emotion regulation. In the current study, we provide an assessment of naturalistic experiences and regulation of emotion, both positive and negative in valence. Using an electronic experience sampling methodology, participants reported on their use of 40 regulatory strategies in response to 14 emotions for 10 consecutive days. On average, participants used 15 different regulatory strategies in response to negative emotions over this time, most frequently relying on acceptance, behavioral activation, and rumination. Participants used a similarly large repertoire of strategies, approximately 16 total, in response to positive emotions, particularly savoring, future focus, and behavioral activation. Participants' mood ratings following strategy use, however, indicated that the most frequently used strategies were often not the most effective strategies. The results of this study provide estimates of the frequency and effectiveness of a large number of emotion regulation strategies in response to both negative and positive emotions. Such findings characterize naturalistic emotion regulation, and estimates of normative emotion regulation processes are imperative to determining the ways in which deviations (e.g., small emotion regulation repertoires, insufficient attention to regulation of positive emotions) impact emotional functioning.

  7. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders.

  8. A naturalistic observational study of children's expressions of anger in the family context.

    PubMed

    Sears, Meredith S; Repetti, Rena L; Reynolds, Bridget M; Sperling, Jacqueline B

    2014-04-01

    Traditional approaches to the study of children's expressions of anger rely on tightly controlled study environments to test hypotheses about outcomes and correlates of expression characteristics. An unexplored area in the study of emotion expression is a naturalistic examination of school-age children's spontaneously occurring expressions of emotion in their real, uncontrolled family contexts. This observational study describes the naturally occurring characteristics and contexts of 8- to 12-year-old children's anger expressions with family members. Thirty-one families were videotaped for 2 days at home and in community settings. Children's expressions of anger were identified and coded for angry facial, vocal and physical behaviors, and for the expressions' instigating situational contexts. The majority of anger expressions were of mild intensity and brief duration, and most often contained vocal behavioral characteristics (e.g., loud voice, whining). The most common cause of an anger expression was a verbal disagreement; other frequently occurring situational causes included homework, requests for compliance, and reprimands. Patterns in the angry behaviors children exhibited in response to specific situational causes support a functionalist perspective on emotion expression in that children engaged in behaviors that appeared to be attempts to get their needs met. Few differences were observed between mothers' and fathers' rates of instigating children's anger expressions, and between boys' and girls' expression characteristics and contexts. This study offers an ecologically valid, uniquely naturalistic methodology to describe children's observable expressions of anger as they occur in family contexts.

  9. Naturalistic arm movements during obstacle avoidance in 3D and the identification of movement primitives.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Britta; Lipinski, John; Schöner, Gregor

    2012-10-01

    By studying human movement in the laboratory, a number of regularities and invariants such as planarity and the principle of isochrony have been discovered. The theoretical idea has gained traction that movement may be generated from a limited set of movement primitives that would encode these invariants. In this study, we ask if invariants and movement primitives capture naturalistic human movement. Participants moved objects to target locations while avoiding obstacles using unconstrained arm movements in three dimensions. Two experiments manipulated the spatial layout of targets, obstacles, and the locations in the transport movement where an obstacle was encountered. We found that all movement trajectories were planar, with the inclination of the movement plane reflecting the obstacle constraint. The timing of the movement was consistent with both global isochrony (same movement time for variable path lengths) and local isochrony (same movement time for two components of the obstacle avoidance movement). The identified movement primitives of transport (movement from start to target position) and lift (movement perpendicular to transport within the movement plane) varied independently with obstacle conditions. Their scaling accounted for the observed double peak structure of movement speed. Overall, the observed naturalistic movement was astoundingly regular. Its decomposition into primitives suggests simple mechanisms for movement generation.

  10. Attention Strongly Modulates Reliability of Neural Responses to Naturalistic Narrative Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ki, Jason J; Kelly, Simon P; Parra, Lucas C

    2016-03-09

    Attentional engagement is a major determinant of how effectively we gather information through our senses. Alongside the sheer growth in the amount and variety of information content that we are presented with through modern media, there is increased variability in the degree to which we "absorb" that information. Traditional research on attention has illuminated the basic principles of sensory selection to isolated features or locations, but it provides little insight into the neural underpinnings of our attentional engagement with modern naturalistic content. Here, we show in human subjects that the reliability of an individual's neural responses with respect to a larger group provides a highly robust index of the level of attentional engagement with a naturalistic narrative stimulus. Specifically, fast electroencephalographic evoked responses were more strongly correlated across subjects when naturally attending to auditory or audiovisual narratives than when attention was directed inward to a mental arithmetic task during stimulus presentation. This effect was strongest for audiovisual stimuli with a cohesive narrative and greatly reduced for speech stimuli lacking meaning. For compelling audiovisual narratives, the effect is remarkably strong, allowing perfect discrimination between attentional state across individuals. Control experiments rule out possible confounds related to altered eye movement trajectories or order of presentation. We conclude that reliability of evoked activity reproduced across subjects viewing the same movie is highly sensitive to the attentional state of the viewer and listener, which is aided by a cohesive narrative. Copyright © 2016 Ki et al.

  11. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor‐preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface‐based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory‐motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory‐motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M‐I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784–2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061771

  12. Topical Review: Families Coping With Child Trauma: A Naturalistic Observation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Alisic, Eva; Barrett, Anna; Bowles, Peter; Conroy, Rowena; Mehl, Matthias R

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a novel, naturalistic observational methodology (the Electronically Activated Recorder; EAR) as an opportunity to better understand the central role of the family environment in children's recovery from trauma. Discussion of current research methods and a systematic literature review of EAR studies on health and well-being. Surveys, experience sampling, and the EAR method each provide different opportunities and challenges for studying family interactions. We identified 17 articles describing relevant EAR studies. These investigated questions of emotional well-being, communicative behaviors, and interpersonal relationships, predominantly in adults. 5 articles reported innovative research in children, triangulating EAR-observed behavioral data (e.g., on child conflict at home) with neuroendocrine assay, sociodemographic information, and parent report. Finally, we discussed psychometric, practical, and ethical considerations for conducting EAR research with children and families. Naturalistic observation methods such as the EAR have potential for pediatric psychology studies regarding trauma and the family environment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Recent Highlights from the ISOLDE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, K.

    2015-11-01

    The ISOLDE facility is CERN's longest running experiment. In its 45 years of operation it has become the world's most comprehensive radioactive-isotope factory. Now capable of delivering more than 1000 isotopes from 70 chemical elements, ISOLDE supports a wide and diverse physics programme. This short article summarizes some of the recent highlights from this programme in the areas of nuclear physics, medicine and biology.

  14. Generation of Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    2 (s)ds/ si. (2) 0=i i=1 §3. Concept of Surface Generation Based on Evolute A surface is generated by moving a generatrix along two directrices . When...Fig. 1(a) shows an object surface Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines 147 Sgeneratrices v generated surface S u directrices evoluteseolesufc (a...the directrices , and suffix u denotes partial differentiation. Fig. 1(b) shows an evolute surface and a generated surface satisfying the constraints

  15. [Highlights in gastroenterology and hepatology 2013].

    PubMed

    Hessler, Roxane; Godat, Sébastien; Fraga, Montserrat; Burgmann, Konstantin; Doerig, Christopher; Deltenre, Pierre; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-01-15

    This review highlights recent advances in gastroenterology and hepatology, including new insights into the diagnosis, pathogenesis and the treatment of ulcerative colitis, of achalasia, of irritable bowel syndrome, of chronic hepatitis B and of eosinophilic esophagitis. These new developments will be summarized and discussed critically, with a particular emphasis on their potential implications for current and future clinical practice. The recent advances on treatment of chronic hepatitis C will be published in another summary this year.

  16. Extending Word Highlighting in Multiparticipant Chat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    un- supervised learners (Bingham, Kabán, and Girolami 2003; Kolenda, Hansen, and Larsen 2001). The difference be- tween these approaches and what we... Learner (UpdateGraph) Unlabeled Data U (from chat logs) GWRH US Ws W (Highlighted) Message m ′ Related Words R, W Message m Graph G Figure 3: GWRH’s...see that in these top ten words, com- mon English words are removed despite their frequent ap- pearance. This is desirable since it allows GWRH to

  17. STS-46 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Scenes of the mission highlights for the STS-46 Atlantis mission are shown. Footage shows the pre-launch activities (crew breakfast and suit-up) and launch of Atlantis. The European Retrievable Carrier's (EURECA) and the Tethered Satellite System's (TSS) pre-deploy and deployment are shown. Shots of the crew's activities and the Earth are shown, including footage taken over the Red Sea and central South America. Atlantis' landing is also shown.

  18. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 5 through 7. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139357), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). On flight day 5, the transfer and installation of a Power and Data Grapple Fixture onto the P6 Truss during an EVA (extravehicular activity) is shown. The relocation of micrometeorite debris shields is also shown. Canadarm 2 is used to move the Mobile Base System near the Mobile Transporter on the ISS Destiny Module. The capture of the Mobile Base System takes place on flight day 6, along with a crew transfer ceremony on board the ISS. The video includes a view of the South Pacific just before dawn, and the Endeavour crew answers questions from the public.

  19. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 3 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 6 and 7. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). Flight day 6 features a very complicated EVA (extravehicular activity) to service the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Linnehan replace the HST's power control unit, disconnecting and reconnecting 36 tiny connectors. The procedure includes the HST's first ever power down. The cleanup of spilled water from the coollant system in Grunsfeld's suit is shown. The pistol grip tool, and two other space tools are also shown. On flight day 7, Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA. They replace the HST's FOC (Faint Object Camera) with the ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys). The video ends with crew members playing in the shuttle's cabin with a model of the HST.

  20. Asian American: Facts and Figures, A Closer Look at the 1970 Census

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, 1975

    1975-01-01

    These highlights include information on the immigration and population, educational characteristics, employment characteristics, poverty characteristics, family characteristics, and income of Japanese Americans, Chinese Americans, Philipino Americans, Korean Americans, and Hawaiians from the 1970 census. (JM)

  1. Arab-American and Muslim-American Contributions: Resources for Secondary Social Studies Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraqi, Monica M.

    2015-01-01

    Arab-Americans and Muslim-Americans live within the United States surrounded by misconceptions about their culture and religion, in part because of the limited inclusion of positive contributions by these groups within the social studies curriculum. This article attempts to highlight Arab-American and Muslim-American contributions within the U.S.…

  2. Arab-American and Muslim-American Contributions: Resources for Secondary Social Studies Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraqi, Monica M.

    2015-01-01

    Arab-Americans and Muslim-Americans live within the United States surrounded by misconceptions about their culture and religion, in part because of the limited inclusion of positive contributions by these groups within the social studies curriculum. This article attempts to highlight Arab-American and Muslim-American contributions within the U.S.…

  3. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 4. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002139469), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). The primary activity of flight day 1 is the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The crew is seen before the launch at a meal and suit-up, and some pre-flight procedures are shown. Perrin holds a sign with a personalized message. The astronauts communicate with Mission Control extensively after launch, and an inside view of the shuttle cabin is shown. The replays of the launch include close-ups of the nozzles at liftoff, and the fall of the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank. Flight day 2 shows footage of mainland Asia at night, and daytime views of the eastern United States and Lake Michigan. Flight day three shows the Endeavour orbiter approaching and docking with the ISS. After the night docking, the crews exchange greetings, and a view of the Nile river and Egypt at night is shown. On flight day 4, the MPLM (Multi-Purpose Logistics Module) Leonardo was temporarily transferred from Endeavour's payload bay to the ISS.

  4. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  5. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  6. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 4 and 5. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The primary activities during these days were EVAs (extravehicular activities) to replace two solar arrays on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Footage from flight day 4 records an EVA by Grunsfeld and Linnehan, including their exit from Columbia's payload bay airlock, their stowing of the old HST starboard rigid array on the rigid array carrier in Columbia's payload bay, their attachment of the new array on HST, the installation of a new starboard diode box, and the unfolding of the new array. The pistol grip space tool used to fasten the old array in its new location is shown in use. The video also includes several shots of the HST with Earth in the background. On flight day 5 Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA to change the port side array and diode box on HST. This EVA is very similar to the one on flight day 4, and is covered similarly in the video. A hand operated ratchet is shown in use. In addition to a repeat of the previous tasks, the astronauts change HST's reaction wheel assembly, and because they are ahead of schedule, install installation and lubricate an instrument door on the telescope. The Earth views include a view of Egypt and Israel, with the Nile River, Red Sea, and Mediterranean Sea.

  7. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam S.

    2014-09-01

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  8. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  9. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-18

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  10. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  11. Highlights of Aeroacoustics Research in the U.S. 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-01-01

    Highlights of aeroacoustics research in the United States of America during 1998 are reported in a summary compiled from information provided by members of the Aeroacoustics Technical Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other leading research groups in industry, national laboratories, and academia. The past few years have seen significant progress in aeroacoustics. Research has steadily progressed toward enhanced safety, noise benefits, and lower costs. Since industrial progress is generally not published in the archival literature, it is particularly important to highlight these accomplishments. This year we chose to report on five topics of great interest to the aerospace industry including a synopsis of fundamental research at universities and national laboratories. The topics chosen are: (1) Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST), (2) High Speed Research (HSR), (3) Rotorcraft, (4) Weapons bay aeroacoustics control and (5) Academic research including Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA). Although the information presented in this review is not all encompassing we hope that the topics covered will provide some insights into aeroacoustics activity in the U.S.

  12. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  13. African Americans and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the opportunities available in the field of agriculture for African American students and notes efforts of the 136 colleges of agriculture to publicize their offerings and recruit students. Profiles six black leaders in agriculture, highlighting their achievements in research and aid to developing countries. A table provides data on annual…

  14. Toward Semantics in the Wild: Activation to Manipulable Nouns in Naturalistic Reading

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonil; Lai, Vicky T.

    2016-01-01

    The neural basis of language processing, in the context of naturalistic reading of connected text, is a crucial but largely unexplored area. Here we combined functional MRI and eye tracking to examine the reading of text presented as whole paragraphs in two experiments with human subjects. We registered high-temporal resolution eye-tracking data to a low-temporal resolution BOLD signal to extract responses to single words during naturalistic reading where two to four words are typically processed per second. As a test case of a lexical variable, we examined the response to noun manipulability. In both experiments, signal in the left anterior inferior parietal lobule and posterior inferior temporal gyrus and sulcus was positively correlated with noun manipulability. These regions are associated with both action performance and action semantics, and their activation is consistent with a number of previous studies involving tool words and physical tool use. The results show that even during rapid reading of connected text, where semantics of words may be activated only partially, the meaning of manipulable nouns is grounded in action performance systems. This supports the grounded cognition view of semantics, which posits a close link between sensory–motor and conceptual systems of the brain. On the methodological front, these results demonstrate that BOLD responses to lexical variables during naturalistic reading can be extracted by simultaneous use of eye tracking. This opens up new avenues for the study of language and reading in the context of connected text. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The study of language and reading has traditionally relied on single word or sentence stimuli. In fMRI, this is necessitated by the fact that time resolution of a BOLD signal much lower than that of cognitive processes that take place during natural reading of connected text. Here, we propose a method that combines eye tracking and fMRI, and can extract word-level information from the

  15. Driver Behavior During Overtaking Maneuvers from the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Kusano, Kristofer D; Gabler, Hampton C

    2015-01-01

    Lane changes with the intention to overtake the vehicle in front are especially challenging scenarios for forward collision warning (FCW) designs. These overtaking maneuvers can occur at high relative vehicle speeds and often involve no brake and/or turn signal application. Therefore, overtaking presents the potential of erroneously triggering the FCW. A better understanding of driver behavior during lane change events can improve designs of this human-machine interface and increase driver acceptance of FCW. The objective of this study was to aid FCW design by characterizing driver behavior during lane change events using naturalistic driving study data. The analysis was based on data from the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study, collected by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. The 100-Car study contains approximately 1.2 million vehicle miles of driving and 43,000 h of data collected from 108 primary drivers. In order to identify overtaking maneuvers from a large sample of driving data, an algorithm to automatically identify overtaking events was developed. The lead vehicle and minimum time to collision (TTC) at the start of lane change events was identified using radar processing techniques developed in a previous study. The lane change identification algorithm was validated against video analysis, which manually identified 1,425 lane change events from approximately 126 full trips. Forty-five drivers with valid time series data were selected from the 100-Car study. From the sample of drivers, our algorithm identified 326,238 lane change events. A total of 90,639 lane change events were found to involve a closing lead vehicle. Lane change events were evenly distributed between left side and right side lane changes. The characterization of lane change frequency and minimum TTC was divided into 10 mph speed bins for vehicle travel speeds between 10 and 90 mph. For all lane change events with a closing lead vehicle, the results showed that drivers change

  16. Independent naturalists make matchless contributions to science and resource management (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Crimmins, M.; Bertelsen, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Much of the recent growth in PPSR, or public participation in scientific research, has been in 'contributory' or 'collaborative'-type PPSR projects, where non-scientists' roles primarily are data collection or some participation in other aspects of project design or execution. A less common PPSR model, referred to as 'collegial' in recent literature, is characterized by dedicated naturalists collecting rich and extensive data sets outside of an organized program and then working with professional scientists to analyze these data and disseminate findings. The three collaborators on this presentation represent an example of the collegial model; our team is comprised of an independent naturalist who has collected over 150,000 records of plant flowering phenology spanning three decades, a professional climatologist, and a professional plant ecologist. Together, we have documented fundamental plant-climate relationships and seasonal patterns in flowering in the Sonoran Desert region, as well as changes in flowering community composition and distribution associated with changing climate conditions in the form of seven peer-reviewed journal articles and several conference presentations and proceedings. These novel findings address critical gaps in our understanding of plant ecology in the Sky Islands region, and have been incorporated into the Southwest Climate Change and other regional planning documents. It is safe to say that the data resource amassed by a single very dedicated individual, which is far beyond what could be accomplished by probably nearly all researchers or resource managers, has been instrumental in documenting fundamental ecological relationships in the Sky Islands region as well as how these systems are changing in this period of rapidly changing climate. The research findings that have resulted from this partnership have the potential to also directly affect management decisions. The watershed under study, managed by the US Forest Service, has been

  17. Toward Semantics in the Wild: Activation to Manipulable Nouns in Naturalistic Reading.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rutvik H; Choi, Wonil; Lai, Vicky T; Henderson, John M

    2016-04-06

    The neural basis of language processing, in the context of naturalistic reading of connected text, is a crucial but largely unexplored area. Here we combined functional MRI and eye tracking to examine the reading of text presented as whole paragraphs in two experiments with human subjects. We registered high-temporal resolution eye-tracking data to a low-temporal resolution BOLD signal to extract responses to single words during naturalistic reading where two to four words are typically processed per second. As a test case of a lexical variable, we examined the response to noun manipulability. In both experiments, signal in the left anterior inferior parietal lobule and posterior inferior temporal gyrus and sulcus was positively correlated with noun manipulability. These regions are associated with both action performance and action semantics, and their activation is consistent with a number of previous studies involving tool words and physical tool use. The results show that even during rapid reading of connected text, where semantics of words may be activated only partially, the meaning of manipulable nouns is grounded in action performance systems. This supports the grounded cognition view of semantics, which posits a close link between sensory-motor and conceptual systems of the brain. On the methodological front, these results demonstrate that BOLD responses to lexical variables during naturalistic reading can be extracted by simultaneous use of eye tracking. This opens up new avenues for the study of language and reading in the context of connected text. The study of language and reading has traditionally relied on single word or sentence stimuli. In fMRI, this is necessitated by the fact that time resolution of a BOLD signal much lower than that of cognitive processes that take place during natural reading of connected text. Here, we propose a method that combines eye tracking and fMRI, and can extract word-level information from the BOLD signal using high

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Program To Teach Naturalistic Early Intervention Strategies in Inclusive Environments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Sarah

    This final report describes the development and evaluation of a project that was funded by the U.S. Department of Education to develop, evaluate, revise, and disseminate a video-assisted, competency-referenced curriculum to teach naturalistic intervention strategies in inclusive, early intervention settings. The project, called Strategies for…

  19. Brief Report: Excessive Alcohol Use Negatively Affects the Course of Adolescent Depression--One Year Naturalistic Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meririnne, Esa; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Ruuttu, Titta; Tuisku, Virpi; Marttunen, Mauri

    2010-01-01

    The impact of alcohol use on the course of adolescent depression over one-year was investigated by following 197 consecutive adolescent outpatients with unipolar depression in a naturalistic treatment setting. Their baseline alcohol consumption was categorized in three groups: excessive use (defined as weekly drunkenness), regular use (monthly…

  20. The Language of Driving: Advantages and Applications of Symbolic Data Reduction for Analysis of Naturalistic Driving Data

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Anthony D.; Lee, John D.; Aksan, Nazan S.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Tippin, Jon; Rizzo, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in onboard vehicle data recording devices have created an abundance of naturalistic driving data. The amount of data exceeds the resources available for analysis; this situation forces researchers to focus on analyses of critical events and to use simple heuristics to identify those events. Critical event analysis eliminates the context that can be critical in understanding driver behavior and can reduce the generalizability of the analysis. This work introduced a method of naturalistic driving data analysis that would allow researchers to examine entire data sets by reducing the sets by more than 90%. The method utilized a symbolic data reduction algorithm, symbolic aggregate approximation (SAX), which reduced time series data to a string of letters. SAX can be applied to any continuous measurement, and SAX output can be reintegrated into a data set to preserve categorical information. This work explored the application of SAX to speed and acceleration data from a naturalistic driving data set and demonstrated SAX's integration with other methods that could begin to tame the complexity of naturalistic data. PMID:26203202

  1. Teaching Social Communication: A Comparison of Naturalistic Behavioral and Development, Social Pragmatic Approaches for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2010-01-01

    There are a variety of effective treatments designed for increasing social communication in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Two such treatments, naturalistic behavioral and developmental, social-pragmatic/relationship-based interventions, differ in their underlying philosophy yet share many similarities in their…

  2. Ecological Human Brain and Young Children's "Naturalist Intelligence" from the Perspective of Developmentally and Culturally Appropriate Practice (DCAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Eunsook

    Based on the view that young children have a different intellectual culture from adults' in the way they know and understand nature, this paper explores ecological human brain development, children's intellectual culture of naturalist intelligence, and developmentally and culturally congruent curricula for young children. The paper discusses the…

  3. Distance Video-Teleconferencing in Early Intervention: Pilot Study of a Naturalistic Parent-Implemented Language Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Andrea; Machalicek, Wendy; Oakes, Ashley; Haebig, Eileen; Weismer, Susan Ellis; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Maternal verbal responsiveness in naturally occurring interactions is known to facilitate language development for children with neurodevelopmental disorders. The present study used a series of A-B replications to examine proximal effects of a naturalistic language intervention on the use of specific language support strategies by mothers of eight…

  4. Approximating Implicit and Explicit Mentalizing with Two Naturalistic Video-Based Tasks in Typical Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblau, Gabriela; Kliemann, Dorit; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been proposed to show greater impairments in implicit than explicit mentalizing. To test this proposition, we developed two comparable naturalistic tasks for a performance-based approximation of implicit and explicit mentalizing in 28 individuals with ASD and 23 matched typically developed (TD)…

  5. Green Youth of Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine: After-School Naturalist Programs in Post-Soviet Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinnikov, Mikhail S.; Lindsey, Jason Royce

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the status of young naturalist after-school programs in three post-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. In the past, the region's environmental teachers, leaders and activists have emerged from such youth programs. Thus, the health of these programs is a leading indicator for the long-term viability of broader…

  6. Quality of Childcare and Otitis Media: Relationship to Children's Language during Naturalistic Interactions at 18, 24, and 36 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Hurley, Megan M.; Yont, Kristine M.; Wamboldt, Patricia M.; Kolak, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the quality of childcare and experience with otitis media (middle ear disease) as they relate to children's early naturalistic language development. Sixty children were followed longitudinally from childcare entry in the first year of life until three years of age. Half the children…

  7. Distance Video-Teleconferencing in Early Intervention: Pilot Study of a Naturalistic Parent-Implemented Language Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Andrea; Machalicek, Wendy; Oakes, Ashley; Haebig, Eileen; Weismer, Susan Ellis; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Maternal verbal responsiveness in naturally occurring interactions is known to facilitate language development for children with neurodevelopmental disorders. The present study used a series of A-B replications to examine proximal effects of a naturalistic language intervention on the use of specific language support strategies by mothers of eight…

  8. A three-dimensional spatiotemporal receptive field model explains responses of area MT neurons to naturalistic movies.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Gallant, Jack L

    2011-10-12

    Area MT has been an important target for studies of motion processing. However, previous neurophysiological studies of MT have used simple stimuli that do not contain many of the motion signals that occur during natural vision. In this study we sought to determine whether views of area MT neurons developed using simple stimuli can account for MT responses under more naturalistic conditions. We recorded responses from macaque area MT neurons during stimulation with naturalistic movies. We then used a quantitative modeling framework to discover which specific mechanisms best predict neuronal responses under these challenging conditions. We find that the simplest model that accurately predicts responses of MT neurons consists of a bank of V1-like filters, each followed by a compressive nonlinearity, a divisive nonlinearity, and linear pooling. Inspection of the fit models shows that the excitatory receptive fields of MT neurons tend to lie on a single plane within the three-dimensional spatiotemporal frequency domain, and suppressive receptive fields lie off this plane. However, most excitatory receptive fields form a partial ring in the plane and avoid low temporal frequencies. This receptive field organization ensures that most MT neurons are tuned for velocity but do not tend to respond to ambiguous static textures that are aligned with the direction of motion. In sum, MT responses to naturalistic movies are largely consistent with predictions based on simple stimuli. However, models fit using naturalistic stimuli reveal several novel properties of MT receptive fields that had not been shown in prior experiments.

  9. Practice Makes Improvement: How Adults with Autism Out-Perform Others in a Naturalistic Visual Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Martin, Jolie M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit superior performance in visual search compared to others. However, most studies demonstrating this advantage have employed simple, uncluttered images with fully visible targets. We compare the performance of high-functioning adults with ASD and matched controls on a naturalistic luggage…

  10. Practice Makes Improvement: How Adults with Autism Out-Perform Others in a Naturalistic Visual Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Martin, Jolie M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit superior performance in visual search compared to others. However, most studies demonstrating this advantage have employed simple, uncluttered images with fully visible targets. We compare the performance of high-functioning adults with ASD and matched controls on a naturalistic luggage…

  11. Self-Assessment of Japanese as a Second Language: The Role of Experiences in the Naturalistic Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assessment has been used to assess second language proficiency; however, as sources of measurement errors vary, they may threaten the validity and reliability of the tools. The present paper investigated the role of experiences in using Japanese as a second language in the naturalistic acquisition context on the accuracy of the…

  12. Green Youth of Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine: After-School Naturalist Programs in Post-Soviet Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinnikov, Mikhail S.; Lindsey, Jason Royce

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the status of young naturalist after-school programs in three post-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. In the past, the region's environmental teachers, leaders and activists have emerged from such youth programs. Thus, the health of these programs is a leading indicator for the long-term viability of broader…

  13. Quality of Childcare and Otitis Media: Relationship to Children's Language during Naturalistic Interactions at 18, 24, and 36 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Hurley, Megan M.; Yont, Kristine M.; Wamboldt, Patricia M.; Kolak, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the quality of childcare and experience with otitis media (middle ear disease) as they relate to children's early naturalistic language development. Sixty children were followed longitudinally from childcare entry in the first year of life until three years of age. Half the children…

  14. Characterizing the Motivational Orientation of Students in Higher Education: A Naturalistic Study in Three Hong Kong Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kember, David; Hong, Celina; Ho, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Background: Consideration of motivation in higher education has often been drawn upon theories and research that were based upon school or workplace studies. Aims: This paper reports an open naturalistic study to better characterize the motivational orientation of students in higher education. Method: Open semi-structured individual interviews…

  15. Synchronous Symmetrical Support: A Naturalistic Study of Live Online Peer-to-Peer Learning via Software Videoconferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Peter; Castaneda, Linda; Quick, Kevin; Linney, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a naturalistic study of peer-to-peer learning, in a live, online video meeting context. Over a six-month period a group of international students of animation attended 99 live, online "study group" events amounting to around 120 hours of live "broadcast meeting time". Some meetings were very large, with up to 34 participants,…

  16. Integrating Cultural and Natural Interpretation. Association of Interpretive Naturalists Program Papers. Workshop (Cape Cod, Massachusetts, October 6-10, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Interpretive Naturalists, Derwood, MD.

    Presented are 54 papers offered during the 1980 Workshop of the Association of Interpretive Naturalists at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. These papers, which relate to the conference theme "Integrating Natural and Cultural Interpretation," are organized into three categories: (1) Operations, (2) Management, and (3) Research. Representative of…

  17. A three-dimensional spatiotemporal receptive field model explains responses of area MT neurons to naturalistic movies

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Gallant, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    Area MT has been an important target for studies of motion processing. However, previous neurophysiological studies of MT have used simple stimuli that do not contain many of the motion signals that occur during natural vision. In this study we sought to determine whether views of area MT neurons developed using simple stimuli can account for MT responses under more naturalistic conditions. We recorded responses from macaque area MT neurons during stimulation with naturalistic movies. We then used a quantitative modeling framework to discover which specific mechanisms best predict neuronal responses under these challenging conditions. We find that the simplest model that accurately predicts responses of MT neurons consists of a bank of V1-like filters, each followed by a compressive nonlinearity, a divisive nonlinearity and linear pooling. Inspection of the fit models shows that the excitatory receptive fields of MT neurons tend to lie on a single plane within the three-dimensional spatiotemporal frequency domain, and suppressive receptive fields lie off this plane. However, most excitatory receptive fields form a partial ring in the plane and avoid low temporal frequencies. This receptive field organization ensures that most MT neurons are tuned for velocity but do not tend to respond to ambiguous static textures that are aligned with the direction of motion. In sum, MT responses to naturalistic movies are largely consistent with predictions based on simple stimuli. However, models fit using naturalistic stimuli reveal several novel properties of MT receptive fields that had not been shown in prior experiments. PMID:21994372

  18. Integrating Cultural and Natural Interpretation. Association of Interpretive Naturalists Program Papers. Workshop (Cape Cod, Massachusetts, October 6-10, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Interpretive Naturalists, Derwood, MD.

    Presented are 54 papers offered during the 1980 Workshop of the Association of Interpretive Naturalists at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. These papers, which relate to the conference theme "Integrating Natural and Cultural Interpretation," are organized into three categories: (1) Operations, (2) Management, and (3) Research. Representative of…

  19. Frequency-band signatures of visual responses to naturalistic input in ferret primary visual cortex during free viewing.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-02-19

    Neuronal firing responses in visual cortex reflect the statistics of visual input and emerge from the interaction with endogenous network dynamics. Artificial visual stimuli presented to animals in which the network dynamics were constrained by anesthetic agents or trained behavioral tasks have provided fundamental understanding of how individual neurons in primary visual cortex respond to input. In contrast, very little is known about the mesoscale network dynamics and their relationship to microscopic spiking activity in the awake animal during free viewing of naturalistic visual input. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) simultaneously in all layers of primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, freely viewing ferrets presented with naturalistic visual input (nature movie clips). We found that naturalistic visual stimuli modulated the entire oscillation spectrum; low frequency oscillations were mostly suppressed whereas higher frequency oscillations were enhanced. In average across all cortical layers, stimulus-induced change in delta and alpha power negatively correlated with the MUA responses, whereas sensory-evoked increases in gamma power positively correlated with MUA responses. The time-course of the band-limited power in these frequency bands provided evidence for a model in which naturalistic visual input switched V1 between two distinct, endogenously present activity states defined by the power of low (delta, alpha) and high (gamma) frequency oscillatory activity. Therefore, the two mesoscale activity states delineated in this study may define the degree of engagement of the circuit with the processing of sensory input.

  20. Naturalistic and Structured Assessments of Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Children: The Influence of Empathy and Perspective Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotti, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    Interrelationship of different categories of prosocial behavior different assessment procedures, and role of empathy and perspective taking were examined. Prosocial behavior in preschool children was assessed using three different approaches: naturalistic observation, structured measures, and teacher ratings. Results indicated preschool children…