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Sample records for american noninjecting heroin

  1. Injecting Transition Risk and Depression among Mexican American Non-Injecting Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Alice; Kaplan, Charles; Neaigus, Alan; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Villarreal, Yolanda; Valdez, Avelardo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Existing research has documented high comorbid rates for injecting drug use (IDU) and social and health consequences including HIV infection, a condition that disproportionately affects U.S. Hispanic populations. Few studies have examined the specific associations between injecting transition risk among non-injecting heroin using (NIU) populations and mental health conditions. This study hypothesizes that injecting transition risk will be strongly associated with depression symptomatology controlling for age and gender among Mexican American NIUs. METHODS Street-recruited NIUs (n=300) were administered structured interviews. The Mexican American sample was predominantly male (66%), unemployed (75%) with more than half experiencing incarceration in their lifetimes (58%). Depression was measured using the CES-D scale. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were employed to determine the associations between the dependent variable of heroin injecting transition risk and the key independent variables of depression symptomatology and other independent variables. RESULTS Depression symptomatology was the strongest independent correlate of injecting transition risk. Those NIUs with high levels of depression symptomatology had more than three times the heroin injecting transition risk than those NIUs with low levels. Heroin use network influence was also found to be a strong correlate. Acculturation level was significantly associated with injecting transition risk. CONCLUSION The comorbid condition of depression symptomatology and heroin use places Mexican American NIUs at elevated risk of contracting blood-borne pathogens such as HIV. Development of prevention and treatment strategies that target Hispanic non-injecting heroin users in socially disadvantaged communities should consider depression symptoms and develop interventions that build new social networks. PMID:22749681

  2. Potential Risk Factors for Injecting Among Mexican American Non-Injecting Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Neaigus, Alan; Cepeda, Alice

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY This study examines potential risk factors for resuming and transitioning to injecting among a prospective cohort of 300 Mexican American non-injecting heroin users (NIUs) with distinct injecting histories (i.e., never vs. former injectors). Overall. findings revealed NIUs with an injecting history are more likely to be at greater risk for resuming injecting practices. Of interest, scoring high on acculturation decreased the risk of being a former injector. The present analysis supports previous research, and more importantly further identifies potential risk factors for injecting that are unique to the cultural and social context of the Mexican American community. PMID:18192204

  3. The Influence of Family and Peer Risk Networks on Drug Use Practices and Other Risks among Mexican American Noninjecting Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Neaigus, Alan; Kaplan, Charles D.

    2008-01-01

    Noninjecting heroin use (NIU) is spreading among social networks of young Mexican American polydrug users. This article examines the influence of family and peer networks on NIU behavior and other drug practices and risks. This study delineates the extent to which a culturally relevant modification of the “network facilitation” theoretical approach can increase both a theoretical and practical understanding of drug use and related risk behaviors. Using the methods of analytic ethnography, it identifies, describes, and explains variations in the social networks among this marginalized population and how specific aspects of Mexican American culture (familismo, and collectivismo) affects risk behaviors. PMID:19337564

  4. Non-injecting routes of administration among entrants to three treatment modalities for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Hetherington, Kate; Ross, Joanne; Lynskey, Michael; Teesson, Maree

    2004-06-01

    A sample of 535 entrants to opioid dependence treatments across three treatment modalities were administered a structured interview to ascertain the prevalence of non-injecting heroin use. Ten per cent of participants had used heroin primarily by smoking/inhaling in the month preceding interview, and 9% had used heroin and other drugs exclusively by non-injecting routes. Non-injectors were younger (25.3 vs. 29.5 years), had higher levels of education (10.6 vs. 10.0 years), were more likely to be employed (33 vs. 18%) and had lower levels of recent crime (31 vs. 56%). They also had shorter heroin using careers (5.1 vs. 9.9 years), fewer symptoms of dependence (5.1 vs. 5.6), had been enrolled in fewer previous treatment episodes (3.3 vs. 11.5) and had less extensive lifetime (8.0 vs. 9.1 drug classes) and recent (3.6 vs. 4.9) polydrug use. Non-injectors were substantially less likely to report lifetime (13% vs. 58%) or recent (2% vs. 29%) heroin overdoses. There were no differences between the general physical and psychological health of the two groups. While non-injectors had a lower level of post-traumatic stress disorder (29% vs. 34%), there were no differences in levels of major depression, attempted suicide, antisocial personality disorder, or borderline personality disorder. A substantial minority of Australian treatment entrants are now using heroin exclusively by non-injecting routes. While this group is younger, and has substantially reduced risk of overdose and blood borne virus transmission, the physical and psychological health of non-injectors mirrors that of injectors.

  5. Impact of South American heroin on the US heroin market 1993–2004

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Unick, George J; Kraus, Allison

    2008-01-01

    Background The past two decades have seen an increase in heroin-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. We report on trends in US heroin retail price and purity, including the effect of entry of Colombian-sourced heroin on the US heroin market. Methods The average standardized price ($/mg-pure) and purity (% by weight) of heroin from 1993 to 2004 was from obtained from US Drug Enforcement Agency retail purchase data for 20 metropolitan statistical areas. Univariate statistics, robust Ordinary Least Squares regression and mixed fixed and random effect growth curve models were used to predict the price and purity data in each metropolitan statistical area over time. Results Over the 12 study years, heroin price decreased 62%. The median percentage of all heroin samples that are of South American origin increased an absolute 7% per year. Multivariate models suggest percent South American heroin is a significant predictor of lower heroin price and higher purity adjusting for time and demographics. Conclusion These analyses reveal trends to historically low-cost heroin in many US cities. These changes correspond to the entrance into and rapid domination of the US heroin market by Colombian-sourced heroin. The implications of these changes are discussed. PMID:19201184

  6. Comparing Injection and Non-Injection Routes of Administration for Heroin, Methamphetamine, and Cocaine Uses in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Scott P.; Kral, Alex H.

    2011-01-01

    Research examining the demographic and substance use characteristics of illicit drug use in the United States has typically failed to consider differences in routes of administration, or has exclusively focused on a single route of administration--Injection Drug Use (IDU). Therefore, a significant gap exists in our understanding of the degree to which IDUs are different from those who use illicit drugs via other routes, such as oral, inhalation, or smoked (non-IDUs). Data from the 2005–2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were used to compare past-year IDU and non-IDU routes of administration for people who use the three drugs most commonly injected drugs in the US: heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine. Among past-year users, IDUs were more likely than those using via other routes to be older (aged 35+), unemployed, possess less than a high school education, and reside in rural areas. IDUs also exhibited higher rates of abuse/dependence, perceived need for substance abuse treatment, and co-occurring physical and psychological problems. Fewer differences between IDUs and non-IDUs were observed for heroin users compared to methamphetamine or cocaine users. These results highlight significant differences in demographics, clinical/psychological manifestations, and treatment needs of injection drug users compared to those engaging in other routes of administration. PMID:21745047

  7. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Heroin KidsHealth > For Teens > Heroin Print A A A ... Quit? Avoiding Heroin en español Heroína What Is Heroin? Heroin is a highly addictive drug made from ...

  8. Personality Differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American Male Heroin Addicts on MMPI Content Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, M. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed personality differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American heroin addicts (N=423). Results confirmed the hypotheses that minority group heroin addicts (Blacks and Hispanics) would show better adjustment than White heroin addicts and that Hispanic-American heroin addicts would evidence personality characteristics unlike those of…

  9. Personality Differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American Male Heroin Addicts on MMPI Content Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, M. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed personality differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American heroin addicts (N=423). Results confirmed the hypotheses that minority group heroin addicts (Blacks and Hispanics) would show better adjustment than White heroin addicts and that Hispanic-American heroin addicts would evidence personality characteristics unlike those of…

  10. [Heroin].

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Heroin (or diacetylmorphine), a depressant nervous central system, is a semi-synthetic opiate. Its main adverse effect, respiratory depression, can lead to death, especially after an intravenous injection. By loss of tolerance, an overdose can be lethal following heroin use after a period of abstinence (voluntary or not). Mortality rate among heroin users is between 1 and 3%. Addiction, following a regular and continuous use, occurs in less than a quarter of persons who ever tried heroine. Heroin addicts often present with different problems (for instance, a criminal behaviour), without any obvious link with addiction. For a fraction of the addicts, addiction becomes a chronic relapsing disease, requiring a long term maintenance substitution therapy. However, relapses and sometimes continuous heroin use are frequent, For treatment resistant and severe heroin addicts, heroin-assisted treatment can be a solution. Despite the numerous available therapies, heroin is considered to be the drug with the most negative effects on the user.

  11. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Prevention Week DEA Museum and Visitors' Center Heroin Last Updated: Friday, September 8, 2017 What is ... from morphine and extracted from certain poppy plants. Heroin comes in a white or brownish powder, or ...

  12. What happened to the HIV epidemic among non-injecting drug users in New York City?

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Campbell, Aimee N C; Tross, Susan; Cooper, Hannah L F; Hagan, Holly; Perlman, David C

    2017-02-01

    HIV has reached high prevalence in many non-injecting drug user (NIDU) populations. The aims of this study were to (1) examine the trend in HIV prevalence among non-injecting cocaine and heroin NIDUs in New York City, (2) identify factors potentially associated with the trend and (3) estimate HIV incidence among NIDUs. Serial-cross sectional surveys of people entering drug treatment programs. People were permitted to participate only once per year, but could participate in multiple years. Mount Sinai Beth Israel drug treatment programs in New York City, USA. We recruited 3298 non-injecting cocaine and heroin users from 2005 to 2014. Participants were 78.7% male, 6.1% white, 25.7% Hispanic and 65.8% African American. Smoking crack cocaine was the most common non-injecting drug practice. Trend tests were used to examine HIV prevalence, demographics, drug use, sexual behavior and use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) by calendar year; χ(2) and multivariable logistic regression were used to compare 2005-10 versus 2011-14. HIV prevalence declined approximately 1% per year (P < 0.001), with a decline from 16% in 2005-10 to 8% in 2011-14 (P < 0.001). The percentages of participants smoking crack and having multiple sexual partners declined and the percentage of HIV-positive people on ART increased. HIV incidence among repeat participants was 1.2 per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval = 0.03/1000-7/1000). HIV prevalence has declined and a high percentage of HIV-positive non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) are receiving antiretroviral treatment, suggesting an end to the HIV epidemic among NIDUs in New York City. These results can be considered a proof of concept that it is possible to control non-injecting drug use related sexual transmission HIV epidemics. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Decline in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Among Non-Injecting Heroin and Cocaine Users in New York City, 2005 to 2014: Prospects for Avoiding a Resurgence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; Feelemyer, Jonathan; McKnight, Courtney; Tross, Susan; Perlman, David C; Campbell, Aimee N C; Hagan, Holly; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2017-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection increases both susceptibility to and transmissibility of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and HSV-2 and HIV are often strongly associated in HIV epidemics. We assessed trends in HSV-2 prevalence among non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) when HIV prevalence declined from 16% to 8% among NIDUs in New York City. Subjects were current non-injecting users of heroin and/or cocaine and who had never injected illicit drugs. Three thousand one hundred fifty-seven NIDU subjects were recruited between 2005 and 2014 among persons entering Mount Sinai Beth Israel substance use treatment programs. Structured interviews, HIV, and HSV-2 testing were administered. Change over time was assessed by comparing 2005 to 2010 with 2011 to 2014 periods. Herpes simplex virus type 2 incidence was estimated among persons who participated in multiple years. Herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence was strongly associated with HIV prevalence (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.1) from 2005 to 2014. Herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence declined from 60% to 56% (P = 0.01). The percentage of NIDUs with neither HSV-2 nor HIV infection increased from 37% to 43%, (P < 0.001); the percentage with HSV-2/HIV coinfection declined from 13% to 6% (P < 0.001). Estimated HSV-2 incidence was 1 to 2/100 person-years at risk. There were parallel declines in HIV and HSV-2 among NIDUs in New York City from 2005 to 2014. The increase in the percentage of NIDUs with neither HSV-2 nor HIV infection, the decrease in the percentage with HSV-2/HIV coinfection, and the low to moderate HSV-2 incidence suggest some population-level protection against resurgence of HIV. Prevention efforts should be strengthened to end the combined HIV/HSV-2 epidemic among NIDUs in New York City.

  14. Prevalence of HIV infection among young adult injecting and non-injecting heroin users in Spain in the era of harm reduction programmes: gender differences and other related factors.

    PubMed

    Barrio, G; De La Fuente, L; Toro, C; Brugal, T M; Soriano, V; Gonzalez, F; Bravo, M J; Vallejo, F; Silva, T C

    2007-05-01

    The aims were to assess the prevalence of HIV infection among young adult heroin users, including injecting heroin users (IHUs) and non-injecting heroin users (NIHUs), and to explore the differences by gender and other factors. The design was a cross-sectional cohort study between April 2001 and December 2003, which included 961 current heroin users (HU), aged 18-30 years: 422 in Madrid, 351 in Barcelona and 188 in Seville; 621 were IHUs and 340 were NIHUs. All were street-recruited by chain referral methods. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire with computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI). Samples for HIV testing (dried blood spot) were collected and tested with ELISA and Western Blot. Bivariate, logistic regression, and classification and regression tree analyses were performed. The overall prevalence of HIV infection among IHUs was 25.8% (95% CI 22.3-29.3) [32.4% (95% CI 26.6-38.1) in Madrid, 20.5% (95% CI 15.6-25.4) in Barcelona, and 20.6% (95% CI 9.8-31.4) in Seville], whereas in NIHUs it was 4.0% (95% CI 2.1-6.7), with no differences among cities. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than in men in NIHUs (10.9%, 95% CI 4.3-17.5 vs. 1.7%, 95% CI 0.5-4.2) and was non-significantly higher in IHUs (30.4%, 95% CI 23.0-37.8 vs. 24.1%, 95% CI 20.1-28.1). HIV prevalence in short-term IHUs was 12.9% (CI 8.8-17.02), with no differences among cities. In the logistic analysis, the variables associated with infection in IHUs were ever having injected with used syringes (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.2-5.3), ever having been in prison (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.0), and heroin as the first drug injected at least weekly (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.5). Factors positively associated with HIV infection in NIHUs were female sex (OR 8.7, 95% CI 2.6-29.2) and age >25 years (OR 3.1, 95% CI 0.9-11.1), while primary educational level was inversely associated (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). Although there are important geographic differences, HIV prevalence in

  15. Results of the first North American prescription heroin study are promising.

    PubMed

    Symington, Alison

    2008-12-01

    In October 2008, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) research team released the primary outcomes of a randomized controlled trial aimed at testing whether the provision of pharmaceutical-grade heroin under medical supervision benefits people suffering from chronic opiate addictions who have not benefitted from other treatments. The treatment phase was completed in June 2008. Retention and response rates were high, suggesting that heroin-assisted therapy is a safe and highly effective treatment for people with chronic heroin addiction.

  16. Low-frequency heroin injection among out-of-treatment, street-recruited injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jennie L; Lorvick, Jennifer; Wenger, Lynn; Wilkins, Tania; Iguchi, Martin Y; Bourgois, Philippe; Kral, Alex H

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we explore the understudied phenomenon of "low-frequency" heroin injection in a sample of street-recruited heroin injectors not in drug treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 2,410 active injection drug users (IDUs) recruited in San Francisco, California from 2000 to 2005. We compare the sociodemographic characteristics and injection risk behaviors of low-frequency heroin injectors (low-FHI; one to 10 self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days) to high-frequency heroin injectors (high-FHI; 30 or more self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days). Fifteen percent of the sample met criteria for low-FHI. African American race, men who have sex with men (MSM) behavior, and injection and noninjection methamphetamine use were independently associated with low-FHI. Compared to high-FHI, low-FHI were less likely to report syringe sharing and nonfatal heroin overdose. A small but significant proportion of heroin injectors inject heroin 10 or less times per month. Additional research is needed to qualitatively examine low-frequency heroin injection and its relationship to drug use trajectories.

  17. MEXICAN AMERICAN YOUTH AND ADULT PRISON GANGS IN A CHANGING HEROIN MARKET

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the interaction between the larger community’s drug markets and youth and adult prison gangs, and the process that leads to specific adverse consequences both to the youth gangs as organizations, and to individual members. Described is the emergence of a restructured heroin market dominated by an adult prison gang. A major consequence of this was the increasing use of heroin among Mexican American gang members and their transformation from autonomous youth gangs to extensions of the adult prison gangs or their demise. Data was collected from 160 members of 26 Mexican American youth gangs and key informants in San Antonio. Findings focus on organizational rules, drug market transformations, consequences on members, and the impact of heroin on the gang’s organization. Discussed is how the dominance of prison gangs is related to the increased incarceration and recidivism rates of Mexican Americans and declining economic opportunities for urban minorities. PMID:21614143

  18. Injection and Non-Injection Drug Use and Infectious Disease in Baltimore City: Differences by Race

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Larry; Khan, Maria; Clifford, Lisa; Harrell, Paul T.; Latimer, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The current study examines differences in the prevalence of biologically-confirmed hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV, and coinfection between Black and White adult cocaine/heroin users across three drug use subgroups identified in previous research (Harrell et al, 2012): non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin users, heroin injectors, and polydrug injectors. Results 59% of the 482 participants in the study were male. Significant race differences emerged between drug use subgroup memberships. Non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin users were predominantly Black (75%), while heroin injectors and polydrug injectors were predominantly White (69% and 72%, respectively). Polydrug injectors accounted for nearly three quarters of the HCV positive diagnoses in Whites. Though HIV disease status, stratified by race, did not differ significantly between drug use subgroups, the non-injection smoking crack/nasal heroin subgroup contained over half of the HIV positive diagnoses in the sample and was predominantly Black. Despite much lower rates of injection, Blacks (8%) had a higher prevalence of coinfection than Whites (3%; X2 (2) = 6.18, p = .015). Conclusions The current findings are consistent with trends in recent HIV transmission statistics where sexual activity has overtaken injection drug use as a HIV risk factor. The current findings also provide further support to the notion of injection drug use as an exceedingly high-risk behavior for HCV and coinfection, specifically those who are polysubstance injectors. PMID:24837755

  19. Characteristics of Mexican and Mexican American Adolescents in Treatment for “Cheese” Heroin Use

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robrina; Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Adinoff, Bryon; Carmody, Thomas; Coton, Casey E.; Tirado, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and cultural characteristics of Hispanic adolescent heroin users are not well described. The current exploratory study was conducted to describe a sample of in-treatment Hispanic adolescents with opioid dependence, specifically, cheese heroin. Mexican and Mexican American adolescents with heroin dependence (N = 72) in three treatment programs were interviewed and completed self-report measures. Participants reported, on average, first using cheese heroin at 13.5 years old and daily use at age 14.2. The majority (74%) reported a previous overdose. Adolescents being raised by caregivers other than both biological parents, who used drugs with relatives, and whose immediate family members have documentation to be in the U.S. fared worse on several indicators of drug use severity and other risky behaviors. The self-reported brief time period from first use to daily use strongly suggests the need for early prevention efforts. Additional research is needed to add to these preliminary results and inform prevention efforts. PMID:25176119

  20. Characteristics of Mexican and Mexican American adolescents in treatment for "cheese" heroin use.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robrina; Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Adinoff, Bryon; Carmody, Thomas; Coton, Casey E; Tirado, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and cultural characteristics of Hispanic adolescent heroin users are not well described. The current exploratory study was conducted to describe a sample of in-treatment Hispanic adolescents with opioid dependence, specifically, cheese heroin. Mexican and Mexican American adolescents with heroin dependence (N = 72) in three treatment programs were interviewed and completed self-report measures. Participants reported, on average, first using cheese heroin at age 13.5 years and daily use at age 14.2 years. The majority (74%) reported a previous overdose. Adolescents being raised by caregivers other than both biological parents, who used drugs with relatives, and whose immediate family members have documentation to be in the United States fared worse on several indicators of drug use severity and other risky behaviors. The self-reported brief time period from first use to daily use strongly suggests the need for early prevention efforts. Additional research is needed to add to these preliminary results and inform prevention efforts.

  1. The process of paradoxical autonomy and survival in the heroin careers of Mexican American women

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Kaplan, Charles D.; Cepeda, Alice

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the process of paradoxical autonomy and survival in the heroin careers of Mexican American women. We explore how gender roles among Mexican American female heroin users influence the emergence of a paradoxical autonomy. Five key subprocesses of this autonomy were identified from 14 life history narratives: sustaining employment, working the welfare system, illegal activities, emotional aloofness, and loss of family and children. Dependency on drugs did not lead simply to the reproduction of traditional gender dependency but, paradoxically, seemed to contribute to a new type of gender autonomy. This autonomy did not necessarily make the survival less arduous, only more independent from gendered responsibilities associated with men and often with family and children. We discuss how this paradoxical autonomy is not acquired without ambiguity by some of these women, who place a value on maintaining relationships with men and family. Our study makes a contribution to a better understanding of the diverse processes by which Mexican American female heroin users struggle to survive. Although this struggle leads to a paradoxical autonomy from their traditional gender roles, it does little to change other barriers to self-development originating from poverty, ethnic discrimination, and the severity of their drug addiction. PMID:21057594

  2. Health Consequences of Long-Term Injection Heroin Use Among Aging Mexican American Men

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luis R.; Kaplan, Charles; Valdez, Avelardo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Research on the health consequences of long-term injection drug use (IDU) is limited. This article examines these consequences among aging, male Mexican American injecting heroin users. Concern for this group is crucial, given its health disparities and the association of IDU with disease transmission. Method Aging, male Mexican American IDUs (N = 227) were recruited through intensive outreach. Participants self-reported health status, medical and substance use history, and completed behavioral and psychometric health scales. Results are compared to Hispanic national samples. Results Participants had significantly poorer self-rated health and negative health conditions. Selected medical conditions not associated with the heroin-use lifestyle (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, arthritis) were lower relative to the comparison samples. Discussion This population has a complex profile of health consequences linked to a heroin-using lifestyle. The study concludes that routine screening of infectious diseases and medical and behavioral conditions among aging substance using populations may contribute to reducing Hispanic health disparities. PMID:21451118

  3. Clara Barton: teacher, nurse, Civil War heroine, founder of the American Red Cross.

    PubMed

    Evans, Gerald D

    2003-01-01

    Clara Barton was a nineteenth century woman driven to greatness. She was a teacher, a nurse, a Civil War heroine and founder of the American Red Cross. In order to cut a path into the future we must know where we have been. The story of Clara Barton is about someone who cut that path. It is about courage, overcoming obstacles, never giving up and doing the job that needs doing. What makes it fascinating is the human side, the weaknesses that coloured her life. We can learn from her journey as we develop our own path into the future.

  4. Heroines of '98: female Army nurses in the Spanish-American war.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, P A

    1975-01-01

    Experiences of female Army nurses-their devotion to duty, contributions, and successes as well as their trials, tribulations, and sufferings--during the Spanish-American War and afterwards are described. How service by the heroines of '98 led to a change of attitude by the Army Medical Department is sketched. At the beginning of the War with Spain, the Medical Department had been reluctant to use female nurses; by the end of the war, the nurses had so demonstrated their value that Congress established permanent Army Reserve Nurse Corps.

  5. “EL Lado Oscuro”: “The Dark Side” of Social Capital in Mexican American Heroin Using Men

    PubMed Central

    Flores, David V.; Torres, Luis R.; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Ren, Yi; Haider, Ali; Bordnick, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes social capital in a cohort of 227 Mexican American men who are long-term injection heroin users. Social capital scores for current and former users were similar, suggesting equal absolute values of capital, but associated with illicit activities in current users and with cessation efforts in former users. Stable drug-using relationships provided high negative capital, whereas conventional relationships provided positive capital. Thus, social capital functions dichotomously in positive and negative contextualized roles. This study provides an alternative understanding of the dynamic interactions between individuals, environment, and drug abuse and can inform prevention and treatment interventions for an important demographic group. PMID:23768430

  6. Spatial Accessibility of Drug Treatment Facilities and the Effects on Locus of Control, Drug Abuse, and Service Use among Heroin-Injecting Mexican American Men

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Dennis; Torres, Luis R.; Guerrero, Erick G.; Mauldin, Rebecca; Bordnick, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study explores the spatial accessibility of outpatient drug treatment facilities and the potential relationship with drug abuse-related outcomes among Mexican American heroin users. Methods Secondary data on 219 current and former heroin-injecting Mexican American men aged 45 and older were drawn from a research study in Houston, Texas. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to derive two spatial accessibility measures: distance from one’s place of residence to the closest drug treatment facility (in minutes); and the number of facilities within a 10-minute driving distance from one’s place of residence. Exploratory logistic regression analyses examined the association between the spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and several drug abuse-related outcomes: internal locus of control (LOC); perceived chances and worries of injecting in the next six months; treatment utilization; and location of last heroin purchase. Results Participants with greater spatial access to treatment programs were more likely to report a higher chance of injecting in the near future. However, while current heroin users were more worried about injecting in the next six months, greater spatial access to treatment programs seemed to have a buffering effect. Finally, those who lived closer to a treatment programs were more likely to have last purchased heroin inside the neighborhood versus outside the neighborhood. Spatial accessibility was not associated with internal LOC or treatment utilization. Conclusion The findings showed that the presence of outpatient treatment facilities—particularly services in Spanish—may influence perceived risk of future heroin use and purchasing behaviors among Mexican American men. Implications for future spatially-informed drug abuse research and the planning of culturally and linguistically responsive drug treatment programs are discussed. PMID:24440123

  7. Spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and the effects on locus of control, drug use, and service use among heroin-injecting Mexican American men.

    PubMed

    Kao, Dennis; Torres, Luis R; Guerrero, Erick G; Mauldin, Rebecca L; Bordnick, Patrick S

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the spatial accessibility of outpatient drug treatment facilities and the potential relationship with drug use-related outcomes among Mexican American heroin users. Secondary data on 219 current and former heroin-injecting Mexican American men aged 45 and older were drawn from a research study in Houston, Texas. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to derive two spatial accessibility measures: distance from one's place of residence to the closest drug treatment facility (in minutes); and the number of facilities within a 10-minute driving distance from one's place of residence. Exploratory logistic regression analyses examined the association between the spatial accessibility of drug treatment facilities and several drug use-related outcomes: internal locus of control (LOC); perceived chances and worries of injecting in the next six months; treatment utilization; and location of last heroin purchase. Participants with greater spatial access to treatment programs were more likely to report a higher chance of injecting in the near future. However, while current heroin users were more worried about injecting in the next six months, greater spatial access to treatment programs seemed to have a buffering effect. Finally, those who lived closer to a treatment programs were more likely to have last purchased heroin inside the neighborhood versus outside the neighborhood. Spatial accessibility was not associated with internal LOC or treatment utilization. The findings showed that the presence of outpatient treatment facilities-particularly services in Spanish-may influence perceived risk of future heroin use and purchasing behaviors among Mexican American men. Implications for future spatially-informed drug use research and the planning of culturally and linguistically responsive drug treatment programs are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Is the New Heroin Epidemic Really New? Racializing Heroin.

    PubMed

    Bowser, Benjamin; Fullilove, Robert; Word, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Heroin abuse as an outcome of the prior use of painkillers increased rapidly over the past decade. This "new epidemic" is unique because the new heroin users are primarily young White Americans in rural areas of virtually every state. This commentary argues that the painkiller-to-heroin transition could not be the only cause of heroin use on such a scale and that the new and old heroin epidemics are linked. The social marketing that so successfully drove the old heroin epidemic has innovated and expanded due to the use of cell-phones, text messaging and the "dark web" which requires a Tor browser, and software that allows one to communicate with encrypted sites without detection. Central city gentrification has forced traffickers to take advantage of larger and more lucrative markets. A second outcome is that urban black and Latino communities are no longer needed as heroin stages areas for suburban and exurban illicit drug distribution. Drug dealing can be done directly in predominantly white suburbs and rural areas without the accompanying violence associated with the old epidemic. Denial of the link between the new and old heroin epidemics racially segregates heroin users and more proactive prevention and treatment in the new epidemic than in the old. It also cuts off a half-century of knowledge about the supply-side of heroin drug dealing and the inevitable public policy measures that will have to be implemented to effectively slow and stop both the old and new epidemic.

  9. Reinterpreting Ethnic Patterns among White and African American Men Who Inject Heroin: A Social Science of Medicine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bourgois, Philippe; Martinez, Alexis; Kral, Alex; Edlin, Brian R; Schonberg, Jeff; Ciccarone, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Background Street-based heroin injectors represent an especially vulnerable population group subject to negative health outcomes and social stigma. Effective clinical treatment and public health intervention for this population requires an understanding of their cultural environment and experiences. Social science theory and methods offer tools to understand the reasons for economic and ethnic disparities that cause individual suffering and stress at the institutional level. Methods and Findings We used a cross-methodological approach that incorporated quantitative, clinical, and ethnographic data collected by two contemporaneous long-term San Francisco studies, one epidemiological and one ethnographic, to explore the impact of ethnicity on street-based heroin-injecting men 45 years of age or older who were self-identified as either African American or white. We triangulated our ethnographic findings by statistically examining 14 relevant epidemiological variables stratified by median age and ethnicity. We observed significant differences in social practices between self-identified African Americans and whites in our ethnographic social network sample with respect to patterns of (1) drug consumption; (2) income generation; (3) social and institutional relationships; and (4) personal health and hygiene. African Americans and whites tended to experience different structural relationships to their shared condition of addiction and poverty. Specifically, this generation of San Francisco injectors grew up as the children of poor rural to urban immigrants in an era (the late 1960s through 1970s) when industrial jobs disappeared and heroin became fashionable. This was also when violent segregated inner city youth gangs proliferated and the federal government initiated its “War on Drugs.” African Americans had earlier and more negative contact with law enforcement but maintained long-term ties with their extended families. Most of the whites were expelled from their

  10. [Heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Heroin is an illicit, highly addictive drug. It is either the most abused or the most rapidly acting member of opioids. Abusers describe a feeling of a surge of pleasurable sensation, named as "rush" or "high". Repeated administration of high doses of heroin results in the induction of physical dependence. Physical dependence refers to an altered physiological state produced by chronic administration of heroin which necessitates the continued administration of the drug to prevent the appearance of a characteristic syndrome, the opioid withdrawal or abstinence syndrome. Withdrawal symptoms may occur within a few hours after the last administration of heroin. Symptoms of the withdrawal include restlessness, insomnia, drug craving, diarrhea, muscle and bone pain, cold flashes with goose bumps, and leg movements. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose of heroin and subside after about a week. At this time, weakness and depression are pronounced and nausea and vomiting are common. Nevertheless, some chronic addicts have shown persistent withdrawal signs for many months or even years. Heroin addiction is considered as a behavioural state of compulsive drug use and a high tendency to relapse after periods of abstinence. It is generally accepted that compulsive use and relapse are typically associated with the status of heroin craving or heroin hunger that are difficult to define but appear to be powerful motivational significance in the addiction process. The route of administering heroin varies largely and may indicate the degree of seriousness of the individual's addiction. Intravenous administration seems to be the predominant method of heroin use, but recently a shift in heroin use pattern has been found, i.e. from injection to sniffing and smoking. Frequent injections coupled with widespread sharing of syringes increase the risk of contracting HIV, hepatitis B, C and other blood-borne infectious diseases. Long-term use of heroin

  11. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI): profile of participants in North America's first trial of heroin-assisted treatment.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Nosyk, Bohdan; Brissette, Suzanne; Chettiar, Jill; Schneeberger, Pascal; Marsh, David C; Krausz, Michael; Anis, Aslam; Schechter, Martin T

    2008-11-01

    The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) in the Canadian context. Our objective is to analyze the profile of the NAOMI participant cohort in the context of illicit opioid use in Canada and to evaluate its comparability with patient profiles of European HAT studies. Recruitment began in February 2005 and ended in March 2007. Inclusion criteria included opioid dependence, 5 or more years of opioid use, regular opioid injection, and at least two previous opiate addiction treatment attempts. Standardized assessment instruments such as the European Addiction Severity Index and the Maudsley Addiction Profile were employed. A total of 251 individuals were randomized from Vancouver, BC (192, 76.5%), and Montreal, Quebec (59, 23.5%); 38.5% were female, the mean age was 39.7 years (SD:8.6), and participants had injected drugs for 16.5 years (SD:9.9), on average. In the prior month, heroin was used a mean of 26.5 days (SD:7.4) and cocaine 16 days (SD;12.6). Vancouver had significantly more patients residing in unstable housing (88.5 vs. 22%; p < 0.001) and higher use of smoked crack cocaine (16.9 days vs. 2.3 days in the prior month; p < 0.001), while a significantly higher proportion of Montreal participants reported needle sharing in the prior 6 months (25% vs. 3.7%; p < 0.001). In many respects, the patient cohort was similar to the European trials; however, NAOMI had a higher proportion of female participants and participants residing in unstable housing. This study suggests that the NAOMI study successfully recruited participants with a profile indicated for HAT. It also raises concern about the high levels of crack cocaine use and social marginalization.

  12. Women in History--Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte: American Physician and Heroine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumm, Bernita L.

    2005-01-01

    This article profiles Susan LaFlesche Picotte, the first Native American woman doctor in the United States. Several accounts record that at a very young age Picotte witnessed an incident involving a Caucasian doctor who refused to care for a dying Native American woman. Picotte was inspired by that incident to become a physician, ultimately…

  13. Women in History--Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte: American Physician and Heroine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumm, Bernita L.

    2005-01-01

    This article profiles Susan LaFlesche Picotte, the first Native American woman doctor in the United States. Several accounts record that at a very young age Picotte witnessed an incident involving a Caucasian doctor who refused to care for a dying Native American woman. Picotte was inspired by that incident to become a physician, ultimately…

  14. DrugFacts: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plan Search Share Print Home » Publications » DrugFacts » Heroin Heroin Email Facebook Twitter Revised January 2017 Photo by DEA What is heroin? Heroin is an opioid drug made from morphine, ...

  15. Miss Heroin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Bernice

    This script, with music, lyrics and dialog, was written especially for youngsters to inform them of the potential dangers of various drugs. The author, who teaches in an elementary school in Harlem, New York, offers Miss Heroin as her answer to the expressed opinion that most drug and alcohol information available is either too simplified and…

  16. Research Reports: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    How is heroin linked to prescription drug abuse? See page 3. from the director: Heroin is a highly addictive opioid drug, and its ... and cost billions of dollars each year. Although heroin use in the general population is rather low, ...

  17. Non-injection Drug Use and Injection Initiation Assistance among People Who Inject Drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamida, Amen; Rafful, Claudia; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Shelly; Gonzalez-Zuniga, Patricia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Werb, Dan

    2017-08-16

    Although most people who inject drugs (PWID) report receiving assistance during injection initiation events, little research has focused on risk factors among PWID for providing injection initiation assistance. We therefore sought to determine the influence of non-injection drug use among PWID on their risk to initiate others. We used generalized estimating equation (GEE) models on longitudinal data among a prospective cohort of PWID in Tijuana, Mexico (Proyecto El Cuete IV), while controlling for potential confounders. At baseline, 534 participants provided data on injection initiation assistance. Overall, 14% reported ever initiating others, with 4% reporting this behavior recently (i.e., in the past 6 months). In a multivariable GEE model, recent non-injection drug use was independently associated with providing injection initiation assistance (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39-4.20). Further, in subanalyses examining specific drug types, recent non-injection use of cocaine (AOR = 9.31, 95% CI = 3.98-21.78), heroin (AOR = 4.00, 95% CI = 1.88-8.54), and methamphetamine (AOR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.16-3.55) were all significantly associated with reporting providing injection initiation assistance. Our findings may have important implications for the development of interventional approaches to reduce injection initiation and related harms. Further research is needed to validate findings and inform future approaches to preventing entry into drug injecting.

  18. Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Listen Heroin is a white ... Español English Español PDF Version Download "I needed heroin just to get by." ©istock.com/ pixelheadphoto Deon ...

  19. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3…

  20. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3…

  1. [The history of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-08-01

    The discovery of heroin and the development of heroin abuse are introduced. Heroin, the hydrochloride of diacetylmorphine, was discovered by acetylation of morphine. Heroin, in pharmacological studies, proved to be more effective than morphine or codeine. The Bayer Company started the production of heroin in 1898 on a commercial scale. The first clinical results were so promising that heroin was considered a wonder drug. Indeed, heroin was more effective than codeine in respiratory diseases. It has turned out, however, that repeated administration of heroin results in the development of tolerance and the patients become heroin-addicts soon. In the early 1910s morphine addicts "discovered" the euphorising properties of heroin and this effect was enhanced by intravenous administration. Heroin became a narcotic drug and its abuse began to spread quickly. Restrictions on its production, use and distribution were regulated by international treties. The total ban on heroin production was also proposed. As a result of the strict regulations the production and cosumption of heroin showed a significant decrease after 1931. At the same time the underworld recognized the shortage of heroin and started the illicit production and trafficking. The quantity of heroin seized by law enforcement agencies in the past decades rose gradually. As an indicator of the worldwide heroin market, the quantity of confiscated heroin underwent a tenfold increase since 1970. The paper surveys the most important heroin-producing and trafficking countries. Heroin, prepared in clandestine ("kitchen" or "jungle") laboratories, is diluted ("cut") by every member of the illegal heroin distributing chain, i.e. smugglers, traffickers, dealers and vendors.

  2. Heroin: Statistics and Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids ... Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids ...

  3. [Efficacy diacetylmorphine (pharmaceutical heroin) for heroin treatment ].

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2010-12-01

    Before implementing the TADAM project in Belgium (a heroin-assisted treatment trial), our research team studied the trials in other countries. Since 1994, six randomised controlled trials have been developed using the same treatment model of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT). Each trial concluded that HAT had more efficacy than methadone treatment. We analysed those trials in order to find on which levels patients in a HAT treatment are expected to improve. Improvements appeared after at least six months on the level of street heroin use, (physical and mental) health and criminal behaviour. In the longer term, the continuation of treatment had positive but limited effects on the social level. Due to his higher cost, this treatment should remain a second-line treatment for this special target group: severe heroin addicts, using continuously street heroin in spite of a methadone treatment.

  4. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI): Profile of Participants in North America’s First Trial of Heroin-Assisted Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Brissette, Suzanne; Chettiar, Jill; Schneeberger, Pascal; Marsh, David C.; Krausz, Michael; Anis, Aslam; Schechter, Martin T.

    2008-01-01

    The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) in the Canadian context. Our objective is to analyze the profile of the NAOMI participant cohort in the context of illicit opioid use in Canada and to evaluate its comparability with patient profiles of European HAT studies. Recruitment began in February 2005 and ended in March 2007. Inclusion criteria included opioid dependence, 5 or more years of opioid use, regular opioid injection, and at least two previous opiate addiction treatment attempts. Standardized assessment instruments such as the European Addiction Severity Index and the Maudsley Addiction Profile were employed. A total of 251 individuals were randomized from Vancouver, BC (192, 76.5%), and Montreal, Quebec (59, 23.5%); 38.5% were female, the mean age was 39.7 years (SD:8.6), and participants had injected drugs for 16.5 years (SD:9.9), on average. In the prior month, heroin was used a mean of 26.5 days (SD:7.4) and cocaine 16 days (SD;12.6). Vancouver had significantly more patients residing in unstable housing (88.5 vs. 22%; p < 0.001) and higher use of smoked crack cocaine (16.9 days vs. 2.3 days in the prior month; p < 0.001), while a significantly higher proportion of Montreal participants reported needle sharing in the prior 6 months (25% vs. 3.7%; p < 0.001). In many respects, the patient cohort was similar to the European trials; however, NAOMI had a higher proportion of female participants and participants residing in unstable housing. This study suggests that the NAOMI study successfully recruited participants with a profile indicated for HAT. It also raises concern about the high levels of crack cocaine use and social marginalization. PMID:18758964

  5. Heroin Addicts Reporting Previous Heroin Overdoses Also Report Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradvik, Louise; Frank, Arne; Hulenvik, Per; Medvedeo, Alvaro; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Nonfatal heroin overdoses and suicide attempts are both common among heroin addicts, but there is limited knowledge about the association between them. The sample in the present study consisted of 149 regular heroin users in Malmo, Sweden. Out of these 98 had taken an unintentional heroin overdose at some time and 51 had made at least one attempt…

  6. Heroin Addicts Reporting Previous Heroin Overdoses Also Report Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradvik, Louise; Frank, Arne; Hulenvik, Per; Medvedeo, Alvaro; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Nonfatal heroin overdoses and suicide attempts are both common among heroin addicts, but there is limited knowledge about the association between them. The sample in the present study consisted of 149 regular heroin users in Malmo, Sweden. Out of these 98 had taken an unintentional heroin overdose at some time and 51 had made at least one attempt…

  7. [Therapy in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sáandor; Fürst, Zsuzsanna

    2014-09-01

    Heroin addiction is one of the most devastating and expensive of public health problems. The most effective treatment is opioid replacement therapy. Replacement of heroin, a short-acting euphoriant with methadone or other opioids that have significantly longer duration of action provides a number of therapeutic benefits. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Opioid-based detoxification is based on the principle of cross-tolerance, in which one opioid is replaced with another one that is slowly tapered. For the treatment of heroin addicts a wide range of psychosocial and pharmacotherapeutic treatments are available; of these, methadone maintenance therapy has the most evidence of benefit. Methadone maintenance reduces and/or eliminates the use of heroin, reduces the death rate and criminality associated with heroin use, and allows patients to improve their health and social productivity. In addition, enrollment in methadone maintenance has the potential to reduce the transmission of infectious diseases associated with heroin injection, such as hepatitis and HIV. The principal effects of methadone maintenance are to relieve narcotic craving, suppress the abstinence syndrome, and block the euphoric effects associated with heroin. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. Buprenorphine which is a long-acting partial agonist was also approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Opioid antagonists can reduce heroin self-administration and opioid craving in detoxified addicts. Naltrexone, which is a long-acting competitive antagonist at the opioid receptors, blocks the subjective and objective responses produced by intravenous opioids. Naltrexone is employed to accelerate opioid detoxification by displacing heroin and as a maintenance agent for detoxified formerly heroin-dependent patients who want to

  8. Role of sexual transmission of HIV among young noninjection and injection opiate users: a respondent-driven sampling study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jianhua; Luo, Jian; Jarlais, Don Des; Koram, Nana

    2011-12-01

    Sexual transmissibility of HIV among young drug users in China has been investigated in few studies. The objective of this study was to examine the role of sexual transmission on HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) and noninjection drug users (NIDUs). Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to recruit 426 young heroin/opium drug users in Yunnan, China. Logistic regression modeling was performed to examine interrelationships among risky sexual behaviors, drug-use modes, and drug-use practices. Substantial proportions of NIDUs and IDUs reported engagement in risky sexual behaviors including: (1) multiple sexual partners (42% of NIDUs vs. 37% of IDUs), (2) concurrent sexual partnerships (48% vs. 46%), (3) commercial sex partners (23% vs. 24%), and sex partners who were NIDUs (14% vs. 17%). Both NIDUs and IDUs reported low levels of condom use with nonregular partners (48% vs. 42%) and regular partner (24% vs. 27%), and having a history of recent methamphetamine use (21% vs. 18%). Compared to IDUs, NIDUs reported having had fewer sex partners who were IDUs, fewer IDU network peers, more NIDU network peers, and having lower levels of HIV knowledge and self-perceived HIV risk. Generalization of the HIV epidemic from high-risk groups to the general population may be driven by risky sexual behavior among drug users. Reducing sexual transmission of HIV among both IDUs and NIDUs is the next major challenge for HIV intervention among drug users in China.

  9. HSV-2 co-infection as a driver of HIV transmission among heterosexual non-injecting drug users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Perlman, David C; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Hagan, Holly; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2014-01-01

    To examine herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2)/HIV co-infection as a contributing factor in the increase in HIV infection among non-injecting heroin and cocaine users in New York City. Subjects were recruited from the Beth Israel Medical Center drug detoxification and methadone maintenance programs in New York City in 1995-1999 and 2005-2011. All reported current heroin and/or cocaine use and no injection drug use. A structured questionnaire was administered and serum samples collected for HIV and HSV-2 testing. Population-attributable risk percentages (PAR%s) were estimated for associations between HSV-2 and increased susceptibility to and increased transmissibility of HIV among female NIDUs. 785 subjects were recruited from 1995-1999, and 1764 subjects from 2005-2011. HIV prevalence increased from 7% to 13%, with nearly uniform increases among all demographic subgroups. HSV-2/HIV co-infection was common in both time periods, with an average (over the two time periods) of 80% of HIV negative females infected with HSV-2, an average of 43% of HIV negative males infected with HSV-2; an average of 97% of HIV positive females also infected with HSV-2 and an average of 67% of HIV positive males also infected with HSV-2. The increase in HIV prevalence was predominantly an increase in HSV-2/HIV co-infection, with relatively little HIV mono-infection in either time period. The estimated PAR%s indicate that approximately half of HIV acquisition among females was caused by HSV-2 infection and approximately 60% of HIV transmission from females was due to HSV-2 co-infection. The increase in HIV infection among these non-injecting drug users is better considered as an increase in HSV-2/HIV co-infection rather than simply an increase in HIV prevalence. Additional interventions (such as treatment as prevention and suppressing the effects of HSV-2 on HIV transmission) are needed to reduce further HIV transmission from HSV-2/HIV co-infected non-injecting drug users.

  10. Heroin crystal nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy.

  11. Heroin crystal nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy. PMID:26034599

  12. The Problem of Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Argues that most of the underlying assumptions of presently recommended solutions to the problem of heroin addiction are unreasonable, unwarranted, or at least open to more than one interpretation. (DM)

  13. Heroin: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heroin (National Institute on Drug Abuse) Also in Spanish Heroin (Drug Enforcement Administration) Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts (National Institute on Drug Abuse) Also in Spanish Latest News Heroin Taking Bigger Share of U.S. ...

  14. Polydrug use and HIV risk among people who inject heroin in Tijuana, Mexico: A Latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, M.C.; Rudolph, A.E.; Strathdee, S.A.; Rusch, M.L.; Brouwer, K.C.; Patterson, T.L.; Vera, A.; Rangel, G.; Roesch, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although most people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico, primarily inject heroin, injection and non-injection use of methamphetamine and cocaine is common. We examined patterns of polydrug use among heroin injectors to inform prevention and treatment of drug use and its health and social consequences. Methods Participants were PWID residing in Tijuana aged ≥ 18 years who reported heroin injection in the past 6 months and were recruited through respondent driven sampling (n=1025). Latent class analysis was conducted to assign individuals to classes on a probabilistic basis, using four indicators of past 6 month polydrug and polyroute use: cocaine injecting, cocaine smoking or snorting, methamphetamine injecting, methamphetamine smoking or snorting. Latent class membership was regressed onto covariates in a multinomial logistic regression. Results Latent class analyses testing 1, 2, 3, and 4 classes were fit, with the 3-class solution fitting best. Class 1 was defined by predominantly heroin use (50.2%, n=515); class 2 by methamphetamine and heroin use (43.7%, n=448), and class 3 by methamphetamine, cocaine, and heroin use (6.0%, n=62). Bivariate and multivariate analyses indicated a group of methamphetamine and cocaine users that exhibited higher risk sexual practices and lower heroin injecting frequency, and a group of methamphetamine users who were younger and more likely to be female. Conclusions Discrete subtypes of heroin PWID were identified based on methamphetamine and cocaine use patterns. These findings have identified subtypes of heroin injectors who require more tailored interventions to reduce the health and social harms of injecting drug use. PMID:26444185

  15. Polydrug Use and HIV Risk Among People Who Inject Heroin in Tijuana, Mexico: A Latent Class Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meacham, Meredith C; Rudolph, Abby E; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Rusch, Melanie L; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Patterson, Thomas L; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Roesch, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Although most people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico, primarily inject heroin, injection and non-injection use of methamphetamine and cocaine is common. We examined patterns of polydrug use among heroin injectors to inform prevention and treatment of drug use and its health and social consequences. Participants were PWID residing in Tijuana, aged ≥18 years who reported heroin injection in the past six months and were recruited through respondent-driven sampling (n = 1,025). Latent class analysis was conducted to assign individuals to classes on a probabilistic basis, using four indicators of past six-month polydrug and polyroute use: cocaine injecting, cocaine smoking or snorting, methamphetamine injecting, and methamphetamine smoking or snorting. Latent class membership was regressed onto covariates in a multinomial logistic regression. Latent class analyses testing 1, 2, 3, and 4 classes were fit, with the 3-class solution fitting best. Class 1 was defined by predominantly heroin use (50.2%, n = 515); class 2 by methamphetamine and heroin use (43.7%, n = 448), and class 3 by methamphetamine, cocaine, and heroin use (6.0%, n = 62). Bivariate and multivariate analyses indicated a group of methamphetamine and cocaine users that exhibited higher-risk sexual practices and lower heroin injecting frequency, and a group of methamphetamine users who were younger and more likely to be female. Discrete subtypes of heroin PWID were identified based on methamphetamine and cocaine use patterns. These findings have identified subtypes of heroin injectors who require more tailored interventions to reduce the health and social harms of injecting drug use.

  16. Exploration of the telescoping effect among not-in-treatment, intensive heroin-using research volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stoltman, Jonathan J K; Woodcock, Eric A; Lister, Jamey J; Greenwald, Mark K; Lundahl, Leslie H

    2015-03-01

    Addiction research literature suggests some demographic groups exhibit a later age of substance use initiation, more rapid escalation to dependence, and worse substance use-related outcomes. This 'telescoping' effect has been observed more often in females but has not yet been examined in not-in-treatment heroin users or racial subgroups. Not-in-treatment, intensive heroin-using adults screened for laboratory-based research studies (N=554; range 18-55 yr; mean age: 42.5 yr; 60.5% African American [AA]; 70.2% male) were included in this secondary analysis. A comprehensive drug history questionnaire assessed heroin-use characteristics and lifetime adverse consequences. We examined telescoping effects by racial and gender groups: Caucasian males and females; AA males and females. Caucasian males initiated heroin use significantly later than AA males but this difference was not observed for age at intensive heroin use (≥3 times weekly). Caucasian males reported significantly more lifetime heroin use-related consequences, were more likely to inject heroin, and reported more-frequent past-month heroin use, but did not differ from AA males in lifetime heroin quit attempts or prior heroin treatment. Females, compared to males, reported later onset of initial and intensive use, but there was no gender-telescoping effect from initial to intensive heroin-use. In this not-in-treatment sample, Caucasian males exhibited more rapid heroin-use progression and adverse consequences than AA males, i.e., within-gender, racial-group telescoping. Despite later-onset heroin use among females, there was no evidence of gender-related telescoping. Given the resurgence of heroin use, differential heroin-use trajectories across demographic groups may be helpful in planning interventions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Heroin addiction and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bashore, R A; Ketchum, J S; Staisch, K J; Barrett, C T; Zimmermann, E G

    1981-06-01

    Pregnant heroin addicts tend to be younger than nonaddicted pregnant patients, unmarried or separated from spouses, and a disproportionately large number are members of minority ethnic groups. Heroin addiction during pregnancy is associated with several significant medical and obstetrical complications and may result in both acute and chronic abnormalities in neonates. Malnutrition, venereal disease, hepatitis, pulmonary complications, preeclampsia and third-trimester bleeding are the most common maternal complications, while fetal death, intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and withdrawal symptoms affect the fetus and neonate. There is controversy about treating addicts with methadone during pregnancy. The findings of studies in animals suggest that there may be a long-lasting drug-induced syndrome, characterized by growth retardation, delayed motor development and behavior abnormalities in offspring of heroin-addicted or methadone-treated mothers.

  18. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis and myocardial injury following heroin inhalation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bazoukis, G; Spiliopoulou, A; Mourouzis, K; Grigoropoulou, P; Yalouris, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heroin use by non-injecting routes of administration (snorting, swallowing, “chasing the dragon”) is considered to be safer but is not risk-free for fatal overdose or serious side effects. We report the case of an adolescent who was transferred unconscious to the emergency department after heroin inhalation. Description of the case: A 17-year-old male was transferred to the emergency department unconscious (Glasgow coma scale: 6/15) after heroin inhalation. He was treated with non-rebreather mask and intravenous infusion of naloxone with gradual improvement of consciousness and arterial blood gasses. The chest computed tomography showed signs of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Laboratory exams on the second day of hospitalization showed elevated creatine kinase (CK) and troponin-I levels while his electrocardiography (ECG) showed J-point elevation in V1, V2, and V3 precordial leads. On the second day of hospitalization the pulmonary infiltrates were not present in his chest X-ray while on the eighth day, troponin-I and CK levels were normalized without dynamic ECG changes and the patient was discharged uneventfully. Conclusion: Heroin inhalation may cause severe complications, such as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis or myocardial injury. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 84-87 PMID:27895451

  19. Increases in heroin overdose deaths - 28 States, 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rose A; Paulozzi, Len J; Bauer, Michael J; Burleson, Richard W; Carlson, Rick E; Dao, Dan; Davis, James W; Dudek, Jennifer; Eichler, Beth Ann; Fernandes, Jessie C; Fondario, Anna; Gabella, Barbara; Hume, Beth; Huntamer, Theron; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Largo, Thomas W; Miles, JoAnne; Newmyer, Ashley; Nitcheva, Daniela; Perez, Beatriz E; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Sabel, Jennifer C; Skiba, Jessica; Slavova, Svetla; Stone, Kathy; Tharp, John M; Wendling, Tracy; Wright, Dagan; Zehner, Anne M

    2014-10-03

    Nationally, death rates from prescription opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdoses quadrupled during 1999-2010, whereas rates from heroin overdoses increased by <50%. Individual states and cities have reported substantial increases in deaths from heroin overdose since 2010. CDC analyzed recent mortality data from 28 states to determine the scope of the heroin overdose death increase and to determine whether increases were associated with changes in OPR overdose death rates since 2010. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, from 2010 to 2012, the death rate from heroin overdose for the 28 states increased from 1.0 to 2.1 per 100,000, whereas the death rate from OPR overdose declined from 6.0 per 100,000 in 2010 to 5.6 per 100,000 in 2012. Heroin overdose death rates increased significantly for both sexes, all age groups, all census regions, and all racial/ethnic groups other than American Indians/Alaska Natives. OPR overdose mortality declined significantly among males, persons aged <45 years, persons in the South, and non-Hispanic whites. Five states had increases in the OPR death rate, seven states had decreases, and 16 states had no change. Of the 18 states with statistically reliable heroin overdose death rates (i.e., rates based on at least 20 deaths), 15 states reported increases. Decreases in OPR death rates were not associated with increases in heroin death rates. The findings indicate a need for intensified prevention efforts aimed at reducing overdose deaths from all types of opioids while recognizing the demographic differences between the heroin and OPR-using populations. Efforts to prevent expansion of the number of OPR users who might use heroin when it is available should continue.

  20. Heroin Mismatch in the Motor City: Addiction, Segregation and the Geography of Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Draus, Paul; Roddy, Juliette; Greenwald, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we employ data drawn from economic and ethnographic interviews with Detroit heroin users, as well as other sources, to illustrate the relationship between heroin users’ mobility patterns and urban and suburban environments, especially in terms of drug acquisition and the geography of opportunity. We explore how the “spatial mismatch” (Kain 1968; 1992) between legal work opportunities and central city residents is seemingly reversed in the case of heroin users. We find that while both geographic location and social networks associated with segregation provide central city residents and African Americans with a strategic advantage over white suburbanites in locating and purchasing heroin easily and efficiently, this same segregation effectively focuses the negative externalities of heroin markets in central city neighborhoods. Finally, we consider how the heroin trade reflects and reproduces the segregated post-industrial landscape, and we discuss directions for potential future research on the relationship between ethnic and economic ghettos and regional drug markets. PMID:22679895

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Today's Heroin Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Today’s Heroin Epidemic More people at risk, multiple drugs abused ... were also addicted to prescription opioid painkillers. Problem Heroin use is increasing, and so are heroin-related ...

  2. HIV, Hepatitis C, and Abstinence from Alcohol Among Injection and Non-injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Stohl, Malka; Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals using illicit drugs are at risk for heavy drinking and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite medical consequences of drinking with HIV and/or HCV, whether drug users with these infections are less likely to drink is unclear. Using samples of drug users in treatment with lifetime injection use (n = 1309) and non-injection use (n = 1996) participating in a large, serial, cross-sectional study, we investigated the associations between HIV and HCV with abstinence from alcohol. About half of injection drug users (52.8 %) and 26.6 % of non-injection drug users abstained from alcohol. Among non-injection drug users, those with HIV were less likely to abstain [odds ratio (OR) 0.55; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.58] while those with HCV were more likely to abstain (OR 1.46; AOR 1.34). In contrast, among injection drug users, neither HIV nor HCV was associated with drinking. However, exploratory analyses suggested that younger injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to drink, whereas older injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to abstain. In summary, individuals using drugs, especially non-injection users and those with HIV, are likely to drink. Age may modify the risk of drinking among injection drug users with HIV and HCV, a finding requiring replication. Alcohol intervention for HIV and HCV infected drug users is needed to prevent further harm. PMID:26080690

  3. What Are the Treatments for Heroin Addiction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Twitter What are the treatments for heroin addiction? A variety of effective treatments are available for heroin addiction, including both behavioral and pharmacological (medications). Both approaches ...

  4. Nonmedical opioid use and heroin use in a nationally representative sample of us high school seniors.

    PubMed

    Palamar, Joseph J; Shearston, Jenni A; Dawson, Eric W; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Ompad, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical use of opioids has become increasingly problematic in recent years with increases in overdoses, treatment admissions, and deaths. Use also appears to be contributing to heroin initiation, which has increased in recent years. Further research is needed to examine which adolescents are at highest risk for nonmedical use of opioids and heroin and to explore potential links between nonmedical opioid use and heroin use. Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of American high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2009-2013, Weighted N=67,822). We examined associations between frequency and recency of nonmedical use of opioids and heroin. Sociodemographic correlates of use of each drug were also examined. 12.4% of students reported lifetime nonmedical opioid use and 1.2% reported lifetime heroin use. As frequency of lifetime nonmedical opioid use increased, so too did the odds for reporting heroin use, with over three-quarters (77.3%) of heroin users reporting lifetime nonmedical opioid use. Recent (30-day) nonmedical opioid use was a robust risk factor for heroin use and almost a quarter (23.2%) of students who reported using opioids ≥40 times reported lifetime heroin use. Black and Hispanic students were less likely to report nonmedical opioid or heroin use than white students, but they were more likely to report heroin use in absence of nonmedical opioid use. Recent and frequent nonmedical opioid use are risk factors for heroin use among adolescents. Prevention needs to be targeted to those at highest risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonmedical Opioid Use and Heroin Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of US High School Seniors*

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Shearston, Jenni A.; Dawson, Eric W.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonmedical use of opioids has become increasingly problematic in recent years with increases in overdoses, treatment admissions, and deaths. Use also appears to be contributing to heroin initiation, which has increased in recent years. Further research is needed to examine which adolescents are at highest risk for nonmedical use of opioids and heroin and to explore potential links between nonmedical opioid use and heroin use. Methods Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of American high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2009–2013, Weighted N = 67,822). We examined associations between frequency and recency of nonmedical use of opioids and heroin. Sociodemographic correlates of use of each drug were also examined. Results 12.4% of students reported lifetime nonmedical opioid use and 1.2% reported lifetime heroin use. As frequency of lifetime nonmedical opioid use increased, so too did the odds for reporting heroin use, with over three-quarters (77.3%) of heroin users reporting lifetime nonmedical opioid use. Recent (30-day) nonmedical opioid use was a robust risk factor for heroin use and almost a quarter (23.2%) of students who reported using opioids ≥40 times reported lifetime heroin use. Black and Hispanic students were less likely to report nonmedical opioid or heroin use than white students, but they were more likely to report heroin use in absence of nonmedical opioid use. Discussion Recent and frequent nonmedical opioid use are risk factors for heroin use among adolescents. Prevention needs to be targeted to those at highest risk. PMID:26653341

  6. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study.

  7. Heroin mismatch in the Motor City: addiction, segregation, and the geography of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Draus, Paul; Roddy, Juliette; Greenwald, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors used data from economic and ethnographic interviews with heroin users from Detroit, Michigan, as well as other sources, to illustrate the relationship between heroin users' mobility patterns and urban and suburban environments, especially in terms of drug acquisition and the geography of opportunity. The authors found that although geographic location and social networks associated with segregation provided central city residents and African Americans with a strategic advantage over White suburbanites in locating and purchasing heroin easily and efficiently, this same segregation effectively focuses the negative externalities of heroin markets in central city neighborhoods. Finally, the authors consider how the heroin trade reflects and reproduces the segregated post-industrial landscape and discuss directions for future research about the relationship between ethnic and economic ghettos and regional drug markets.

  8. The Dreams of Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Maryanne

    1972-01-01

    Few heroin addicts get high'' in their dreams. An exploration of the reasons for this failure provides some clues to the conflicts and other problems that retard an addict's progress in therapy. (Author)

  9. Problematic heroin use incidence trends in Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Niubò, Albert; Fortiana, Josep; Barrio, Gregorio; Suelves, Josep Maria; Correa, Juan Francisco; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia

    2009-02-01

    To estimate the annual incidence of heroin use in Spain. Data on individuals' year of first heroin use (from 1971 to 2005), year of first heroin treatment between 1991 and 2005 and most frequent route of heroin administration when presenting to treatment were obtained from the Spanish Drug Observatory Register and used to calculate the delay between onset and treatment. By using a log-linear model approach it was possible to correct for missing observations (heroin users who presented for treatment before 1991 and those who had still not presented by the end of 2005) and to estimate heroin incidence over time. The estimated incidence of problematic heroin use in the population aged 15-44 peaked at 190 per 100,000 in 1980--after rising rapidly from less than 40 per 100,000 in 1971--and fell subsequently to about 8 per 100,000 in 2005. On average, incidence was five times higher in men. Injecting heroin incidence peaked and declined rapidly from 1980; as heroin smoking did not decline as rapidly, from 1985 onwards its estimated incidence has remained above that of heroin injecting. The delay between starting heroin use and entering treatment had a median of 3 years. We demonstrate the utility of a method to estimate heroin incidence from analysis of observed trends in presentations at specialist drug treatment facilities. The estimates suggest that incidence of heroin use, especially injecting, has fallen since 1980 and is now lower than in the early 1970s.

  10. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Gursharan; Euesden, Jack; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110-6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field.

  11. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A.; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110−6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field. PMID:27936112

  12. Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Law Enforcement Resources Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic Opioids are natural or synthetic chemicals ... in your brain or body. Common opioids include heroin and prescription drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and ...

  13. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... glamorization of “heroin chic” in films, fashion, and music, heroin use can have tragic consequences that extend far beyond its users. Fetal effects, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, violence, and crime are all ...

  14. Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164350.html Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America Use of the narcotic grew ... people transition from painkillers to heroin, Martins explained. It is also related to availability, lower cost and ...

  15. Predictors of non-use of illicit heroin in opioid injection maintenance treatment of long-term heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Sordo, Luis; Guh, Daphne; Marsh, David C; Lock, Kurt; Brissette, Suzanne; Anis, Aslam H; Schechter, Martin T

    2015-02-01

    To investigate baseline and concurrent predictors of non-use of illicit heroin among participants randomized to injectable opioids in the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) clinical trial. NAOMI was an open-label randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of injectable diacetylmorphine and hydromorphone for long-term opioid-dependency. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and during treatment (3, 6, 9, 12months). Days of non-use of illicit heroin in the prior month at each follow-up visit were divided into three categories: Non-use; Low use (1 to 7days) and High use (8days or more). Tested covariates were: Sociodemographics, Health, Treatment, Drug use and illegal activities. Mixed-effect proportional odds models with random intercept for longitudinal ordinal outcomes were used to assess the predictors of the non-use of illicit heroin. 139 participants were included in the present analysis. At each follow-up visit, those with non-use of illicit heroin represented 47.5% to 54.0% of the sample. Fewer days of cocaine use (p=0.074), fewer days engaged in illegal activities at baseline (p<0.01) and at each visit (p<0.01), less money spent on drugs (p<0.001), days with injection opioid or oral methadone treatment (p<0.001) and total mg of injectable opioids taken (p<0.001), independently predicted lower use of illicit heroin. The independent effect of several concurrent factors besides the injection of opioid dose suggests benefits from the clinic that go beyond the provision of the medication alone. Thus, this supervised model of care presents an opportunity to maximize the beneficial impact of medical and psychosocial components of the treatment on improving outcomes associated with non-use of illicit heroin. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. [X-ray diffraction spectrum of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Kan, J; Yuan, B

    1999-06-01

    In this paper, practical measured X-ray diffraction spectra of heroin and opium are given and the parameters of each diffraction peak of the heroin are listed. The heroin belongs to orthorhombic crystal system; the basic vectors of the primitive cell are: a = 8.003, b = 14.373, c = 16.092 x 10(-10) m. As compared with the standard spectra of pure heroin and sucrose, the main doped additive checked by us, is sugar affirmatively.

  17. The Dynamics of a Heroin Addiction Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Robert L.; Greene, Mark H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent trends in heroin addiction in Washington, D.C. In 1969 a comprehensive, multimodal treatment program for addicts was introduced and a major law enforcement commitment was made to reduce the heroin supply. These factors, together with changing community attitudes, may be responsible for a remarkable decline in heroin addiction. (JR)

  18. The Dynamics of a Heroin Addiction Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Robert L.; Greene, Mark H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent trends in heroin addiction in Washington, D.C. In 1969 a comprehensive, multimodal treatment program for addicts was introduced and a major law enforcement commitment was made to reduce the heroin supply. These factors, together with changing community attitudes, may be responsible for a remarkable decline in heroin addiction. (JR)

  19. Pharmacokinetic Correlates of the Effects of a Heroin Vaccine on Heroin Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raleigh, Michael D.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a morphine-conjugate vaccine (M-KLH) on the acquisition, maintenance, and reinstatement of heroin self-administration (HSA) in rats, and on heroin and metabolite distribution during heroin administration that approximated the self-administered dosing rate. Vaccination with M-KLH blocked heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin responding. Vaccination also decreased HSA at low heroin unit doses but produced a compensatory increase in heroin self-administration at high unit doses. Vaccination shifted the heroin dose-response curve to the right, indicating reduced heroin potency, and behavioral economic demand curve analysis further confirmed this effect. In a separate experiment heroin was administered at rates simulating heroin exposure during HSA. Heroin and its active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) and morphine, were retained in plasma and metabolite concentrations were reduced in brain in vaccinated rats compared to controls. Reductions in 6-AM concentrations in brain after vaccination were consistent with the changes in HSA rates accompanying vaccination. These data provide evidence that 6-AM is the principal mediator of heroin reinforcement, and the principal target of the M-KLH vaccine, in this model. While heroin vaccines may have potential as therapies for heroin addiction, high antibody to drug ratios appear to be important for obtaining maximal efficacy. PMID:25536404

  20. Pharmacokinetic correlates of the effects of a heroin vaccine on heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Michael D; Pentel, Paul R; LeSage, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a morphine-conjugate vaccine (M-KLH) on the acquisition, maintenance, and reinstatement of heroin self-administration (HSA) in rats, and on heroin and metabolite distribution during heroin administration that approximated the self-administered dosing rate. Vaccination with M-KLH blocked heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin responding. Vaccination also decreased HSA at low heroin unit doses but produced a compensatory increase in heroin self-administration at high unit doses. Vaccination shifted the heroin dose-response curve to the right, indicating reduced heroin potency, and behavioral economic demand curve analysis further confirmed this effect. In a separate experiment heroin was administered at rates simulating heroin exposure during HSA. Heroin and its active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) and morphine, were retained in plasma and metabolite concentrations were reduced in brain in vaccinated rats compared to controls. Reductions in 6-AM concentrations in brain after vaccination were consistent with the changes in HSA rates accompanying vaccination. These data provide evidence that 6-AM is the principal mediator of heroin reinforcement, and the principal target of the M-KLH vaccine, in this model. While heroin vaccines may have potential as therapies for heroin addiction, high antibody to drug ratios appear to be important for obtaining maximal efficacy.

  1. [The message from heroin overdoses].

    PubMed

    Pap, Ágota; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2015-03-01

    Drug use can be defined as a kind of self destruction, and it is directly linked to attitudes toward death and suicide occurring in a significant number of users of different narcotics. The aim of the authors was to look for the background of this relationship between drug and death and examine the origin, development, and motives behind heroin overdose based on an analysis of previous studies. It seems clear that pure heroin overdose increased gradually over the years. The fear of the police is the inhibitory factor of the overdose prevention and notification of emergency health care service. Signs of suicide could be the own home as the chosen location for heroin overdose and the presence of partners ("moment of death companion"). Interventions should include simple techniques such as first aid, naloxone administration, resuscitation, prevention of relapse of prisoners and social network extension involving maintenance programs.

  2. Cue-induced craving in dependence upon prescription opioids and heroin.

    PubMed

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Park, Sara; Weiss, Roger D

    2014-01-01

    Cues associated with heroin use (eg, needles, powder) elicit robust craving responses in individuals dependent upon heroin. Elevated cue-induced craving may be a risk factor for relapse and can persist after periods of drug abstinence. Despite the growing prevalence of opioid dependence involving prescription opioids, published studies have yet to examine whether cue-induced craving is also present in prescription opioid dependence. A sample of 50 adults diagnosed with opioid dependence (20 prescription opioid users, 25 heroin users, and 5 mixed opioid users) completed a cue reactivity assessment. Participants were administered a series of 90 pictures, including heroin-specific, prescription opioid-specific, and neutral images, and were asked to rate craving and cue salience after each image. Both the prescription opioid and heroin groups experienced significantly more craving to drug than to neutral stimuli. The prescription opioid group reported significantly less craving to prescription opioid stimuli than the heroin group to heroin stimuli; however, this effect was smaller and non-significant when controlling for group differences in cue salience. This study found evidence for cue-induced craving in individuals dependent upon prescription opioids. Further research is needed to better understand the role of cue reactivity in the course and treatment of opioid dependence involving prescription opioid use. As elevated craving reactivity to drug cues may reflect a risk factor for relapse, understanding the nature of cue-induced craving in individuals with opioid dependence is important to improving treatments for this population. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  3. Risk factors associated with the transition from heroin sniffing to heroin injection: a street addict role perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús; Chitwood, Dale D; Koo, Dixie J

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify characteristics of heroin sniffers likely to shift to injection by evaluating the street addict role theory as an informing theoretical framework to explain transition from heroin sniffing to injection. A nested case-control research design was used to identify 142 heroin sniffers who never had injected a drug (controls) and 146 recently transitioned injection drug users (cases) from a larger study of 600 African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white men and women who were street recruited from multiple communities known for high drug use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the proposed hypotheses derived from the street addict role theory. Our findings partially support the utility of the street addict role perspective as an explanatory framework for understanding the role played by sociocultural factors in the transition to injection. This perspective can help contextualize this HIV-related behavior within the high risk social environment of heroin users. The development of effective prevention strategies for this group should be guided by a comprehensive understanding of the social environment where HIV-related risk behaviors occur.

  4. Nonmedical Prescription Opioid and Heroin Use Among Adolescents Who Engage in Sports and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Veliz, Philip; Boyd, Carol J; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has found that adolescent athletes may be at increased risk of nonmedical prescription opioid use (NPOU) due to injuries. Although adolescent athletes are at an increased risk of engaging in NPOU, it has yet to be determined if they are also at greater risk for heroin use. The major purpose of this study was to examine both the trends in prevalence rates and patterns of initiation in lifetime NPOU and lifetime heroin use among adolescents who engage in sports and exercise. Eighteen cross-sections of eighth and 10th graders were used from the Monitoring the Future study. The sample consisted of 191 682 respondents who answered questions on past-year participation in sports and exercise, lifetime NPOU, lifetime heroin use, age of NPOU onset, and age of heroin onset. The trends in NPOU and lifetime heroin use among adolescents who engage in sports and exercise has declined between 1997 and 2014. Logistic regression analyses found that adolescents who engage in sports and exercise had lower odds of reporting lifetime NPOU and heroin use compared with adolescents who did not engage in these activities during the past year. Analyses among lifetime heroin users found that adolescents who engage in sports and exercise had lower odds of initiating NPOU before heroin when compared with their peers who did not engage in these activities in the past year. Daily participation in sports and exercise may serve as a protective factor with respect to NPOU and heroin use. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Craving and illicit heroin use among patients in heroin-assisted treatment.

    PubMed

    Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent M; Koeter, Maarten W J; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    To investigate in heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) compared to methadone maintenance treatment (MMT): the course of heroin craving and illicit heroin use, their mutual association, and their association with multi-domain treatment response. RCTs on the efficacy of 12 months co-prescribed injectable or inhalable HAT compared to 12 months continued oral MMT. Outpatient treatment in MMT- or specialized HAT-centers in the Netherlands. Chronic, treatment-refractory heroin dependent patients (n=73). STUDY PARAMETERS: General craving for heroin (Obsessive Compulsive Drug Use Scale); self-reported illicit heroin use; multi-domain treatment response in physical, mental and social health and illicit drug use. The course of heroin craving and illicit heroin use differed significantly, with strong reductions in HAT but not in MMT. General heroin craving was significantly related to illicit heroin use. Heroin craving was not and illicit heroin use was marginally related to multi-domain treatment response, but only in MMT and not in HAT. Heroin craving and illicit heroin use were significantly associated and both strongly decreased in HAT but not in MMT. Craving was not related to multi-domain treatment response and illicit heroin use was marginally related to treatment response in MMT, but not in HAT. The latter was probably due to the strong reduction in illicit heroin use in most patients in HAT and the small sample size of the sub-study. It is hypothesized that the strong reductions in craving for heroin in HAT are related to the stable availability of prescribed, pharmaceutical grade heroin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lay theories of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Furnham, A; Thomson, L

    1996-07-01

    This study examined the structure and determinants of lay people's implicit theories of heroin addiction. A questionnaire was derived from interviews with lay people about their beliefs and theories of heroin addiction and academic literature on the subject. One hundred and forty-four subjects completed the questionnaire, in which they rated 105 statements about the causes, correlates and cures of heroin addiction. The three parts of the questionnaire were individually factor analyzed and a clear, interpretable factor structure emerged for each. The factors seemed similar to explicit academic theories, but the exception was beliefs about cure, which did not show overall support for the most clinically used models. When the three factor analyses were combined into a single 'higher-order' factor analysis four factors emerged, labelled moralistic, psychosocial, sociocultural and drug treatment, which reflect more or less coherent views on the nature of heroin addiction. Subjects' political beliefs was the greatest (demographic and attitudinal) determinant of lay beliefs in these factors, with experience of addiction, addicts, drugs and age also highly correlated. Vote was the main determinant and best predictor of the four 'higher-order' structured lay theories: right-wing voters emphasizing moralistic and individualistic theory and left-wing voters supporting the psychological and societal ideas. Implications for policy and interventions to addicts of these lay theories are considered.

  7. The Threat of Hepatitis C as an Influence on Injecting Amphetamine Users' Change towards Non-Injecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Jeremy; Richards, Naomi; Lang, Cathryne P.; Davies, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    Young injecting drug users are a particularly vulnerable group for Hepatitis C (HCV) infection. One method for minimising the risk of contraction of Hepatitis C for amphetamine users (not widely explored in the research to date) is through encouraging non-injecting routes of administration (NIROA). Self-report data from 150 young injecting…

  8. The Threat of Hepatitis C as an Influence on Injecting Amphetamine Users' Change towards Non-Injecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Jeremy; Richards, Naomi; Lang, Cathryne P.; Davies, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    Young injecting drug users are a particularly vulnerable group for Hepatitis C (HCV) infection. One method for minimising the risk of contraction of Hepatitis C for amphetamine users (not widely explored in the research to date) is through encouraging non-injecting routes of administration (NIROA). Self-report data from 150 young injecting…

  9. The relationship between US heroin market dynamics and heroin-related overdose, 1992-2008.

    PubMed

    Unick, George; Rosenblum, Daniel; Mars, Sarah; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Heroin-related overdose is linked to polydrug use, changes in physiological tolerance and social factors. Individual risk can also be influenced by the structural risk environment including the illicit drug market. We hypothesized that components of the US illicit drug market, specifically heroin source/type, price and purity, will have independent effects on the number of heroin-related overdose hospital admissions. Yearly, from 1992 to 2008, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) price and purity series were estimated from the US Drug Enforcement Administration data. Yearly heroin overdose hospitalizations were constructed from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Socio-demographic variables were constructed using several databases. Negative binomial models were used to estimate the effect of price, purity and source region of heroin on yearly hospital counts of heroin overdoses controlling for poverty, unemployment, crime, MSA socio-demographic characteristics and population size. Purity was not associated with heroin overdose, but each $100 decrease in the price per pure gram of heroin resulted in a 2.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.8%, 1.0%] increase in the number of heroin overdose hospitalizations (P = 0.003). Each 10% increase in the market share of Colombian-sourced heroin was associated with a 4.1% (95% CI = 1.7%, 6.6%) increase in number of overdoses reported in hospitals (P = 0.001) independent of heroin quality. Decreases in the price of pure heroin in the United States are associated with increased heroin-related overdose hospital admissions. Increases in market concentration of Colombian-source/type heroin is also associated with an increase in heroin-related overdose hospital admissions. Increases in US heroin-related overdose admissions appear to be related to structural changes in the US heroin market. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Transactional Sex among Noninjecting Illicit Drug Users: Implications for HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Aurélio Goulart; Fernandes, Inaina Lara; Silva, Graciele Cristina; de Felipe, Rodrigo Lopes; Vera, Ivânia; Gregório, Valéria Duarte; Lucchese, Roselma

    2016-01-01

    Noninjecting illicit drug users (NIDUs) present high risk for HIV infection, due especially to transactional sex. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for transactional sex among NIDUs in the Southwest region of Goiás State, Central Brazil. The prevalence of self-reported transactional sex was 22.8%. Prevalence in women and men was 52.7% and 16.8%, respectively, a significant difference (p < 0.001). Crack use and history of sexually transmitted infections (STI) were risk factors for transactional sex in men. Homelessness, crack use, sex under the influence of drugs, and history of sexual violence were risk factors for transactional sex in women. A high prevalence of transactional sex was observed among NIDUs. This risk behavior may contribute to the high rates of HIV among this population and their social networks and in the general population. PMID:27648467

  11. Multiple infections and associated risk factors among non-injecting cocaine users in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diana; Radulich, Graciela; Muzzio, Estela; Naveira, Jorge; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rey, Jorge; Griemberg, Gloria; Friedman, Samuel R; Martínez-Peralta, Liliana; Weissenbacher, Mercedes

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV, core antibody), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections and analyze associated risk factors among 504 non-injecting cocaine users (NICU) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Participants were interviewed in face-to-face sessions through a short structured questionnaire. Using venipuncture, 10 mL of blood was collected. Seroprevalence rates were: HIV (6.3%), HBV (9%), HCV (7.5%), and VDRL (4.2%). The risk of being infected with HIV, HBV, and HCV was significantly associated with having had a sex partner who was either a drug injector or who was known to be HIV positive. HIV and HCV infections were associated with former imprisonment, and HCV was associated with having been tattooed. Because of the rising number of NICU and the multiple infections detected, it is essential to implement prevention strategies focused on this population.

  12. Illicit Use of Buprenorphine/Naloxone Among Injecting and Noninjecting Opioid Users

    PubMed Central

    Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yokell, Michael; Fu, Jeannia J.; Rich, Josiah D.; Zaller, Nickolas D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We examined the use, procurement, and motivations for the use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone among injecting and noninjecting opioid users in an urban area. Methods A survey was self-administered among 51 injecting opioid users and 49 noninjecting opioid users in Providence, RI. Participants were recruited from a fixed-site syringe exchange program and a community outreach site between August and November 2009. Results A majority (76%) of participants reported having obtained buprenorphine/naloxone illicitly, with 41% having done so in the previous month. More injection drug users (IDUs) than non-IDUs reported the use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone (86% vs 65%, P = 0.01). The majority of participants who had used buprenorphine/naloxone reported doing so to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms (74%) or to stop using other opioids (66%) or because they could not afford drug treatment (64%). More IDUs than non-IDUs reported using diverted buprenorphine/naloxone for these reasons. Significantly more non-IDUs than IDUs reported ever using buprenorphine/naloxone to “get high” (69% vs 32%, P < 0.01). The majority of respondents, both IDUs and non-IDUs, were interested in receiving treatment for opioid dependence, with greater reported interest in buprenorphine/naloxone than in methadone. Common reasons given for not being currently enrolled in a buprenorphine/naloxone program included cost and unavailability of prescribing physicians. Conclusions The use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone was common in our sample. However, many opioid users, particularly IDUs, were using diverted buprenorphine/naloxone for reasons consistent with its therapeutic purpose, such as alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms and reducing the use of other opioids. These findings highlight the need to explore the full impact of buprenorphine/naloxone diversion and improve the accessibility of buprenorphine/naloxone through licensed treatment providers. PMID:21844833

  13. Australian heroin seizures and the causes of the 2001 heroin shortage.

    PubMed

    Jiggens, John

    2008-08-01

    This paper uses Australian heroin seizure data, along with estimates of the size of the Australian heroin market to evaluate the impact of drug law enforcement on the 2001 Australian heroin shortage from the percentage of the market seized. It also critically examines international heroin production trends and published reports on the causes of the Australian heroin shortage. Its conclusion is that previous studies may have overstated the success of drug law enforcement and that the most likely explanation for Australia's 2001 heroin shortage was a significant decline in heroin production world-wide, due to a general move away from heroin production in the countries of Southeast Asia and the prohibition on opium growing by the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

  14. [Rapid analysis of added ingredients in heroin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-fen; Yu, Jing; Guo, Xin; Sun, Xing-long; Wang, Ding-fang

    2011-07-01

    The method of rapid analysis of added ingredients in heroin was studied in the present paper. Adding sucrose, fructose, glucose, starch, caffeine and phenacetin to heroin with a certain percentage, the changes in the infrared spectrum with the concentration of heroin increasing and the detection limit of the additives were determined. Whether or not heroin can be detected in the sample with high concentration of added ingredients was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Similarly, in high purity of heroin, whether or not Raman spectroscopy can detect the added ingredients was tested. Through systematic experiments, the results showed that: using infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to test the added ingredients of heroin is a rapid and effective method. Each has both advantages and disadvantages. We should select the appropriate method according to the actual cases.

  15. The relationship between trajectories of family/cultural stressors and depression and suicidal ideation among substance using Mexican-American adults.

    PubMed

    Saint Onge, Jarron M; Cepeda, Alice; Lee King, Patricia A; Valdez, Avelardo

    2013-12-01

    We used an intersectional minority stress perspective to examine the association between family/cultural stress and mental health among substance-using Mexican-Americans. Employing a unique longitudinal sample of 239 socioeconomically disadvantaged, non-injecting heroin-using Mexican-Americans from San Antonio, Texas, we examined how culturally relevant stressors are related to depression and suicidal ideation. First, we identified depression and suicidal ideation prevalence rates for this disadvantaged sample. Second, we determined how cultural stress is experienced over time using stress trajectories. Third, we evaluated how family/cultural stressors and stress trajectories are related to depression and suicidal ideation outcomes. Results showed high rates of baseline depression (24 %) and suicidal ideation (30 %). We used latent class growth analysis to identify three primary stress trajectories (stable, high but decreasing, and increasing) over three time points during 1 year. We found that the increasing stressors trajectory was associated with higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation, and that stress trajectories had unique relationships with mental illness. We also showed that baseline stressors, sum stressors, and high but decreasing stressors maintained positive associations with mental illness after controlling for baseline depression. Our results highlight the importance of focusing on within-group, culturally specific stressors and addressing both operant and cumulative stressors in the study of mental health for marginalized populations and suggest the importance of early intervention in minimizing stressors.

  16. Screening for illicit heroin use in patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Huitema, Alwin D R; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J X; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of illicit heroin among patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program. In this program, pharmaceutical-grade heroin was administered to heroin-addicted patients. Monitoring of illicit heroin use was considered important for the evaluation of this treatment program. Acetylcodeine and codeine, common adulterants of "street" heroin, were used as markers for illicit heroin. A liquid chromatography method with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS-MS) was developed, for quantitative analysis of heroin and methadone, their metabolites, and the simultaneous detection of acetylcodeine. One-hundred patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program were screened for acetylcodeine in plasma. Furthermore, patients were interviewed about illicit heroin use, and they were tested for alcohol and cocaine use. In plasma samples of 16% of the patients, acetylcodeine was detected. Overall agreement between self-report and plasma samples was 95% (kappa: 0.81). Patients who tested positive for acetylcodeine had visited the outpatients' clinics significantly less frequently than the patients who tested negative. Alcohol and cocaine use was more common in patients who tested positive for acetylcodeine. Illicit heroin use was observed in a limited percentage of patients. Overall agreement between self-report and markers of illicit heroin use was good.

  17. Heroin in brown, black and white: structural factors and medical consequences in the US heroin market.

    PubMed

    Ciccarone, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Heroin coming into the United States historically comes from three widely dispersed geographical regions: Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia and Mexico. A fourth source of US-bound heroin, from Colombia, originated in the early 1990s. The fact that the four heroin sources produce differing morphologies and qualities of heroin has not been critically examined. In addition, it is not well established how the contemporary competing dynamics of interdiction, or restriction of heroin flows across international boundaries, and neoliberal, e.g., global expansion of free trade, policies are affecting heroin markets. This paper will highlight changes in the US heroin market, including source trends, the political economy of the now dominant source and the resultant effects on the heroin risk environment by US region. Using a structural and historical framework this paper examines two decades of secondary data sources, including government and drug control agency documents, on heroin flows together with published work on the political and economic dynamics in Latin America. Co-occurring neoliberal economic reforms may have contributed to paradoxical effects of US/Colombian interdiction efforts. Since entering the US market, heroin from Colombia has been distributed at a much higher quality and lower retail price. An increasingly exclusive market has developed with Mexican and Colombian heroin gaining market share and displacing Asian heroin. These trends have had dramatic effects on the risk environment for heroin consumers. An intriguing factor is that different global sources of heroin produce substantially different products. Plausible associations exist between heroin source/form and drug use behaviours and harms. For example, cold water-soluble powdered heroin (sources: Asia, Colombia) may be associated with higher HIV prevalence in the US, while low-solubility "black tar" heroin (BTH; source: Mexico) is historically used in areas with reduced HIV prevalence. BTH is

  18. Heroin in brown, black and white: Structural factors and medical consequences in the US heroin market

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background Heroin coming into the United States historically comes from three widely dispersed geographical regions: Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia and Mexico. A fourth source of US-bound heroin, from Colombia, originated in the early 1990s. The fact that the four heroin sources produce differing morphologies and qualities of heroin has not been critically examined. In addition, it is not well established how the contemporary competing dynamics of interdiction, or restriction of heroin flows across international boundaries, and neoliberal, e.g., global expansion of free trade, policies are affecting heroin markets. This paper will highlight changes in the US heroin market, including source trends, the political economy of the now dominant source and the resultant effects on the heroin risk environment by US region. Methods Using a structural and historical framework this paper examines two decades of secondary data sources, including government and drug control agency documents, on heroin flows together with published work on the political and economic dynamics in Latin America. Results Co-occurring neoliberal economic reforms may have contributed to paradoxical effects of US/Colombian interdiction efforts. Since entering the US market, heroin from Colombia has been distributed at a much higher quality and lower retail price. An increasingly exclusive market has developed with Mexican and Colombian heroin gaining market share and displacing Asian heroin. These trends have had dramatic effects on the risk environment for heroin consumers. An intriguing factor is that different global sources of heroin produce substantially different products. Plausible associations exist between heroin source/form and drug use behaviours and harms. For example, cold water-soluble powdered heroin (sources: Asia, Colombia) may be associated with higher HIV prevalence in the US, while low-solubility “black tar” heroin (BTH; source: Mexico) is historically used in areas with reduced

  19. Heroin fatality due to penile injection.

    PubMed

    Winek, C L; Wahba, W W; Rozin, L

    1999-03-01

    Death due to heroin overdose and/or rapid injection of heroin is a frequent occurrence among opioid addicts. We present an unusual case of heroin fatality due to the injection of the drug in the penis. Blood, urine, bile, and vitreous humor concentrations of morphine were 0.68, 0.49, 0.32 and 0.062 microg/ml, respectively. Ethanol was detected at concentrations of 104, 124, 106, and 94 mg/dl in the blood, urine, bile, and vitreous humor, respectively. The cause of death was determined to be due to heroin and ethanol intoxication.

  20. Heroin delay discounting: Modulation by pharmacological state, drug-use impulsivity, and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Stoltman, Jonathan J K; Woodcock, Eric A; Lister, Jamey J; Lundahl, Leslie H; Greenwald, Mark K

    2015-12-01

    Delay discounting (DD) refers to how rapidly an individual devalues goods based on delays to receipt. DD usually is considered a trait variable but can be state dependent, yet few studies have assessed commodity valuation at short, naturalistically relevant time intervals that might enable state-dependent analysis. This study aimed to determine whether drug-use impulsivity and intelligence influence heroin DD at short (ecologically relevant) delays during two pharmacological states (heroin satiation and withdrawal). Out-of-treatment, intensive heroin users (n = 170; 53.5% African American; 66.7% male) provided complete DD data during imagined heroin satiation and withdrawal. Delays were 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours; maximum delayed heroin amount was thirty $10 bags. Indifference points were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC). We also assessed drug-use impulsivity (subscales from the Impulsive Relapse Questionnaire [IRQ]) and estimated intelligence (Shipley IQ) as predictors of DD. Heroin discounting was greater (smaller AUC) during withdrawal than satiation. In regression analyses, lower intelligence and IRQ Capacity for Delay as well as higher IRQ Speed (to return to drug use) predicted greater heroin discounting in the satiation condition. Lower intelligence and higher IRQ Speed predicted greater discounting in the withdrawal condition. Sex, race, substance use variables, and other IRQ subscales were not significantly related to the withdrawal or satiation DD behavior. In summary, heroin discounting was temporally rapid, pharmacologically state dependent, and predicted by drug-use impulsivity and estimated intelligence. These findings highlight a novel and sensitive measure of acute DD that is easy to administer.

  1. Heroin delay discounting: modulation by pharmacological state, drug-use impulsivity and intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Stoltman, Jonathan J.K.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Lister, Jamey J.; Lundahl, Leslie H.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2015-01-01

    Delay discounting (DD) refers to how rapidly an individual devalues goods based on delays to receipt. DD usually is considered a trait variable but can be state-dependent; yet few studies have assessed commodity valuation at short, naturalistically relevant time intervals that might enable state-dependent analysis. This study aimed to determine whether drug-use impulsivity and intelligence influence heroin DD at short (ecologically relevant) delays during two pharmacological states (heroin satiation and withdrawal). Out-of-treatment, intensive heroin users (n=170; 53.5% African-American; 66.7% male) provided complete DD data during imagined heroin satiation and withdrawal. Delays were 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours; maximum delayed heroin amount was thirty $10 bags. Indifference points were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC). We also assessed drug-use impulsivity (subscales from the Impulsive Relapse Questionnaire, IRQ) and estimated intelligence (Shipley IQ) as predictors of DD. Heroin discounting was greater (smaller AUC) during withdrawal than satiation. In regression analyses, lower intelligence and IRQ Capacity for Delay as well as higher IRQ Speed (to return to drug use) predicted greater heroin discounting in the satiation condition. Lower intelligence and higher IRQ Speed predicted greater discounting in the withdrawal condition. Sex, race, substance use variables, and other IRQ subscales were not significantly related to the withdrawal or satiation DD behavior. In summary, heroin discounting was temporally rapid, pharmacological state-dependent, and predicted by drug-use impulsivity and estimated intelligence. These findings highlight a novel and sensitive measure of acute DD that is easy to administer. PMID:26595426

  2. Is inhalant use a risk factor for heroin and injection drug use among adolescents in the United States?

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Howard, Matthew O

    2007-02-01

    We examined whether inhalant use was associated with heroin and injection drug use (IDU) among adolescents aged 12 to 17 in the United States. Data were drawn from the 2002/2003 administrations of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). We conducted logistic regression analyses to estimate associations of inhalant use with heroin use, heroin injection, and IDU, respectively, among adolescent drug users (N=8161). Approximately 30.9% of adolescents had ever used at least one illicit drug. More than one-fifth (22.2%) of adolescents were past-year or recent drug users. Among past-year adolescent drug users, 1.4% had progressed to heroin use and 1.2% reported IDU. Adolescents who had used inhalants and marijuana were 2.8 and 2.9 times as likely as adolescents who had used marijuana but not inhalants to report heroin use and any IDU, respectively. Adolescents who had used inhalants or other drugs but not marijuana were unlikely to use heroin. However, inhalant users, irrespective of their marijuana use histories, had greater odds of IDU than drug users who had not used inhalants. Adolescent drug users who were females, school dropouts, whites, or delinquents had significantly increased odds of heroin use and IDU. Cigarette smoking before the age of 15 was strongly associated with heroin use, and a history of foster care placement was associated with IDU. This national study of American adolescents identifies several subgroups of recent drug users, such as females, school dropouts, and youth who have used inhalants and marijuana, which have substantially increased odds of heroin use and IDU. Screening, prevention, and treatment interventions targeted to these groups might reduce medical and social complications of heroin use and IDU.

  3. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  4. [Heroin. II. Preparation, hydrolysis, stability, pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-10-01

    Heroin is prepared by treating morphine with acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride. It is a simple reaction and the yields are generally quantitative. Nowadays the whole process is illegal. Morphine is the major alkaloid present in the opium poppy. Opium is manufactured illicitly then morphine is extracted from it in clandestine laboratories. Numerous studies were carried out on heroin to investigate its rate of hydrolysis. It has been shown that heroin is rapidly deacylated in aqueous solution at alkaline or acidic pH to form 6-acethylmorphine and finally, to morphine. Heroin also rapidly decomposes in biological medium yielding first 6-acetylmorphine and then morphine. Hydrolysis can be performed in blood and in tissue homogenates. Heroin can be administered by several routes. Smoking and intravenous administration are preferred, but intranasal, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration are also common. Recently, there has been a shift in heroin use patterns from injection to sniffing and smoking. Sharing of the injection equipment can result in several severe infectious diseases, such as AIDS, hepatitis B and C. Soon after administration, heroin metabolizes to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Most of the pharmacological activities of heroin are due to these active metabolites. Therefore, knowledge of distribution of 6-acetylmorphine and morphine is essential to understand pharmacological properties of heroin. Heroin, which is relatively nonpolar compound compared with morphine, has high lipid solubility facilitating rapid absorption from the bloodstream and passage through the blood-brain barrier. When heroin is administered by intravenously the drug takes 10 s to reach the brain i.e. pharmacological effects appear quickly.

  5. Unintentional drug overdose death trends in New Mexico, USA, 1990-2005: combinations of heroin, cocaine, prescription opioids and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nina G; Lathrop, Sarah L; Reichard, R Ross; Landen, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    To determine the contribution of heroin, prescription opioids, cocaine and alcohol/drug combinations to the total overdose death rate and identify changes in drug overdose patterns among New Mexico subpopulations. We analyzed medical examiner data for all unintentional drug overdose deaths in New Mexico during 1990-2005. Age-adjusted drug overdose death rates were calculated by sex and race/ethnicity; we modeled overall drug overdose death adjusting for age and region. The total unintentional drug overdose death rate in New Mexico increased from 5.6 per 100 000 in 1990 to 15.5 per 100 000 in 2005. Deaths caused by heroin, prescription opioids, cocaine and alcohol/drug combinations together ranged from 89% to 98% of the total. Heroin caused the most deaths during 1990-2005, with a notable rate increase in prescription opioid overdose death during 1998-2005 (58%). During 1990-2005, the 196% increase in single drug category overdose death was driven by prescription opioids alone and heroin alone; the 148% increase in multi-drug category overdose death was driven by heroin/alcohol and heroin/cocaine. Hispanic males had the highest overdose death rate, followed by white males, white females, Hispanic females and American Indians. The most common categories causing death were heroin alone and heroin/alcohol among Hispanic males, heroin/alcohol among American Indian males and prescription opioids alone among white males and all female subpopulations. Interventions to prevent drug overdose death should be targeted according to use patterns among at-risk subpopulations. A comprehensive approach addressing both illicit and prescription drug users, and people who use these drugs concurrently, is needed to reduce overdose death.

  6. Replication of ZNF804A gene variant associations with risk of heroin addiction

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Bierut, Laura J.; Kral, Alex H.; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Heroin addiction is heritable, but few specific genetic variants have been reproducibly associated with this disease. The zinc finger protein 804A (ZNF804A) gene is a biologically plausible susceptibility gene for heroin addiction, given its function as a transcription factor in human brain. Novel associations of two common ZNF804A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7597593 and rs1344706, with heroin addiction have been reported in Han Chinese. Both SNPs have also been implicated for regulating ZNF804A expression in human brain, including the addiction-relevant dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In this independent replication study, we tested the rs7597593 and rs1344706 SNP genotypes and their corresponding haplotypes for association with heroin addiction using cases drawn from the Urban Health Study and population controls: total N=10,757 (7,095 European Americans and 3,662 African Americans). We independently replicated both ZNF804A SNP associations in European Americans: the rs7597593-T (P=0.016) and rs1344706-A (P=0.029) alleles both being associated with increased risk of heroin addiction, consistent with the prior report. Neither SNP was associated in African Americans alone, but meta-analysis across both ancestry groups resulted in significant associations for rs1344706-A (P=0.016, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.13 [1.02–1.25]) and its haplotype with rs7597593-T (P=0.0067, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.16 [1.04–1.29]). By demonstrating consistent associations across independent studies and diverse ancestry groups, our study provides evidence that these two ZNF804A SNPs and their risk haplotype are among the few replicable genetic associations with heroin addiction. PMID:26382569

  7. Ethnic dimensions of habitus among homeless heroin injectors

    PubMed Central

    Bourgois, Philippe; Schonberg, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Ten years of participant-observation fieldwork and photography among a multi-ethnic social network of homeless heroin injectors and crack smokers in California reveal hierarchical interpersonal relations between African Americans, whites and Latinos despite the fact that they all share a physical addiction to heroin and live in indigent poverty in the same encampments. Focusing on tensions between blacks and whites, we develop the concept of ‘ethnicized habitus’ to understand how divisions drawn on the basis of skin color are enforced through everyday interaction to produce ‘intimate apartheid’ in the context of physical proximity and shared destitution. Specifically, we examine how two components of ethnic habitus are generated. One is a simple technique of the body, a preference for intravenous versus intramuscular or subcutaneous heroin injection. The second revolves around income-generation strategies and is more obviously related to external power constraints. Both these components fit into a larger constellation of ethnic distinction rooted in historically entrenched political, economic and ideological forces. An understanding of the generative forces of the ethnic dimensions of habitus allows us to recognize how macro-power relations produce intimate desires and ways of being that become inscribed on individual bodies and routinized in behavior. These distinctions are, for the most part, interpreted as natural attributes of genetics and culture by many people in the United States, justifying a racialized moral hierarchy. PMID:19777125

  8. Heroin: Challenge for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Susan M.

    The rise in heroin use in the 1990s is attributed to an increase in snorting and smoking heroin as opposed to earlier epidemics that relied on intravenous use. An increase in purity has also added to the addiction problem. The trend towards use by young people was confirmed by the 2000 Monitoring the Future Study, which reported that 10.6% of high…

  9. The heroin addict! A personal view.

    PubMed

    Cyngler, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Heroin beckons like the sweet seductive calls of Ulysses' sirens. The alluring nectar of the poppy seed, once experienced is not easy to escape. The greed for pleasure is endless. Gratification begets gratification. This paper explores issues and complications of treatment intervention in heroin addiction. The author is a general practitioner with 25 years experience and special interest in substance abuse medicine.

  10. Risk for Heterosexual HIV Transmission Among Non-Injecting Female Partners of Injection Drug Users in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Uusküla, A; McMahon, J M; Kals, M; Talu, A; Abel-Ollo, K; Rüütel, K; Des Jarlais, D C

    2013-03-01

    The HIV epidemic in Estonia, as with other eastern European countries, is currently concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). Non-IDUs who have IDU sex partners could serve as a potential bridge in an expanding epidemic. We applied HIV transmission modelling to data collected from non-IDU/IDU heterosexual couples in Kohtla-Järve, Estonia to estimate HIV risk from IDUs to their sex partners based on self-reported sexual behaviors shared by the couple. IDUs and their current main non-injecting sex partners were recruited for an interviewer-administered survey and HIV testing. Bernoulli modelling techniques were applied to estimate the risk of HIV transmission (incidence) among HIV negative non-injecting female partners of male IDUs. The estimated HIV incidence in this population of non-injecting women with only main sexual partners in the last 6 months ranged from 3.24 to 4.94 HIV seroconversions per 100 person years depending on the value used in the models for the per act transmission rate during acute stage infection. Non-IDUs who have IDU sex partners are at high risk for HIV and could serve as a potential bridge to a more generalized epidemic. Whether this might lead to an expansion of the HIV epidemic beyond core groups in Estonia or other Eastern European countries warrants closer study.

  11. Heroin purchasing is income and price sensitive.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Juliette; Steinmiller, Caren L; Greenwald, Mark K

    2011-06-01

    Semi-structured interviews were used to assess behavioral economic drug demand in heroin dependent research volunteers. Findings on drug price, competing purchases, and past 30-day income and consumption, established in a previous study, are replicated. We extended these findings by having participants indicate whether hypothetical environmental changes would alter heroin purchasing. Participants (n = 109) reported they would significantly (p < .005) decrease heroin daily purchasing amounts (DPA) from past 30-day levels (M = $60/day) if: (a) they encountered a 33% decrease in income (DPA = $34), (b) family/friends no longer paid their living expenses (DPA = $32), or (c) they faced four-fold greater likelihood of police arrest at their purchasing location (DPA = $42). Participants in higher income quartiles (who purchase more heroin) show greater DPA reductions (but would still buy more heroin) than those in lower income quartiles. For participants receiving government aid (n = 31), heroin purchasing would decrease if those subsidies were eliminated (DPA = $28). Compared to participants whose urine tested negative for cocaine (n = 31), cocaine-positive subjects (n = 32) reported more efficient heroin purchasing, that is, they live closer to their primary dealer; are more likely to have heroin delivered or walk to obtain it (and less likely to ride the bus), thus reducing purchasing time (52 vs. 31 min, respectively); and purchase more heroin per episode. These simulation results have treatment and policy implications: Daily heroin users' purchasing repertoire is very cost-effective, more so for those also using cocaine, and only potent environmental changes (income reductions or increased legal sanctions) may impact this behavior.

  12. Heroin Purchasing is Income and Price Sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Juliette; Steinmiller, Caren L.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were used to assess behavioral economic drug demand in heroin dependent research volunteers. Findings on drug price, competing purchases, and past 30-day income and consumption, established in a previous study, are replicated. We extended these findings by having participants indicate whether hypothetical environmental changes would alter heroin purchasing. Participants (n = 109) reported they would significantly (p < .005) decrease heroin daily purchasing amounts (DPA) from past 30-day levels (mean = $60/day) if: (1) they encountered a 33% decrease in income (DPA = $34), (2) family/friends no longer paid their living expenses (DPA = $32), or (3) they faced four-fold greater likelihood of police arrest at their purchasing location (DPA = $42). Participants in higher income quartiles (who purchase more heroin) show greater DPA reductions (but would still buy more heroin) than those in lower income quartiles. For participants receiving government aid (n = 31), heroin purchasing would decrease if those subsidies were eliminated (DPA = $28). Compared to participants whose urine tested negative for cocaine (n = 31), cocaine-positive subjects (n = 32) reported more efficient heroin purchasing, i.e., live closer to their primary dealer, more likely to have heroin delivered or walk to obtain it (and less likely to ride the bus), thus reducing purchasing time (52 vs. 31 min, respectively), and purchasing more heroin per episode. These simulation results have treatment and policy implications: Daily heroin users’ purchasing repertoire is very cost-effective, more so for those also using cocaine, and only potent environmental changes (income reductions or increased legal sanctions) may impact this behavior. PMID:21443296

  13. Rationale to evaluate medically supervised safer smoking facilities for non-injection illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Collins, Courtney L C; Kerr, Thomas; Tyndall, Mark W; Marsh, David C; Kretz, Patricia S; Montaner, Julio S; Wood, Evan

    2005-01-01

    Many cities are experiencing ongoing infectious disease epidemics and substantial community harm as a result of illicit drug use. In an effort to reduce these public order and public health concerns, consideration has been given to the opening in Vancouver of a safer smoking facility (SSF). The present review was conducted to examine if there is a rationale to support the evaluation of a SSF in the Canadian context. Available evidence suggests that conventional drug control strategies are insufficient to address the health and community harms of non-injection drug use, and that the public order benefits of supervised injection facilities may be relevant to SSFs. In addition, there is persuasive evidence to suggest there is potential for blood-borne disease transmission through the sharing of smoking paraphernalia, and the potential for SSFs to address this concern is a pressing public health question. Also relevant to this topic are interventions to prevent transition into injection drug use, and SSFs may also be evaluated as a potential strategy to address this concern.

  14. Shape and phase control of CdS nanocrystals using cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Monodispersed CdS nanocrystals with controllable shape and phase have been successfully synthesized in this study by adding cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis system. With the increase of the amount of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) added, the shape of the CdS nanocrystals changed from spherical to multi-armed, and the phase changed from zinc-blende to wurtzite. It was found that halide ion Cl- plays a key role in the transformation, and other halide ions such as Br- can also induce similar transformation. We proposed that the strong binding between Cd2+ and halide ions reduced the reactivity of the precursors, decreased the nuclei formed in the nucleation stage, and led to the high concentration of precursor in the growth stage, resulting in the increase of size and phase transformation of CdS nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that the multi-armed CdS nanocrystals lost quantum confinement effect because of the increase of the size with the increase of the concentration of CTAC. PMID:21711888

  15. HIV Testing in Non-Injection Drug Users: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Alves Guimarães, Rafael; Lucchese, Roselma; Lara Fernandes, Inaina; Vera, Ivânia; Goulart Rodovalho, Aurélio; Alves Guimarães, Vanessa; Cristina Silva, Graciele; Lopes de Felipe, Rodrigo; Alexandre de Castro, Paulo; Martins Ferreira, Priscilla

    2017-05-24

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and identify factors associated with lifetime testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in non-injection drug users (NIDU). A cross-sectional study was conducted with 323 individuals in clinics for chemical dependency in the state of Goiás in the Central-West region of Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with lifetime HIV testing. Testing for HIV was associated with age, female gender, crack use, history of sexually transmitted infections, acquaintance with people living with HIV/AIDS and/or who had died from AIDS, and history of having received some instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention methods. It was found that only 26.6% reported having access to the HIV rapid test. We concluded determinants for HIV testing must be taken into account when planning prevention and programming strategies. These include the widening of testing coverage among NIDU, educational health actions, establishment of links between sexually transmitted infection prevention services and addiction treatment services, and the use of rapid tests to help people who are in contact with the virus learn about their HIV status, enter treatment, and improve their quality of life.

  16. Non-fatal cocaine overdose among injecting and non-injecting cocaine users in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Sharlene; Darke, Shane

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the frequency of non-fatal cocaine overdose, and responses to overdoses, among injecting and non-injecting cocaine users. Cross-sectional study. Sydney, Australia. Two hundred current cocaine users. Structured interview. Thirteen per cent of the sample had overdosed on cocaine, 7% in the preceding 12 months. Cocaine injectors were more likely to have overdosed, both ever (17 v 6%) and in the preceding 12 months (9 v 3%). The most common symptoms of overdose were palpitations (68%), intense sweating (44%) and seizures (40%). The use of other drugs in combination with cocaine prior to the most recent overdose was prevalent (64%), most commonly opioids (40%), alcohol (24%) and cannabis (24%). Those who had overdosed were more likely to be female, had longer cocaine use careers, had used more cocaine in the preceding month and preceding 6 months, had higher levels of cocaine dependence and more extensive polydrug use. Twenty-four per cent had witnessed a cocaine overdose, 13% in the preceding 12 months. Injectors were more likely to have witnessed overdoses, both ever (35% v 8%) and in the preceding 12 months (20% v 3%). Experience of, and exposure to, overdose were not rare events. Cocaine users need to be aware of the possibility and nature of overdose, and that cocaine overdose can occur irrespective of method of use. There is a need to emphasise the potential danger of combining cocaine with other drugs.

  17. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  18. Heroin addiction and voluntary choice: the case of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Henden, Edmund

    2013-09-01

    Does addiction to heroin undermine the voluntariness of heroin addicts' consent to take part in research which involves giving them free and legal heroin? This question has been raised in connection with research into the effectiveness of heroin prescription as a way of treating dependent heroin users. Participants in such research are required to give their informed consent to take part. Louis C. Charland has argued that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to do this since heroin addiction by nature involves a loss of ability to resist the desire for heroin. In this article, I argue that Charland is right that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to consent, but not for the reason he thinks. In fact, as Charland's critics correctly point out, there is plenty of evidence showing that heroin addicts can resist their desire for heroin. These critics are wrong, however, to conclude from this that we should presume that heroin addicts are competent to give their voluntary consent. There are, I shall argue, other conditions associated with heroin addiction that might constrain heroin addicts' choice in ways likely to undermine the voluntariness of their consent. In order to see this, we need to move beyond the focus on the addicts' desires for heroin and instead consider the wider social and psychological circumstances of heroin addiction, as well as the effects these circumstances may have on the addicts' beliefs about the nature of their options.

  19. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  20. Explicit and implicit heroin-related cognitions and heroin use among patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Wei; Lin, Huang-Chi; Wu, Hung-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Yao; Chung, Kuan-Sheng; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Craving is an important issue in substance use disorder. To achieve a better understanding of the cognitive processing systems of craving, the cognitive processes of craving have been considered as two distinct processes. One system, based on rule-based inferences and named explicit cognition, is more conscious and effortful. The other system, based on prior learned association and named implicit cognition, is unconscious and effortless. How explicit and implicit cognitions are associated with heroin use in patients with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is not clear. This study aimed to explore the relationship between explicit and implicit cognition and heroin use in patients undergoing MMT. This study recruited one-hundred forty intravenous heroin users. The participants were invited to provide social-demographic data, the severity of substance dependence and explicit cognition with regard to heroin. Then, participants completed a computerized test to assess implicit cognition with regards to heroin. This study found that explicit and implicit heroin-related cognitions were associated with the frequency of heroin use. There was an interaction effect between implicit and explicit cognition on the frequency of heroin use. This study also found that higher explicit heroin-related cognition was a risk factor for continuing heroin use. Both explicit and implicit cognitions were associated with the frequency of heroin use in patients undergoing MMT, but only explicit cognition was associated with whether patients could stop using heroin during MMT. Therefore, the status of heroin use in patients undergoing MMT may be related to different cognitive processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of heroin maintenance in controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hartnoll, R L; Mitcheson, M C; Battersby, A; Brown, G; Ellis, M; Fleming, P; Hedley, N

    1980-08-01

    Ninety-six confirmed heroin addicts requesting a heroin maintenance prescription were randomly allocated to treatment with injectable heroin or oral methadone. Progress was monitored throughout the next 12 months by research workers operating independently of the clinic. Heroin can be seen as maintaining the status quo, with the majority continuing to inject heroin regularly and to supplement their maintenance prescription from other sources; it was associated with a continuing intermediate level of involvement with the drug subculture and criminal activity. Refusal to prescribe heroin while offering oral methadone constituted a more confrontational response and resulted in a higher abstinence rate, but also a greater dependence on illegal sources of drugs for these who continued to inject. Those offered oral methadone tended to polarize toward high or low categories of illegal drug use and involvement with the drug subculture, and were more likely to be arrested during the 12-month follow-up. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of employment, health, or consumption of nonopiate drugs. Refusal to prescribe heroin resulted in a significantly greater drop out from regular treatment.

  2. Medical prescription of heroin to treatment resistant heroin addicts: two randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, Wim; Hendriks, Vincent M; Blanken, Peter; Koeter, Maarten W J; van Zwieten, Barbara J; van Ree, Jan M

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether supervised medical prescription of heroin can successfully treat addicts who do not sufficiently benefit from methadone maintenance treatment. Design Two open label randomised controlled trials. Setting Methadone maintenance programmes in six cities in the Netherlands. Participants 549 heroin addicts. Interventions Inhalable heroin (n = 375) or injectable heroin (n = 174) prescribed over 12 months. Heroin (maximum 1000 mg per day) plus methadone (maximum 150 mg per day) compared with methadone alone (maximum 150 mg per day). Psychosocial treatment was offered throughout. Main outcome measures Dichotomous, multidomain response index, including validated indicators of physical health, mental status, and social functioning. Results Adherence was excellent with 12 month outcome data available for 94% of the randomised participants. With intention to treat analysis, 12 month treatment with heroin plus methadone was significantly more effective than treatment with methadone alone in the trial of inhalable heroin (response rate 49.7% v 26.9%; difference 22.8%, 95% confidence interval 11.0% to 34.6%) and in the trial of injectable heroin (55.5% v 31.2%; difference 24.3%, 9.6% to 39.0%). Discontinuation of the coprescribed heroin resulted in a rapid deterioration in 82% (94/115) of those who responded to the coprescribed heroin. The incidence of serious adverse events was similar across treatment conditions. Conclusions Supervised coprescription of heroin is feasible, more effective, and probably as safe as methadone alone in reducing the many physical, mental, and social problems of treatment resistant heroin addicts. PMID:12907482

  3. Correlates of Heroin and Methamphetamine Use among Homeless Male Ex-Jail and Prison Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa E.; Farabee, David; Hall, Elizabeth; Zhang, Sheldon; Marfisee, Mary; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Musto, Stefanie; Leake, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Homeless men exiting California State jails and prisons are a heterogeneous community with varied childhood, incarceration and drug use histories. This cross-sectional study assessed whether homeless men who were discharged from either jail or prison into a residential substance abuse treatment program, differed in terms of methamphetamine and heroin use. This study utilized baseline data collected on 540 recently paroled men randomized to one of three programs that assessed the impact of a peer coaching intervention on subsequent drug use and re-incarceration. We found that younger ex-offenders exiting prisons and jails were more likely to have used methamphetamine alone, whereas African American ex-offenders were less likely to have used methamphetamine alone when compared to other ethnic groups. Further, ex-offenders exiting jails and self-reporting use of heroin only at baseline were significantly more likely than their counterparts to have been removed from home before age 18. For men exiting jails, there was an association between lower self-esteem and having used methamphetamine but not heroin. However, having used both heroin and methamphetamine was associated with both violent crime and cognitive problems in both jail and prison samples. Our findings showcase the need to understand unique correlates of both heroin and methamphetamine as they relate to jail and prison populations. PMID:25489295

  4. Replication of ZNF804A gene variant associations with risk of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Hancock, D B; Levy, J L; Gaddis, N C; Glasheen, C; Saccone, N L; Page, G P; Bierut, L J; Kral, A H; Johnson, E O

    2015-11-01

    Heroin addiction is heritable, but few specific genetic variants have been reproducibly associated with this disease. The zinc finger protein 804A (ZNF804A) gene is a biologically plausible susceptibility gene for heroin addiction, given its function as a transcription factor in human brain. Novel associations of two common ZNF804A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7597593 and rs1344706, with heroin addiction have been reported in Han Chinese. Both SNPs have also been implicated for regulating ZNF804A expression in human brain, including the addiction-relevant dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In this independent replication study, we tested the rs7597593 and rs1344706 SNP genotypes and their corresponding haplotypes for association with heroin addiction using cases drawn from the Urban Health Study and population controls: total N = 10 757 [7095 European Americans (EAs) and 3662 African Americans (AAs)]. We independently replicated both ZNF804A SNP associations in EAs: the rs7597593-T (P = 0.016) and rs1344706-A (P = 0.029) alleles both being associated with increased risk of heroin addiction, consistent with the prior report. Neither SNP was associated in AAs alone, but meta-analysis across both ancestry groups resulted in significant associations for rs1344706-A [P = 0.016, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 1.13 (1.02-1.25)] and its haplotype with rs7597593-T [P = 0.0067, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 1.16 (1.04-1.29)]. By showing consistent associations across independent studies and diverse ancestry groups, our study provides evidence that these two ZNF804A SNPs and their risk haplotype are among the few replicable genetic associations with heroin addiction.

  5. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit our Prescription Opioids Drug Facts page. 1 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral ... hepatitis (a liver disease) through shared needles 2 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral ...

  6. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... restlessness muscle and bone pain diarrhea vomiting alternating hot and cold flashes with goosebumps kicking movements severe ...

  7. Leucoencephalopathy following abuse of sniffed heroin.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Romain; Lebas, Axel; Gérardin, Emmanuel; Grangeon, Lou; Ozkul-Wermester, Ozlem; Aubier-Girard, Carole; Martinaud, Olivier; Maltête, David

    2017-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted for acute cognitive impairment. Three weeks earlier, he had been admitted for coma due to sniffed heroin abuse responsive to naloxone infusion. At admission, the patient presented with apraxia, severe memory impairment and anosognosia. Brain MRI revealed symmetric hyperintensities of supratentorial white matter, sparing brainstem and cerebellum, on FLAIR and B1000 sequences. Four months later, repeated neuropsychological assessment revealed dramatic improvement of global cognitive functions. Toxic leucoencephalopathy excluding the cerebellum and brainstem is a rare complication of heroin abuse, and seems to concern especially patients that use heroin by sniff or injection. In these patients, cognitive troubles are predominant, prognosis seems better and infratentorial brain structures can be spared. In conclusion, our observation emphasizes that heroin-induced encephalopathy can have a favourable outcome and that imaging and clinical patterns can indicate the mode of drug administration.

  8. "Addiction Proneness" and Personality in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jerome J.

    1975-01-01

    A carefully controlled comparison of the personality characteristics of heroin addict (n=27) and nonaddict (n=20) offenders was carried out so as to avoid methodological problems associated with earlier studies. (Editor)

  9. How Does Heroin Use Affect Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy can result in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS occurs when heroin passes through the placenta to ... weight gain, tremors, diarrhea, vomiting, and possibly death. NAS requires hospitalization and treatment with medication (often morphine) ...

  10. Should we prescribe heroin? A current Scottish debate.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J; McKeganey, N

    2007-11-01

    There have been recent calls from within both Scotland and England for the wider prescription of heroin to heroin addicts as a way of coping with our burgeoning drug problem and as a route to reducing drug related criminality. But how feasible is heroin prescribing in this context? This paper considers some of the existing research evidence relating to heroin prescribing and looks also at the ethics and practicalities of prescribing heroin to heroin addicts in Scotland. We conclude that whilst the evidence on the benefits of heroin prescribing is far from clear cut there is a case for mounting a Scottish trial of heroin prescribing. Such a trial would need to be tightly controlled and rigorously evaluated. It would need to show that heroin prescribing was associated not only with a comparable level of harm reduction, as methadone prescribing, but that it was also an effective route towards drug users' eventual recovery and drug cessation.

  11. Heroin-associated anthrax with minimal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Black, Heather; Chapman, Ann; Inverarity, Donald; Sinha, Satyajit

    2017-03-08

    In 2010, during an outbreak of anthrax affecting people who inject drugs, a heroin user aged 37 years presented with soft tissue infection. He subsequently was found to have anthrax. We describe his management and the difficulty in distinguishing anthrax from non-anthrax lesions. His full recovery, despite an overall mortality of 30% for injectional anthrax, demonstrates that some heroin-related anthrax cases can be managed predominately with oral antibiotics and minimal surgical intervention. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Naloxone without the needle - systematic review of candidate routes for non-injectable naloxone for opioid overdose reversal.

    PubMed

    Strang, John; McDonald, Rebecca; Alqurshi, Abdulmalik; Royall, Paul; Taylor, David; Forbes, Ben

    2016-06-01

    Deaths from opioid overdose can be prevented through administration of the antagonist naloxone, which has been licensed for injection since the 1970s. To support wider availability of naloxone in community settings, novel non-injectable naloxone formulations are being developed, suitable for emergency use by non-medical personnel. 1) Identify candidate routes of injection-free naloxone administration potentially suitable for emergency overdose reversal; 2) consider pathways for developing and evaluating novel naloxone formulations. A three-stage analysis of candidate routes of administration was conducted: 1) assessment of all 112 routes of administration identified by FDA against exclusion criteria. 2) Scrutiny of empirical data for identified candidate routes, searching PubMed and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform using search terms "naloxone AND [route of administration]". 3) Examination of routes for feasibility and against the inclusion criteria. Only three routes of administration met inclusion criteria: nasal, sublingual and buccal. Products are currently in development and being studied. Pharmacokinetic data exist only for nasal naloxone, for which product development is more advanced, and one concentrated nasal spray was granted licence in the US in 2015. However, buccal naloxone may also be viable and may have different characteristics. After 40 years of injection-based naloxone treatment, non-injectable routes are finally being developed. Nasal naloxone has recently been approved and will soon be field-tested, buccal naloxone holds promise, and it is unclear what sublingual naloxone will contribute. Development and approval of reliable non-injectable formulations will facilitate wider naloxone provision across the community internationally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The "lessons" of the Australian "heroin shortage".

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Day, Carolyn; Gilmour, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2006-05-02

    Heroin use causes considerable harm to individual users including dependence, fatal and nonfatal overdose, mental health problems, and blood borne virus transmission. It also adversely affects the community through drug dealing, property crime and reduced public amenity. During the mid to late 1990s in Australia the prevalence of heroin use increased as reflected in steeply rising overdose deaths. In January 2001, there were reports of an unpredicted and unprecedented reduction in heroin supply with an abrupt onset in all Australian jurisdictions. The shortage was most marked in New South Wales, the State with the largest heroin market, which saw increases in price, dramatic decreases in purity at the street level, and reductions in the ease with which injecting drug users reported being able to obtain the drug. The abrupt onset of the shortage and a subsequent dramatic reduction in overdose deaths prompted national debate about the causes of the shortage and later international debate about the policy significance of what has come to be called the "Australian heroin shortage". In this paper we summarise insights from four years' research into the causes, consequences and policy implications of the "heroin shortage".

  14. Measuring the incentive value of escalating doses of heroin in heroin-dependent Fischer rats during acute spontaneous withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Brian; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Rationale/objectives Although continued heroin use and relapse are thought to be motivated, in part, by the positive incentive-motivational value attributed to heroin, little is understood about heroin’s incentive value during the relapse-prone state of withdrawal. This study uses place preference to measure the incentive value attributed to escalating-dose heroin in the context of heroin dependence. Methods Male Fischer rats were exposed chronically to escalating doses of heroin in the homecage and during place preference conditioning sessions. Conditioned preference for the context paired with escalating-dose heroin was tested after homecage exposure was discontinued and rats entered acute spontaneous withdrawal. Individuals’ behavioral and locomotor responses to heroin and somatic withdrawal signs were recorded. Results Conditioned preference for the heroin-paired context was strong in rats that received chronic homecage exposure to escalating-dose heroin and were tested in acute withdrawal. Behavioral responses to heroin (e.g., stereotypy) varied widely across individuals, with rats that expressed stronger heroin preference also expressing stronger behavioral activation in response to heroin. Individual differences in preference were also related to locomotor responses to heroin but not to overt somatic withdrawal signs. Conclusions Escalating doses of heroin evoked place preference in rats, suggesting that positive incentive-motivational value is attributed to this clinically relevant pattern of drug exposure. This study offers an improved preclinical model for studying dependence and withdrawal and provides insight into individual vulnerabilities to addiction-like behavior. PMID:21748254

  15. Heroin shortage in Coastal Kenya: A rapid assessment and qualitative analysis of heroin users’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Sasha; Miles, Gillian; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Muthui, Mercy; Needle, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While relatively rare events, abrupt disruptions in heroin availability have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality risk among those who are heroin dependent. A heroin shortage occurred in Coast Province, Kenya from December 2010 to March 2011. This qualitative analysis describes the shortage events and consequences from the perspective of heroin users, along with implications for health and other public sectors. Methods As part of a rapid assessment, 66 key informant interviews and 15 focus groups among heroin users in Coast Province, Kenya were conducted. A qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken in Atlas.ti. to identify salient themes related to the shortage. Results Overall, participant accounts were rooted in a theme of desperation and uncertainty, with emphasis on six sub-themes: (1) withdrawal and strategies for alleviating withdrawal, including use of medical intervention and other detoxification attempts; (2) challenges of dealing with unpredictable drug availability, cost, and purity; (3) changes in drug use patterns, and actions taken to procure heroin and other drugs; (4) modifications in drug user relationship dynamics and networks, including introduction of risky group-level injection practices; (5) family and community response; and (6) new challenges with the heroin market resurgence. Conclusions The heroin shortage led to a series of consequences for drug users, including increased risk of morbidity, mortality and disenfranchisement at social and structural levels. Availability of evidence-based services for drug users and emergency preparedness plans could have mitigated this impact. PMID:26470646

  16. Heroin overdose deaths and heroin purity between 1990 and 2000 in Istanbul, Turkey*.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Sadik; Cetin, Ilhan

    2009-09-01

    Turkey has continuously experienced problems with abuse of, and addiction to, opium derivatives. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between heroin overdose deaths and the characteristics of seized opium derivatives. Data were gathered from the Council of Forensic Medicine of the Ministry of Justice in Istanbul from 1990 to 2000. There were 636 heroin-related deaths during this period, 595 of which were classified as heroin overdose deaths. Mean crude and weighted heroin purities remained relatively constant and were calculated to be 46% (57-34%) and 51% (39-59%), respectively. The weight of heroin and the number of heroin seizures, but not the heroin purity, were significantly associated with the number of heroin-related deaths. Prevention strategies are needed to reduce the number of deaths caused by overdoses in countries situated on drug trafficking routes. These strategies should focus on drug trafficking, by providing increased levels of, and support for, law enforcement, stopping the supply of precursor chemicals, and combating corruption among border officials.

  17. Heroin shortage in Coastal Kenya: A rapid assessment and qualitative analysis of heroin users' experiences.

    PubMed

    Mital, Sasha; Miles, Gillian; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Muthui, Mercy; Needle, Richard

    2016-04-01

    While relatively rare events, abrupt disruptions in heroin availability have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality risk among those who are heroin dependent. A heroin shortage occurred in Coast Province, Kenya from December 2010 to March 2011. This qualitative analysis describes the shortage events and consequences from the perspective of heroin users, along with implications for health and other public sectors. As part of a rapid assessment, 66 key informant interviews and 15 focus groups among heroin users in Coast Province, Kenya were conducted. A qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken in Atlas.ti. to identify salient themes related to the shortage. Overall, participant accounts were rooted in a theme of desperation and uncertainty, with emphasis on six sub-themes: (1) withdrawal and strategies for alleviating withdrawal, including use of medical intervention and other detoxification attempts; (2) challenges of dealing with unpredictable drug availability, cost, and purity; (3) changes in drug use patterns, and actions taken to procure heroin and other drugs; (4) modifications in drug user relationship dynamics and networks, including introduction of risky group-level injection practices; (5) family and community response; and (6) new challenges with the heroin market resurgence. The heroin shortage led to a series of consequences for drug users, including increased risk of morbidity, mortality and disenfranchisement at social and structural levels. Availability of evidence-based services for drug users and emergency preparedness plans could have mitigated this impact. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Description of a new non-injectable connector to reduce the complications of arterial blood sampling.

    PubMed

    Mariyaselvam, M Z; Heij, R E; Laba, D; Richardson, J A; Hodges, E J; Maduakor, C A; Carter, J J; Young, P J

    2015-01-01

    Arterial cannulation is associated with complications including bacterial contamination, accidental intra-arterial injection and blood spillage. We performed a series of audits and experiments to gauge the potential for these, as well as assess the possible contribution of a new device, the Needle-Free Arterial Non-Injectable Connector (NIC), in reducing these risks. The NIC comprises a needle-free connector that prevents blood spillage and a one-way valve allowing aspiration only; once screwed onto the side port of a three-way tap, the device can only be removed with difficulty. We performed a clinical audit of arterial monitoring systems in our intensive care unit, which showed an incidence of bacterial colonisation of five in 86 (6%) three-way tap ports. We constructed a manikin simulation experiment of the management of acute bradycardia, in which trainee doctors were required to inject atropine intravenously. Ten of 15 (66%) doctors injected the drug into the three-way tap of the arterial monitoring system rather than into the intravenous cannula or the central venous catheter. In a laboratory study, we replicated the arterial blood sampling and flushing sequence from a three-way tap, with the syringes attached either directly to the three-way tap port or to a NIC attached to the port. The first (discard) syringe attached to the three-way tap was contaminated with bacteria. Bacterial growth was found in 17 of 20 (85%) downstream flushed samples (corresponding to the patient's circulation) when the three-way tap was accessed directly, compared to none of 20 accessed via the NIC (p < 0.0001). Growth was found on all of 20 (100%) ports accessed directly compared to none of 20 accessed via the NIC (p < 0.0001). The NIC effectively prevents bacteria from contaminating sampling lines. As its design also prevents accidental intra-arterial injection, we suggest that it can reduce complications of arterial monitoring. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of

  19. Influence of noninjecting and injecting drug use on mortality, retention in the cohort, and antiretroviral therapy, in participants in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Huber, M; Battegay, M; Stähelin, C; Castro Batanjer, E; Calmy, A; Bregenzer, A; Bernasconi, E; Schoeni-Affolter, F; Ledergerber, B

    2015-03-01

    We studied the influence of noninjecting and injecting drug use on mortality, dropout rate, and the course of antiretroviral therapy (ART), in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). Cohort participants, registered prior to April 2007 and with at least one drug use questionnaire completed until May 2013, were categorized according to their self-reported drug use behaviour. The probabilities of death and dropout were separately analysed using multivariable competing risks proportional hazards regression models with mutual correction for the other endpoint. Furthermore, we describe the influence of drug use on the course of ART. A total of 6529 participants (including 31% women) were followed during 31 215 person-years; 5.1% participants died; 10.5% were lost to follow-up. Among persons with homosexual or heterosexual HIV transmission, noninjecting drug use was associated with higher all-cause mortality [subhazard rate (SHR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.83], compared with no drug use. Also, mortality was increased among former injecting drug users (IDUs) who reported noninjecting drug use (SHR 2.34; 95% CI 1.49-3.69). Noninjecting drug use was associated with higher dropout rates. The mean proportion of time with suppressed viral replication was 82.2% in all participants, irrespective of ART status, and 91.2% in those on ART. Drug use lowered adherence, and increased rates of ART change and ART interruptions. Virological failure on ART was more frequent in participants who reported concomitant drug injections while on opiate substitution, and in current IDUs, but not among noninjecting drug users. Noninjecting drug use and injecting drug use are modifiable risks for death, and they lower retention in a cohort and complicate ART. © 2014 British HIV Association.

  20. The effects of different cooking regimes on the cook yield and tenderness of non-injected and injection enhanced forequarter beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Walsh, H; Martins, S; O'Neill, E E; Kerry, J P; Kenny, T; Ward, P

    2010-03-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of different cooking regimes on the cook yield and tenderness of non-injected and brine injected (0.5% residual NaCl) bovine M. triceps brachii caput longum (TB), M. supraspinatus (SP) and M. pectoralis profundus (PP). Injected and non-injected TB, SP and PP muscle sections (400 g) were (a) conventionally oven cooked to 72 degrees C or cooked slowly (using a Delta10 programme) to 72 degrees C or (b) cooked in a water bath to 72 degrees C or cooked in a water bath to 55 degrees C and held at this temperature for 2 h before heating to 72 degrees C. In addition, injected PP muscle sections were oven cooked to 69 degrees C and held at this temperature for up to 12 h. Slow cooking using a Delta10 programme had no significant (P<0.05) effect on WBSF values of injected or non-injected SP and TB muscles but significantly (P<0.05) decreased the WBSF values of injected and non-injected PP muscles when compared to conventional cooking. Slow cooking significantly (P<0.05) increased % cook yield of injected PP, SP and TB muscles. Staged cooking significantly (P<0.05) decreased the WBSF values and had no significant effect on sensory tenderness ratings of non-injected TB, SP and PP muscles and injected PP muscles. Staged cooked injected or non-injected PP, SP and TB muscles had lower % cook yield values than those cooked straight to 72 degrees C. Increasing the cooking time of injected PP muscles at 69 degrees C to 8 and 12 h decreased % cook yield, decreased WBSF values and increased sensory tenderness ratings. It also alleviated the problem of residual chewiness which was evident in PP muscles cooked using the other regimes.

  1. Orbitofrontal response to drug-related stimuli after heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Scheffler, Klaus; Seifritz, Erich; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    The compulsion to seek and use heroin is frequently driven by stress and craving during drug-cue exposure. Although previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that craving is mediated by increased prefrontal cortex activity, it remains unknown how heroin administration modulates the prefrontal cortex response. This study examines the acute effects of heroin on brain function in heroin-maintained patients. Using a crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 27 heroin-maintained patients performed functional magnetic resonance imaging 20 minutes after the administration of heroin or placebo (saline) while drug-related and neutral stimuli were presented. Images were processed and analysed with statistical parametric mapping. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Region of interest analyses showed a drug-related cue-associated blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in heroin-dependent patients during both treatment conditions (heroin and placebo). This activation of the OFC was significantly higher after heroin than after placebo administration. These findings may indicate the importance of OFC activity for impulse control and decision-making after regular heroin administration and may emphasize the benefit of the heroin-assisted treatment in heroin dependence.

  2. Extended Heroin Access Increases Heroin Choices Over a Potent Nondrug Alternative

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Cantin, Lauriane; Vanhille, Nathalie; Serre, Fuschia; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological research shows that the proportion of drug users who become addicted to heroin is higher than to cocaine. Here we tested whether this difference could be due to a difference in the addiction liability between the two drugs. Addiction liability was assessed under a discrete-trials choice procedure by measuring the proportion of rats that prefer the drug over a potent alternative reward (ie, water sweetened with saccharin). Previous research on choice between self-administration of i.v. cocaine or sweet water showed that the proportion of cocaine-preferring rats remains relatively low and invariable (ie, 15%), even after extended drug access and regardless of past drug consumption (ie, total drug use before choice testing). By contrast, the present study shows that under similar choice conditions, the proportion of heroin-preferring rats considerably increases with extended heroin access (6–9 h per day for several weeks) and with past heroin consumption, from 11 to 51% at the highest past drug consumption level. At this level, the proportion of drug-preferring rats was about three times higher with heroin than with cocaine (51% vs 15%). This increase in the rate of heroin preference after extended heroin access persisted even after recovery from acute heroin withdrawal. Overall, these findings show that choice procedures are uniquely sensitive to different drugs and suggest that heroin is more addictive than cocaine. This higher addiction liability may contribute to explain why more drug users become addicted to heroin than to cocaine in epidemiological studies. PMID:23322185

  3. Heroin self-administration and reinstatement of heroin-seeking in adolescent vs. adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Doherty, James M; Frantz, Kyle J

    2012-02-01

    Heroin abuse is prevalent among teenagers, and early onset drug use might predict long-term drug dependence. However, adolescent sensitivity to drug reinforcement has not been explored thoroughly in animal models. This study aimed to compare intravenous (i.v.) self-administration of heroin, as well as extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking, in adolescent vs. adult male rats. Adolescent (35 days old at start) and adult (86 days old at start) male Sprague-Dawley rats spontaneously acquired lever pressing maintained by i.v. heroin infusions. In experiment 1, self-administration was tested on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement (0.05 and 0.025 mg/kg per infusion), followed by within-session extinction and reinstatement tests after 1 or 12 days of abstinence. In experiment 2, self-administration was tested on a progressive ratio schedule (0.0125-0.1 mg/kg per infusion), followed 12 days later by a single test of extinction responding in the presence of cues. In experiment 1, adolescent rats self-administered more heroin than adults. After 1 or 12 days of abstinence, adolescents exhibited less heroin-seeking than adults, although levels of heroin-seeking increased over abstinence period for both age groups. In experiment 2, adolescents and adults reached the same maximal response ratio (breakpoint), although adolescents earned more infusions when response requirements were low. For extinction responding in the presence of cues, heroin-seeking was similar across ages. Lower levels of heroin-seeking suggest that younger rats are less sensitive than adults to some residual effects of heroin intake.

  4. Extended heroin access increases heroin choices over a potent nondrug alternative.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Cantin, Lauriane; Vanhille, Nathalie; Serre, Fuschia; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological research shows that the proportion of drug users who become addicted to heroin is higher than to cocaine. Here we tested whether this difference could be due to a difference in the addiction liability between the two drugs. Addiction liability was assessed under a discrete-trials choice procedure by measuring the proportion of rats that prefer the drug over a potent alternative reward (ie, water sweetened with saccharin). Previous research on choice between self-administration of i.v. cocaine or sweet water showed that the proportion of cocaine-preferring rats remains relatively low and invariable (ie, 15%), even after extended drug access and regardless of past drug consumption (ie, total drug use before choice testing). By contrast, the present study shows that under similar choice conditions, the proportion of heroin-preferring rats considerably increases with extended heroin access (6-9 h per day for several weeks) and with past heroin consumption, from 11 to 51% at the highest past drug consumption level. At this level, the proportion of drug-preferring rats was about three times higher with heroin than with cocaine (51% vs 15%). This increase in the rate of heroin preference after extended heroin access persisted even after recovery from acute heroin withdrawal. Overall, these findings show that choice procedures are uniquely sensitive to different drugs and suggest that heroin is more addictive than cocaine. This higher addiction liability may contribute to explain why more drug users become addicted to heroin than to cocaine in epidemiological studies.

  5. Motivational Assessment of Non-Treatment Buprenorphine Research Participation in Heroin Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Gina; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Heroin abuse remains an important public health problem, particularly in economically disadvantaged areas. Insight into this problem is gained from interviewing addicted individuals. However, we lack systematic data on factors that motivate heroin users to participate in non-treatment research that offers both financial incentives (compensation) and non-financial incentives (e.g., short-term medication). Aim To better understand the relative importance of several types of personal motivations to participate in non-treatment buprenorphine research, and to relate self-motivations to social, economic, demographic and drug use factors. Methods Heroin dependent volunteers (N = 235 total; 57 female and 178 male; 136 African American, 86 Caucasian, and 13 Other) applied for non-therapeutic buprenorphine research in an urban outpatient setting from 2004–2008. We conducted a semi-structured behavioral economic interview, after which participants ranked 11 possible motivations for research participation. Results Although the study was repeatedly described as non-treatment research involving buprenorphine, participants often ranked some treatment-related motivations as important (wanting to reduce/stop heroin use, needing a medication to get stabilized/detoxify). Some motivations correlated with income, heroin use, and years since marketing of buprenorphine. Two dimensions emerged from principal component analysis of motivation rankings: (1) treatment motivation vs. greater immediate needs, and (2) commitment to trying alternatives vs. a more accepting attitude toward traditional interventions. In summary, heroin addicts’ self-motivations to engage in non-therapeutic research are complex – they value economic gain but not exclusively or primarily – and relate to variables such as socioeconomic factors and drug use. PMID:22137646

  6. Motivational assessment of non-treatment buprenorphine research participation in heroin dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Papke, Gina; Greenwald, Mark K

    2012-06-01

    Heroin abuse remains an important public health problem, particularly in economically disadvantaged areas. Insight into this problem is gained from interviewing addicted individuals. However, we lack systematic data on factors that motivate heroin users to participate in non-treatment research that offers both financial incentives (compensation) and non-financial incentives (e.g., short-term medication). To better understand the relative importance of several types of personal motivations to participate in non-treatment buprenorphine research, and to relate self-motivations to social, economic, demographic and drug use factors. Heroin dependent volunteers (N=235 total; 57 female and 178 male; 136 African American, 86 Caucasian, and 13 Other) applied for non-therapeutic buprenorphine research in an urban outpatient setting from 2004 to 2008. We conducted a semi-structured behavioral economic interview, after which participants ranked 11 possible motivations for research participation. Although the study was repeatedly described as non-treatment research involving buprenorphine, participants often ranked some treatment-related motivations as important (wanting to reduce/stop heroin use, needing a medication to get stabilized/detoxify). Some motivations correlated with income, heroin use, and years since marketing of buprenorphine. Two dimensions emerged from principal component analysis of motivation rankings: (1) treatment motivation vs. greater immediate needs and (2) commitment to trying alternatives vs. a more accepting attitude toward traditional interventions. In summary, heroin addicts' self-motivations to engage in non-therapeutic research are complex--they value economic gain but not exclusively or primarily--and relate to variables such as socioeconomic factors and drug use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heroin users in Australia: population trends.

    PubMed

    Kaya, C Yalçin; Tugai, Yuliya; Filar, Jerzy A; Agrawal, Manju R; Ali, Robert L; Gowing, Linda R; Cooke, Richard

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify certain important population trends among heroin users in Australia for the period 1971 - 97, such as: population growth, initiation, i.e. the number who were initiated to heroin in a given year, and quitting, i.e. the number that quit using heroin. For this purpose, we summarize and extract relevant characteristics from data from National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS 1998) conducted in Australia in 1998. We devise a systematic procedure to estimate historical trends from questions concerning past events. It is observed from our findings that the size of the heroin user population in Australia is in a sharp increase, especially from the early 1980s onwards. The general trend obtained for the period 1971 - 97 is strikingly similar to that obtained by Hall et al. (2000) for the dependent heroin user population in Australia, even though their study was based on different datasets and a different methodology. In our reconstruction of the time history we also detect a levelling-off prior to 1990. Initiation is also observed to be on a sharp increase. The latter trend is accompanied by a similar trend of quitting, perhaps indicating a relatively short heroin use career. A sharp decrease in both initiation and quitting is observed after 1990. In conclusion, in the case of the trend in the population of heroin users a high rate of growth has been identified that is consistent with the existing literature. In the process, we demonstrated that even a static survey such as NDSHS 1998 can, sometimes, be used to extract historical (dynamic) trends of certain important variables.

  8. Urban segregation and the US heroin market: A quantitative model of anthropological hypotheses from an inner-city drug market

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Fernando Montero; Bourgois, Philippe; Mars, Sarah; Karandinos, George; Unick, Jay; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background We hypothesize that the location of highly segregated Hispanic and in particular Puerto Rican neighborhoods can explain how Colombian-sourced heroin, which is associated with a large-scale decade long decline in heroin price and increase in purity, was able to enter and proliferate in the US. Methods Our multidisciplinary analysis quantitatively operationalizes participant-observation ethnographic hypotheses informed by social science theory addressing complex political economic, historical, cultural and social processes. First, we ethnographically document the intersection of structural forces shaping Philadelphia's hypersegregated Puerto Rican community as a regional epicenter of the US heroin market. Second, we estimate the relationship between segregation and: a) the entry of Colombian heroin into the US, and b) the retail price per pure gram of heroin in 21 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Results Ethnographic evidence documents how poverty, historically-patterned antagonistic race relations, an interstitial socio-cultural political and geographic linkage to both Caribbean drug trafficking routes and the United States and kinship solidarities combine to position poor Puerto Rican neighborhoods as commercial distribution centers for high quality, low cost Colombian heroin. Quantitative analysis shows that heroin markets in cities with highly segregated Puerto Rican communities were more quickly saturated with Colombian-sourced heroin. The level of Hispanic segregation (specifically in cities with a high level of Puerto Rican segregation) had a significant negative association with heroin price from 1990–2000. By contrast, there is no correlation between African-American segregation and Colombian-sourced heroin prevalence or price. Discussion Our iterative mixed methods dialogue allows for the development and testing of complex social science hypotheses and reduces the limitations specific to each method used in isolation. We build on prior research

  9. Urban segregation and the US heroin market: a quantitative model of anthropological hypotheses from an inner-city drug market.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Daniel; Castrillo, Fernando Montero; Bourgois, Philippe; Mars, Sarah; Karandinos, George; Unick, George Jay; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    We hypothesize that the location of highly segregated Hispanic and in particular Puerto Rican neighborhoods can explain how Colombian-sourced heroin, which is associated with a large-scale decade long decline in heroin price and increase in purity, was able to enter and proliferate in the US. Our multidisciplinary analysis quantitatively operationalizes participant-observation ethnographic hypotheses informed by social science theory addressing complex political economic, historical, cultural and social processes. First, we ethnographically document the intersection of structural forces shaping Philadelphia's hypersegregated Puerto Rican community as a regional epicenter of the US heroin market. Second, we estimate the relationship between segregation and: (a) the entry of Colombian heroin into the US, and (b) the retail price per pure gram of heroin in 21 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Ethnographic evidence documents how poverty, historically-patterned antagonistic race relations, an interstitial socio-cultural political and geographic linkage to both Caribbean drug trafficking routes and the United States and kinship solidarities combine to position poor Puerto Rican neighborhoods as commercial distribution centers for high quality, low cost Colombian heroin. Quantitative analysis shows that heroin markets in cities with highly segregated Puerto Rican communities were more quickly saturated with Colombian-sourced heroin. The level of Hispanic segregation (specifically in cities with a high level of Puerto Rican segregation) had a significant negative association with heroin price from 1990 to 2000. By contrast, there is no correlation between African-American segregation and Colombian-sourced heroin prevalence or price. Our iterative mixed methods dialogue allows for the development and testing of complex social science hypotheses and reduces the limitations specific to each method used in isolation. We build on prior research that assumes geographic proximity

  10. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  11. High prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among noninjecting drug users: association with sharing the inhalation implements of crack.

    PubMed

    Macías, Juan; Palacios, Rosa B; Claro, Evangelina; Vargas, Julio; Vergara, Salvador; Mira, José A; Merchante, Nicolás; Corzo, Juan E; Pineda, Juan A

    2008-07-01

    Most of the prevalent cases of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are attributable to intravenous drug using. However, a substantial number of individuals, particularly noninjecting drug users (NIDU), report no identifiable source of HCV exposure. This may be interpreted as inaccurate reporting of past intravenous exposure or as the presence of an unidentified source of HCV infection. Because of this, we evaluated the prevalence of and factors associated with HCV infection among NIDU. One hundred and eighty-two individuals who were attended from 2003 to 2004 in a drug addiction facility because of noninjecting drug use were included. HCV infection was detected in 23 (12.6%) participants. Sharing the inhalation tube of crack cocaine [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-9.8, P=0.01], presence of tattoos (AOR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-9.1, P=0.02) and age >or=34 years (AOR 3.9, 95% CI 1.3-11.6, P=0.01) 3.9 were independently associated with HCV infection. The prevalence of HCV infection in NIDU is higher than in general population. HCV infection is more likely among older drug users, those with tattoos and crack cocaine users that share the inhalation implements.

  12. Birth Order and Polydrug Abuse Among Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Steven E.; Linder, Ronald L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of possible relationships between birth order and polydrug use patterns of heroin addicts prior to undergoing treatment. Overrepresentation of "only child" heroin addicts was evident among the population studied. (Author)

  13. Birth Order and Polydrug Abuse Among Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Steven E.; Linder, Ronald L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of possible relationships between birth order and polydrug use patterns of heroin addicts prior to undergoing treatment. Overrepresentation of "only child" heroin addicts was evident among the population studied. (Author)

  14. An investigation into the microflora of heroin.

    PubMed

    McLauchlin, J; Mithani, V; Bolton, F J; Nichols, G L; Bellis, M A; Syed, Q; Thomson, R P M; Ashton, J R

    2002-11-01

    In 2000, an unusual increase of morbidity and mortality among illegal injecting drug users in the UK and Ireland was reported and Clostridium novyi was identified as the likely source of the serious infection, although infections due to C. botulinum and Bacillus cereus were also reported. Because heroin was a possibile source of infection, this study investigated the microflora of heroin samples seized in England during 2000 and 2002. Two methods were developed for the examination of the microflora of heroin. The first consisted of suspension of the drug in maximum recovery diluent (MRD) which was inoculated directly into Clostridium Botulinum Isolation Cooked Meat Broth (CBI). The second method rendered the heroin soluble in citric acid, concentrated particulate material (and bacterial cells) by filtration and removed heroin residues by washing with citric acid and phosphate-buffered saline before placing the filter in CBI broth. Duplicate CBI broths from both methods were incubated without heating and after heating at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Subcultures were made after incubation for 7 and 14 days on to eight different solid media. The methods were evaluated with heroin samples spiked with either C. botulinum or C. novyi spore suspensions; recovery of 10 spores in the original sample was demonstrated. Fifty-eight heroin samples were tested by citric acid solubilisation and 34 by the MRD suspension technique. Fifteen different gram-positive species of four genera were recognised. No fungi were isolated. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (Bacillus spp. and Paenibacillus macerans) were the predominant microflora isolated and at least one species was isolated from each sample. B. cereus was the most common species and was isolated from 95% of all samples, with B. licheniformis isolated from 40%. Between one and five samples yielded cultures of B. coagulans, B. laterosporus, B. pumilus, B. subtilis and P. macerans. Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from 23 (40

  15. Orexin / hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist reduces heroin self-administration and cue-induced heroin seeking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel J; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2012-03-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in several addiction-related behaviors. In the present experiments, we examined the involvement of orexin in heroin reinforcement and relapse by administering the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 prior to heroin self-administration or prior to cue-induced or heroin-induced reinstatement of extinguished heroin seeking in male Sprague Dawley rats. SB-334867 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) reduced heroin intake during self-administration under fixed ratio-1 and progressive ratio schedules. SB-334867 also attenuated reinstatement of heroin seeking elicited by cues, but not reinstatement elicited by a heroin prime. These results indicate that orexin antagonism reduces heroin self-administration, and they support a role for orexin in cue-triggered drug relapse.

  16. Isolation and purification of heroin from heroin street samples by preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Zheng, Hui; Lu, Yanzhen; Wei, Yun

    2012-09-10

    The present study established a novel method using preparative high performance liquid chromatography to isolate and purify heroin·HCl from heroin street samples to be used as a reference standard. Different kinds of mobile phases and columns were used, ultimately the mobile phase consisting of hexane-isopropanol-methanol (65:28:7, v/v) and the SIL preparative column prepared in laboratory were selected as the final condition. Heroin was further purified by the drowning-out crystallization method using isopropanol-methanol (50:1, v/v) and hexane as drowning-out anti-solvents and salting-out agents, respectively. The purity was assessed by analytical high performance liquid chromatography and the confirmation of the chemical structure was performed by IR and NMR. About 110.7mg of heroin·HCl at a purity of over 99.52% was obtained from 180mg of heroin street samples which contained 156.15mg of heroin·HCl component by preparative high performance liquid chromatography. This method is suitable for preparing heroin standards in forensic science area.

  17. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin Print A A A en español Lo que ... sobre las drogas: La heroína What It Is: Heroin (say: HAIR-uh-win) comes from the opium ...

  18. Observed transition from opioid analgesic deaths toward heroin.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Creppage, Kathleen; Austin, Anna; Ringwalt, Christopher; Sanford, Catherine; Proescholdbell, Scott K

    2014-12-01

    In the United States, overdose mortality from controlled substances has increased over the last two decades, largely involving prescription opioid analgesics. Recently, there has been speculation on a transition away from prescription opioid use toward heroin, however the impact on overdose deaths has not been evaluated. Time series study of North Carolina residents, 2007 through 2013. Monthly ratio of prescription opioid-to-heroin overdose deaths. Non-parametric local regression models used to ascertain temporal shifts from overdoses involving prescription opioids to heroin. There were 4332 overdose deaths involving prescription opioids, and 455 involving heroin, including 44 where both were involved (total n = 4743). A gradual 6-year shift toward increasing heroin deaths was observed. In January, 2007, for one heroin death there were 16 opioid analgesic deaths; in December, 2013 there were 3 prescription opioid deaths for each heroin death. The transition to heroin appears to have started prior to the introduction of tamper-resistant opioid analgesics. The age of death among heroin decedents shifted toward younger adults. Most heroin and opioid analgesic deaths occurred in metropolitan areas, with little change between 2007 and 2013. The observed increases in heroin overdose deaths can no longer be considered speculation. Deaths among younger adults were noted to have increased in particular, suggesting new directions for targeting interventions. More research beyond vital statistics is needed to understand the root causes of the shift from prescription opioids to heroin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin A A A en español Lo que necesitas ... sobre las drogas: La heroína What It Is: Heroin (say: HAIR-uh-win) comes from the opium ...

  20. The impact of law enforcement activity on a heroin market.

    PubMed

    Weatherburn, D; Lind, B

    1997-05-01

    It may be argued that seizing large quantities of heroin being imported into the country should decrease its supply and hence increase its price, resulting in a reduction in the quantity of the drug being purchased or consumed. To date, however, there has been no empirical evidence that heroin seizures in Australia have any effect on the price of heroin at street level. This article describes a 2-year research study during which the price and purity of street-level heroin were regularly monitored. It was found that heroin seizures had no effect on the price, purity or perceived availability of heroin at street level. It was further found that admissions to methadone treatment were not affected by the price or perceived availability of heroin or by local arrests for heroin use/possession, nor was any relationship found between these arrests and the price of street-level heroin. Nevertheless, two-thirds of those who sought entry to local methadone programmes indicated the price as a reason for stopping using heroin. This paper argues that supply-side law enforcement should only be used as a strategy for maintaining high heroin prices if the demand for heroin can be shown to be price-elastic and, further, that the costs of such a strategy need to be weighted against the benefits.

  1. The resurgence of heroin abuse in the District of Columbia.

    PubMed

    Greene, M H

    1975-01-01

    Prospectively collected drug abuse trend surveillance data suggest that the rate of heroin use in Washington, D.C. is rising following a two year decline in the magnitude of this problem. Supportive data include increased potency of street level heroin, increased numbers of heroin-related deaths, increased detection of heroin positive urine specimens in the D.C. Superior Court arrestee population, increased demand for addiction treatment services and rising property crime rates. Increased prevalence of heroin use has not yet been associated with an increase in incidence, suggesting that former heroin users have begun to use once again following a period of abstinence. Analysis of heroin specimens seized across the United States suggests that cities formerly dependant upon European (white) heroin have now developed a new heroin distribution system which supplies Mexican (brown) heroin. This has offset the reduction in heroin use observed during 1972-1973 concomitant with the East Coast heroin shortage and widespread introduction of addiction treatment services.

  2. Cannabinoid modulation of the reinforcing and motivational properties of heroin and heroin-associated cues in rats.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Taco J; Homberg, Judith R; Binnekade, Rob; Raasø, Halfdan; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2003-07-01

    Recently, we provided evidence for a cannabinoid mechanism in relapse to cocaine seeking in rats. There is also increasing evidence for functional cross-talk between cannabinoid and opioid systems in several physiological processes. This study was designed to evaluate whether the cannabinoid system plays a role in mediating the reinforcing and motivational effects of heroin and heroin-paired stimuli. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer heroin (50 microg/kg per infusion) on fixed (FR5) or progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement in the presence of a discriminative and discrete heroin-associated cue. The selective cannabinoid CB1 antagonist SR141716A was given 30 min before the session to determine its effect on responding for heroin. Separate groups of rats were subjected to extinction training during which heroin-associated cues were absent and no heroin was delivered. During subsequent reinstatement tests, the effects of the cannabinoid agonist HU210 and the antagonist SR141716A on reinstatement of heroin seeking were evaluated. The cannabinoid antagonist dose-dependently reduced responding for heroin on the FR5 schedule and to a greater extent on the progressive ratio schedule. HU210 (20 microg/kg) reinstated heroin seeking behaviour following a 2-week extinction period, whereas SR141716A dose-dependently attenuated heroin seeking that was provoked by a priming injection of heroin (0.25 mg/kg) and heroin seeking that was triggered by re-exposure to heroin paired stimuli. The results show that the reinforcing and motivational effects of heroin and heroin-paired stimuli are mediated, at least in part, by activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Therefore, the present study provides a rationale for the use of cannabinoid antagonists in the treatment of opiate addiction.

  3. Emotion regulation in male abstinent heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhao; Lu, Xie; Li, Fu; Haitao, He; Ling, Yang; Aibao, Zhou

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined 25 male prisoners with a history of heroin dependency (M = 35.3 yr., SD = 8.5, range = 21-48) and 25 male prisoners with no history of substance abuse (M = 31.5 yr., SD = 9.8, range = 19-47) who were selected to complete the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Results showed that the group with a history of heroin dependency used a cognitive reappraisal strategy less frequently than controls and that there was no difference in the use of expression suppression strategies between the two groups. It was concluded that the negative impact of heroin abuse on an individual's emotion regulation is primarily reflected in the cognitive reappraisal dimension.

  4. Toxicological criterion of the heroin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Shigeev, S

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents toxicological characteristics of 198 cases of acute parenteral heroin intoxication, analyzes the clinically encountered range of blood and urinary concentrations of its metabolites. The principal causes of death are elucidated in victims of heroin poisoning at the hospital stage. Where there is a relationship of death probability to the detection of morphine in the victims' biological fluids is considered; its blood and urinary concentrations are determined, which undoubtedly suggests the occurrence of poisoning-related death. It has been established that death from poisoning by heroin may occur in the whole range of its detectable concentrations. There is no doubt that the blood morphine concentrations of at least 2.0 microg/ml should be considered to be fatal.

  5. Plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Bassi, C; Zanoni, P; Plancher, A C

    1991-12-31

    We examined total cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, high density lipoproteins- (HDL) cholesterolemia, apolipoproteins A1 and B, body mass index, albuminemia and alanine aminotransferase in 60 heroin addicts. After comparing 23 control subjects with the heroin addicts the result was that the latter have significantly lower mean values of total cholesterolemia and of HDL-cholesterolemia and higher values of triglyceridemia. They also have significantly higher prevalences of cases of hypocholesterolemia and of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia. Within the addict group there is no linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and body mass index; there is, however, an inverse linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and alanine aminotransferase. Therefore, the alterations found in the lipid pattern of heroin addicts are not due to malnutrition but hypothetically to liver diseases which are frequent in these patients.

  6. From victim to heroine: children's stories revisited.

    PubMed

    Turkel, Ann Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The need to escape reality and the taste for adventure with the unknown fills a universal need for both adults and children. Fairy tales have a powerful grip on the imagination because they are homespun versions of myths and have passionate intensity without epic grandeur. The happy ending of fairy tales reflects gender stereotyping because the heroine usually does very little except sit, wish, and wait for marriage. She has no control over her destiny and no active involvement in selecting or planning her future. These heroines are really passive victims. Sexism was once rampant in children's books. The Oz books, with their independent, courageous, and active heroine were way ahead of their time. The advent of women's liberation has led to a reappraisal of the female in folk literature. Anthropologists have now discovered stories of admirable women who were strong characters in their own epic dramas.

  7. Crystal in Iran: methamphetamine or heroin kerack

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, methamphetamine use has dramatically increased in Iran while there is a crucial misunderstanding about the colloquial words related to methamphetamine among health providers, policy makers, clinicians, scholars and people in the community. The word Crystal refers to methamphetamine in some parts of Iran while in some other parts of the country, Crystal refers to a high purity street-level heroin which is called Kerack and its abuse is epidemic. Methamphetamine and heroin Kerack are different drugs in Iran. Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug while heroin Kerack is an opioid. Health providers especially clinicians and emergency medicine specialists should consider colloquial words that Iranian drug users apply. Special training courses should be designed and implemented for clinicians in Iran to inform them about methamphetamine and its frequently used colloquial words in the community. This issue has important clinical and health implications. PMID:23497450

  8. Is there a need for heroin substitution treatment in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside?

    PubMed

    Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Conway, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) was a randomized controlled trial conducted in Vancouver and Montreal comparing heroin substitution treatment (HST) to methadone treatment (MT) for heroin addicts. The HST group had a higher treatment retention rate and lower illicit heroin use than the MT group. Despite the rigour with which the study was designed, systematic flaws have affected the interpretation of the results. In the MT arm, the dose was titrated slowly, contributing to the high early dropout rate. The mean maintenance dose was suboptimal. The investigators did not calculate on-treatment retention rates; by the end of the trial, more subjects were on MT than HST. Life-threatening events were more common in the HST than the MT group. Overall, the only clear advantage of HST over MT was its greater initial treatment attractiveness, resulting in more early drop-outs in the MT group. HST is intended for treatment-refractory addicts who have no other option but to use street heroin. Yet for most NAOMI subjects, the safest and most cost-effective approach is comprehensive MT or buprenorphine with optimal dosing, flexible program policies, and the provision of integrated primary care and social services. These proven strategies, currently lacking in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, should be implemented before diverting already insufficient resources to HST, given its risks, cost and uncertain efficacy.

  9. [Gender heteronomy of heroin addiction in adolescences].

    PubMed

    Bokhan, N A; Baturin, E V

    2010-01-01

    On the model of heroin addiction in adolescents the premises for grounding the concept of gender heteronomy of addictions have been identified. The clinical-dynamic patterns associated with gender--so called gender associated types of disease in which the leading factors of difference formation are biological sex, valuable orientation structure, sexual experience and social status were singled out. The gender-associated types of heroin addiction in boys and girls were specified as dominant, repressive, partner, utilitarian, integrating and independent. Gender-differentiated programs of pharmaco- and psychotherapy are proposed.

  10. Heroin craving and its correlations with clinical outcome indicators in people with heroin dependence receiving methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Huang-Chi; Wang, Peng-Wei; Ko, Chih-Hung; Lee, Kun-Hua; Hsu, Chih-Yao; Chung, Kuan-Sheng; Wu, Hung-Chi; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Craving for substance use has been added as one of the diagnostic criteria of substance use disorders in DSM-5. However, further research is necessary to examine and expand the clinical potential of craving in the assessment and treatment for heroin users. This study aimed to examine the psychometrics of the Desire for Drug Questionnaire-Chinese Mandarin version (DDQ-CM) and its clinical utility of assessing craving for heroin measured among heroin users with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Self-reported craving for heroin use was measured on the DDQ-CM and visual analog scale among 314 intravenous heroin users receiving MMT. Self-reported heroin dependence, attitude toward heroin use, readiness to change heroin use, and depression were collected. The results found that although the original three-factor model was acceptable for applying the DDQ-CM for heroin users with MMT, only the concurrent validity of the subscales of Desire and Intention and Negative Reinforcement was supported but not that of Control. Meanwhile, the levels of craving on the subscales of Desire and Intention and of Negative Reinforcement on the DDQ-CM were positively associated with the levels of heroin dependence, positive and negative attitudes toward heroin use, and depression, but negatively associated with readiness to change heroin use. This study supported the application of the subscales of Desire and Intention and Negative Reinforcement on the DDQ-CM to measure heroin craving in Taiwanese-Chinese heroin users and supported the clinical implication of craving in heroin users with MMT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental enrichment as a potential intervention for heroin seeking.

    PubMed

    Galaj, E; Manuszak, M; Ranaldi, R

    2016-06-01

    Heroin-related cues can trigger craving and relapse in addicts or heroin seeking in rats. In the present study we investigated whether environmental enrichment (EE) implemented after heroin exposure can reduce cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and expression of heroin conditioned place preference. In Experiment 1, male Long Evans rats that already acquired a heroin self-administration habit, were housed in enriched or non-enriched environments, underwent extinction training and later were tested for cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. In Experiment 2, rats were conditioned with heroin in one compartment of a CPP apparatus and saline in the other, exposed to 30days of enrichment or no enrichment and were later tested for heroin CPP. The results showed that exposure to EE significantly reduced responding during the reinstatement test (Experiment 1) and prevented the expression of heroin CPP (Experiment 2). Our findings suggest that EE can be an effective behavioral approach to diminish the effects of conditioned cues on heroin seeking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Documenting the heroin shortage in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Day, Carolyn; Degenhardt, Louisa; Hall, Wayne

    2006-07-01

    Australian heroin markets have recently undergone dramatic change, sparking debate about the nature of such markets. This study aimed to determine the onset, peak and decline of the heroin shortage in New South Wales (NSW), using the most appropriate available methods to detect market level changes. The parameters of the heroin shortage were determined by reviewing: reports of heroin users about availability and price (derived from the existing literature and the Illicit Drug Reporting System); qualitative interviews with injecting drug users, and health and law enforcement professionals working in the illicit drug field; and examining data on heroin seizures over the past decade. There was a marked reduction in heroin supply in NSW in early 2001. An increase in the price of heroin occurred in 2001, whereas it had decreased steadily since 1996. A reduction in purity also occurred, as reported by drug users and heroin seizures. The peak period of the shortage appears to have been January to April 2001. The market appears to have stabilised since that time, although it has not returned to pre-2001 levels: heroin prices have decreased in NSW for street grams, but not to former levels, and the price of 'caps' (street deals) remain elevated. Heroin purity in NSW has remained low, with perhaps a 10% increase above the lowest recorded levels. These data support the notion that the heroin market in NSW underwent significant changes, which appear to have involved a lasting shift in the nature of the market.

  13. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, M. Florencia; Lum, Paula J.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M.; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). PMID:21241735

  14. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, M Florencia; Lum, Paula J; Evans, Jennifer L; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2011-02-24

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Years of Potential Life Lost among Heroin Addicts 33 Years after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Breda; Hoffman, Valerie; Fan, Jing; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine premature mortality in terms of years of potential life lost (YPLL) among a cohort of long-term heroin addicts. Method This longitudinal, prospective study followed a cohort of 581 male heroin addicts in California for more than 33 years. In the latest follow-up conducted in 1996/97, 282 subjects (48.5%) were confirmed as deceased by death certificates. YPLL before age 65 years were calculated by causes of death. Ethnic differences in YPLL were assessed among Whites, Hispanics, and African Americans. Results On average, addicts in this cohort lost 18.3 years (SD = 10.7) of potentiallife before age 65. Of the total YPLL for the cohort, 22.3% of the years lost was due to heroin overdose, 14.0% due to chronic liver disease, and 10.2% to accidents. The total YPLL and YPLL by death cause in addict cohort were significant higher than that of US population. The YPLL among African Americans was significantly lower than that among Whites or Hispanics. Conclusion The YPLL among addicts was much higher than that in the national population; within the cohort, premature mortality was higher among Whites and Hispanics compared to African American addicts. PMID:17291577

  16. Correlates of sex trading among male non-injecting drug users in Myanmar: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Saw, Yu Mon; Saw, Thu Nandar; Wai, Kyi Mar; Poudel, Krishna C; Win, Hla Hla

    2016-12-05

    Sex trading is a recognized risk factor for human immune deficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted infections among non-injecting drug users (NIDUs). However, very little research has addressed the factors associated with sex trading among male NIDUs in Myanmar. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to February 2010 using the respondent-driven sampling method. In total, 210 NIDUs aged between 18 and 49 years, with no history of injecting drug use, and who used non-injected illicit drugs in the last 6 months were recruited. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire to collect information on participants' sexual and drug use behaviors. Binary and multivariate logistic regressions were applied to analyze the resulting data. Of 210 NIDUs, 84 (40%) reported involvement in the sex trade during the last 3 months. In the adjusted model, factors associated with sex trade involvement included homosexual preference (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.61-14.95), having more than two partners (AOR = 3.88; 95% CI 1.55-9.72), had a regular job (AOR = 5.10; 95% CI 1.65-15.72), use of stimulant drugs rather than opiate (AOR = 2.38; 95% CI 1.10-5.15), and who used drugs more than twice per day. More than one third of NIDUs were involved in sex trading. This study suggested that further comprehensive intervention programs that aim to reduce risk factors of trading sex among NIDUs may consider including NIDUs who used stimulant drugs, had regular/full-time jobs, used drugs more than twice per day, and had homosexual preferences.

  17. Youth, violence and non-injection drug use: nexus of vulnerabilities among lesbian and bisexual sex workers.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Tara; Kerr, Thomas; Duff, Putu; Feng, Cindy; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence of enhanced HIV risk among sexual minority populations, and sex workers (SWs) in particular, there remains a paucity of epidemiological data on the risk environments of SWs who identify as lesbian or bisexual. Therefore, this short report describes a study that examined the individual, interpersonal and structural associations with lesbian or bisexual identity among SWs in Vancouver, Canada. Analysis drew on data from an open prospective cohort of street and hidden off-street SWs in Vancouver. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the independent relationships between individual, interpersonal, work environment and structural factors and lesbian or bisexual identity. Of the 510 individuals in our sample, 95 (18.6%) identified as lesbian or bisexual. In multivariable analysis, reporting non-injection drug use in the last six months (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89; 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.42, 5.75), youth ≤24 years of age (AOR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.24, 4.73) and experiencing client-perpetrated verbal, physical and/or sexual violence in the last six months (AOR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.15, 2.98) remained independently associated with lesbian/bisexual identity, after adjusting for potential confounders. The findings demonstrate an urgent need for evidence-based social and structural HIV prevention interventions. In particular, policies and programmes tailored to lesbian and bisexual youth and women working in sex work, including those that prevent violence and address issues of non-injection stimulant use are required.

  18. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Bentz, D; Schicktanz, N; Milnik, A; Aerni, A; Gerhards, C; Schwegler, K; Vogel, M; Blum, J; Schmid, O; Roozendaal, B; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; de Quervain, D

    2015-07-28

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce craving, for example, by interfering with addiction memory. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin-dependent patients and to determine whether the effects depend on the daily dose of heroin consumption. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 29 heroin-dependent patients in a stable heroin-assisted treatment setting. A single oral dose of 20 mg of cortisol or placebo was administered 105 min before the daily heroin administration. The primary outcome measure was cortisol-induced change in craving. Secondary measures included anxiety, anger and withdrawal symptoms. For the visual analog scale for craving, we found a significant interaction (P = 0.0027) between study medication and heroin-dose group (that is, daily low, medium or high dose of heroin). Cortisol administration reduced craving in patients receiving a low dose of heroin (before heroin administration: P = 0.0019; after heroin administration: P = 0.0074), but not in patients receiving a medium or high dose of heroin. In a picture-rating task with drug-related pictures, cortisol administration did not affect the ratings for the picture-characteristic craving in all the three heroin-dose groups. Cortisol also did not significantly affect secondary outcome measures. In conclusion, a single administration of cortisol leads to reduced craving in low-dose heroin addicts. The present findings might have important clinical implications with regard to understanding stress effects and regarding treatment of addiction.

  19. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M; Bentz, D; Schicktanz, N; Milnik, A; Aerni, A; Gerhards, C; Schwegler, K; Vogel, M; Blum, J; Schmid, O; Roozendaal, B; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; de Quervain, D

    2015-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce craving, for example, by interfering with addiction memory. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin-dependent patients and to determine whether the effects depend on the daily dose of heroin consumption. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 29 heroin-dependent patients in a stable heroin-assisted treatment setting. A single oral dose of 20 mg of cortisol or placebo was administered 105 min before the daily heroin administration. The primary outcome measure was cortisol-induced change in craving. Secondary measures included anxiety, anger and withdrawal symptoms. For the visual analog scale for craving, we found a significant interaction (P=0.0027) between study medication and heroin-dose group (that is, daily low, medium or high dose of heroin). Cortisol administration reduced craving in patients receiving a low dose of heroin (before heroin administration: P=0.0019; after heroin administration: P=0.0074), but not in patients receiving a medium or high dose of heroin. In a picture-rating task with drug-related pictures, cortisol administration did not affect the ratings for the picture-characteristic craving in all the three heroin-dose groups. Cortisol also did not significantly affect secondary outcome measures. In conclusion, a single administration of cortisol leads to reduced craving in low-dose heroin addicts. The present findings might have important clinical implications with regard to understanding stress effects and regarding treatment of addiction. PMID:26218852

  20. The effect of heroin dependence on resumption of heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Meenu; Leri, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that relapse vulnerability in previously dependent individuals results from augmentation of drug-induced reinforcement due to repeated associations between the interoceptive properties of the drug and reduction of acute withdrawal distress. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered 0.05 mg/kg/inf heroin on continuous reinforcement (CR) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules. During this period, they also received injections of vehicle or escalating doses of heroin. Following tests of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal, as well as a drug-free period (4 days), and extinction (9 sessions), they were pre-treated with vehicle or yohimbine (0.5mg/kg, IV) and tested for resumption of heroin self-administration (0.05 mg/kg/inf) on CR and PR schedules, or tested for reinstatement in extinction conditions. Increased self-administration on the CR schedule was observed in the heroin-injected rats, but no group differences were observed on the PR schedule, in spite of greater signs of withdrawal precipitated by naloxone in the heroin-injected rats. More importantly, there were no group differences in resumption of heroin self-administration, and this was not altered by yohimbine. These results suggest that relapse vulnerability cannot be uniquely ascribed to enhanced reinforcing action of drugs; contextual and other conditioning factors must play a role in modulating resumption of drug intake after abstinence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heroin reduces startle and cortisol response in opioid-maintained heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Degen, Bigna; Albrich, Jürgen; Oppel, Monika; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Dürsteler-MacFarland, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Heroin dependence (HD) is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by a compulsion to seek and use heroin. Stress is seen as a key factor for heroin use. Methadone maintenance and the prescription of pharmaceutical heroin [diacetylmorphine (DAM)] are established treatments for HD in several countries. The present study examined whether DAM-maintained patients and methadone-maintained patients differ from healthy controls in startle reflex and cortisol levels. Fifty-seven participants, 19 of each group matched for age, sex and smoking status, completed a startle session which included the presentation of 24 bursts of white noise while eye-blink responses to startling noises were recorded. Salivary cortisol was collected three times after awakening, before, during and after the startle session. DAM was administered before the experiment, while methadone was administered afterwards. Both heroin-dependent patient groups exhibited significantly smaller startle responses than healthy controls (P < 0.05). Whereas the cortisol levels after awakening did not differ across the three groups, the experimental cortisol levels were significantly lower in DAM-maintained patients, who received their opioid before the experiment, than in methadone-maintained patients and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). Opioid maintenance treatment for HD is associated with reduced startle responses. Acute DAM administration may suppress cortisol levels, and DAM maintenance treatment may represent an effective alternative to methadone in stress-sensitive, heroin-dependent patients.

  2. Selective Effects of a Morphine Conjugate Vaccine on Heroin and Metabolite Distribution and Heroin-Induced Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M.; Harris, A.C.; Birnbaum, A.K.; Pentel, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Morphine conjugate vaccines have effectively reduced behavioral effects of heroin in rodents and primates. To better understand how these effects are mediated, heroin and metabolite distribution studies were performed in rats in the presence and absence of vaccination. In non-vaccinated rats 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) was the predominant opioid in plasma and brain as early as 1 minute after i.v. administration of heroin and for up to 14 minutes. Vaccination with morphine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (M-KLH) elicited high titers and concentrations of antibodies with high affinity for heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine. Four minutes after heroin administration vaccinated rats showed substantial retention of all three opioids in plasma compared to controls and reduced 6-MAM and morphine, but not heroin, distribution to brain. Administration of 6-MAM rather than heroin in M-KLH vaccinated rats showed a similar drug distribution pattern. Vaccination reduced heroin-induced analgesia and blocked heroin-induced locomotor activity throughout 2 weeks of repeated testing. Higher serum opioid-specific antibody concentrations were associated with higher plasma opioid concentrations, lower brain 6-MAM and morphine concentrations, and lower heroin-induced locomotor activity. Serum antibody concentrations over 0.2 mg/ml were associated with substantial effects on these measures. These data support a critical role for 6-MAM in mediating the early effects of i.v. heroin and suggest that reducing 6-MAM concentration in brain is essential to the efficacy of morphine conjugate vaccines. PMID:23220743

  3. Selective effects of a morphine conjugate vaccine on heroin and metabolite distribution and heroin-induced behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, M D; Pravetoni, M; Harris, A C; Birnbaum, A K; Pentel, P R

    2013-02-01

    Morphine conjugate vaccines have effectively reduced behavioral effects of heroin in rodents and primates. To better understand how these effects are mediated, heroin and metabolite distribution studies were performed in rats in the presence and absence of vaccination. In non-vaccinated rats 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) was the predominant opioid in plasma and brain as early as 1 minute after i.v. administration of heroin and for up to 14 minutes. Vaccination with morphine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (M-KLH) elicited high titers and concentrations of antibodies with high affinity for heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine. Four minutes after heroin administration vaccinated rats showed substantial retention of all three opioids in plasma compared to controls and reduced 6-MAM and morphine, but not heroin, distribution to brain. Administration of 6-MAM rather than heroin in M-KLH vaccinated rats showed a similar drug distribution pattern. Vaccination reduced heroin-induced analgesia and blocked heroin-induced locomotor activity throughout 2 weeks of repeated testing. Higher serum opioid-specific antibody concentrations were associated with higher plasma opioid concentrations, lower brain 6-MAM and morphine concentrations, and lower heroin-induced locomotor activity. Serum antibody concentrations over 0.2 mg/ml were associated with substantial effects on these measures. These data support a critical role for 6-MAM in mediating the early effects of i.v. heroin and suggest that reducing 6-MAM concentration in brain is essential to the efficacy of morphine conjugate vaccines.

  4. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen prevents heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Spano, Maria Sabrina; Fattore, Liana; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2007-06-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by high rates of relapse. The gamma-aminobutyric acid GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen is known to affect the reinforcing effects of several drugs of abuse, including heroin, as well as to decrease cue-maintained responding for heroin, cocaine and nicotine and suppress alcohol deprivation effect in rats. Here we studied the effect of baclofen on the reinstatement of extinguished heroin-seeking behavior triggered by a priming injection of heroin in abstinent rats trained to stably self-administer heroin (30 microg/kg per infusion) under a continuous reinforcement schedule. Following extinction, the effect of non-contingent non-reinforced primings with heroin, baclofen or heroin/baclofen combination on the resumption of responding was evaluated. Results indicate that heroin priming (0.25mg/kg) promptly reinitiated heroin-seeking behavior, an effect dose-dependently reduced by baclofen at doses (0.625 and 1.25mg/kg) not affecting responding per sè. Importantly, baclofen did not affect locomotion either alone or in combination with heroin, dispelling any doubt as to the eliciting of possible non-specific (motor) effects. The present results show that GABA(B) receptor activation may reduce the propensity to resume drug-induced heroin-seeking behavior thus offering a possible approach in maintaining opiate abstinence.

  5. Implicit processing of heroin and emotional cues in abstinent heroin users: early and late event-related potential effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zhang, Jianxun; Zhao, Xin

    2015-05-01

    The abnormal cognitive processing of drug cues is a core characteristic of drug dependence. Previous research has suggested that the late positive potential (LPP) of heroin users is increased by heroin-related stimuli because of the attention-grabbing nature of such stimuli. The present research used a modified emotional Stroop (eStroop) task to examine whether there was an early posterior negativity (EPN) modulation to heroin cues compared with emotional or neutral stimuli in heroin dependent subjects. Fifteen former heroin users and 15 matched controls performed the eStroop task, which was composed of positive, negative, heroin-related, and neutral pictures with superimposed color squares. Participants responded to the color of the square and not to the picture while behavioral data and event-related potentials were recorded. There were no significant differences of EPN amplitudes to emotional and neutral stimuli between heroin users and controls. However, heroin users displayed increased EPN modulation for heroin cues, whereas this modulation was absent in controls. Drug-related cues acquire motivational salience and automatically capture the attention of heroin users at early processing stages, even when engaged in a non-drug-related task. The EPN to heroin cues could represent a novel electrophysiological index with clinical implications for selecting abstinent drug users who are at increased risk of relapse or to evaluate treatment interventions.

  6. Martha E. Rogers: heretic and heroine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John R

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms of Martha Rogers' life and work are presented showing her evolution as a heretic and a heroine through her heretical thinking. New concepts of unitariology, energyspirit, wellbecoming, integral presence, and soul are presented with their relevance for advancing Rogers' science of unitary human beings. New dimensions of practice make explicit pandimensional ministering to humankind and living in the universe.

  7. Protecting against cocaine, heroin, and sarin gas.

    PubMed

    McRee, Duncan

    2003-04-01

    The first X-ray structure of human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and the structures of hCE1 with drug analogs bound reveal important molecular details of how the drugs cocaine, heroin, and tacrine are metabolized and cleared.

  8. A Primer on Heroin and Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie

    2017-06-01

    Heroin and fentanyl use have reached epidemic proportions in the United States and are now blamed for the majority of drug-related overdose deaths. Both drugs are produced primarily in South America and Asia and enter the United States illegally. One result of smoking or injecting heroin or fentanyl is the development of a substance use disorder (SUD), which causes changes in brain chemistry and function. These changes result in negative behaviors and an inability to stop use. Yet, treatments are available and recovery is possible. Nurses have the potential to impact the heroin and fentanyl epidemic through developing therapeutic relationships with patients who are at risk or already have a SUD. Strategies for effective communication include maintaining a supportive, nonjudgmental attitude and incorporating motivational interviewing. All patients should be screened for opioid use and referred for treatment if indicated. It is important for nurses to be knowledgeable about heroin and fentanyl and available treatments. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(6), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Heroin dependence and HIV infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chawarski, Marek C; Mazlan, Mahmud; Schottenfeld, Richard S

    2006-04-01

    Malaysia is experiencing severe problems with heroin dependence and HIV infection. This, study evaluated drug use and other HIV risk behaviors and their association with HIV and other infectious diseases in heroin-dependent subjects enrolled in a clinical trial of drug abuse treatment in Muar, Malaysia. Baseline assessment of treatment-seeking subjects (n=177) included the Addiction Severity Index; AIDS Risk Inventory; serological tests for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C; and chest X-ray. All of the subjects were male; 67.8% were Malays, 28.8% Chinese, and 2.3%. Indian. Subjects had a mean (SD) age of 37.2 (9.1) years and 14.4 (8.5) years of using heroin; 76.3% reported lifetime injection drug use (IDU), and 41.5% reported current IDU; 30 of 156 (19.2%) tested HIV positive, 143 of 159 (89.9%) tested hepatitis C positive, and 25 of 159 (15.7%) had radiological evidence of pulmonary tuberbulosis. Malay subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of current IDU, needle sharing (p<0.01), and HIV infection (p<0.05) compared with Chinese subjects. Lifetime IDU, needle sharing, lack of consistent condom use, and Malay ethnicity were significantly associated with HIV infection. The high prevalence of HIV infection among heroin-dependent individuals, in Malaysia supports the important of interventions to reduce the major risk factors for HIV, including IDU, needle sharing, and unprotected sex.

  10. Sustained incentive value of heroin-related cues in short- and long-term abstinent heroin users.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Wagner, Michael; Sulzbach, Christian; Hoenig, Klaus; Neubauer, Julia; Franke, Petra E; Petrovsky, Nadine; Frommann, Ingo; Rehme, Anne K; Quednow, Boris B

    2013-10-01

    Models of addiction and addiction memory propose that drug-associated cues elicit incentive effects in drug users, which play an important role in maintenance of drug use and relapse. Incentive effects have been demonstrated for smoking and alcohol-related cues but evidence for heroin-related cues has been inconclusive. Furthermore, it is unknown whether appetitive effects of heroin-related cues persist after prolonged abstinence, although heroin addiction is known to have high relapse rates. Therefore, we investigated implicit and explicit valence of heroin-related cues in dependent users at different stages of abstinence using affective startle modulation. In Study I, 15 current heroin users were measured before and after detoxification. Correspondingly, 15 healthy control participants were tested twice at an interval of 14 days. In Study II, 14 long-term abstinent heroin users were additionally measured in a single session. Implicit processing of drug-related stimuli was assessed using affective startle modulation by pictures of heroin and smoking scenes. Explicit reactions were measured using ratings of valence and craving. In contrast to controls, heroin-dependent participants showed a clear reduction of startle response during heroin-related pictures (p<0.05). Detoxification did not significantly change their startle responses to heroin-cues. No difference between non-detoxified current and long-term abstinent heroin users was found in implicit reactions to heroin-cues, whereas explicit measures differed between both groups (all p<0.05). After detoxification and even after prolonged abstinence, heroin cues still exert implicit appetitive effects in heroin users. This implies that drug-induced adaptations of reward circuits are long-lasting, resulting in a highly stable addiction memory.

  11. What caused the recent reduction in heroin supply in Australia?

    PubMed

    Wodak, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Heroin availability and purity decreased and prices increased in Australia suddenly in early 2001. The heroin market in Australia has still not returned to the status quo ante after more than six years. Benefits of the heroin shortage, including a substantial reduction in drug overdose deaths and property crime, are generally considered to have outweighed adverse effects which included increased use of other drugs, especially stimulants, with a subsequent increase in aggression, violence and mental illness. Some commentators attributed the heroin shortage to a combination of factors, while an influential study highlighted the importance of supply control asserting that increased funding and improved effectiveness of domestic drug law enforcement produced critical heroin seizures which disrupted major syndicates, thereby producing the heroin shortage. Evidence to support a critical role for drug law enforcement in the heroin shortage is weak with some recent evidence contradicting key assertions used to support the supply control hypothesis. Although the most likely interpretation is still a combination of multiple factors, the most important factors appear to have been a substantial recent reduction in source opium cultivation and heroin production in Burma, but probably also increased heroin consumption en route through China and a switch from heroin to amphetamine production in Burma. This interpretation is consistent with the international experience of several recent decades in numerous countries where national heroin shortages have occurred rarely and generally only briefly, notwithstanding vigorous and very well resourced supply control efforts. The recent reduction in heroin supply in Australia, the most severe, longest lasting and best-documented heroin shortage in the world, cannot be confidently attributed, solely or largely, to improved domestic drug law enforcement. At best, domestic law enforcement may have made a small contribution compared to several

  12. Patterns of opiate use in a heroin maintenance programme.

    PubMed

    Perneger, T V; Mino, A; Giner, F; Broers, B

    2000-09-01

    Little is known about patterns of opiate use by heroin addicts. To describe opiate use over time among heroin addicts who had access to legally prescribed intravenous heroin and oral opiates. Analysis of daily drug administration records of 37 patients enrolled in the Geneva heroin maintenance programme for 4-29 months (total 23,136 patient-days). The average dose of intravenous heroin was 466 mg/day; the total opiate dose, after conversion of oral opiates to heroin-equivalents, was 543 mg/day. Patients received intravenous heroin only on 39% of days, oral opiates only on 7% of days, and mixed regimens on 49% of days; the remaining 4% of days were spent outside the programme, usually on oral opiates. The daily dose of heroin-equivalents increased during the first trimester in the programme, by 30 mg/day per month (95% confidence interval 12-46 mg/day per month), but decreased gradually thereafter, by 12 mg/day per month (95% confidence interval, 8-17 mg/day per month). In patients who alternated between heroin and methadone, 1 mg methadone typically replaced 4.1 mg heroin. During follow-up, five patients switched to methadone maintenance, five underwent detoxification, and three were discharged for noncompliance with regulations. Heroin users who have facilitated access to legally prescribed drugs consume about 0.5 g heroin per day. Consumption patterns vary, but the daily amount of opiates remains stable or decreases over time. A substantial minority of patients elect for alternative treatments after several months of heroin maintenance.

  13. Heroin and saccharin demand and preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lindsay P; Kim, Jung S; Silberberg, Alan; Kearns, David N

    2017-09-01

    Several recent studies have investigated the choice between heroin and a non-drug alternative reinforcer in rats. A common finding in these studies is that there are large individual differences in preference, with some rats preferring heroin and some preferring the non-drug alternative. The primary goal of the present study was to determine whether individual differences in how heroin or saccharin is valued, based on demand analysis, predicts choice. Rats lever-pressed for heroin infusions and saccharin reinforcers on fixed-ratio schedules. The essential value of each reinforcer was obtained from resulting demand curves. Rats were then trained on a mutually exclusive choice procedure where pressing one lever resulted in heroin and pressing another resulted in saccharin. After seven sessions of increased access to heroin or saccharin, rats were reexposed to the demand and choice procedures. Demand for heroin was more elastic than demand for saccharin (i.e., heroin had lower essential value than saccharin). When allowed to choose, most rats preferred saccharin. The essential value of heroin, but not saccharin, predicted preference. The essential value of both heroin and saccharin increased following a week of increased access to heroin, but similar saccharin exposure had no effect on essential value. Preference was unchanged after increased access to either reinforcer. Heroin-preferring rats differed from saccharin-preferring rats in how they valued heroin, but not saccharin. To the extent that choice models addiction-related behavior, these results suggest that overvaluation of opioids specifically, rather than undervaluation of non-drug alternatives, could identify susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasma level monitoring of the major metabolites of diacetylmorphine (heroin) by the "chasing the dragon" route in severe heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Dubois, N; Demaret, I; Ansseau, M; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify if severe physical health problems frequently encountered in heroin addicts and the concomitant use of alcohol and legal or illegal drugs other than heroin influenced the pharmacokinetics of the major metabolites of heroin. We conducted a 90 minutes follow-up of the plasma concentrations of the pharmaceutical heroin, named diacetylmorphine (DAM), in patients recruited in a DAM assisted treatment centre. TADAM (Traitement Assisté par DiAcétylMorphine) aimed to compare the efficacy of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) compared with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for heroin users considered as treatment resistant patients and who have severe physical and mental health problems. Eleven patients were recruited. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 45 and 90 minutes after DAM administration. All patients received DAM by the "chasing the dragon" route. Plasma samples were analyzed by a previously described ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS-MS) method. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and 8 metabolite concentrations ratios were calculated to evaluate the influence of various factors (DAM dose, patient pathologies, concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin, alcohol and cocaine) on heroin metabolite pharmacokinetics. It seemed to be not affected by the DAM dose, patient pathologies and the concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin and alcohol. Cocaine use was the only parameter which showed differences in heroin pharmacokinetics.

  15. The phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram attenuates heroin-seeking behavior induced by cues or heroin priming in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Miaojun; Zhu, Huaqiang; Sun, Anna; Zhuang, Dingding; Fu, Dan; Chen, Weisheng; Zhang, Han-Ting; Zhou, Wenhua

    2014-09-01

    Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), an enzyme that specifically hydrolyzes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases intracellular cAMP/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) signaling. Activation of this signaling is considered as an important compensatory response that decreases motivational properties of drugs of abuse. However, it is not known whether PDE4 is involved in heroin seeking. Self-administration of heroin (50 μg/kg/infusion) was performed under the fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule for 14 d and then drug seeking was extinguished for 10 d. The progressive ratio schedule was used to evaluate the relative motivational value of heroin reinforcement. After training, the conditioned cue or heroin priming (250 μg/kg) was introduced for the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Pretreatment (i.p.) with rolipram (0.03-0.3 mg/kg), a prototypical, selective PDE4 inhibitor, failed to inhibit heroin self-administration under the FR1 schedule, but decreased the reward values under the progressive ratio schedule in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rolipram decreased the reinstatement of heroin seeking induced by cues or heroin priming even at the lowest dose (0.03 mg/kg); in contrast, the highest dose (0.3 mg/kg) of rolipram was required to decrease sucrose reinforcement. Finally, the effects of rolipram on heroin-seeking behavior were correlated with the increases in expression of phosphorylated CREB in the nucleus accumbens. The study demonstrated that rolipram inhibited heroin reward and heroin-seeking behavior. The results suggest that PDE4 plays an essential role in mediating heroin seeking and that PDE4 inhibitors may be used as a potential pharmacotherapeutic approach for heroin addiction.

  16. Heroin self-administration by means of 'chasing the dragon': pharmacodynamics and bioavailability of inhaled heroin.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, V M; van den Brink, W; Blanken, P; Bosman, I J; van Ree, J M

    2001-06-01

    In this controlled clinical study, the bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of inhaled heroin are evaluated and compared between 'chasing the dragon' and inhalation from a heating device, and at three dose levels, 25, 50 and 100 mg heroin, in two separate study phases. In study phase 1, no differences between the inhalation methods were detected on any of the physiological or behavioral measures, nor in bioavailability. Subjectively, the participants had a strong preference for the method of chasing, which was therefore used in study phase 2. In phase 2, heroin produced a dose-related increase in subjective drug-liking, body temperature and heart rate, and a clear, dose-related decline in reaction time. Linearly dose-related differences were found in the amount of total morphine in urine, amounting to an average of 45% of the parent heroin base received. Based on these findings, it is concluded that chasing is quite an effective route of heroin administration, producing rapid, dose-related subjective and objective effects and a sufficiently high and reproducible bioavailability.

  17. [Analysis of two year heroin seizures in the Liege area].

    PubMed

    Denooz, R; Dubois, N; Charlier, C

    2005-09-01

    The results of heroin analysis from seizures in the Liege area during the last two years are presented in this article. Between January 2003 and January 2005, 50 samples were analysed in the Laboratory of Clinical Toxicology and Forensic Toxicology of the University of Liege. Mean heroin concentration was 14,7%. Noscapine and papaverine, other opium alcaloïds, were simultaneously present with heroin. As diluents, we only identified caffein and acetaminophen.

  18. Lemon juice as a solvent for heroin in Spain.

    PubMed

    Page, J B; Fraile, J S

    1999-06-01

    Preliminary observations and responses to interviews in Valencia, Spain reveal that injecting drug users (IDUs) dissolve heroin before injection with two or three drops of lemon juice. Solution in lemon juice makes heating of heroin in water unnecessary. This pattern apparently developed spontaneously in Spain, but is almost unknown elsewhere in the world. Its implications for IDUs' health remain speculative, but use of lemon juice to dissolve heroin for injection deserves further scientific study.

  19. Dynamic vaccine blocks relapse to compulsive intake of heroin

    PubMed Central

    Schlosburg, Joel E.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Bremer, Paul T.; Lockner, Jonathan W.; Wade, Carrie L.; Nunes, Ashlee A. K.; Stowe, G. Neil; Edwards, Scott; Janda, Kim D.; Koob, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Heroin addiction, a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by excessive drug taking and seeking, requires constant psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic interventions to minimize the potential for further abuse. Vaccine strategies against many drugs of abuse are being developed that generate antibodies that bind drug in the bloodstream, preventing entry into the brain and nullifying psychoactivity. However, this strategy is complicated by heroin’s rapid metabolism to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. We recently developed a “dynamic” vaccine that creates antibodies against heroin and its psychoactive metabolites by presenting multihaptenic structures to the immune system that match heroin’s metabolism. The current study presents evidence of effective and continuous sequestration of brain-permeable constituents of heroin in the bloodstream following vaccination. The result is efficient blockade of heroin activity in treated rats, preventing various features of drugs of abuse: heroin reward, drug-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and reescalation of compulsive heroin self-administration following abstinence in dependent rats. The dynamic vaccine shows the capability to significantly devalue the reinforcing and motivating properties of heroin, even in subjects with a history of dependence. In addition, targeting a less brain-permeable downstream metabolite, morphine, is insufficient to prevent heroin-induced activity in these models, suggesting that heroin and 6-acetylmorphine are critical players in heroin’s psychoactivity. Because the heroin vaccine does not target opioid receptors or common opioid pharmacotherapeutics, it can be used in conjunction with available treatment options. Thus, our vaccine represents a promising adjunct therapy for heroin addiction, providing continuous heroin antagonism, requiring minimal medical monitoring and patient compliance. PMID:23650354

  20. Association of polymorphisms of the cannabinoid receptor (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes with heroin addiction: impact of long repeats of CNR1.

    PubMed

    Proudnikov, D; Kroslak, T; Sipe, J C; Randesi, M; Li, D; Hamon, S; Ho, A; Ott, J; Kreek, M J

    2010-06-01

    Alterations in expression of a cannabinoid receptor (CNR1, CB1), and of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) that degrades endogenous ligands of CB1, may contribute to the development of addiction. The 385C>A in the FAAH gene and six polymorphisms of CNR1 were genotyped in former heroin addicts and control subjects (247 Caucasians, 161 Hispanics, 179 African Americans and 19 Asians). In Caucasians, long repeats (>or=14) of 18087-18131(TAA)(8-17) were associated with heroin addiction (P=0.0102). Across three ethnicities combined, a highly significant association of long repeats with heroin addiction was found (z=3.322, P=0.0009). Point-wise significant associations of allele 1359A (P=0.006) and genotype 1359AA (P=0.034) with protection from heroin addiction were found in Caucasians. Also in Caucasians, the genotype pattern, 1359G>A and -6274A>T, was significantly associated with heroin addiction experiment wise (P=0.0244). No association of FAAH 385C>A with heroin addiction was found in any group studied.

  1. A heroin addict with focal weakness.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Giuliana; Ariatti, Alessandra; Gozzi, Manuela; Cavazza, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    A 24-year-old female with 5 year history of heroin abuse experienced painless stiffness of elbow joints and weakness of shoulder and upper limb muscles. She was injecting herself 4-6 times daily alternatively in the upper extremities, sparing the lower limbs. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic changes in clinically affected and unaffected muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed muscle fibrosis in directly injected muscles, whereas in subcutaneous fat and within muscles of anterior and posterior compartments of both thighs, not directly injected, there were signal changes supportive of oedema and inflammation. EMG and MRI were congruent in showing abnormalities in muscles not directly injected, suggesting long distant effects of heroin or adulterants with a mechanism either toxic or immunologically mediated.

  2. Pregnant heroin addict: what about the baby?

    PubMed Central

    Namboodiri, Vasudevan; George, Sanju; Boulay, Sylvie; Fair, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    Heroin misuse in pregnancy is a significant health and social problem, and it can have an adverse effect on the mother and the baby. Although heroin and methadone have no specific teratogenic potential, 48–94% of children exposed in utero will have neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The primary aim of this case report is to raise awareness of NAS among clinicians and to remind them that although very common, it is not inevitable. The risk of NAS can be further minimised by offering comprehensive and co-ordinated antenatal care that addresses the various biopsychosocial needs of the pregnant woman. Further, a brief description of NAS and a review of evidence in the field of management of opioid misuse in pregnancy, as relevant to this case, are provided. We have also included the patient’s own reflections on her pregnancy and treatment. PMID:22328902

  3. Compulsive heroin use and interpersonal orientation.

    PubMed

    Saxon, S; Blaine, J D; Dennett, C P

    1978-04-01

    This research attempt to clarify and quantify the ways in which heroin addicts deal with interpersonal relations. A sample of heroin addicts on a methadone maintenance program were given the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior (FIRO-B) scale. An accidental sample consisted of 35, approximately one-half, of the clinic's population. A mean interpersonal orientation profile is established and interpreted. An analysis of variance was performed for each of the six FIRO-B scores. Patients needs based on FIRO-B scores are discussed with regard to the descriptions of addicts life-styles as described in the literature. The possible etiological basis for these interpersoanl orientations is also discussed. Several therapeutic approaches, as indicated by FIRO-B scores, are explored.

  4. [Efficiency of noophen in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Kuchkarov, U I; Ashurov, Z Sh; Sultanov, Sh Kh

    2009-01-01

    24 patients with heroin addiction have been observed with the purpose to assess cognitive and neurosis-like disorders during the treatment with Noofen. The methods of research included clinical-psychopathological examination. The course therapy with Noofen reduced intensity of memory and attention disorders and improved general cognitive status of the patients. The therapy with Noofen has not increased a pathological drive to narcotics. Noofen use has improve cognitive sphere alongside with reduction in concomitant psychopathological symptoms including depressive and other disorders.

  5. A System Description of the Heroin Trade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    104 Bibliography .............................................. log vii Figures 1.1. Worldwide Opium Production: NNICC and INCSR Estimates from 1983 to...United States (18 to 25 Years Old) ........................................ 5 2.1. The World’s Three Principal Opium Producing Regions ......... 10 2.2... Opium Production by the Major Producing Countries in 1991 ..... 11 2.3. Heroin Availability in the United States by Source Region ....... 14 3.1

  6. Rethinking Informed Consent in Research on Heroin-Assisted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Susanne; Broers, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Can heroin addicts give consent to research on trials in which heroin is prescribed to them? Analyses of addicts and informed consent have been objects of debate in several articles. Informed consent requires the agent not only to be competent but also to give consent voluntarily. This has been questioned because of alleged features of heroin addiction. Until recently the discussion has focused on heroin addicts' desires for heroin, whether these are irresistible and thus pose a problem for giving consent. Still, in light of empirical evidence, there seems to be a consensus more or less that the problem is not whether the addicts can resist their desire for heroin. A recent article concentrates specifically on heroin addicts' false assumptions of options and voluntariness. We argue that the prevailing framing of the options in this discussion in terms of heroin and access to it is problematic. The way in which the options are typically laid out suggests an assumption that participation in the research is allegedly based on the addicts' views on using the drug. We argue that this way of presenting the options is, first, a mismatch to the studies carried out and, second, symptomatic of potential misconceptions about heroin addiction and addicts. Furthermore, we also suggest that the account of voluntariness needs to be realistic in order for subjects to be able to give consent voluntarily in actual situations, and for medical research to carry out studies on improving outcomes in addiction treatment in an ethical way.

  7. Contact allergy and respiratory/mucosal complaints from heroin (diacetylmorphine).

    PubMed

    Hogen Esch, A J; van der Heide, S; van den Brink, W; van Ree, J M; Bruynzeel, D P; Coenraads, P J

    2006-01-01

    After the start of heroin (diacetylmorphine)-assisted treatment to a selected group of chronic treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients in the Netherlands, we reported about work-related eczema and positive patch tests to heroin in some nurses and nasal and respiratory complaints. To investigate the prevalence of heroin contact allergy, we started a questionnaire-based study with follow-up by allergological examinations. Of 120 questionnaires sent, 101 (84%) was returned: 67 from nurses and 34 from other employees. Of 101 workers, 38 (38%) had reported work-related complaints: 33 of 67 (49%) nurses and 5 of 34 (15%) other employees. Patch tests to heroin were performed in 24 nurses and were positive in 8 (33%). All the 8 had eyelid or facial eczema and, in 6, accompanied by mucosal or respiratory complaints. The prevalence of heroin contact allergy in this study was 8% (8/101) among all employees and 12% (8/67) among nurses. Respiratory and mucosal complaints could not be ascribed to a contact allergy, and in these cases, serum was analysed for specific immunoglobulin E to heroin. A type 1 allergy to heroin could not be shown. These complaints are possibly due to the histamine-liberating effect of heroin, to atopic constitution, to a combination of these factors or - less likely - to other non-allergic factors.

  8. Documentation of a heroin manufacturing process in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Zerell, U; Ahrens, B; Gerz, P

    2005-01-01

    The present article documents an authentic process of heroin manufacturing in Afghanistan: white heroin hydrochloride produced using simple equipment and a small quantity of chemicals. The quantities of chemicals actually used corresponded to the minimum needed for manufacturing heroin. The only organic solvent used was acetone, and only a very small quantity of it was used. Because the chemicals used in the demonstration were from actual seizures in Afghanistan, some of the chemicals had been disguised or repackaged by smugglers. Others had been put into labelled containers that proved to be counterfeit, and some glass containers used were not the original containers of the manufacturer displayed on the label. The brown heroin base prepared as an intermediate step in the process shares some of the characteristics of the South-West Asia type of heroin preparations often seized in Germany. The final product of the documented heroin manufacturing process was white heroin hydrochloride, which shares the key characteristics of the white heroin occasionally seized in Germany and other countries in Western Europe since 2000. The present article demonstrates that this kind of heroin can be produced in Afghanistan.

  9. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  10. Synthesis and immunological effects of heroin vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuying; Cheng, Kejun; Antoline, Joshua F G; Iyer, Malliga R; Matyas, Gary R; Torres, Oscar B; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan; Alving, Carl R; Parrish, Damon A; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C

    2014-10-07

    Three haptens have been synthesized with linkers for attachment to carrier macromolecules at either the piperidino-nitrogen or via an introduced 3-amino group. Two of the haptens, with a 2-oxopropyl functionality at either C6, or at both the C3 and C6 positions on the 4,5-epoxymorphinan framework, as well as the third hapten (DiAmHap) with diamido moieties at both the C3 and C6 positions, should be much more stable in solution, or in vivo in a vaccine, than a hapten with an ester in one of those positions, as found in many heroin-based haptens. A "classical" opioid synthetic scheme enabled the formation of a 3-amino-4,5-epoxymorphinan which could not be obtained using palladium chemistry. Our vaccines are aimed at the reduction of the abuse of heroin and, as well, at the reduction of the effects of its predominant metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. One of the haptens, DiAmHap, has given interesting results in a heroin vaccine and is clearly more suited for the purpose than the other two haptens.

  11. Bacillus cereus cellulitis from contaminated heroin.

    PubMed

    Dancer, S J; McNair, D; Finn, P; Kolsto, A B

    2002-03-01

    Concern exists over recent unexplained deaths among intravenous drug users. This report describes a patient with crepitant cellulitis who was admitted complaining of severe pain in the right forearm. Ultrasonography demonstrated gas in the tissues and he was referred for early surgical debridement of the arm. He was treated with intravenous benzyl penicillin, gentamicin and metronidazole and made a full recovery. Aspirate samples grew Bacillus cereus, morphologically similar to the isolate obtained from a sample of the patient's own heroin. Antibiogram and API 50CHB profiles were also similar. Further typing included 'H' flagellar serotyping, which found both blood and heroin strains to be non-typable, and amplified fragment polymorphism analysis, which showed that the strains were indistinguishable. Genotyping of two selected genes from B. cereus confirmed almost certain identity between the two strains. This case illustrates the potential virulence of B. cereus when inoculated into tissues, and to our knowledge, is the first report to demonstrate a conclusive microbiological link between contaminated heroin and serious sepsis in a drug user due to B. cereus.

  12. Deuterodiacetylmorphine as a marker for use of illicit heroin by addicts in a heroin-assisted treatment program.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Rook, Elisabeth J; Hillebrand, Michel J X; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-09-01

    In preparation for a treatment program concerning the medical coprescription of heroin and methadone to treatment-resistant addicts in the Netherlands, we studied a novel strategy for monitoring co-use of illicit (nonprescribed) heroin. A deuterated analogue of heroin was added (1:20) to pharmaceutical, smokable heroin (a powder mixture of 75% w/w diacetylmorphine base and 25% w/w caffeine anhydrate), to be used by inhalation after volatilization ("chasing the dragon"). Plasma and urine samples were collected from nine male patients who had used pharmaceutical, smokable heroin during a four-day stay in a closed clinical research unit, and these samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Ratios of deuterated and undeuterated diacetylmorphine and 6-acetylmorphine (MAM/MAM-d3) in plasma and urine were calculated from peak areas of these substances in the respective chromatograms. The MAM/MAM-d3 ratios in plasma and urine were normally distributed (with small standard deviations) and independent from concentrations of 6-acetylmorphine and from time after use of pharmaceutical heroin. A MAM/MAM-d3 ratio in urine above 32.8 was considered indicative of co-use of illicit heroin, and this value was associated with a false-positive rate of only 1% (95% confidence interval: -1 to 3%). The MAM/MAM-d3 ratio was detectable in urine for 4-9.5 h after use of pharmaceutical, smokable heroin. Addition of stable, isotopically labelled heroin to pharmaceutical, smokable heroin is considered to be a feasible strategy for the detection of co-use of illicit heroin by patients in heroin-assisted treatment.

  13. Mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin self-administration: pharmacologic modulation of heroin vs food choice in heroin-dependent rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens; Rice, Kenner C

    2009-03-01

    Opioid withdrawal can produce a constellation of physiological and behavioral signs, including an increase in opioid self-administration. Different mechanisms mediate different withdrawal signs, and the present study used pharmacologic tools to assess mechanisms underlying withdrawal-associated increases in opioid reinforcement. Five rhesus monkeys were rendered heroin dependent via daily 21-h heroin self-administration sessions. One hour after each heroin self-administration session, monkeys chose between heroin (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection) and food (1 g pellets) during 2-h choice sessions. Under these conditions, heroin maintained a dose-dependent increase in heroin choice, such that monkeys responded primarily for food when low heroin doses were available (0-0.01 mg/kg per injection) and primarily for heroin when higher heroin doses were available (0.032-0.1 mg/kg per injection). Periods of spontaneous withdrawal were intermittently introduced by omitting one 21-h heroin self-administration session, and test drugs were administered during these withdrawal periods. Untreated withdrawal robustly increased heroin choice during choice sessions. Withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice were completely suppressed by the mu opioid agonist morphine (0.032-0.32 mg/kg/h, i.v.), but not by the alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), the dopamine/norepinephrine releaser amphetamine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), or the kappa-opioid antagonist 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (1.0 mg/kg, i.m.). The corticotropin-releasing factor 1 antagonist antalarmin (1.0-10 mg/kg per day, i.m.) produced a morphine-like suppression of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice in one of three monkeys. These results suggest that mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in the relative reinforcing efficacy of opioid agonists may be different from mechanisms of many other somatic, mood-related, and motivational signs of opioid withdrawal.

  14. The Textures of Heroin: User Perspectives on “Black Tar” and Powder Heroin in Two US Cities

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Sarah G.; Bourgois, Philippe; Karandinos, George; Montero, Fernando; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, US heroin consumers have been divided from the full range of available products: east of the Mississippi River, Colombian-sourced powder heroin (PH) dominates the market, while to the west, Mexican-sourced “black tar” (BTH) is the main heroin available. By conducting qualitative research in two exemplar cities, Philadelphia (PH) and San Francisco (BTH), we compare users’ experiences of heroin source-types, markets, health consequences and consumption preferences. The strict division of heroin markets may be changing with novel forms of powder heroin appearing in San Francisco. Our researchers and interviewees perceived vein loss stemming from the injection of heroin alone to be a particular problem of BTH while among the Philadelphia sample, those who avoided the temptations of nearby cocaine sales displayed healthier injecting sites and reported few vein problems. Abscesses were common across both sites, the Philadelphia sample generally blaming missing a vein when injecting cocaine and the San Francisco group finding several explanations, including the properties of BTH. Consumption preferences revealed a ‘connoisseurship of potency’, with knowledge amassed and deployed to obtain the strongest heroin available. We discuss the reasons that their tastes take this narrow form and its relationship to the structural constraints of the heroin market. PMID:27440088

  15. Testing human hair for drugs of abuse. III. Identification of heroin and 6-acetylmorphine as indicators of heroin use.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Caplan, Y H; Maguire, T; Cone, E J

    1991-01-01

    Hair samples from 20 documented heroin users contained 6-acetylmorphine, a unique metabolite of heroin, in all samples. Heroin was identified in smaller amounts in seven of these samples. The identity of 6-acetylmorphine and heroin was established by comparison of full scan spectra of extracts to standard reference materials. The presence of 6-acetylmorphine generally predominated over heroin, morphine, and codeine. The mean concentrations of analytes were as follows: 6-acetylmorphine, 0.90 ng/mg, N = 20; heroin, 0.17 ng/mg, N = 7; morphine, 0.26 ng/mg, N = 20; codeine, 0.18 ng/mg, N = 15. Analysis of hair samples obtained from 10 drug-free control subjects were negative for 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, and codeine. However, a small interfering peak was observed at the retention time for heroin. Control samples soaked in aqueous solutions of heroin and 6-acetylmorphine were found to be contaminated, even though an initial wash step was included in the analysis. These data suggest that hair analysis for 6-acetylmorphine can be used to differentiate heroin users from other types of opiate exposure (e.g., poppy seed, licit morphine, and codeine); however, environmental contamination can potentially produce false positives during opiate testing.

  16. Social and individual risk determinants of HIV testing practices among noninjection drug users at high risk for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    White, Kellee; Rudolph, Abby E; Jones, Kandice C; Latkin, Carl; Benjamin, Ebele O; Crawford, Natalie D; Fuller, Crystal M

    2013-01-01

    HIV testing services and research among drug users has largely focused on injection drug users (IDUs); yet noninjection drug users (NIDUs) are also at increased risk for HIV due to high-risk sexual behaviors and overlapping networks with IDUs. This study examined drug use, sexual risk, and social network characteristics associated with recent HIV testing (testing within past year) among NIDUs. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were conducted among 418 NIDUs and log-binomial regression models were used to identify correlates of recent HIV testing. Prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Nearly 97% of NIDUs reported having ever been tested for HIV and most participants (85.7%) indicated testing for HIV within the past year. Factors independently associated with recent HIV testing were higher educational attainment (PR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.34) and networks to discuss health and medical services (PR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.20). A prior positive sexually transmitted infection was associated with decreased likelihood of recent HIV test (PR: 0.43; 95% CI 0.25, 0.74). Identifying specific social network characteristics may be effective in facilitating HIV testing and prevention strategies targeting NIDUs.

  17. Heroin Use: What Communities Should Know. Monthly Action Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    This action kit was created in response to a rise in heroin use. Facts are provided about the scope of heroin use since it is the one illegal drug that is growing in popularity in some areas among young people. A brief explanation of some treatment options is provided including detoxification, methadone treatment, other medications, and behavioral…

  18. Altered prefrontal connectivity after acute heroin administration during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; Walter, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies have reported reduced activity in a broad network of brain regions during response inhibition in heroin-dependent patients. However, how heroin in an acute dose modulates the neural correlates of response inhibition and the underlying brain connectivity has not yet been investigated. In this double-blind placebo-controlled study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether acute heroin administration changed whole brain activity during response inhibition in 26 heroin-dependent patients. We then applied dynamic causal modelling to investigate the effect of an acute dose of heroin on the functional interactions between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Heroin acutely reduced dACC activity, as well as the inhibition-induced modulation of connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG compared with placebo. Furthermore, dACC activity was positively related to false alarm rates after placebo but not heroin administration. These results suggest that acute heroin administration impairs cognitive control in dependent patients by reducing the activity in the dACC activity and the functional connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG.

  19. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse.

  20. Hopelessness in Alcohol- and Heroin-Dependent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Beck Hopelessness Scale to alcoholic (N=20) and heroin-addicted (N=20) women. Results indicated that although both groups expressed comparable levels of overall hopelessness, alcoholic women anticipated more success and better lives in the next 10 years than did the heroin-dependent women. (LLL)

  1. Neurobiological underpinnings of sensation seeking trait in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Liu, Yu-Pin; Chan, Chetwyn C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Zeng, Hong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-11-01

    Neurobiological investigation of heroin revealed that abusers of this highly addictive substance show dysregulation in brain circuits for reward processing and cognitive control. Psychologically, personality traits related to reward processing and cognitive control differed between heroin abusers and non-abusers. Yet, there is no direct evidence on the relationship between these neurobiological and psychological findings on heroin abusers, and whether such relationship is altered in these abusers. The present study filled this research gap by integrating findings obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (structural volume and resting-state functional connectivity) and self-reported personality trait measures (Zuckerman׳s Sensation Seeking Scale and Barratt Impulsivity Scale) on 33 abstinent heroin users and 30 matched healthy controls. The key finding is a negative relationship between high sensation seeking tendency and midbrain structural volume in the heroin users. Importantly, there was stronger coupling between the midbrain and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and weaker coupling between the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in heroin users. Our findings offer significant insight into the neural underpinning of sensation seeking in heroin users. Importantly, the data shed light on a novel relationship between the mesolimbic-prefrontal pathway of the reward system and the high sensation seeking personality trait in heroin abusers.

  2. Hopelessness in Alcohol- and Heroin-Dependent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Beck Hopelessness Scale to alcoholic (N=20) and heroin-addicted (N=20) women. Results indicated that although both groups expressed comparable levels of overall hopelessness, alcoholic women anticipated more success and better lives in the next 10 years than did the heroin-dependent women. (LLL)

  3. Influence of treatment with inhalable heroin on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Buster, M C A; van den Brink, W; van Brussel, G H A; van Ree, J M

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to asses the influence of inhalable heroin on pulmonary function in chronic heroin-dependent patients treated with inhalable heroin. Among 32 patients (all cigarette smokers), a spirometric test was conducted at baseline and after an average period of 10 months of treatment with medically prescribed heroin. Patients showed a high frequency of pulmonary dysfunction at baseline [34%, with percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1)<80%]. However, after excluding those who started pulmonary treatment (n=2) or who used heroin intravenously only (n=2), no statistically significant differences in %FEV1 between baseline and follow-up were observed (n=28; mean %FEV1 86% at baseline vs. 91% at follow-up; p=0.09). This small and relatively brief study suggests that 10 months of co-prescribed inhalable heroine base does not seem to (further) deteriorate pulmonary function in chronic, cigarette smoking treatment refractory heroin addicts. Screening for and treatment of pulmonary dysfunction is recommended for methadone patients with and without co-prescribed heroin. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Psychotropic drug consumption and other factors associated with heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cebollada, J; de la Torre, R; Ortuño, J; Garcés, J M; Camí, J

    1994-04-01

    In clinical or forensic practice there are few studies assessing which risk factors are associated with heroin overdoses. A series of 76 consecutive non-fatal heroin overdoses were compared to 22 consecutive subjects who self-injected heroin within 1 h before admission to the emergency room. Whereas blood levels of alcohol and IgE and urinary cocaine metabolite levels were similar in both groups, higher benzodiazepine plasma levels were detected in the heroin overdose group. The assessment of methadone, dextropropoxyphene, amphetamines and cannabis in urine analysis did not show differences between both groups. The interview revealed that only 48% of subjects in the heroin overdose group self-administered the last dose of heroin before admission in the usual setting as compared to 100% of subjects in the non-overdose group. The application of a log-linear regression model identified self-injection of heroin in an unusual place and plasma concentrations of total morphine and benzodiazepines as risk factors for heroin overdose.

  5. Acetylcodeine as a urinary marker to differentiate the use of street heroin and pharmaceutical heroin.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, Rudolf; Hasler, Felix; Würsch, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcodeine (ACOD) is a synthesis byproduct present in street heroin but not in pharmaceutical diacetylmorphine (DAM) as used in the Swiss program Heroin-Assisted Treatment for Opiate Dependent Drug Users (HAT). ACOD was evaluated and validated as an urine marker to detect the consumption of street heroin by HAT participants. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method allowing the quantitation of ACOD concentrations as low as 0.2 ng/mL urine has been developed. In opiate-naïve subjects, intravenous (i.v.) ACOD showed a plasma elimination half-life of 237 +/- 18 min, urine peak concentrations 2 h after administration, and a detection window of 8 h. Only 0.4 +/- 0.1% was excreted unchanged, with codeine (COD) as the main metabolite. ACOD may be formed by transacetylation when i.v. DAM and oral codeine are co-administered. To avoid false-positive results, the calculation of COD/ACOD ratios is recommended. In a study with 105 HAT participants, 14% of the tested urines were ACOD positive. Only a low correlation was found between the anonymously self-declared consumption of street heroin and the ACOD positive rate.

  6. Managing Heroin Addiction in an Outpatient Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Malliarakis, Kate Driscoll

    2015-12-01

    Heroin use may be under-recognized among older adults. Baby Boomers are the largest age as well as the largest drug-using cohort in modern history. Although some drug users age out of their addiction, others do not. Nurses caring for older adults may come into contact with heroin users due to associated conditions or sequelae of their drug use that cause them to seek care. Few nurses are prepared to provide the care needed when heroin use accompanies other health problems. Using an individual example, the current article provides guidance for identifying heroin addiction, essential information about heroin use, and resources for guiding patients to experts for the comprehensive care needed for recovery.

  7. Plasma catecholamines during an ultrarapid heroin detoxification.

    PubMed

    Macedo, T R; Relvas, J; Fontes Ribeiro CA; Pacheco, F; Morgadinho, M T; Pinto, C M; Gomes, P C; Ventura, M; Henriques, V; Nunes, S V; Ruis, G R; Ramalheira, C; Boto, I; Vale, L L

    2000-09-01

    The adrenergic system has long been known to be activated in a situation of stress and thus during opiate withdrawal. A method for detoxification that decreases the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system will prevent changes of catecholamine levels. Some of such methods have been developed. One of them uses direct transition from heroin to oral naltrexone after deep sedation with midazolam in conjunction with naloxone, droperidol, ondansetron, and clonidine treatment for 24 hours. Can such method prevent adrenergic changes? Moreover, 5-HT has been related to mood disorders. This study aims to determine plasma catecholamines and 5-HT before heroin withdrawal, during the day of the withdrawal, and at the ends of the first day, the first week, and the first 6 months. Forty-three patients with more than 6 years of drug abuse volunteered to seek help to detoxify. After clinical evaluation, blood samples were taken. Plasma catecholamines were isolated by standard alumina procedures and measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Only for NE was there a significant decrease in the day of heroin withdrawal with deep sedation, followed the next day by an increase. During the following days, NE plasma concentrations returned slowly to basal levels. Epinephrine and dopamine plasma levels did not significantly change. Platelet 5-HT levels progressively decreased from the day before detoxification until the last period of observation. We also found that there were no abrupt changes in cardiovascular functions. In conclusion, our results suggest that this type of ultrarapid opiate detoxification prevents the dramatic activation of the autonomic nervous system.

  8. Concurrent heroin use among methadone maintenance clients in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Wan, Dai; Zhang, Linglin; Lai, Wenhong

    2012-03-01

    The study examined concurrent illicit heroin use among methadone maintenance clients in China and its association with clients' demographic characteristics, treatment experience, and personal social network. Face-to-face surveys were conducted with 178 clients randomly recruited from six methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinics in Sichuan, China. Concurrent heroin use was measured based on self-report of heroin use during the past 30 days and a confirmatory urine morphine test. The participants' demographic characteristics and treatment factors were measured and examined. The drug use status of their family members and friends was also assessed. A total of 80 participants (44.9%) who either reported illicit heroin use in the past 30 days or had a positive urine test were defined as using heroin concurrently. Having drug-using friends was significantly associated with increased concurrent heroin use. Longer length of treatment (2 years or longer) was associated with increased concurrent heroin use. Among those who had both drug-using family members and friends, more women (71.4%) than men (50.0%) used heroin. For those who had no drug-using family members or friends, more men (34.8%) than women (20.8%) used heroin. Study findings indicate an urgent need to address concurrent illicit heroin use among MMT clients. Further examination of the influence of social networks on concurrent drug abuse behavior is encouraged. Results also highlight the importance of understanding gender differences in treatment seeking and behavioral changes, which is crucial to the development of gender-specific treatment strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Escalation patterns of varying periods of heroin access.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Misra, Kaushik K; Chen, Scott A; Greenwell, Thomas N; Koob, George F

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of opioid abuse and dependence has been on the rise in just the past few years. Animal studies indicate that extended access to heroin produces escalation of intake over time, whereas stable intake is observed under limited-access conditions. Escalation of drug intake has been suggested to model the transition from controlled drug use to compulsive drug seeking and taking. Here, we directly compared the pattern of heroin intake in animals with varying periods of heroin access. Food intake was also monitored over the course of escalation. Rats were allowed to lever press on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement to receive intravenous infusions of heroin for 1, 6, 12, or 23h per day for 14 sessions. The results showed that heroin intake in the 12 and 23h groups markedly increased over time, whereas heroin intake in the 1h group was stable. The 6h group showed a significant but modest escalation of intake. Total heroin intake was similar in the 12 and 23h groups, but the rate of heroin self-administration was two-fold higher in the 12h group compared with the 23h group. Food intake decreased over sessions only in the 12h group. The 12 and 23h groups showed marked physical signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These findings suggest that 12h heroin access per day may be the optimal access time for producing escalation of heroin intake. The advantages of this model and the potential relevance for studying drug addiction are discussed.

  10. Supply of a nondrug substitute reduces escalated heroin consumption.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Ahmed, Serge H

    2008-08-01

    Escalation of drug consumption-a hallmark of addiction-has been hypothesized to be associated with a relative devaluation of alternative nondrug rewards and thus with a decrease in their ability to compete with or to substitute for the drug. In a behavioral economic framework, decreased substitutability of nondrug rewards for drug would explain why drug consumption is behaviorally dominant and relatively resistant to change (eg price-inelastic) in drug-addicted individuals. The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis using a validated rat model of heroin intake escalation. Escalation was precipitated by long (6 h, long access (LgA)), but not short (1 h, short access (ShA)), daily access to i.v. heroin self-administration. After escalation, the effects of price (ie fixed-ratio value) on heroin consumption were assessed under two alternative reward conditions: in the presence or absence of a nondrug substitute for heroin (ie four freely available chow pellets). As expected, escalated heroin consumption by LgA rats was less sensitive to price than heroin consumption by ShA rats, showing that heroin had acquired greater reinforcing strength during escalation. However, supplying a substitute during access to heroin was sufficient to reverse this post-escalation increase in the reinforcing effectiveness of heroin. Thus, escalated heroin consumption is not associated with a decreased sensitivity to competing nondrug rewards. Escalated drug use may therefore persist, not so much because of a relative devaluation of nondrug substitutes, but because of a loss or reduction of their availability.

  11. Self-identification of nonpharmaceutical fentanyl exposure following heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Matthew K; Chai, Peter R; Krotulski, Alex J; Friscia, Melissa; Chapman, Brittany; Boyer, Edward W; Logan, Barry K; Babu, Kavita M

    2017-07-06

    To compare user self-identification of nonpharmaceutical fentanyl exposure with confirmatory urine drug testing in emergency department (ED) patients presenting after heroin overdose. This was a cross-sectional study of adult ED patients who presented after a heroin overdose requiring naloxone administration. Participants provided verbal consent after which they were asked a series of questions regarding their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs toward heroin and nonpharmaceutical fentanyl. Participants also provided urine samples, which were analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the presence of fentanyl, heroin metabolites, other clandestine opioids, common pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse. Thirty participants were enrolled in the study period. Ten participants (33%) had never required naloxone for an overdose in the past, 20 participants (67%) reported recent abstinence, and 12 participants (40%) reported concomitant cocaine use. Naloxone was detected in all urine drug screens. Heroin or its metabolites were detected in almost all samples (93.3%), as were fentanyl (96.7%) and its metabolite, norfentanyl (93.3%). Acetylfentanyl was identified in nine samples (30%) while U-47700 was present in two samples (6.7%). Sixteen participants self-identified fentanyl in their heroin (sensitivity 55%); participants were inconsistent in their qualitative ability to identify fentanyl in heroin. Heroin users presenting to the ED after heroin overdose requiring naloxone are unable to accurately identify the presence of nonpharmaceutical fentanyl in heroin. Additionally, cutting edge drug testing methodologies identified fentanyl exposures in 96.7% of our patients, as well as unexpected clandestine opioids (like acetylfentanyl and U-47700).

  12. A vitamin profile of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    el-Nakah, A; Frank, O; Louria, D B; Quinones, M A; Baker, H

    1979-10-01

    Circulating thiamine, riboflavin, nicotinates, folates, vitamin B12, B6, A, and carotenes of 149 heroin addicts aged 17-60 years were compared to 204 healthy subjects not using drugs or vitamins. Only 24 per cent of the addicts had no evidence of hypovitaminemia; 45 per cent and 37 per cent had vitamin B6 and folate deficit respectively, whereas deficits of thiamine, vitamin B12, riboflavin, and nicotinate were recorded for 13-19 per cent of the addict population; impaired liver function in addicts did not influence these results.

  13. The influence of GABRA2, childhood trauma, and their interaction on alcohol, heroin, and cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David; Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    The GABRA2 gene has been implicated in addiction. Early life stress has been shown to alter GABRA2 expression in adult rodents. We hypothesized that childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation, and their interaction would influence addiction vulnerability. African-American men were recruited for this study: 577 patients with lifetime DSM-IV single and comorbid diagnoses of alcohol, cocaine, and heroin dependence, and 255 control subjects. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was administered. Ten GABRA2 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. We found that exposure to childhood trauma predicted substance dependence (p < .0001). Polysubstance dependence was associated with the highest CTQ scores (p < .0001). The African Americans had four common haplotypes (frequency: .11-.30) within the distal haplotype block: two that correspond to the Caucasian and Asian yin-yang haplotypes, and two not found in other ethnic groups. One of the unique haplotypes predicted heroin addiction, whereas the other haplotype was more common in control subjects and seemed to confer resilience to addiction after exposure to severe childhood trauma. The yin-yang haplotypes had no effects. Moreover, the intron 2 SNP rs11503014, not located in any haplotype block and potentially implicated in exon splicing, was independently associated with addiction, specifically heroin addiction (p < .005). Childhood trauma interacted with rs11503014 variation to influence addiction vulnerability, particularly to cocaine (p < .005). Our results suggest that at least in African-American men, childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation, and their interaction play a role in risk-resilience for substance dependence.

  14. The Influence of GABRA2, Childhood Trauma and their Interaction on Alcohol, Heroin and Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David; Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    Background The GABRA2 gene has been implicated in addiction. Early life stress has been shown to alter GABRA2 expression in adult rodents. We hypothesized that childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation and their interaction would influence addiction vulnerability. Methods African American men were recruited for this study: 577 patients with lifetime DSM-IV single and comorbid diagnoses of alcohol, cocaine and heroin dependence, and 255 controls. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was administered. Ten GABRA2 haplotype-tagging SNPs were genotyped. Results We found that exposure to childhood trauma predicted substance dependence (p < 0.0001). Polysubstance dependence was associated with the highest CTQ scores (p < 0.0001). The African Americans had four common haplotypes (frequency: 0.11 – 0.30) within the distal haplotype block: two that correspond to the Caucasian and Asian yin-yang haplotypes and two not found in other ethnic groups. One of the unique haplotypes predicted heroin addiction whereas the other haplotype was more common in controls and appeared to confer resilience to addiction after exposure to severe childhood trauma. The yin-yang haplotypes had no effects. Moreover, the intron 2 SNP rs11503014, not located in any haplotype block and potentially implicated in exon splicing, was independently associated with addiction, specifically heroin addiction (p < 0.005). Childhood trauma interacted with rs11503014 variation to influence addiction vulnerability, particularly to cocaine (p < 0.005). Conclusions Our results suggest that at least in African American men, childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation and their interaction play a role in risk-resilience for substance dependence. PMID:19833324

  15. [Effect of Heroin on DLG4 Expression in Hippocampus, Amygdala and Frontal Cortex of Rats].

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang-ming; Gong, Qun; Liu, Jian-feng; Zhao, Ming-quan; Chen, Dong-dong; Xie, Yao-yao; Zhu, Hua

    2015-06-01

    To observe the expression of discs large homolog 4 (DLG4) protein in hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex of rats and evaluate postsynaptic density in heroin dependence. The rat heroin dependent model was established by increasing intraperitoneal injection of heroin. DLG4 proteins in hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex of heroin dependent 9, 18, 36 days rats were detected with immunohistochemical staining and compared with that in the control group. DLG4 proteins in hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex were gradually reduced with extension of heroin dependent time. Heroin dependence can affect postsynaptic density of hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex. The changes become more apparent with extension of heroin dependence time.

  16. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Huitema, Alwin D R; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin (up to 1000 mg/day) are prescribed to chronic heroin dependents, who do not respond to conventional interventions such as methadone maintenance treatment. Possible drug-drug interactions with the hydrolysis of heroin into 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine, the glucuronidation of morphine and interactions with drug transporting proteins are described. Since renal and hepatic impairment is common in the special population of heroin dependent patients, specific attention was paid on the impact of renal and hepatic impairment. Hepatic impairment did not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its metabolites. However, some modest effects of renal impairment have been noted, and therefore control of the creatinine clearance during heroin-assisted treatment seems recommendable.

  18. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  19. Fatal poisoning by alcohol and heroin.

    PubMed

    Sutlović, Davorka; Definis-Gojanović, Marija

    2007-09-01

    Drug abuse with alcohol consumption have been on the rise in Split-Dalmatian County for a while now. This article reports two separate cases with three deaths due to fatal combinations of heroin and alcohol. The first case of poisoning is related to a young couple, a 30-year-old man and a 28-year-old woman, who were found dead in a car, surrounded by cans of a variety alcoholic drinks. Two needles were found beside the bodies as well. The victims were registered drug abusers who had been in withdrawal programs. The second case was a 29-year-old man who was found dead in a house. Three fresh injection marks were visible on his right arm, and two needles were near his body. He was not known as a drug addict, but he had tried to commit suicide recently. Carboxyhaemoglobin was found in blood samples of both victims from the first case. The concentration was 25% and that could contribute to their death. In both described cases blood alcohol concentration was higher then 1.60 g kg(-1). Toxicology tests were positive for heroin, meconin, acetaminophen, 6-acetylmorphine, codeine, noscapine and papaverine. Ethanol, being a respiratory depressant, combined with morphine drastically increases the risk of rapid death due to respiration failure.

  20. Health service utilization of heroin abusers: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Ming; Huang, Charles Lung-Cheng; Yeh, Bao-Juan; Chien, Yi-Ling

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the patterns of medical service utilization among heroin users and to identify the factors associated with the frequency of utilization. We conducted a retrospective/prospective cohort study of 789 heroin-using adults in a catchment area, collecting data on their usage of medical care, including inpatient care, emergency visits, and outpatient care, in a 2-year observation period. We interviewed and reviewed the medical records of 789 heroin users in a methadone clinic of a general hospital in a rural area of Taiwan. The demographic data, records of service use, diagnoses, and information on viral infection status from Jan. 1, 2007 to Dec. 31, 2008 were collected. Most patients were middle-aged and unemployed, had a basic educational level, and began their first heroin use in their twenties. The health service utilization of heroin users was mostly for infectious diseases, orthopedic conditions, and gastroenterological disorders mainly due to blood-borne or local infections and traumatic injury. Heroin users utilize fewer outpatient or inpatient services, but more emergency care than the general public. The major correlates of inpatient and emergency service utilization were HIV status and education level. Our findings suggest that integrated outpatient services may help to enhance medical service accessibility and adherence, and also imply the necessity of putting more effort into promoting health management and safe behaviors in heroin users, particularly the lower-educated addicts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduced volume of the nucleus accumbens in heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian L; Magon, Stefano; Sprenger, Till; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G; Denier, Niklaus; Vogel, Marc; Schmidt, André; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The neural mechanisms of heroin addiction are still incompletely understood, even though modern neuroimaging techniques offer insights into disease-related changes in vivo. While changes on cortical structure have been reported in heroin addiction, evidence from subcortical areas remains underrepresented. Functional imaging studies revealed that the brain reward system and particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a volume difference of the NAcc in heroin addiction in comparison to healthy controls. A further aim was to correlate subcortical volumes with clinical measurements on negative affects in addiction. Thirty heroin-dependent patients under maintenance treatment with diacetylmorphine and twenty healthy controls underwent structural MRI scanning at 3T. Subcortical segmentation analysis was performed using FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool function of FSL. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess trait anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. A decreased volume of the left NAcc was observed in heroin-dependent patients compared to healthy controls. Depression score was negatively correlated with left NAcc volume in patients, whereas a positive correlation was found between the daily opioid dose and the volume of the right amygdala. This study indicates that there might be structural differences of the NAcc in heroin-dependent patients in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, correlations of subcortical structures with negative emotions and opioid doses might be of future relevance for the investigation of heroin addiction.

  2. Historiography taking issue: analyzing an experiment with heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Dehue, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the predicament of historians becoming part of the history they are investigating and illustrates the issue in a particular case. The case is that of the randomized controlled trial (RCT)-more specifically, its use for testing the effects of providing heroin to severe heroin abusers. I counter the established view of the RCT as a matter of timeless logic and argue that this research design was developed in the context of administrative knowledge making under twentieth-century economic liberalism of which it epitomizes some central values. I also argue that the applicability of the RCT depends on the degree to which its advocates can define the issue to be studied according to its inherent values. Next, I demonstrate how advocates of an RCT with heroin provision in the Netherlands steered the political discussion on heroin provision and how the values of economic liberalism also shaped the results of the Dutch maintenance experiment. In addition, I relate how my analysis of this experiment became part of political debates in the Netherlands. Contrary to my intentions, adversaries of heroin maintenance used my critique on the heroin RCT as an argument against heroin maintenance. Such risks are inherent to historiography and sociology of science aiming at practical relevance while challenging treasured scientific beliefs. I conclude that it still seems better to expose arguments on unjustified certainties than to suppress them for strategic reasons. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impaired decision-making in psychopathic heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Jasmin; Petkova, Pavlina; Georgiev, Stefan; Martin, Eileen M; Tersiyski, Ruslan; Raycheva, Margarita; Velinov, Vladimir; Marinov, Peter

    2007-01-12

    Substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) often show neurocognitive deficits in decision-making, such that their choices are biased toward the greatest immediate reward rather than the optimal future outcome. However, studies of SDIs are often hampered by two significant methodological challenges: polysubstance dependence and comorbid conditions, which are independently associated with neurocognitive impairments. We addressed these methodological challenges by testing heroin addicts in Bulgaria, where heroin addiction is highly prevalent but polysubstance dependence is rare. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential contribution of psychopathy to decision-making processes among this group of Bulgarian heroin addicts. We tested 78 male currently abstaining heroin addicts, classified as psychopathic or non-psychopathic using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist, Revised (PCL-R). Psychopathic heroin addicts showed notable deficits in decision-making in that they made significantly more disadvantageous decisions relative to non-psychopathic heroin addicts. Results indicate that the presence of psychopathy may exacerbate decision-making deficits in heroin addicts.

  4. Aggressive responding in abstinent heroin addicts: neuroendocrine and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Moi, Gabriele; Bussandri, Monica; Bubici, Cristina; Mossini, Matteo; Raggi, Maria Augusta; Brambilla, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    Objective measures of experimentally induced aggressiveness were evaluated in 20 abstinent heroin-dependent subjects, in comparison with 20 normal healthy male subjects. All the subjects were preliminarily submitted to DSM-IV interviews, Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI II). During a laboratory task, the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP), subjects earned monetary reinforcers with repeated button presses and were provoked by the subtraction of money, which was attributed to a fictitious other participant. Subjects could respond by ostensibly subtracting money from the fictitious subject (the aggressive response). Money-earning responses were not different in drug-free heroin addicts and controls during the first two sessions and significantly lower during the third session in heroin-dependent subjects (t=2.99, P<.01). Aggressive responses were significantly higher (F=4.9, P<.01) in heroin addicted individuals, in comparison with controls. During the experimentally induced aggressiveness, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (CORT) concentrations increased less significantly, and norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels, together with heart rate (HR), increased more significantly in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects than in healthy subjects. PSAP aggressive responses positively correlated with catecholamine changes, BDHI "direct" and "irritability" scores, MMPI "psychopathic deviate" scores in heroin-dependent subjects and controls, and with CORT responses only in healthy subjects. No correlation was found between heroin-exposure extent (substance abuse history duration) and aggressiveness levels. The present findings suggest that heroin-dependent patients have higher outward-directed aggressiveness than healthy subjects, in relation with monoamine hyperreactivity, after long-term opiate discontinuation. Aggressiveness in heroin addicts seems to be related more to the

  5. Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2012-08-01

    Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) is a solution for improving the condition of treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Since 1994, six randomized controlled trials have concluded that HAT is more efficacious than oral methadone for severe heroin addicts. We visited seven HAT treatment centres in four countries in order to observe diacetylmorphine (DAM) administration and to study the main concerns of the staff. Nurses were concerned by the risk taken if a previously intoxicated patient received his dose of DAM. Another concern was the smuggling of DAM doses. The HAT centres face a dilemma: treating patients while at the same time allowing their risky street habits in the centre.

  6. A 50-Year-Old Woman Addicted to Heroin

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a complicated medical and psychiatric issue, with well-established as well as newer modes of treatment. The case of Ms W, a 50-year-old woman with a long history of opiate addiction who has been treated successfully with methadone for 9 years and who now would like to consider newer alternatives, illustrates the complex issues of heroin addiction. The treatment of heroin addiction as a chronic disease is reviewed, including social, medical, and cultural issues and pharmacologic treatment with methadone and the more experimental medication options of buprenorphine and naltrexone. PMID:18594026

  7. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  8. The NK1 Receptor Antagonist L822429 Reduces Heroin Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects. PMID:23303056

  9. Opioid abstinence reinforcement delays heroin lapse during buprenorphine dose tapering.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n=12) received $4.00 for completing assessments at each thrice-weekly visit during dose tapering; 10 of 12 lapsed to heroin use 1 day after discharge. The abstinence reinforcement group (n=10) received $30.00 for each consecutive opioid-free urine sample; this significantly delayed heroin lapse (median, 15 days).

  10. Is there a need for heroin substitution treatment in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside? Yes there is, and in many other places too.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Martin T; Kendall, Perry

    2011-01-01

    The prescription of medically-supervised diacetylmorphine, the active ingredient in heroin, to individuals with treatment-refractory opioid dependence is a controversial and often politically charged subject. Just as methadone maintenance was opposed in the 1960s by some treatment providers who preferred abstinence-based therapies, heroin-assisted therapy is now being opposed by some methadone treatment providers--this despite the fact that the effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment has been demonstrated in no less than six randomized trials in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Canada and the UK. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) trial in Canada clearly showed heroin-assisted therapy to be superior to methadone in individuals with chronic, treatment-refractory heroin addiction both in terms of retention in addiction treatment and clinical response. An international internal review panel, three Research Ethics Boards, the CIHR RCT review panel, the Therapeutic Products Directorate of Health Canada, and several journal peer-reviewers reviewed the NAOMI trial. Nevertheless, authors of a commentary in this issue of CJPH find fault with the trial in terms of methadone prescribing, use of intention-to-treat analysis, safety and cost. We take this opportunity to respond to the numerous misconceptions and errors in their commentary.

  11. Talking about screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for adolescents: An upstream intervention to address the heroin and prescription opioid epidemic.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett R

    2016-10-01

    Overdose deaths from heroin and prescription opioids have reached epidemic proportions in recent years. Deaths specifically involving heroin have more than tripled since 2011, and for the first time, drug overdose deaths have exceeded deaths resulting from motor vehicle accidents. This epidemic has been receiving attention among policymakers and the media which has resulted in efforts to provide training and education on prescribing practices, increase the use of naloxone, and expand the availability and use of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). What is not being talked about is the relationship between early initiation of less harmful substances such as alcohol and marijuana and subsequent use of prescription opioids and heroin. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a model which shows promise for preventing initiation and reducing risky substance use among adolescents before it progresses to use of harder drugs such as heroin. Unfortunately, though recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, health care providers are not even screening their adolescent patients for substance use. The heroin and prescription opioid epidemic and the dissemination of information regarding federal, state, and local efforts to combat the epidemic provide a platform for increasing awareness of SBIRT, garnering support for more research, and facilitating uptake and integration into practice. It is time to add SBIRT to the conversation.

  12. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  13. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  14. Cost utility analysis of co-prescribed heroin compared with methadone maintenance treatment in heroin addicts in two randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; van der Zanden, Bart P; de Borgie, Corianne A J M; Blanken, Peter; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost utility of medical co-prescription of heroin compared with methadone maintenance treatment for chronic, treatment resistant heroin addicts. Design Cost utility analysis of two pooled open label randomised controlled trials. Setting Methadone maintenance programmes in six cities in the Netherlands. Participants 430 heroin addicts. Interventions Inhalable or injectable heroin prescribed over 12 months. Methadone (maximum 150 mg a day) plus heroin (maximum 1000 mg a day) compared with methadone alone (maximum 150 mg a day). Psychosocial treatment was offered throughout. Main outcome measures One year costs estimated from a societal perspective. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs) based on responses to the EuroQol EQ-5D at baseline and during the treatment period. Results Co-prescription of heroin was associated with 0.058 more QALYs per patient per year (95% confidence interval 0.016 to 0.099) and a mean saving of €12 793 (£8793, $16 122) (€1083 to €25 229) per patient per year. The higher programme costs (€16 222; lower 95% confidence limit €15 084) were compensated for by lower costs of law enforcement (- €4129; upper 95% confidence limit - €486) and damage to victims of crime (- €25 374; upper 95% confidence limit - €16 625). The results were robust for the use of national EQ-5D tariffs and for the exclusion of the initial implementation costs of heroin treatment. Completion of treatment is essential; having participated in any abstinence treatment in the past is not. Conclusions Co-prescription of heroin is cost effective compared with treatment with methadone alone for chronic, treatment resistant heroin addicts. PMID:15933353

  15. Facial recognition of heroin vaccine opiates: type 1 cross-reactivities of antibodies induced by hydrolytically stable haptenic surrogates of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and morphine.

    PubMed

    Matyas, Gary R; Rice, Kenner C; Cheng, Kejun; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F G; Iyer, Malliga R; Jacobson, Arthur E; Mayorov, Alexander V; Beck, Zoltan; Torres, Oscar B; Alving, Carl R

    2014-03-14

    Novel synthetic compounds similar to heroin and its major active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine, were examined as potential surrogate haptens for the ability to interface with the immune system for a heroin vaccine. Recent studies have suggested that heroin-like haptens must degrade hydrolytically to induce independent immune responses both to heroin and to the metabolites, resulting in antisera containing mixtures of antibodies (type 2 cross-reactivity). To test this concept, two unique hydrolytically stable haptens were created based on presumed structural facial similarities to heroin or to its active metabolites. After conjugation of a heroin-like hapten (DiAmHap) to tetanus toxoid and mixing with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, high titers of antibodies after two injections in mice had complementary binding sites that exhibited strong type 1 ("true") specific cross-reactivity with heroin and with both of its physiologically active metabolites. Mice immunized with each surrogate hapten exhibited reduced antinociceptive effects caused by injection of heroin. This approach obviates the need to create hydrolytically unstable synthetic heroin-like compounds to induce independent immune responses to heroin and its active metabolites for vaccine development. Facial recognition of hydrolytically stable surrogate haptens by antibodies together with type 1 cross-reactivities with heroin and its metabolites can help to guide synthetic chemical strategies for efficient development of a heroin vaccine. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Bacillus cereus panophthalmitis after intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Hatem, G; Merritt, J C; Cowan, C L

    1979-03-01

    Two healthy young black men developed panophthalmitis after intravenous heroin injections. Bacillus cereus, considered to be a relatively noncommon pathogen for man, was found to be the causative agent as it was recovered from the anterior chamber and viterous cavity of both cases. The ocular findings were unilateral in each case, and neither patient had any sistemic involvement from the bacteremia. The onset of visual symptoms varied from 24 to 36 hours after the last intravenous injection with the eye becoming rapidly blind. Photographs of the early fundus lesions included preretinal hypopyon-like lesions and peculiar changes in the blood vasculature. Intracameral gentamicin and steroids did not alter the cause, and treatment was enucleation.

  17. Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin) for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J R; Meyer-Witting, M

    1992-05-01

    Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin, diacetyl morphine) 2.5 mg in isotonic saline 2.5 ml was given to 13 patients in labour through a 26 gauge Quincke needle. Three patients were given epidural bupivacaine at a mean of 295 min after injection of diamorphine and a further 2 used 50% nitrous oxide during the second stage of labour. Eight patients needed no additional analgesia for labour although 1 received a pudendal nerve block for forceps delivery. No neonatal complications attributable to diamorphine were observed. There was a high incidence of post partum headache (6/13 cases). The use of a Sprotte needle and a fine spinal catheter might overcome the limitations of spinal headache and limited duration of action respectively.

  18. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  19. GABAergic function in detoxified heroin addicts: relationship to anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Ferri, M; Zaimovic, A; Giucastro, G; Palladino, M; Sartori, R; Delsignore, R; Maestri, D; Marzocchi, G; Brambilla, F

    1998-02-09

    The function of the GABAergic system was examined in 20 subjects with heroin dependence and abuse, 2 months after detoxification, and in 10 healthy volunteers, by measuring the growth hormone (GH) response to a challenge with the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen. Ten heroin addicts had comorbid anxiety disorder (Group A), while the other ten had heroin addiction uncomplicated by Axis I and II psychopathologies (Group B). GH responses to baclofen stimulation of Group A patients were significantly blunted, while those of Group B subjects did not differ from responses of healthy volunteers. Our data show that the function of the GABAergic system is impaired only in heroin addicts with comorbid anxiety disorders (anxious cluster), suggesting that the GABA system is not persistently influenced by prolonged exposure to opioid receptor stimulation.

  20. Abuse of Prescription Pain Medications Risks Heroin Use

    MedlinePlus

    ABUSE OF PRESCRIPTION PAIN MEDICATIONS RISKS HEROIN USE In 2010 almost 1 in 20 adolescents and adults - 12 million people - used prescription pain medication when it was not prescribed for them or only for the ...

  1. Young people with heroin dependence: findings from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS).

    PubMed

    Mills, Katherine L; Teesson, Maree; Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Lynskey, Michael

    2004-07-01

    This paper examines the patterns and correlates of heroin use in a cohort of 210 young Australians aged between 18 and 24, who were participants in the Australian Treatment Outcome Study, a longitudinal study of treatment outcomes for heroin dependence. Of major importance were the high rates of psychiatric comorbidity found among this group (37% lifetime Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, 23% current Major Depression, 75% Anti-Social Personality Disorder, and 51% Borderline Personality Disorder). Seventeen percent had attempted suicide in the preceding year. Although both the young (aged 18-24 years) heroin users and their older counterparts (aged 25-56 years) initiated drug use at the same age, young heroin users progressed to heroin use, regular heroin use, and treatment for heroin use, twice as quickly as older heroin users. These findings suggest that there is a limited window of opportunity in which early interventions may be applied before young heroin users progress to problematic use.

  2. DNA profiling from heroin street dose packages.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Ashira; Cohen, Yaron; Azoury, Myriam

    2007-03-01

    A large amount of heroin street doses are seized and examined for drug content by the Israel police. These are generally wrapped in heat-sealed plastic. Occasionally it is possible to visualize latent fingerprints on the plastic wrap itself, but the small size of the plastic item and the sealing process makes the success rate very low. In this study, the possibility of extracting and profiling DNA from the burnt edge of the plastic wrap was investigated. The idea was based on the assumption that epithelial cells might be trapped during the sealing process. The results show that there are sufficient quantities of DNA deposited at the "amorphic" burnt edges of sealed street doses for DNA profiling to be carried out. A controlled experiment using a known donor was performed. This subject carried out sealing of "street drug" packages and consequent DNA extractions were performed to show that known DNA profiles could be recovered from such packages, as a result of handling by the "packer." "Square-like" burnt edges did not yield DNA profiles, probably because of differences in the sealing process. It was also shown that DNA could be recovered from the plastic wrap itself and not only from the amorphic burnt edges. As heroin dealers and drug users are often involved in other crimes and run-ins with the law, the effective extraction and addition of their DNA profiles from such items of evidence to the newly established DNA database in Israel provides new avenues in the continued fight against crime and drug traffickers.

  3. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (heroin-positive specimens. COD was present in 1218 (42.4%) specimens. Prevalence of combinations for specimens containing MOR were as follows: DAM only 13 (0.59%), 6AM only 1140 (52.0%), 6AC only 24 (1.1%), DAM/6AM/6AC 710 (32.4%), 6AM/6AC 188 (8.6%), DAM/6AM 113 (5.2%), DAM/6AC 6 (0.27%). Importantly, the prevalence of combinations for specimens without MOR were as follows: DAM only 161 (23.8%), 6AM only 217 (32.1%), 6AC only 92 (13.6%), DAM/6AM/6AC 50 (7.4%), 6AM/6AC 7 (1.0%), DAM/6AM 145 (21.4%), DAM/6AC 5 (0.74%). Unexpected patterns of excretion were observed, such as the presence of DAM and 6AC in the absence of 6AM and MOR; therefore, multiple heroin markers may be useful to assess for

  4. Carious lesions in the heroin addicted patient. A case report.

    PubMed

    Shen, E C; Fu, E

    1998-08-01

    Heroin abuse is destroying the health of many individuals in our society. Much of the information that has appeared in the literature has concerned itself with the general health of addicts; the oral health status of these individuals has not been studied to the same extent. This report will present and discuss the management of a case involving the effects of long-term heroin abuse on the dentition.

  5. [Ischemic cerebral vascular stroke after heroin sniffing. A new case].

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, F; Nicoli, F; Swiader, L; Gastaut, J L

    1992-06-06

    Three hours after sniffing a dose of heroin, a 30-year old man developed right hemiplegia with aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed an infarct in the territory of the left anterior choroid artery. Cerebral vascular accidents occurring as complications of heroin addiction are rare: a review of the literature yielded only 13 documented cases. The main characteristics of these strokes are analysed and their pathogenetic mechanisms (immuno-allergic vasculitis, vascular spasm) are discussed.

  6. Cold Preparation of Heroin in a Black Tar Market.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexis M; Armenta, Richard F; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goldshear, Jesse L; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S

    2017-07-29

    Black tar heroin is typically prepared for injection with heat which decreases the risk of HIV transmission by inactivating the virus. We received reports that persons who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, a black tar heroin market, were using only water to dissolve heroin. Because Tijuana abuts San Diego County, CA, United States, we undertook the present analyses to determine the prevalence of this practice among PWID in San Diego, California. PWID completed quarterly behavioral assessments and serological testing for blood-borne viruses. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess for individual, social, and structural correlates of preparing heroin without heat within the preceding 6 months. Nearly half of black tar heroin users (149/305) reported they had prepared heroin without heat within 6 months. In multivariable analysis, cold preparation was independently associated with younger age (10 year decrease; AOR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.03, 1.53), more drug injecting acquaintances (per 5 acquaintance increase; AOR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01, 1.09) and prefilled syringe use (injecting drugs from syringes that are already filled with drugs before purchase; AOR = 1.86; 95% CI 1.14, 3.02). Conclusions/Importance: To our knowledge, this is the first paper to report that PWID living in a black tar heroin market are preparing heroin without heat. Additional research is needed to determine whether this is an endemic practice or PWID are engaging in new forms of drug preparation in response to changes in the environment.

  7. BDNF Val(66)Met genotype is associated with drug-seeking phenotypes in heroin-dependent individuals: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Mark K; Steinmiller, Caren L; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Lundahl, Leslie; Burmeister, Margit

    2013-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met genotype has been associated with neurobehavioral deficits. To examine its relevance for addiction, we examined BDNF genotype differences in drug-seeking behavior. Heroin-dependent volunteers (n = 128) completed an interview that assessed past-month naturalistic drug-seeking/use behaviors. In African Americans (n = 74), the Met allele was uncommon (carrier frequency 6.8%); thus, analyses focused on European Americans (n = 54), in whom the Met allele was common (carrier frequency 37.0%). In their natural setting, Met carriers (n = 20) reported more time- and cost-intensive heroin-seeking and more cigarette use than Val homozygotes (n = 34). BDNF Val(66)Met genotype predicted 18.4% of variance in 'weekly heroin investment' (purchasing time × amount × frequency). These data suggest that the BDNF Met allele may confer a 'preferred drug-invested' phenotype, resistant to moderating effects of higher drug prices and non-drug reinforcement. These preliminary hypothesis-generating findings require replication, but are consistent with pre-clinical data that demonstrate neurotrophic influence in drug reinforcement. Whether this genotype is relevant to other abused substances besides opioids or nicotine, or treatment response, remains to be determined.

  8. Childhood Symptoms of ADHD and Impulsivity in Abstinent Heroin Users.

    PubMed

    Segalà, Laura; Vasilev, Georgi; Raynov, Ivaylo; Gonzalez, Raul; Vassileva, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Heroin dependence is associated with deficits in impulsivity, which is also a core feature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to explore the association between childhood ADHD symptoms and cognitive and motor impulsivity among abstinent individuals with a history of heroin dependence. Thirty-two abstinent Bulgarian males with a history of heroin dependence participated in the study. Self-rated childhood ADHD symptoms were obtained using the Wender-Utah Rating Scale. Cognitive impulsivity was measured using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), an index of impulsive decision making, and the Delayed Reward Discounting Task (DRDT), a measure of intertemporal choice. Motor impulsivity was indexed with the Stop Signal Task (SST), a measure of response inhibition. Participants, whose average age was 27.66 years (SD = 2.7), had an average ADHD symptom score of 36.6 (SD = 18.6), had roughly 7 years (SD = 2.9) of heroin use, and had been abstinent for just over a year (M = 402.5 days, SD = 223.8). Linear regression analyses revealed that self-reported ADHD symptoms predicted impulsive decision making (IGT), but not delayed discounting (DRDT) or response inhibition (SST). Self-reported childhood ADHD symptoms do not uniformly predict impulsivity among abstinent individuals with heroin dependence. Results suggest the IGT may be more sensitive to externalizing psychopathology among individuals with heroin dependence than other measures of impulsivity.

  9. Heroin maintenance treatment: from idea to research to practice.

    PubMed

    Uchtenhagen, Ambros A

    2011-03-01

    Maintaining opiate addicts on opiates has a long history. The idea to prescribe pharmaceutical morphine as a substitute for street heroin started in USA and was abolished on the basis of prohibitionist legislation. A new approach to maintain opiate addicts on substitution therapy was initiated in USA in 1963, with the prescription of methadone. This approach found, although slowly, increasing acceptance, and is nowadays considered to be a cornerstone in the management of opiate dependence and for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in opiate injectors. Since 1975, the concept of heroin maintenance treatment was re-activated in order to reach out to treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Research projects were performed in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Canada and in England, another one is planned in Belgium. Based on the unanimously positive outcomes, heroin maintenance has become routine treatment for otherwise untreatable heroin addicts in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany and England, and Denmark has set up heroin maintenance without new research trials. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Neuroelectrophysiological approaches in heroin addiction research: A review of literatures.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Menke, J Michael; Rashid, Rusdi; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-04-01

    Neuroelectrophysiological properties have been used in human heroin addiction studies. These studies vary in their approach, experimental conditions, paradigms, and outcomes. However, it is essential to integrate previous findings and experimental methods for a better demonstration of current issues and challenges in designing such studies. This Review examines methodologies and experimental conditions of neuroelectrophysiological research among heroin addicts during withdrawal, abstinence, and methadone maintenance treatment and presents the findings. The results show decrements in attentional processing and dysfunctions in brain response inhibition as well as brain activity abnormalities induced by chronic heroin abuse. Chronic heroin addiction causes increased β and α2 power activity, latency of P300 and P600, and diminished P300 and P600 amplitude. Findings confirm that electroencephalography (EEG) band power and coherence are associated with craving indices and heroin abuse history. First symptoms of withdrawal can be seen in high-frequency EEG bands, and the severity of these symptoms is associated with brain functional connectivity. EEG spectral changes and event-related potential (ERP) properties have been shown to be associated with abstinence length and tend to normalize within 3-6 months of abstinence. From the conflicting criteria and confounding effects in neuroelectrophysiological studies, the authors suggest a comprehensive longitudinal study with a multimethod approach for monitoring EEG and ERP attributes of heroin addicts from early stages of withdrawal until long-term abstinence to control the confounding effects, such as nicotine abuse and other comorbid and premorbid conditions.

  11. Temporal clustering of heroin overdoses in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Kalter, H D; Ruttenber, A J; Zack, M M

    1989-01-01

    During the 5-day period from 28 Feb. 1985 through 4 March 1985, 24 heroin overdoses occurred in the District of Columbia. Statistical tests for clustering of fatal and nonfatal overdoses during this interval identified 7 heroin-related deaths that occurred on March 1 to 2 as a statistically significant cluster (p = 0.007). An extension of the analysis for clustering to a 15-month period identified 2 additional clusters, 1 of fatal overdoses and 1 of nonfatal ones. When all victims of fatal overdose in cluster intervals were combined and compared with all other heroin-related deaths, no significant differences were noted for levels of morphine or ethanol in blood. However, bile morphine concentrations of cluster decedents were significantly lower than those of noncluster decedents (p = 0.033), suggesting that these decedents were less tolerant to the effects of narcotics than the comparison group. Heroin concentrations in street-level heroin samples collected during clusters did not differ from those collected during comparison intervals. These data conflict with the traditional explanation of overdose clusters, which attributes these events to unusually potent street-level heroin.

  12. An economic analysis of income and expenditures by heroin-using research volunteers.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Juliette; Greenwald, Mark

    2009-01-01

    At a Detroit research program from 2004 to 2005, out-of-treatment chronic daily heroin users (N = 100) were interviewed to evaluate relationships between past 30-day income and factors influencing heroin price, expenditures, and consumption. Weekly heroin purchasing frequency was positively related to income and number of suppliers, and negatively related to time cost (min) from primary supplier. Daily heroin consumption was positively related to income and injection heroin use, and negatively related to unit cost of heroin. Implications and limitations are noted. Simulations are underway to assess within-subject changes in drug demand.

  13. The dopamine receptor antagonist levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates heroin self-administration and heroin-induced reinstatement in rats.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Ru, Qin; Chen, Lin; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2012-07-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic recrudescent disorder characterized by a high rate of relapse. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid substance extracted from Corydalis and Stephania and is contained in a number of traditional Chinese herbal preparations. Compared to other dopamine receptor antagonists, l-THP has lower affinity for D2 receptors than for D1 receptors, and a recent study showed that l-THP also binds to D3 receptors, possibly functioning as an antagonist. The unique pharmacological profile of l-THP suggests that l-THP may be effective for the treatment of opiate addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-THP on heroin self-administration and reinstatement triggered by a priming injection of heroin in abstinent rats trained to stably self-administer heroin under an extinction/reinstatement protocol, and found that l-THP (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased heroin self-administration on the fixed-ratio 1 schedule and dose-dependently (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Importantly, l-THP (1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect locomotion, indicating that the observed effects of l-THP on reinstatement do not appear to be due to motor impairments. The present results demonstrated that dopamine receptor antagonist l-THP attenuates heroin self-administration and heroin-induced reinstatement.

  14. ZNF804A variants confer risk for heroin addiction and affect decision making and gray matter volume in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhao, Li-Yan; Wang, Gui-Bin; Yue, Wei-Hua; He, Yong; Shu, Ni; Lin, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Fan; Li, Jia-Li; Chen, Na; Wang, Hui-Min; Kosten, Thomas R; Feng, Jia-Jia; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yu-De; Liu, Shu-Xue; Deng, Gui-Fa; Diao, Gan-Huan; Tan, Yun-Long; Han, Hong-Bin; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction shares common neurobiological pathways and risk genes with other psychiatric diseases, including psychosis. One of the commonly identified risk genes associated with broad psychosis has been ZNF804A. We sought to test whether psychosis risk variants in ZNF804A increase the risk of heroin addiction by modulating neurocognitive performance and gray matter volume (GMV) in heroin addiction. Using case-control genetic analysis, we compared the distribution of ZNF804A variants (genotype and haplotype) in 1035 heroin abusers and 2887 healthy subjects. We also compared neurocognitive performance (impulsivity, global cognitive ability and decision-making ability) in 224 subjects and GMV in 154 subjects based on the ZNF804A variants. We found significant differences in the distribution of ZNF804A intronic variants (rs1344706 and rs7597593) allele and haplotype frequencies between the heroin and control groups. Decision-making impairment was worse in heroin abusers who carried the ZNF804A risk allele and haplotype. Subjects who carried more risk alleles and haplotypes of ZNF804A had greater GMV in the bilateral insular cortex, right temporal cortex and superior parietal cortex. The interaction between heroin addiction and ZNF804A variants affected GMV in the left sensorimotor cortex. Our findings revealed several ZNF804A variants that were significantly associated with the risk of heroin addiction, and these variants affected decision making and GMV in heroin abusers compared with controls. The precise neural mechanisms that underlie these associations are unknown, which requires future investigations of the effects of ZNF804A on both dopamine neurotransmission and the relative increases in the volume of various brain areas.

  15. A comparison of blood toxicology of heroin-related deaths and current heroin users in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Darke, S; Sunjic, S; Zador, D; Prolov, T

    1997-07-25

    Blood toxicology results for deaths attributed to heroin overdose during 1995 in the South Western Sydney (SWS) region (n = 39) were compared with those of a sample of 100 current SWS heroin users who had injected within the preceding 24 h. Heroin-related deaths had a higher median concentration of morphine than current heroin users (0.35 versus 0.09 mg/l). However, there was substantial overlap between the blood morphine concentrations of the two groups, ranging from 0.08-1.45 mg/l. This range incorporated 90% of heroin-related deaths. A third of current users had morphine concentrations over twice the toxic blood morphine concentration employed by the analytical laboratories, and 7% had morphine levels higher than the median recorded for fatal cases. Alcohol was detected in 51% of fatal cases (median = 0.10 g/100 ml) compared with 1% of current heroin user. There was a significant negative correlation among fatal cases between blood morphine and blood alcohol concentrations (r2 = -0.41). There was no significant difference between groups in the proportions of subjects positive for blood benzodiazepines. The results raise questions about the mechanisms of death in what are termed overdoses, and about the role of alcohol in these fatalities.

  16. Analysis of variations in the glutamate receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate 2A (GRIN2A) gene reveals their relative importance as genetic susceptibility factors for heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Zhu, Yongsheng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Hai-Min; Wang, Yun-Peng; Lai, Jiang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate 2A (GRIN2A) gene that encodes the 2A subunit of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was recently shown to be involved in the development of opiate addiction. Genetic polymorphisms in GRIN2A have a plausible role in modulating the risk of heroin addiction. An association of GRIN2A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with heroin addiction was found earlier in African Americans. To identify markers that contribute to the genetic susceptibility to heroin addiction, we examined the potential association between heroin addiction and forty polymorphisms of the GRIN2A gene using the MassARRAY system and GeneScan in this study. The frequency of the (GT)26 repeats (rs3219790) in the heroin addiction group was significantly higher than that in the control group (χ(2) = 5.360, P = 0.021). The allele frequencies of three polymorphisms (rs1102972, rs1650420, and rs3104703 in intron 3) were strongly associated with heroin addiction (P<0.001, 0.0002, and <0.001, after Bonferroni correction). Three additional SNPs from the same intron (rs1071502, rs6497730, and rs1070487) had nominally significant P values for association (P<0.05), but did not pass the threshold value. Haplotype analysis revealed that the G-C-T-C-C-T-A (block 6) and T-T (block 10) haplotypes of the GRIN2A gene displayed a protective effect (P = <0.001 and 0.003). These findings point to a role for GRIN2A polymorphisms in heroin addiction among the Han Chinese from Shaanxi province, and may be informative for future genetic or neurobiological studies on heroin addiction.

  17. An Exploratory Study of Inhalers and Injectors Who Used Black Tar Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Spence, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To undertake an exploratory study to examine the characteristics of patients in narcotic treatment programs who started their use of black tar heroin either as inhalers or as injectors and to compare them with those who started as inhalers but shifted to injecting. Other studies in this area have used subjects using other forms of heroin more amenable to inhaling. Participants, Design, and Measurement A purposive sample of 199 patients in 6 methadone programs in Texas were interviewed in 2002-2003 using a structured instrument. Findings At admission to treatment, those who were heroin inhalers were more likely to be African American, to live with their families, to have income from wages, and to report fewer days of problems on most of the ASI measures. Those who shifted from inhaling to injecting were more likely to be Hispanic and to have had mental health problems that interfered with their lives and to have had less nurturing while growing up. Injectors were older at this treatment admission, had more treatment episodes and more times in jail, and were more likely to have hepatitis C, AIDS, or gonorrhea. There were high levels of physical and mental problems and histories of traumatization as children and adults for almost all the respondents. Males were as likely as females to have been sexually abused as children or as adults. Conclusions The high rates of mental and physical problems among all the clients interviewed showed the need for comprehensive services to be delivered within the substance abuse treatment programs. Histories of trauma and sexual abuse should be addressed for both male and female clients. PMID:21552428

  18. Heroin overdose among young injection drug users in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Kristen C; Davidson, Peter J; Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Moss, Andrew R

    2005-12-12

    We sought to identify prevalence and predictors of heroin-related overdose among young injection drug users (IDU). A total of 795 IDU under age of 30 years were interviewed in four neighbourhoods in San Francisco, California, USA. Participants were recruited as part of a broader study of HIV, hepatitis B and C among injecting drug users in San Francisco using street outreach and snowball techniques. Independent predictors of recent heroin overdose requiring intervention were determined using regression analysis. Of 795 injecting drug users under age of 30 years, 22% (174/795) of participants reported a heroin overdose in the last year. In stepwise multiple logistic regression, independent predictors of recent heroin overdose were lifetime incarceration exceeding 20 months (odds ratio (OR) = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.52-5.88); heroin injection in the last 3 months (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 2.03-11.74); cocaine injection in the last 3 months (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.14-2.45); injection of heroin mixed with methamphetamine in the last 3 months (OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.15-2.65); ever tested for hepatitis B or C (OR = 1.66 per year, CI = 1.09-2.54) and ever having witnessed another person overdose (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.76-4.73). Individuals with high levels of incarceration are at great risk of overdose, and prison or jail should be considered a primary intervention site. Further research on the role of cocaine and amphetamine in heroin-related overdose is indicated.

  19. International patent applications for non-injectable naloxone for opioid overdose reversal: Exploratory search and retrieve analysis of the PatentScope database.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rebecca; Danielsson Glende, Øyvind; Dale, Ola; Strang, John

    2017-06-08

    Non-injectable naloxone formulations are being developed for opioid overdose reversal, but only limited data have been published in the peer-reviewed domain. Through examination of a hitherto-unsearched database, we expand public knowledge of non-injectable formulations, tracing their development and novelty, with the aim to describe and compare their pharmacokinetic properties. (i) The PatentScope database of the World Intellectual Property Organization was searched for relevant English-language patent applications; (ii) Pharmacokinetic data were extracted, collated and analysed; (iii) PubMed was searched using Boolean search query '(nasal OR intranasal OR nose OR buccal OR sublingual) AND naloxone AND pharmacokinetics'. Five hundred and twenty-two PatentScope and 56 PubMed records were identified: three published international patent applications and five peer-reviewed papers were eligible. Pharmacokinetic data were available for intranasal, sublingual, and reference routes. Highly concentrated formulations (10-40 mg mL(-1) ) had been developed and tested. Sublingual bioavailability was very low (1%; relative to intravenous). Non-concentrated intranasal spray (1 mg mL(-1) ; 1 mL per nostril) had low bioavailability (11%). Concentrated intranasal formulations (≥10 mg mL(-1) ) had bioavailability of 21-42% (relative to intravenous) and 26-57% (relative to intramuscular), with peak concentrations (dose-adjusted Cmax  = 0.8-1.7 ng mL(-1) ) reached in 19-30 min (tmax ). Exploratory analysis identified intranasal bioavailability as associated positively with dose and negatively with volume. We find consistent direction of development of intranasal sprays to high-concentration, low-volume formulations with bioavailability in the 20-60% range. These have potential to deliver a therapeutic dose in 0.1 mL volume. [McDonald R, Danielsson Glende Ø, Dale O, Strang J. International patent applications for non-injectable naloxone for opioid overdose reversal

  20. As U.S. Heroin Use Reaches 20-Year High, Cost to Society Soars

    MedlinePlus

    ... study shows. The financial toll includes heroin-related crime and imprisonment. It also includes treatment for addiction ... from the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime. Deaths due to heroin overdoses have more than ...

  1. Do heroin overdose patients require observation after receiving naloxone?

    PubMed

    Willman, Michael W; Liss, David B; Schwarz, Evan S; Mullins, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Heroin use in the US has exploded in recent years, and heroin overdoses requiring naloxone are very common. After awakening, some heroin users refuse further treatment or transport to the hospital. These patients may be at risk for recurrent respiratory depression or pulmonary edema. In those transported to the emergency department, the duration of the observation period is controversial. Additionally, non-medical first responders and lay bystanders can administer naloxone for heroin and opioid overdoses. There are concerns about the outcomes and safety of this practice as well. To search the medical literature related to the following questions: (1) What are the medical risks to a heroin user who refuses ambulance transport after naloxone? (2) If the heroin user is treated in the emergency department with naloxone, how long must they be observed prior to discharge? (3) How effective in heroin users is naloxone administered by first responders and bystanders? Are there risks associated with naloxone distribution programs? We searched PubMed and GoogleScholar with search terms related to each of the questions listed above. The search was limited to English language and excluded patents and citations. The search was last updated on September 31, 2016. The articles found were reviewed for relevance to our objective questions. Eight out of 1020 citations were relevant to the first 2 questions, 5 of 707 were relevant to the third question and 15 of 287 were relevant to the fourth question. In the prehospital environment, does a heroin user revived with naloxone always require ambulance transport and what are the medical risks if ambulance transport is refused after naloxone? The eight articles were all observational studies done either prospectively or retrospectively. Two studies focused on heroin overdoses and included 1069 patients not transported to the hospital. No deaths occurred in this group. In counting the patients from all eight studies, some of which

  2. [Socio-cultural alientation and heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Vales, P A

    1975-01-01

    Heroin addiction is approached in this paper as a sociological process which takes place as a refusal of, or alienation from, the conventional social system, with, at the same time, attraction towards an alienated world, which gives recognition and identity to the subject. Three phases are identifiable in such process: 1) The subject is unable to copy or identify with an adult sexual model (normally, the parent of the same sex). This may reach the level of rejectal of the model. 2) The subject does not succeed in obtaining legitimate goals and benefits. This failure may only be imaginary, but involves a condition of subjective suffering. 3) The subject cannot establish good and significant relationships with nonaddicted peers, and consquently lives in isolation. The three phases are evident in a study carried out by the Author on 750 eddicts from New York and Puerto Rico. The integration into the deviant addict culture, which follows the triple failure outlined above, must be treated with training and resocialization techniques.

  3. Role of orbitofrontal cortex neuronal ensembles in the expression of incubation of heroin craving

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Sanya; Goldart, Evan M.; Theberge, Florence R.M.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    In humans, exposure to cues previously associated with heroin use often provokes relapse after prolonged withdrawal periods. In rats, cue-induced heroin-seeking progressively increases after withdrawal (incubation of heroin craving). Here, we examined the role of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) neuronal ensembles in the enhanced response to heroin cues after prolonged withdrawal or the expression of incubation of heroin craving. We trained rats to self-administer heroin (6-h/d for 10 d) and assessed cue-induced heroin-seeking in extinction tests after 1 or 14 withdrawal days. Cue-induced heroin-seeking increased from 1 day to 14 days and was accompanied by increased Fos expression in ~12% of OFC neurons. Non-selective inactivation of OFC neurons with the GABA agonists baclofen+muscimol decreased cue-induced heroin-seeking on withdrawal day 14 but not day 1. We then used the Daun02 inactivation procedure to assess a causal role of the minority of selectively activated Fos-expressing OFC neurons (that presumably form cue-encoding neuronal ensembles) in cue-induced heroin-seeking after 14 withdrawal days. We trained cfos-lacZ transgenic rats to self-administer heroin and 11 days later re-exposed them to heroin-associated cues or novel cues for 15 min (induction day) followed by OFC Daun02 or vehicle injections 90 min later; we then tested the rats in extinction tests 3 days later. Daun02 selectively decreased cue-induced heroin-seeking in rats previously re-exposed to the heroin-associated cues on induction day, but not in rats previously exposed to novel cues. Results suggest that heroin-cue-activated OFC neuronal ensembles contribute to the expression of incubation of heroin craving. PMID:22915104

  4. Cerebral blood flow effects of acute intravenous heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Noss, Roger S; Hämmig, Robert; Wielepp, Peter; Bundeli, Petra; Heidbreder, Rebeca; Kinser, Jane A; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Fisch, Hans-Ulrich; Kayser, Sarah; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    We examined acute effects of intravenous diacetylmorphine (heroin) administration - which induces a characteristic biphasic response: A short rush-sensation associated with intense pleasurable feelings followed by a subjectively different period of euphoria on cerebral blood flow. This was assessed in nine male heroin dependent patients participating in a heroin maintenance program in a setting resembling everyday pattern of heroin abuse. 99mTc-HMPAO was administered 45 s (rush) and 15 min (euphoria) after administration of i.v. heroin and 45 s after administration of saline (placebo). Plasma concentration of diacetylmorphine and its metabolites were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Compared to the euphoria condition, rush was associated with blood flow increase in the left posterior cerebellar lobe, left anterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus. Our results are in line with recent reports indicating that the cerebellum is an important component in functional brain systems subserving sensory and motor integration, learning, modulation of affect, motivation and social behaviour, which all play important roles in reinforcing properties of opioids.

  5. Postmortem sole incisions - a new sign of heroin overdose?

    PubMed

    Benomran, Fawzi

    2008-01-01

    Postmortem sole incisions have been observed in a number of heroin overdose fatalities. Acqueintance of those victims confessed to producing those incisions as a life saving procedure in a futile attempt to help the comatose overdose victim. They thought that bleeding the unconscious victim would remove the overdose, in manner similar to bloodletting or phlebotomy which is still popular in the Gulf region. The presence of such wounds has become a first indication or rather "sign" of heroin poisoning. In such cases, laboratory investigation confirmed the pathologist's preliminary suspicion. In Dubai, postmortem sole incisions are important sign of death from heroin overdose even in the absence of other classical signs. This sign becomes more credible when accompanied by other signs and/or circumstantial evidence suggestive of heroin use. It is suggested that this should be called "bloodletting sign" of death from heroin overdose. The sign should not be confused with the self-inflicted cuts seen on the arms and forearms of drug misusers which are caused for other reasons.

  6. Toxicological analysis in rats subjected to heroin and morphine overdose.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Joakim J; Kugelberg, Fredrik C; Alkass, Kanar; Gustavsson, Anna; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Spigset, Olav; Druid, Henrik

    2006-09-30

    In heroin overdose deaths the blood morphine concentration varies substantially. To explore possible pharmacokinetic explanations for variable sensitivity to opiate toxicity we studied mortality and drug concentrations in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of rats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with heroin, 21.5 mg/kg, or morphine, 223 mg/kg, causing a 60-80% mortality among drug-naïve rats. Additional groups of rats were pre-treated with morphine for 14 days, with or without 1 week of subsequent abstinence. Brain, lung and blood samples were analyzed for 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. i.v. morphine administration to drug-naïve rats resulted in both rapid and delayed deaths. The brain morphine concentration conformed to an exponential elimination curve in all samples, ruling out accumulation of morphine as an explanation for delayed deaths. This study found no support for formation of toxic concentration of morphine-6-glucuronide. Spontaneous death among both heroin and morphine rats occurred at fairly uniform brain morphine concentrations. Morphine pre-treatment significantly reduced mortality upon i.v. morphine injection, but the protective effect was less evident upon i.v. heroin challenge. The morphine pre-treatment still afforded some protection after 1 week of abstinence among rats receiving i.v. morphine, whereas rats given i.v. heroin showed similar death rate as drug-naïve rats.

  7. Investigation of trace inorganic elements in street doses of heroin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kar-Weng; Tan, Guan-Huat; Wong, Richard C S

    2013-03-01

    Sixteen trace elements found in 309 street heroin samples, piped water and contaminated water were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. All the street heroin samples were found to contain high levels of sodium, a reflection of the use of sodium bicarbonate during heroin synthesis. Additionally, this element was also found to be one of the potential contaminants acquired from the piped water. Calcium could be derived from lime while iron, aluminum and zinc could have come from the metallic container used in the processing/cutting stage. The levels of these elements remained low in the heroin and it could be due to the dilution effects from the addition of adulterants. Statistical validation was performed with six links of related heroin samples using principal component analysis to find the best pretreatment for sample classification. It was obtained that normalization followed by fourth root showed promising results with 8% errors in the sample clustering. The technique was then applied to the case samples. Finally, the result suggested that the case samples could have originated from at least two major groups respectively showing unique elemental profiles at the street level. Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain Hyperglycemia Induced by Heroin: Association with Metabolic Neural Activation.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Bola, R Aaron; Fasulo, Bradley J; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2017-02-15

    Glucose enters the brain extracellular space from arterial blood, and its proper delivery is essential for metabolic activity of brain cells. By using enzyme-based biosensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats, we previously showed that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) display high variability, increasing rapidly following exposure to various arousing stimuli. In this study, the same technology was used to assess NAc glucose fluctuations induced by intravenous heroin. Heroin passively injected at a low dose optimal for maintaining self-administration behavior (100 μg/kg) induces a rapid but moderate glucose rise (∼150-200 μM or ∼15-25% over resting baseline). When the heroin dose was doubled and tripled, the increase became progressively larger in magnitude and longer in duration. Heroin-induced glucose increases also occurred in other brain structures (medial thalamus, lateral striatum, hippocampus), suggesting that brain hyperglycemia is a whole-brain phenomenon but changes were notably distinct in each structure. While local vasodilation appears to be the possible mechanism underlying the rapid rise in extracellular glucose levels, the driving factor for this vasodilation (central vs peripheral) remains to be clarified. The heroin-induced NAc glucose increases positively correlated with increases in intracerebral heat production determined in separate experiments using multisite temperature recordings (NAc, temporal muscle and skin). However, glucose levels rise very rapidly, preceding much slower increases in brain heat production, a measure of metabolic activation associated with glucose consumption.

  9. Transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation for the treatment of withdrawal syndrome in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Da; Han, Ji-Sheng; Diao, Quan-Heng; Deng, Gui-Fa; Ping, Xing-Jie; Jin, Wei-Jie; Wu, Liu-Zhen; Cui, Cai-Lian; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-05-01

    10 days in abrupt abstinence of the heroin addicts resulted in a marked reduction of the withdrawal syndrome as well as a reduced requirement for rescue opioids. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  10. Low dose risperidone attenuates cue-induced but not heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    PubMed

    Lai, Miaojun; Chen, Weisheng; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xiaoli; Liu, Huifen; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with risperidone on heroin self-administration and heroin-seeking behaviour induced by cues and heroin priming. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 2 wk and nose-poke responding was extinguished for 10 d, after which reinstatement of drug seeking was induced by conditioned cues or heroin priming. Acute risperidone administration at doses 10-100 μg/kg potently and dose-dependently inhibited reinstatement of conditioned cue-induced heroin seeking; the minimum dose of inhibition was 30 μg/kg. In contrast, risperidone at the same doses did not attenuate reinstatement induced by two priming doses of heroin (100 or 250 μg/kg s.c.). Risperidone at these doses failed to alter heroin self-administration and locomotion activity. These data demonstrate that acute treatment with low-dose risperidone inhibits conditioned cue-induced heroin seeking and risperidone may be an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of heroin addiction.

  11. The Developmental Outcome of Children Born to Heroin-Dependent Mothers, Raised at Home or Adopted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children born to heroin-dependent mothers (n=83) were compared to 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to 3 control groups with and without environmental deprivation and health problems. Results found that developmental delays and behavioral disorders found among heroin-exposed children resulted primarily from severe environmental…

  12. The Developmental Outcome of Children Born to Heroin-Dependent Mothers, Raised at Home or Adopted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children born to heroin-dependent mothers (n=83) were compared to 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to 3 control groups with and without environmental deprivation and health problems. Results found that developmental delays and behavioral disorders found among heroin-exposed children resulted primarily from severe environmental…

  13. Methodology for the Randomised Injecting Opioid Treatment Trial (RIOTT): evaluating injectable methadone and injectable heroin treatment versus optimised oral methadone treatment in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Lintzeris, Nicholas; Strang, John; Metrebian, Nicola; Byford, Sarah; Hallam, Christopher; Lee, Sally; Zador, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Whilst unsupervised injectable methadone and diamorphine treatment has been part of the British treatment system for decades, the numbers receiving injectable opioid treatment (IOT) has been steadily diminishing in recent years. In contrast, there has been a recent expansion of supervised injectable diamorphine programs under trial conditions in a number of European and North American cities, although the evidence regarding the safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness of this treatment approach remains equivocal. Recent British clinical guidance indicates that IOT should be a second-line treatment for those patients in high-quality oral methadone treatment who continue to regularly inject heroin, and that treatment be initiated in newly-developed supervised injecting clinics. The Randomised Injectable Opioid Treatment Trial (RIOTT) is a multisite, prospective open-label randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the role of treatment with injected opioids (methadone and heroin) for the management of heroin dependence in patients not responding to conventional substitution treatment. Specifically, the study examines whether efforts should be made to optimise methadone treatment for such patients (e.g. regular attendance, supervised dosing, high oral doses, access to psychosocial services), or whether such patients should be treated with injected methadone or heroin. Eligible patients (in oral substitution treatment and injecting illicit heroin on a regular basis) are randomised to one of three conditions: (1) optimized oral methadone treatment (Control group); (2) injected methadone treatment; or (3) injected heroin treatment (with access to oral methadone doses). Subjects are followed up for 6-months, with between-group comparisons on an intention-to-treat basis across a range of outcome measures. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients who discontinue regular illicit heroin use (operationalised as providing >50% urine drug screens negative for markers of

  14. Matching of treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients to medical prescription of heroin or oral methadone treatment: results from two randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent M; Koeter, Maarten W J; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    To investigate which baseline patient characteristics of treatment-resistant heroin addicts differentially predicted treatment response to medical heroin prescription compared to standard methadone maintenance treatment. Two open-label randomized controlled trials; pooled data. Methadone maintenance programmes and heroin treatment centres in six cities in the Netherlands. Four hundred and thirty heroin addicts. Methadone plus injectable heroin or methadone plus inhalable heroin compared to methadone alone prescribed over 12 months: heroin maximum 1000 mg per day, methadone maximum 150 mg per day. Dichotomous, multi-domain response index, including validated indicators of physical health, mental status and social functioning. Data of the inhalable and injectable heroin trials were pooled. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that treatment with medically prescribed heroin plus methadone was significantly more effective (51.8% response) than standard methadone maintenance treatment (28.7%) (95% CI of response difference: 14.1-32.2%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that only one of all baseline characteristics was predictive of a differential treatment effect: patients who had previously participated in abstinence-orientated treatment responded significantly better to heroin-assisted treatment than to methadone treatment (61% versus 24%), while patients without experience in abstinence-orientated treatment did equally well in heroin-assisted or methadone maintenance treatment (39% and 38%, respectively). The effect of heroin-assisted treatment is not dependent on clinical characteristics, with the exception of previous abstinence-orientated treatment: medical prescription of heroin is most effective for those patients who have previously participated in abstinence-orientated treatment.

  15. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  16. The α1 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Reduces Heroin Self-Administration in Rats with Extended Access to Heroin Administration

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell, Thomas N.; Walker, Brendan M.; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration in dependent rats. Prazosin, an α1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). The data show that the α1-adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended drug access, while also stimulating their food intake by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. PMID:18703080

  17. Psychiatric morbidity among cocaine and heroin users in the community.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Silvia; Herrero, Ma Jesús; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia; Molist, Gemma; Barrio, Gregorio; de la Fuente, Luís; Brugal, Ma Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. Moreover, co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders are common among drug users. This paper examines psychiatric disorders of young cocaine and heroin users using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI). A cohort of 1266 young (18-30 years) current regular cocaine (705) and heroin (561) users were recruited outside the health services in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville, Spain. The WMH-CIDI was used to evaluate mental disorders; the Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) measured the degree of dependence; and the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ) assessed social support, in a crosssectional study design. About 43% was diagnosed with a lifetime mental disorder. The most common diagnoses were depression (37.5%) and specific phobia (6.8%). During the last 12 months, prevalence rates were also slightly higher in heroin group (26.4%) than in cocaine cohort (21.7%). Every day cocaine consumption, having unstable living conditions and low social support were variables highly associated with psychiatric morbidity in cocaine cohort. In heroin cohort, earning money through illegal activities was associated with psychiatric morbidity, while the moderate use of alcohol acted as a protective factor for mental pathology. Morbidity was associated to having received psychiatric/psychological treatment during the last 12 months in both cohorts. This study has shown a relatively high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in cocaine and heroin users recruited in non-clinical settings. Future studies examining differences between cocaine and heroin patterns of consumption associated with mental diseases are necessary.

  18. Intravenous buprenorphine self-administration by detoxified heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Collins, Eric D; Fischman, Marian W

    2002-04-01

    Several sources indicate that intravenously administered buprenorphine may have significant abuse liability in humans. The present study evaluated the reinforcing effects of intravenously administered buprenorphine (0, 2, and 8 mg) in detoxified heroin-dependent participants during a 7.5-week inpatient study. Participants (n = 6) were detoxified from heroin over a 1.5-week period immediately after admission. Testing subsequently occurred in three 2-week blocks. During the first week of each 2-week block, the reinforcing effects of buprenorphine were evaluated. Participants first received a dose of buprenorphine and $20 and then were given either the opportunity to self-administer the dose or $20 during choice sessions. During the second week of each 2-week block, the direct effects of heroin were measured to evaluate potential long-lasting antagonist effects of buprenorphine. Progressive ratio break-point values were significantly higher after 2 and 8 mg of buprenorphine compared with placebo. Correspondingly, several positive subjective ratings increased after administration of active buprenorphine relative to placebo. Although there were few differences in peak effects produced by 2 versus 8 mg of buprenorphine, the higher buprenorphine dose generally produced longer-lasting effects. Heroin also produced dose-related increases in several subjective effects. Peak ratings produced by heroin were generally higher than peak ratings produced by buprenorphine. There was little evidence of residual antagonism produced by buprenorphine. These results demonstrate that buprenorphine served as a reinforcer under these conditions, and that it may have abuse liability in nonopioid-dependent individuals who abuse heroin.

  19. Heroin epidemics, treatment and ODE modelling.

    PubMed

    White, Emma; Comiskey, Catherine

    2007-07-01

    The UN [United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC): World Drug Report, 2005, vol. 1: Analysis. UNODC, 2005.], EU [European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA): Annual Report, 2005.http://annualreport.emcdda.eu.int/en/home-en.html.] and WHO [World Health Organisation (WHO): Biregional Strategy for Harm Reduction, 2005-2009. HIV and Injecting Drug Use. WHO, 2005.] have consistently highlighted in recent years the ongoing and persistent nature of opiate and particularly heroin use on a global scale. While this is a global phenomenon, authors have emphasised the significant impact such an epidemic has on individual lives and on society. National prevalence studies have indicated the scale of the problem, but the drug-using career, typically consisting of initiation, habitual use, a treatment-relapse cycle and eventual recovery, is not well understood. This paper presents one of the first ODE models of opiate addiction, based on the principles of mathematical epidemiology. The aim of this model is to identify parameters of interest for further study, with a view to informing and assisting policy-makers in targeting prevention and treatment resources for maximum effectiveness. An epidemic threshold value, R(0), is proposed for the drug-using career. Sensitivity analysis is performed on R(0) and it is then used to examine the stability of the system. A condition under which a backward bifurcation may exist is found, as are conditions that permit the existence of one or more endemic equilibria. A key result arising from this model is that prevention is indeed better than cure.

  20. Patients with non-substance-related disorders report a similar profile of childhood trauma experiences compared to heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Schwaninger, Philipp V; Mueller, Sandra E; Dittmann, Rebecca; Poespodihardjo, Renanto; Vogel, Marc; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Walter, Marc; Petitjean, Sylvie A

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to traumatic events is common among patients with substance use disorders (SUD). In patients with non-substance-related disorders, especially with gambling disorders (GD) and internet addiction (IA), traumatic childhood experiences have not been investigated extensively. The objective of this study was to compare trauma histories in patients with GD and IA to patients with heroin dependence. Cross-sectional surveys including the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) and clinical data among 107 participants; 59 patients with non-substance-related disorders (GD [n = 39]; IA [n = 20]) were compared to 28 patients prescribed injectable heroin for opioid dependence in heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) and to a healthy control group (HC) (n = 20). The findings revealed a high prevalence of trauma exposure in all three clinical groups, with 74.4% of patients with GD, 80.0% of patients with IA, and 93.0% of patients in HAT compared to 40% in HC. All three groups (GD, IA, HAT) reported significantly higher levels of "emotional neglect" compared to HC. The results provide clinically relevant information suggesting that the burden of childhood traumatic experiences may be as common in patients with GD and IA as in patients with heroin dependence. These findings could pose an important starting-point for treatment. (Am J Addict 2017;26:215-220). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. Analysis of Cocaine, Heroin, and their Metabolites in Saliva

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-10

    from a study of the metabolism of radiolabeled cocaine.6 Later, cocaine was found in the saliva of impaired drivers.7 Most studies show similar...reported.9,10 The latter was a controlled study examined the metabolism of heroin in plasma and saliva. This study followed the metabolism of heroin by...in Table 1. Table 1 - HPLC Conditions Column: Alltech/Applied Science Econosphere C8, 250 x 4.6 mm Solvent A: 0.1M Ammonium Acetate Solvent B: 10:90

  2. Brugada phenocopy in concomitant ethanol and heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Rambod, Mehdi; Elhanafi, Sherif; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Brugada phenocopy describes conditions with Brugada-like ECG pattern but without true congenital Brugada syndrome. We report a case of 44-year-old man with no known medical history who presented with loss of consciousness. Toxicology screening was positive for opiates and high serum alcohol level. His initial ECG showed Brugada type 1 pattern which resolved after several hours of observation and treatment with continuous naloxone infusion. Patient regained his consciousness and disclosed heroin abuse and drinking alcohol. This case highlights the heroin overdose as a possible cause of Brugada phenocopy.

  3. Noscapine as an adulterant in illicit heroin samples.

    PubMed

    Klemenc, S

    2000-01-24

    In this short report the evidence is given (based on the analyses of 22 case samples) that noscapine can be used as an adulterant in illicit heroin samples. In this context, the appearance of illicit heroin samples characterised by a high noscapine content (up to 61%) and a high noscapine/whole morphine ratio (up to 3.5) is highlighted. All samples discussed in the paper (132) were seized in Slovenia, in the period from 1997 to 1999 and were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  4. Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    drug deterrence program were raised from 300 ng/ml to 4000 ng/ml for morphine and 2000 ng/ml for codeine in an attempt to distinguish between poppy seed ...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6512 Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use r- I- FCTE DAVID...Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kidwell. D.A. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 113b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year

  5. Injectional anthrax in a heroin skin-popper.

    PubMed

    Ringertz, S H; Høiby, E A; Jensenius, M; Maehlen, J; Caugant, D A; Myklebust, A; Fossum, K

    2000-11-04

    Anthrax is rare in western Europe but may arise sporadically in people exposed to animal products from endemic areas. A heroin-injecting drug user presented with a severe soft-tissue infection at the injection site, septic shock, and meningitis. A gram-positive endospore-forming aerobic rod was isolated from the soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid; confirmation of Bacillus anthracis was made by PCR. Since contaminated heroin was the probable source of infection, this case is of concern and warrants surveillance.

  6. Scientific and political challenges in North America's first randomized controlled trial of heroin-assisted treatment for severe heroin addiction: rationale and design of the NAOMI study.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Nosyk, Bohdan; Marsh, David C; Guh, Daphne; Brissette, Suzanne; Gartry, Candice; Krausz, Michael; Anis, Aslam; Schechter, Martin T

    2009-06-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic relapsing disease, best treated with opioid-agonist substitution therapy such as methadone maintenance. However, a subset of the most severely affected individuals do not benefit sufficiently from this treatment. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to evaluate the hypothesis that pharmaceutical-grade heroin, diacetylmorphine (DAM) is more effective in retaining patients and improving their outcomes than Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) among those with chronic, refractory injection opioid dependence. The study aimed at randomizing 253 participants to two intervention arms: (1) MMT alone or (2) injectable opioids (DAM or hydromorphone) plus adjunctive MMT if deemed appropriate. The planned study duration was 3 years, with a 1-year intake period, 1 year of treatment, and an additional year of follow-up. The NAOMI trial was initiated in March 2005 at two Canadian sites (Vancouver and Montreal). This was the first multicenter RCT in North America to compare the relative efficacy of these different therapeutic strategies. We discuss the rationale behind the NAOMI study design, as well as the scientific and political issues and methodological challenges arising from the conduct of a trial that involves the prescription of a controlled substance to individuals with dependence on that substance. Restrictive entry criteria led to the exclusion of many otherwise eligible participants, slowing recruitment into the study. Inability to offer DAM treatment beyond 12 months led to artificial boundary effects in the trial. Addiction treatment research navigates between science and politics, and evidence-based medicine is many times confronted by moral beliefs. Political considerations influence study design to a further degree than in RCTs treating less-stigmatized disorders with more-reputable medications.

  7. Accelerated transition to injection among male heroin initiates in Hanoi, Vietnam: implications for early harm reduction interventions.

    PubMed

    Clatts, Michael C; Goldsamt, Lloyd A; Giang, Le Minh; Colón-López, Vivian

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines changes in the interval between first heroin smoking and onset of injection in a large, out-treatment sample of male heroin users in Hanoi, Vietnam (n = 1,115). Mean age at initiation of heroin use (smoking) was 18.4 and mean age of onset of heroin injection was 20.9 years. Full multivariate analysis indicates that the interval between first heroin use (smoking) and first heroin injection has been significantly attenuated among more recent heroin initiates (P = 0.0043), suggesting that heroin users in Vietnam may be at increased risk for exposure to HIV relatively soon after onset of heroin use, highlighting the need for behavioral interventions that target heroin smokers. Critical intervention goals include delaying the onset of injection and improved education about safer drug sharing and drug injection practices.

  8. Comparison of striatal dopamine transporter levels in chronic heroin-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Liu, Xing Dang; Han, Mei; Lv, Rong Bin; Wang, Yuan Kai; Zhang, Guang Ming; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of heroin and methamphetamine (METH) addiction on dopamine transporters (DATs) in the same dose and duration, we assessed DAT levels in the striatum by (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images in people with heroin and METH dependence. We recruited 21 healthy human controls, 23 heroin-dependent subjects and 25 METH abusers. The heroin- and METH-dependent subjects exhibited negative urine toxicology after undergoing physiological detoxification. All subjects underwent SPECT brain imaging, and specific tracer uptake ratios (SURs) were assessed bilaterally in the regions of interest. A significant SUR reduction in heroin-dependent subjects and METH-dependent subjects compared with healthy controls was found in the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. There were no significant differences in the heroin group and METH group for the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. The scores of craving, HAMA (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), in heroin abusers were lower than in the METH abusers. Our results show that people with heroin and METH dependence who are currently abstinent had lower DAT levels in the striatum than healthy controls. There were no differences in striatal DAT in heroin and METH users. These results suggest that chronic heroin and METH abuse appears to produce similar effects in striatal DAT in humans. METH users may have more serious craving and anxiety symptoms than heroin users with prolonged abstinence.

  9. AUTS2 in the nucleus accumbens is essential for heroin-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongsheng; Xing, Bo; Dang, Wei; Ji, Yuanyuan; Yan, Peng; Li, Yunxiao; Qiao, Xiaomeng; Lai, Jianghua

    2016-10-01

    Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2) is a gene associated with autism and mental retardation. Recent studies have suggested an association of the AUTS2 gene with heroin dependence, and reduced AUTS2 gene expression may confer increased susceptibility to heroin dependence. However, the functional role of the AUTS2 protein in regulating enduring neuroadaptations in response to heroin exposure has not been established. Here, we investigated the effects of acute and chronic heroin exposure on AUTS2 mRNA and protein expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen (CPu) to determine whether changes in AUTS2 expression are associated with heroin-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Moreover, we explored whether AUST2 knockdown affects heroin-induced locomotor sensitization. AUTS2 mRNA and protein expression in the NAc, but not the CPu, was decreased after chronic heroin (1mg/kg) administration. In the NAc, the expression of heroin-induced locomotor sensitization was enhanced through the lentiviral-AUTS2-shRNA-mediated knockdown of AUTS2, while the overexpression of AUTS2 attenuated the locomotor-stimulant effects of heroin. Together, these results indicate that AUTS2 in the NAc, but not the CPu, suppresses the initiation and expression of heroin-induced behavioral sensitization, suggesting that AUST2 may be a potential target for the treatment of heroin dependence. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pupil responses to intravenous heroin (diamorphine) in dependent and non-dependent humans.

    PubMed

    Tress, K H; El-Sobky, A A

    1979-02-01

    1. Intravenous heroin was administered to volunteers, in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg to non-dependent subjects and does of 1/6, 1/3 and 1/2 of their prescribed daily does of opiates to dependent subjects, and pupillary responses measured before and three times during the 2 h after injection. 2. Tolerance to the miotic effects of heroin in the dependent subjects was demonstrated--larger doses of heroin were needed to produce the same pupil response in dependent subjects than in non-dependent subjects and the duration of action was shorter in the former group. 3. The effect of concurrent oral methadone medication on pupil response to heroin was demonstrated. Subjects prescribed both methadone and heroin showed smaller control pupil diameters and a reduced dose effect to heroin than did subjects prescribed heroin alone.

  11. Pupil responses to intravenous heroin (diamorphine) in dependent and non-dependent humans.

    PubMed Central

    Tress, K H; El-Sobky, A A

    1979-01-01

    1. Intravenous heroin was administered to volunteers, in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg to non-dependent subjects and does of 1/6, 1/3 and 1/2 of their prescribed daily does of opiates to dependent subjects, and pupillary responses measured before and three times during the 2 h after injection. 2. Tolerance to the miotic effects of heroin in the dependent subjects was demonstrated--larger doses of heroin were needed to produce the same pupil response in dependent subjects than in non-dependent subjects and the duration of action was shorter in the former group. 3. The effect of concurrent oral methadone medication on pupil response to heroin was demonstrated. Subjects prescribed both methadone and heroin showed smaller control pupil diameters and a reduced dose effect to heroin than did subjects prescribed heroin alone. PMID:760755

  12. Global flows in drug treatment: heroin addiction and therapeutic community approaches in China.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Sandra Teresa

    2010-07-01

    This article focuses on one residential therapeutic community for the treatment of heroin and opiate addiction in contemporary China. It discusses 2 case vignettes and shows that although addictions are extremely difficult to treat, there are small successes being reached in China's southwest. Residential treatment communities follow mobile global practices that link Western models of 12-step Narcotics Anonymous, self-healing, to other Chinese practices like Maoist "speak bitterness." In China it is in the drug aid theaters where Sunlight-International traveled to do three things: (a) stave off the American drug market, (b ) reduce drug trafficking across national borders, and (c) address the psychosocial problems associated with global drug trafficking and consumption. Through the process of unraveling the on-the-ground practices of public health international humanitarian nongovernmental organizations and some of their therapeutic models, we begin to see new alliances formed across the globe around drug treatment and care that point toward important results.

  13. The therapeutic use of heroin: a review of the pharmacological literature.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    1986-01-01

    Heroin is currently being advocated by some as a superior therapeutic agent for use in terminal illness. However, a review of the literature on heroin presently available does not support this contention. Administered orally, heroin is approximately 1.5 times more potent than morphine in controlling chronic pain in terminal cancer patients. Its effects on mood and the incidence and nature of side effects do not differ from those of morphine except in males where poorer pain control probably accounts for the worse effect on mood. Given parenterally for acute pain, heroin is 2-4 times more potent than morphine and faster in onset of action. When the potency difference is accounted for, the pharmacological effects of heroin do not differ appreciably from those of morphine. Heroin is metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. After oral administration of heroin, morphine but not heroin or 6-acetylmorphine is detected in blood. In this case, heroin is a prodrug for the delivery of systemic morphine. Following acute i.v. administration, heroin appears transiently in blood with a half-life of about 3 min. The half-life of heroin exposed to blood or serum in vitro is 9-22 min, indicating that organ metabolism is involved in blood clearance as well. Direct renal clearance of heroin is less than 1% of the administered dose. In animal studies, heroin and 6-acetylmorphine are both more potent and faster acting than morphine as analgesics, effects attributed to their greater lipid solubility and subsequent penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Given centrally, morphine is more potent than heroin and 6-acetylmorphine in producing analgesia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Nationwide Increase in Hospitalizations for Heroin-related Soft Tissue Infections: Associations with Structural Market Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Dan; Unick, George Jay; Cohen, Jenny; Mars, Sarah G.; Rosenblum, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about trends in national rates of injection-related skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and their relationship to the structural risk environment for heroin users. Use of Mexican-sourced “Black Tar” heroin, predominant in western US states, may have greater risk for SSTI compared with eastern US powder heroin (Colombian-sourced) due to its association with non-intravenous injection or from possible contamination. Methods Using nationally representative hospital admissions data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and heroin price and purity data from the Drug Enforcement Administration, we looked at rates of hospital admissions for opiate-related SSTI (O-SSTI) between 1993 and 2010. Regression analyses examined associations between O-SSTI and heroin source, form and price. Results Hospitalization rates of O-SSTI doubled from 4 to 9 per 100,000 nationally between 1993 and 2010; the increase concentrated among individuals aged 20 to 40. Heroin market features were strongly associated with changes in the rate of SSTI. Each $100 increase in yearly heroin price-per–gram-pure was associated with a 3% decrease in the rate of heroin-related SSTI admissions. Mexican-sourced-heroin-dominant cities had twice the rate of O-SSTI compared to Colombian-sourced-heroin-dominant cities. Discussion Heroin-related SSTI are increasing and structural factors, including heroin price and source-form, are associated with higher rates of SSTI hospital admissions. Clinical and harm reduction efforts should educate heroin users on local risk factors, e.g., heroin type, promote vein health strategies and provide culturally sensitive treatment services for persons suffering with SSTI. PMID:27155756

  15. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527…

  16. Youth, Heroin, Crack: A Review of Recent British Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on recent British trends in the use of heroin and/or crack-cocaine by young people in order to appraise the scale and nature of the contemporary health problem they pose. Design/methodology/approach: The approach consists of a narrative review of the main current data sources on…

  17. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  18. Tracking Heroin Chic: The Abject Body Reconfigures the Rational Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a recent fashion trend known as "heroin chic" challenges conventional modes of argumentation. Considers how its popularization of abject, emaciated bodies presents an alternative to a logic of rationalism that grounds traditional argumentation. Discusses how by foregrounding corporeal performativity as a form of argument,…

  19. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  20. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  1. Neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention for detoxified heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dingyan; Liu, Yan; He, Wulong; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Zengzhen

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the effects of combined administration of tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) on heroin withdrawal syndromes and mental symptoms in detoxified heroin addicts. In the cluster-randomized placebo-controlled trial, 83 detoxified heroin addicts were recruited from a detoxification treatment center in Wuhan, China. Patients in the intervention group (n=41) were given the combined treatment with tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and 5-HTP and those in the control group (n=42) were administered the placebo. The sleep status and the withdrawal symptoms were observed daily throughout the study, and the mood states were monitored pre- and post-intervention. The results showed that the insomnia and withdrawal scores were significantly improved over time in participants in the intervention group as compared with those in the control group. A greater reduction in tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia and total mood disturbance, and a greater increase in their vigor-activity symptoms were found at day 6 in the intervention group than in the control group (all P<0.05). It was concluded that the neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention is effective in alleviating the withdrawal and mood symptoms and it may become a supplementary method for patients' recovery from heroin addiction.

  2. Youth, Heroin, Crack: A Review of Recent British Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on recent British trends in the use of heroin and/or crack-cocaine by young people in order to appraise the scale and nature of the contemporary health problem they pose. Design/methodology/approach: The approach consists of a narrative review of the main current data sources on…

  3. The Association Between Heroin Inhalation and Early Onset Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Walker, Paul P; Thwaite, Erica; Amin, Suzanne; Curtis, John M; Calverley, Peter M A

    2015-11-01

    Inhalation/smoking has become the most common method of recreational opiate consumption in the United Kingdom and other countries. Although some heroin smokers appear to develop COPD, little is known about the association. We present data from a cohort of 73 heroin smokers with clinician-diagnosed and spirometrically confirmed COPD, seen within our clinical service, where symptoms developed before the age of 40 years. The whole group mean age at diagnosis was 41 years, subjects had smoked heroin for 14 years, and mean FEV1 was 1.08 L (31.5% predicted), with mean FEV1/FVC of 0.4. No subject was found to have severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. Forty-four subjects had either a high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan (32) or measurement of lung diffusion (12). Overall HRCT scan emphysema score averaged across the upper, middle, and lower part of the lung was 2.3 (5%-25% emphysema), with 47% subjects having an upper lobe emphysema score ≥ 3 (25%-50% emphysema). Median diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was 48% of predicted value. Recreational smoking of heroin appears to lead to early onset COPD with a predominant emphysema phenotype. This message is important to both clinicians and the public, and targeted screening and education of this high-risk population may be justified.

  4. Tracking Heroin Chic: The Abject Body Reconfigures the Rational Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a recent fashion trend known as "heroin chic" challenges conventional modes of argumentation. Considers how its popularization of abject, emaciated bodies presents an alternative to a logic of rationalism that grounds traditional argumentation. Discusses how by foregrounding corporeal performativity as a form of argument,…

  5. Urinary Kinetics of Heroin Metabolites in Pigs Shortly After Intake.

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Gottås, André; Berg, Thomas; Arnestad, Marianne; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Bachs, Liliana C

    2017-06-01

    In previous experimental studies on heroin metabolites excretion in urine, the first sample was often collected a few hours after intake. In forensic cases, it is sometimes questioned if a positive urine result is expected e.g., 30 min after intake. The aim of this study was to investigate urinary excretion of heroin metabolites (morphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G)) every 30 min until 330 min after injection of a 20 mg heroin dose in six pigs. Samples were analyzed using a previously published, fully validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. All metabolites were detected after 30 min in all pigs. The time to maximum concentration (Tmax) median (range) for 6-MAM and morphine was 30 min (first sample) (30-120), and 90 min (30-330) for M3G. In four of the six pigs, the Tmax of 6-MAM and morphine was reached within 30 min. All analytes were still detectable at the end of study. This study showed that positive results in urine are expected to be seen shortly after use of heroin in pigs. Detection times were longer than previously indicated, especially for 6-MAM, but previous studies used lower doses. As the physiology of these animals resembles that of the humans, transferability to man is expected. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Non-infective neurologic complications associated to heroin use].

    PubMed

    Pascual Calvet, J; Pou, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Gutiérrez Cebollada, J

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with heroin addiction has changed in the past six years because of the progressive knowledge of the neurological complications related to HIV infection. We reviewed 48 heroin addicts with neurological complications and 452 heroin overdose who were seen in the Emergency Unit of our hospital during 1988 and the publications since 1967. Regarding the overdose we present the results of a prospective study leading to determine the causes. We emphasize the relationship with the level of total morphine in serum, instead of conjugate morphine, and with the presence of high levels of benzodiazepines found in the plasma rather than an hypothetic hypersensitivity phenomenon. We resume the neurological complications related with heroin addiction: spongiform leukoencephalopathy, epileptic seizures, stroke, transverse myelopathy and neuromuscular complications such mononeuropathy, plexopathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, rhabdomyolysis, fibrosing myopathy, musculoskeletal syndrome and acute bacterial myopathy. Some of such complications (i.e. transverse myelitis, polyradiculoneuropathy, leucoencephalopathy) must rise the suspicion of an HIV infection. Likewise, in patients assisted for overdosage we believe it's necessary rule out myoglobinuria by means of CPK serum levels and detection of urine hematic pigments without red blood cels in the urine sediment, in order to prevent and treat the renal failure. We report the results of muscular biopsy found in the musculoskeletal syndrome, which are similar to those found in alcoholic myopathy. Finally, we describe the clinical and diagnostic aspects in an unusually neuromuscular complication: the acute bacterial myopathy.

  7. The Cognitive Structure Underlying Heroin-Injecting Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnigan, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the identification of critical elements that will induce and maintain behavior change in drug education. Demonstrates how the Theory of Reasoned Action can be used to identify these elements. Data were gathered from a sample of heroin injectors and the cognitive structures underlying drug use were investigated. Discusses findings with…

  8. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527…

  9. Heroin Addiction: Psychosocial Characteristics and Considerations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, John K.

    This paper presents a review of relevant medical and psychological literature that addresses the psychological characteristics of heroin addiction and addicts: dependence (both physical and psychological); explanations of the phenomenon of addiction (both medical and behavioral); and other psychosocial views of causation including escapism,…

  10. Heroin Addiction: Psychosocial Characteristics and Considerations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, John K.

    This paper presents a review of relevant medical and psychological literature that addresses the psychological characteristics of heroin addiction and addicts: dependence (both physical and psychological); explanations of the phenomenon of addiction (both medical and behavioral); and other psychosocial views of causation including escapism,…

  11. Opium and heroin alter biochemical parameters of human's serum.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Divsalar; Tahereh, Haghpanah; Mohammadreza, Afarinesh; Minoo, Mahmoudi Zarandi

    2010-05-01

    Iran is a significant consumer of opium, and, generally, of opioids, in the world. Addiction is one of the important issues of the 21st century and is an imperative issue in Iran. Long-term consumption of opioids affects homeostasis. To determine the effects of opium and heroin consumption on serum biochemical parameters. In a cross-sectional study, subjects who had consumed heroin (n = 35) or opium (n = 42) for more than two years and 35 nonaddict volunteers as the control group were compared in regard to various biochemical parameters such as fasting blood sugar (FBS), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), uric acid (UA), triglyceride (TG), cholesterol, creatinine, and total protein. Chromatography was used to confirm opioid consumption, and the concentration of biochemical parameters was determined by laboratory diagnostic tests on serum. No significant differences were found in Na(+), Ca(2+), BUN, UA, TG, creatinine, and total protein concentrations among the three groups. FBS, K(+), and UA levels were significantly lower in opium addicts compared to the control group. Serum Ca(2+) concentration of heroin addicts showed a significant decrease compared to that of the control group. Both addict groups showed a significant decrease in serum cholesterol levels. Chronic use of opium and heroin can change serum FBS, K(+), Ca(2+), UA, and cholesterol. This study, one of few on the effects of opium on serum biochemical parameters in human subjects, has the potential to contribute to the investigation of new approaches for further basic studies.

  12. Family Atmosphere and Relationships as Predictors of Heroin Addiction.

    PubMed

    Mirković-Hajdukov, Mitra; Spahić, Tamara Efendić; Softić, Rusmir; Bećirović, Elvir; Šimić, Josip

    2017-05-01

    Studies show that dysfunctional family relationships are important predictors of addictions to all psychoactive substances. To establish if there is a connection between family relations and heroin addiction and if found to exist, what is the quality of this connection. This research was conducted on the sample comprised of 160 subjects divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 61 heroin addicts treated at the Tuzla University Clinical Centre Psychiatric Hospital. The second group consisted of 99 subjects who were students at the Tuzla University Faculties of Philosophy and Electrical Engineering and who were not using any psychoactive substances. The subjects were tested with the Quality of Family Interactions Scale (KOBI) which measures the interactions between children and parents in two dimensions, described in literature as 'acceptance' and 'rejection'. The research team established statistically significant differences between the heroin addicts and the students, the non-users, in terms of their family relationships. The results show that the addicts families were characterized by lack of understanding, by conflicts, rejection, non-acceptance by parents, while the non-users families were characterized by understanding, acceptance by parents and good communication. There is a connection between inter-family relationships and addiction. Namely, rejection and non-acceptance of children/persons by their families and parents, bad communication and dysfunctional family relationships are significant predictors of heroin addiction.

  13. Genetic association analyses of PDYN polymorphisms with heroin and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T-K; Ambrose-Lanci, L; Ferraro, T N; Berrettini, W H; Kampman, K M; Dackis, C A; Pettinati, H M; O'Brien, C P; Oslin, D W; Lohoff, F W

    2012-06-01

    Genetic factors are believed to account for 30-50% of the risk for cocaine and heroin addiction. Dynorphin peptides, derived from the prodynorphin (PDYN) precursor, bind to opioid receptors, preferentially the kappa-opioid receptor, and may mediate the aversive effects of drugs of abuse. Dynorphin peptides produce place aversion in animals and produce dysphoria in humans. Cocaine and heroin have both been shown to increase expression of PDYN in brain regions relevant for drug reward and use. Polymorphisms in PDYN are therefore hypothesized to increase risk for addiction to drugs of abuse. In this study, 3 polymorphisms in PDYN (rs1022563, rs910080 and rs1997794) were genotyped in opioid-addicted [248 African Americans (AAs) and 1040 European Americans (EAs)], cocaine-addicted (1248 AAs and 336 EAs) and control individuals (674 AAs and 656 EAs). Sex-specific analyses were also performed as a previous study identified PDYN polymorphisms to be more significantly associated with female opioid addicts. We found rs1022563 to be significantly associated with opioid addiction in EAs [P = 0.03, odds ratio (OR) = 1.31; false discovery rate (FDR) corrected q-value]; however, when we performed female-specific association analyses, the OR increased from 1.31 to 1.51. Increased ORs were observed for rs910080 and rs199774 in female opioid addicts also in EAs. No statistically significant associations were observed with cocaine or opioid addiction in AAs. These data show that polymorphisms in PDYN are associated with opioid addiction in EAs and provide further evidence that these risk variants may be more relevant in females. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. GABRB2 Haplotype Association with Heroin Dependence in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Su; Yang, Mei; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Su, Zhonghua; Jiang, Xianfei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Liu, Siyu; Hu, Taobo; Pun, Frank; Liao, Yanhui; Tang, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaogang; Hao, Wei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Substance dependence is a frequently observed comorbid disorder in schizophrenia, but little is known about genetic factors possibly shared between the two psychotic disorders. GABRB2, a schizophrenia candidate gene coding for GABAA receptor β2 subunit, is examined for possible association with heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GABRB2, namely rs6556547 (S1), rs1816071 (S3), rs18016072 (S5), and rs187269 (S29), previously associated with schizophrenia, were examined for their association with heroin dependence. Two additional SNPs, rs10051667 (S31) and rs967771 (S32), previously associated with alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder respectively, were also analyzed. The six SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing of PCR amplicons of target regions for 564 heroin dependent individuals and 498 controls of Han Chinese origin. Interestingly, it was found that recombination between the haplotypes of all-derived-allele (H1; OR = 1.00) and all-ancestral-allele (H2; OR = 0.74) at S5-S29 junction generated two recombinants H3 (OR = 8.51) and H4 (OR = 5.58), both conferring high susceptibility to heroin dependence. Additional recombination between H2 and H3 haplotypes at S1-S3 junction resulted in a risk-conferring haplotype H5 (OR = 1.94x109). In contrast, recombination between H1 and H2 haplotypes at S3-S5 junction rescued the risk-conferring effect of recombination at S5-S29 junction, giving rise to the protective haplotype H6 (OR = 0.68). Risk-conferring effects of S1-S3 and S5-S29 crossovers and protective effects of S3-S5 crossover were seen in both pure heroin dependent and multiple substance dependence subgroups. In conclusion, significant association was found with haplotypes of the S1-S29 segment in GABRB2 for heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Local recombination was an important determining factor for switching haplotypes between risk-conferring and protective statuses. The present study

  15. Temporal diversification of Central American cichlids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes are classic examples of adaptive radiation because of their putative tendency to explosively diversify after invading novel environments. To examine whether ecological opportunity increased diversification (speciation minus extinction) early in a species-rich cichlid radiation, we determined if Heroine cichlids experienced a burst of diversification following their invasion of Central America. Results We first reconstructed the Heroine phylogeny and determined the basal node to use as the root of Central American Heroine diversification. We then examined the influence of incomplete taxon sampling on this group's diversification patterns. First, we added missing species randomly to the phylogeny and assessed deviations from a constant rate of lineage accumulation. Using a range of species numbers, we failed to recover significant deviations from a pure-birth process and found little support for an early burst of diversification. Then, we examined patterns of lineage accumulation as nodes were increasingly truncated. We assumed that as we removed more recently diverged lineages that sampling would become more complete thereby increasing the power to detect deviations from a pure-birth model. However, truncation of nodes provided even less support for an early burst of diversification. Conclusions Contrary to expectations, our analyses suggest Heroine cichlids did not undergo a burst of diversification when they invaded from South America. Throughout their history in Central America, Heroine cichlids appear to have diversified at a constant rate. PMID:20840768

  16. Cognitive impulsivity in cocaine and heroin polysubstance abusers.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio J; Perales, José C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-05-01

    Chronic abuse of psychoactive substances produces significant deficits in executive control functions (ECF). These deficits are prominent in different domains associated with cognitive impulsivity, including response inhibition and decision-making. The extent and nature of these deficits may depend on the principal substance of abuse. To analyse response inhibition and decision-making performance in abstinent polysubstance abusers (PSA) of cocaine and heroin, and healthy participants. We used univariate and multivariate analyses of variance to compare the performances of cocaine and heroin PSA and healthy controls on several well-validated measures of response inhibition (Stroop, 5-Digit Test and Go/No Go Task) and decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task). Post-hoc exploratory analyses of the results from the Go/No Go task were conducted to examine specific effects of task switching on the pattern of omission/commission errors in the PSA groups. Cocaine but not heroin PSA showed significant deficits on several measures of response inhibition, when compared to controls. Reversal of task contingencies in the Go/No Go task primarily altered the commission error rate in cocaine PSA, and the omission error rate in heroin PSA. In contrast, both cocaine and heroin PSA showed poorer performance on decision-making compared to controls. Assuming the relevance of polysubstance involvement, cocaine abuse seems to differentially correlate with motor impulsivity skills, while both substances seem to be equally linked to the inability to decide advantageously in complex decision-making tasks. Possible discrepancies in the neurological and psychological effects of these drugs are discussed.

  17. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 minutes after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3×2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3×20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 hours after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal. PMID:23771528

  18. Increased locomotor activity induced by heroin in mice: pharmacokinetic demonstration of heroin acting as a prodrug for the mediator 6-monoacetylmorphine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Ripel, Ase; Boix, Fernando; Normann, Per Trygve; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the relative importance of heroin and its metabolites in eliciting a behavioral response in mice by studying the relationship between concentrations of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and morphine in brain tissue and the effects on locomotor activity. Low doses (subcutaneous) of heroin (< or =5 micromol/kg) or 6MAM (< or =15 micromol/kg) made the mice run significantly more than mice given equimolar doses of morphine. There were no differences in the response between heroin and 6MAM, although we observed a shift to the left of the dose-response curve for the maximal response of heroin. The behavioral responses were abolished by pretreatment with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. Heroin was detected in brain tissue after injection, but the levels were low and its presence too short-lived to be responsible for the behavioral response observed. The concentration of 6MAM in brain tissue increased shortly after administration of both heroin and 6MAM and the concentration changes during the first hour roughly reflected the changes in locomotor activity. Both the maximal and the total concentration of 6MAM were higher after administration of heroin than after administration of 6MAM itself. The morphine concentration increased slowly after injection and could not explain the immediate behavioral response. In summary, the locomotor activity response after injection of heroin was mediated by 6MAM, which increased shortly after administration. Heroin acted as an effective prodrug. The concentration of morphine was too low to stimulate the immediate response observed but might have an effect on the later part of the heroin-induced behavioral response curve.

  19. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-09-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 min after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3 × 2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3 × 20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 h after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal.

  20. Gray Matter Density Negatively Correlates with Duration of Heroin Use in Young Lifetime Heroin-Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Yi; Zhu, Zude; Shi, Jinfu; Zou, Zhiling; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Yijun; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Weng, Xuchu

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented cognitive impairments and hypoactivity in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in drug users. However, the relationships between opiate dependence and brain structure changes in heroin users are largely unknown. In the present study, we measured the density of gray matter (DGM) with voxel-based…

  1. Comparison of urine results concerning co-consumption of illicit heroin and other drugs in heroin and methadone maintenance programs.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, Frank; Trafkowski, Jens; Lichtermann, Dirk; Madea, Burkhard

    2010-09-01

    Urine samples of patients from a heroin maintenance program (HMP) and a methadone maintenance program (MMP) were chromatographically analyzed 1 month before and 6 and 12 months into treatment for the presence of classical markers of heroin use as well as for the presence of markers for illicit heroin abuse. Furthermore, the samples were immunochemically tested for cannabinoids, cocaine metabolites, amphetamine, methylendioxyamphetamines and benzodiazepines. A co-consumption of illicit heroin (HER) in the HMP was determined to be 50% but was significantly lower compared to the MMP with a co-use of 71%. The incidence was high because not only acetylcodeine (AC) as a very specific marker was considered but also other marker substances for illicit HER use. Amphetamines played only a minor part in both collectives, and the proportion of HER and methadone patients using cocaine was similar and decreased during treatment. Also, the benzodiazepine use decreased, and cannabis use was high in both collectives during treatment. Considering only the AC in the present study, a co-use of illicit HER in the HMP was similar to previous reports concerning HER-assisted treatment programs. If additional marker substances were examined, the suspicion of a co-use of illicit HER is markedly enhanced.

  2. Gray Matter Density Negatively Correlates with Duration of Heroin Use in Young Lifetime Heroin-Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Yi; Zhu, Zude; Shi, Jinfu; Zou, Zhiling; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Yijun; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Weng, Xuchu

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented cognitive impairments and hypoactivity in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in drug users. However, the relationships between opiate dependence and brain structure changes in heroin users are largely unknown. In the present study, we measured the density of gray matter (DGM) with voxel-based…

  3. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  4. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  5. A monoclonal antibody specific for 6-monoacetylmorphine reduces acute heroin effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Boix, Fernando; Nerem, Elisabeth; Mørland, Jørg; Andersen, Jannike Mørch

    2014-06-01

    Immunotherapy against drugs of abuse is being studied as an alternative treatment option in addiction medicine and is based on antibodies sequestering the drug in the bloodstream and blocking its entry into the brain. Producing an efficient vaccine against heroin has been considered particularly challenging because of the rapid metabolism of heroin to multiple psychoactive molecules. We have previously reported that heroin's first metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), is the predominant mediator for heroin's acute behavioral effects and that heroin is metabolized to 6-MAM primarily prior to brain entry. On this basis, we hypothesized that antibody sequestration of 6-MAM is sufficient to impair heroin-induced effects and therefore examined the effects of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for 6-MAM. In vitro experiments in human and rat blood revealed that the antibody was able to bind 6-MAM and block the metabolism to morphine almost completely, whereas the conversion of heroin to 6-MAM remained unaffected. Mice pretreated with the mAb toward 6-MAM displayed a reduction in heroin-induced locomotor activity that corresponded closely to the reduction in brain 6-MAM levels. Intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of the anti-6-MAM mAb gave equivalent protection against heroin effects, and the mAb was estimated to have a functional half-life of 8 to 9 days in mice. Our study implies that an antibody against 6-MAM is effective in counteracting heroin effects.

  6. Metabolomic profiling of brain tissues of mice chronically exposed to heroin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Shi; Takeda, Tomoki; Ohshima, Takashi; Yamada, Hideyuki; Ishii, Yuji

    2017-02-01

    The chronic neurotoxicity of heroin on the nervous system is poorly understood. To address this issue, we comprehensively assessed the alteration of brain metabolomics caused by chronic heroin exposure and the withdrawal of heroin. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 10) were given heroin (15 μmol/kg, i.p., twice a day) for 12 days while the withdrawal group received saline-treatment instead of heroin for the last two days. The control group received saline. We developed an UPLC-TOF/MS-based metabolomic approach to analyze the metabolites and carry out a metabolic pathway analysis in the brain. The major metabolites contributing to the discrimination were identified as amino acids, tricarboxylic-acid cycle intermediates, neurotransmitters, nucleotides and other compounds. A marked reduction in histidine and a slight but significant increase in phenylalanine and tryptophan were observed after heroin was withdrawn while the increased level of catecholamines was restored to baseline. Interestingly, N-acetylserotonin - a precursor of melatonin - was increased with the withdrawal of heroin while melatonin was markedly reduced along with the sub-chronic exposure to heroin. This shows that heroin disrupts not only the energy metabolism but also the biosynthesis of both catecholamines and melatonin in the mouse brain. Therefore, these substances are candidate biomarkers for chronic heroin-abuse. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling of subcutaneous heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain of mice.

    PubMed

    Boix, Fernando; Andersen, Jannike M; Mørland, Jørg

    2013-01-01

    High blood-brain permeability and effective delivery of morphine to the brain have been considered as explanations for the high potency of heroin. Results from Andersen et al. indicate that 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), and not morphine, is the active metabolite responsible for the acute effects observed for heroin. Here, we use pharmacokinetic modeling on data from the aforementioned study to calculate parameters of the distribution of heroin, 6-MAM and morphine in blood and brain tissue after subcutaneous heroin administration in mice. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters imply that the very low heroin and the high 6-MAM levels observed both in blood and brain in the original experiment are likely to be caused by a very high metabolic rate of heroin in blood. The estimated metabolic rate of heroin in brain was much lower and cannot account for the low heroin and high 6-MAM levels in the brain, which would primarily reflect the concentrations of these compounds in blood. The very different metabolic rates for heroin in blood and brain calculated by the model were confirmed by in vitro experiments. These results show that heroin's fast metabolism in blood renders high concentrations of 6-MAM which, due to its relatively good blood-brain permeability, results in high levels of this metabolite in the brain. Thus, it is the high blood metabolism rate of heroin and the blood-brain permeability to 6-MAM, and not to heroin, which could account for the highly efficient delivery of active metabolites to the brain after heroin administration.

  8. Acute effects of intravenous heroin on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Kuhl, Hans Christian; Schmid, Otto; Joechle, Wolfgang; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Schächinger, Hartmut; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Borgwardt, Stefan J

    2013-04-01

    Heroin dependence is associated with a stressful environment and with dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The present study examined the acute effects of intravenous heroin versus placebo on the HPA axis response in heroin-dependent patients. Twenty-eight heroin-dependent patients in heroin-assisted treatment and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were included in a controlled trial in which patients were twice administered heroin or saline in a crossover design, and healthy controls were only administered saline. The HPA axis response was measured by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels and by cortisol levels in serum and saliva before and 20 and 60 minutes after substance administration. Craving, withdrawal, and anxiety levels were measured before and 60 minutes after substance application. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Heroin administration reduces craving, withdrawal, and anxiety levels and leads to significant decreases in ACTH and cortisol concentrations (P < 0.01). After heroin administration, cortisol concentrations did not differ from healthy controls, and ACTH levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). In contrast, when patients receive saline, all hormone levels were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (P < 0.01). Heroin-dependent patients showed a normalized HPA axis response compared to healthy controls when they receive their regular heroin dose. These findings indicate that regular opioid administration protects addicts from stress and underscore the clinical significance of heroin-assisted treatment for heroin-dependent patients.

  9. Trends and characteristics of heroin overdoses in Wisconsin, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Meiman, Jon; Tomasallo, Carrie; Paulozzi, Leonard

    2015-07-01

    Heroin abuse has increased substantially during the past decade in the United States. This study describes trends and demographic shifts of heroin overdoses and heroin-related fatalities in Wisconsin and contrasts these with prescription opioid overdoses. This study was cross-sectional using databases of emergency department (ED) visits, hospital admissions, and death certificates in Wisconsin, United States, during 2003-2012. Cases were Wisconsin residents treated for heroin or prescription opioid overdose, and residents who died of heroin-related drug poisoning. Primary measurements were rates over time and by geographic region, and rates and rate ratios for selected demographic characteristics. During 2003-2012, age-adjusted rates of heroin overdoses treated in EDs increased from 1.0 to 7.9/100,000 persons; hospitalized heroin overdoses increased from 0.7 to 3.5/100,000. Whites accounted for 68% of hospitalized heroin overdoses during 2003-2007 but 80% during 2008-2012. Heroin-related deaths were predominantly among urban residents; however, rural fatalities accounted for zero deaths in 2003 but 31 (17%) deaths in 2012. Among patients aged 18-34 years, those hospitalized with heroin overdose were more often men (73.0% versus 54.9%), uninsured (44.2% versus 29.9%), and urban (84.3% versus 73.2%) than those with prescription opioid overdose. Rates of ED visits for heroin overdose in this age group exceeded rates for prescription opioid overdose in 2012 (26.1/100,000 versus 12.6/100,000 persons, respectively). An epidemic of heroin abuse is characterized by demographic shifts toward whites and rural residents. Rates of heroin overdose in younger persons now exceed rates of prescription opioid overdose. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. SR141716A reduces the reinforcing properties of heroin but not heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Caillé, Stéphanie; Parsons, Loren H

    2003-12-01

    The present experiments tested the hypothesis that the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A alters heroin self-administration by attenuating heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine levels. SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently (0.3-3 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced operant heroin self-administration by male Wistar rats under a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement, and significantly lowered the breaking point of responding for heroin under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. These observations are consistent with recent reports that CB1 receptor inactivation reduces the rewarding properties of opiates. Operant responding for water reinforcement by water-restricted rats was unaltered by these SR141716A doses. Microdialysis tests revealed that heroin self-administration significantly increases interstitial dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell of vehicle-pretreated control rats. However, whereas SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration, it did not alter the heroin-associated increase in nucleus accumbens dopamine. These findings suggest that the CB1 antagonist-induced attenuation of heroin reward does not involve dopaminergic mechanisms in the nucleus accumbens shell.

  11. Mapping heroin careers: utilising a standardised history-taking method to assess the speed of escalation of heroin using careers in a treatment-seeking cohort.

    PubMed

    Best, David; Day, Ed; Cantillano, Vanessa; Gaston, Romina Lopez; Nambamali, Angela; Sweeting, Ruth; Keaney, Francis

    2008-03-01

    Although there has been increasing research attention to the concept of addiction careers and treatment careers, there are few standardised measures for assessing illicit drug using careers. A new instrument for mapping lifetime drug use history (LDUH) was used to assess transitions in the initial stages of heroin use careers among illicit drug users. 58 lifetime heroin users completed a one-off researcher-administered interview in treatment settings in two English cities, London and Birmingham, about their histories of drug use, drug treatment and other key life events. The sample reported initiating heroin use at a mean age of 21 years and escalated to daily use by 23 years. On average, there was a gap of nearly 8 years before seeking treatment and at the time of interview the cohort averaged one-third of their heroin careers in treatment. However, there was marked variability across the group, with three discernible groups identified based on use patterns. While one group (n = 21) showed consistent escalation in total quantity of heroin used across the first year, the second group had an intermittent pattern of use and the third group reported an unchanging monthly heroin use pattern. These groups differed in the time taken to initiate treatment and in the proportion of their heroin careers in active use. The instrument was acceptable to research participants and identified important variability in onset and escalation factors in heroin careers. The implications for therapeutic interventions and for clinical use of the instrument are discussed.

  12. A randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate a novel noninjectable anesthetic gel with thermosetting agent during scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, MM; Akbar, SM

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the efficacy of a noninjectable anesthetic gel with a thermosetting agent in the reduction of pain during scaling and root planing (SRP) in untreated chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized, double-masked, split-mouth, placebo-controlled trial. Thirty patients were enrolled who underwent SRP in a split-mouth (right side/left side) manner. Before commencement of SRP, both quadrants on each side were isolated and had a randomized gel (either placebo or test gel) placed in the periodontal pockets for 30 s. The pain was measured using numerical rating scale (NRS) and verbal rating scale (VRS). Results: The median NRS pain score for the patients treated with the anesthetic test gel was 1 (range: 0-4) as opposed to 5 (range: 3-7) in the placebo treated patients. The mean rank of pain score using NRS in test gel was 16.18 as compared to 44.82 in placebo treated sites. Hence, significant reduction in pain was found in test gel as compared to placebo using NRS (P < 0.001). The VRS showed that the majority of patients reported no pain or mild pain with a median of 1 as compared to placebo treated sites with a median of 2 suggestive of moderate pain. Conclusions: The NRS and VRS pain scores showed that the side treated with anesthetic gel was statistically more effective than the placebo in reducing pain during SRP. PMID:27051372

  13. Individual, network, and neighborhood correlates of exchange sex among female non-injection drug users in Baltimore, MD (2005–2007)

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Abby E; Linton, Sabriya; Dyer, Typhanye Penniman; Latkin, Carl

    2012-01-01

    The “HIV risk environment” has been characterized as a dynamic interplay between structural and network factors. However, most HIV prevention research has not examined the independent and combined impact of network and structural factors. We aimed to identify individual, network, and neighborhood correlates of exchange sex (≥1 exchange sex partner, past 90 days) among female non-injection drug users (NIDUs). We used baseline data from 417 NIDUs enrolled in a randomized HIV prevention trial in Baltimore (2005–2007). Surveys ascertained demographic variables, drug/sex risk behaviors, neighborhood perceptions, and social/sexual network characteristics. Correlates of exchange sex were identified with descriptive statistics and log-binomial regression. Our findings suggest that sex and drug relationships among female NIDUs are interlinked and may be difficult to modify without altering social norms. Strengthening ties that provide social support but not drug support and reducing ties that provide both drug and social support may facilitate reductions in individual-level HIV-risk behaviors. PMID:22983502

  14. Acute heroin intoxication in a baby chronically exposed to cocaine and heroin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute intoxication with drugs of abuse in children is often only the tip of the iceberg, actually hiding chronic exposure. Analysis using non-conventional matrices such as hair can provide long-term information about exposure to recreational drugs. Case presentation We report the case of a one-month-old Caucasian boy admitted to our pediatric emergency unit with respiratory distress and neurological abnormalities. A routine urine test was positive for opiates, suggesting an acute opiate ingestion. No other drugs of misuse, such as cocaine, cannabis, amphetamines or derivatives, were detected in the baby's urine. Subsequently, hair samples from the baby and the parents were collected to evaluate the possibility of chronic exposure to drug misuse by segmental analysis. Opiates and cocaine metabolites were detected in hair samples from the baby boy and his parents. Conclusions In light of these and previous results, we recommend hair analysis in babies and children from risky environments to detect exposure to heroin and other drug misuse, which could provide the basis for specific social and health interventions. PMID:21729296

  15. Levels of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid after i.v. heroin administration to freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Gottås, A; Øiestad, E L; Boix, F; Vindenes, V; Ripel, Å; Thaulow, C H; Mørland, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Heroin, with low affinity for μ-opioid receptors, has been considered to act as a prodrug. In order to study the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its active metabolites after i.v. administration, we gave a bolus injection of heroin to rats and measured the concentration of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid (ECF). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH After an i.v. bolus injection of heroin to freely moving Sprague–Dawley rats, the concentrations of heroin and metabolites in blood samples from the vena jugularis and in microdialysis samples from striatal brain ECF were measured by ultraperformance LC-MS/MS. KEY RESULTS Heroin levels decreased very fast, both in blood and brain ECF, and could not be detected after 18 and 10 min respectively. 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) increased very rapidly, reaching its maximal concentrations after 2.0 and 4.3 min, respectively, and falling thereafter. Morphine increased very slowly, reaching its maximal levels, which were six times lower than the highest 6-MAM concentrations, after 12.6 and 21.3 min, with a very slow decline during the rest of the experiment and only surpassing 6-MAM levels at least 30 min after injection. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS After an i.v. heroin injection, 6-MAM was the predominant opioid present shortly after injection and during the first 30 min, not only in the blood but also in rat brain ECF. 6-MAM might therefore mediate most of the effects observed shortly after heroin intake, and this finding questions the general assumption that morphine is the main and most important metabolite of heroin. PMID:23865556

  16. Craving correlates with mesolimbic responses to heroin-related cues in short-term abstinence from heroin: an event-related fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Yarong; Zhang, Yi; Li, Wei; Yang, Weichuan; Zhu, Jia; Wu, Ning; Chang, Haifeng; Zheng, Ying; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Liyan; Yuan, Kai; Liu, Jixin; Wang, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2012-08-21

    Craving is an important factor in relapse to drug abuse, and cue-induced craving is an especially powerful form of this construct. Neuroimaging methods have been utilized to study drug cue-induced craving and neural correlates in the human brain. However, very few studies have focused on characterizing craving and the neural responses to heroin-related cues in short-term abstinent heroin-dependent patients. Twenty-four heroin-dependent subjects and 20 demographically matched drug-naïve subjects participated in this study. An event-related cue-reactivity paradigm was employed, while changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals were acquired by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The heroin-dependent group reported significantly increased craving following exposure to heroin-related cues. Direct comparison between the two groups showed that brain activation to heroin-related minus neutral cues was significantly greater for the heroin-dependent group in the bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate, putamen, amygdala, hippocampus/parahippocampus, midcingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), medial frontal gyrus (MeFG), midbrain, thalamus, left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and subcallosal gyrus. Changes in craving in the heroin-dependent group correlated positively with brain activation in the bilateral NAc, caudate, right putamen, and left ACC. The abstinence duration correlated positively with brain activation in the left caudate and right parahippocampal gyrus. In conclusion, the cue-reactivity paradigm significantly activated neural responses in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and induced increased craving in short-term abstinent heroin-dependent patients. We suggest that these response patterns characterize the high vulnerability of relapse in short-term abstinent heroin-dependent subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All

  17. Intravenous Heroin-Associated Delayed Spongiform Leukoencephalopathy: Case Report and Reviews of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pirompanich, Pattarin; Chankrachang, Siwaporn

    2015-07-01

    Heroin-associated spongiform leukoencephalopathy is a rare, and sometimes fatal, condition usually caused by vapor inhalation of heroin. The authors report a 41-year-old man who was diagnosed with delayed spongiform leukoencephalopathy three weeks after injecting heroin intravenously. He had been admitted to another hospital due to acute heroin overdose, which had occurred four hours after intravenous injection of an unknown amount of heroin. His clinical condition showed progressive improvement and he was discharged 12 days after admission. Three weeks after this episode, his cognitive functioning declined. Akinetic mutism, spasticity and hyperreflexia of all extremities were observed. Electroencephalography (EEG) and imaging of the brain showed typical characteristics of spongiform leukoencephalopathy. The three and six-month follow-up of the patient showed clinical improvement and this was corroborated through EEG measures and brain imaging. The discussion summarizes eight previously reported cases of intravenous heroin associated spongiform leukoencephalopathy and compares them to the authors'case.

  18. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable.

  19. Hair analysis for opiates: hydromorphone and hydrocodone as indicators of heroin use.

    PubMed

    Madry, Milena M; Bosshard, Mona M; Kraemer, Thomas; Baumgartner, Markus R

    2016-05-01

    Identification of external contamination is a challenge in hair analysis. This study investigates metabolite ratios of hydromorphone to morphine and hydrocodone to codeine as indicators to distinguish contamination from heroin use provided that hydromorphone/hydrocodone intake is excluded. Hair samples after external contamination with street heroin proved to be negative for hydromorphone/hydrocodone. Hair samples from individuals with suspected street heroin use/contamination or opiate medication were analyzed for 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, acetylcodeine, codeine, hydromorphone and hydrocodone, and metabolite ratios of hydromorphone to morphine and hydrocodone to codeine were assessed. Hair samples from individuals with medicinal heroin/morphine/codeine use displayed significantly higher metabolite ratios than those with suspected street heroin use/contamination. Hydromorphone/hydrocodone are solely formed during body passage. Thus, metabolite ratios can be used to distinguish morphine/heroin use from external contamination.

  20. An Economic Analysis of Income and Expenditures by Heroin-Using Research Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    RODDY, JULIETTE; GREENWALD, MARK

    2015-01-01

    At a Detroit research program from 2004 to 2005, out-of-treatment chronic daily heroin users (N = 100) were interviewed to evaluate relationships between past 30-day income and factors influencing heroin price, expenditures, and consumption. Weekly heroin purchasing frequency was positively related to income and number of suppliers, and negatively related to time cost (min) from primary supplier. Daily heroin consumption was positively related to income and injection heroin use, and negatively related to unit cost of heroin. Implications and limitations are noted. Simulations are underway to assess within-subject changes in drug demand. Supported by NIH/NIDA R01 DA15462 and Joe Young, Sr. Funds (State of Michigan). PMID:19938929

  1. Microbiology and Initial Antibiotic Therapy for Injection Drug Users and Non-Injection Drug Users with Cutaneous Abscesses in the Era of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Timothy C.; Knepper, Bryan C.; Moore, S. Jason; Saveli, Carla C.; Pawlowski, Sean W.; Perlman, Daniel M.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Burman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cutaneous abscesses has increased markedly since the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Injection drug use is a risk factor for abscesses and may impact the microbiology and treatment of these infections. In a cohort of patients hospitalized with cutaneous abscesses in the era of CA-MRSA, our objectives were to: 1) compare the microbiology of abscesses between injection drug users and non-injection drug users, and 2) evaluate antibiotic therapy started in the emergency department in relation to microbiological findings and national guideline treatment recommendations. Methods This was a secondary analysis of two published retrospective cohorts of patients requiring hospitalization for an acute bacterial skin infection between January 1, 2007 and May 31, 2012 in 7 academic and community hospitals in Colorado. In the subgroup of patients with a cutaneous abscess, microbiological findings and the antibiotic regimen started in the emergency department were compared among injection drug users and non-injection drug users. Antibiotic regimens involving multiple agents, lack of activity against MRSA, or an agent with broad gram-negative activity were classified as discordant with Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guideline treatment recommendations. Results Of 323 patients with a cutaneous abscess, 104 (32%) occurred in injection drug users. Among the 235 cases where at least one microorganism was identified by culture, S. aureus was identified less commonly among injection drug users compared with non-injection drug users (55% vs 75%, p = .003), with similar patterns observed for both MRSA (33% vs. 47%, p = .054) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (17% vs. 26%, p = .11). In contrast to S. aureus, streptococcal species (53% vs 25%, p <.001) and anaerobic organisms (29% vs 10%, p < .001) were identified more commonly among injection drug users. Of 88 injection drug users and

  2. Normalizing effect of heroin maintenance treatment on stress-induced brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Seifritz, Erich; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that a single maintenance dose of heroin attenuates psychophysiological stress responses in heroin-dependent patients, probably reflecting the effectiveness of heroin-assisted therapies for the treatment of severe heroin addiction. However, the underlying neural circuitry of these effects has not yet been investigated. Using a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled design, 22 heroin-dependent and heroin-maintained outpatients from the Centre of Substance Use Disorders at the University Hospital of Psychiatry in Basel were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 17 healthy controls from the general population were included for placebo administration only. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect brain responses to fearful faces and dynamic causal modelling was applied to compute fear-induced modulation of connectivity within the emotional face network. Stress responses were assessed by hormone releases and subjective ratings. Relative to placebo, heroin acutely reduced the fear-induced modulation of connectivity from the left fusiform gyrus to the left amygdala and from the right amygdala to the right orbitofrontal cortex in dependent patients. Both of these amygdala-related connectivity strengths were significantly increased in patients after placebo treatment (acute withdrawal) compared to healthy controls, whose connectivity estimates did not differ from those of patients after heroin injection. Moreover, we found positive correlations between the left fusiform gyrus to amygdala connectivity and different stress responses, as well as between the right amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex connectivity and levels of craving. Our findings indicate that the increased amygdala-related connectivity during fearful face processing after the placebo treatment in heroin-dependent patients transiently normalizes after acute heroin maintenance treatment. Furthermore, this study suggests that the assessment of

  3. Abnormal functional integration of thalamic low frequency oscillation in the BOLD signal after acute heroin treatment.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Heroin addiction is a severe relapsing brain disorder associated with impaired cognitive control, including deficits in attention allocation. The thalamus has a high density of opiate receptors and is critically involved in orchestrating cortical activity during cognitive control. However, there have been no studies on how acute heroin treatment modulates thalamic activity. In a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 29 heroin-maintained outpatients were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 20 healthy controls were included for the placebo condition only. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze functional integration of the thalamus by three different resting state analysis techniques. Thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) was analyzed by seed-based correlation, while intrinsic thalamic oscillation was assessed by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Relative to the placebo treatment and healthy controls, acute heroin administration reduced thalamocortical FC to cortical regions, including the frontal cortex, while the reductions in FC to the mediofrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal pole were positively correlated with the plasma level of morphine, the main psychoactive metabolite of heroin. Furthermore, heroin treatment was associated with increased thalamic ReHo and fALFF values, whereas fALFF following heroin exposure correlated negatively with scores of attentional control. The heroin-associated increase in fALFF was mainly dominated by slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) oscillations. Our findings show that there are acute effects of heroin within the thalamocortical system and may shed new light on the role of the thalamus in cognitive control in heroin addiction. Future research is needed to determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and their role in heroin addiction.

  4. Association of frontal gray matter volume and cerebral perfusion in heroin addiction: a multimodal neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structure and function are closely related in the healthy human brain. In patients with chronic heroin exposure, brain imaging studies have identified long-lasting changes in gray matter (GM) volume. More recently, we showed that acute application of heroin in dependent patients results in hypoperfusion of fronto-temporal areas compared with the placebo condition. However, the relationship between structural and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in heroin addiction has not yet been investigated. Moreover, it is not known whether there is any interaction between the chronic structural changes and the short and long-term effects on perfusion caused by heroin. Using a double-blind, within-subject design, heroin or placebo (saline) was administered to 14 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program, in order to observe acute short-term effects. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to calculate perfusion quantification maps in both treatment conditions, while Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was conducted to calculate regional GM density. VBM and ASL data were used to calculate homologous correlation fields by Biological Parametric Mapping (BPM) and a whole-brain Pearson r correlation. We correlated each perfusion condition (heroin and placebo) separately with a VBM sample that was identical for the two treatment conditions. It was assumed that heroin-associated perfusion is manifested in short-term effects, while placebo-associated perfusion is more related to long-term effects. In order to restrict our analyses to fronto-temporal regions, we used an explicit mask for our analyses. Correlation analyses revealed a significant positive correlation in frontal areas between GM and both perfusion conditions (heroin and placebo). Heroin-associated perfusion was also negatively correlated with GM in the inferior temporal gyrus on both hemispheres. These findings indicate that, in heroin-dependent patients, low GM volume is positively associated with

  5. Valsalva manoeuvre effect on distribution of lung damage in heroin inhalation.

    PubMed

    Prowse, S J; Lima, T; Irion, K L; Burhan, H; Hochhegger, B; Marchiori, E

    2011-10-01

    This article reports the case of a patient demonstrating acute bilateral pneumonitis almost completely confined to the upper lobes as a result of inhaling heroin. We attribute this distribution to the patient performing the Valsalva manoeuvre immediately after inhaling heroin. This pattern has not been reported before and we believe it may be seen more frequently owing to a switch amongst drug users from intravenous to inhaled heroin.

  6. Normalizing effect of heroin maintenance treatment on stress-induced brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Seifritz, Erich; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A.; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that a single maintenance dose of heroin attenuates psychophysiological stress responses in heroin-dependent patients, probably reflecting the effectiveness of heroin-assisted therapies for the treatment of severe heroin addiction. However, the underlying neural circuitry of these effects has not yet been investigated. Using a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled design, 22 heroin-dependent and heroin-maintained outpatients from the Centre of Substance Use Disorders at the University Hospital of Psychiatry in Basel were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 17 healthy controls from the general population were included for placebo administration only. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect brain responses to fearful faces and dynamic causal modelling was applied to compute fear-induced modulation of connectivity within the emotional face network. Stress responses were assessed by hormone releases and subjective ratings. Relative to placebo, heroin acutely reduced the fear-induced modulation of connectivity from the left fusiform gyrus to the left amygdala and from the right amygdala to the right orbitofrontal cortex in dependent patients. Both of these amygdala-related connectivity strengths were significantly increased in patients after placebo treatment (acute withdrawal) compared to healthy controls, whose connectivity estimates did not differ from those of patients after heroin injection. Moreover, we found positive correlations between the left fusiform gyrus to amygdala connectivity and different stress responses, as well as between the right amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex connectivity and levels of craving. Our findings indicate that the increased amygdala-related connectivity during fearful face processing after the placebo treatment in heroin-dependent patients transiently normalizes after acute heroin maintenance treatment. Furthermore, this study suggests that the assessment of

  7. A survey on acupuncture for giving up heroin and treatment of the withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Lanqiong; Zeng, Lin; Liao, Qishun; Chen, Ping

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the study of acupuncture for giving up heroin and treatment of withdrawal syndrome in China from 1995 to 2003, which includes the selection of acupoints, the evaluation of the therapeutic effects, studies of acupoints and application of relevant instruments, as well as treatment of the withdrawal syndromes of heroin with acupuncture. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture and moxibustion is definite and indispensable, especially at the time when there is no specific remedy for heroin addition.

  8. Inflammatory response in heroin addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Szu-Nian; Lin, Jyh-Chyang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-03-30

    Opioid addiction influences many physiological functions including reactions of the immune system. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) compared to healthy controls. We tested the cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α from a group of heroin addicts (n=34) and healthy controls (n=20). The results show that production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly higher in the group of methadone-maintained patients than in the healthy control group. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly correlated with the dairy methadone dosage administered, and the IL-1β level was significantly correlated with the duration of methadone maintenance treatment. These findings suggest that methadone maintenance treatment influences the immune system functions of opioid-dependent patients and may also induce long-term systemic inflammation.

  9. PREDICTORS OF INPATIENT TREATMENT COMPLETION OF SUBJECTS WITH HEROIN DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, P.K.; Ray, R.; Chandiramani, K.

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and four subjects with heroin dependence, consecutive new admission to a ward were studied prospectively to assess treatment retention. All these subjects were admitted voluntarily after pre-admission counselling wherein treatment package (four week′s stay), ward routine, rules and regulation were explained. Socio-demographic parameters, drug use history, motivation as understood by “readiness to change”, reasons for seeking treatment were obtained. Reasons for non completion were noted. Thirty two subjects (31%) completed treatment. Out of 72 non-completers, 38 subjects (36%) left against medical advice and 34(33%) were discharged prematurely by the treating team for violating ward norms. Multivariate analysis showed that readiness to change (being in action stage), age of onset of heroin use (late), legal problems (high) and self confidence regarding recovery (high) in order of significance, predicted treatment completion. Therapeutic strategies to minimise drop-out. are discussed. PMID:21584093

  10. Researching a local heroin market as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Lee D; Bobashev, Georgiy; Morris, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    This project applies agent-based modeling (ABM) techniques to better understand the operation, organization, and structure of a local heroin market. The simulation detailed was developed using data from an 18-month ethnographic case study. The original research, collected in Denver, CO during the 1990s, represents the historic account of users and dealers who operated in the Larimer area heroin market. Working together, the authors studied the behaviors of customers, private dealers, street-sellers, brokers, and the police, reflecting the core elements pertaining to how the market operated. After evaluating the logical consistency between the data and agent behaviors, simulations scaled-up interactions to observe their aggregated outcomes. While the concept and findings from this study remain experimental, these methods represent a novel way in which to understand illicit drug markets and the dynamic adaptations and outcomes they generate. Extensions of this research perspective, as well as its strengths and limitations, are discussed.

  11. Impaired emotion recognition is linked to alexithymia in heroin addicts

    PubMed Central

    Craparo, Giuseppe; Gori, Alessio; Dell’Aera, Stefano; Costanzo, Giulia; Fasciano, Silvia; Tomasello, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Several investigations document altered emotion processing in opiate addiction. Nevertheless, the origin of this phenomenon remains unclear. Here we examined the role of alexithymia in the ability (i.e., number of errors—accuracy and reaction times—RTs) of thirty-one heroin addicts and thirty-one healthy controls to detect several affective expressions. Results show generally lower accuracy and higher RTs in the recognition of facial expressions of emotions for patients, compared to controls. The hierarchical multivariate regression analysis shows that alexithymia might be responsible of the between groups difference with respect to the RTs in emotion detection. Overall, we provide new insights in the clinical interpretation of affective deficits in heroin addicts suggesting a role of alexithymia in their ability to recognize emotions. PMID:27069803

  12. Recovering a fecal habitus: analyzing heroin users' toilet talk.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Lucy; Neale, Joanne; Nettleton, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    There is a particular silence around the social life of defecation. Little analyzed, rarely discussed in polite conversation, it largely appears only at moments of dysfunction. For active heroin users, digestion is often characterized by such dysfunction and experienced through constipation; recovery, a welcome return to defecating 'normally.' Drawing on interviews with active and recovering heroin users in southern England, we focus on this moment of transition in order to illuminate the experiences and transitions between a dysfunctional, constipated body and 'normal' defecation. We discuss the contrast between candor in talk in active use with the silences surrounding defecation talk in recovery, and analyze these twin shifts within the context of a historical progression within Europe toward ever-increasing levels of masking defecation from social life. Located thus, this analysis of the tipping point between constipation and 'normality,' disclosure and embarrassment, provides a powerful lens through which to view the invisibility of defecation in contemporary British social life.

  13. Nutritional effects of marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Mohs, M E; Watson, R R; Leonard-Green, T

    1990-09-01

    Use of addictive drugs, such as cocaine, marijuana, and nicotine, affects food and liquid intake behavior, taste preference, and body weight. Changes in specific nutrient status and metabolism can also develop; heroin addiction can cause hyperkalemia and morphine use can result in calcium inhibition. Nutrition-related physiological aspects, such as impaired gastrin release, hypercholesterolemia, hypothermia, and hyperthermia, are also seen with morphine use. Nutrition-related conditions can affect sensitivity to and dependence on drugs and their effects. Diabetes decreases sensitivity to and dependence on morphine, protein deprivation produces preferential fat utilization with low cocaine use, and vitamin D deficiency decelerates morphine dependency. During use and/or withdrawal from nicotine, heroin, marijuana, and cocaine, major changes in food selection and intake occur, which result in weight gain or loss. Detailed human studies are needed to investigate the effects of drug use on the broad spectrum of nutrients and to determine the role of nutrition during drug withdrawal.

  14. Personality Characteristics of Viet Nam veterans identified as heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Black, F W

    1975-07-01

    The author presents data on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) characteristics of a sample of enlisted Army men returning from Viet Nam identified as heroin abusers. Although a marked heterogeneity of MMPI profile types was found, a significant percentage of the subjects showed indications of marked psychopathology, and only a minority performed within normal limits on the MMPI. Theses military subjects showed neither greater nor less psychopathology and sociopathology than previously reported samples of civilian addicts.

  15. Predicting Heroin and Alcohol Usage Among Young Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Ronald L.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    Using 1968 data collected from junior and senior high school students in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, substance usage patterns for heroin and alcohol were predicted for 1975-6. A sample of 1,000 of the initial 5,000 students were selected for re-interview; half were selected to be at high risk of substance abuse and half were selected randomly. Some 657…

  16. Effect of heroin-conditioned auditory stimuli on cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.; Stein, E.A.

    1988-08-01

    Cerebral functional activity was measured as changes in distribution of the free fatty acid (1-14C)octanoate in autoradiograms obtained from rats during brief presentation of a tone previously paired to infusions of heroin or saline. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administering animal and two animals receiving yoked infusions of heroin or saline. Behavioral experiments in separate groups of rats demonstrated that these training parameters imparts secondary reinforcing properties to the tone for animals self-administering heroin while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion animals. The optical densities of thirty-seven brain regions were normalized to a relative index for comparisons between groups. Previous pairing of the tone to heroin infusions irrespective of behavior (yoked-heroin vs. yoked-saline groups) produced functional activity changes in fifteen brain areas. In addition, nineteen regional differences in octanoate labeling density were evident when comparison was made between animals previously trained to self-administer heroin to those receiving yoked-heroin infusions, while twelve differences were noted when comparisons were made between the yoked vehicle and self administration group. These functional activity changes are presumed related to the secondary reinforcing capacity of the tone acquired by association with heroin, and may identify neural substrates involved in auditory signalled conditioning of positive reinforcement to opiates.

  17. MAOA rs1137070 and heroin addiction interactively alter gray matter volume of the salience network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Linwen; Feng, Jiajia; Yue, Weihua; Lu, Lin; Fan, Yong; Shi, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The rs1137070 polymorphism of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is associated with alcoholism and smoking behavior. However, the association between rs1137070 and heroin addiction remains unclear. In this study, we examined the allelic distribution of rs1137070 in 1,035 heroin abusers and 2,553 healthy controls and investigated the interactive effects of rs1137070 and heroin addiction on gray matter volume (GMV) based on 78 heroin abusers and 79 healthy controls. The C allele frequency of rs1137070 was significantly higher in heroin abusers. Heroin addiction and the rs1137070 variant interactively altered measures of GMV in the anterior cingulate cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole, and insula, which were correlated with cognitive function. Heroin abusers with the C allele had lower measures of GMV in these regions than the healthy controls with the same allele, whereas those with the T allele displayed a different trend. The altered brain regions were connected with white matter tracts, yielding a structural network that partially overlapped with the salience network. These findings suggest that the low activity-related C allele of MAOA rs1137070 is associated with an increase in the sensitivity to heroin addiction and the damaging effects of heroin abuse on cognition and the salience network. PMID:28345608

  18. Male heroin addicts and their female mates: impact on disorder and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lex, B W

    1990-01-01

    A pilot investigation was undertaken to determine whether the social relationships between men who currently used heroin with their female mates differed from those of men who formerly used heroin, but were currently abstinent, with their female mates. Six couples were selected for study via the representative case method. Men currently abstinent from heroin had begun drug use later, had a family history of affective disorders, and had initiated their conjugal relationship after cessation of heroin use. Female mates of males currently abstinent from heroin had never used heroin with their mates in conjunction with sexual activity, had significantly positive ratings of their mates' performance of social roles, and were striving to obtain formal training to improve their employment skills. In contrast, the couples including actively using heroin addicts used opiates together, especially to enhance their sexual activity. The relationships of these couples were not as mutually supportive, and the male's role was less responsible and attracted less respect than that of the abstinent male. The females were depressed and had little positive aspects to their lives. Partners in all couples experienced a large number of stressful events, but current heroin use increased stress and hampered coping efforts. Interaction analysis of dynamics in relationships of men currently abstinent from heroin revealed that participation in mates' family life served to reshape their behaviors into more socially acceptable roles.

  19. DRD3 variation associates with early-onset heroin dependence, but not specific personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chen, Chun-Yen; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chang, Hsin-An; Yen, Che-Hung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Liang, Chih-Sung; Chou, Han-Wei; Lu, Ru-Band; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-06-03

    Dopamine D3 receptor-mediated pathways are involved in the mechanism of addiction, and genetic factors play a role in the vulnerability to heroin dependence. The aim of this study was to examine whether the corresponding gene, DRD3, is associated with the development of heroin dependence and specific personality traits in HD patients. Eight polymorphisms in DRD3 were analyzed in 1067 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (566 heroin dependence patients and 501 controls). All participants were screened using the same assessment tool and all patients met the criteria for heroin dependence. A Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire was used to assess personality traits in 276 heroin dependence patients. In addition, heroin dependence patients were divided into 4 clinical subgroups based on age-of-onset and family history of substance abuse, to reduce the clinical heterogeneity. The rs6280 and rs9825563 variants showed association with the development of early-onset heroin dependence. The GTA haplotype frequency in the block (rs324029, rs6280, rs9825563) was significantly associated with early-onset heroin dependence (p=0.003). However, these significant associations were weaker after Bonferroni's correction. In addition, these DRD3 polymorphisms did not influence novelty seeking and harm avoidance scores in HD patients. DRD3 is possibly a genetic factor in the development of early-onset heroin dependence, but is not associated with specific personality traits in these patients among the Han Chinese population.

  20. Neurocognitive Characterizations of Russian Heroin Addicts without a Significant History of Other Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Diana H.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Flannery, Barbara A.; Langevin, Doris J.; Bobashev, Georgiy; Verbitskaya, Elena; Augustine, Cynthia B.; Bolla, Karen I.; Zvartau, Edwin; Schech, Barry; Egorova, Valentina; Bushara, Natali; Tsoy, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Research on the neurocognitive characteristics of heroin addiction is sparse and studies that do exist include polydrug abusers; thus, they are unable to distinguish neurocognitive effects of heroin from those of other drugs. To identify neurocognitive correlates specific to heroin addiction, the present study was conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia where individuals typically abuse and/or become addicted to only one substance, generally alcohol or heroin. Heroin addicts were recruited from an inpatient treatment facility in St. Petersburg. Three comparison groups included alcoholics, addicts who used both alcohol and heroin, and non-abusers. Psychiatric, background, and drug history evaluations were administered after detoxification to screen for exclusion criteria and characterize the sample. Executive Cognitive Functions (ECF) that largely activate areas of the prefrontal cortex and its circuitry measured include complex visual pattern recognition (Paired Associates Learning), working memory (Delayed Matching to Sample), problem solving (Stockings of Cambridge), executive decision making (Cambridge Decision Making Task), cognitive flexibility (Stroop Color-Word Task) and response shifting (Stop Change Task). In many respects, the heroin addicts were similar to alcohol and alcohol\\heroin dependent groups in neurocognitive deficits relative to controls. The primary finding was that heroin addicts exhibited significantly more disadvantageous decision making and longer deliberation times while making risky decisions than the other groups. Because the nature and degree of recovery from drug abuse are likely a function of the type or pattern of neurocognitive impairment, differential drug effects must be considered. PMID:17382488

  1. Heroin body packer's death in Haryana; India: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, Jitender Kumar; Dhattarwal, S K; Aggarwal, A D; Chikara, Pankaj; Khanagwal, Vijay Pal

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of death due to heroin leakage in a body packer, attempting to smuggle the drug by concealing it in his gastro-intestinal tract. The body was recovered 3-5 days of incidence that was confirmed by autopsy. Fifty pellets (packages) were recovered from the body, 42 identical oval shaped "egg" packages were found in the stomach out of which two were damaged, 6 in small intestine, 2 in large intestine. The total weight of the powder was 267 g. Toxicological analysis of the powder samples from the damaged package and other 48 packages was performed and was found positive for heroin, caffeine and codeine. The main pathological findings at autopsy were pulmonary and cerebral edema. This case illustrates the challenges in postmortem evaluation of narcotic fatalities and the need to consider factors such as ante-mortem history, thorough post mortem examination, toxicology results and photography in forensic diagnosis. This case is unique in the sense that cause of death was intoxication caused by leakage of heroin from damaged packages detected at autopsy and demonstrates that body packing is an existing problem in India.

  2. Epigenetically modified nucleotides in chronic heroin and cocaine treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Bailey, Alexis; Kouidou, Sofia; Kovatsi, Leda

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetic changes include the addition of a methyl group to the 5' carbon of the cytosine ring, known as DNA methylation, which results in the generation of the fifth DNA base, namely 5-methylcytosine. During active or passive demethylation, an intermediate modified base is formed, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. We have currently quantified 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the liver and brain of mice treated with cocaine or heroin, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results show that global 5-methylcytosine levels are not affected by heroin or cocaine administration, neither in the liver nor in the brain. However, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels are reduced in the liver following cocaine administration, while they are not affected by cocaine in the brain or by heroin administration in the liver and the brain. Elucidation of the epigenetic phenomena that takes place with respect to drug abuse and addiction, via quantitative analysis of different modified bases, may enable a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may lead to more personalized and effective treatment options.

  3. Taste- and odor-reactivity in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Perl, E; Shufman, E; Vas, A; Luger, S; Steiner, J E

    1997-01-01

    Opiates in general, and heroin in particular, are known to induce compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. Addiction is accompanied by psychobiological processes which may distort perception of sensory stimuli. Gustatory and olfactory stimuli are hedonically polarized and therefore most appropriate for the assessment of the organism's reactivity to "useful" and "harmful" chemosensory events. Previous studies revealed that psychophysical self-estimates and reflectory facial expressions mirror with comparable reliability the hedonics of the perceived taste and odor sensations. In the present study both cognitive verbal and reflectory facial expressions of a group of: a) heroin addicts were recorded and compared to those of a group of b) detoxified former addicts and to c) a group of matching controls. Results show that all three groups differentiate between pleasant, indifferent and aversive tastes and odors. Active addicts estimated sweet taste and savory smells as being somewhat more pleasant, and bitter and sour tastes and a putrid odor as less unpleasant than did the other two groups. The reflectory facial displays of addicts were less expressive and discriminative than those of the two other groups. Taste- and odor-induced facial displays are known to be controlled primarily by the brainstem. The findings indicate that heroin-addiction affects brain-mechanisms, which mirror taste- and odor-hedonics. Modulation of the phylogenetically ancient, sensory-motor coordinations was found to be of a different pattern than that of the cortically-controlled cognitive reactions.

  4. The measurement of morphine in the hair of heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    George, S; Braithwaite, R A

    1997-07-01

    Several techniques have been described for the determination of morphine in hair as a method of monitoring past heroin use. However, although some of the techniques [notably radioimmunoassay (RIA)] may appear relatively simple to perform, any results obtained must be interpreted with caution. In this study, hair specimens from four known heroin abusers were sectionally analysed by a specific RIA for morphine. Prior to analysis, all hair sections were cleaned to remove any possible surface contamination. Five different hair digestion procedures were evaluated to determine the most effective method that could be used to liberate morphine from hair. The greatest analytical recovery was obtained by incubation with 1.0 M sodium hydroxide for 18 h at 55 degrees C, neutralization with 1.0 M hydrochloric acid, and pH adjustment with 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). The morphine concentrations detected in the hair specimens ranged from 0.5 to 13.2 ng/mg of hair. It was also found that the use of shorter length segments (e.g. 1 cm length) gave a clearer, more detailed picture of the historic pattern of heroin use in the four subjects studied.

  5. Heroin: from drug to ambivalent medicine : on the introduction of medically prescribed heroin and the emergence of a new space for treatment.

    PubMed

    Schepelern Johansen, Birgitte; Schepelern Johansen, Katrine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an anthropological analysis of the introduction of medically prescribed heroin as part of official substance abuse treatment. While anthropological inquiries of substance abuse treatment have mainly focused on providing the users perspectives on the (ab)use or unraveling the conflicts and negotiations between users and staff, the present article argues for the merits of paying attention to the spatial dimensions of substance abuse treatment. Focusing on the spatial and material ramification of the treatment can shed a nuanced light on the still vulnerable process of altering the heroin from drug to medicine, and thereby on the attempts to settle heroin in a new practical and semantic landscape. The heroin is anchored in some powerful discourses of crime, death, and pleasure, and the analysis shows how these discourses (re-)appear in the spatial textures of the clinic, contesting the attempts to medicalize the heroin. Further, the article argues that even though the treatment aims at a marginalization of the heroin in the life of the clients, the spatial arrangements and the practices within them simultaneously enforces a centralization of the heroin, making the space for treatment highly ambivalent.

  6. Greater avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue is associated with greater escalation of heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Caesar G; Grigson, Patricia S

    2015-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse affecting over half of its users. Therefore, modeling individual differences in addiction-like behavior is needed to better reflect the human condition. In a rodent model, avoidance of a cocaine-paired saccharin cue is associated with greater cocaine seeking and taking. Here, we tested whether rats would avoid a saccharin cue when paired with the opportunity to self-administer heroin and whether the rats that most greatly avoid the heroin-paired taste cue would exhibit the greatest drug escalation over time, the greatest willingness to work for drug, and the greatest heroin-induced relapse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5 min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 3 hr (short access) or 6 hr (extended access). Following 16 to 18 pairings, terminal saccharin intake was used to categorize the rats into small (>200 licks/5min) or large (<200 licks/5min) suppressors and responding for drug was examined accordingly. Only 5% of the short access rats reached the criteria for large suppressors. This large suppressor did not differ from the small suppressors in drug-taking behavior. On the other hand, 50% of the extended access saccharin-heroin rats were large suppressors and showed the largest escalation of drug intake, drug-loading behavior, and the greatest relapse-like behaviors. Extended access small suppressors displayed drug-taking behaviors that were similar to rats in the short access heroin condition. Avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual differences in addiction-like behavior for heroin using extended drug access.

  7. Temporal correlation between opiate seizures in East/Southeast Asia and B.C. heroin deaths: a transoceanic model of heroin death risk.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mark E

    2003-01-01

    Because heroin supply changes cannot be measured directly, their impact on populations is poorly understood. British Columbia has experienced an injection drug use epidemic since the 1980s that resulted in 2,590 illicit drug deaths from 1990-1999. Since previous work indicates heroin seizures can correlate with supply and B.C. receives heroin only from Southeast Asia, this study examined B.C. heroin deaths against opiate seizures in East/Southeast Asia. Opiate seizures in East/Southeast Asia and data from two B.C. mortality datasets containing heroin deaths were examined. The Pearson correlation coefficient for seizures against each mortality dataset was determined. Opiate seizures, all illicit drug deaths and all opiate deaths concurrently increased twice and decreased twice from 1989-1999, and all reached new peak values in 1993. Three B.C. sub-regions exhibited illicit drug deaths rate trends concurrent with the three principal datasets studied. The Pearson correlation coefficient for opiate-induced deaths against opiate seizures from 1980-1999 was R=0.915 (p<0.0001), and for illicit drug deaths against opiate seizures from 1987-1999 was R=0.896 (p<0.0001). From 1980-1999, opiate seizures in East/Southeast Asia were very strongly correlated with B.C. opiate and illicit drug deaths. The number of B.C. heroin-related deaths may be strongly linked to heroin supply. Enforcement services are not effective in preventing harm caused by heroin in B.C.; therefore, Canada should examine other methods to prevent harm. The case for harm reduction is strengthened by the ineffectiveness of enforcement and the unlikelihood of imminent eradication of heroin production in Southeast Asia.

  8. Greater Avoidance of a Heroin-Paired Taste Cue is Associated with Greater Escalation of Heroin Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Imperio, Caesar G.; Grigson, Patricia S.

    2015-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse affecting over half of its users. Therefore, modeling individual differences in addiction-like behavior is needed to better reflect the human condition. In a rodent model, avoidance of a cocaine-paired saccharin cue is associated with greater cocaine seeking and taking. Here, we tested whether rats would avoid a saccharin cue when paired with the opportunity to self-administer heroin and whether the rats that most greatly avoid the heroin-paired taste cue would exhibit the greatest drug escalation over time, the greatest willingness to work for drug, and the greatest heroin-induced relapse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5 min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 3 h (short access) or 6 h (extended access). Following 16 – 18 pairings, terminal saccharin intake was used to categorize the rats into small (>200 licks/5min) or large (<200 licks/5min) suppressors and responding for drug was examined accordingly. Only 5% of the short access rats reached the criteria for large suppressors. This large suppressor did not differ from the small suppressors in drug taking behavior. Conversely, 50% of the extended access saccharin-heroin rats were large suppressors and showed the largest escalation of drug intake, drug-loading behavior, and the greatest relapse-like behaviors. Extended access small suppressors displayed drug-taking behaviors that were similar to rats in the short access heroin condition. Avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual differences in addiction-like behavior for heroin using extended drug access. PMID:26214212

  9. A reduction in blood morphine concentrations amongst heroin overdose fatalities associated with a sustained reduction in street heroin purity.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Duflou, Johan; Torok, Michelle

    2010-05-20

    To determine the effects of a sudden and sustained reduction in heroin purity on the toxicology of heroin overdose, 959 consecutive heroin overdose cases autopsied at the NSW Department of Forensic Medicine (1/1/1998-31/12/2006) were analysed. There was a significant reduction in blood morphine concentration across the study period (beta=-0.07), declining from a median of 0.50mg/L in the years 1998-2000 prior to 0.40mg/L in the period 2001-2006. There was no significant change in the proportion of alcohol positive cases, but the proportion of benzodiazepine positive cases increased across time (OR 1.11), as did methadone positive cases (OR 1.12). The decline in blood morphine concentrations remained significant after controlling for these factors (beta=-0.07). In determining toxic and lethal morphine concentrations, the fact that the toxicology of overdose is responsive to changes in the opioid street market needs to be borne in mind.

  10. Attitudes of Australian Heroin Users to Peer Distribution of Naloxone for Heroin Overdose: Perspectives on Intranasal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Paul; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Jolley, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from “very good idea” to “very bad idea”) and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration. PMID:18347990

  11. Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Debra; Dietze, Paul; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Jolley, Damien

    2008-05-01

    Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from "very good idea" to "very bad idea") and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration.

  12. Heroin discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, LAAM and other isomers of acetylmethadol in rats.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jennifer L; Vann, Robert E; May, Everette L; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2002-10-01

    LAAM (alpha- l-acetylmethadol) is a derivative of the synthetic mu-opiate agonist methadone and is one of the four isomers of acetylmethadol. Methadone and LAAM have similar pharmacological properties and both are approved medications for the treatment of heroin dependency disorders. Few studies have reported on the pharmacology of acetylmethadol's other isomers and most of these have focused on their potential analgesic activity. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the discriminative stimulus effects of LAAM, the other isomers of acetylmethadol, and methadone in rats trained to discriminate heroin from water, and to compare the duration of the discriminative stimulus effects of heroin, methadone, and LAAM. Long-Evans rats were trained to discriminate 0.3 mg/kg heroin from water under a fixed ratio 10 (FR10) schedule of food reinforcement. Dose-response functions for heroin, methadone, LAAM, three other isomers of acetylmethadol: alpha- d-acetylmethadol, beta- d-acetylmethadol, beta- l-acetylmethadol, and its precursor, beta- l-methadol were examined. Additionally, the time course effects for heroin, methadone, and LAAM were examined. LAAM and methadone dose-dependently occasioned heroin-like discriminative stimulus effects. Two of acetylmethadol's isomers, alpha- d-acetylmethadol and beta- d-acetylmethadol, were more potent than LAAM in producing heroin-like effects. The beta- l-methadol precursor and beta- l-acetylmethadol did not fully substitute for heroin's discriminative stimulus. LAAM elicited heroin-like discriminative stimulus effects for at least 6 h and generated partial generalization up to 36 h following administration. Methadone, LAAM, beta- d-acetylmethadol and alpha- d-acetylmethadol, but not beta- l-acetylmethadol and beta- l-methadol evoke heroin-like discriminative stimulus effects.

  13. Role of 6-monoacetylmorphine in the acute release of striatal dopamine induced by intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Gottås, A; Boix, F; Øiestad, E L; Vindenes, V; Mørland, J

    2014-09-01

    After injection, heroin is rapidly metabolized to 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and further to morphine. As morphine has been shown to increase striatal dopamine, whereas 6-MAM has not been studied in this respect, we gave i.v. injections of 3 μmol 6-MAM, morphine or heroin to rats. Opioids were measured in blood, and dopamine and opioids in microdialysate from brain striatal extracellular fluid (ECF), by UPLC-MS/MS. After 6-MAM injection, 6-MAM ECF concentrations increased rapidly, and reached Cmax of 4.4 μM after 8 min. After heroin injection, 6-MAM increased rapidly in blood and reached Cmax of 6.4 μM in ECF after 8 min, while ECF Cmax for heroin was 1.2 μM after 2 min. T max for morphine in ECF was 29 and 24 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively, with corresponding Cmax levels of 1 and 2 μM. Dopamine levels peaked after 8 and 14 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively. The dopamine responses were equal, indicating no dopamine release by heroin per se. Furthermore, 6-MAM, and not morphine, appeared to mediate the early dopamine response, whereas morphine administration, giving rise to morphine ECF concentrations similar to those observed shortly after 6-MAM injection, did not increase ECF dopamine. 6-MAM appeared accordingly to be the substance responsible for the early increase in dopamine observed after heroin injection. As 6-MAM was formed rapidly from heroin in blood, and was the major substance reaching the brain after heroin administration, this also indicates that factors influencing blood 6-MAM concentrations might change the behavioural effects of heroin.

  14. Inferior frontal cortex modulation with an acute dose of heroin during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No-Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition.

  15. Inferior Frontal Cortex Modulation with an Acute Dose of Heroin During Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No–Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition. PMID:23673865

  16. Discriminative stimulus effects of intravenous heroin and its metabolites in rhesus monkeys: opioid and dopaminergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Platt, D M; Rowlett, J K; Spealman, R D

    2001-11-01

    Heroin has characteristic subjective effects that contribute importantly to its widespread abuse. Drug discrimination procedures in animals have proven to be useful models for investigating pharmacological mechanisms underlying the subjective effects of drugs in humans. However, surprisingly little information exists concerning the mechanisms underlying the discriminative stimulus (DS) effects of heroin. This study characterized the DS effects of heroin in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate i.v. heroin from saline. In drug substitution experiments, heroin, its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide, and morphine-3-glucuronide, and the mu-agonists fentanyl and methadone engendered dose-dependent increases in heroin-lever responding, reaching average maximums of >80% (full substitution) at doses that did not appreciably suppress response rate. In contrast, the delta-agonist SNC 80, the kappa-agonist spiradoline, and the dopamine uptake blockers/releasers cocaine, methamphetamine, and GBR 12909 did not engender heroin-like DS effects regardless of dose. In antagonism studies, in vivo apparent pA2 and pK(B) values for naltrexone combined with heroin, morphine, and 6-monoacetylmorphine (8.0-8.7) were comparable with those reported previously for naltrexone antagonism of prototypical mu-agonists. The results show that the DS effects of heroin are pharmacologically specific and mediated primarily at mu-opioid receptors. Moreover, the acetylated and glucuronated metabolites of heroin appear to play significant roles in these effects. Despite previous speculation that morphine-3-glucuronide lacks significant opioid activity, it substituted fully for heroin in our study, suggesting that it can exhibit prominent mu-agonist effects in vivo.

  17. Non-injection and one-pot approach to CdSe: Eu3+ hybrid nanocrystals with tunable photoluminescence from green to red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingcan; Chu, Xuefeng; Wang, Chuanxi; Yang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Europium ion-doped CdSe hybrid nanocrystals (CdSe:Eu3+ NCs) as a class of new luminescent materials have drawn increasing attention in recent years owing to their remarkable optical properties. In this paper, we report a facile method to prepare CdSe:Eu3+ NCs using oleic acid (OA) as the capping agent. With this non-injection and one-pot synthesized approach, the formation and surface passivation of CdSe:Eu3+ NCs are performed simultaneously and result in intrinsic luminescence. The as-prepared CdSe:Eu3+ NCs are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Their optical properties are also studied by UV-vis and photoluminescence spectra. Moreover, the effects of feed ratios and reaction temperatures on the optical properties are further investigated. The results show that the luminescent spectra of CdSe:Eu3+ NCs are tunable from green (490 nm) to red (630 nm) and gradually redshift with the increase of the nanoparticle size from 2.5 to 4.4 nm. Upon decoration with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA), the luminescence of europium ion drastically increases and efficient energy transfer from CdSe host to the europium ion is proposed. In addition, an MTT and apoptosis assay show CdSe:Eu3+ NCs have low cellular toxicity and could be used as fluorescence imaging for human epithelial type 2 (Hep-2) cells. These properties make CdSe:Eu3+ NCs a potential candidate for biological labeling, immunoassays, and optical sensing.

  18. What are the factors associated with HIV testing among male injecting and non-injecting drug users in Lashio, Myanmar: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Saw, Yu Mon; Yasuoka, Junko; Saw, Thu Nandar; Poudel, Krishna C; Tun, Soe; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-06-20

    HIV testing is an effective intervention for reducing HIV risk and providing information on HIV status. However, uptake of HIV testing is a major challenge within the drug-using population due to the stigma and discrimination associated with their illegal drug use behaviours. This study thus aimed to identify factors associated with HIV testing among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) in Lashio, Myanmar. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2010 to February 2010. This study was carried out in Lashio city, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. In total, 158 male IDUs and 210 male NIDUs were recruited using a respondent-driven sampling method. Proportion of both drug users who were ever tested for HIV and factors associated with HIV testing. Approximately 77% of IDUs and 46% of NIDUs were ever tested for HIV. The multivariate analysis revealed that having ever received drug treatment was positively associated with HIV testing among both IDUs (adjusted OR (AOR) 13.07; 95% CI 3.38 to 50.53) and NIDUs (AOR 3.58; 95% CI 1.38 to 9.24). IDUs who were married (AOR 0.24; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.94) and who injected at least twice daily (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.97) were less likely to undergo HIV testing. Among NIDUs, those who belonged to Shan (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.84) or Kachin (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.87) ethnicities were less likely to test for HIV. IDUs and NIDUs who have received drug treatment are more likely to test for HIV. Integrating HIV testing into drug treatment programmes alongside general expansion of HIV testing services may be effective in increasing HIV testing uptake among both IDUs and NIDUs in the Northern Shan State of Myanmar.

  19. Trajectories of Heroin Addiction: Growth Mixture Modeling Results Based on a 33-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Huang, David; Chou, Chih-Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates trajectories of heroin use and subsequent consequences in a sample of 471 male heroin addicts who were admitted to the California Civil Addict Program in 1964-1965 and followed over 33 years. Applying a two-part growth mixture modeling strategy to heroin use level during the first 16 years of the addiction careers since…

  20. Trajectories of Heroin Addiction: Growth Mixture Modeling Results Based on a 33-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Huang, David; Chou, Chih-Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates trajectories of heroin use and subsequent consequences in a sample of 471 male heroin addicts who were admitted to the California Civil Addict Program in 1964-1965 and followed over 33 years. Applying a two-part growth mixture modeling strategy to heroin use level during the first 16 years of the addiction careers since…

  1. Heroin use among Miami's public school students, 1992: peers and the "drug subculture" overwhelm parents, religion and schools.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, B M

    1996-01-01

    This analysis examines the use of heroin by 481 adolescents in Dade County, Florida public schools during 1992. Statistically significant factors which tend to increase the probability of heroin use by adolescents include: peer use of heroin and students' involvement in school clubs. Not significantly related to heroin use is their access to the drug, their ethnic background or race, and their gender. Although not statistically significant, adolescents were more likely to use heroin if they knew of the risks associated with heroin use. There are no statistically significant variables which inhibit the rise of heroin by Miami adolescents. When religion was an important part of their lives, they were at lower risk for heroin use, but this was not significant. Also not significantly related to heroin use are a number of other variables, including family-related variables (whether adolescents live with their mothers, fathers, or alone: and whether someone in the family has a problem with drugs or alcohol). Similarly, early cigarette smoking and alcohol rise did not serve as gateways to later heroin use. Academic performance, and extracurricular school activities (athletics, music, and other activities) were all unrelated to the use of heroin by adolescents, with the exception of involvement in school clubs which substantially increased the risk of heroin use.

  2. Interactions between Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of µ-opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on intravenous heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001-0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared with data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g. for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of individual drugs.

  3. Interactions between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on i.v. heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001–0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1–1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032–0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose-dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared to data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g., for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of the individual drugs. PMID:23044830

  4. Marijuana Use by Heroin Abusers as a Factor in Program Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellner, Melvyn

    1977-01-01

    Primary heroin abusers who remained in a voluntary drug-free treatment program for an average of nine months were carefully matched with not-retained control subjects. Marijuana was used by the retained subjects as a heroin substitute and those who used marijuana were more apt to remain in the treatment program. (Author)

  5. Heroin Use among Southern Arrestees: Regional Findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Ronald J., Jr.; Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Ross, Michael W.; Johnson, Regina J.

    2002-01-01

    To be effective with rehabilitation counseling, counselors need to be aware of cultural patterns of drug use. This study analyzed trends in heroin use between 1990 and 1997 among the arrestee population in some parts of the South. Findings suggest geographic, ethnic, and age-related variables for heroin use. (JDM)

  6. Heroin: Abuse and Addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Although heroin use has decreased in the general population during the last few years, a troubling new trend is emerging. Use is up among school-age children and they are now subject to a popular culture in music and films that glamorizes its use. This trend along with increased availability and purity of heroin has created a major health concern…

  7. Criminality of heroin users presenting to an Australian hospital-based drug and alcohol unit.

    PubMed

    Desland, M; Batey, R

    1990-06-01

    The rates of criminality of two groups of heroin users presenting to Westmead Hospital were studied. Forty-seven heroin users referred by a structured court diversion scheme (DACAP) were compared with 45 self-referred heroin users. Demographic data, heroin use measures, non-narcotic drug use, and alcohol use were collected by semi-structured interview. Official records were used for measures of criminality. This provided a comprehensive profile of conviction and incarceration rates. Each sample was compared on the age at presentation, intensity and duration of heroin use, and presenting rates of criminality. Results demonstrated the DACAP sample was significantly less heroin involved at presentation with a marginally shorter history of use. Comparisons on criminality demonstrated no difference between samples on six measures. The DACAP group recorded significantly higher levels on two criminality measures, the reverse of what was hypothesized. It is suggested that the DACAP diversion scheme generates a distinct subpopulation of heroin users, characterized by younger age, lower education, less marital attachment, poorer employment history, earlier onset of antisocial behaviour and comparable criminality. Identifiable subpopulations of heroin users appear to be generated by the different referral sources: legal or health oriented. The utility of diverting a more criminally and socially dysfunctional group to treatment agencies is discussed.

  8. A Collection of NIDA NOTES. Articles That Address Research on Heroin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Included in this document are selections of topic-specific articles on heroin research reprinted from the National Institute on Drug Abuses (NIDA) research newsletter, NIDA Notes. Titles include: Buprenorphine Taken Three Times Per Week Is as Effective as Daily Doses in Treating Heroin Addiction; 33-Year Study Finds Lifelong, Lethal Consequences…

  9. Psychological and behavioural factors associated with relapse among heroin abusers treated in therapeutic communities.

    PubMed

    Llorente del Pozo, J M; Fernández Gómez, C; Gutiérrez Fraile, M; Vielva Pérez, I

    1998-01-01

    The authors carried out a comparative study on two groups of heroin abusers treated in several therapeutic communities: One group consumed heroin on at least three occasions between the fifth and sixth months of treatment (n = 130), and the other continued without consuming heroin after 7 months of treatment (n = 130). The instruments used for data collection were a structured interview and urine analysis. The relapsed group includes older patients with more medical problems, lower educational and occupational level, and major chronicity in heroin consumption. The collection of retrospective data referring to the treatment period shows that relapsed patients more frequently consumed alcohol, hashish, cocaine, and amphetamines; suffered more heroin cravings; used fewer coping strategies to overcome the craving; and justified the craving or the heroin consumption in more situations than those who abstained. The last heroin craving during the treatment period arose in different temporal, social, and physical contexts in the two groups, and it was accompanied more frequently by inadequate responses in the relapsed group: psychophysiological alterations, depressed feelings, negative thoughts, and coping behaviours. The two groups are different in their attitudes toward heroin abstinence. The authors discuss the findings from a cognitive-behavioural perspective and come to the conclusion that various models need to be integrated.

  10. Pleasure, power and dangerous substances: applying Foucault to the study of 'heroin dependence' in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Viktoria B

    2004-04-01

    Taking the observation of disciplining and controlling everyday practices of methadone substitution as a point of departure, this paper explores the question of what exactly is so threatening or dangerous about heroin and heroin users. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, the main argument of this article is that the danger of heroin use is a discursive construction in accordance with bio-power. On the one hand, the juridical governance of heroin dependence is shifting from punishment to therapy, and biomedical discourses proclaim the substitution of a moral notion of heroin dependence by a disease model. Nevertheless, in the context of the anxiety associated with HIV, heroin remains the dangerous drug par excellence, and heroin users are constructed as 'abject others', unable to subordinate to certain social norms. As a reaction to such injurious ascriptions, I argue, applicants to the methadone programme in their life stories intensely narrate a desire for normalization, which I read as a desire to emerge from the realm of the abject. Both the danger and the pleasure associated with heroin use are bound to fundamental processes of subject formation, which are often ignored in biomedical and anthropological discourses.

  11. The new heroin users among Manhattan arrestees: variations by race/ethnicity and mode of consumption.

    PubMed

    Golub, Andrew; Johnson, Bruce D

    2005-03-01

    The incidence of heroin use among Manhattan arrestees interviewed by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program remained around 20% from 1987 through 2001. However, the authors had expected a decline because the heroin injection epidemic peaked back in the 1960s and early 1970s. A detailed analysis found differences across race/ethnicity. Black arrestees born since 1955 (who came of age since the heroin injection epidemic) were much less likely to use heroin than those born between 1945 and 1954 (who came of age during the epidemic). Hispanic arrestees born since 1970 (but not those born between 1955 and 1969) were also less likely to use heroin, suggesting that the decline in heroin use started among Blacks before Hispanics. During the 1990s, sniffing replaced injecting as the predominant mode of heroin consumption for Black and Hispanic arrestees, even among older arrestees. In strong contrast, the prevalence of heroin use among White arrestees did not decline in the 1990s and injection was still their most popular method of consumption. The discussion highlights implications for further research and drug treatment.

  12. Marijuana Use by Heroin Abusers as a Factor in Program Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellner, Melvyn

    1977-01-01

    Primary heroin abusers who remained in a voluntary drug-free treatment program for an average of nine months were carefully matched with not-retained control subjects. Marijuana was used by the retained subjects as a heroin substitute and those who used marijuana were more apt to remain in the treatment program. (Author)

  13. Heroin Use among Southern Arrestees: Regional Findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Ronald J., Jr.; Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Ross, Michael W.; Johnson, Regina J.

    2002-01-01

    To be effective with rehabilitation counseling, counselors need to be aware of cultural patterns of drug use. This study analyzed trends in heroin use between 1990 and 1997 among the arrestee population in some parts of the South. Findings suggest geographic, ethnic, and age-related variables for heroin use. (JDM)

  14. Chronic intermittent heroin produces locomotor sensitization and long-lasting enhancement of conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J; Thornton, V; Ranaldi, R

    2011-09-01

    In a previous study we showed that chronic intermittent heroin in rats enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement and reversal learning of a conditioned magazine approach task when tested three days after the heroin treatment. Whether or not this enhanced appetitive learning persists after a protracted withdrawal period remains unknown and constitutes the aim of the present study. Forty-eight male Long Evans rats were each exposed to positive pairings of a light stimulus and food for 4 consecutive daily sessions. Then, two groups of rats received saline and two groups received heroin (2 mg/kg) injections before placement in activity monitors for 9 consecutive daily sessions. This was followed by testing in operant conditioning chambers where one lever produced the light stimulus previously paired with food and another no stimulus. For one saline and one heroin group this testing occurred after 2 days of withdrawal while for the other saline and heroin groups it occurred after 30 days of withdrawal. The results indicate that animals treated with heroin displayed progressively and significantly greater locomotor activity across sessions while animals treated with saline displayed locomotor activity that remained low and stable across sessions. In addition, the heroin groups in each withdrawal condition displayed significantly enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement compared to their respective saline control groups. These results demonstrate that chronic intermittent heroin enhances appetitive learning for natural reinforcers and motivational processes and that this effect persists even after 30-days of withdrawal.

  15. Evidence from opiate binding studies that heroin acts through its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Inturrisi, C E; Schultz, M; Shin, S; Umans, J G; Angel, L; Simon, E J

    1983-01-01

    The relative affinity to opiate receptors of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine was estimated by determining their ability to displace specifically bound 3H-naltrexone from rat brain opiate binding sites. In vitro hydrolysis of heroin to 6-acetylmorphine was monitored in the binding assay filtrate by use of a quantitative HPLC procedure. The rate of heroin hydrolysis was significantly slower at 0 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The displacement of 1 nM 3H-naltrexone by unlabeled ligand at concentrations ranging from 7 to 500 nM was measured at 0 degrees C for 120 minutes, yielding IC50 values of heroin = 483 nM, 6-acetylmorphine = 73 nM and morphine = 53 nM. When the binding data for heroin were recalculated to include the displacement that could be attributed to the 6-acetylmorphine derived from heroin degradation during the incubation, all of the apparent heroin binding was accounted for by the 6-acetylmorphine. These results are consistent with previous reports of the low binding affinity of morphine congeners (e.g., codeine) that lack a free phenolic 3-hydroxyl group and support the view that heroin is a prodrug which serves to determine the distribution of its intrinsically active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine.

  16. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis UR-1, isolated from a German heroin user.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Licht, Katharina; Kalinowski, Jörn; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Antwerpen, Markus; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Reischl, Udo; Holzmann, Thomas; Gessner, André; Tiemann, Carsten; Grass, Gregor

    2012-11-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis UR-1, isolated from a fatal case of injectional anthrax in a German heroin user. Analysis of the genome sequence of strain UR-1 may aid in describing phylogenetic relationships between virulent heroin-associated isolates of B. anthracis isolated in the United Kingdom, Germany, and other European countries.

  17. Opioid Agonist Treatments and Heroin Overdose Deaths in Baltimore, Maryland, 1995–2009

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Jan; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Sharfstein, Joshua M.; Warren, Gregory; Olsen, Yngvild; Mitchell, Shannon G.; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the association between the expansion of methadone and buprenorphine treatment and the prevalence of heroin overdose deaths in Baltimore, Maryland from 1995 to 2009. Methods. We conducted a longitudinal time series analysis of archival data using linear regression with the Newey–West method to correct SEs for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation, adjusting for average heroin purity. Results. Overdose deaths attributed to heroin ranged from a high of 312 in 1999 to a low of 106 in 2008. While mean heroin purity rose sharply (1995–1999), the increasing number of patients treated with methadone was not associated with a change in the number of overdose deaths, but starting in 2000 expansion of opioid agonist treatment was associated with a decline in overdose deaths. Adjusting for heroin purity and the number of methadone patients, there was a statistically significant inverse relationship between heroin overdose deaths and patients treated with buprenorphine (P = .002). Conclusions. Increased access to opioid agonist treatment was associated with a reduction in heroin overdose deaths. Implementing policies that support evidence-based medication treatment of opiate dependence may decrease heroin overdose deaths. PMID:23488511

  18. "Every 'never' I ever said came true": transitions from opioid pills to heroin injecting.

    PubMed

    Mars, Sarah G; Bourgois, Philippe; Karandinos, George; Montero, Fernando; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This qualitative study documents the pathways to injecting heroin by users in Philadelphia and San Francisco before and during a pharmaceutical opioid pill epidemic. Data was collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews (conducted between 2010 and 2012) that were, conducted against a background of longer-term participant-observation, ethnographic studies of street-based drug users and dealers in Philadelphia (2007-12) and San Francisco (1994-2007, 2012). Philadelphia and San Francisco were selected for their contrasting political economies, immigration patterns and source type of heroin. In Philadelphia the ethnographers found heroin injectors, usually white users, who had started their opiate using careers with prescription opioids rather than transitioning from other drugs. In both Philadelphia and San Francisco, most of the young heroin injectors interviewed began, their drug-use trajectories with opioid pills--usually Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen), generic short acting oxycodone or, OxyContin (long-acting oxycodone)--before transitioning to heroin, usually by nasal inhalation (sniffing) or smoking at first, followed by injecting. While most of the Philadelphia users were born in the city or its suburbs and had started using both opioid pills and heroin there, many of the San Francisco users had initiated their pill and sometimes heroin use elsewhere and had migrated to the city from around the country. Nevertheless, patterns of transition of younger injectors were similar in both cities suggesting an evolving national pattern. In contrast, older users in both Philadelphia and San Francisco were more likely to have graduated to heroin injection from non-opiate drugs such as cannabis, methamphetamine and cocaine. Pharmaceutical opioid initiates typically reported switching to heroin for reasons of cost and ease-of-access to supply after becoming physically and emotionally dependent on opioid pills. Many expressed surprise and dismay at their

  19. Characterization and origin of the 'B' and 'C' compounds in the acid/neutral forensic signatures of heroin - products from the acylation of porphyroxine and subsequent hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Casale, John F; Casale, Ellen S; Toske, Steven G; Hays, Patrick A; Panicker, Sini

    2017-03-01

    Two significant compounds often found in the gas chromatographic analysis of the acid/neutral extracts from illicit heroin have remained uncharacterized for 30 years. The unknown compounds are referred to as the 'B' and 'C' compounds. It has been postulated that these compounds arise from acetylation of porphyroxine, a rhoeadine alkaloid found at trace levels in the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. Porphyroxine was isolated from opium and acetylated to produce N,O(8) -diacetylporphyroxine. Mild hydrolysis produced N,O(8) -diacetyl-O(14) -desmethyl-epi-porphyroxine (the C compound) and N-acetyl-O(14) -desmethyl-epi-porphyroxine (the B compound). Both N,O(8) -diacetyl-O(14) -desmethyl-epi-porphyroxine and N-acetyl-O(14) -desmethyl-epi-porphyroxine were determined to be C-14 epimers of porphyroxine and N,O(8) -diacetylporphyroxine. The non-epimerized isomers of the B and C compounds were also detected in illicit heroin, but at much lower levels. Chromatographic and spectroscopic data are presented for the aforementioned compounds. The presence/absence and relative concentrations of these compounds is presented for the four types of heroin (Southwest Asian, South American, Southeast Asian, and Mexican). The prevalence of detection for the B and C compounds are Southwest Asian = 92-93%, South American = 64-72%, Southeast Asian = 45-49%, and Mexican ≤ 3%. When detected, the overall trend of relative concentrations of dicaetylporhyroxine, the B-compound, and C-compound is Southwest Asian > South American > Southeast Asian, each by an order of magnitude. These compounds were rarely detected in Mexican heroin. The presence/absence and relative concentrations of these compounds provide pertinent forensic signature characteristics that significantly enhance the final regional classifications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Region-specific contribution of the ventral tegmental area to heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Lee W; Szczytkowski, Jennifer L; Saurer, Timothy B; Lebonville, Christina; Fuchs, Rita A; Lysle, Donald T

    2014-05-01

    Dopamine receptor stimulation is critical for heroin-conditioned immunomodulation; however, it is unclear whether the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contributes to this phenomenon. Hence, rats received repeated pairings of heroin with placement into a distinct environmental context. At test, they were re-exposed to the previously heroin-paired environment followed by systemic lipopolysaccharide treatment to induce an immune response. Bilateral GABA agonist-induced neural inactivation of the anterior, but not the posterior VTA, prior to context re-exposure inhibited the ability of the heroin-paired environment to suppress peripheral nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α expression, suggesting a role for the anterior VTA in heroin-conditioned immunomodulation.

  1. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  2. The onset of heroin use and criminal behaviour: does order make a difference?

    PubMed

    Kaye, S; Darke, S; Finlay-Jones, R

    1998-12-01

    The extent to which the onset of criminality with respect to heroin use accounts for heterogeneity within a heroin-using population was investigated among 400 community and incarcerated methadone maintenance patients. Those for whom crime preceded heroin use (primary antisocials) were younger and more likely to be male than those for whom heroin use preceded crime (secondary antisocials). Primary antisocials were also more likely to have committed violent crime and to qualify for a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). It is concluded that taking the order of onset of heroin use and criminality into account may reduce the risk of overdiagnosing ASPD among this population and help clarify the relationship between drug use and crime.

  3. The cutting of cocaine and heroin: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Broséus, Julian; Gentile, Natacha; Esseiva, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The illicit drug cutting represents a complex problem that requires the sharing of knowledge from addiction studies, toxicology, criminology and criminalistics. Therefore, cutting is not well known by the forensic community. Thus, this review aims at deciphering the different aspects of cutting, by gathering information mainly from criminology and criminalistics. It tackles essentially specificities of cocaine and heroin cutting. The article presents the detected cutting agents (adulterants and diluents), their evolution in time and space and the analytical methodology implemented by forensic laboratories. Furthermore, it discusses when, in the history of the illicit drug, cutting may take place. Moreover, researches studying how much cutting occurs in the country of destination are analysed. Lastly, the reasons for cutting are addressed. According to the literature, adulterants are added during production of the illicit drug or at a relatively high level of its distribution chain (e.g. before the product arrives in the country of destination or just after its importation in the latter). Their addition seems hardly justified by the only desire to increase profits or to harm consumers' health. Instead, adulteration would be performed to enhance or to mimic the illicit drug effects or to facilitate administration of the drug. Nowadays, caffeine, diltiazem, hydroxyzine, levamisole, lidocaïne and phenacetin are frequently detected in cocaine specimens, while paracetamol and caffeine are almost exclusively identified in heroin specimens. This may reveal differences in the respective structures of production and/or distribution of cocaine and heroin. As the relevant information about cutting is spread across different scientific fields, a close collaboration should be set up to collect essential and unified data to improve knowledge and provide information for monitoring, control and harm reduction purposes. More research, on several areas of investigation, should be

  4. The effects of piracetam on heroin-induced CPP and neuronal apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Li, Min; Bai, Yanping; Lu, Wei; Ling, Xiaomei; Li, Weidong

    2015-05-01

    Piracetam is a positive allosteric modulator of the AMPA receptor that has been used in the treatment of cognitive disorders for decades. Recent surveys and drug analyses have demonstrated that a heroin mixture adulterated with piracetam has spread rapidly in heroin addicts in China, but its addictive properties and the damage it causes to the central neural system are currently unknown. The effect of piracetam on the reward properties of heroin was assessed by conditioned place preference (CPP). Electron microscopy and radioimmunoassay were used to compare the effects of heroin mixed with equivalent piracetam (HP) and heroin alone on neuronal apoptosis and the levels of beta-endorphin (β-EP) in different brain subregions within the corticolimbic system, respectively. Piracetam significantly enhanced heroin-induced CPP expression while piracetam itself didn't induce CPP. Morphological observations showed that HP-treated rats had less neuronal apoptosis than heroin-treated group. Interestingly, HP normalized the levels of β-EP in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and core of the nucleus accumbens (AcbC) subregions, in where heroin-treated rats showed decreased levels of β-EP. These results indicate that piracetam potentiate the heroin-induced CPP and protect neurons from heroin-induced apoptosis. The protective role of HP might be related to the restoration of β-EP levels by piracetam. Our findings may provide a potential interpretation for the growing trend of HP abuse in addicts in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual-energy CT behavior of heroin, cocaine, and typical adulterants.

    PubMed

    Laberke, Patrick J; Fornaro, Juergen; Kim, Suk-kyum; Blum, Simon; Augsburger, Marc; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildermuth, Simon; Hausmann, Roland; Leschka, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the dual-energy CT behavior of cocaine and heroin and of typical adulterants, and to evaluate the elemental composition of pure cocaine and heroin compared with cocaine and heroin in bodypacks. Pure heroin and pure synthetic cocaine samples, eight different adulterants, and in each case ten different bodypacks containing cocaine or heroin, were imaged at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp in a dual source CT system at two different degrees of compression. Two radiologists, blinded to the samples, measured the attenuation. The dual-energy index (DEI) was calculated. We performed atomic mass spectrometry for the elemental analysis of pure cocaine, pure heroin, and heroin and cocaine in bodypacks, and 140 kVp in a dual-source CT system. Inter- and intra-observer agreement for attenuation measurements was good (r = 0.61-0.72; p < 0.01). The cocaine bodypacks had a positive DEI of 0.029, while the pure drugs and the heroin bodypacks had a negative DEI (-0.051 to -0.027). Levamisole was the only substance which expressed a positive DEI of 0.011, while the remaining adulterants had negative DEIs ranging between -0.015 and -0.215. Atomic mass spectrometry revealed a concentration of tin in the cocaine bodypack that was 67 times higher than in the pure synthetic cocaine sample. The different DEIs of bodypacks containing cocaine and heroin allow them to be distinguished with dual-energy CT. Although the material properties of pure cocaine, pure heroin, or common drug extenders do not explain the differences in DEI, tin contamination during illicit natural cocaine production may be a possible explanation.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of injectable opioid treatment v. oral methadone for chronic heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Byford, Sarah; Barrett, Barbara; Metrebian, Nicola; Groshkova, Teodora; Cary, Maria; Charles, Vikki; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Strang, John

    2013-11-01

    Despite evidence of the effectiveness of injectable opioid treatment compared with oral methadone for chronic heroin addiction, the additional cost of injectable treatment is considerable, and cost-effectiveness uncertain. To compare the cost-effectiveness of supervised injectable heroin and injectable methadone with optimised oral methadone for chronic refractory heroin addiction. Multisite, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Outcomes were assessed in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Economic perspective included health, social services and criminal justice resources. Intervention costs over 26 weeks were significantly higher for injectable heroin (mean £8995 v. £4674 injectable methadone and £2596 oral methadone; P<0.0001). Costs overall were highest for oral methadone (mean £15 805 v. £13 410 injectable methadone and £10 945 injectable heroin; P = n.s.) due to higher costs of criminal activity. In cost-effectiveness analysis, oral methadone was dominated by injectable heroin and injectable methadone (more expensive and less effective). At willingness to pay of £30 000 per QALY, there is a higher probability of injectable methadone being more cost-effective (80%) than injectable heroin. Injectable opioid treatments are more cost-effective than optimised oral methadone for chronic refractory heroin addiction. The choice between supervised injectable heroin and injectable methadone is less clear. There is currently evidence to suggest superior effectiveness of injectable heroin but at a cost that policy makers may find unacceptable. Future research should consider the use of decision analytic techniques to model expected costs and benefits of the treatments over the longer term.

  7. Increased densities of nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons in the temporal cortex and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of polytoxicomanic heroin overdose victims: possible implications for heroin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Trübner, Kurt; Krebs, Philipp; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bielau, Hendrik; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Heroin is one of the most dangerous drugs of abuse, which may exert various neurotoxic actions on the brain (such as gray matter loss, neuronal apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, synaptic defects, depression of adult neurogenensis, as well as development of spongiform leucoencephalopathy). Some of these toxic effects are probably mediated by the gas nitric oxide (NO). We studied by morphometric analysis the numerical density of neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cortical and hypothalamic areas of eight heroin overdose victims and nine matched controls. Heroin addicts showed significantly increased numerical densities of nNOS immunoreactive cells in the right temporal cortex and the left paraventricular nucleus. Remarkably, in heroin abusers, but not in controls, we observed not only immunostained interneurons, but also cortical pyramidal cells. Given that increased cellular expression of nNOS was accompanied by elevated NO generation in brains of heroin addicts, these elevated levels of NO might have contributed to some of the known toxic effects of heroin (for example, reduced adult neurogenesis, mitochondrial pathology or disturbances in synaptic functioning).

  8. Bartonella spp. antibodies in forensic samples from Swedish heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    McGill, Svena; Hjelm, Eva; Rajs, Jovan; Lindquist, Olle; Friman, Göran

    2003-06-01

    A high frequency of Bartonella elizabethae seropositivity (39%) was recorded among intravenous heroin addicts in Stockholm, Sweden, who died from a lethal injection. Some of the B. elizabethae-seropositive individuals also had antibodies to B. henselae Houston-1, B. grahamii, and B. quintana, but none had antibodies to B. henselae Marseille or B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii. Hepatitis was a frequent finding but no case had peliosis hepatitis. There was no case of endocarditis, but in three persons active subacute-to-chronic myocarditis was found; two of these cases were Bartonella-positive and HIV-negative.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin, by intravenous or by inhalation route in opioid-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J X; Huitema, Alwin D R; Hendriks, Vincent M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study was performed in opioid-dependent patients in the Netherlands, who were currently treated with high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin on medical prescription. Besides intravenous heroin, heroin was prescribed for inhalation by "chasing the dragon" method. In this technique, heroin base is heated on aluminium foil, and heroin vapours are inhaled into the lungs. Not much is known about the pharmacokinetics profile and bioavailability of this specific administration method. Therefore, a study was performed on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of heroin inhalation and intravenous use. Eleven patients who injected heroin and 9 patients who inhaled heroin entered the study. They were on steady-state heroin treatment for at least 12 months. For safety reasons, there was no crossing-over between heroin injection or inhalation. In a double-blind randomised study, 67-100-150% of the regular heroin maintenance dose was administered to each patient. Maximal single heroin dose was 450 mg. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine and morphine-glucuronides were analysed using LC-MS-MS. Blood pressure, heart rate, skin temperature and reaction time were assessed. Furthermore, visual analogue scales regarding craving and appreciation of heroin effect were scored by the subjects. Both in inhaling and injecting patients, the areas under curve of heroin and all measured metabolites were linearly related to heroin dose. Mean C(max) of heroin and its metabolites were 2-6 times lower after inhalation, than after intravenous injection. Bioavailability (F) of heroin inhalation was estimated as 52% (95% CI 44-61%). Heroin was rapidly cleared from plasma. Cl/F was 930 l/hr (95% CI 799-1061 l/hr) after intravenous administration, and 1939 l/hr (95% CI 1661-2217 l/hr) after inhalation. Heroin Cl and Vd were correlated to body weight (R(2) 15-19%). Morphine-glucuronides levels were inversely related to

  10. Asymmetric Generalization and Interaction Profiles in Rhesus Monkeys Discriminating Intravenous Cocaine or Intravenous Heroin from Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, James K.; Spealman, Roger D.

    2010-01-01

    Many polydrug abusers combine cocaine with heroin in the form of a “speedball.” This study investigated the discriminative stimulus (DS) effects of speedballs in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate either intravenous cocaine or intravenous heroin from vehicle. Initial substitution tests revealed an asymmetry in the generalization profile of dopamine and opioid agonists such that μ agonists partially substituted for cocaine, but direct and indirect dopamine agonists did not substitute for heroin. Subsequent speedball tests in which drug mixtures were administered by coinjecting the component drugs while keeping the dose-ratio constant revealed an additional asymmetry. In cocaine-trained monkeys, coadministration of cocaine and heroin produced leftward shifts in the cocaine dose-response function. Heroin's cocaine-enhancing effects were mimicked by the μ agonists fentanyl and methadone and less consistently by the δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC 80) and reversed by the μ antagonist naltrexone and the δ antagonist naltrindole. In heroin-trained monkeys, coadministration of cocaine and heroin attenuated the DS effects of heroin. Cocaine's heroin-attenuating effects were mimicked by the D1-like agonist 6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine (SKF 81297) and the D2-like agonist R-(−)-propylnorapomorphine and reversed by the D1-like antagonist (6aS-trans)-11-chloro-6,6a,7,8,9,13b-hexahydro-7-methyl-5H- benzo[d] aphtha[2,1-b]azepin-12-ol hydrobromide (SCH 39166) and the D2-like antagonist raclopride. Attenuation of the effects of heroin was accompanied by decreases in response rate. These results suggest that heroin enhances the DS effects of cocaine via μ, and to a lesser extent δ, receptor mechanisms; whereas cocaine-induced inhibition of the DS effects of heroin probably was due at least in part to masking of the heroin DS presumably via

  11. What are the factors associated with HIV testing among male injecting and non-injecting drug users in Lashio, Myanmar: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Yu Mon; Yasuoka, Junko; Saw, Thu Nandar; Poudel, Krishna C; Tun, Soe; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives HIV testing is an effective intervention for reducing HIV risk and providing information on HIV status. However, uptake of HIV testing is a major challenge within the drug-using population due to the stigma and discrimination associated with their illegal drug use behaviours. This study thus aimed to identify factors associated with HIV testing among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) in Lashio, Myanmar. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2010 to February 2010. Setting This study was carried out in Lashio city, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. Participants In total, 158 male IDUs and 210 male NIDUs were recruited using a respondent-driven sampling method. Primary outcome measures Proportion of both drug users who were ever tested for HIV and factors associated with HIV testing. Results Approximately 77% of IDUs and 46% of NIDUs were ever tested for HIV. The multivariate analysis revealed that having ever received drug treatment was positively associated with HIV testing among both IDUs (adjusted OR (AOR) 13.07; 95% CI 3.38 to 50.53) and NIDUs (AOR 3.58; 95% CI 1.38 to 9.24). IDUs who were married (AOR 0.24; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.94) and who injected at least twice daily (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.97) were less likely to undergo HIV testing. Among NIDUs, those who belonged to Shan (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.84) or Kachin (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.87) ethnicities were less likely to test for HIV. Conclusions IDUs and NIDUs who have received drug treatment are more likely to test for HIV. Integrating HIV testing into drug treatment programmes alongside general expansion of HIV testing services may be effective in increasing HIV testing uptake among both IDUs and NIDUs in the Northern Shan State of Myanmar. PMID:23794581

  12. Cost effectiveness of 'on demand' HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for non-injection drug-using men who have sex with men in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Estelle; Durand, Madeleine; Guertin, Jason R; LeLorier, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile L

    2015-01-01

    Recent trials report the efficacy of continuous tenofovir-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for prevention of HIV infection. The cost effectiveness of 'on demand' PrEP for non-injection drug-using men who have sex with men at high risk of HIV acquisition has not been evaluated. To conduct an economic evaluation of the societal costs of HIV in Canada and evaluate the potential benefits of this PrEP strategy. Direct HIV costs comprised outpatient, inpatient and emergency department costs, psychosocial costs and antiretroviral costs. Resource consumption estimates were derived from the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal HIV cohort. Estimates of indirect costs included employment rate and work absenteeism. Costs for 'on demand' PrEP were modelled after an ongoing clinical trial. Cost-effectiveness analysis compared costs of 'on demand' PrEP to prevent one infection with lifetime costs of one HIV infection. Benefits were presented in terms of life-years and quality-adjusted life-years. The average annual direct cost of one HIV infection was $16,109 in the least expensive antiretroviral regimen scenario and $24,056 in the most expensive scenario. The total indirect cost was $11,550 per year. Total costs for the first year of HIV infection ranged from $27,410 to $35,358. Undiscounted lifetime costs ranged from $1,439,984 ($662,295 discounted at 3% and $448,901 at 5%) to $1,482,502 ($690,075 at 3% and $485,806 at 5%). The annual cost of PrEP was $12,001 per participant, and $621,390 per infection prevented. The PrEP strategy was cost-saving in all scenarios for undiscounted and 3% discounting rates. At 5% discounting rates, the strategy is largely cost-effective: according to least and most expensive scenarios, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged from $60,311 to $47,407 per quality-adjusted life-year. This 'on demand' PrEP strategy ranges from cost-saving to largely cost-effective. The authors believe it represents an important public health

  13. Low-temperature noninjection approach to homogeneously-alloyed PbSe(x)S(1-x) colloidal nanocrystals for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kui; Ouyang, Jianying; Zhang, Yanguang; Tung, Hsien-Tse; Lin, Shuqiong; Nagelkerke, Robbert A L; Kingston, David; Wu, Xiaohua; Leek, Donald M; Wilkinson, Diana; Li, Chunsheng; Chen, In-Gann; Tao, Ye

    2011-05-01

    Homogeneously alloyed PbSe(x)S(1-x) nanocrystals (NCs) with their excitonic absorption peaks in wavelength shorter than 1200 nm were developed for photovoltaic (PV) applications. Schottky-type solar cells fabricated with our PbSe₀.₃S₀.₇ NCs as their active materials reached a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.44%, with an open circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.49 V, short circuit photocurrent (J(sc)) of 13.09 mA/cm², and fill factor (FF) of 0.54 under Air Mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) irradiation of 100 mW/cm². The syntheses of the small-sized colloidal PbSe(x)S(1-x) NCs were carried out at low temperature (60 °C) with long growth periods (such as 45 min) via a one-pot noninjection-based approach in 1-octadecene (ODE), featuring high reaction yield, high product quality, and high synthetic reproducibility. This low-temperature approach employed Pb(oleate)₂ as a Pb precursor and air-stable low-cost thioacetamide (TAA) as a S source instead of air-sensitive high-cost bis(trimethylsilyl)sulfide ((TMS)₂S), with n-tributylphosphine selenide (TBPSe) as a Se precursor instead of n-trioctylphosphine selenide (TOPSe). The reactivity difference of TOPSe made from commercial TOP 90% and TBPSe made from commercial TBP 97% and TBP 99% was addressed with in situ observation of the temporal evolution of NC absorption and with ³¹P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Furthermore, the addition of a strong reducing/nucleation agent diphenylphosphine (DPP) promoted the reactivity of the Pb precursor through the formation of a Pb-P complex, which is much more reactive than Pb(oleate)₂. Thus, the reactivity of TBPSe was increased more than that of TAA. The larger the DPP-to-Pb feed molar ratio, the more the Pb-P complex, the higher the Se amount in the resulting homogeneously alloyed PbSe(x)S(1-x) NCs. Therefore, the use of DPP allowed reactivity match of the Se and S precursors and led to sizable nucleation at low temperature so that long growth periods became

  14. The Cedar Project: Historical trauma, sexual abuse and HIV risk among young Aboriginal people who use injection and non-injection drugs in two Canadian cities☆

    PubMed Central

    For the Cedar Project Partnership; Pearce, Margo E.; Christian, Wayne M.; Patterson, Katharina; Norris, Kat; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Craib, Kevin J.P.; Schechter, Martin T.; Spittal, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent Indigenist scholarship has situated high rates of traumatic life experiences, including sexual abuse, among Indigenous peoples of North America within the larger context of their status as colonized peoples. Sexual abuse has been linked to many negative health outcomes including mental, sexual and drug-related vulnerabilities. There is a paucity of research in Canada addressing the relationship between antecedent sexual abuse and negative health outcomes among Aboriginal people including elevated risk of HIV infection. The primary objectives of this study were to determine factors associated with sexual abuse among participants of the Cedar Project, a cohort of young Aboriginal people between the ages of 14 and 30 years who use injection and non-injection drugs in two urban centres in British Columbia, Canada; and to locate findings through a lens of historical and intergenerational trauma. We utilized post-colonial perspectives in research design, problem formulation and the interpretation of results. Multivariate modeling was used to determine the extent to which a history of sexual abuse was predictive of negative health outcomes and vulnerability to HIV infection. Of the 543 eligible participants, 48% reported ever having experienced sexual abuse; 69% of sexually abused participants were female. The median age of first sexual abuse was 6 years for both female and male participants. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables and factors of historical trauma, sexually abused participants were more likely to have ever been on the streets for more than three nights, to have ever self-harmed, to have suicide ideation, to have attempted suicide, to have a diagnosis of mental illness, to have been in the emergency department within the previous 6 months, to have had over 20 lifetime sexual partners, to have ever been paid for sex and to have ever overdosed. The prevalence and consequences of sexual abuse among Cedar Project participants are of grave concern

  15. Differential effect of opioid and cannabinoid receptor blockade on heroin-seeking reinstatement and cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats

    PubMed Central

    Fattore, L; Spano, MS; Melis, V; Fadda, P; Fratta, W

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opioids and cannabinoids interact in drug addiction and relapse. We investigated the effect of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and/or the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on cannabinoid-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and on cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were trained to self-administer heroin (30 µg·kg−1 per infusion) under a fixed-ratio 1 reinforcement schedule. After extinction of self-administration (SA) behaviour, we confirmed the effect of naloxone (0.1–1 mg·kg−1) and rimonabant (0.3–3 mg·kg−1) on the reinstatement of heroin seeking induced by priming with the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN, 0.15–0.3 mg·kg−1). Then, in a parallel set of heroin-trained rats, we evaluated whether WIN (12.5 µg·kg−1 per infusion) SA substituted for heroin SA after different periods of extinction. In groups of rats in which substitution occurred, we studied the effect of both antagonists on cannabinoid intake. KEY RESULTS Cannabinoid-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking was significantly attenuated by naloxone (1 mg·kg−1) and rimonabant (3 mg·kg−1) and fully blocked by co-administration of sub-threshold doses of the two antagonists. Moreover, contrary to immediate (1 day) or delayed (90 days) drug substitution, rats readily self-administered WIN when access was given after 7, 14 or 21 days of extinction from heroin, and showed a response rate that was positively correlated with the extinction period. In these animals, cannabinoid intake was increased by naloxone (1 mg·kg−1) and decreased by rimonabant (3 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings extend previous research on the crosstalk between cannabinoid and opioid receptors in relapse mechanisms, which suggests a differential role in heroin-seeking reinstatement and cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on

  16. Differential effect of opioid and cannabinoid receptor blockade on heroin-seeking reinstatement and cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats.

    PubMed

    Fattore, L; Spano, Ms; Melis, V; Fadda, P; Fratta, W

    2011-08-01

    Opioids and cannabinoids interact in drug addiction and relapse. We investigated the effect of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and/or the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant on cannabinoid-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and on cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were trained to self-administer heroin (30 µg·kg(-1) per infusion) under a fixed-ratio 1 reinforcement schedule. After extinction of self-administration (SA) behaviour, we confirmed the effect of naloxone (0.1-1 mg·kg(-1)) and rimonabant (0.3-3 mg·kg(-1)) on the reinstatement of heroin seeking induced by priming with the CB(1) receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN, 0.15-0.3 mg·kg(-1)). Then, in a parallel set of heroin-trained rats, we evaluated whether WIN (12.5 µg·kg(-1) per infusion) SA substituted for heroin SA after different periods of extinction. In groups of rats in which substitution occurred, we studied the effect of both antagonists on cannabinoid intake. Cannabinoid-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking was significantly attenuated by naloxone (1 mg·kg(-1)) and rimonabant (3 mg·kg(-1)) and fully blocked by co-administration of sub-threshold doses of the two antagonists. Moreover, contrary to immediate (1 day) or delayed (90 days) drug substitution, rats readily self-administered WIN when access was given after 7, 14 or 21 days of extinction from heroin, and showed a response rate that was positively correlated with the extinction period. In these animals, cannabinoid intake was increased by naloxone (1 mg·kg(-1)) and decreased by rimonabant (3 mg·kg(-1)). Our findings extend previous research on the crosstalk between cannabinoid and opioid receptors in relapse mechanisms, which suggests a differential role in heroin-seeking reinstatement and cannabinoid substitution in heroin-abstinent rats. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Resting-state abnormalities in heroin-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Pandria, Niki; Kovatsi, Leda; Vivas, Ana B; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-11-21

    Drug addiction is a major health problem worldwide. Recent neuroimaging studies have shed light into the underlying mechanisms of drug addiction as well as its consequences to the human brain. The most vulnerable, to heroin addiction, brain regions have been reported to be specific prefrontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal regions, as well as, some subcortical regions. The brain regions involved are usually linked with reward, motivation/drive, memory/learning, inhibition as well as emotional control and seem to form circuits that interact with each other. So, along with neuroimaging studies, recent advances in resting-state dynamics might allow further assessments upon the multilayer complexity of addiction. In the current manuscript, we comprehensively review and discuss existing resting-state neuroimaging findings classified into three overlapping and interconnected groups: functional connectivity alterations, structural deficits and abnormal topological properties. Moreover, behavioral traits of heroin-addicted individuals as well as the limitations of the currently available studies are also reviewed. Finally, in need of a contemporary therapy a multimodal therapeutic approach is suggested using classical treatment practices along with current neurotechonologies, such as neurofeedback and goal-oriented video-games.

  18. Comparative toxicology of intentional and accidental heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Duflou, Johan; Torok, Michelle

    2010-07-01

    The demographic and toxicological characteristics of deliberate (SUI, n = 50) and accidental (ACC, n = 927) fatal heroin overdose cases were examined. SUI cases were more likely to be female, had lower body mass indices, were more likely to be enrolled in treatment and less likely to have hepatic pathology. The median blood morphine concentration of SUI cases was significantly higher than that of ACC cases (0.70 vs. 0.40 mg/L, p < 0.001). Blood morphine concentrations of >1 mg/L were seen among 38.0% of SUI cases compared to 13.9% of ACC cases. Being a member of the SUI group remained a significant independent predictor of higher morphine concentrations after controlling for the effects of potential confounders (p < 0.001), other significant predictors being the absence of alcohol (p < 0.001), the presence of methadone (p < 0.05), and the presence of cocaine (p < 0.05). The current data are consistent with the view that suicide forms a small, but distinct, category of heroin overdose cases, rather than overdose being a parasuicidal phenomenon per se.

  19. Heroin-associated myocardial damages--conventional and immunohistochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, R; Friedrich, K; Schmidt, P; Madea, B

    2009-05-30

    Well-known complications related to drug abuse are myocardial insufficiency, myocardial infarction, endocarditis, myocarditis, aortic dissection, neurologic damages, ischemic colitis, thrombotic phenomenons, renal infarction and acute liver failure. Furthermore, microfocal fibrosis of the myocardium is found in stimulant abuse. The origin of myocardial fibrosis associated with opiate abuse (endocarditis, myocarditis, embolism) is still unclear. This question shall be investigated using immunohistochemical staining for early diagnosis of myocarditis. A quantification of myocardial interstitial leucocytic infiltrates was accomplished in 21 chronic drug abusers who died of heroin/morphine intoxication and compared to 15 normal subjects who died suddenly due to non-cardiac causes of death without intoxication (e.g. traffic accidents, head trauma). Toxicological investigations were performed and in addition, blood samples were checked to clarify the status of HIV, hepatitis A, B and C in both groups. To verify signs of inflammation, myocardial specimen from different locations were investigated with conventional histological stainings and immunohistochemical techniques for characterization and quantification of interstitial myocardial leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages. The number of cells were found up to fivefold increased in heroin addicts compared to the control group without reaching the cut-off values for immunohistochemically based diagnosis of myocarditis.

  20. Endophthalmitis related to lemon allergy in a heroin addict.

    PubMed

    Armentia, A; Pineda, F; Martin-Armentia, B; Ramos, C; Gil Martin, F J; Palacios, R

    2016-01-01

    Heroin and its contaminants may be an important source of allergens in young people. We present a case of severe endophthalmitis in a patient that also suffered from anaphylactoid symptoms (hypotension, urticaria, glottic oedema) whenever he ingested lemon. Prick tests with a battery of 42 aeroallergens including fruits and citrus fruits (orange, mandarin, grapefruit and lemon) and specific IgE to these allergens were carried out. Immunodetection was performed using the patient's serum and the following allergens: lemon, Candida, Aspergillus, Penicillium and Alternaria recombinant Alt 1 (Laboratories Diater). Skin tests were negative for Candida, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium (ALK-Spain) as were specific IgE antibodies for CAP (Thermofisher, Sweden) and positive only for lemon and, doubtfully, to Candida. Specific IgE tests to pollen, arthropods, fungi, dander and foods were positive only for lemon (0.49kU/L). Serological study of fungi ruled out fungal infection at that time. The immunodetection showed that the patient's serum recognised a protein of approximately 25kDa of lemon peel, one of approximately 12-13kDa of Penicillium, and perfectly recognised Alt a 1. Lemon surface can be contaminated by Candida and other fungi. In heroin addicts with positive skin tests for lemon, the possibility of these serious complications should be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. [Social integration after 4 years of heroin-assisted treatment].

    PubMed

    Verthein, U; Schäfer, I; Degkwitz, P

    2013-08-01

    Studies from several countries have by now shown the effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment in comparison to methadone treatment. However, only few long-term results exist, and in particular data with a focus on social integration of the patients are scarce. The study analyzes the course of long-term social integration among the patients of the German diamorphine study. Individual changes in health, drug use and social integration among patients who had participated in a 4-year diamorphine treatment (n=156) were described and statistically tested by means of repeated measures analyses. The criteria used are based on the instruments OTI-HSS and SCL-90-R, on medical findings, urinalyses, and on variables as well as composite scores from the European Addiction Severity Index. In all domains significant improvements were found after long-term treatment. The percentage of patients employed or currently working had increased 3-fold up to 40% after 4 years. Moreover, the living situation and leisure behaviour improved, and criminal activities declined markedly. The main influencing factor for successful social integration after 4 years of treatment is the ability to work. Heroin-assisted treatment is a long-term effective treatment for severely dependent opiate addicts with respect to stabilization of health, reduction of illegal drug use and improvement of social integration. Furthermore, the results show that processes of social (re-)integration of drug users take time. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Skin ulcer caused by venous extravasation of heroin.

    PubMed

    Onesti, Maria G; Fioramonti, Paolo; Fino, Pasquale; Massera, Diego; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolo

    2014-08-01

    The accidental leakage of the compound, in this case heroin, from the veins where it is injected, causes the formation of tissue lesions. Similar mechanisms lead to progressive tissue necrosis, which, if not immediately treated, results in the loss of the relevant function. A 57-year-old man presented a skin lesion on the posterior region of the left forearm with extensive necrosis of skin and subcutaneous layer involving the underlying muscle planes, caused by a venous extravasation of heroin that he reports having injected himself. The wound size is 15 × 10 cm; it had a sanious, fibrinous, secreting and smelly bottom. In this period, the patient was subjected to daily focused dressing before debridement of the lesion through a collagenase plus hyaluronic acid ointment: Bionect Start®; (FIDIA Pharmaceutical, Abano, Italy). The therapeutic choice was rewarded with a complete resolution of the wound through a non-invasive technique and over a short period. Avoiding the hospitalisation of the patient achieved a reduction of risks for him and of the costs for the National Health Service (NHS). The Bionect Start®; (FIDIA Pharmaceutical) as well as allowing the healing of the wound also decreased significantly the pain felt by the patient, the amount of exudate and the bad smell improving in a non-negligible way his quality of life. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Depression among regular heroin users: the influence of gender.

    PubMed

    Sordo, L; Chahua, M; Bravo, M J; Barrio, G; Brugal, M T; Domingo-Salvany, A; Molist, G; De la Fuente, L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of recent (last 12 months) depression in regular young heroin users and to ascertain factors associated with depression in this population, broken down by gender. A sample of 561 participants completed a cross-sectional survey. Eligibility criteria were: age 30 years or younger, and having used heroin for at least 12 days in the last 12 months and at least one day in the last 3 months. Participants were recruited outside of health-care facilities in the cities of Barcelona, Madrid and Seville by targeted sampling and chain referral methods. Depression was assessed using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The prevalence of recent depression was 22.3% (35.2% among women and 17.3% among men, p<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the factors positively associated with recent depression in the whole sample were female gender, age 25 or less, inability to work due to health problems and high risk consumption of alcohol. Among woman, the related variables were age 25 or less, cocaine dependence in the last 12 months, and alcohol consumption in that period. Among men, employment status was the only related variable. Analysis of an overall sample without the gender breakdown may hide important differences in the factors associated with depression in men and women. Both prevention and treatment of depression should rely on specific gender analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reversal of overdose on fentanyl being illicitly sold as heroin with naloxone nasal spray: A case report.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Buchanan-Cummings, Ann Marie; Crampton, Kelli; Grant, Angela; Drexler, Karen

    2015-08-01

    This is a case report describing a reversal of fentanyl overdose with naloxone nasal spray. The patient was not aware that he overdosed on fentanyl being sold as heroin. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented an initiative to provide education for veterans, their families, friends and significant others about opioid overdose and use of naloxone reversal kits. The Atlanta VA Medical Center adopted this program to reduce the risk of opioid overdose in high risk patients. Over the past year, we provided educational sessions for 63 veterans and their families. We also prescribed 41 naloxone kits. We have received three reports of opioid overdose reversal with use of naloxone kits prescribed by the Atlanta VA Medical Center. The authors recommend that public health administrators and policy makers advocate for the implementation of these programs to reduce the rising number of overdose death in the United States and worldwide. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  5. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users' health.

    PubMed

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2015-11-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users' perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users' concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications.

  6. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users’ health

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users’ perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users’ concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications. PMID:26077143

  7. Serum concentrations of macro and trace elements in heroin addicts of the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, José F; Sañudo, Ricardo I; Rodríguez, Elena M; Romero, Carlos Díaz

    2004-01-01

    Na, K, Ca, Mg, P, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se concentrations were determined in the serum of 106 heroin addicts and were compared with the concentrations obtained in a control group formed of 186 apparently healthy individuals. Heroin addicts displayed K and Se mean concentrations lower (p < 0.05), and Na, Mg, P mean concentrations and a Cu/Zn ratio higher (p < 0.05) than those mean values observed in the control group. The Mg and P concentrations in the serum of heroin addicts tended to normalize when age increased. The heroin addicts included in the methadone maintenance treatment program had higher serum mean concentrations of K and Mg than the heroin addicts in the detoxification process. The Na, K and Mg concentrations displayed highly significant correlations, with a different behavior for the heroin addicts group and the control group. When applying factor analysis and representing the scores of the first and second factors, the heroin addicts tended to differentiation from the control group. However, methadone substitution treatment was not able to normalize these concentrations.

  8. MiR-218 targets MeCP2 and inhibits heroin seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Biao; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yao, Wenqing; Le, Qiumin; Xu, Bo; Liu, Xing; Ma, Lan

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of evolutionarily conserved, 18–25 nucleotide non-coding sequences that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Recent studies implicated their roles in the regulation of neuronal functions, such as learning, cognition and memory formation. Here we report that miR-218 inhibits heroin-induced behavioral plasticity. First, network propagation-based method was used to predict candidate miRNAs that played potential key roles in regulating drug addiction-related genes. Microarray screening was also carried out to identify miRNAs responding to chronic heroin administration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Among the collapsed miRNAs, top-ranked miR-218 was decreased after chronic exposure to heroin. Lentiviral overexpression of miR-218 in NAc could inhibit heroin-induced reinforcement in both conditioned place preference (CPP) test and heroin self-administration experiments. Luciferase activity assay indicated that miR-218 could regulate 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTR) of multiple neuroplasticity-related genes and directly target methyl CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2). Consistently, Mecp2308/y mice exhibited reduced heroin seeking behavior in CPP test. These data reveal a functional role of miR-218 and its target, MeCP2, in the regulation of heroin-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:28074855

  9. Impact of the heroin 'drought' on patterns of drug use and drug-related harms.

    PubMed

    Longo, Marie C; Henry-Edwards, Susan M; Humeniuk, Rachel E; Christie, Paul; Ali, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    Since late 2000, anecdotal reports from drug users and health professionals have suggested that there was a reduction in the supply of heroin in Adelaide in the first half of 2001, referred to as a heroin 'drought'. The aim of this paper was to critically review evidence for this, using data obtained from 100 injecting drug users surveyed for the 2001 Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS). This project is carried out annually in all Australian jurisdictions, and collects up-to-date information on the markets for heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and cannabis. This paper also investigates the possible implications of this 'drought' on patterns of drug use and drug-related harms. The 2001 IDRS found consistent reports by users of an increase in the price of heroin, together with decreases in purity and availability. These factors resulted in a decrease in the frequency of self-reported heroin use among those surveyed in 2001, and a concomitant increase in the use of other drugs, in particular methamphetamine and morphine. The heroin 'drought' appears to have had a substantial impact on several indices of drug-related harm. There was a marked decrease in the number of opioid-related fatalities, and hospital data also showed reductions in heroin-related presentations. Treatment service data showed an increase in the number of admissions related to amphetamines. There is a need for health promotion and education on the adverse effects of methamphetamine use, and the development of improved treatment protocols for methamphetamine abuse and dependence.

  10. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioids and Heroin Use Among Adolescents Involved in Competitive Sports.

    PubMed

    Veliz, Philip; Boyd, Carol J; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2017-03-01

    Examine the past-year prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioids (NUPOs), heroin use, and the concurrent NUPO and heroin in a sample of 12th graders involved in 16 different sports. A secondary analysis of nationally representative data from nine cohorts (2006-2014) of the Monitoring the Future study (n = 21,557). No differences were found between 12th graders who participated in at least one competitive sport and nonparticipants with respect to past-year NUPO, heroin use, and concurrent NUPO and heroin use. Most of the 16 sports analyzed were not associated with the three drug use outcomes. However, 12th graders who participated in ice hockey had substantially greater odds of both past-year heroin use and concurrent NUPO and heroin, while those who participated in weightlifting (NUPO and heroin) and wrestling (NUPO) had slightly higher odds of using these drugs. The study provides critical information to inform physicians, parents, and school officials of the risks associated with participating in certain high contact sports, particularly ice hockey. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in combination with dextromethorphan and quinidine

    PubMed Central

    Vosburg, Suzanne K.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Comer, Sandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studies have suggested that the N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist dextromethorphan may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence. Design This double-blinded, placebo-controlled inpatient study evaluated the effects of 0, 30, and 60 mg of dextromethorphan and quinidine (DMQ) on the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in recently detoxified heroin abusers. Participants Nine heroin-dependent participants were admitted and then detoxified from heroin over the course of several days. Interventions Participants were subsequently stabilized on 0, 30, or 60 mg of DMQ. Each dose of DMQ was administered for two consecutive weeks, and the effects of heroin (0, 12.5, and 50 mg) were studied under each DMQ maintenance dose condition. DMQ and heroin dose were administered in random order both within and between participants. Results Planned comparisons revealed statistically significant increases in progressive ratio breakpoint values and positive subjective ratings as a function of heroin dose. There were no consistent changes in any of the responses as a function of DMQ maintenance dose, other than a modest reduction in craving. Conclusions In summary, results from this study suggest that maintenance on dextromethorphan in combination with quinidine has a limited role in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:22320027

  12. Evaluation of the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in combination with dextromethorphan and quinidine.

    PubMed

    Vosburg, Suzanne K; Sullivan, Maria A; Comer, Sandra D

    2011-01-01

    Studies have suggested that the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dextromethorphan may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence. This double-blinded, placebo-controlled inpatient study evaluated the effects of 0, 30, and 60 mg of dextromethorphan and quinidine (DMQ) on the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in recently detoxified heroin abusers. Nine heroin-dependent participants were admitted and then detoxified from heroin over the course of several days. Participants were subsequently stabilized on 0, 30, or 60 mg of DMQ. Each dose of DMQ was administered for two consecutive weeks, and the effects of heroin (0, 12.5, and 50 mg) were studied under each DMQ maintenance dose condition. DMQ and heroin dose were administered in random order both within and between participants. Planned comparisons revealed statistically significant increases in progressive ratio breakpoint values and positive subjective ratings as a function of heroin dose. There were no consistent changes in any of the responses as a function of DMQ maintenance dose, other than a modest reduction in craving. In summary, results from this study suggest that maintenance on dextromethorphan in combination with quinidine has a limited role in the treatment of opioid dependence.

  13. A conjugate vaccine attenuates morphine- and heroin-induced behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Qian; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Xue, Yan-Xue; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Chen, Na; Deng, Jia-Hui; Zhai, Hai-Feng; Kosten, Thomas R; Shi, Jie; Lu, Lin; Sun, Hong-Qiang

    2014-12-07

    Currently approved medications for opioid addiction have shown clinical efficacy, but undesired side effects, dependence induced by the medications themselves, and low treatment compliance necessitate the need for novel therapies. A novel morphine-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate vaccine was synthesized with 6-glutarylmorphine as the hapten and a lengthened linker of 6 carbon atoms. The titer and specificity of the triggered antibody were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of the vaccine on the morphine-induced elevation of dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of the vaccine on morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin self-administration were also assessed. After subcutaneous administration in rats, the vaccine triggered a high antibody titer, with comparable specificity for morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, and heroin, but no interaction with dissimilar therapeutic opioid compounds, including buprenorphine, naloxone, and nalorphine, was observed. The vaccine significantly prevented the elevation of dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens induced by a single morphine challenge. Moreover, the vaccine prevented the expression of morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin seeking, suggesting its potential for preventing relapse. These results demonstrate that active immunization with the present vaccine induces a robust morphine/heroin-specific antibody response in rats and attenuates the behavioral effects of morphine and heroin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  14. [Comparison of morphine and codeine concentration in urines of heroin abusers and codeine users].

    PubMed

    Bu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Shu

    2012-12-01

    To compare morphine and codeine concentration in urines of heroin abusers and codeine users and to discuss the judgment index to distinguish between heroin abuser and codeine user. The urines of heroin abusers and codeine users were collected at different time periods. After protein precipitation, the urine samples were conducted for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of morphine and codeine by UPLC-MS/MS. And the results were all statistically analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that morphine and codeine concentration in urines of heroin abusers and codeine users were both abnormal distributions. The probability of the heroin abuser would be more than 95% and less than 5% for the codeine user when the concentration of morphine in urine sample was more than 67 ng/mL. The probability of the codeine user would be more than 95% and less than 5% for the heroin abuser when the concentration of morphine in urine sample was less than 67 ng/mL. The morphine concentration in urine could be used as a criterion to distinguish the heroin abuser from the codeine user, while the codeine concentration could not.

  15. A Conjugate Vaccine Attenuates Morphine- and Heroin-Induced Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian-Qian; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Xue, Yan-Xue; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Chen, Na; Deng, Jia-Hui; Zhai, Hai-Feng; Kosten, Thomas R.; Shi, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently approved medications for opioid addiction have shown clinical efficacy, but undesired side effects, dependence induced by the medications themselves, and low treatment compliance necessitate the need for novel therapies. Methods: A novel morphine-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate vaccine was synthesized with 6-glutarylmorphine as the hapten and a lengthened linker of 6 carbon atoms. The titer and specificity of the triggered antibody were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of the vaccine on the morphine-induced elevation of dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of the vaccine on morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin self-administration were also assessed. Results: After subcutaneous administration in rats, the vaccine triggered a high antibody titer, with comparable specificity for morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, and heroin, but no interaction with dissimilar therapeutic opioid compounds, including buprenorphine, naloxone, and nalorphine, was observed. The vaccine significantly prevented the elevation of dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens induced by a single morphine challenge. Moreover, the vaccine prevented the expression of morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin seeking, suggesting its potential for preventing relapse. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that active immunization with the present vaccine induces a robust morphine/heroin-specific antibody response in rats and attenuates the behavioral effects of morphine and heroin. PMID:25522425

  16. Molecular epidemiologic investigation of an anthrax outbreak among heroin users, Europe.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Seymour, Meagan L; Sarovich, Derek S; Latham, Jennie; Wolken, Spenser R; Mason, Joanne; Vincent, Gemma; Drees, Kevin P; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Phillippy, Adam M; Koren, Sergey; Okinaka, Richard T; Chung, Wai-Kwan; Schupp, James M; Wagner, David M; Vipond, Richard; Foster, Jeffrey T; Bergman, Nicholas H; Burans, James; Pearson, Talima; Brooks, Tim; Keim, Paul

    2012-08-01

    In December 2009, two unusual cases of anthrax were diagnosed in heroin users in Scotland. A subsequent anthrax outbreak in heroin users emerged throughout Scotland and expanded into England and Germany, sparking concern of nefarious introduction of anthrax spores into the heroin supply. To better understand the outbreak origin, we used established genetic signatures that provided insights about strain origin. Next, we sequenced the whole genome of a representative Bacillus anthracis strain from a heroin user (Ba4599), developed Ba4599-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays, and genotyped all available material from other heroin users with anthrax. Of 34 case-patients with B. anthracis-positive PCR results, all shared the Ba4599 single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype. Phylogeographic analysis demonstrated that Ba4599 was closely related to strains from Turkey and not to previously identified isolates from Scotland or Afghanistan, the presumed origin of the heroin. Our results suggest accidental contamination along the drug trafficking route through a cutting agent or animal hides used to smuggle heroin into Europe.

  17. Addiction, Heroin-Assisted Treatment and the Idea of Abstinence: A reply to Henden.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Susanne; Broers, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    In our previous article on the question whether heroin addicts are able to give informed consent voluntarily to research on heroin-assisted treatment, we criticized the ongoing bioethical discussion of a flawed conceptualization of heroin addicts' options. As a participant in this discussion, Edmund Henden defends the conceptualization as sufficient for determining whether heroin addicts are able to give informed consent to the research on heroin-assisted treatment voluntarily. This discussion on research on heroin-assisted treatment seems to go astray in several respects. In his reply to our article Henden maintains some of the biases, such as the necessity of abstinence in recovery, that seem to prevail in addiction research on a more general level as well. These biases run the danger of having implausible ethical implications on stakeholders in addiction research and treatment. In our reply to him, we will further clarify and discuss the importance of describing the relevant issues in plausible terms that do justice to the realities of the cases of informed consent in research on heroin-assisted treatment and also raise a wider issue of the ethics of wording as well as of the narrow scope, or 'tunnel vision', in addiction research as currently conducted.

  18. Molecular Epidemiologic Investigation of an Anthrax Outbreak among Heroin Users, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Price, Erin P.; Seymour, Meagan L.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Latham, Jennie; Wolken, Spenser R.; Mason, Joanne; Vincent, Gemma; Drees, Kevin P.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Phillippy, Adam M.; Koren, Sergey; Okinaka, Richard T.; Chung, Wai-Kwan; Schupp, James M.; Wagner, David M.; Vipond, Richard; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bergman, Nicholas H.; Burans, James; Pearson, Talima; Brooks, Tim

    2012-01-01

    In December 2009, two unusual cases of anthrax were diagnosed in heroin users in Scotland. A subsequent anthrax outbreak in heroin users emerged throughout Scotland and expanded into England and Germany, sparking concern of nefarious introduction of anthrax spores into the heroin supply. To better understand the outbreak origin, we used established genetic signatures that provided insights about strain origin. Next, we sequenced the whole genome of a representative Bacillus anthracis strain from a heroin user (Ba4599), developed Ba4599-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays, and genotyped all available material from other heroin users with anthrax. Of 34 case-patients with B. anthracis–positive PCR results, all shared the Ba4599 single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype. Phylogeographic analysis demonstrated that Ba4599 was closely related to strains from Turkey and not to previously identified isolates from Scotland or Afghanistan, the presumed origin of the heroin. Our results suggest accidental contamination along the drug trafficking route through a cutting agent or animal hides used to smuggle heroin into Europe. PMID:22840345

  19. A randomized trial of enhanced HIV risk reduction and vaccine trial education interventions among HIV-negative, high-risk women who use non-injection drugs: The UNITY Study

    PubMed Central

    Koblin, Beryl A.; Bonner, Sebastian; Hoover, Donald R.; Xu, Guozhen; Lucy, Debbie; Fortin, Princess; Putnam, Sara; Latka, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on interventions to reduce sexual risk behaviors and increase knowledge of HIV vaccine trial concepts in high risk populations eligible to participate in HIV vaccine efficacy trials. Methods The UNITY Study was a two-arm randomized trial to determine the efficacy of enhanced HIV risk reduction and vaccine trial education interventions to reduce the occurrence of unprotected vaginal sex acts and increase HIV vaccine trial knowledge among 311 HIV-negative non-injection drug using women. The enhanced vaccine education intervention using pictures along with application vignettes and enhanced risk reduction counseling consisting of three one-on-one counseling sessions were compared to standard conditions. Follow-up visits at one week and one, six and twelve months after randomization included HIV testing and assessment of outcomes. Results During follow up, the percent of women reporting sexual risk behaviors declined significantly, but did not differ significantly by study arm. Knowledge of HIV vaccine trial concepts significantly increased but did not significantly differ by study arm. Concepts about HIV vaccine trials not adequately addressed by either condition included those related to testing a vaccine for both efficacy and safety, guarantees about participation in future vaccine trials, assurances of safety, medical care, and assumptions about any protective effect of a test vaccine. Conclusions Further research is needed to boost educational efforts and strengthen risk reduction counseling among high-risk non-injection drug using women. PMID:20190585

  20. Transnational cocaine and heroin flow networks in western Europe: A comparison.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Siddharth; Joba, Johnathan

    2015-08-01

    A comparison of the properties of drug flow networks for cocaine and heroin in a group of 17 western European countries is provided with the aim of understanding the implications of their similarities and differences for drug policy. Drug flow data for the cocaine and heroin networks were analyzed using the UCINET software package. Country-level characteristics including hub and authority scores, core and periphery membership, and centrality, and network-level characteristics including network density, the results of a triad census, and the final fitness of the core-periphery structure of the network, were computed and compared between the two networks. The cocaine network contains fewer path redundancies and a smaller, more tightly knit core than the heroin network. Authorities, hubs and countries central to the cocaine network tend to have higher hub, authority, and centrality scores than those in the heroin network. The core-periphery and hub-authority structures of the cocaine and heroin networks reflect the west-to-east and east-to-west patterns of flow of cocaine and heroin respectively across Europe. The key nodes in the cocaine and heroin networks are generally distinct from one another. The analysis of drug flow networks can reveal important structural features of trafficking networks that can be useful for the allocation of scarce drug control resources. The identification of authorities, hubs, network cores, and network-central nodes can suggest foci for the allocation of these resources. In the case of Europe, while some countries are important to both cocaine and heroin networks, different sets of countries occupy positions of prominence in the two networks. The distinct nature of the cocaine and heroin networks also suggests that a one-size-fits-all supply- and interdiction-focused policy may not work as well as an approach that takes into account the particular characteristics of each network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased functional connectivity in the resting-state basal ganglia network after acute heroin substitution

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Denier, N; Magon, S; Radue, E-W; Huber, C G; Riecher-Rossler, A; Wiesbeck, G A; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; Walter, M

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement signals in the striatum are known to be crucial for mediating the subjective rewarding effects of acute drug intake. It is proposed that these effects may be more involved in early phases of drug addiction, whereas negative reinforcement effects may occur more in later stages of the illness. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether acute heroin substitution also induced positive reinforcement effects in striatal brain regions of protracted heroin-maintained patients. Using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach, we compared resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network across a group of heroin-dependent patients receiving both an acute infusion of heroin and placebo and 20 healthy subjects who received placebo only. Subsequent correlation analyses were performed to test whether the rsFC strength under heroin exposure correlated with the subjective rewarding effect and with plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites morphine. Relative to the placebo treatment in patients, heroin significantly increased rsFC of the left putamen within the basal ganglia/limbic network, the extent of which correlated positively with patients' feelings of rush and with the plasma level of morphine. Furthermore, healthy controls revealed increased rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in this network relative to the placebo treatment in patients. Our results indicate that acute heroin substitution induces a subjective rewarding effect via increased striatal connectivity in heroin-dependent patients, suggesting that positive reinforcement effects in the striatum still occur after protracted maintenance therapy. PMID:25803496

  2. Similarity and Difference in Drug Addiction Process Between Heroin- and Methamphetamine-Dependent Users.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyun; Li, Wei-Xiu; Zhi-Min, Liu

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to compare the drug addiction process between Chinese heroin- and methamphetamine (MA)-dependent users via a modified 4-stage addiction model (experimentation, occasional use, regular use, and compulsive use). A descriptive study was conducted among 683 eligible participants. In the statistical analysis, we selected 340 heroin- and 295 MA-dependent users without illicit drug use prior to onset of heroin or MA use. The addiction process of heroin-dependent users was shorter than that of MA-dependent users, with shorter transitions from the onset of drug-use to the first drug craving (19.5 vs. 50.0 days), regular use (30.0 vs. 60.0 days), and compulsive use (50.0 vs. 85.0 days). However, no significant differences in the addiction process were observed in frequency of drug administration, except that heroin users reported more administrations of the drug (20.0 vs. 15.0) before progressing to the stage of compulsive drug use. A larger proportion of regular heroin users progressed to use illicit drugs recklessly than did MA users. Most heroin and MA users reported psychological dependence as their primary motivation for compulsive drug use, but more heroin users selected uncomfortable symptoms upon ceasing drug use as further reason to continue. Our results suggest that typical heroin and MA users may experience a similar four-stage addiction process, but MA users might undergo a longer addiction process (in days). More research is necessary to further explore factors influencing the drug addiction process.

  3. Fatal intoxication as a consequence of intranasal administration (snorting) or pulmonary inhalation (smoking) of heroin.

    PubMed

    Thiblin, I; Eksborg, S; Petersson, A; Fugelstad, A; Rajs, J

    2004-01-28

    In recent years we have noticed an increasing proportion of mortalities resulting from an overdose of heroin that involve routes of administration other than injection. Of 239 cases of fatal heroin intoxication examined at our department during the period 1997-2000, 18 deaths were associated with non-parental administration. Seven of these fatalities were experienced heroin users who had begun to use more sporadically, seven were recreational "party-users", while the remaining four persons had relapsed into heroin use following long periods of abstinence. The median blood morphine concentration of these non-injectors was 0.095 microg/g (range: 0.02-0.67 microg/g), significantly lower than that of the injectors. Concurrent use of alcohol, other illicit drugs and/or pharmaceutical preparations was observed in 17 of the 18 cases. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the victims of heroin intoxication by injection or by other routes with respect to the proportion who had simultaneously consumed alcohol or benzodiazepines. Pathological alterations like lung fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, endocarditis, etc. were not found to play a significant role in any of the 18 mortalities. We conclude that snorting or smoking heroin probably involves a reduced risk of obtaining high blood concentrations of morphine but still constitutes a considerable risk of lethal outcome due to high variability in blood concentrations. Furthermore, decreased tolerance resulting from periods of reduced or sporadic use appears to be an important risk factor in connection with heroin overdosing by snorting or smoking, which indicate that some heroin addicts may inaccurately assume that these routes of administration are safe when resuming their use of heroin after a period of abstinence.

  4. Depot naltrexone: long-lasting antagonism of the effects of heroin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Eric D.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Nuwayser, Elie S.; Kerrigan, James H.; Fischman, Marian W.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, is currently approved as a treatment for heroin dependence. However, naltrexone is generally not well accepted by patients, and medication non-compliance is a difficult obstacle to treatment. A sustained-release form of naltrexone may improve compliance. Objective The present study was designed to evaluate the time course, safety, and effectiveness of a depot formulation of naltrexone (Depotrex®). Methods Twelve heroin-dependent individuals participated in an 8-week inpatient study. After a 1-week detoxification period, six participants received 192 mg naltrexone base and six participants received 384 mg naltrexone base. For safety, the low dose of depot naltrexone was tested before the high dose. The effects of heroin (0, 6.25, 12.5, 18.75, 25 mg, IV) were evaluated for the next 6 weeks. One dose of heroin was tested per day on Mondays through Fridays, and the entire dose range was tested each week. Active heroin doses were administered in ascending order during the week, while placebo could be administered on any day. Subjective, performance, and physiological effects were measured both before and after heroin administration. The hypotheses were that depot naltrexone would antagonize the effects of heroin, and that the high dose of depot naltrexone would produce a more effective and longer-lasting antagonism than the low dose. Results The low and high doses of depot naltrexone antagonized heroin-induced subjective ratings for 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. Plasma levels of naltrexone remained above 1 ng/ml for approximately 3 and 4 weeks after administration of 192 mg and 384 mg naltrexone. Other than the initial discomfort associated with the injection of depot naltrexone, there were no untoward side-effects. Conclusions: These results suggest that this depot formulation of naltrexone provides a safe, effective, long-lasting antagonism of the effects of heroin. PMID:11823887

  5. Increased functional connectivity in the resting-state basal ganglia network after acute heroin substitution.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Denier, N; Magon, S; Radue, E-W; Huber, C G; Riecher-Rossler, A; Wiesbeck, G A; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; Walter, M

    2015-03-24

    Reinforcement signals in the striatum are known to be crucial for mediating the subjective rewarding effects of acute drug intake. It is proposed that these effects may be more involved in early phases of drug addiction, whereas negative reinforcement effects may occur more in later stages of the illness. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether acute heroin substitution also induced positive reinforcement effects in striatal brain regions of protracted heroin-maintained patients. Using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach, we compared resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network across a group of heroin-dependent patients receiving both an acute infusion of heroin and placebo and 20 healthy subjects who received placebo only. Subsequent correlation analyses were performed to test whether the rsFC strength under heroin exposure correlated with the subjective rewarding effect and with plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites morphine. Relative to the placebo treatment in patients, heroin significantly increased rsFC of the left putamen within the basal ganglia/limbic network, the extent of which correlated positively with patients' feelings of rush and with the plasma level of morphine. Furthermore, healthy controls revealed increased rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in this network relative to the placebo treatment in patients. Our results indicate that acute heroin substitution induces a subjective rewarding effect via increased striatal connectivity in heroin-dependent patients, suggesting that positive reinforcement effects in the striatum still occur after protracted maintenance therapy.

  6. Evidence for controlled heroin use? Low levels of negative health and social outcomes among non-treatment heroin users in Glasgow (Scotland).

    PubMed

    Shewan, David; Dalgarno, Phil

    2005-02-01

    This longitudinal study focused on 126 long-term heroin users who had never been in specialist treatment for use of any drug. The primary aim of the study was to assess whether this 'hidden' population resembled heroin users identified with drug treatment agencies, or alternatively, to test whether heroin could indeed be used in a controlled, non-intrusive fashion for an extended period of time. Recruitment was achieved through chain-referred purposive sampling methods, and data were collected through two semi-structured interviews. 67% of participants were re-recruited for follow-up. Participants had levels of occupational status and educational achievement comparable to that in the general UK population, and considerably higher than typically found in heroin research. At the conclusion of the study, six participants had entered treatment. While there was evidence of intensive risky patterns of drug use among the sample, there was equal evidence for planned, controlled patterns of use. Some drugrelated negative health and social outcomes had occurred on a lifetime basis, but ongoing problems were rare, and heroin was not a significant predictor in either context. In contrast to typical samples of heroin users, high levels of negative health and social outcomes did not appear to be inevitable within this sample. Frequency of heroin use was predicted by attributional items, indicating the importance of psychological factors in drug use and addiction. Drug research should more fully incorporate previously hidden populations to more fully inform theory and practice. The pharmacological properties of specific substances should not be assumed to inevitably lead to addictive and destructive patterns of drug use.

  7. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, reduces cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Galaj, Ewa; Manuszak, Monica; Babic, Sandra; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Ranaldi, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Because the role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors has been investigated primarily in relation to cocaine-related behaviors little is known of the role of these receptors in heroin seeking. To investigate the effect of the selective DA D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, on cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference (CPP). In experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer intravenous heroin for 15 days followed by extinction. Following extinction animals were treated with one of several SR 21502 doses (0, 7.5, 10 or 15mg/kg) and a cue-induced reinstatement test was conducted. In experiment 2, animals were conditioned to experience heroin in one compartment of a CPP apparatus and saline in the other. On the test day animals were treated with 0, 3.75, 7.5, 10 or 15mg/kg of SR 21502 and tested for their CPP. The results from experiment 1 showed a significant dose-related reduction in cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the 7.5 and 10mg groups and an absence of the reinstatement effect in the 15mg group. In experiment 2, animals treated with vehicle or 3.75mg of SR 21502 showed significant heroin place preferences but those treated with the higher doses showed no CPP. Our findings suggest that DA D3 receptors play a significant role in heroin approach behaviors driven by conditioned stimuli. As such, we propose that SR 21502 holds potential as an effective pharmacotherapeutic agent for relapse prevention and should be studied further. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, reduces cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference in rats

    PubMed Central

    Galaj, Ewa; Manuszak, Monica; Babic, Sandra; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Ranaldi, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Because the role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors has been investigated primarily in relation to cocaine-related behaviors little is known of the role of these receptors in heroin seeking. Purposes To investigate the effect of the selective DA D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, on cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference (CPP). Methods In experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer intravenous heroin for 15 days followed by extinction. Following extinction animals were treated with one of several SR 21502 doses (0, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg) and a cue-induced reinstatement test was conducted. In Experiment 2, animals were conditioned to experience heroin in one compartment of a CPP apparatus and saline in the other. On the test day animals were treated with 0, 3.75, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg of SR 21502 and tested for their CPP. Results The results from Experiment 1 showed a significant dose-related reduction in cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the 7.5 and 10 mg groups and an absence of the reinstatement effect in the 15 mg group. In experiment 2, animals treated with vehicle or 3.75 mg of SR 21502 showed significant heroin place preferences but those treated with the higher doses showed no CPP. Conclusions Our findings suggest that DA D3 receptors play a significant role in heroin approach behaviors driven by conditioned stimuli. As such, we propose that SR 21502 holds potential as an effective pharmacotherapeutic agent for relapse prevention and should be studied further. PMID:26429728

  9. Heroin-assisted treatment: has a controversial treatment come of age?†.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael; Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    This editorial considers the findings of the systematic review of heroin-assisted treatment, with six different studies from six different countries, published in this issue. The meta-analysis focuses on supervised injected heroin and reports significant crime reduction and an overall cost-effectiveness of treatment. Despite this body of evidence, policy makers remain reluctant to develop this treatment further. The question remains, what else is required to convince policy makers of the value of such treatment for severe and refractory heroin dependence?

  10. Randomised trial of heroin maintenance programme for addicts who fail in conventional drug treatments

    PubMed Central

    Perneger, Thomas V; Giner, Francisco; del Rio, Miguel; Mino, Annie

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an experimental heroin maintenance programme. Design: Randomised trial. Setting: Outpatient clinic in Geneva, Switzerland. Subjects: Heroin addicts recruited from the community who were socially marginalised and in poor health and had failed in at least two previous drug treatments. Intervention: Patients in the experimental programme (n=27) received intravenous heroin and other health and psychosocial services. Control patients (n=24) received any other conventional drug treatment (usually methadone maintenance). Main outcome measures: Self reported drug use, health status (SF-36), and social functioning. Results: 25 experimental patients completed 6 months in the programme, receiving a median of 480 mg of heroin daily. One experimental subject and 10 control subjects still used street heroin daily at follow up (difference 44%; 95% confidence interval 16% to 71%). Health status scores that improved significantly more in experimental subjects were mental health (0.58 SD; 0.07 to 1.10), role limitations due to emotional problems (0.95 SD; 0.11 to 1.79), and social functioning (0.65 SD; 0.03 to 1.26). Experimental subjects also significantly reduced their illegal income and drug expenses and committed fewer drug and property related offences. There were no benefits in terms of work, housing situation, somatic health status, and use of other drugs. Unexpectedly, only nine (38%) control subjects entered the heroin maintenance programme at follow up. Conclusions: A heroin maintenance programme is a feasible and clinically effective treatment for heroin users who fail in conventional drug treatment programmes. Even in this population, however, another attempt at methadone maintenance may be successful and help the patient to stop using injectable opioids. Key messages A heroin maintenance programme may be a useful treatment option for patients who do not succeed in conventional drug treatment programmes Patients randomly allocated to the Geneva

  11. The Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS): what have we learnt about treatment for heroin dependence?

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Teesson, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Opioids make the single largest contribution to illicit drug-related mortality and morbidity worldwide In this paper we reflect upon what has been learnt regarding treatment outcome and the natural history of heroin use from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS). We focus on what we knew prior to ATOS, what ATOS revealed that is novel, and the implications for research, practice and policy. ATOS provided strong evidence for sustained improvement attributable to treatment across the three years of the study. It is argued that treatment for heroin dependence is money well spent, and leads to clear and sustained benefits to both heroin users and society.

  12. Chronology of illness in dual diagnosis heroin addicts: The role of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Maremmani, Angelo G I; Rovai, Luca; Rugani, Fabio; Bacciardi, Silvia; Massimetti, Enrico; Gazzarrini, Denise; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Tang, Fengyi; Akiskal, Hagop S; Maremmani, Icro

    2015-07-01

    Recent celebrity deaths have been widely reported in the media and turned the public attention to the coexistence of mood, psychiatric and substance-abuse disorders. These tragic and untimely deaths motivated us to examine the scientific and clinical data, including our own work in this area. The self-medication hypothesis states that individuals with psychiatric illness tend to use heroin to alleviate their symptoms. This study examined the correlations between heroin use, mood and psychiatric disorders, and their chronology in the context of dual diagnosis. Out of 506 dual diagnosed heroin addicts, 362 patients were implicated in heroin abuse with an onset of at least one year prior to the associated mental disorder (HER-PR), and 144 patients were diagnosed of mental illness at least one year prior to the associated onset of heroin use disorder (MI-PR). The retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the two groups compared their demographic, clinical and diagnostic characteristics at univariate and multivariate levels. Dual diagnosis heroin addicts whose heroin dependences existed one year prior to their diagnoses (HER-PR) reported more frequent somatic comorbidity (p≤0.001), less major problems at work (p=0.003), more legal problems (p=0.004) and more failed treatment for their heroin dependence (p<0.001) in the past. More than 2/3 reached the third stage of heroin addiction (p=<0.001). Their length of dependence was longer (p=0.004). HER-PR patients were diagnosed more frequently as affected by mood disorders and less frequently as affected by psychosis (p=0.004). At the multivariate level, HER-PR patients were characterized by having reached stage 3 of heroin dependence (OR=2.45), diagnosis of mood disorder (OR=2.25), unsuccessful treatment (OR=2.07) and low education (OR=1.79). The main limitation is its retrospective nature. Nonetheless, it does shed light on what needs to be done from a clinical and public health perspective and especially prevention. The

  13. The developmental outcome of children born to heroin-dependent mothers, raised at home or adopted.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, A; Michailevskaya, V; Lukashov, I; Bar-Hamburger, R; Harel, S

    1996-05-01

    In the present investigation we were interested to study the possible role of in-utero exposure to heroin and of the home environmental in the etiology of long-term developmental problems in children born to heroin-dependent parents in comparison to matched controls. The children were examined at .5-6 years of age by a developmental pediatrician and a developmental psychologist using, for the children up to 2.5 years of age, the Bayley Developmental Scales, and for children aged 3-6 years the McCarthy Scales for Children's Abilities. We examined 83 children born to heroin-dependent mothers, and compared the results to those of 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to three control groups; 50 children with environmental deprivation, 50 normal children from families of moderate or high socioeconomic class, without environmental deprivation, and 80 healthy children from kindergartens in Jerusalem. There were five children (6.0%) with significant neurological damage among the children born to heroin-dependent mothers and six (7.9%) children among those born to heroin-dependent fathers. The children born to heroin-dependent mothers had a lower birth weight and a lower head circumference at examination when compared to controls. The children born to heroin-dependent parents also had a high incidence of hyperactivity, inattention, and behavioral problems. The lowest DQ or IQ among the children with cognitive levels above 70 was found in the children with environmental deprivation, next was the DQ or IQ of children born to heroin-dependent fathers, then the DQ or IQ of the children born to heroin-dependent mothers. When the children born to heroin-dependent mothers were divided to those that were adopted at a very young age and to those raised at home, the adopted children were found to function similarly to the controls while those not adopted functioned significantly lower. Our results show that the developmental delay and behavioral disorders observed among

  14. Identification of a heroin esterase in Rhodococcus sp. strain H1.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, G W; Jordan, K N; Holt, P J; Baker, P B; Lowe, C R; Bruce, N C

    1994-01-01

    A strain of a Rhodococcus sp. (termed H1) capable of utilizing heroin as its sole carbon and energy source was isolated by selective enrichment. An inducible heroin esterase was partially purified and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of both of the acetylester groups of heroin. The enzyme displays optimum activity at pH 8.5 and appears to be a trimer of identical subunits with an M(r) or 39,000 and a native M(r) of 120,000. PMID:7986057

  15. Changes in US Lifetime Heroin Use and Heroin Use Disorder: Prevalence From the 2001-2002 to 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Silvia S; Sarvet, Aaron; Santaella-Tenorio, Julian; Saha, Tulshi; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah S

    2017-05-01

    Heroin use is an urgent concern in the United States. Little is know about the course of heroin use, heroin use disorder, and associated factors. To examine changes in the lifetime prevalence, patterns, and associated demographics of heroin use and use disorder from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013 in 2 nationally representative samples of the US adult general population. This survey study included data from 43 093 respondents of the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and 36 309 respondents of the 2012-2013 NESARC-III. Data were analyzed from February 2 to September 15, 2016. Lifetime heroin use and DSM-IV heroin use disorder. Among the 79 402 respondents (43.3% men; 56.7% women; mean [SD] age, 46.1 [17.9] years), prevalence of heroin use and heroin use disorder significantly increased from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013 (use: 0.33% [SE, 0.03%] vs 1.6% [SE, 0.08%]; disorder: 0.21% [SE, 0.03%] vs 0.69% [SE, 0.06%]; P < .001). The increase in the prevalence of heroin use was significantly pronounced among white (0.34% [SE, 0.04%] in 2001-2002 vs 1.90% [SE, 0.12%] in 2012-2013) compared with nonwhite (0.32% [SE, 0.05%] in 2001-2002 vs 1.05% [SE, 0.10%] in 2012-2013; P < .001) individuals. The increase in the prevalence of heroin use disorder was more pronounced among white individuals (0.19% [SE, 0.03%] in 2001-2002 vs 0.82% [SE, 0.08%] in 2012-2013; P < .001) and those aged 18 to 29 (0.21% [SE, 0.06%] in 2001-2002 vs 1.0% [0.17%] in 2012-2013; P = .01) and 30 to 44 (0.20% [SE, 0.04%] in 2001-2002 vs 0.77% [0.10%] in 2012-2013; P = .03) years than among nonwhite individuals (0.25% [SE, 0.04%] in 2001-2002 vs 0.43% [0.07%] in 2012-2013) and older adults (0.22% [SE, 0.04%] in 2001-2002 vs 0.51% [SE, 0.07%] in 2012-2013). Among users, significant differences were found across time in the proportion of respondents meeting DSM-IV heroin use disorder criteria (63.35% [SE, 4.79%] in 2001-2001 vs 42.69% [SE, 2.87%] in

  16. The role of alcohol abuse in the etiology of heroin-related deaths. Evidence for pharmacokinetic interactions between heroin and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Groppi, A; Montagna, M

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate pharmacokinetic interactions between heroin and alcohol and their role in the etiology of heroin-related deaths (HRD), the alcohol concentration in blood (BAC), the free (FM) and total morphine (TM) concentrations in blood (determined by DPC Coat-A-Count radioimmunoassay before and after enzymatic hydrolysis), and the TM concentration in urine and bile (DPC Coat-A-Count after enzymatic hydrolysis) in a population of 39 lethal cases included in the records of the Department of Legal Medicine and Public Health at the University of Pavia from the period January 1997-April 1998 were examined. The cause of death in each case was attributed to either heroin or associated heroin-ethanol intoxication. Cases were arbitrarily divided into two groups according to BAC (low-ethanol group, LE, BAC < or = 1000 mg/L and high-ethanol group, HE, BAC > 1000 mg/L). The differences in the FM and TM concentrations in blood, bile, and urine and in the FM/TM ratios between the two . groups were statistically evaluated (Mann-Whitney U test). A similar statistical evaluation was carried out on data from a previously published study concerning the disposition of heroin and its metabolites (6-acetylmorphine and morphine) in blood and urine in 23 lethal cases attributed to either heroin or heroin and alcohol intoxication. The values of the following variables in the LE and HE groups were compared: FM, TM, and 6-acetylmorphine concentrations in blood (6-AM); the FM/ (FM + 6-AM) ratio; the FM/TM ratio; and the urinary concentrations of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and free morphine. Statistical analyses of data indicated that high BACs are associated with reduced hydrolysis of 6-AM to morphine (FM/[FM + 6-AM], p = 0.0022) and that a good inverse correlation exists between BAC and hydrolysis of 6-AM to morphine (r2 = 0.67). High BACs were also found to be associated with an increased FM/TM ratio and with reduced excretion of free and total morphine. These results suggest the

  17. Validated assay for the determination of markers of illicit heroin in urine samples for the control of patients in a heroin prescription program.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Trafkowski, J; Madea, B

    2004-11-05

    A fully validated procedure for the simultaneous determination of morphine (MOR), morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), codeine (COD), codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), acetylcodeine (AC), noscapine (NOS) and papaverine (PAP) based on liquid chromatography followed by electrospray mass spectrometry applying multiple reaction monitoring (LC-ESI-MS/MS) in urine samples is described. The extraction was carried out on a Zymark Rapid Trace Workstation using C18 solid-phase extraction cartridges. The separation was performed in 19 min on an Agilent 1100 HPLC system, using a Phenomenex C18 AQUA column (4 microm, 150 mm x 2 mm), which is coupled with an Applied Biosystems API 2000 mass spectrometer. Deuterated analogues were used as internal standards. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.1 ng/ml (PAP) to 7.4 ng/ml (M6G), the coefficients of correlation were higher than 0.996, the precisions ranged from 3% to 12% and the absolute recoveries were between 45% (M3G) and 98% (MOR). Analyses of samples from patients of a heroin prescription program demonstrated the usefulness of the procedure for the analytical differentiation between prescribed synthetic heroin (diamorphine) use and non-prescription heroin abuse on the basis of urine analysis. After the ingestion of pharmaceutical heroin only general markers for heroin use were detected, which are MOR, M3G, M6G and 6AM, respectively. When illicit heroin was abused, additionally to further general markers (COD, C6G) specific markers for non-prescription heroin abuse (AC, NOS, PAP) were found. However, it must be kept in mind that only AC may be regarded as absolute specific marker of non-prescription heroin, because all other compounds may appear in urine after ingestion of opiate alkaloids containing medicines or foods (e.g. poppy seeds). Therefore, patients of a heroin prescription program should be advised not to ingest such products.

  18. Effects of olanzapine on aggressiveness in heroin dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Di Petta, G; D'Amore, A; Iannotta, P; Bardicchia, F; Falorni, F; Coacci, A; Strepparola, G; Campione, G; Lucchini, A; Vedda, G; Serio, G; Manzato, E; Antonioni, M; Bertacca, S; Moi, G; Zaimovic, A

    2006-09-30

    This study compared the anti-aggressiveness effects of the atypical anti-psychotic olanzapine with that of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and benzodiazepines (BZD) among patients with heroin dependence submitted to opioid-agonists substitution treatment. Sixty-seven (67) patients who met the DSM-IV criteria for heroin dependence and showed aggressive personality traits, not affected by comorbid schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, accepted to participate in a 12-week prospective, observational trial. Patients were included into two subgroups in relationship with treatment, for the evaluation of the endpoints at week 12: group 1: substitution treatment in combination with OLA (32 patients); group 2: substitution treatment in combination with fluoxetine/paroxetine and clonazepam (35 patients). Efficacy measures were Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), Symptoms Check List-90 (SCL 90) anger--hostility scores, incidence rates of aggressive incidents and attacks. The rates of patients who remained in treatment at week 12 in group 1, treated with OLA, and group 2, treated with SSRI and BDZ, were not significantly different (17 = 53.1% vs 16 = 45.7%). BDHI total, direct aggressiveness, verbal aggressiveness scores, SCL 90 aggressiveness scores and aggressive incidents rates showed a significantly more consistent decrease from baseline in group 1 than in group 2 subjects, in the patients who completed the treatment (p < 0.001; p < 0.01; p < 0.05; p < 0.01; p < 0.001). Among the completers, 69.3% achieved early full substance abuse remission, while 30.7% achieved partial substance abuse remission, with no significant difference between 1 and 2 treatment subgroups. Although obtained by an observational--open clinical study, with multiple limitations, our findings suggest that OLA may be useful as an adjunctive agent in reducing aggressive/hostile behaviour in heroin addicted individuals during maintenance substitution treatment. Otherwise, atypical anti

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