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Sample records for aminoglycoside resistance genes

  1. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  3. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  4. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Padmasini, Elango; Padmaraj, R.; Ramesh, S. Srivani

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) by MIC for gentamicin (GM), streptomycin (SM) and both (GM + SM) antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME) in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia; aph(2′′)-Ib; aph(2′′)-Ic; aph(2′′)-Id and aph(3′)-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′)-IIIa gene. aph(2′′)-Ib; aph(2′′)-Ic; aph(2′′)-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′′)-Ia and aph(3′)-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai. PMID:24672306

  5. Mutations in the aph(2")-Ic Gene Are Responsible for Increased Levels of Aminoglycoside Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Clewell, Don B.; Lerner, Stephen A.; Chow, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Random PCR mutagenesis of the enterococcal aph(2")-Ic gene followed by selection for mutant enzymes that confer enhanced levels of aminoglycoside resistance resulted in mutants of APH(2")-Ic with His-258-Leu and Phe-108-Leu substitutions, all of which conferred rises in the MICs of several aminoglycosides. The mutated residues are located outside conserved regions of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. PMID:12234853

  6. Altered denA and anr gene expression in aminoglycoside adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, J A; Hoban, D J; Zelenitsky, S A; Zhanel, G G

    1997-09-01

    Adaptive resistance to aminoglycoside killing and cytoplasmic accumulation occurs in cultures of originally susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa following an initial incubation with aminoglycoside. Anaerobiosis has also been reported to reduce bacterial killing and limit cytoplasmic aminoglycoside accumulation. We hypothesized that a common mechanism may facilitate reduced bacterial killing and aminoglycoside accumulation in both cases. Northern blot analysis of P. aeruginosa adaptively resistant to gentamicin demonstrated increased mRNA levels of both denA (nitrite reductase), which facilitates terminal electron acceptance in the anaerobic respiratory pathway, and its regulatory protein, ANR, in the absence of promoter DNA sequence changes, when compared with controls. These observations suggested that P. aeruginosa may regulate the expression of genes in its anaerobic respiratory pathway in response to aminoglycosides and may explain, at least partially, P. aeruginosa adaptive resistance to aminoglycosides.

  7. Characterization of aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes among Enterococcus spp. isolated from a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-03-11

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as "other" Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  8. In Silico Assigned Resistance Genes Confer Bifidobacterium with Partial Resistance to Aminoglycosides but Not to Β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Fouhy, Fiona; O’Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; van Sinderen, Douwe; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have received significant attention due to their contribution to human gut health and the use of specific strains as probiotics. It is thus not surprising that there has also been significant interest with respect to their antibiotic resistance profile. Numerous culture-based studies have demonstrated that bifidobacteria are resistant to the majority of aminoglycosides, but are sensitive to β-lactams. However, limited research exists with respect to the genetic basis for the resistance of bifidobacteria to aminoglycosides. Here we performed an in-depth in silico analysis of putative Bifidobacterium-encoded aminoglycoside resistance proteins and β-lactamases and assess the contribution of these proteins to antibiotic resistance. The in silico-based screen detected putative aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance proteins across the Bifidobacterium genus. Laboratory-based investigations of a number of representative bifidobacteria strains confirmed that despite containing putative β-lactamases, these strains were sensitive to β-lactams. In contrast, all strains were resistant to the aminoglycosides tested. To assess the contribution of genes encoding putative aminoglycoside resistance proteins in Bifidobacterium sp. two genes, namely Bbr_0651 and Bbr_1586, were targeted for insertional inactivation in B. breve UCC2003. As compared to the wild-type, the UCC2003 insertion mutant strains exhibited decreased resistance to gentamycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. This study highlights the associated risks of relying on the in silico assignment of gene function. Although several putative β-lactam resistance proteins are located in bifidobacteria, their presence does not coincide with resistance to these antibiotics. In contrast however, this approach has resulted in the identification of two loci that contribute to the aminoglycoside resistance of B. breve UCC2003 and, potentially, many other bifidobacteria. PMID:24324818

  9. In silico assigned resistance genes confer Bifidobacterium with partial resistance to aminoglycosides but not to β-lactams.

    PubMed

    Fouhy, Fiona; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; van Sinderen, Douwe; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have received significant attention due to their contribution to human gut health and the use of specific strains as probiotics. It is thus not surprising that there has also been significant interest with respect to their antibiotic resistance profile. Numerous culture-based studies have demonstrated that bifidobacteria are resistant to the majority of aminoglycosides, but are sensitive to β-lactams. However, limited research exists with respect to the genetic basis for the resistance of bifidobacteria to aminoglycosides. Here we performed an in-depth in silico analysis of putative Bifidobacterium-encoded aminoglycoside resistance proteins and β-lactamases and assess the contribution of these proteins to antibiotic resistance. The in silico-based screen detected putative aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance proteins across the Bifidobacterium genus. Laboratory-based investigations of a number of representative bifidobacteria strains confirmed that despite containing putative β-lactamases, these strains were sensitive to β-lactams. In contrast, all strains were resistant to the aminoglycosides tested. To assess the contribution of genes encoding putative aminoglycoside resistance proteins in Bifidobacterium sp. two genes, namely Bbr_0651 and Bbr_1586, were targeted for insertional inactivation in B. breve UCC2003. As compared to the wild-type, the UCC2003 insertion mutant strains exhibited decreased resistance to gentamycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. This study highlights the associated risks of relying on the in silico assignment of gene function. Although several putative β-lactam resistance proteins are located in bifidobacteria, their presence does not coincide with resistance to these antibiotics. In contrast however, this approach has resulted in the identification of two loci that contribute to the aminoglycoside resistance of B. breve UCC2003 and, potentially, many other bifidobacteria.

  10. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates.

  11. Characterization of resistance to tetracyclines and aminoglycosides of sheep mastitis pathogens: study of the effect of gene content on resistance.

    PubMed

    Lollai, S A; Ziccheddu, M; Duprè, I; Piras, D

    2016-10-01

    Mastitis causes economic losses and antimicrobials are frequently used for mastitis treatment. Antimicrobial resistance surveys are still rare in the ovine field and characterization of strains is important in order to acquire information about resistance and for optimization of therapy. Bacterial pathogens recovered in milk samples from mastitis-affected ewes were characterized for resistance to tetracyclines and aminoglycosides, members of which are frequently used antimicrobials in small ruminants. A total of 185 strains of staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci, common mastitis pathogens, were tested for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and for resistance genes by PCR. Effects of different tet genes arrangements on MICs were also investigated. Staphylococci expressed the lowest MIC for tetracycline and tet(K) was the most common gene recovered; tet(M) and tet(O) were also found. Gene content was shown to influence the tetracycline MIC values. Enterococci and streptococci showed higher MICs to tetracyclines and nonsusceptible strains always harboured at least one ribosomal protection gene (MIC above 8 μg ml(-1) ). Streptococci often harboured two or more tet determinants. As regards the resistance to aminoglycosides, staphylococci showed the lowest gentamicin and kanamycin median MIC along with streptomycin high level resistant (HLR) strains (MIC >1024 μg ml(-1) ) all harbouring str gene. The resistance determinant aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia was present in few strains. Streptococci were basically nonsusceptible to aminoglycosides but neither HLR isolates nor resistance genes were detected. Enterococci revealed the highest MICs for gentamicin; two str harbouring isolates were shown to be HLR to streptomycin. Evidence was obtained for the circulation of antimicrobial-resistant strains and genes in sheep dairy farming. Tetracycline MIC of 64 μg ml(-1) and high

  12. Oxidative Stress Induction of the MexXY Multidrug Efflux Genes and Promotion of Aminoglycoside Resistance Development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraud, Sebastien; Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., peroxide) was shown to induce expression of the PA5471 gene, which was previously shown to be required for antimicrobial induction of the MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system and aminoglycoside resistance determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. mexXY was also induced by peroxide exposure, and this too was PA5471 dependent. The prospect of ROS promoting mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance recalls P. aeruginosa infection of the chronically inflamed lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where the organism is exposed to ROS and where MexXY-OprM predominates as the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. While ROS did not enhance aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, long-term (8-day) exposure of P. aeruginosa to peroxide (mimicking chronic in vivo ROS exposure) increased aminoglycoside resistance frequency, dependent upon PA5471 and mexXY. This enhanced resistance frequency was also seen in a mutant strain overexpressing PA5471, in the absence of peroxide, suggesting that induction of PA5471 by peroxide was key to peroxide enhancement of aminoglycoside resistance frequency. Resistant mutants selected following peroxide exposure were typically pan-aminoglycoside-resistant, with mexXY generally required for this resistance. Moreover, PA5471 was required for mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance in these as well as several CF isolates examined. PMID:21173187

  13. Distribution of aminoglycoside resistance genes in recent clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus avium.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, N.; Alam, M.; Nishimoto, Y.; Urasawa, S.; Uehara, N.; Watanabe, N.

    2001-01-01

    Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs) are major factors which confer aminoglycoside resistance on bacteria. Distribution of genes encoding seven AMEs was investigated by multiplex PCR for 279 recent clinical isolates of enterococci derived from a university hospital in Japan. The aac(6')-aph(2"), which is related to high level gentamicin resistance, was detected at higher frequency in Enterococcus faecalis (42.5%) than in Enterococcus faecium (4.3%). Almost half of E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates possessed ant(6)-Ia and aph(3')-IIIa. The profile of AME gene(s) detected most frequently in individual strains of E. faecalis was aac(6')aph(2") + ant(6)-Ia + aph(3')-IIIa, and isolates with this profile showed high level resistance to both gentamicin and streptomycin. In contrast, AME gene profiles of aac(6')-Ii+ ant(6)-Ia+aph(3')-IIIa, followed by aac(6')-Ii alone, were predominant in E. faecium. Only one AME gene profile of ant(6)-Ia+aph(3')-IIIa was found in Enterococcus avium. The ant(4')-Ia and ant(9)-Ia, which have been known to be distributed mostly among Staphylococcus aureus strains, were detected in a few enterococcal strains. An AME gene aph(2")-Ic was not detected in any isolates of the three enterococcal species. These findings indicated a variety of distribution profiles of AME genes among enterococci in our study site. PMID:11349969

  14. The occurrence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli carrying aminoglycoside resistance genes in urinary tract infections in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alyamani, Essam J; Khiyami, Anamil M; Booq, Rayan Y; Majrashi, Majed A; Bahwerth, Fayez S; Rechkina, Elena

    2017-01-06

    The infection and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) is a worldwide problem, and the presence of ESBLs varies between countries. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of plasmid-mediated ESBL/AmpC/carbapenemase/aminoglycoside resistance gene expression in Escherichia coli using phenotypic and genotypic techniques. A total of 58 E. coli isolates were collected from hospitals in the city of Makkah and screened for the production of ESBL/AmpC/carbapenemase/aminoglycoside resistance genes. All samples were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic analyses. The antibiotic susceptibility of the E. coli isolates was determined using the Vitek-2 system and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Antimicrobial agents tested using the Vitek 2 system and MIC assay included the expanded-spectrum (or third-generation) cephalosporins (e.g., cefoxitin, cefepime, aztreonam, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime) and carbapenems (meropenem and imipenem). Reported positive isolates were investigated using genotyping technology (oligonucleotide microarray-based assay and PCR). The genotyping investigation was focused on ESBL variants and the AmpC, carbapenemase and aminoglycoside resistance genes. E. coli was phylogenetically grouped, and the clonality of the isolates was studied using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Our E. coli isolates exhibited different levels of resistance to ESBL drugs, including ampicillin (96.61%), cefoxitin (15.25%), ciprofloxacin (79.66%), cefepime (75.58%), aztreonam (89.83%), cefotaxime (76.27%), ceftazidime (81.36%), meropenem (0%) and imipenem (0%). Furthermore, the distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli was consistent with the data obtained using an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay and PCR genotyping against genes associated with β-lactam resistance. ST131 was the dominant sequence type lineage of the isolates and was the most uropathogenic E. coli lineage. The E. coli isolates also carried aminoglycoside

  15. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  16. Transgenic hybrid aspen overexpressing the Atwbc19 gene encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter confers resistance to four aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Guk; Ye, Xia; Osburn, Lori D; Stewart, C N; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistance genes of bacterial origin are invaluable markers for plant genetic engineering. However, these genes are feared to pose possible risk to human health by horizontal gene transfer from transgenic plants to bacteria, potentially resulting in antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria; this is a considerable regulatory concern in some countries. The Atwbc19 gene, encoding an Arabidopsis thaliana ATP-binding cassette transporter, has been reported to confer resistance to kanamycin specifically as an alternative to bacterial antibiotic-resistance genes. In this report, we transformed hybrid aspen (Populus canescens x P. grandidentata) with the Atwbc19 gene. Unlike Atwbc19-transgenic tobacco that was only resistant to kanamycin, the transgenic Populus plants also showed resistance to three other aminoglycoside antibiotics (neomycin, geneticin, and paromomycin) at comparable levels to plants containing a CaMV35S-nptII cassette. Although it is unknown why the transgenic Populus with the Atwbc19 gene is resistant to all aminoglycoside antibiotics tested, the broad utility of the Atwbc19 gene as a reporter gene is confirmed here in a second dicot species. Because the Atwbc19 gene is plant-ubiquitous, it might serve as an alternative selectable marker to current bacterial antibiotic-resistance marker genes and alleviate the potential risk for horizontal transfer of bacterial-resistance genes in transgenic plants.

  17. High-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. R.; Fedorka-Cray, P. J.; Barrett, J. B.; Ladely, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 42% (187/444) of swine enterococci collected between the years 1999 and 2000 exhibited high-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), kanamycin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), or streptomycin (MIC > or =1000 microg/ml). Eight aminoglycoside resistance genes were detected using PCR, most frequently ant(6)-Ia and aac(6')-Ii from Enterococcus faecium. Twenty-four per cent (45/187) of total high-level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates and 26% (4/15) of isolates resistant to high levels of all three antimicrobials were negative for all genes tested. These data suggest that enterococci isolated from swine contain diverse and possibly unidentified aminoglycoside resistance genes. PMID:15816164

  18. High-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C R; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Barrett, J B; Ladely, S R

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 42% (187/444) of swine enterococci collected between the years 1999 and 2000 exhibited high-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), kanamycin (MIC > or =500 microg/ml), or streptomycin (MIC > or =1000 microg/ml). Eight aminoglycoside resistance genes were detected using PCR, most frequently ant(6)-Ia and aac(6')-Ii from Enterococcus faecium. Twenty-four per cent (45/187) of total high-level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates and 26% (4/15) of isolates resistant to high levels of all three antimicrobials were negative for all genes tested. These data suggest that enterococci isolated from swine contain diverse and possibly unidentified aminoglycoside resistance genes.

  19. Determinants of Intrinsic Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, Thomas; Gilmour, Christie; Tilak, Justin; Fraud, Sebastien; Kerr, Nicholas; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung

    2012-01-01

    Screening of a transposon insertion mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for increased susceptibility to paromomycin identified a number of genes whose disruption enhanced susceptibility of this organism to multiple aminoglycosides, including tobramycin, amikacin, and gentamicin. These included genes associated with lipid biosynthesis or metabolism (lptA, faoA), phosphate uptake (pstB), and two-component regulators (amgRS, PA2797-PA2798) and a gene of unknown function (PA0392). Deletion mutants lacking these showed enhanced panaminoglycoside susceptibility that was reversed by the cloned genes, confirming their contribution to intrinsic panaminoglycoside resistance. None of these mutants showed increased aminoglycoside permeation of the cell envelope, indicating that increased susceptibility was not related to enhanced aminoglycoside uptake owing to a reduced envelope barrier function. Several mutants (pstB, faoA, PA0392, amgR) did, however, show increased cytoplasmic membrane depolarization relative to wild type following gentamicin exposure, consistent with the membranes of these mutants being more prone to perturbation, likely by gentamicin-generated mistranslated polypeptides. Mutants lacking any two of these resistance genes in various combinations invariably showed increased aminoglycoside susceptibility relative to single-deletion mutants, confirming their independent contribution to resistance and highlighting the complexity of the intrinsic aminoglycoside resistome in P. aeruginosa. Deletion of these genes also compromised the high-level panaminoglycoside resistance of clinical isolates, emphasizing their important contribution to acquired resistance. PMID:22908149

  20. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases.

    PubMed

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2013-08-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA.

  1. Inhibitors of aminoglycoside resistance activated in cells.

    PubMed

    Vong, Kenward; Tam, Ingrid S; Yan, Xuxu; Auclair, Karine

    2012-03-16

    The most common mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics entails bacterial expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as the clinically widespread aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase (AAC(6')). Aminoglycoside-CoA bisubstrates are highly potent AAC(6') inhibitors; however, their inability to penetrate cells precludes in vivo studies. Some truncated bisubstrates are known to cross cell membranes, yet their activities against AAC(6') are in the micromolar range at best. We report here the synthesis and biological activity of aminoglycoside-pantetheine derivatives that, although devoid of AAC(6') inhibitory activity, can potentiate the antibacterial activity of kanamycin A against an aminoglycoside-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecium. Biological studies demonstrate that these molecules are potentially extended to their corresponding full-length bisubstrates by enzymes of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. This work provides a proof-of-concept for the utility of prodrug compounds activated by enzymes of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway, to resensitize resistant strains of bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  2. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6’)-aph(2”) Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. Objectives: This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3”)-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. Results: The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6’)-aph(2”). The prevalence of aph(3”)-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6’)-aph(2”) among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary. PMID:27217920

  3. Detection and characterization of multidrug-resistant enterobacteria bearing aminoglycoside-modifying gene in a university hospital at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, along three decades.

    PubMed

    Dias-Gonçalves, Verônica; Bohrer-Lengruber, Françoise; Oliveira-Fonseca, Bianca; Santos-Pereira, Renata Meirelles; Barbosa de Melo, Luis Dione; Gazos-Lopes, Ulisses; Ribeiro-Bello, Alexandre; Adler-Pereira, José Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, particularly those resistant to gentamicin, have become one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. We sought to investigate the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, specially to gentamicin, in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli multidrug-resistant strains isolated from different clinical materials among patients hospitalized in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Ten colonization strains and 20 infection strains were evaluated during three decades (1980 to 2010) using selective media containing 8 µg/ml of gentamicin. Thirty strains were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Twenty two strains were subjected to plasmid DNA extraction and 12 to hybridization assays using as probe a 1.9 kb plasmid DNA fragment from one of the K. pneumoniae strains isolated from faecal samples. This fragment was sequenced and assigned to the GQ422439 GenBank record. PCR was also performed using oligonucleotides designed for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. An accC2 acetylase, besides transposons and insertion sequences, were evidenced. Twenty-four (80%) of the isolates were positive for the aacC2 gene in agreement with antibiotic susceptibility testing profiles, indicating the persistent presence of this gene throughout the three decades. We detected high molecular weight plasmids in 54,5% of the strains. Of the tested strains, 91% showed positive signal in the hybridization assays. A gene codifying for one specific aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme was detected all throughout the three decades. Our data back the adoption of preventive measures, such as a more conscious use of antimicrobial agents in hospital environments, which can contribute to control the dissemination of microorganisms harboring resistance gene plasmids.

  4. Characterization of high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci isolated from non-hospital sources.

    PubMed

    Ngbede, Emmanuel O; Raji, Mashood A; Kwanashie, Clara N; Kwaga, Jacob K P; Adikwu, Alex A; Maurice, Nanven A; Adamu, Andrew M

    2017-07-01

    High level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci are being increasingly reported from non-hospital sources. This study was carried out to characterize these strains from non-hospital sources in Nigeria. A collection of Enterococcus faecium isolated from vegetables, soil, farm animals and manure and observed to be resistant to ampicillin (n=63) and gentamicin (n=37) discs, were screened for resistance to high levels of ampicillin and aminoglycoside using E-test strips. Putative high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant strains were screened for pbp5 and aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes, respectively, by PCR. The C-terminal region of the amplified pbp5 gene was also sequenced. Five (5/63) and thirty-five (35/37) of the ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant strains were identified as high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant E. faecium strains, respectively, based on the MIC results. The amplified pbp5 gene from the high level ampicillin-resistant isolates displayed 96-99 % nucleotide sequence similarity with the reference strains and three novel insertions (500Glu→Leu, 502Asp→Arg and 614Ile→Phe) in the amino acid sequence. Aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″) (100 %), aph(2')-Ic (88.8 %), aph(3')-IIIa (90 %) and ant(4')-Ia (40 %) were detected among the high level aminoglycoside-resistant isolates. This is the first report on the characterization of high level ampicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Enterococcus faecium among animals and vegetables in Nigeria. The results show that non-hospital sources can constitute a reservoir for potential dissemination of these strains and genes to humans via the food chain or by direct contact.

  5. Rapid Aminoglycoside NP Test for Rapid Detection of Multiple Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Patrice; Jayol, Aurélie; Dobias, Jan; Poirel, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    The rapid aminoglycoside NP (Nordmann/Poirel) test was developed to rapidly identify multiple aminoglycoside (AG) resistance in Enterobacteriaceae It is based on the detection of the glucose metabolism related to enterobacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of amikacin plus gentamicin. Formation of acid metabolites was evidenced by a color change (orange to yellow) of the red phenol pH indicator. The rapid aminoglycoside NP test was evaluated by using bacterial colonies of 18 AG-resistant isolates producing 16S rRNA methylases, 20 AG-resistant isolates expressing AG-modifying enzymes (acetyl-, adenyl-, and phosphotransferases), and 10 isolates susceptible to AG. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 97%, respectively, compared to the broth dilution method, which was taken as the gold standard for determining aminoglycoside resistance. The test is inexpensive, rapid (<2 h), and implementable worldwide. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Molecular epidemiological survey on aminoglycoside antibiotics-resistant genotype and phenotype of avian Escherichia coli in North China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Wang, C G; Jiang, G E; Lv, J C; Zhong, X H

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring drug resistance in Escherichia coli is important for prevention and treatment of colibacillosis. To choose effective drugs to prevent and control avian colibacillosis in North China, we investigated resistance of 205 E. coli isolates (from Beijing, Tianjin, inner Mongolia, Shanxi, and Hebei regions) to commonly used clinical aminoglycoside antibiotics using a drug susceptibility test. The results show that the isolates had varying degrees of resistance to kanamycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, amikacin, neomycin, and spectinomycin. Particularly, the resistance rates of the former 3 antibiotics exceeded 40%. To explore the reasons for wide drug resistance, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes (AME) genes, which are important in generation of aminoglycoside resistance, were detected by PCR. Of the isolates, 60.98% carried AME genes and 38.05% carried commensal multidrug resistance genes. Therefore, resistance of avian E. coli to aminoglycoside antibiotics is very serious in North China, perhaps due to the existence of resistance genes.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Aminoglycosides Resistance in Acinetobacter Spp. with Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Moniri, R; Farahani, R Kheltabadi; Shajari, Gh; Shirazi, MH. Nazem; Ghasemi, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter spp. is characterized as an important nosocomial pathogen and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Our aim was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility and aminoglycosides resistance genes of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from hospitalized patients. Methods: Sixty isolates were identified as Acinetobacter species. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance by disc diffusion method for 12 antimicrobials. The presence of aphA6, aacC1 aadA1, and aadB genes were detected using PCR. Results: From the isolated Acinetobacter spp. the highest resistance rate showed against amikacin, tobramycin, and ceftazidim, respectively; while isolated bacteria were more sensitive to ampicillic/subactam. More than 66% of the isolates were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 27.5% of MDR strains were resistant to all seven tested classes of antimicrobials. The higher MDR rate presented in bacteria isolated from the ICU and blood samples. More than 60% of the MDR bacteria were resistance to amikacin, ceftazidim, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, doxycycline, tobramycin and levofloxacin. Also, more than 60% of the isolates contained phosphotransferase aphA6, and acetyltransferase genes aacC1, but adenylyltransferase genes aadA1 (41.7%), and aadB (3.3%) were less prominent. 21.7% of the strains contain three aminoglycoside resistance genes (aphA6, aacC1 and aadA1). Conclusion: The rising trend of resistance to aminoglycosides poses an alarming threat to treatment of such infections. The findings showed that clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. in our hospital carrying various kinds of aminoglycoside resistance genes. PMID:23113008

  8. A novel multidrug resistance plasmid isolated from an Escherichia coli strain resistant to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Shasha; Xie, Zhijing; Yang, Fangfang; Sun, Yani; Zhu, Yanli; Zhao, Xiaomin; Jiang, Shijin

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have reported several different plasmids that confer multidrug resistance (MDR) including resistance to aminoglycosides. In this study, we investigated the aminoglycoside resistance patterns for 224 Escherichia coli isolates from diseased chickens and ducks in China, characterized a novel MDR plasmid, and collected prevalence data on similar resistance plasmids. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined using disc diffusion and the microdilution method. The plasmid pXZ was analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with EcoRI and SalI, and sequenced. The prevalence of similar resistance plasmids was assessed by multiplex PCR and by RFLP analysis. Among the 224 E. coli isolates, 189 (84.4%) were resistant to streptomycin, 125 (55.8%) were resistant to kanamycin, 116 (51.8%) were resistant to gentamicin, 106 (47.3%) were resistant to neomycin and 98 (43.8%) were resistant to amikacin. Among the 224 E. coli isolates, 17 contained a plasmid with the MDR-encoding region of pXZ, which showed high-level resistance to aminoglycosides (MICs of gentamicin and amikacin ≥ 512 mg/L). The plasmid pXZ was digested into five fragments by EcoRI and six fragments by SalI. The plasmid pXZ was a circular DNA molecule of 76635 bp with a 51.65% guanine + cytosine content and included four resistance genes (rmtB, fosA3, bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-24)). A novel MDR plasmid, pXZ, harbouring four resistance genes (rmtB, fosA3, bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M)) was identified. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an aminoglycoside resistance plasmid harbouring the fosA3 gene.

  9. High level resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci from Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Al-Ballaa, S R; Qadri, S M; Al-Ballaa, S R; Kambal, A M; Saldin, H; Al-Qatary, K

    1994-07-01

    Enterococci with high level of aminoglycosides resistance are being reported from different parts of the world with increasing frequency. Treatment of infections caused by such isolates is associated with a high incidence of failure or relapse. This is attributed to the loss of the synergetic effect of aminoglycosides and cell wall active agents against isolates exhibiting this type of resistance. To determine the prevalence of enterococci with high level resistance to aminoglycosides in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 241 distinct clinical isolates were examined by disk diffusion method using high content aminoglycosides disks. Seventy-four isolates (30%) were resistant to one or more of the aminoglycosides tested. The most common pattern of resistance was that to streptomycin and kanamycin. Of the 241 isolates tested, 29 (12%) were resistant to high levels of gentamicin, 35 (15%) to tobramycin, 65 (27%) to kanamycin and 53 (22%) to streptomycin. The highest rate of resistance to a high level of gentamicin was found among enterococcal blood isolates (30%). Eighteen of the isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium, 13 (72%) of these showed high level resistance to two or more of the aminoglycosides tested.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of aminoglycosides resistance on Klebsiella pneumonia in a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caiqian; Xing, Bangrong; Yang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Yongmei; Feng, Yaqun; Zhang, Yongbiao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycosides resistance among Klebsiella pneumonia in hospitals in China, the antibiotics resistance and the possession of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) from 162 isolates were examined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and PCR sequencing. Overall, 47.5% (77/162) of strains showed an ESBL phenotype. According to antibiotics resistance, ESBLs-positive K. pneumoniae showed significantly higher resistance to most antibiotics than ESBLs-negative strains (P<0.05). Moreover, 162 strains harboured aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (AMEs) including aac (3)-II (n = 49), aac (6')-Ib (n = 32), ant (3")-I (n = 22) and ant (2")-I (n = 7). Overall, 11.1% (18/162) and 6.2% (10/162) of isolates carried 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA and rmtB), in which the aminoglycoside MIC was more than 256 μg/ml. In conclusion, our study characterised aminoglycosides resistance among K. pneumoniae strains in China hospitals and revealed antibiotic resistance and the increased presence of AMEs and 16S rRNA methylase genes in K. pneumonia, enabling the prevalence of aminoglycosides resistance of K. pneumoniae to be tracked from patients.

  11. Emerging resistance to aminoglycosides in lactic acid bacteria of food origin-an impending menace.

    PubMed

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2016-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are the most preferred choice of therapy against serious infections in humans. Therefore, its use in animal husbandry has been strictly regulated in the EU, UK, and USA to avoid the hazards of aminoglycoside resistance in gut microflora. Nevertheless, aminoglycosides are recommended for prophylaxis and therapeutics in food animals and agriculture owing to its bactericidal nature. In the recent past, the global surge in aminoglycoside-resistant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from food sources has been noticed that might question its continued use in animal husbandry. Upon antibiotic administration, a selective pressure is created in the gut environment; in such instances, LAB could act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance which may facilitate their transfer to pathogenic organisms contradicting its probiotic and industrial significance. This may be a risk to human health as the presence of one aminoglycoside resistance gene renders the bacteria tolerant to almost all antibiotics of the same class, thereby challenging its therapeutic efficacy. Low doses of aminoglycosides are recommended in farm animals due to its toxic nature and insolubility in blood. However, recent investigations indicate that use of aminoglycosides in sub-lethal concentrations can trigger the selection and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance in probiotic LAB. Resistance to erythromycin, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones in LAB were reported earlier to which immediate regulatory measures were adopted by some countries. Paradoxically, lack of regulations on antibiotic use in farms in most developing countries makes them a potential source of antibiotic resistance and its uncontrolled spread around the globe. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance was observed in enterococci from food origin earlier; however, its emergence in lactobacilli and pediococci suggests its spread in probiotic cultures which prompts immediate precautionary methods. This review highlights the

  12. Prospects for circumventing aminoglycoside kinase mediated antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Caldwell, Shane J.; Fong, Desiree H.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, resistance in clinical isolates is pervasive, rendering many aminoglycosides ineffective. The most widely disseminated means of resistance to this class of antibiotics is inactivation of the drug by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). There are two principal strategies to overcoming the effects of AMEs. The first approach involves the design of novel aminoglycosides that can evade modification. Although this strategy has yielded a number of superior aminoglycoside variants, their efficacy cannot be sustained in the long term. The second approach entails the development of molecules that interfere with the mechanism of AMEs such that the activity of aminoglycosides is preserved. Although such a molecule has yet to enter clinical development, the search for AME inhibitors has been greatly facilitated by the wealth of structural information amassed in recent years. In particular, aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases (APHs) have been studied extensively and crystal structures of a number of APHs with diverse regiospecificity and substrate specificity have been elucidated. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the available APH structures and recent progress in APH inhibitor development, with a focus on the structure-guided strategies. PMID:23805415

  13. Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin.

    PubMed Central

    Coria-Jiménez, R.; Ortiz-Torres, C.

    1994-01-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of 147 Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin were studied. All strains analysed belonged to three different bacterial populations. The periods of study and the institutions the strains were isolated from correlated significantly with the resistance patterns shown by the strains. The most frequent resistance patterns found were the following: ACC (6')-I at the Hospital Infantil de México (Children's Hospital of México), and ANT (2'') + AAC(6')-I at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INPed or National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Furthermore, the isolation frequency of aminoglycoside-sensitive strains decreased remarkably at the INPed over a 12-year period. These results suggest that there has been a selection of Serratia marcescens strains that are very resistant to aminoglycosides. PMID:8119351

  14. Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin.

    PubMed

    Coria-Jiménez, R; Ortiz-Torres, C

    1994-02-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of 147 Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin were studied. All strains analysed belonged to three different bacterial populations. The periods of study and the institutions the strains were isolated from correlated significantly with the resistance patterns shown by the strains. The most frequent resistance patterns found were the following: ACC (6')-I at the Hospital Infantil de México (Children's Hospital of México), and ANT (2'') + AAC(6')-I at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INPed or National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Furthermore, the isolation frequency of aminoglycoside-sensitive strains decreased remarkably at the INPed over a 12-year period. These results suggest that there has been a selection of Serratia marcescens strains that are very resistant to aminoglycosides.

  15. Enzymology of aminoglycoside biosynthesis-deduction from gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Wehmeier, Udo F; Piepersberg, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The classical aminoglycosides are, with very few exceptions, typically actinobacterial secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activities all mediated by inhibiting translation on the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Some chemically related natural products inhibit glucosidases by mimicking oligo-alpha-1,4-glucosides. The biochemistry of the aminoglycoside biosynthetic pathways is still a developing field since none of the pathways has been analyzed to completeness as yet. In this chapter we treat the enzymology of aminoglycoside biosyntheses as far as it becomes apparent from recent investigations based on the availability of DNA sequence data of biosynthetic gene clusters for all major structural classes of these bacterial metabolites. We give a more general overview of the field, including descriptions of some key enzymes in various aminoglycoside pathways, whereas in Chapter 20 provides a detailed account of the better-studied enzymology thus far known for the neomycin and butirosin pathways.

  16. Properties of Achromobacter xylosoxidans highly resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Sachiko; Goda, Natsumi; Hayabuchi, Tatsuya; Tamaki, Hiroo; Ishida, Ayami; Suzuki, Ayaka; Nakano, Kaori; Yui, Shoko; Katsumata, Yuto; Yamagami, Yuki; Burioka, Naoto; Chikumi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    We herein discovered a highly resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs to amikacin, gentamicin, and arbekacin of 128 μg/mL or higher in a drug sensitivity survey of 92 strains isolated from the specimens of Yoka hospital patients between January 2009 and October 2010, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans was separated from this P. aeruginosa isolate. The sensitivity of this bacterium to 29 antibiotics was investigated. The MICs of this A. xylosoxidans strain to 9 aminoglycoside antibiotics were: amikacin, gentamicin, arbekacin, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, and spectinomycin, 1,024 μg/mL or ≥ 1,024 μg/mL; netilmicin, 512 μg/mL; and tobramycin, 256 μg/mL. This strain was also resistant to dibekacin. This aminoglycoside antibiotic resistant phenotype is very rare, and we are the first report the emergence of A. xylosoxidans with this characteristic.

  17. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  18. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  19. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Karah, Nabil; Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Johansson, Anders; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-11

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

  20. The genetic basis of aminoglycoside ototoxicity: The search for susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Prezant, T.R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity appears to be genetically determined. Recently we identified a mutation in the small ribosomal RNA gene of the mitochondrial DNA that can cause deafness after aminoglycoside treatment in families with maternally-inherited susceptibility to the ototoxic effect of these antibiotics. The mutation produces a structural change in the 12S rRNA, which allows increased binding of aminoglycosides, mistranslation of mitochondrial proteins, decreased energy production, and cell death. Because only a minority of sporadic patients have mutations in the 12S rRNA gene, we anticipate the involvement of other genes in ototoxic deafness. We have developed a model system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionally identify genes whose products interact with aminoglycosides. Besides its small genome size and well-developed genetic tools, a unique advantage of using this haploid organism is that recessive drug-responsive mutations will not be missed. An additional advantage is that yeast can be grown in either fermentative or respiratory media, allowing the functional categorization of mutants. Over 100 antibiotic-resistant mutants have now been isolated. The majority of these mutations (69%) are dominant and are being sorted by segregation tests. The 31% of mutations that are recessive have been sorted into two major complementation groups, indicating that two genes appear to be responsible for most of the recessive cases. Our strategy is to isolate the yeast genes that most commonly acquire mutations, clone the human homologs, and screen patients for susceptibility mutations.

  1. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  2. The crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa, an enzyme responsible for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Nurizzo, Didier; Shewry, Steven C; Perlin, Michael H; Brown, Scott A; Dholakia, Jaydev N; Fuchs, Roy L; Deva, Taru; Baker, Edward N; Smith, Clyde A

    2003-03-21

    A major factor in the emergence of antibiotic resistance is the existence of enzymes that chemically modify common antibiotics. The genes for these enzymes are commonly carried on mobile genetic elements, facilitating their spread. One such class of enzymes is the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (APH) family, which uses ATP-mediated phosphate transfer to chemically modify and inactivate aminoglycoside antibiotics such as streptomycin and kanamycin. As part of a program to define the molecular basis for aminoglycoside recognition and inactivation by such enzymes, we have determined the high resolution (2.1A) crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa (APH(3')-IIa) in complex with kanamycin. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using multiple models derived from the related aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-III enzyme (APH(3')-III), and refined to an R factor of 0.206 (R(free) 0.238). The bound kanamycin molecule is very well defined and occupies a highly negatively charged cleft formed by the C-terminal domain of the enzyme. Adjacent to this is the binding site for ATP, which can be modeled on the basis of nucleotide complexes of APH(3')-III; only one change is apparent with a loop, residues 28-34, in a position where it could fold over an incoming nucleotide. The three rings of the kanamycin occupy distinct sub-pockets in which a highly acidic loop, residues 151-166, and the C-terminal residues 260-264 play important parts in recognition. The A ring, the site of phosphoryl transfer, is adjacent to the catalytic base Asp190. These results give new information on the basis of aminoglycoside recognition, and on the relationship between this phosphotransferase family and the protein kinases.

  3. Molecular detection of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Mohsen; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Khoshnood, Saeed; Eslami, Gita; Atyabi, Seyyed Mohammad; Nazem, Habibollah; Fazilati, Mohammad; Hashemi, Ali; Soleimani, Saleh

    2016-12-16

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major opportunistic pathogen in healthcare settings worldwide. In Iran, there are only few reports on the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes among A. baumannii isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes from A. baumannii strains collected at a university teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred A. baumannii strains were collected between 2014 and 2015 from hospitalized patients at Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. The DNA was extracted using a kit obtained from Bioneer Co. (Korea) and was used as a template for polymerase chain reaction. The most active antimicrobial agent against these strains was colistin. The rate of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was 97%. The aadA1, aadB, aac(6')-Ib, and aac(3)-IIa genes were found in 85%, 77%, 72%, and 68% of A. baumannii isolates, respectively. This study showed a high prevalence rate of AME genes in A. baumannii. This prevalence rate has explained that further aminoglycoside resistance genes may have role in the resistance of clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Therefore, control and treatment of serious infections caused by this opportunistic pathogen should be given more consideration.

  4. Susceptibility to Aminoglycosides and Distribution of aph and aac(3)-XI Genes among Corynebacterium striatum Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Navas, Jesús; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Salas, Carlos; Cano, María Eliecer; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum is an opportunistic pathogen, often multidrug-resistant, which has been associated with serious infections in humans. Aminoglycosides are second-line or complementary antibiotics used for the treatment of Corynebacterium infections. We investigated the susceptibility to six aminoglycosides and the molecular mechanisms involved in aminoglycoside resistance in a collection of 64 Corynebacterium striatum isolated in our laboratory during the period 2005–2009. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using E-test. The mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance were investigated by PCR and sequencing. The 64 C. striatum were assessed for the possibility of clonal spreading by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Netilmicin and amikacin were active against the 64 C. striatum isolates (MICs90 = 0.38 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively). Twenty-seven of the 64 C. striatum strains showed a MIC90 for kanamycin > 256 mg/L, and 26 out the 27 were positive for the aph(3’)-Ic gene. Thirty-six out of our 64 C. striatum were streptomycin resistant, and 23 out of the 36 carried both the aph(3”)-Ib and aph(6)-Id genes. The gene aac(3)-XI encoding a new aminoglycoside 3-N acetyl transferase from C. striatum was present in 44 out of the 64 isolates, all of them showing MICs of gentamicin and tobramycin > 1 mg/L. CS4933, a C. striatum showing very low susceptibility to kanamycin and streptomycin, contains an aminoglycoside resistance region that includes the aph(3’)-Ic gene, and the tandem of genes aph(3”)-Ib and aph(6)-Id. Forty-six major PFGE types were identified among the 64 C. striatum isolates, indicating that they were mainly not clonal. Our results showed that the 64 clinical C. striatum were highly resistant to aminoglycosides and mostly unrelated. PMID:27936101

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of aminoglycoside-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Bauskenieks, Matiss; Pole, Ilva; Skenders, Girts; Jansone, Inta; Broka, Lonija; Nodieva, Anda; Ozere, Iveta; Kalvisa, Adrija; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2015-03-01

    Mutations causing resistance to aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin (KAN), amikacin (AMK), and streptomycin, are not completely understood. In this study, polymorphisms of aminoglycoside resistance influencing genes such as rrs, eis, rpsL, and gidB in 41 drug-resistant and 17 pan-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Latvia were analyzed. Mutation A1400G in rrs gene was detected in 92% isolates with high resistance level to KAN and diverse MIC level to AMK. Mutations in promoter region of eis were detected in 80% isolates with low-level MIC of KAN. The association of K43R mutation in rpsL gene, a mutation in the rrs gene at position 513, and various polymorphisms in gidB gene with distinct genetic lineages of M. tuberculosis was observed. The results of this study suggest that association of different controversial mutations of M. tuberculosis genes to the drug resistance phenotype should be done in respect to genetic lineages.

  6. Genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lu; Lv, Yuemeng; Yuan, Min; Hu, Xinxin; Nie, Tongying; Yang, Xinyi; Li, Guoqing; Pang, Jing; Zhang, Jingpu; Li, Congran; Wang, Xiukun; You, Xuefu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates from Beijing, China. 173 A. baumannii clinical isolates from hospitals in Beijing from 2006 to 2009 were first subjected to high level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR, MIC to gentamicin and amikacin>512 µg/mL) phenotype selection by broth microdilution method. The strains were then subjected to genetic basis analysis by PCR detection of the aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, aac(3)-IIc, aac(6′)-Ib, aac(6′)-II, aph(4)-Ia, aph(3′)-I, aph(3′)-IIb, aph(3′)-IIIa, aph(3′)-VIa, aph(2″)-Ib, aph(2″)-Ic, aph(2″)-Id, ant(2″)-Ia, ant(3″)-I and ant(4′)-Ia) and the 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA, rmtB and rmtC). Correlation analysis between the presence of aminoglycoside resistance gene and HLAR phenotype were performed by SPSS. Totally 102 (58.96%) HLAR isolates were selected. The HLAR rates for year 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 were 52.63%, 65.22%, 51.11% and 70.83%, respectively. Five modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, detection rate of 65.69%; aac(6′)-Ib, detection rate of 45.10%; aph(3′)-I, detection rate of 47.06%; aph(3′)-IIb, detection rate of 0.98%; ant(3″)-I, detection rate of 95.10%) and one methylase gene (armA, detection rate of 98.04%) were detected in the 102 A. baumannii with aac(3)-I+aac(6′)-Ib+ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 25.49%), aac(3)-I+aph(3′)-I+ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 21.57%) and ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 12.75%) being the most prevalent gene profiles. The values of chi-square tests showed correlation of armA, ant(3″)-I, aac(3)-I, aph(3′)-I and aac(6′)-Ib with HLAR. armA had significant correlation (contingency coefficient 0.685) and good contingency with HLAR (kappa 0.940). The high rates of HLAR may cause a serious problem for combination therapy of aminoglycoside with β-lactams against A. baumannii infections. As armA was

  7. Overexpression of the chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside acetyltransferase eis confers kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zaunbrecher, M Analise; Sikes, R David; Metchock, Beverly; Shinnick, Thomas M; Posey, James E

    2009-11-24

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) highlights the urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance to the drugs used to treat this disease. The aminoglycosides kanamycin and amikacin are important bactericidal drugs used to treat MDR TB, and resistance to one or both of these drugs is a defining characteristic of extensively drug-resistant TB. We identified mutations in the -10 and -35 promoter region of the eis gene, which encodes a previously uncharacterized aminoglycoside acetyltransferase. These mutations led to a 20-180-fold increase in the amount of eis leaderless mRNA transcript, with a corresponding increase in protein expression. Importantly, these promoter mutations conferred resistance to kanamycin [5 microg/mL < minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) resistance harbored eis promoter mutations. These results have important clinical implications in that clinical isolates determined to be resistant to kanamycin may not be cross-resistant to amikacin, as is often assumed. Molecular detection of eis mutations should distinguish strains resistant to kanamycin and those resistant to kanamycin and amikacin. This may help avoid excluding a potentially effective drug from a treatment regimen for drug-resistant TB.

  8. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients. PMID:27403451

  9. Enterococci from Bangkok, Thailand, with high-level resistance to currently available aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B E; Tsao, J; Panida, J

    1983-01-01

    Enterococcal endocarditis is usually treated with a combination of a penicillin and an aminoglycoside. Recent reports have documented the emergence of enterococci in France with high-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin and the emergence of strains in Houston, Tex. with high-level resistance to all of these drugs and streptomycin. In this study, we examined strains from a geographic area where newer aminoglycosides have been less commonly used. Of 125 distinct patient isolates, 18 (14%) were resistant to greater than 2,000 micrograms of gentamicin and most other aminoglycosides per ml. Four of these strains transferred gentamicin resistance to a laboratory recipient. One strain, chosen for further study, was resistant to synergism between penicillin and gentamicin, tobramycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and amikacin and demonstrated the following enzymatic activities: 3'- and 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, and adenylylation of streptomycin. Optimal therapy for endocarditis caused by such highly resistant strains is currently unknown. PMID:6614889

  10. Mutational Activation of the AmgRS Two-Component System in Aminoglycoside-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N.; Poole, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:23459488

  11. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  12. Structural Basis of APH(3)-IIIa-Mediated Resistance to N1-Substituted Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Butirosin is unique among the naturally occurring aminoglycosides, having a substituted amino group at position 1 (N1) of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring with an (S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) group. While bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides can be ascribed chiefly to drug inactivation by plasmid-encoded aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, the presence of an AHB group protects the aminoglycoside from binding to many resistance enzymes, and hence, the antibiotic retains its bactericidal properties. Consequently, several semisynthetic N1-substituted aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, isepamicin, and netilmicin, were developed. Unfortunately, butirosin, amikacin, and isepamicin are not resistant to inactivation by 3'-aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferase type IIIa [APH(3')-IIIa]. We report here the crystal structure of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with an ATP analog, AMPPNP [adenosine 5'-(?,{gamma}-imido)triphosphate], and butirosin A to 2.4-A resolution. The structure shows that butirosin A binds to the enzyme in a manner analogous to other 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides, and the flexible antibiotic-binding loop is key to the accommodation of structurally diverse substrates. Based on the crystal structure, we have also constructed a model of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with amikacin, a commonly used semisynthetic N1-substituted 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside. Together, these results suggest a strategy to further derivatize the AHB group in order to generate new aminoglycoside derivatives that can elude inactivation by resistance enzymes while maintaining their ability to bind to the ribosomal A site.

  13. Rise and dissemination of aminoglycoside resistance: the aac(6')-Ib paradigm.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, María S; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic modification is a prevalent mechanism by which bacteria defeat the action of antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are often inactivated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoded by genes present in the chromosome, plasmids, and other genetic elements. The AAC(6')-Ib (aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib) is an enzyme of clinical importance found in a wide variety of gram-negative pathogens. The AAC(6')-Ib enzyme is of interest not only because of his ubiquity but also because of other characteristics, it presents significant microheterogeneity at the N-termini and the aac(6')-Ib gene is often present in integrons, transposons, plasmids, genomic islands, and other genetic structures. Excluding the highly heterogeneous N-termini, there are 45 non-identical AAC(6')-Ib related entries in the NCBI database, 32 of which have identical name in spite of not having identical amino acid sequence. While some variants conserved similar properties, others show dramatic differences in specificity, including the case of AAC(6')-Ib-cr that mediates acetylation of ciprofloxacin representing a rare case where a resistance enzyme acquires the ability to utilize an antibiotic of a different class as substrate. Efforts to utilize antisense technologies to turn off expression of the gene or to identify enzymatic inhibitors to induce phenotypic conversion to susceptibility are under way.

  14. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells.

  15. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  16. Molecular genetics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to aminoglycosides and cyclic peptide testing by MTBDRsl in Armenia.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Farnia, Parissa; Hayrapetyan, Armen; Mirzoyan, Alvard

    2016-12-01

    The GenoType MTBDRsl test rapidly detects resistance to ethambutol, fluoroquinolones, second-line aminoglycosides (amikacin [AMK] and kanamycin [KAN]), and cyclic peptides (capreomycin [CAP]) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. According to data from Global Drug Resistance Surveillance Report (2007), Armenia is counted as a high-burden country for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The estimated burden of MDR-TB in 2012 was 9.4 (7-12) and 43 (38-49) among retreatment TB cases. A total of 92 laboratory confirmed cases were reported to the World Health Organization (57 new and 35 previously treated) out of 511 cases tested for MDR-TB. A set of 77 drug-resistant TB isolates during 2011 and 2012 period, being either acid-fast bacterium positive or negative but culture-positive resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or both according to the GenoType MTBDR plus assay, were consecutively tested using GenoType MTBDRsl. rrs gene analysis and the results from GenoType MTBDRsl were compared with phenotypic drug resistance testing. The DNA preparation method was performed as recommended by the manufacturer (Genotype MTBDR plus version 1.0 and Genotype MTBDRsl version 2.0 Hain Lifescience Nehren, Germany). Aminoglycosides are key drugs for the treatment of MDR-TB. A total of 77 drug-resistant TB and four extensively drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates from Armenian TB patients were analyzed to characterize mutations within rrs and to compare with phenotypic drug resistance testing. Simultaneously, the following were identified: 65 (84.41%) rrs wild type (WT), 1 (1.3%) rrs WT MUT1 and MUT2 (WT; A1401G and G1484T), 1 (1.3%) rrs WT1, MUT1 (A1401G), 9 (11.7%) rrs WT1, MUT1 (A1401G), and 1 (1.3%) rrs WT1, MUT1. Mutation at position 1401 in rrs leads to resistance to KAN (7/77=9%), AMK (9/77=11.68%), and CAP (5/77=6.49%). Eleven (14.28%) streptomycin-resistant strains had a rrs mutation. Isolates with rrs structural gene mutations were cross-resistant to streptomycin, KAN, CAP, and

  17. Aminoglycoside-Streptothricin Resistance Gene Cluster aadE–sat4–aphA-3 Disseminated among Multiresistant Isolates of Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Guido; Hildebrandt, Bianca; Witte, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Seventy-two Enterococcus faecium isolates of different origins highly resistant to nourseothricin and streptomycin were studied. Sequencing of a genomic fragment from two isolates identified a gene cluster, aadE–sat4–aphA-3, which has been isolated recently in staphylococci and Campylobacter coli. Patterns of digested PCR products of aadE–sat4–aphA-3 were identical for all isolates. PMID:11600397

  18. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  19. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3’)-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. Previously we demonstrated that eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, due to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. As well, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. Here, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3’)-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds – anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrazolopyrimidine (PP) – and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3’)-Ia versus ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP-derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3’)-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant E. coli strain. The structures presented here and these inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  20. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance.

  1. Clinical predictors of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity in drug-resistant Tuberculosis patients on intensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Sogebi, Olusola Ayodele; Adefuye, Bolanle Olufunlola; Adebola, Stephen Oluwatosin; Oladeji, Susan Modupe; Adedeji, Taiwo Olugbemiga

    2017-08-01

    The study objectives were to determine the incidence of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity in institutionalized patients on intensive phase of therapy for drug-resistant Tuberculosis (DR Tb) and also to assess clinical factors which could predict the ototoxicity. The study was a prospective analytical study among consecutive DR Tb patients who were admitted for intensive phase of therapy (of 4 months) at the DR-Tb center over a 12-month period. Patients were diagnosed as DR Tb using the Gene Xpert machine to confirm Rifampicin resistance. All eligible 70 out of 87 consenting patients were consecutively recruited into the study. Patients had baseline (admission) and serial pure tone audiometries (PTAs) performed at 4 weekly intervals until discharge after 4 months of admission. Audiometric confirmation of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity was done by comparing serial with baseline PTA. Among the 70 patients the male:female ratio was 1.7:1. Nine patients (12.9%) were retroviral-positive, and 16 patients (22.9%) were confirmed to have ototoxicity by audiometric criteria. The duration of treatment when ototoxicity was detected in the patients ranged 4-17 (Mean±SD; 9.4±3.4) weeks. Ototoxicity was detected in the audiometric low frequency ranges in 7 (43.8%) and at the high frequencies in 4 (25.0%) of the patients. Univariate analyses of clinical parameters found that age, underlying diabetes mellitus, deranged baseline PTAv >25dB HL, BMI on admission and retroviral status were significantly associated, while sex and previous drug regimen failure were not associated with ototoxicity. Multivariate adjusted logistic regression analyses, controlling for sex, revealed age (OR=1.068, p=0.018), BMI on admission (OR=0.673, p=0.012) and retroviral positivity (OR=8.822, p=0.014) of patients could significantly predict aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity. Incidence of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity in DR Tb patients was 22.9%. The clinical predictors for ototoxicity were age

  2. Prevalence of resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a University Hospital in Northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna Diana; Sacha, Pawel Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Anna; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among twenty-five Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between 2002 and 2009. In PCR, following genes were detected: ant(2″)-Ia in 9 (36.0%), aac(6')-Ib in 7 (28.0%), qnrB in 5 (20.0%), aph(3″)-Ib in 2 (8.0%) of isolates.

  3. Cholera in Vietnam: Changes in Genotypes and Emergence of Class I Integrons Containing Aminoglycoside Resistance Gene Cassettes in Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains Isolated from 1979 to 1996

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, A.; Forslund, A.; Tam, N. V.; Vinh, D. X.; Cam, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water supplies. All cases were associated with Vibrio cholerae O1. Using ribotyping, cholera toxin (CT) genotyping, and characterization of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiotic resistance genes by PCR, we show that strains isolated after 1990 were clearly different from strains isolated before 1991. In contrast to strains isolated before 1991, 94% of 104 strains isolated after 1990 showed an identical ribotype R1, were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin, and showed a different CT genotype. Furthermore, PCR analysis revealed that sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains harbored class I integrons containing a gene cassette ant(3")-1a encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of class I integrons in V. cholerae. The development of cholera and the changes in the phenotypic and genotypic properties of V. cholerae O1 shown in the present study highlight the importance of monitoring V. cholerae O1 in Vietnam as in other parts of the world. In particular, the emergence of the new ribotype R1 strain containing class I integrons should be further studied. PMID:9986842

  4. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  5. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  6. Prevalence of carbapenemases among high-level aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a university hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhong; Shen, Min; Yang, Jingni; Dai, Min; Chang, Yaowen; Zhang, Chi; Luan, Guangxin; Ling, Baodong; Jia, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistant enzymes has previously been reported and extended-spectrum β-lactamase among Acinetobacter baumannii. To track the risk of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, the present study aimed to determine the prevalence of carbapenemases in high-level aminoglycoside resistant A. baumannii over two years. A total of 118 strains of A. baumannii were consecutively collected in the First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, China. These isolates were investigated on the genetic basis of their resistance to aminoglycosides. The results showed that 75 (63.56%) isolates were high-level resistant to aminoglycosides, including gentamicin and amikacin (minimum inhibitory concentration, ≥256 µg/ml). Aminoglycoside-resistant genes ant(2″)-Ia, aac(6′)-Ib, aph(3′)-Ia, aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IIa, armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, rmtF, rmtG, rmtH and npmA, and carbapenem-resistant genes blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58, blaSIM, blaIMP, blaNDM-1 and blaKPC, were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. The positive rate of ant(2″)-Ia, aac(6′)-Ib, aph(3′)-Ia, aac(3)-Ia and aac(3)-IIa was 66.95, 69.49, 42.37, 39.83 and 14.41%, respectively. armA was present in 72.0% (54/75) of A. baumannii isolates with high-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The remaining nine 16S ribosomal RNA methlyase genes (rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, rmtF, rmtG, rmtH and npmA) and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene aac(6′)-Ib-cr were not detected. Among the 54 armA-positive isolates, the prevalence of the carbapenem resistant blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 genes was 79.63 and 100%, respectively. armA, ant(2″)-Ia and aac(6′)-Ib were positive in 43 isolates. The results of multilocus sequence typing revealed 31 sequence types (STs) in all clinical strains. Among these STs, the high-level aminoglycoside-resistant A. baumannii ST92, which mostly harbored blaOXA-23, was the predominant clone (29/75). In conclusion, A. baumannii

  7. Effects of Altering Aminoglycoside Structures on Bacterial Resistance Enzyme Activities▿†

    PubMed Central

    Green, Keith D.; Chen, Wenjing; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) constitute the most prevalent mechanism of resistance to aminoglycosides by bacteria. We show that aminoglycosides can be doubly modified by the sequential actions of AMEs, with the activity of the second AME in most cases unaffected, decreased, or completely abolished. We demonstrate that the bifunctional enzyme AAC(3)-Ib/AAC(6′)-Ib′ can diacetylate gentamicin. Since single acetylation does not always inactivate the parent drugs completely, two modifications likely provide more-robust inactivation in vivo. PMID:21537023

  8. Studying Modification of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by Resistance-Causing Enzymes via Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a significant public health concern. To remain a step ahead of evolving bacteria, new methods to study resistance to antibacterials and to uncover novel antibiotics that evade resistance are urgently needed. Herein, microarray-based methods that have been developed to study aminoglycoside modification by resistance-causing enzymes are reviewed. These arrays can also be used to study the binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the rRNA aminoacyl site (A-site), and how modification by resistance-causing enzymes affects their abilities to bind RNA. PMID:22057534

  9. Studying modification of aminoglycoside antibiotics by resistance-causing enzymes via microarray.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Widespread bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a significant public health concern. To remain a step ahead of evolving bacteria, new methods to study resistance to antibacterials and to uncover novel antibiotics that evade resistance are urgently needed. Herein, microarray-based methods that have been developed to study aminoglycoside modification by resistance-causing enzymes are reviewed. These arrays can also be used to study the binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the rRNA aminoacyl site (A-site), and how modification by resistance-causing enzymes affects their abilities to bind RNA.

  10. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase enzyme in Streptococcus faecalis and identification and cloning of gene regions specifying the two activities.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, J J; Gilmore, K S; Courvalin, P

    1986-08-01

    The gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase [APH(2")] enzyme from the Streptococcus faecalis plasmid pIP800 was cloned in Escherichia coli. A single protein with an apparent molecular weight of 56,000 was specified by this cloned determinant as detected in minicell experiments. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of an open reading frame capable of specifying a protein of 479 amino acids and with a molecular weight of 56,850. The deduced amino acid sequence of the bifunctional AAC(6')-APH(2") gene product possessed two regions of homology with other sequenced resistance proteins. The N-terminal region contained a sequence that was homologous to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase of Bacillus pumilus, and the C-terminal region contained a sequence homologous to the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of Streptomyces fradiae. Subcloning experiments were performed with the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance determinant, and it was possible to obtain gene segments independently specifying the acetyltransferase and phosphotransferase activities. These data suggest that the gene specifying the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance enzyme arose as a result of a gene fusion.

  11. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  12. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant. PMID:15963296

  13. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact.

  14. Cytosolic Proteome Profiling of Aminoglycosides Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates Using MALDI-TOF/MS

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Lata, Manju; Singh, Rananjay; Deo, Nirmala; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is the consequence of the failure of second line TB treatment. Aminoglycosides are the important second line anti-TB drugs used to treat the multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Main known mechanism of action of aminoglycosides is to inhibit the protein synthesis by inhibiting the normal functioning of ribosome. Primary target of aminoglycosides are the ribosomal RNA and its associated proteins. Various mechanisms have been proposed for aminoglycosides resistance but still some are unsolved. As proteins are involved in most of the biological processes, these act as a potential diagnostic markers and drug targets. In the present study we analyzed the purely cytosolic proteome of amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Twenty protein spots were found to have over expressed in resistant isolates and were identified. Among these Rv3208A, Rv2623, Rv1360, Rv2140c, Rv1636, and Rv2185c are six proteins with unknown functions or undefined role. Docking results showed that AK and KM binds to the conserved domain (DUF, USP-A, Luciferase, PEBP and Polyketidecyclase/dehydrase domain) of these hypothetical proteins and over expression of these proteins might neutralize/modulate the effect of drug molecules. TBPred and GPS-PUP predicted cytoplasmic nature and potential pupylation sites within these identified proteins, respectively. String analysis also suggested that over expressed proteins along with their interactive partners might be involved in aminoglycosides resistance. Cumulative effect of these over expressed proteins could be involved in AK and KM resistance by mitigating the toxicity, repression of drug target and neutralizing affect. These findings need further exploitation for the expansion of newer therapeutics or diagnostic markers against AK and KM resistance so that an extreme condition like XDR-TB can be prevented

  15. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance and Aminoglycoside Resistance Determinants among Carbapeneme Non-Susceptible Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shan; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Background Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS) isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs) and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs) among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. Methods The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes blaKPC and blaSME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs) blaIMP, blaVIM and blaNDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs),blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaSHV), QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6′)-Ib-cr) and ARDs (including aac(6′)-Ib, armA and rmtB) of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7%) harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7%) carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6%) were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1%) were ARD positive. Among the 5 blaIMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80%) contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100%) harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1%) were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9%) were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3%) were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. Conclusion QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing blaNDM-1, blaIMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported. PMID:23110085

  16. Failure of aminoglycoside antibiotics to kill anaerobic, low-pH, and resistant cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, D

    1988-01-01

    The critical inhibition of ribosome function by aminoglycosides has long been established. But the binding of drug to ribosomes is reversible: why then are aminoglycosides bactericidal? Several groups have shown that irreversible action (lethality) results from irreversible uptake into susceptible cells; conversely, resistance in cases such as anaerobiosis is associated with the failure of uptake. Oddly, the pattern of results excludes all traditional transport mechanisms; most unusual is the apparent dependence of uptake on the interaction of drug with ribosomes. A traditional view that ribosomes may function during uptake as a "sink" for aminoglycosides cannot explain all the data. Instead, the alternative is considered that cycling ribosomes at the cell membrane help to induce "one-way endocytic pores." Although no detailed mechanism is formulated, the results do suggest a way that the permeation of antibiotics might be systematically controllable to render them more cidal. PMID:3060245

  17. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carrera, Dámaso; Bravo-Navas, Sara; Cabezón, Elena; Arechaga, Ignacio; Cabezas, Matilde; Yáñez, Lucrecia; Pipaón, Carlos

    2017-04-03

    While working with G418-resistant stably transfected cells, we realized the neomycin resistance gene (NeoR), which encodes the aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(3')-IIa], also confers resistance to the nucleoside analog fludarabine. Fludarabine is a cytostatic drug widely used in the treatment of hematologic and solid tumors as well as in the conditioning of patients before transplantation of hematopoietic progenitors. We present evidence that NeoR-transfected cells do not incorporate fludarabine, thus avoiding DNA damage caused by the drug, evidenced by a lack of FANCD2 monoubiquitination and impaired apoptosis. A screening of other nucleoside analogs revealed that APH(3')-IIa only protects against ATP purine analogs. Moreover, APH(3')-IIa ATPase activity is inhibited by fludarabine monophosphate, suggesting that APH(3')-IIa blocks fludarabine incorporation into DNA by dephosphorylating its active fludarabine triphosphate form. Furthermore, overexpression of the catalytic subunit of the eukaryotic kinase PKA, which is structurally related to APHs, also provides resistance to fludarabine, anticipating its putative utility as a response marker to the drug. Our results preclude the use of Neo marker plasmids in the study of purine analogs and unveils a new resistance mechanism against these chemotherapeuticals.-Sánchez-Carrera, D., Bravo-Navas, S., Cabezón, E., Arechaga, I., Cabezas, M., Yáñez, L., Pipaón, C. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  18. Aph(3′)-IIc, an Aminoglycoside Resistance Determinant from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia▿

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Aki; Avison, Matthew B.

    2007-01-01

    We report the characterization of an intrinsic, chromosomally carried aph(3′)-IIc gene from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolate K279a, encoding an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase enzyme that significantly increases MICs of kanamycin, neomycin, butirosin, and paromomycin when expressed in Escherichia coli. Disruption of aph(3′)-IIc in K279a results in decreased MICs of these drugs. PMID:17088477

  19. Strategies to overcome the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes for treating resistant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Labby, Kristin J; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of the first antibiotics, bacterial resistance began to emerge. Many mechanisms give rise to resistance; the most prevalent mechanism of resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) family of antibiotics is the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Since the identification of these modifying enzymes, many efforts have been put forth to prevent their damaging alterations of AGs. These diverse strategies are discussed within this review, including: creating new AGs that are unaffected by AMEs; developing inhibitors of AMEs to be co-delivered with AGs; or regulating AME expression. Modern high-throughput methods as well as drug combinations and repurposing are highlighted as recent drug-discovery efforts towards fighting the increasing antibiotic resistance crisis. PMID:23859208

  20. Strategies to overcome the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes for treating resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Labby, Kristin J; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-07-01

    Shortly after the discovery of the first antibiotics, bacterial resistance began to emerge. Many mechanisms give rise to resistance; the most prevalent mechanism of resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) family of antibiotics is the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Since the identification of these modifying enzymes, many efforts have been put forth to prevent their damaging alterations of AGs. These diverse strategies are discussed within this review, including: creating new AGs that are unaffected by AMEs; developing inhibitors of AMEs to be co-delivered with AGs; or regulating AME expression. Modern high-throughput methods as well as drug combinations and repurposing are highlighted as recent drug-discovery efforts towards fighting the increasing antibiotic resistance crisis.

  1. Resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics of gram-negative bacilli isolated in Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I B; Cheung, E Y; Haldane, E V; Jackson, F L; McNaughton, R D; Morisset, R A; Noble, M A; Rennie, R P; Ronald, A R; Smith, J A

    1981-01-01

    A survey was made of the frequency of resistance to amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin among aerobic gram-negative bacilli isolated over a 4-week period in 1979 at six large, geographically separated Canadian hospitals. In the entire series of 4407 isolates the frequency of resistance was 2.5% to amikacin, 8.1% to gentamicin, 5.9% to tobramycin and 1.7% to all three. Most (81%) of the resistant bacteria were acquired by the patients after admission to hospital. The frequency of resistance to the three aminoglycoside antibiotics in each hospital largely reflected the local rate of cross-infection by endemic strains of resistant bacteria. PMID:7237336

  2. Synthesis of a phosphonate-linked aminoglycoside-coenzyme A bisubstrate and use in mechanistic studies of an enzyme involved in aminoglycoside resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Yan, Xuxu

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferases (AAC(6′)s) are important determinants of antibiotic resistance. A good mechanistic understanding of these enzymes is essential to overcome aminoglycoside resistance. We have previously reported the synthesis of amide-linked and sulfonamide-linked aminoglycoside-coenzyme A conjugates which were useful mechanistic and structural probes of AAC(6′)s. We report here the synthesis of a phosphonate-linked aminoglycoside-coenzyme A variant, which is expected to be a superior mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate proposed for catalysis by AAC(6′)s. This synthetic target is especially challenging for a number of reasons including the presence of multiple functional groups, the water solubility of both starting materials, and incompatibility of P(III) chemistry with water. We have overcome these challenges by adding the expensive coenzyme A in the last step via an elegant Michael-type addition onto a vinylphosphonate in water. Overall, a single protection step was needed. The decreased inhibitory potency of this bisubstrate compared to that of the amide-linked analog suggests that Enterococcus faecium AAC(6′)-Ii may not stabilize the proposed tetrahedral intermediate, and may act mainly via proximity catalysis. PMID:19152351

  3. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, phenotypes, and mechanisms of Gram-negative bacteria from infected patients in upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gad, Gamal F; Mohamed, Heba A; Ashour, Hossam M

    2011-02-17

    With the re-emergence of older antibiotics as valuable choices for treatment of serious infections, we studied the aminoglycoside resistance of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with ear, urinary tract, skin, and gastrointestinal tract infections at Minia university hospital in Egypt. Escherichia coli (mainly from urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract infections) was the most prevalent isolate (28.57%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.7%) (mainly from ear discharge and skin infections). Isolates exhibited maximal resistance against streptomycin (83.4%), and minimal resistance against amikacin (17.7%) and intermediate degrees of resistance against neomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Resistance to older aminoglycosides was higher than newer aminoglycosides. The most common aminoglycoside resistance phenotype was that of streptomycin resistance, present as a single phenotype or in combination, followed by kanamycin-neomycin as determined by interpretative reading. The resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were capable of producing aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and using efflux as mechanisms of resistance. Using checkerboard titration method, the most frequently-observed outcome in combinations of aminoglycosides with β-lactams or quinolones was synergism. The most effective combination was amikacin with ciprofloxacin (100% Synergism), whereas the least effective combination was gentamicin with amoxicillin (53.3% Synergistic, 26.7% additive, and 20% indifferent FIC indices). Whereas the studied combinations were additive and indifferent against few of the tested strains, antagonism was never observed. The high resistance rates to aminoglycosides exhibited by Gram-negative bacteria in this study could be attributed to the selective pressure of aminoglycoside usage which could be controlled by successful implementation of infection control measures.

  4. Reduced Expression of the rplU-rpmA Ribosomal Protein Operon in mexXY-Expressing Pan-Aminoglycoside-Resistant Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N.

    2012-01-01

    Pan-aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants expressing the mexXY components of the aminoglycoside-accommodating MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system but lacking mutations in the mexZ gene encoding a repressor of this efflux system and in the mexXY promoter have been reported (S. Fraud and K. Poole, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 55:1068–1074, 2011). Genome sequencing of one of these mutants, K2966, revealed the presence of a mutation within the predicted promoter region of the rplU-rpmA operon encoding ribosomal proteins L21 and L27, consistent with an observed 2-fold decrease in expression of this operon in the mutant relative to wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1. Moreover, correction of the mutation restored rplU-rpmA expression and, significantly, reversed the elevated mexXY expression and pan-aminoglycoside resistance of the mutant. Reduced rplU-rpmA expression was also observed in a second mexXY-expressing pan-aminoglycoside-resistant mutant, K2968, which, however, lacked a mutation in the rplU-rpmA promoter region. Restoration of rplU-rpmA expression in the K2968 mutant following chromosomal integration of the rplU-rpmA operon derived from wild-type P. aeruginosa failed, however, to reverse the elevated mexXY expression and pan-aminoglycoside resistance of this mutant, although it did so for K2966, suggesting that the mutation impacting rplU-rpmA expression in K2968 also impacts other mexXY-related genes. Increased mexXY expression owing to reduced rplU-rpmA expression in K2966 and K2968 was dependent on PA5471, whose expression was also elevated in these mutants. Thus, mutational disruption of ribosome function, by limiting expression of ribosomal constituents, promotes recruitment of mexXY and does so via PA5471, reminiscent of mexXY induction by ribosome-disrupting antimicrobial agents. Interestingly, reduced rplU-rpmA expression was also observed in a mexXY-expressing pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolate, suggesting that ribosome

  5. aph(3')-IIb, a gene encoding an aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, is under the positive control of surrogate regulator HpaA.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Jin, Shouguang

    2003-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbors a chromosomal aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene, aph(3')-IIb, which confers P. aeruginosa resistance to several important aminoglycoside antibiotics, including kanamycin A and B, neomycin B and C, butirosin, and seldomycin F5. The aph(3')-IIb gene has been found to be regulated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator (HpaA) encoded by a gene located upstream of the aph(3')-IIb gene. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA), HpaA activates the expression of aph(3')-IIb as well as that of the hpa regulon which encodes metabolic enzymes for the utilization of 4-HPA. hpaA and aph(3')-IIb form an operon, and in response to the presence of 4-HPA, the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PAK (but not its hpaA mutant strain) displays increased resistance to neomycin. A survey of 39 clinical and 19 environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa demonstrated in all of them the presence of an hpaA-aph gene cluster, while 56 out of the 58 isolates are able to utilize the 4-HPA as a sole carbon source, suggesting a feature common to P. aeruginosa strains. Interestingly, a larger portion of clinical isolates than environmental isolates showed 4-HPA-induced resistance to neomycin. The aph(3')-IIb gene product is likely to function as a metabolic enzyme which has a cross-reactivity with aminoglycosides. These findings provide new insight into the possible mechanism of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance.

  6. Mechanism of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Resistance in Anaerobic Bacteria: Clostridium perfringens and Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L. E.; Kowand, S. K.; Van Den Elzen, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    Cell-free amino acid incorporation using ribosomes from strains of either Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis was shown to be susceptible to inhibition by streptomycin and gentamicin. Ribosomes bound dihydrostreptomycin as effectively as ribosomes from Escherichia coli. No inactivation of streptomycin or gentamicin was detected by cell extracts of either anaerobic bacterial species. B. fragilis, grown without added hemin, menadione, and fumarate, and C. perfringens did not show any time-dependent accumulation of dihydrostreptomycin or gentamicin at concentrations tested. Decreased resistance to aminoglycosides and time-dependent uptake of dihydrostreptomycin at 500 μg/ml was observed with B. fragilis grown with hemin, menadione, and fumarate. With the last additions, cytochrome b was detected by cytochrome spectra of B. fragilis. These results demonstrate that anaerobic bacteria unable to carry out oxygen- or nitrate-dependent electron transport are resistant to streptomycin and gentamicin because of failure to transport aminoglycosides. The induction of fumarate-dependent electron transport in B. fragilis is associated with some aminoglycoside transport that is of poor efficiency relative to bacteria with electron transport to oxygen or nitrate. PMID:218500

  7. In70 of Plasmid pAX22, a blaVIM-1-Containing Integron Carrying a New Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase Gene Cassette

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2001-01-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to β-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-β-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a blaVIM-1 determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the blaVIM-1 gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3′)-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3′)-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5′ and 3′ conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3′ conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most β-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  8. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Kandler, Justin L.; Holley, Concerta L.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W.

    2016-01-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity. PMID:27216061

  9. Brief communication: detection of clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from China containing transferable quinolone resistance determinants exhibiting resistance to both aminoglycoside and β-lactams.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xinying; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Naxin; Liu, Yuxia; Luo, Yanping; Zhou, Guang; Guan, Xizhou

    2014-01-01

    Though aminoglycosides are routinely used clinically as antimicrobial agents for the treatment of severe infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, resistance to the same is an increasing problem. One such resistance mechanism is the production of 16S rRNA methylases. The objective of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and molecular epidemology of 16S rRNA methylase genes among 43 K. pneumoniae isolates (each of which had at least one PQMR gene and ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration greater than 0.25) recovered from nine tertiary hospitals in China. Our results suggest great genetic variation in terms of 16S rRNA methylase gene of K. pneumoniae hosts containing at least one PQMR gene. This further reinforces the clinical and systemic urgency required to characterize and block their transmission routes.

  10. Mutations in aarE, the ubiA homolog of Providencia stuartii, result in high-level aminoglycoside resistance and reduced expression of the chromosomal aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Paradise, M R; Cook, G; Poole, R K; Rather, P N

    1998-04-01

    The aarE1 allele was identified on the basis of the resulting phenotype of increased aminoglycoside resistance. The aarE1 mutation also resulted in a small-colony phenotype and decreased levels of aac(2')-Ia mRNA. The deduced AarE gene product displayed 61% amino acid identity to the Escherichia coli UbiA protein, an octaprenyltransferase required for the second step of ubiquinone biosynthesis. Complementation experiments in both Providencia stuartii and E. coli demonstrated that aarE and ubiA are functionally equivalent.

  11. Fitness cost and interference of Arm/Rmt aminoglycoside resistance with the RsmF housekeeping methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Belen; Escudero, Jose A; San Millan, Alvaro; Hidalgo, Laura; Carrilero, Laura; Ovejero, Cristina M; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Thomas-Lopez, Daniel; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Arm/Rmt methyltransferases have emerged recently in pathogenic bacteria as enzymes that confer high-level resistance to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides through methylation of the G1405 residue in the 16S rRNA (like ArmA and RmtA to -E). In prokaryotes, nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification, and they are introduced posttranscriptionally by a variety of site-specific housekeeping enzymes to optimize ribosomal function. Here we show that while the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase RmtC methylates G1405, it impedes methylation of the housekeeping methyltransferase RsmF at position C1407, a nucleotide that, like G1405, forms part of the aminoglycoside binding pocket of the 16S rRNA. To understand the origin and consequences of this phenomenon, we constructed a series of in-frame knockout and knock-in mutants of Escherichia coli, corresponding to the genotypes rsmF(+), ΔrsmF, rsmF(+) rmtC(+), and ΔrsmF rmtC(+). When analyzed for the antimicrobial resistance pattern, the ΔrsmF bacteria had a decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, showing that the housekeeping methylation at C1407 is involved in intrinsic aminoglycoside susceptibility in E. coli. Competition experiments between the isogenic E. coli strains showed that, contrary to expectation, acquisition of rmtC does not entail a fitness cost for the bacterium. Finally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allowed us to determine that RmtC methylates the G1405 residue not only in presence but also in the absence of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, the coupling between housekeeping and acquired methyltransferases subverts the methylation architecture of the 16S rRNA but elicits Arm/Rmt methyltransferases to be selected and retained, posing an important threat to the usefulness of aminoglycosides worldwide.

  12. Fitness Cost and Interference of Arm/Rmt Aminoglycoside Resistance with the RsmF Housekeeping Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Belen; Escudero, Jose A.; San Millan, Alvaro; Hidalgo, Laura; Carrilero, Laura; Ovejero, Cristina M.; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Thomas-Lopez, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Arm/Rmt methyltransferases have emerged recently in pathogenic bacteria as enzymes that confer high-level resistance to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides through methylation of the G1405 residue in the 16S rRNA (like ArmA and RmtA to -E). In prokaryotes, nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification, and they are introduced posttranscriptionally by a variety of site-specific housekeeping enzymes to optimize ribosomal function. Here we show that while the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase RmtC methylates G1405, it impedes methylation of the housekeeping methyltransferase RsmF at position C1407, a nucleotide that, like G1405, forms part of the aminoglycoside binding pocket of the 16S rRNA. To understand the origin and consequences of this phenomenon, we constructed a series of in-frame knockout and knock-in mutants of Escherichia coli, corresponding to the genotypes rsmF+, ΔrsmF, rsmF+ rmtC+, and ΔrsmF rmtC+. When analyzed for the antimicrobial resistance pattern, the ΔrsmF bacteria had a decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, showing that the housekeeping methylation at C1407 is involved in intrinsic aminoglycoside susceptibility in E. coli. Competition experiments between the isogenic E. coli strains showed that, contrary to expectation, acquisition of rmtC does not entail a fitness cost for the bacterium. Finally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allowed us to determine that RmtC methylates the G1405 residue not only in presence but also in the absence of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, the coupling between housekeeping and acquired methyltransferases subverts the methylation architecture of the 16S rRNA but elicits Arm/Rmt methyltransferases to be selected and retained, posing an important threat to the usefulness of aminoglycosides worldwide. PMID:22330907

  13. Sulfonamide-Based Inhibitors of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Eis Abolish Resistance to Kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garzan, Atefeh; Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Posey, James E; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-12-08

    A two-drug combination therapy where one drug targets an offending cell and the other targets a resistance mechanism to the first drug is a time-tested, yet underexploited approach to combat or prevent drug resistance. By high-throughput screening, we identified a sulfonamide scaffold that served as a pharmacophore to generate inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetyltransferase Eis, whose upregulation causes resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotic kanamycin A (KAN) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rational systematic derivatization of this scaffold to maximize Eis inhibition and abolish the Eis-mediated KAN resistance of M. tuberculosis yielded several highly potent agents. A crystal structure of Eis in complex with one of the most potent inhibitors revealed that the inhibitor bound Eis in the AG-binding pocket held by a conformationally malleable region of Eis (residues 28-37) bearing key hydrophobic residues. These Eis inhibitors are promising leads for preclinical development of innovative AG combination therapies against resistant TB.

  14. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM.

    PubMed

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel; Desmolaize, Benoît; Douthwaite, Stephen; Mechulam, Yves; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium methyltransferase, as well as by the previously characterized aac(6')-Ii that encodes a 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase. Inactivation of efmM in E. faecium increases susceptibility to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and tobramycin, and, conversely, expression of a recombinant version of efmM in Escherichia coli confers resistance to these drugs. The EfmM protein shows significant sequence similarity to E. coli RsmF (previously called YebU), which is a 5-methylcytidine (m⁵C) methyltransferase modifying 16S rRNA nucleotide C1407. The target for EfmM is shown by mass spectrometry to be a neighboring 16S rRNA nucleotide at C1404. EfmM uses the methyl group donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine to catalyze formation of m⁵C1404 on the 30S ribosomal subunit, whereas naked 16S rRNA and the 70S ribosome are not substrates. Addition of the 5-methyl to C1404 sterically hinders aminoglycoside binding. Crystallographic structure determination of EfmM at 2.28 Å resolution reveals an N-terminal domain connected to a central methyltransferase domain that is linked by a flexible lysine-rich region to two C-terminal subdomains. Mutagenesis of the methyltransferase domain established that two cysteines at specific tertiary locations are required for catalysis. The tertiary structure of EfmM is highly similar to that of RsmF, consistent with m⁵C formation at adjacent sites on the 30S subunit, while distinctive structural features account for the enzymes' respective specificities for nucleotides C1404 and C1407.

  15. Distribution of innate efflux-mediated aminoglycoside resistance among different Achromobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Bador, J.; Neuwirth, C.; Liszczynski, P.; Mézier, M.-C.; Chrétiennot, M.; Grenot, E.; Chapuis, A.; de Curraize, C.; Amoureux, L.

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter spp. are emerging respiratory pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. Since 2013 the genus Achromobacter includes 15 species for which innate antibiotic resistance is unknown. Previously the AxyXY-OprZ efflux system has been described to confer aminoglycoside (AG) resistance in A. xylosoxidans. Nevertheless, some Achromobacter spp. strains are susceptible to AG. This study including 49 Achromobacter isolates reveals that AG resistance is correlated with different Achromobacter spp. It is noteworthy that the axyXY-oprZ operon is detected only in AG-resistant species, including the most frequently encountered in cystic fibrosis patients: A. xylosoxidans, A. ruhlandii, A. dolens and A. insuavis. PMID:26904200

  16. Draft genome sequence of an aminoglycoside-resistant RmtD2-producing Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae ST395 in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, Evelin Rodrigues; Casella, Tiago; Bueno, Maria Fernanda Campagnari; Francisco, Gabriela Rodrigues; Tolentino, Fernanda Modesto; de Freitas, Ana Carolina Tegon; Cerdeira, Louise; Costa, Monalisa Nogueira; Cevada, Carla; Lincopan, Nilton; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Nogueira, Mara Corrêa Lelles

    2017-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae has recently emerged as an important agent of nosocomial infections owing to the dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases in this species. In this context, a rise in the therapeutic use of aminoglycosides was noticed, followed by the accelerated development of resistance mechanisms. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant E. cloacae subsp. cloacae strain (Ec2) isolated from an active surveillance culture of a patient with Chagas disease. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed using a Nextera XT DNA library and NextSeq platform. WGS analysis revealed the presence of 5527 coding genes, 62 RNA-encoding genes and 275 pseudogenes. Strain Ec2 belongs to sequence type 395 (ST395) and carries 22 transferable antibiotic resistance genes, comprising eight antimicrobial classes, including the rmtD2 gene conferring high-level aminoglycoside resistance. This draft genome can be used in comparative genomic analyses with different E. cloacae strains. In addition, it could help at elucidating epidemiological aspects regarding the dissemination of clinically relevant resistance genes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  18. Aminoglycoside-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in cytochrome d, nitrite reductase, and aerobic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L E; Kwan, S

    1981-01-01

    Two gentamicin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO 503 were selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. Mutant PAO 2403 had significantly increased resistance to aminoglycoside but not to other antibiotics. Mutant PAO 2402 showed a similar spectrum of resistance but of lower magnitude. Both mutants showed no detectable cytochrome d and had a high frequency of reversion to a fully wild-type phenotype. PAO 2403 had a marked decrease and PAO 2402 had a moderate decrease in nitrite reductase activity. Both mutants had reduced uptake of gentamicin and dihydrostreptomycin. Mutant PAO 2403 showed a general decrease in transport rate of cationic compounds, whereas mutant PAO 2402 had only deficient glucose transport. Both mutants showed enhanced rates of glutamine transport and no change in glutamic acid transport. Other components of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were normal. These mutants involve ferrocytochrome C551 oxidoreductase formed only on anaerobic growth but illustrate transport defects in aerobically grown cells. PMID:6791588

  19. Development and evaluation of immunochromatography to detect Gram-negative bacteria producing ArmA 16S rRNA methylase responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Satoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Kameoka, Yousuke; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohmagari, Norio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria is an important infection-control measure and a crucial aspect of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The enzyme 16S rRNA methylase has been shown to mediate aminoglycoside resistance in bacteria. This study describes a newly developed immunochromatographic assay using novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize ArmA 16S rRNA methylase. Epitope mapping showed that these mAbs recognized amino acids 1-93 of ArmA, which consists of 257 amino acids. Evaluation of the assay using ArmA producing and non-producing bacterial species, as well as bacteria producing other types of 16S rRNA methylases, indicated that immunochromatographic detection of the ArmA-type 16S rRNA methylase was fully consistent with PCR analysis for armA genes, with all immunochromatographically positive strains being resistant to aminoglycosides (MIC≥128μg/mL). The detection limit of the assay was 12ng ArmA. These findings indicate that this assay can be used for the rapid and reliable detection of the production of ArmA 16S rRNA methylase by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cosubstrate tolerance of the aminoglycoside resistance enzyme Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjing; Green, Keith D; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2012-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that aminoglycoside acetyltransferases (AACs) display expanded cosubstrate promiscuity. The enhanced intracellular survival (Eis) protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for the resistance of this pathogen to kanamycin A in a large fraction of clinical isolates. Recently, we discovered that Eis is a unique AAC capable of acetylating multiple amine groups on a large pool of aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics, an unprecedented property among AAC enzymes. Here, we report a detailed study of the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) cosubstrate profile of Eis. We show that, in contrast to other AACs, Eis efficiently uses only 3 out of 15 tested acyl-CoA derivatives to modify a variety of AGs. We establish that for almost all acyl-CoAs, the number of sites acylated by Eis is smaller than the number of sites acetylated. We demonstrate that the order of n-propionylation of the AG neamine by Eis is the same as the order of its acetylation. We also show that the 6' position is the first to be n-propionylated on amikacin and netilmicin. By sequential acylation reactions, we show that AGs can be acetylated after the maximum possible n-propionylation of their scaffolds by Eis. The information reported herein will advance our understanding of the multiacetylation mechanism of inactivation of AGs by Eis, which is responsible for M. tuberculosis resistance to some AGs.

  1. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  2. A survey of the frequency of aminoglycoside antibiotic-resistant genotypes and phenotypes in Escherichia coli in broilers with septicaemia in Hebei, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F Y; Huo, S Y; Li, Y R; Xie, R; Wu, X J; Chen, L G; Gao, Y H

    2014-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of aminoglycoside resistance and the prevalence of 6 important modifying enzyme genes, i.e. (strA, strB, aph(3')-IIa, aac(3)-IIa, aac(6')-Ib and ant(3")-Ia), in Escherichia coli strains in broilers with septicaemia in Hebei, China. 2. A total of 111 clinical isolates of E. coli were collected from 46 large-scale farms. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests, using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, were performed on all 111 isolates. In addition, all were screened for the presence of modifying enzyme genes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 3. The results show that the rates of resistance were as follows: streptomycin: 97.3%, kanamycin: 97.0%, gentamicin: 95.5%, neomycin: 50.5%, amikacin: 46.0%, spectinomycin: 22.5%. Of the genes examined, strB (73.9%) was the most frequently identified gene in the phenotypic resistant isolates, followed in order by: ant(3")-Ia, aac(3)-IIa, aac(6')-Ib, aph(3')-IIa and strA. 4. It is concluded that aminoglycoside resistance in E. coli from broilers with septicaemia remains a serious problem in Hebei, China. This emphasises the need to ban the non-therapeutic use of antibiotics, discourage their misuse and to be continually vigilant by providing appropriate scientific and technological support for the poultry industry.

  3. High-level amikacin resistance in Escherichia coli due to phosphorylation and impaired aminoglycoside uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M H; Lerner, S A

    1986-01-01

    Plasmid pMP1-1 in Escherichia coli L-0 encodes aminoglycoside (AG) 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. This enzyme modifies and confers high-level resistance to kanamycin. Although amikacin is a substrate for APH(3')-II, strain L-0(pMP1-1) is susceptible to amikacin. Plasmid pMP1-2 is a spontaneous mutant of pMP1-1 which determines increased APH(3')-II activity for amikacin, apparently as a result of an increase in the copy number of the plasmid. From amikacin-susceptible, gentamicin-susceptible transformants and transconjugants that bear the APH(3')-II gene on plasmid pMP1-1 or pMP1-2 or cloned into multicopy plasmid pBR322, we selected spontaneous mutants at concentrations of amikacin or gentamicin that were two to four times higher than the MICs of these antibiotics. In each case, whether they were selected by using amikacin or gentamicin, the mutants exhibited modest (two- to eightfold) increases in the MIC of gentamicin and major (64- to 128-fold) increases in the MIC of amikacin. Using these laboratory strains of E. coli, we examined the effects on AG susceptibility of the interaction of AG-modifying enzyme activity and generalized AG uptake. Increasing the level of activity of an AG phosphotransferase in these strains lowered their susceptibility to AGs which were substrates for which the enzyme had low Kms. However, an increase in AG-modifying activity alone did not result in large increases in the MICs for poor substrates of the enzyme. In strains which lacked AG-modifying enzymes, a decrease in the rate of AG uptake increased the MICs modestly for a broad spectrum of AGs. When a strain bore the phosphotransferase, a decrease in generalized AG uptake could raise the MIC further, not only for low-Km substrates, but even for AG substrates for which the enzyme had high Kms. Thus, increased modifying activity, together with a diminished rate of uptake, could produce even higher MICs for poor AG substrates. PMID:2424366

  4. aph(3′)-IIb, a Gene Encoding an Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzyme, Is under the Positive Control of Surrogate Regulator HpaA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Jin, Shouguang

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbors a chromosomal aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene, aph(3′)-IIb, which confers P. aeruginosa resistance to several important aminoglycoside antibiotics, including kanamycin A and B, neomycin B and C, butirosin, and seldomycin F5. The aph(3′)-IIb gene has been found to be regulated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator (HpaA) encoded by a gene located upstream of the aph(3′)-IIb gene. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA), HpaA activates the expression of aph(3′)-IIb as well as that of the hpa regulon which encodes metabolic enzymes for the utilization of 4-HPA. hpaA and aph(3′)-IIb form an operon, and in response to the presence of 4-HPA, the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PAK (but not its hpaA mutant strain) displays increased resistance to neomycin. A survey of 39 clinical and 19 environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa demonstrated in all of them the presence of an hpaA-aph gene cluster, while 56 out of the 58 isolates are able to utilize the 4-HPA as a sole carbon source, suggesting a feature common to P. aeruginosa strains. Interestingly, a larger portion of clinical isolates than environmental isolates showed 4-HPA-induced resistance to neomycin. The aph(3′)-IIb gene product is likely to function as a metabolic enzyme which has a cross-reactivity with aminoglycosides. These findings provide new insight into the possible mechanism of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. PMID:14638496

  5. Low abundance of respiratory nitrate reductase is essential for Escherichia coli in resistance to aminoglycoside and cephalosporin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Guo, Chang; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2013-07-11

    In the present study, we have characterized low abundance of NarG and NarH, two components of respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar), in streptomycin (SM)-, gentamicine (GEN)-, ceftazidime (CAZ)-, tetracycline (TET)- and nalidixic acid (NA)-resistant Escherichia coli strains using native/SDS-PAGE based proteomics. We validate the finding using Western blotting and native/SDS-PAGE upon narG and narH deletion mutants. However, further functional evidence indicates that loss of narG and narH results in two types of growth behaviors, higher and lower than control, in these antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains. Specifically, SM-, GEN- and CAZ-resistant bacteria grow faster, whereas NA- and TET-resistant E. coli strains grow slower. Our data indicate that low abundance of respiratory Nar is essential for E. coli in resistance to aminoglycoside and cephalosporin antibiotics. Meanwhile, the results show that differential mechanisms exist in different antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The reason why the reversal growths are detected in NA- and TET-resistant E. coli strains waits investigation. Our findings serve to propose novel strategies for controlling of aminoglycoside- and cephalosporin-resistant E. coli strains through elevation of respiratory Nar activity. Our data indicate that low abundance of respiratory Nar is essential for E. coli in resistance to aminoglycoside and cephalosporin antibiotics. Meanwhile, the results show that differential mechanisms exist in different antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Our findings serve to propose novel strategies for controlling of aminoglycoside- and cephalosporin-resistant E. coli strains through elevation of respiratory Nar activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A review of patents (2011–2015) towards combating resistance to and toxicity of aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Chandrika, Nishad Thamban

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first aminoglycoside (AG), streptomycin, in 1943, these broad-spectrum antibiotics have been extensively used for the treatment of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections. The inherent toxicity (ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity) associated with their long-term use as well as the emergence of resistant bacterial strains have limited their usage. Structural modifications of AGs by AG-modifying enzymes, reduced target affinity caused by ribosomal modification, and decrease in their cellular concentration by efflux pumps have resulted in resistance towards AGs. However, the last decade has seen a renewed interest among the scientific community for AGs as exemplified by the recent influx of scientific articles and patents on their therapeutic use. In this review, we use a non-conventional approach to put forth this renaissance on AG development/application by summarizing all patents filed on AGs from 2011–2015 and highlighting some related publications on the most recent work done on AGs to overcome resistance and improving their therapeutic use while reducing ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. We also present work towards developing amphiphilic AGs for use as fungicides as well as that towards repurposing existing AGs for potential newer applications. PMID:27019689

  7. Transferable Resistance to Aminoglycosides by Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA and to Hydrophilic Fluoroquinolones by QepA-Mediated Efflux in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Périchon, Bruno; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid pIP1206 was detected in Escherichia coli strain 1540 during the screening of clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae for high-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The sequence of this IncFI conjugative plasmid of ca. 100 kb was partially determined. pIP1206 carried the rmtB gene for a ribosome methyltransferase that was shown to modify the N7 position of nucleotide G1405, located in the A site of 16S rRNA. It also contained the qepA (quinolone efflux pump) gene that encodes a 14-transmembrane-segment putative efflux pump belonging to the major facilitator superfamily of proton-dependent transporters. Disruption of membrane proton potential by the efflux pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in a transconjugant harboring the qepA gene resulted in elevation of norfloxacin accumulation. The transporter conferred resistance to the hydrophilic quinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. PMID:17470656

  8. Effects of medium and inoculum variations on screening for high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sahm, D F; Torres, C

    1988-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates that are refractory to aminoglycoside-penicillin synergy can be detected by their ability to grow in the presence of high concentrations of aminoglycoside (2,000 micrograms/ml). In past studies investigators have used a variety of media and inoculum sizes to perform high-level aminoglycoside resistance screens, but little is known about how these variations affect test accuracy. We screened 63 E. faecalis strains on different media by using various inoculum sizes and correlated the results with synergy test results obtained by time-kill studies. Screens were done with dextrose-phosphate agar, brain heart infusion agar, Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood, Mueller-Hinton agar with 5% sheep blood, dextrose-phosphate broth, and Mueller-Hinton broth. Agar screens were inoculated with 10(2), 10(4), and 10(6) CFU; and broth screens contained a final inoculum of 10(5) CFU/ml. The E. faecalis isolates were tested for high-level resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Of the 63 isolates tested, 21 did not show high-level resistance to any of the aminoglycosides tested, and 42 demonstrated high-level resistance to one or more drugs. The sensitivity of most screens was greater than or equal to 90%. Regardless of the inoculum size or medium used, false-resistance results were seldom encountered. Screen specificity, which was used as the indicator of false susceptibility, was markedly influenced by both the inoculum size and the drug being tested. Specificity was low whenever a 10(2)-CFU inoculum was used, when amikacin was tested with any inoculum, and when tobramycin was tested in broth media. Data for kanamycin could be used to predict amikacin-penicillin synergy, and the highly accurate gentamicin screen obviated the need for the testing of tobramycin. We recommend a 10(6) -CFU inoculum for agar screens and a 10(5) -CFU/ml inoculum for broth screens. The type of medium used did not substantially

  9. High-level aminoglycoside resistance and virulence characteristics among Enterococci isolated from recreational beaches in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Yook; Hamid, Rahimi

    2013-09-01

    We report the first study on the occurrence of high-level aminoglycoside-resistant (HLAR) Enterococci in coastal bathing waters and beach sand in Malaysia. None of the encountered isolates were resistant to high levels of gentamicin (500 μg/mL). However, high-level resistance to kanamycin (2,000 μg/mL) was observed in 14.2 % of tested isolates, the highest proportions observed being among beach sand isolates. High-level resistance to kanamycin was higher among Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium than Enterococcus spp. Chi-square analysis showed no significant association between responses to tested antibiotics and the species allocation or source of isolation of all tested Enterococci. The species classification of encountered Enterococci resistance to vancomycin was highest among Enterococcus spp. (5.89 %) followed by E. faecium (4.785) and least among E. faecalis. A total of 160 isolates were also tested for virulence characteristics. On the whole, caseinase production was profoundly highest (15.01 %) while the least prevalent virulence characteristic observed among tested beach Enterococci was haemolysis of rabbit blood (3.65 %). A strong association was observed between the source of isolation and responses for each of caseinase (C = 0.47, V = 0.53) and slime (C = 0.50, V = 0.58) assays. Analysis of obtained spearman's coefficient showed a strong correlation between caseinase and each of the slime production (p = 0.04), gelatinase (p = 0.0035) and haemolytic activity on horse blood (p = 0.004), respectively. Suggestively, these are the main virulent characteristics of the studied beach Enterococci. Our findings suggest that recreational beaches may contribute to the dissemination of Enterococci with HLAR and virulence characteristics.

  10. Detection of methicillin/oxacillin resistance and typing in aminoglycoside-susceptible methicillin-resistant and kanamycin-tobramycin-resistant methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hamdad, F; Donda, F; Lefebvre, J F; Laurans, G; Biendo, M; Thomas, D; Canarelli, B; Rousseau, F; Eb, F

    2006-01-01

    Eighty-five atypical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus divided into 73 aminoglycoside-susceptible methicillinresistant (AS-MRSA) and 12 kanamycin-tobramycin-resistant methicillin-susceptible (KTR-MSSA) were phenotypically and genotypically examined for methicillin resistance. Among these tests, the diffusion method using the oxacillin and cefoxitin disks on Mueller-Hinton agar with and without NaCl, the incubation at 35 degrees C or 30 degrees C for 24 or 48 hr, respectively, and the determination of oxacillin MICs by E-test were performed. We also examined the presence of the mecA gene by PCR and its product PBP 2a by the Slidex MRSA Detection test after induction by cefoxitin disk. All of the AS-MRSA strains (100%) were detected by the cefoxitin disk in all conditions and by the oxacillin disk on Mueller-Hinton agar with 2% of NaCl at 35 degrees C. Without NaCl, the sensitivity fell to 97.2% by oxacillin disk. The oxacillin MICs for these isolates ranged from 2 to 128 mg/L. The mecA gene determinant and its product PBP 2a were detected in all AS-MRSA strains. All KTR-MSSA strains were phenotypically methicillin-susceptible and oxacillin MICs were below or borderline of breakpoint (< or =2 mg/L). The mecA gene determinant and its product were detected in one strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied and revealed the presence of two major patterns A (36.9%) and B (46.2%) in AS-MRSA isolates and seven patterns in the KTR-MSSA strains.

  11. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the bifunctional antibiotic resistance enzyme aminoglycoside (6') acetyltransferase-ie/aminoglycoside (2'') phosphotransferase-ia reveals a rigid solution structure.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Shane J; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-01

    Aminoglycoside (6') acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside (2″) phosphotransferase-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia] is one of the most problematic aminoglycoside resistance factors in clinical pathogens, conferring resistance to almost every aminoglycoside antibiotic available to modern medicine. Despite 3 decades of research, our understanding of the structure of this bifunctional enzyme remains limited. We used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to model the structure of this bifunctional enzyme in solution and to study the impact of substrate binding on the enzyme. It was observed that the enzyme adopts a rigid conformation in solution, where the N-terminal AAC domain is fixed to the C-terminal APH domain and not loosely tethered. The addition of acetyl-coenzyme A, coenzyme A, GDP, guanosine 5'-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP), and combinations thereof to the protein resulted in only modest changes to the radius of gyration (R(G)) of the enzyme, which were not consistent with any large changes in enzyme structure upon binding. These results imply some selective advantage to the bifunctional enzyme beyond coexpression as a single polypeptide, likely linked to an improvement in enzymatic properties. We propose that the rigid structure contributes to improved electrostatic steering of aminoglycoside substrates toward the two active sites, which may provide such an advantage.

  12. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Analysis of the Bifunctional Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Aminoglycoside (6′) Acetyltransferase-Ie/Aminoglycoside (2″) Phosphotransferase-Ia Reveals a Rigid Solution Structure

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Shane J.

    2012-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (6′) acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside (2″) phosphotransferase-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia] is one of the most problematic aminoglycoside resistance factors in clinical pathogens, conferring resistance to almost every aminoglycoside antibiotic available to modern medicine. Despite 3 decades of research, our understanding of the structure of this bifunctional enzyme remains limited. We used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to model the structure of this bifunctional enzyme in solution and to study the impact of substrate binding on the enzyme. It was observed that the enzyme adopts a rigid conformation in solution, where the N-terminal AAC domain is fixed to the C-terminal APH domain and not loosely tethered. The addition of acetyl-coenzyme A, coenzyme A, GDP, guanosine 5′-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP), and combinations thereof to the protein resulted in only modest changes to the radius of gyration (RG) of the enzyme, which were not consistent with any large changes in enzyme structure upon binding. These results imply some selective advantage to the bifunctional enzyme beyond coexpression as a single polypeptide, likely linked to an improvement in enzymatic properties. We propose that the rigid structure contributes to improved electrostatic steering of aminoglycoside substrates toward the two active sites, which may provide such an advantage. PMID:22290965

  13. Distribution of 16S rRNA Methylases Among Different Species of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Poland.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Katarzyna; Zacharczuk, Katarzyna; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Bareja, Elżbieta; Olak, Monika; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a group of antimicrobial agents still the most commonly used in the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections in human and animals. The emergence and spread of 16S rRNA methylases, which confer high-level resistance to the majority of clinically relevant aminoglycosides, constitute a major public health concern. Our goal was to evaluate the distribution of 16S rRNA methylases among different species of Enterobacteriaceae during a five month-long survey in a tertiary hospital in Warszawa, Poland. In the survey, a total of 1770 non-duplicate clinical isolates were collected from all hospital wards in a tertiary hospital in Warszawa, Poland. The survey was conducted between 19 April and 19 September 2010. The ability to produce 16S rRNA methylase was examined by determining MICs for gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin by means of the agar dilution method. The isolates resistant to high concentration of aminoglycosides were PCR tested for genes: armA, rmtA, rmtB and rmtC. PCR products were subjected to DNA sequencing by the Sanger method. The genetic similarity of the ArmA-producing isolates was analysed by pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis (PFGE). ArmA was the only 16S rRNA methylase detected in 20 of 1770 tested isolates. The overall prevalence rate of ArmA was 1.13%. In K. pneumoniae (n = 742), P. mirabilis (n = 130), and E. cloacae (n = 253) collected in the survey, the prevalence of ArmA was 0.4%, 0.8% and 5.9%, respectively. The PFGE revealed both horizontal and clonal spread of the armA gene in the hospital. The prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase ArmA reported in this study is significantly higher than observed in other countries in Europe.

  14. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  15. Ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression engineered by genetic selection in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Benedikt; Atanasov, Janina; Siewert, Lena K; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-05-15

    Systems for conditional gene expression are powerful tools in basic research as well as in biotechnology. For future applications, it is of great importance to engineer orthogonal genetic switches that function reliably in diverse contexts. RNA-based switches have the advantage that effector molecules interact immediately with regulatory modules inserted into the target RNAs, getting rid of the need of transcription factors usually mediating genetic control. Artificial riboswitches are characterized by their simplicity and small size accompanied by a high degree of modularity. We have recently reported a series of hammerhead ribozyme-based artificial riboswitches that allow for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via switching mRNA, tRNA, or rRNA functions. A more widespread application was so far hampered by moderate switching performances and a limited set of effector molecules available. Here, we report the re-engineering of hammerhead ribozymes in order to respond efficiently to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We first established an in vivo selection protocol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that enabled us to search large sequence spaces for optimized switches. We then envisioned and characterized a novel strategy of attaching the aptamer to the ribozyme catalytic core, increasing the design options for rendering the ribozyme ligand-dependent. These innovations enabled the development of neomycin-dependent RNA modules that switch gene expression up to 25-fold. The presented aminoglycoside-responsive riboswitches belong to the best-performing RNA-based genetic regulators reported so far. The developed in vivo selection protocol should allow for sampling of large sequence spaces for engineering of further optimized riboswitches.

  16. RmtC introduces G1405 methylation in 16S rRNA and confers high-level aminoglycoside resistance on Gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Kimura, Kouji; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Satowa; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2010-10-01

    Seven plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methyltransferases (MTases), RmtA, RmtB, RmtC, RmtD, RmtE, ArmA, and NpmA, conferring aminoglycoside resistance have so far been found in Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, by performing an RNase protection assay, primer extension, and HPLC, we confirmed that RmtC indeed methylates at the N7 position of nucleotide G1405 in 16S rRNA as found in ArmA and RmtB. RmtC has an MTase activity specific for the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit consisting of 16S rRNA and several ribosomal proteins, but not for the naked 16S rRNA, as seen in ArmA, RmtB, and NpmA. All seven 16S rRNA MTases have been found exclusively in Gram-negative bacilli to date, and no plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA MTase has been reported in Gram-positive pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, we checked whether or not the RmtC could function in Gram-positive bacilli, and found that RmtC could indeed confer high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. 16S rRNA MTases seemed to be functional to some extent in any bacterial species, regardless of the provenance of the 16S rRNA MTase gene responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

  17. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid enhances the activities of aminoglycosides against methicillin- sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Oakes, Edward; Soren, Odel; Moussa, Caroline; Rathor, Getika; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony; Hu, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are prevalent. MRSA infections are difficult to treat and there are no new classes of antibiotics produced to the market to treat infections caused by the resistant bacteria. Therefore, using antibiotic enhancers to rescue existing classes of antibiotics is an attractive strategy. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is an antioxidant compound found in extracts from plant Larrea Tridentata. It exhibits antimicrobial activity and may target bacterial cell membrane. Combination efficacies of NDGA with many classes of antibiotics were examined by chequerboard method against 200 clinical isolates of MRSA and MSSA. NDGA in combination with gentamicin, neomycin, and tobramycin was examined by time-kill assays. The synergistic combinations of NDGA and aminoglycosides were tested in vivo using a murine skin infection model. Calculations of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) showed that NDGA when combined with gentamicin, neomycin, or tobramycin displayed synergistic activities in more than 97% of MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Time kill analysis demonstrated that NDGA significantly augmented the activities of these aminoglycosides against MRSA and MSSA in vitro and in murine skin infection model. The enhanced activity of NDGA resides on its ability to damage bacterial cell membrane leading to accumulation of the antibiotics inside bacterial cells. We demonstrated that NDGA strongly revived the therapeutic potencies of aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo. This combinational strategy could contribute major clinical implications to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. PMID:26579101

  18. Thermodynamic characterization of a thermostable antibiotic resistance enzyme, the aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (4').

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaomin; Wright, Edward; Bible, Amber N; Peterson, Cynthia B; Alexandre, Gladys; Bruce, Barry D; Serpersu, Engin H

    2012-11-13

    The aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (4') (ANT) is an aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that detoxifies antibiotics by nucleotidylating at the C4'-OH site. Previous crystallographic studies show that the enzyme is a homodimer and each subunit binds one kanamycin and one Mg-AMPCPP, where the transfer of the nucleotidyl group occurs between the substrates bound to different subunits. In this work, sedimentation velocity analysis of ANT by analytical ultracentrifugation showed the enzyme exists as a mixture of a monomer and a dimer in solution and that dimer formation is driven by hydrophobic interactions between the subunits. The binding of aminoglycosides shifts the equilibrium toward dimer formation, while the binding of the cosubstrate, Mg-ATP, has no effect on the monomer-dimer equilibrium. Surprisingly, binding of several divalent cations, including Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+), to the enzyme also shifted the equilibrium in favor of dimer formation. Binding studies, performed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, showed that divalent cations bind to the aminoglycoside binding site in the absence of substrates with a stoichiometry of 2:1. Energetic aspects of binding of all aminoglycosides to ANT were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry to be enthalpically favored and entropically disfavored with an overall favorable Gibbs energy. Aminoglycosides in the neomycin class each bind to the enzyme with significantly different enthalpic and entropic contributions, while those of the kanamycin class bind with similar thermodynamic parameters.

  19. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  20. Emergence of resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics during moxalactam therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed Central

    Preheim, L C; Penn, R G; Sanders, C C; Goering, R V; Giger, D K

    1982-01-01

    In four patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, the infecting strain developed resistance to moxalactam during therapy with this drug. In addition, P. aeruginosa isolates from two of these four patients showed increased resistance to aminoglycosides. Isolates from a third patient acquired cross-resistance to other antipseudomonal beta-lactams. In three of the cases, disk susceptibility tests failed to detect the resistance that was demonstrated in broth dilution assays. Isolate identities were confirmed by serotyping. No new plasmids were found by agarose gel electrophoresis. The mechanisms for this resistance did not involve enzymatic antibiotic degradation. These findings suggest that currently available expanded-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives should probably not be used alone for most serious infections due to P. aeruginosa. They also suggest that strains with multiple antibiotic resistance may become more prevalent in hospitals if these drugs are used extensively. PMID:6218778

  1. A novel family of genomic resistance islands, AbGRI2, contributing to aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates belonging to global clone 2.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Steven J; Farrugia, Daniel N; Paulsen, Ian T; Hall, Ruth M

    2013-03-01

    To determine the context and location of antibiotic resistance genes in carbapenem- and aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 2 (GC2) isolates carrying a class 1 integron. Isolates were from Sydney hospitals. Resistance to antibiotics was determined by disc diffusion. BLAST searches identified relevant DNA fragments in a draft genome sequence. PCR was used to assemble fragments and map equivalent regions. In two isolates belonging to GC2, WM99c and A91, the bla(TEM) gene, the class 1 integron carrying the aacC1-orfP-orfP-orfQ-aadA1 cassette array and sul1 gene, and the aphA1b gene in Tn6020 were each in segments flanked by IS26. These, together with a fourth IS26-flanked segment, formed a 19.5 kb genomic resistance island (GRI), designated AbGRI2-1, containing five copies of IS26. Part of this island was identical to part of the multiple antibiotic resistance region of AbaR-type islands found in global clone 1 (GC1). AbGRI2-1 has replaced a 40.9 kb segment found in the AB0057 genome. Related GRIs were identified in the same location in published GC2 genomes and appear to have arisen from AbGRI2-1 via IS26-mediated deletions. Like A91, WM99c carries ISAba1 upstream of ampC and Tn6167, an AbGRI1-type island in the chromosomal comM gene containing sul2, tet(B), strA and strB genes and bla(OXA-23) in Tn2006. In WM99c, the chromosomal gene encoding OXA-Ab is interrupted by ISAba17. AbGRI2-1 is the largest so far of a new type of GRI designated AbGRI2 to distinguish them from the islands in comM in GC1 isolates (AbaR type) and in GC2 isolates (AbGRI1 type).

  2. Sulfonamide-Based Inhibitors of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Eis Abolish Resistance to Kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Garzan, Atefeh; Willby, Melisa J.; Green, Keith D.; Gajadeera, Chathurada S.; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Posey, James E.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-12-08

    A two-drug combination therapy where one drug targets an offending cell and the other targets a resistance mechanism to the first drug is a time-tested, yet underexploited approach to combat or prevent drug resistance. By high-throughput screening, we identified a sulfonamide scaffold that served as a pharmacophore to generate inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetyltransferase Eis, whose upregulation causes resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotic kanamycin A (KAN) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rational systematic derivatization of this scaffold to maximize Eis inhibition and abolish the Eis-mediated KAN resistance of M. tuberculosis yielded several highly potent agents. A crystal structure of Eis in complex with one of the most potent inhibitors revealed that the inhibitor bound Eis in the AG-binding pocket held by a conformationally malleable region of Eis (residues 28–37) bearing key hydrophobic residues. These Eis inhibitors are promising leads for preclinical development of innovative AG combination therapies against resistant TB.

  3. Increased prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Norway is associated with the acquisition of AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib.

    PubMed

    Haldorsen, Bjørg C; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Samuelsen, Orjan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that the increasing prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance observed in Norway among clinical Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates is mainly due to the presence of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib. A frequent co-association of aminoglycoside resistance with Cefotaximase-München group 1 extended-spectrum β-lactamases was also observed.

  4. [Vancomycin and high-level aminoglycoside resistant Enterococcus carriage and the risk factors related to resistance in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Mustafa; Sencan, Irfan; Ozdemir, Davut; Oksüz, Sükrü; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Sahin, Idris

    2007-04-01

    The aims of this study were to detect the prevalence of fecal vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization with high-level resistance to aminoglycoside and other antibiotics and, the risk factors related to resistance in hospitalized patients in Düzce Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey. A total of 105 patients (61 from internal medicine, 44 from surgery clinics; 54.3% female, mean age: 47.2 +/- 24.54 years) were included to the study and a single stool sample was collected from each of the patients. Specimens were cultivated in Enterococcus selective media (BioMerieux, France), and the isolates were identified by conventional microbiological methods together with the API 20 Strep test. Beta-lactamase activities of the isolates were tested with nitrocefin disk, and antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by the disk diffusion method. Enterococcus spp. were isolated from 81 (77%) of the patients' samples and 60.5% were identified as E. faecium, 13.6% as E. faecalis, 11.1% as E. gallinarum, 7.4% as E. durans, 2.5% as E. raffinosus, 2.5% as E. mundtii, 1.2% as E. casseliflavus, and 1.2% as E. avium. High-level streptomycin and gentamicin resistance rates were found in 19.8% and 9.9% of the isolates, respectively. The resistance rates for the other antibiotics were found as follows; 18.5% to ampicillin, 27.2% to penicilin, 34.6% to nitrofurantoin, 65.4% to norfloxacin, and 70.4% to both tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. No vancomycin resistance was detected, and none of the enterococci had beta-lactamase activity. Long hospitalization period, antibiotic usage and experience of intra-abdominal operation were found as the significant risk factors for colonization of the resistant bacteria. Our results demonstrated that there was no fecal VRE carriage in our hospital during the study period, however, it was concluded that the screening tests should be done periodically in order to detect resistant strains as soon as possible.

  5. Expansion of the aminoglycoside-resistance 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family: expression and functional characterization of four hypothetical enzymes of diverse bacterial origin.

    PubMed

    Witek, Marta A; Conn, Graeme L

    2014-09-01

    The global dissemination, potential activity in diverse species and broad resistance spectrum conferred by the aminoglycoside-resistance ribosomal RNA methyltransferases make them a significant potential new threat to the efficacy of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the treatment of serious bacterial infections. The N1 methylation of adenosine 1408 (m(1)A1408) confers resistance to structurally diverse aminoglycosides, including kanamycin, neomycin and apramycin. The limited analyses to date of the enzymes responsible have identified common features but also potential differences in their molecular details of action. Therefore, with the goal of expanding the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase family as a platform for developing a more complete mechanistic understanding, we report here the cloning, expression and functional analyses of four hypothetical aminoglycoside-resistance rRNA methyltransferases from recent genome sequences of diverse bacterial species. Each of the genes produced a soluble, folded protein with a secondary structure, as determined from circular dichroism (CD) spectra, consistent with enzymes for which high-resolution structures are available. For each enzyme, antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays revealed a resistance spectrum characteristic of the known 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferases and the modified nucleotide was confirmed by reverse transcription as A1408. In common with other family members, higher binding affinity for the methylation reaction by-product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) than the cosubstrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) was observed for three methyltransferases, while one unexpectedly showed no measurable affinity for SAH. Collectively, these results confirm that each hypothetical enzyme is a functional 16S rRNA (m(1)A1408) methyltransferase but also point to further potential mechanistic variation within this enzyme family.

  6. Evaluation of the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion test as a screening test for high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Niles, A C; Murray, P R

    1984-10-01

    The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion test was evaluated as a test to detect high-level aminoglycoside (streptomycin, kanamycin, tobramycin, and gentamicin) resistance in isolates of enterococci. The authors found that high-level resistance could not be predicted accurately with the diffusion test.

  7. Aminoglycoside Resistance and Susceptibility Testing Errors in Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    the most active aminoglycoside (27.1% of isolates were susceptible ). Disk diffusion and Etest tended to be more accurate than the Vitek 2 , Phoenix...and MicroScan automated systems; but errors were noted with all methods. The Vitek 2 instrument incorrectly reported that more than one-third of the...Acinetobacter, we have observed in clinical practice at the San Antonio Mil- itary Medical Center results of susceptibility to amikacin from the Vitek 2

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Ralstonia pickettii Strains with Different Aminoglycoside Resistance Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Martínez, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of two Ralstonia pickettii strains (H2Cu2 and H2Cu5), isolated from hospital effluent in a selective medium containing CuSO4, were sequenced. They presented MICs of >256 and 6 µg/ml for the aminoglycoside gentamicin, respectively. The 5.2-Mb draft genomes have 40 contigs for strain H2Cu2 and 113 for H2Cu5. PMID:27834709

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Acinetobacter spp. Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferases Highlights Functional and Evolutionary Variation among Antibiotic Resistance Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Kuhn, Misty L; Evdokimova, Elena; Law, Melissa; Courvalin, Patrice; Savchenko, Alexei

    2017-02-10

    Modification of aminoglycosides by N-acetyltransferases (AACs) is one of the major mechanisms of resistance to these antibiotics in human bacterial pathogens. More than 50 enzymes belonging to the AAC(6') subfamily have been identified in Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates. Our understanding of the molecular function and evolutionary origin of these resistance enzymes remains incomplete. Here we report the structural and enzymatic characterization of AAC(6')-Ig and AAC(6')-Ih from Acinetobacter spp. The crystal structure of AAC(6')-Ig in complex with tobramycin revealed a large substrate-binding cleft remaining partially unoccupied by the substrate, which is in stark contrast with the previously characterized AAC(6')-Ib enzyme. Enzymatic analysis indicated that AAC(6')-Ig and -Ih possess a broad specificity against aminoglycosides but with significantly lower turnover rates as compared to other AAC(6') enzymes. Structure- and function-informed phylogenetic analysis of AAC(6') enzymes led to identification of at least three distinct subfamilies varying in oligomeric state, active site composition, and drug recognition mode. Our data support the concept of AAC(6') functionality originating through convergent evolution from diverse Gcn5-related-N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) ancestral enzymes, with AAC(6')-Ig and -Ih representing enzymes that may still retain ancestral nonresistance functions in the cell as provided by their particular active site properties.

  10. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-mediated amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by zinc and copper pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A; Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections.

  11. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib-Mediated Amikacin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Zinc and Copper Pyrithione

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A.; Lin, David L.; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn2+ or Cu2+ in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  12. Pharmacodynamic modeling of aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: identifying dosing regimens to suppress resistance development.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vincent H; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Vo, Giao; Kabbara, Samer; Lim, Tze-Peng; Nikolaou, Michael

    2008-11-01

    To facilitate optimal dosing regimen design, we previously developed a mathematical model using time-kill study data to predict the responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to various pharmacokinetic profiles of meropenem and levofloxacin. In this study, we extended the model to predict the activities of gentamicin and amikacin exposures against P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, respectively. The input data were from a time-kill study with 10(7) CFU/ml of bacteria at baseline. P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was exposed to gentamicin (0 to 16x MIC; MIC = 2 mg/liter), and A. baumannii ATCC BAA 747 was exposed to amikacin (0 to 32x MIC; MIC = 4 mg/liter) for 24 h. Using the estimates of the best-fit model parameters, bacterial responses to various fluctuating aminoglycoside exposures (half-life, 2.5 h) over 72 h were predicted via computer simulation. The computer simulations were subsequently validated using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model with similar aminoglycoside exposures. A significant initial reduction in the bacterial burden was predicted for all gentamicin exposures examined. However, regrowth over time due to resistance emergence was predicted for regimens with a maximum concentration of the drug (C(max))/MIC (dosing frequency) of 4 (every 8 h [q8h]), 12 (q24h), and 36 (q24h). Sustained suppression of bacterial populations was forecast with a C(max)/MIC of 30 (q12h). Similarly, regrowth and suppression of A. baumannii were predicted and experimentally verified with a three-dimensional response surface. The mathematical model was reasonable in predicting extended bacterial responses to various aminoglycoside exposures qualitatively, based on limited input data. Our approach appears promising as a decision support tool for dosing regimen selection for antimicrobial agents.

  13. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-04-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3-8 extra nucleotides at the 5' terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  14. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3–8 extra nucleotides at the 5’ terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:24489121

  15. Structural Basis for the Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA by Aminoglycoside Resistance Methyltransferase Sgm from an Antibiotic Producer: a Diversity of Active Sites in m7G Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, N.; Tkaczuk, K; Tulsidas, S; Kaminska, K; Cubrilo, S; Maravic -Vlahovicek, G; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Sgm (Sisomicin-gentamicin methyltransferase) from antibiotic-producing bacterium Micromonospora zionensis is an enzyme that confers resistance to aminoglycosides like gentamicin and sisomicin by specifically methylating G1405 in bacterial 16S rRNA. Sgm belongs to the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase (Arm) family of enzymes that have been recently found to spread by horizontal gene transfer among disease-causing bacteria. Structural characterization of Arm enzymes is the key to understand their mechanism of action and to develop inhibitors that would block their activity. Here we report the structure of Sgm in complex with cofactors S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.0 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, and results of mutagenesis and rRNA footprinting, and protein-substrate docking. We propose the mechanism of methylation of G1405 by Sgm and compare it with other m{sup 7}G methyltransferases, revealing a surprising diversity of active sites and binding modes for the same basic reaction of RNA modification. This analysis can serve as a stepping stone towards developing drugs that would specifically block the activity of Arm methyltransferases and thereby re-sensitize pathogenic bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  16. Investigation of the reformulated Remel Synergy Quad plate for detection of high-level aminoglycoside and vancomycin resistance among enterococci.

    PubMed

    Free, L; Sahm, D F

    1995-06-01

    We investigated the accuracy of the recently released Remel Synergy Quad plate, a commercially available agar screening method for detecting high-level aminoglycoside and vancomycin resistance among enterococci that is based on the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards recommended guidelines (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, M7-A3, 1993). The Synergy Quad correctly determined the gentamicin and streptomycin resistance status for > or = 97% of 147 Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates tested. Detection of vancomycin resistance also was reliable, as no false susceptibility occurred with 36 vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis and E. faecium strains and false resistance occurred only once with the 47 susceptible strains tested. One strain each of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus failed to grow on the screen, but because the true nature and significance of resistance in such isolates is unknown the implication of their screen negativity is uncertain. In summary, the Remel Synergy Quad provides a highly accurate and convenient method for susceptibility testing of enterococci against gentamicin, streptomycin, and vancomycin.

  17. High-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection: Twelve-year surveillance in the Minami Ibaraki Area.

    PubMed

    Osuka, Hanako; Nakajima, Jun; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Funayama, Yasunori; Ebihara, Tsugio; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Saito, Kazuto; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2016-01-01

    We examined prevalence of high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection in the Minami Ibaraki Area. Ten strains of both species each, recovered from the blood or the cerebrospinal fluid between 2003 and 2014, were randomly selected every year. High-level resistance to gentamicin (HLR-GM) and streptomycin (HLR-SM) was detected in 34% (41 of 120 strains) and 18% (21) of E. faecalis and 9% (11) and 39% (48) of E. faecium, respectively. In comparisons of the proportions among three four-year periods, HLR-SM among E. faecium was significantly lower in the 2011-2014 period. All strains with HLR-GM were positive for the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The ant(6')-Ia gene was detected in all with HLR-SM except for one E. faecalis strain. The present study showed that prevalence of HLR-GM among E. faecalis and E. faecium causing invasive infection in this area was nearly equivalent to that described in previous studies in Japan and that proportions of strains with HLAR did not vary during the study period except for that of HLR-SM among E. faecium.

  18. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferases from the ArmA/Rmt family operate late in the 30S ribosomal biogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zarubica, Tamara; Baker, Matthew R; Wright, H Tonie; Rife, Jason P

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to 4,6-type aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the ribosome, has been traced to the ArmA/RmtA family of rRNA methyltransferases. These plasmid-encoded enzymes transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N7 of the buried G1405 in the aminoglycoside binding site of 16S rRNA of the 30S ribosomal subunit. ArmA methylates mature 30S subunits but not 16S rRNA, 50S, or 70S ribosomal subunits or isolated Helix 44 of the 30S subunit. To more fully characterize this family of enzymes, we have investigated the substrate requirements of ArmA and to a lesser extent its ortholog RmtA. We determined the Mg+² dependence of ArmA activity toward the 30S ribosomal subunits and found that the enzyme recognizes both low Mg+² (translationally inactive) and high Mg+² (translationally active) forms of this substrate. We tested the effects of LiCl pretreatment of the 30S subunits, initiation factor 3 (IF3), and gentamicin/kasugamycin resistance methyltransferase (KsgA) on ArmA activity and determined whether in vivo derived pre-30S ribosomal subunits are ArmA methylation substrates. ArmA failed to methylate the 30S subunits generated from LiCl washes above 0.75 M, despite the apparent retention of ribosomal proteins and a fully mature 16S rRNA. From our experiments, we conclude that ArmA is most active toward the 30S ribosomal subunits that are at or very near full maturity, but that it can also recognize more than one form of the 30S subunit.

  19. Transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa reveals a potential drug target in the antibiotic resistance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Perrine; Leban, Nadia; Kunzelmann, Simone; Chaloin, Laurent; Serpersu, Engin H.; Webb, Martin R.; Barman, Tom; Lionne, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases are bacterial enzymes responsible for the inactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by O-phosphorylation. It is important to understand the mechanism of enzymes in order to find efficient drugs. Using rapid-mixing methods, we studied the transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa. We show that an ADP-enzyme complex is the main steady state intermediate. This intermediate interacts strongly with kanamycin A to form an abortive complex that traps the enzyme in an inactive state. A good strategy to prevent the inactivation of aminoglycosides would be to develop uncompetitive inhibitors that interact with this key ADP-enzyme complex. PMID:23108046

  20. Transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa reveals a potential drug target in the antibiotic resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, Perrine; Leban, Nadia; Kunzelmann, Simone; Chaloin, Laurent; Serpersu, Engin H; Webb, Martin R; Barman, Tom; Lionne, Corinne

    2012-11-30

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases are bacterial enzymes responsible for the inactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by O-phosphorylation. It is important to understand the mechanism of enzymes in order to find efficient drugs. Using rapid-mixing methods, we studied the transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa. We show that an ADP-enzyme complex is the main steady state intermediate. This intermediate interacts strongly with kanamycin A to form an abortive complex that traps the enzyme in an inactive state. A good strategy to prevent the inactivation of aminoglycosides would be to develop uncompetitive inhibitors that interact with this key ADP-enzyme complex.

  1. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  2. Decreased membrane permeability in a polymyxin B-resistant Escherichia coli mutant exhibiting multiple resistance to beta-lactams as well as aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, S O; Mukherjee, J; Chakrabarti, A; Pal, S

    1998-04-15

    A laboratory mutant of Escherichia coli stably resistant to more than 36,000 U ml-1 of polymyxin B was isolated. The mutant exhibited moderate increases in minimum inhibitory concentration to fluoroquinolones and bacitracin but high levels of cross-resistance to beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. However, it remained susceptible to tetracycline, nalidixic acid and novobiocin. Changes were observed in the outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide profile leading to a decrease in permeability as evident from reduction in the following: (i) minimum inhibitory concentration values in the presence of Tween 80, (ii) uptake of 1-N-phenyl naphthylamine and norfloxacin, (iii) hydrolysis of beta-lactams and (iv) diffusion of lactose and cefazolin into proteoliposomes reconstituted with outer membrane proteins. We therefore suggest that the novel pattern of cross-resistance of our isolate is due to the decrease in its permeability.

  3. Molecular Determinants of Antibiotic Recognition and Resistance by Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (3′)-IIIa: A Calorimetric and Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Malvika; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Srinivasan, Annankoil R.; Pilch, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The growing threat from the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens highlight a critical need to expand our currently available arsenal of broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this connection, new antibiotics must be developed that exhibit the abilities to circumvent known resistance pathways. An important step toward achieving this goal is to define the key molecular interactions that govern antibiotic resistance. Here, we use site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with calorimetric, NMR, and enzymological techniques, to define the key interactions that govern the binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin and kanamycin B to APH(3′)-IIIa (an antibiotic phosphorylating enzyme that produces resistance). Our mutational analyses identify the D261, E262, and C-terminal F264 residues of the enzyme as being critical for recognition of the two drugs as well as the manifestation of the resistance phenotype. In addition, the E160 residue is more important for recognition of kanamycin B than neomycin, with mutation of this residue partially restoring sensitivity to kanamycin B but not to neomycin. By contrast, the D193 residue partially restores sensitivity to neomycin but not to kanamycin B, with the origins of this differential effect being due to the importance of D193 for catalyzing the phosphorylation of neomycin. These collective mutational results, coupled with 15N NMR-derived pKa and calorimetrically-derived binding-linked drug protonation data, identify the 1-, 3-, and 2′-amino groups of both neomycin and kanamycin B as being critical functionalities for binding to APH(3′)-IIIa. These drug amino functionalities represent potential sites of modification in the design of next-generation compounds that can overcome APH(3′)-IIIa-induced resistance. PMID:17418235

  4. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  5. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM.

  6. Molecular determinants of antibiotic recognition and resistance by aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (3')-IIIa: a calorimetric and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Malvika; Barbieri, Christopher M; Srinivasan, Annankoil R; Pilch, Daniel S

    2007-05-25

    The growing threat from the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens highlights a critical need to expand our currently available arsenal of broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this connection, new antibiotics must be developed that exhibit the abilities to circumvent known resistance pathways. An important step toward achieving this goal is to define the key molecular interactions that govern antibiotic resistance. Here, we use site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with calorimetric, NMR, and enzymological techniques, to define the key interactions that govern the binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin and kanamycin B to APH(3')-IIIa (an antibiotic phosphorylating enzyme that confers resistance). Our mutational analyses identify the D261, E262, and C-terminal F264 residues of the enzyme as being critical for recognition of the two drugs as well as for the manifestation of the resistance phenotype. In addition, the E160 residue is more important for recognition of kanamycin B than neomycin, with mutation of this residue partially restoring sensitivity to kanamycin B but not to neomycin. By contrast, the D193 residue partially restores sensitivity to neomycin but not to kanamycin B, with the origins of this differential effect being due to the importance of D193 for catalyzing the phosphorylation of neomycin. These collective mutational results, coupled with (15)N NMR-derived pK(a) and calorimetrically derived binding-linked drug protonation data, identify the 1-, 3-, and 2'-amino groups of both neomycin and kanamycin B as being critical functionalities for binding to APH(3')-IIIa. These drug amino functionalities represent potential sites of modification in the design of next-generation compounds that can overcome APH(3')-IIIa-induced resistance.

  7. An outbreak of infections caused by strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides. II. Epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Crossley, K; Landesman, B; Zaske, D

    1979-03-01

    Studies to determine the epidemiologic behavior of strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides (MARS) were conducted over a period of two and one-half years, during which MARS were isolated from 201 patients at a hospital in the midwestern United States. Most cases of infection or colonization with MARS (156 of 201) occurred in patients with burns. In the burn unit, MARS were recovered from the air, from the hair and hands of personnel, and from inanimate objects. Nasal (72%) and rectal (66%) colonization were common among burned patients with infected or colonized burn wounds but occurred in only six of 74 burn unit personnel. When compared with two control periods, the prophylactic use of antistaphylococcal agents in patients with burns increased markedly at the time the outbreak began. Of the 45 patients without burns from whom MARS were isolated, 42 (93%) were surgical patients. MARS were not demonstrated in the air or environment of patients with infected surgical wounds. None of 334 non-burn unit hospital personnel were found to be carriers of MARS. Four phage types (83A, 6/75/85, 29/52/80, and 92) were recovered during the outbreak. A determinant of antibiotic resistance was probably transmitted among strains of S. aureus.

  8. [Evaluation of GenoType MTBDRsl for testing resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to fluoroquinlone, aminoglycoside, and ethambutol].

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of GenoType MTBDRsl (Hain Lifescience, Germany) in detecting resistance to fluoroquinolone (FQ), aminoglycoside (AG), and ethambutol (EB). We evaluated the resistance of 76 Mycobacterium tuberculosis samples, namely, 13 extensively drug-resistant (XDR), 29 multi-drug resistant (MDR), and 4 susceptible clinical isolates from Japan, and 30 strains from Supra-national Reference Laboratory Network, to FQ, AG, and EB by using GenoType MTBDRs. The gyrA, rrs, and embB were directly sequenced for all the strains, and the mutations were confirmed. The susceptibility testing result obtained using the standard proportion method with 1% Ogawa medium was considered as the gold standard. The sensitivities of GenoType TBDRsl listance to FQ, kanamycin (KM), amikacin (AMK), capreomycin (CPM), and EB were 82.4%, 57.1%, 100%, 83.3%, and 55.8%, respectively. The specificity for FQ was 97.6%, and that for KM, AMK, CPM, and EB were 100%. The mutant strains detected by GenoType TBDRsl ere as follows: in 20 Japanese FQ resistant isolates, 7 gyrA MUT3A (D94A) (35.0%), 6 MUT3C (D94G) (30.0%), 2 MUT1 (A90V) (10.0%), and 1 MUT1 with MUT3C (5.0%); in 18 KM resistant isolates, 10 rrs MUT1 (A1401G) (55.6%); and in 34 EB resistant isolates, 9 embB MUT1B (M306V) (26.5%), 2 MUT1A (M306I) (5.9%), and 8 WT1 deficits (covering codon 306; 23.5%). Direct sequencing showed additional substitutions in embB (2 D328Y, 1 D354A, 1 G406D, and 1 G406S). The sensitivity of GenoType" MTBDRsl ws simillr to that by sequencing method for resistance to FQ and AG, but that for EB was slightly less than by sequencing method, but the difference was not significant. The sensitivity of GenoType MTBDRsl for the letection of FQ resistance was approximately 80% to that by standard drug sensitivity test results by using conventional proportion methods, while it was relatively less accurate for the diagnosis of resistance to KM and EB in Japanese isolates. Thus, GenoType MTBDRsl is useful lr the early

  9. Intra- and inter-generic plasmid-mediated spread of cephalosporin and aminoglycoside resistance amongst Klebsiella aerogenes K41 and other enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Verma, A; Desai, N; Shannon, K; Philpott-Howard, J; Hill, R L

    2001-02-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes K41, resistant to third generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides, was isolated from clinical samples of 153 in-patients. Blood cultures accounted for 24 (15.7%) of isolates. The MIC(90) of ceftazidime for the isolates of 84 patients was >512 mg/l and was reduced to 2.0 by 4 mg/l of clavulanic acid, but only to 64 by 4 mg/l of sulbactam. Isolates of K. aerogenes K41 produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) SHV-5 and TEM-1, identified by isoelectric focusing. Plasmid profiles showed that co-dissemination of cephalosporin and aminoglycoside resistance, plus ESBL production, coincided with the acquisition of a 116-kb plasmid. This plasmid was transferable in vitro from K. aerogenes K41 to other serotypes and genera of the Enterobacteriaceae.

  10. Innate aminoglycoside resistance of Achromobacter xylosoxidans is due to AxyXY-OprZ, an RND-type multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Bador, Julien; Amoureux, Lucie; Blanc, Emmanuel; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an innately multidrug-resistant pathogen which is emerging in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We characterized a new resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pump, AxyXY-OprZ. This system is responsible for the intrinsic high-level resistance of A. xylosoxidans to aminoglycosides (tobramycin, amikacin, and gentamicin). Furthermore, it can extrude cefepime, carbapenems, some fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and erythromycin. Some of the AxyXY-OprZ substrates are major components widely used to treat pulmonary infections in CF patients.

  11. Luteolin potentiates the effects of aminoglycoside and β-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JOUNG, DAE-KI; KANG, OK-HWA; SEO, YUN-SOO; ZHOU, TIAN; LEE, YOUNG-SEOB; HAN, SIN-HEE; MUN, SU-HYUN; KONG, RYONG; SONG, HO-JUN; SHIN, DONG-WON; KWON, DONG-YEUL

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious clinical problem worldwide, and alternative natural or combination drug therapies are required for its treatment. The aim of the present study was to examined the antimicrobial activity of luteolin (LUT) against MRSA. Luteolin is a polyphenolic flavonoid compound with a wide spectrum of biological activities. The antimicrobial activities of LUT and the antibiotics ampicillin (AM), oxacillin (OX) and gentamicin (GT), used alone or in combination, were evaluated against five clinical MRSA isolates and two reference strains using a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, MTT colorimetric assay, checkerboard dilution test and time-kill assay. The MIC of LUT against all strains was found to be 62.5 µg/ml. The combinations of LUT and antibiotics exhibited a synergistic effect against MRSA in the majority of cases, as determined by the checkerboard method. Time-kill curves revealed that a combination of LUT with AM, OX or GT significantly reduced bacterial counts, which dropped below the lowest detectable limit after 24 h. These results indicate that LUT potentiates the effects of β-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics against MRSA. PMID:27284353

  12. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  13. Restoration of APC gene function in colorectal cancer cells by aminoglycoside- and macrolide-induced read-through of premature termination codons.

    PubMed

    Zilberberg, Alona; Lahav, Lital; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2010-04-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a multifunctional tumour suppressor protein that negatively regulates the Wnt signalling pathway. The APC gene is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and organs, including the large intestine and central nervous system. The majority of patients with sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancer have mutations in the gene encoding APC. Approximately 30% of these mutations are single nucleotide changes that result in premature stop codons (nonsense mutations). A potential therapeutic approach for treatment of this subset of patients is the use of aminoglycosides and macrolides that induce nonsense mutation read-through and restore levels of full-length protein. We have used reporter plasmids and colorectal cancer cell lines to demonstrate that several aminoglycosides and tylosin, a member of the macrolide family, induced read-through of nonsense mutations in the APC gene. In xenograft experiments and in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model, these compounds ameliorated the tumorigenic clinical symptoms caused by nonsense mutations in the APC gene.

  14. Source of Phosphate in the Enzymic Reaction as a Point of Distinction among Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferases*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Chow, Joseph W.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases are clinically important enzymes that cause high levels of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the organisms that harbor them. These enzymes phosphorylate aminoglycosides, and the modified antibiotics show significant reduction in the binding ability to target the bacterial ribosome. This report presents a detailed characterization of the antibiotic resistance profile and the aminoglycoside and nucleotide triphosphate substrate profiles of four common aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases widely distributed in clinically important Gram-positive microorganisms. Although the antibiotic resistance phenotypes exhibited by these enzymes are similar, their aminoglycoside and nucleotide triphosphate substrate profiles are distinctive. Contrary to the dogma that these enzymes use ATP as the source of phosphate in their reactions, two of the four aminoglycoside 2′-phosphotransferases utilize GTP as the phosphate donor. Of the other two enzymes, one exhibits preference for ATP, and the other can utilize either ATP or GTP as nucleotide triphosphate substrate. A new nomenclature for these enzymes is put forth that takes into account the differences among these enzymes based on their respective substrate preferences. These nucleotide triphosphate preferences should have ramifications for understanding of the evolution, selection, and dissemination of the genes for these important resistance enzymes. PMID:19158087

  15. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie-phosphotransfer­ase(2′′)-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2′′)-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2′′)-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2′′)-IIa and APH(2′′)-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2′′)-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2′′)-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a ‘gatekeeper’ residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2′′)-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme. PMID:24914967

  16. Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains Exhibit Diversity in Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes, Which Exert Differing Effects on Plazomicin and Other Agents

    PubMed Central

    Almaghrabi, Reem; Doi, Yohei; Hao, Binghua; Chen, Liang; Shields, Ryan K.; Press, Ellen G.; Iovine, Nicole M.; Townsend, Bethany M.; Wagener, Marilyn M.; Kreiswirth, Barry; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2014-01-01

    We measured in vitro activity of plazomicin, a next-generation aminoglycoside, and other aminoglycosides against 50 carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from two centers and correlated the results with the presence of various aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Ninety-four percent of strains were sequence type 258 (ST258) clones, which exhibited 5 ompK36 genotypes; 80% and 10% of strains produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase 2 (KPC-2) and KPC-3, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of strains possessed AMEs, including AAC(6′)-Ib (98%), APH(3′)-Ia (56%), AAC(3)-IV (38%), and ANT(2″)-Ia (2%). Gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin nonsusceptibility rates were 40, 98, and 16%, respectively. Plazomicin MICs ranged from 0.25 to 1 μg/ml. Tobramycin and plazomicin MICs correlated with gentamicin MICs (r = 0.75 and 0.57, respectively). Plazomicin exerted bactericidal activity against 17% (1× MIC) and 94% (4× MIC) of strains. All strains with AAC(6′)-Ib were tobramycin-resistant; 16% were nonsusceptible to amikacin. AAC(6′)-Ib combined with another AME was associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs than AAC(6′)-Ib alone (P = 0.01, 0.0008, and 0.046, respectively). The presence of AAC(3)-IV in a strain was also associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs (P = 0.0006, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.01, respectively). The combination of AAC(6′)-Ib and another AME, the presence of AAC(3)-IV, and the presence of APH(3′)-Ia were each associated with gentamicin resistance (P = 0.0002, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains (including ST258 clones) exhibit highly diverse antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes. Plazomicin may offer a treatment option against strains resistant to other aminoglycosides. The development of molecular assays that predict antimicrobial responses among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains should be a research

  17. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains exhibit diversity in aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, which exert differing effects on plazomicin and other agents.

    PubMed

    Almaghrabi, Reem; Clancy, Cornelius J; Doi, Yohei; Hao, Binghua; Chen, Liang; Shields, Ryan K; Press, Ellen G; Iovine, Nicole M; Townsend, Bethany M; Wagener, Marilyn M; Kreiswirth, Barry; Nguyen, M Hong

    2014-08-01

    We measured in vitro activity of plazomicin, a next-generation aminoglycoside, and other aminoglycosides against 50 carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from two centers and correlated the results with the presence of various aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Ninety-four percent of strains were sequence type 258 (ST258) clones, which exhibited 5 ompK36 genotypes; 80% and 10% of strains produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase 2 (KPC-2) and KPC-3, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of strains possessed AMEs, including AAC(6')-Ib (98%), APH(3')-Ia (56%), AAC(3)-IV (38%), and ANT(2")-Ia (2%). Gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin nonsusceptibility rates were 40, 98, and 16%, respectively. Plazomicin MICs ranged from 0.25 to 1 μg/ml. Tobramycin and plazomicin MICs correlated with gentamicin MICs (r = 0.75 and 0.57, respectively). Plazomicin exerted bactericidal activity against 17% (1× MIC) and 94% (4× MIC) of strains. All strains with AAC(6')-Ib were tobramycin-resistant; 16% were nonsusceptible to amikacin. AAC(6')-Ib combined with another AME was associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs than AAC(6')-Ib alone (P = 0.01, 0.0008, and 0.046, respectively). The presence of AAC(3)-IV in a strain was also associated with higher gentamicin, tobramycin, and plazomicin MICs (P = 0.0006, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.01, respectively). The combination of AAC(6')-Ib and another AME, the presence of AAC(3)-IV, and the presence of APH(3')-Ia were each associated with gentamicin resistance (P = 0.0002, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains (including ST258 clones) exhibit highly diverse antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes. Plazomicin may offer a treatment option against strains resistant to other aminoglycosides. The development of molecular assays that predict antimicrobial responses among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains should be a research priority

  18. In vitro synergistic effect of ciprofloxacin with aminoglycosides against multidrug resistant-Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Firdous; Akhtar, Naeem; Hameed, Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasingly prevalent nosocomial human pathogen. Infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa are currently a treatment challenge and requires search for better treatment options. To determine in vitro synergistic effect of ciprofloxacin in combination with amikacin and gentamicin against MDR P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Antibiotic resistance pattern of 100 identified clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was determined against eight antibiotics by disc diffusion method at Microbiology Laboratory, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi. For 30 selected MDR isolates, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amikacin and gentamicin were determined separately by agar diffusion method followed by combined activity of ciprofloxacin with amikacin and gentamicin by checkerboard agar dilution technique. Antibiotic resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa isolates was; gentamicin and carbenicillin (94%), amikacin and piperacillin (92%), ceftazidime (90%), colistin (87%), ciprofloxacin (79%) and imipenem (72%). MICs against 30 selected MDR isolates ranged from 32 to >128μg/mL for amikacin, and >128μg/mL for gentamicin. Synergistic effect was observed in 12/30(40%) isolates for AK+CIP and in 05/30 (16.7%) for CN+CIP. Ciprofloxacin in combination with amikacin and gentamicin showed synergistic effect and no antagonistic effect against MDR P. aeruginosa.

  19. Rapid identification of aminoglycoside-induced deafness gene mutations using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shasha; Xiang, Guangxin; Kang, Dongyang; Wang, Chen; Kong, Yanling; Zhang, Xun; Liang, Shujian; Mitchelson, Keith; Xing, Wanli; Dai, Pu

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics can induce ototoxicity in genetically susceptible individuals carrying certain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (C1494T and A1555G), resulting in hearing loss. So, a rapid diagnostic approach is needed to accurately identify subjects carrying such gene mutations. In the present study, we describe a rapid and reliable four-color, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneously detecting two mtDNA 12S rRNA gene variants, A1555G and C1494T, which are prevalent in the Han Chinese population. This multiplex assay incorporates three allele-specific TaqMan probes labeled with different fluorophores in a single reaction, providing high genotyping accuracy for clinical blood samples. Tests with C1494T, A1555G and wild-type DNA exhibited high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility and accuracy of discriminating mutations from wild-type. This study shows that this simple and inexpensive method can be used for routine molecular diagnostics and potentially for large-scale genetic screening. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Revisiting the nucleotide and aminoglycoside substrate specificity of the bifunctional aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia enzyme.

    PubMed

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2012-12-21

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (k(cat)/K(m) = 10(5)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides.

  1. Further involvement of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in aminoglycoside-induced deafness: A novel type of heteroplasmy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.; Prezant, T.R.; Bu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been linked recently to a predisposing mutation in the 3{prime} end of the small ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of human mitochondria (1555 A{yields}G) that makes the mitochondrial rRNA structurally more similar to its bacterial counterpart. This mutation was found in Chinese families in which the susceptibility to develop ototoxic deafness was inherited through the maternal lineage. However, the 1555 A{yields}G mutation was rarely found in sporadic patients in China, where aminoglycosides are commonly used. To further characterize the mutations predisposing to aminoglycoside ototoxicity, we analyzed the 12S rRNA gene in 35 sporadic patients without the 1555 mutation. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, heteroduplex (HD) analysis, sequencing, and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, we found that 3 of 35 sporadic patients had unique sequence changes in the 12S rRNA gene. Two of these changes were homoplasmic. One of the patients displayed a novel type of heteroplasmy, which we term multiplasmy, with one base deletion at nt 961 and different populations of mitochondrial DNA with varying numbers of inserted cytosines at that site.

  2. Combinations of β-Lactam or Aminoglycoside Antibiotics with Plectasin Are Synergistic against Methicillin-Sensitive and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M.; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87–89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  3. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Akiko; Taura, Kojiro; Koyama, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. While this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. While γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 hrs after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1–43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  4. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs.

  5. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among coagulase negative staphylococci in Iranian pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Moshafi, Mohammad Hassan; Forootanfar, Hamid; Hojabri, Zoya; Saffari, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    In spite of widespread emergence of aminoglycoside resistance, these drugs are still used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of aminoglycoside resistance and genes encoding aminoglycoside - modifying enzymes (AMEs) as well as Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) type in coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in pediatric patients. Totally, 93 CoNS isolates were examined for susceptibility to aminoglycosides using disk diffusion and/or E-test methods. AMEs genes and SCCmec types were detected using multiplex PCR. Strain typing was performed using repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) - PCR assay. The non-susceptibility rates to kanamycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, amikacin and netilmicin were 73%, 59%, 49.5%, 16% and 7.5%, respectively. aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, ant(4')-Ia and aph(3')-IIIa were encountered in 56 (60.2%), 38 (40.8%) and 18 (19.3%) isolates, respectively. In aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia- positive isolates, the non- susceptibility rates to kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin and netilmicin were 83%, 74%, 73%, 49% and 43%, respectively. SCCmec types included type IV (n = 31), I (n = 17), II (n = 5), III (n = 4), and V (n = 2). Three isolates had two types; I + III (n = 2) and III + IV (n = 1) whereas 11 isolates were non-typeable. AMEs genes carriers were distributed frequently into type IV. We found diverse fingerprint patterns among our isolates. In conclusion, there was a strong correlation between alarming rate of aminoglycoside resistance and methicillin resistance. Discordances between phenotypic and genotypic detection of aminoglycoside resistance were discernible. AMEs genes might be related to SCCmec types. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of Ampicillin plus Ceftriaxone in Treatment of Experimental Endocarditis Due to Enterococcus faecalis Strains Highly Resistant to Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldà, Joan; Torres, Carmen; Tenorio, Carmen; López, Pedro; Zaragoza, Myriam; Capdevila, Josep A.; Almirante, Benito; Ruiz, Fernanda; Borrell, Nuria; Gomis, Xavier; Pigrau, Carles; Baquero, Fernando; Pahissa, Albert

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the in vitro possibilities of ampicillin-ceftriaxone combinations for 10 Enterococcus faecalis strains with high-level resistance to aminoglycosides (HLRAg) and to assess the efficacy of ampicillin plus ceftriaxone, both administered with humanlike pharmacokinetics, for the treatment of experimental endocarditis due to HLRAg E. faecalis. A reduction of 1 to 4 dilutions in MICs of ampicillin was obtained when ampicillin was combined with a fixed subinhibitory ceftriaxone concentration of 4 μg/ml. This potentiating effect was also observed by the double disk method with all 10 strains. Time-kill studies performed with 1 and 2 μg of ampicillin alone per ml or in combination with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μg of ceftriaxone per ml showed a ≥2 log10 reduction in CFU per milliliter with respect to ampicillin alone and to the initial inoculum for all 10 E. faecalis strains studied. This effect was obtained for seven strains with the combination of 2 μg of ampicillin per ml plus 10 μg of ceftriaxone per ml and for six strains with 5 μg of ceftriaxone per ml. Animals with catheter-induced endocarditis were infected intravenously with 108 CFU of E. faecalis V48 or 105 CFU of E. faecalis V45 and were treated for 3 days with humanlike pharmacokinetics of 2 g of ampicillin every 4 h, alone or combined with 2 g of ceftriaxone every 12 h. The levels in serum and the pharmacokinetic parameters of the humanlike pharmacokinetics of ampicillin or ceftriaxone in rabbits were similar to those found in humans treated with 2 g of ampicillin or ceftriaxone intravenously. Results of the therapy for experimental endocarditis caused by E. faecalis V48 or V45 showed that the residual bacterial titers in aortic valve vegetations were significantly lower in the animals treated with the combinations of ampicillin plus ceftriaxone than in those treated with ampicillin alone (P < 0.001). The combination of ampicillin and ceftriaxone showed in vitro and

  7. Antimicrobial resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolated from retail meat purchased in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Ali Ahmad; Checkley, Sylvia; Avery, Brent; Chalmers, Gabhan; Bohaychuk, Valerie; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard; Aslam, Mueen

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzed antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and resistance genes in generic Escherichia coli isolated from retail meat samples purchased (2007-2008) in Alberta, Canada, and determined potential associations between resistance phenotypes and resistance genes with relation to the meat types. A total of 422 E. coli isolates from retail chicken, turkey, beef, and pork meats were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Multiplex PCRs were used to detect major resistance genes for tetracyclines [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C)], sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, sul3), aminoglycosides (strA/B, aadA, aadB, aac(3)IV, aphA1, aphA2), and β-lactamase (bla(CMY-2), bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(PSE-1)). Resistance to ciprofloxacin was not found in any isolate. Overall resistances to clinically important antimicrobials amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (16.8% of isolates) and ceftriaxone (12.6% isolates) were observed. These resistances were observed more frequently (p<0.0001) in chicken-derived E. coli than those from the other meat types. Resistance to multiple antimicrobials (≥ 5) was found in more chicken derived E. coli (32%) than E. coli from other meat types. The β-lactamase genes of clinical importance, including bla(CMY-2) and bla(TEM), were found in about 18% of poultry-derived E. coli and in only 5% of ground beef. The bla(CMY-2) gene was more likely to be found in E. coli from chicken than turkey, beef, or pork meats. The tet(A) gene was associated with bla(CMY-2), whereas bla(CMY-2) and bla(TEM) genes were associated with strA/B genes. Resistance genes for tetracycline, sulfonamides, and aminoglycosides were associated with the phenotypic expression of resistance to unrelated classes of antimicrobials. These data suggest the prevalence of AMR and select resistance genes were higher in poultry-derived E. coli. The multiple associations found between AMR phenotypes and resistance genes suggest a complex nature of resistance in E. coli from retail meat, and hence the use of a single

  8. Molecular determinants of affinity for aminoglycoside binding to the aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Serpersu, Engin H

    2006-08-29

    One of the most commonly occurring aminoglycoside resistance enzymes is aminoglycoside 2''-O-nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(2'')]. In the present study molecular determinants of affinity and specificity for aminoglycoside binding to this enzyme are investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Binding of aminoglycosides is enthalpically driven accompanied by negative entropy changes. The presence of metal-nucleotide increases the affinity for all but one of the aminoglycosides studied but has no effect on specificity. The substituents at positions 1, 2', and 6' are important determinants of substrate specificity. An amino group at these positions leads to greater affinity. No correlation is observed between the change in affinity and enthalpy. At the 2' position greater affinity results from a more negative enthalpy for an aminoglycoside containing an amino rather than a hydroxyl at that position. At the 6' position the greater affinity for an aminoglycoside containing an amino substituent results from a less disfavorable entropic contribution. The thermodynamic basis for the change in affinity at position 1 could not be determined because of the weak binding of one of the aminoglycoside substrates, amikacin. The effect of increasing osmotic stress on affinity was used to determine that a net release of approximately four water molecules occurs when tobramycin binds to ANT(2''). No measurable net change in the number of bound water molecules is observed when neomycin binds the enzyme. Data acquired in this work provide the rationale for the ability of ANT(2'') to confer resistance against kanamycins but not neomycins.

  9. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  10. Diverse Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Dairy Cow Manure

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. PMID:24757214

  11. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides.

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of N-acetylcysteine in preventing aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity: implications for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB.

    PubMed

    Kranzer, Katharina; Elamin, Wael F; Cox, Helen; Seddon, James A; Ford, Nathan; Drobniewski, Francis

    2015-11-01

    Ototoxicity is a severe side effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are recommended for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) appears to protect against drug- and noise-induced hearing loss. This review aimed to determine if coadministering NAC with aminoglycoside affected ototoxicity development, and to assess the safety and tolerability of prolonged NAC administration. Eligible studies reported on the efficacy of concomitant NAC and aminoglycoside administration for ototoxicity prevention or long-term (≥ 6 weeks) administration of NAC regardless of indication. Pooled estimates were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) statistic. Three studies reported that NAC reduced ototoxicity in 146 patients with end-stage renal failure receiving aminoglycosides. Pooled relative risk for otoprotection at 4-6 weeks was 0.14 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.45), and the risk difference was -33.3% (95% CI 45.5% to 21.2%). Eighty-three studies (N=9988) described the administration of NAC for >6 weeks. Abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and arthralgia were increased 1.4-2.2 times. This review provides evidence for the safety and otoprotective effect of NAC when coadministered with aminoglycoside. It represents a strong justification for a clinical trial to investigate the effect of concomitant NAC treatment in patients receiving aminoglycosides as part of MDR-TB treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Selectively guanidinylated aminoglycosides as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; Hensler, Mary E; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Dam, Quang N; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of virulent, drug-resistant bacterial strains coupled with a minimal output of new pharmaceutical agents to combat them makes this a critical time for antibacterial research. Aminoglycosides are a well-studied, highly potent class of naturally occurring antibiotics with scaffolds amenable to modification, and therefore, they provide an excellent starting point for the development of semisynthetic, next-generation compounds. To explore the potential of this approach, we synthesized a small library of aminoglycoside derivatives selectively and minimally modified at one or two positions with a guanidine group replacing the corresponding amine or hydroxy functionality. Most guanidino-aminoglycosides showed increased affinity for the ribosomal decoding rRNA site, the cognate biological target of the natural products, when compared with their parent antibiotics, as measured by an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) A-site binding assay. Additionally, certain analogues showed improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against resistant bacterial strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An amikacin derivative holds particular promise with activity greater than or equal to the parent antibiotic in the majority of bacterial strains tested.

  14. Construction of an Escherichia-Pseudomonas shuttle vector containing an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene and a lacZ'' Gene for alpha-complementation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bheong-Uk; Hong, Ja-Heon; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Oh, Kye-Heon

    2006-12-01

    A new 4.87 kb Escherichia-Pseudomonas shuttle vector has been constructed by inserting a 1.27 kb DNA fragment with a replication origin of a Pseudomonas plasmid pRO1614 into the 3.6 kb E. coli plasmid pBGS18. This vector, designated pJH1, contains an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene (aph) from Tn903, a lacZ'' gene for alpha-complementation and a versatile multiple cloning site possessing unique restriction sites for EcoRI, SacI, KpnI, SmaI, BamHI, XbaI, SalI, BspMI, PstI, SphI, and HindIII. When pJH1 was transformed into E. coli DH5alpha and into P. putida HK-6, it was episomally and stably maintained in both strains. In addition, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene which was transcriptionally cloned into pJH1 rendered E. coli cells fluorescence when its transformants were illuminated at 488 nm.

  15. Glycodiversification for the optimization of the kanamycin class aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Li, Jie; Chen, Hsiao-Nung; Chang, Huiwen; Tanifum, Christabel Tomla; Liu, Hsiu-Hsiang; Czyryca, Przemyslaw G; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom

    2005-10-06

    In an effort to optimize the antibacterial activity of kanamycin class aminoglycoside antibiotics, we have accomplished the synthesis and antibacterial assay of new kanamycin B analogues. A rationale-based glycodiversification strategy was employed. The activity of the lead is comparable to that of commercially available kanamycin. These new members, however, were found to be inactive against aminoglycoside resistant bacteria. Molecular modeling was used to provide the explanation. Thus, a new strategy for structural modifications of kanamycin class aminoglycosides is suggested.

  16. Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyger, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides exert their cytotoxic effect at three different locations: at the cell surface, in the cytosol, or in the nucleus. At the cell surface, aminoglycoside binding can cause temporary hearing loss, motor paralysis at the neuromuscular junction, ion wasting in kidneys, or analgesia in mechano- and nocioreceptors (touch and pain sensory…

  17. Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyger, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides exert their cytotoxic effect at three different locations: at the cell surface, in the cytosol, or in the nucleus. At the cell surface, aminoglycoside binding can cause temporary hearing loss, motor paralysis at the neuromuscular junction, ion wasting in kidneys, or analgesia in mechano- and nocioreceptors (touch and pain sensory…

  18. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-10-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and enterococcal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6')-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2'')-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2'')-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2'')-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2'')-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia enzyme.

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  20. Occurrence and clonal diversity of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from inanimate surfaces in Algerian hospital environment: First report of armA, qnrB and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes.

    PubMed

    Zenati, Karima; Sahli, Farida; Garcia, Vincent; Bakour, Sofiane; Belhadi, Djellali; Rolain, Jean Marc; Touati, Abdelaziz

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the molecular support of antibiotic resistance in MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from inanimate surfaces between March 2012 to February 2014 in three teaching hospitals (Setif, Bejaia and Constantine) in Algeria. Forty-four K. pneumoniae producing ESBL were detected and blaCTX-M-15 and blaCTX-M-3 were detected respectively in 41 and 3 isolates. These K. pneumoniae isolates producing ESBL were also resistant to gentamicin (87%), tobramicin (87%), ciprofloxacin (66%) and ofloxacin (62%). Aminoglycosides resistance genes detected were 16S rRNA methylase (armA), aminoglycoside acetyl-transferase (aac(6')-Ib), aminoglycoside nucleotidyl-transferase (aadA2) and aminoglycoside, phosphoryl-transferase (ant3″Ih-aac(6')-IId). Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes detected were aac(6')-Ib-cr (34 isolates) and qnrB genes in (34 isolates). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) resulted in 12 different sequence types (STs) regrouped into 5 clonal complexes (CC147, CC17, CC37, CC2 and CC23), one clonal group (CG485) and 4 singletons (ST1426, ST405, ST1308, ST873). Here, we report the detection of the ESBLs encoding gene linked with plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and aminoglycosides resistance recovered from inanimate surfaces in hospital environment. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  2. Chromosomal aadD2 encodes an aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase in Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Gerbaud, Guy; Courvalin, Patrice; Leclercq, Roland

    2003-04-01

    Bacillus clausii SIN is one of the four strains of B. clausii composing a probiotic administered to humans for the prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic therapy. The strain is resistant to kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. A gene conferring aminoglycoside resistance was cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. The gene, called aadD2, encoding a putative 246-amino acid protein, shared 47% identity with ant(4')-Ia from Staphylococcus aureus, which encodes an aminoglycoside 4'-O-nucleotidyltransferase. Phosphocellulose paper-binding assays indicated that the gene product was responsible for nucleotidylation of kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. The aadD2 gene was detected by DNA-DNA hybridization in the three other strains of the probiotic mixture and in the reference strain B. clausii DSM8716, although it did not confer resistance in these strains. Mutations in the sequence of the putative promoter for aadD2 from B. clausii SIN resulted in higher identity with consensus promoter sequences and may account for aminoglycoside resistance in that strain. The aadD2 gene was chromosomally located in all strains and was not transferable by conjugation. These data indicate that chromosomal aadD2 is specific to B. clausii.

  3. Diverse antibiotic resistance genes in dairy cow manure.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-04-22

    Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. IMPORTANCE The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria is one of the most intractable challenges in 21st-century public health. The origins of resistance are complex, and a better understanding of the impacts of antibiotics used on farms would produce a more robust platform for public policy. Microbiomes of farm animals are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which may affect distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in human pathogens. Previous studies have focused on antibiotic resistance genes in manures of animals subjected

  4. Revisiting the Nucleotide and Aminoglycoside Substrate Specificity of the Bifunctional Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (kcat/Km = 105-107 m−1 s−1). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:23115238

  5. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from human gut microbiota reveals a novel gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hu, Yongfei; Yin, Yeshi; Yang, Xi; Xiang, Chunsheng; Wang, Baohong; Chen, Yanfei; Yang, Fengling; Lei, Fang; Wu, Na; Lu, Na; Li, Jing; Chen, Quanze; Li, Lanjuan; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-11-01

    The human gut microbiota has a high density of bacteria that are considered a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, one fosmid metagenomic library generated from the gut microbiota of four healthy humans was used to screen for ARGs against seven antibiotics. Eight new ARGs were obtained: one against amoxicillin, six against d-cycloserine, and one against kanamycin. The new amoxicillin resistance gene encodes a protein with 53% identity to a class D β-lactamase from Riemerella anatipestifer RA-GD. The six new d-cycloserine resistance genes encode proteins with 73-81% identity to known d-alanine-d-alanine ligases. The new kanamycin resistance gene encodes a protein of 274 amino acids with an N-terminus (amino acids 1-189) that has 42% identity to the 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] from Enterococcus hirae and a C-terminus (amino acids 190-274) with 35% identity to a hypothetical protein from Clostridiales sp. SSC/2. A functional study on the novel kanamycin resistance gene showed that only the N-terminus conferred kanamycin resistance. Our results showed that functional metagenomics is a useful tool for the identification of new ARGs.

  6. Aminoglycosides: Molecular Insights on the Recognition of RNA and Aminoglycoside Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Chittapragada, Maruthi; Roberts, Sarah; Ham, Young Wan

    2009-01-01

    RNA is increasingly recognized for its significant functions in biological systems and has recently become an important molecular target for therapeutics development. Aminoglycosides, a large class of clinically significant antibiotics, exert their biological functions by binding to prokaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and interfering with protein translation, resulting in bacterial cell death. They are also known to bind to viral mRNAs such as HIV-1 RRE and TAR. Consequently, aminoglycosides are accepted as the single most important model in understanding the principles that govern small molecule-RNA recognition, which is essential for the development of novel antibacterial, antiviral or even anti-oncogenic agents. This review outlines the chemical structures and mechanisms of molecular recognition and antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides and various aminoglycoside mimics that have recently been devised to improve biological efficacy, binding affinity and selectivity, or to circumvent bacterial resistance. PMID:19812740

  7. New trends in aminoglycosides use

    PubMed Central

    Fosso, Marina Y.; Li, Yijia; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Despite their inherent toxicity and the acquired bacterial resistance that continuously threaten their long-term clinical use, aminoglycosides (AGs) still remain valuable components of the antibiotic armamentarium. Recent literature shows that the AGs’ role has been further expanded as multi-tasking players in different areas of study. This review aims at presenting some of the new trends observed in the use of AGs in the past decade, along with the current understanding of their mechanisms of action in various bacterial and eukaryotic cellular processes. PMID:25071928

  8. Providencia stuartii Isolates from Greece: Co-Carriage of Cephalosporin (blaSHV-5, blaVEB-1), Carbapenem (blaVIM-1), and Aminoglycoside (rmtB) Resistance Determinants by a Multidrug-Resistant Outbreak Clone.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Olga; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan; Mevius, Dik; Wareham, David W

    2016-07-01

    Providencia stuartii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. We describe an outbreak due to a multidrug-resistant strain over a 4-month period in a critical care unit in Athens. Molecular typing revealed each of the isolates to be clonally related with coresistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and quinolones. Each isolate contained a 220-kb multi-replicon (IncA/C and IncR) conjugative plasmid encoding TEM-1, SHV-5, VEB-1, and VIM-1 β-lactamases and the 16S rDNA methylase RmtB. Antimicrobial therapy was unsuccessful in 3 of 6 cases, and resistance was readily transmissible to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli by transformation and conjugation. This highlights the clinical importance of P. stuartii and its ability to disseminate critical resistance determinants to other bacterial pathogens.

  9. Recognition of a Nocardia transvalensis complex by resistance to aminoglycosides, including amikacin, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R W; Steingrube, V A; Brown, B A; Blacklock, Z; Jost, K C; McNabb, A; Colby, W D; Biehle, J R; Gibson, J L; Wallace, R J

    1997-09-01

    Amikacin resistance, rare among nocardiae, was observed in 58 clinical isolates of nocardiae. All of these isolates hydrolyzed hypoxanthine, and 75 to 100% utilized citrate, D-galactose, and D-trehalose as sole carbon sources. Based on utilization of I-erythritol, D-glucitol, i-myo-inositol, D-mannitol, and ribitol and susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, the 58 isolates were separable into four groups. One group was negative for I-erythritol and ribitol and included all the isolates belonging to Nocardia asteroides complex antibiogram type IV. The remaining three groups were positive for I-erythritol and ribitol and were grouped within Nocardia transvalensis. The group that included the type strain was designated N. transvalensis sensu stricto, and the other two groups were designated new taxons 1 and 2. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a 439-bp segment of the 65-kDa heat shock protein gene with XhoI and HinfI produced identical patterns for 53 (91%) and 58 (100%) isolates, respectively, and differentiated them from all other Nocardia taxa. NarI- and HaeIII-derived RFLP patterns clearly differentiated each of the four biochemically defined taxa. These four groups were also distinguishable by using the chromogenic substrates in Dade MicroScan test panels. By high-performance liquid chromatography, these isolates exhibited the same unique mycolic acid-ester elution patterns that differed from those of all other clinically significant nocardiae. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of fatty acids also produced similar patterns for all isolates that distinguished them from all other Nocardia taxa, but did not differentiate the four taxa within the complex. We propose the designation N. transvalensis complex for these four groups of nocardiae, pending further genetic evaluation.

  10. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  11. NMR-based analysis of aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4'): the pattern of OH/NH3(+) substitution determines the preferred antibiotic binding mode and is critical for drug inactivation.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Julia; Vacas, Tatiana; Torrado, Mario; Corzana, Francisco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Menendez, Margarita; Bastida, Agatha; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2008-04-16

    The most significant mechanism of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides is the enzymatic inactivation of the drug. Herein, we analyze several key aspects of the aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus, employing NMR complemented with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and measurements of the enzymatic activity on newly synthesized kanamycin derivatives. From a methodological perspective, this analysis provides the first example reported for the use of transferred NOE (trNOE) experiments in the analysis of complex molecular recognition processes, characterized by the existence of simultaneous binding events of the ligand to different regions of a protein receptor. The obtained results show that, in favorable cases, these overlapping binding processes can be isolated employing site-directed mutagenesis and then independently analyzed. From a molecular recognition perspective, this work conclusively shows that the enzyme ANT(4') displays a wide tolerance to conformational variations in the drug. Thus, according to the NMR data, kanamycin-A I/II linkage exhibits an unusual anti-Psi orientation in the ternary complex, which is in qualitative agreement with the previously reported crystallographic complex. In contrast, closely related, kanamycin-B is recognized by the enzyme in the syn-type arrangement for both glycosidic bonds. This observation together with the enzymatic activity displayed by ANT(4') against several synthetic kanamycin derivatives strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of positive charges within the aminoglycoside scaffold is the key feature that governs its preferred binding mode to the protein catalytic region and also the regioselectivity of the adenylation reaction. In contrast, the global shape of the antibiotic does not seem to be a critical factor. This feature represents a qualitative difference between the target A-site RNA and the resistance enzyme ANT(4') as aminoglycoside

  12. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  13. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, Dennis; D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance. PMID:26153129

  14. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; van Schaik, Willem; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W J

    2015-07-08

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  15. Maternally Inherited Aminoglycoside-Induced and Nonsyndromic Deafness Is Associated with the Novel C1494T Mutation in the Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Gene in a Large Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Qiuju; Yan, Qingfeng; Deng, Jian-Hong; Han, Dongyi; Bai, Yidong; Young, Wie-Yen; Guan, Min-Xin

    2004-01-01

    We report here the characterization of a large Chinese family with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic deafness. In the absence of aminoglycosides, some matrilineal relatives in this family exhibited late-onset/progressive deafness, with a wide range of severity and age at onset. Notably, the average age at onset of deafness has changed from 55 years (generation II) to 10 years (generation IV). Clinical data reveal that the administration of aminoglycosides can induce or worsen deafness in matrilineal relatives. The age at the time of drug administration appears to be correlated with the severity of hearing loss experienced by affected individuals. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified a homoplasmic C-to-T transition at position 1494 (C1494T) in the 12S rRNA gene. The C1494T mutation is expected to form a novel U1494-1555A base pair, which is in the same position as the C1494-1555G pair created by the deafness-associated A1555G mutation, at the highly conserved A site of 12S rRNA. Exposure to a high concentration of paromomycin or neomycin caused a variable but significant average increase in doubling time in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from four symptomatic and two asymptomatic individuals in this family carrying the C1494T mutation when compared to four control cell lines. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the rate of total oxygen consumption was observed in the mutant cell lines. Thus, our data strongly support the idea that the A site of mitochondrial 12S rRNA is the primary target for aminoglycoside-induced deafness. These results also strongly suggest that the nuclear background plays a role in the aminoglycoside ototoxicity and in the development of the deafness phenotype associated with the C1494T mutation in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. PMID:14681830

  16. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bora; Park, Woojun

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin). Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline) have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii. PMID:26360766

  17. Novel gentamicin resistance genes in Campylobacter isolated from humans and retail meats in the USA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohua; Mukherjee, Sampa; Chen, Yuansha; Li, Cong; Young, Shenia; Warren, Melissa; Abbott, Jason; Friedman, Sharon; Kabera, Claudine; Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2015-05-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter and investigate aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms. One-hundred-and-fifty-one gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter isolates from humans (n = 38 Campylobacter jejuni; n = 41, Campylobacter coli) and retail chickens (n = 72 C. coli), were screened for the presence of gentamicin resistance genes by PCR and subtyped using PFGE. A subset of the isolates (n = 41) was analysed using WGS. Nine variants of gentamicin resistance genes were identified: aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, Ig, If, If1, If3, Ih, aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-Ia and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2. The aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, If1, If3, Ih and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2 variants were identified for the first time in Campylobacter. Human isolates showed more diverse aminoglycoside resistance genes than did retail chicken isolates, in which only aph(2″)-Ic and -Ig were identified. The aph(2″)-Ig gene was only gene shared by C. coli isolates from human (n = 27) and retail chicken (n = 69). These isolates displayed the same resistance profile and similar PFGE patterns, suggesting that contaminated retail chicken was probably the source of human C. coli infections. Human isolates were genetically diverse and generally more resistant than the retail chicken isolates. The most frequent co-resistance was to tetracycline (78/79, 98.7%), followed by ciprofloxacin/nalidixic acid (46/79, 58.2%), erythromycin and azithromycin (36/79, 45.6%), telithromycin (32/79, 40.5%) and clindamycin (18/79, 22.8%). All human and retail meat isolates were susceptible to florfenicol. This study demonstrated that several new aminoglycoside resistance genes underlie the recent emergence of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter, and that, in addition to contaminated retail chicken, other sources have also contributed to gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter infections in humans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  18. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance gene markers in Mycoplasma genitalium: application to studies of the minimal gene complement.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Burgos, Raul; Planell, Raquel; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2006-02-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been proposed as a suitable model for an in-depth understanding of the biology of a free-living organism. This paper reports that the expression of the aminoglycoside resistance gene aac(6')-aph(2''), the only selectable marker hitherto available for M. genitalium genetic studies, correlates with a growth impairment of the resistant strains. In light of this finding, a tetM438 construction based on the tetracycline resistance gene tetM was developed; it can be used efficiently in M. genitalium and confers multiple advantages when compared to aac(6')-aph(2''). The use of tetM438 significantly improves transformation efficiency and generates visible colonies faster. Finally, the improvements in the pMTnTetM438 construction made it possible to obtain insertions in genes which have not been previously considered to be dispensable under laboratory growth conditions.

  19. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-07

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored.

  20. Use of a DNA Microarray for Simultaneous Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes among Staphylococcal Clinical Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Can; Yang, Hua-Wei; Jiang, Di; Zhang, Qiong; Mitchelson, Keith; Cheng, Jing

    2007-01-01

    We developed a multiplex asymmetric PCR (MAPCR)-based DNA microarray assay for characterization of the clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes leading to penicillin, methicillin, aminoglycoside, macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance in staphylococci. The DNA-based assay involves detection of specific conserved regions of the mecA, blaZ (methicillin and penicillin resistance), aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2‴) (aminoglycoside resistance), ermA and ermC genes (MLSB resistance), and the msrA gene (macrolide and streptogramin B resistance). The microarray uses a variable sequence region of the 16S rRNA gene to broadly differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). The performance of the microarray was validated with a total of 178 clinically important S. aureus and 237 CoNS isolates, with correlations of 100% for S. aureus to CoNS discrimination and more than 90% for antibiotic resistance between the genotypic analysis determined by the microarray and the phenotype determined by standard methods of species identification and susceptibility testing. The major discrepant results were 17 mecA-positive CoNS and 60 aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2‴)-positive CoNS isolates measured by microarray that were susceptible to the corresponding antibiotics based on disk diffusion assay. Overall, this microarray-based assay offers a simultaneous, fast (≤5 h), and accurate identification of antibiotic resistance genes from a single colony, as well as species classification. Our extensive validation of the microarray suggests that it may be a useful tool to complement phenotypic susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories and to survey the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants in epidemiological studies. PMID:17728472

  1. Single daily dosing of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Preston, S L; Briceland, L L

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the rationale behind dosing aminoglycosides as a single daily dose versus traditional dosing approaches, we conducted a MEDLINE search to identify all pertinent articles, and also reviewed the references of all articles. Single daily dosing of aminoglycosides is not a new concept, having been examined since 1974. The advantages of this regimen include optimum concentration-dependent bactericidal activity, longer dosing intervals due to the postantibiotic effect (PAE), and prevention of bacterial adaptive resistance. Because of longer dosing intervals, toxicity may also be delayed or reduced. Costs may be reduced due to decreased monitoring and administration. Clinically, the regimen has been implemented in various patient populations with reported success. Questions remain, however, about optimum dose, peak and trough serum concentrations, and dose adjustment in patients with renal impairment or neutropenia. More clinical experience with this method in large numbers of patients has to be published. Pharmacists can be instrumental in monitoring patients receiving once-daily therapy and by educating health care professionals as to the rationale behind the therapy.

  2. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in two Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Yi; Liao Zhisu; Li Zhiyuan; Chen Jianfu; Qian Yaping; Tang Xiaowen; Wang Jindan; Yang Li; Li Ronghua; Ji Jinzhang; Choo, Daniel I. |; Lu Jianxin . E-mail: jx@mail.wz.zj.cn; Guan Minxin |||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-14

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  3. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. AAC(3)-XI, a New Aminoglycoside 3-N-Acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum

    PubMed Central

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  5. Effect of Enzymatic Adenylylation on Dihydrostreptomycin Accumulation in Escherichia coli Carrying an R-Factor: Model Explaining Aminoglycoside Resistance by Inactivating Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, P.; Bryan, L. E.; Pickard, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli carrying R-factor R71(a), which codes for a streptomycin-spectinomycin adenylyltransferase, have elevated levels of resistance to dihydrostreptomycin (DHS) compared with isogenic R− bacteria. DHS accumulated by whole cells and spheroplasts of R+ bacteria is lower than that observed for R− strains, a result of the absence of the second and more rapid of the two energy-dependent phases of DHS uptake seen in susceptible E. coli. A mutant of R+E. coli with reduced DHS resistance has been shown to have reduced levels of streptomycin-spectinomycin adenylyltransferase activity as well as enhanced drug accumulation. Actively accumulated DHS was recovered from R+ cells as the adenylylated derivative. Neither was inactivated antibiotic detected in culture filtrates, nor was actively accumulated drug lost from R+ cells under normal conditions. The cellular distribution of actively accumulated DHS in R+ and R− cells was found to be the same. Membranes isolated from these cells retained only a small fraction (≃1%) of the total cell-associated drug. The R+ derivative of a mutant with defective energy transduction (E. coli NR-70) and reduced ability to transport aminoglycosides has a significantly higher minimal inhibitory concentration of DHS than its R+ parent (strain 7). Streptomycin-spectinomycin adenylyltransferase activity, from comparisons of Km values and total activities of enzyme, was the same in both strains. The enzyme has been localized to the exterior surface of the bacterial inner membrane, although isolated membranes lacked detectable enzyme activity. The preceding observations are consistent with the proposal that the level of R71(a)-mediated DHS resistance is the outcome of competition between the rate of adenylylation and the rate of the first energy-dependent phase of DHS transport. When the rate of adenylylation exceeds the first energy-dependent phase, adenylylated DHS is accumulated, apparently in a manner identical to

  6. Characterization of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in enterobacteriaceae clinical strains and characterization of the plasmids implicated in their diffusion.

    PubMed

    Miró, Elisenda; Grünbaum, Federico; Gómez, Laura; Rivera, Alba; Mirelis, Beatriz; Coll, Pere; Navarro, Ferran

    2013-04-01

    A total of 788 clinical Enterobacteriaceae were collected to describe the aminoglycoside-modifying genes (AME genes) and to characterize the plasmids that carry these genes. Among the 788 strains collected, 330 (41.8%) were aminoglycoside-resistant: 264 Escherichia coli (80%), 33 Proteus mirabilis (10%), 10 Klebsiella pneumoniae (3%), six K. oxytoca (1.8%), five Enterobacter cloacae (1.5%), three Morganella morganii (0.9%), three Providencia stuartii (0.9%), two Salmonella enterica (0.6%), and one each Citrobacter freundii, C. koseri, Proteus vulgaris, and Shigella sonnei. The most affected aminoglycoside was streptomycin (92.7%), followed by kanamycin (26.3%), gentamicin (18%), tobramycin (16.9%), netilmicin (3.6%), and amikacin (1.5%). The AME genes found were aph(3″)-Ib (65.4%), ant(3″)-Ia (37.5%), aph(3')-Ia (13.9%), aac(3)-IIa (12.4%), aac(6')-Ib (4.2%), ant(2″)-Ia (3.6%), and aph(3')-IIa (1.2%). Thirty-four percent of the strains showed more than one enzyme. The most frequent association was ant(3″)-Ia plus aph(3″)-Ib (35 strains). From 66 selected AME genes, 24 were plasmid located: 12 aac(3)-IIa, six aph(3')-Ia, three ant(3″)-Ia, two ant(2″)-Ia, and one aac(6')-Ib. These genes were located in plasmids belonging to incompatibility groups F, FIA, FIB, or HI2. In conclusion, the AME genes involved in aminoglycoside-clinical resistance were aac(3)-IIa, aac(6')-Ib, and ant(2″)-Ia, genes that confer resistance to tobramycin, gentamicin, and amikacin.

  7. A New High-Level Gentamicin Resistance Gene, aph(2")-Id, in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shane F.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Clewell, Don B.; Donabedian, Susan M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Chow, Joseph W.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococcus casseliflavus UC73 is a clinical blood isolate with high-level resistance to gentamicin. DNA preparations from UC73 failed to hybridize with intragenic probes for aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and aph(2")-Ic. A 4-kb fragment from UC73 was cloned and found to confer resistance to gentamicin in Escherichia coli DH5α transformants. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of a 906-bp open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had a region with homology to the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme APH(2")-Ic and to the C-terminal domain of the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-APH(2"). The gene is designated aph(2")-Id, and its observed phosphotransferase activity is designated APH(2")-Id. A PCR-generated intragenic probe hybridized to the genomic DNA from 17 of 118 enterococcal clinical isolates (108 with high-level gentamicin resistance) from five hospitals. All 17 were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates, and pulsed-field typing revealed three distinct clones. The combination of ampicillin plus either amikacin or neomycin exhibited synergistic killing against E. casseliflavus UC73. Screening and interpretation of high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci may need to be modified to include detection of APH(2")-Id. PMID:9593155

  8. Complete genome sequence analysis of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare provides insights into antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity related genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulei; Zhao, Lijuan; Chen, Wenjie; Huang, Yunmao; Yang, Ling; Sarathbabu, V; Wu, Zaohe; Li, Jun; Nie, Pin; Lin, Li

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed here the complete genome sequences of a highly virulent Flavobacterium columnare Pf1 strain isolated in our laboratory. The complete genome consists of a 3,171,081 bp circular DNA with 2784 predicted protein-coding genes. Among these, 286 genes were predicted as antibiotic resistance genes, including 32 RND-type efflux pump related genes which were associated with the export of aminoglycosides, indicating inducible aminoglycosides resistances in F. columnare. On the other hand, 328 genes were predicted as pathogenicity related genes which could be classified as virulence factors, gliding motility proteins, adhesins, and many putative secreted proteases. These genes were probably involved in the colonization, invasion and destruction of fish tissues during the infection of F. columnare. Apparently, our obtained complete genome sequences provide the basis for the explanation of the interactions between the F. columnare and the infected fish. The predicted antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity related genes will shed a new light on the development of more efficient preventional strategies against the infection of F. columnare, which is a major worldwide fish pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterologous production of kasugamycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic from Streptomyces kasugaensis, in Streptomyces lividans and Rhodococcus erythropolis L-88 by constitutive expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Kano; Sasaki, Akira; Matsuo, Takashi; Yamamoto, Chika; Minato, Yuiko; Kuwahara, Naoya; Fujii, Chikako; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Agematu, Hitosi; Tamura, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Jun; Ikeda, Haruo; Kojima, Ikuo

    2017-02-27

    Kasugamycin (KSM), an aminoglycoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces kasugaensis cultures, has been used against rice blast disease for more than 50 years. We cloned the KSM biosynthetic gene (KBG) cluster from S. kasugaensis MB273-C4 and constructed three KBG cassettes (i.e., cassettes I-III) to enable heterologous production of KSM in many actinomycetes by constitutive expression of KBGs. Cassette I comprised all putative transcriptional units in the cluster, but it was placed under the control of the P neo promoter from Tn5. It was not maintained stably in Streptomyces lividans and did not transform Rhodococcus erythropolis. Cassette II retained the original arrangement of KBGs, except that the promoter of kasT, the specific activator gene for KBG, was replaced with P rpsJ , the constitutive promoter of rpsJ from Streptomyces avermitilis. To enhance the intracellular concentration of myo-inositol, an expression cassette of ino1 encoding the inositol-1-phosphate synthase from S. avermitilis was inserted into cassette II to generate cassette III. These two cassettes showed stable maintenance in S. lividans and R. erythropolis to produce KSM. Particularly, the transformants of S. lividans induced KSM production up to the same levels as those produced by S. kasugaensis. Furthermore, cassette III induced more KSM accumulation than cassette II in R. erythropolis, suggesting an exogenous supply of myo-inositol by the ino1 expression in the host. Cassettes II and III appear to be useful for heterologous KSM production in actinomycetes. Rhodococcus exhibiting a spherical form in liquid cultivation is also a promising heterologous host for antibiotic fermentation.

  10. Versatility of Aminoglycosides and Prospects for Their Future

    PubMed Central

    Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2003-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics have had a major impact on our ability to treat bacterial infections for the past half century. Whereas the interest in these versatile antibiotics continues to be high, their clinical utility has been compromised by widespread instances of resistance. The multitude of mechanisms of resistance is disconcerting but also illuminates how nature can manifest resistance when bacteria are confronted by antibiotics. This article reviews the most recent knowledge about the mechanisms of aminoglycoside action and the mechanisms of resistance to these antibiotics. PMID:12857776

  11. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  12. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming.

  14. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  15. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2' and 6', but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3')-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antifungal Amphiphilic Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C.-W. T.; Takemoto, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The attachment of alkyl and other hydrophobic groups to traditional antibacterial kanamycins and neomycins creates amphiphilic aminoglycosides with altered antimicrobial properties. In this review, we summarize the discovery of amphiphilic kanamycins that are antifungal, but not antibacterial, and that inhibit the growth of fungi by perturbation of plasma membrane functions. With low toxicities against plant and mammalian cells, they appear to specifically target the fungal plasma membrane. These new antifungal agents offer new options for fighting fungal pathogens and are examples of reviving old drugs to confront new therapeutic challenges. PMID:25110571

  17. Aminoglycoside efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of novel outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Jo, James T H; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2003-03-01

    The expression of tripartite multidrug efflux pumps such as MexA-MexB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to intrinsic resistance to a wide variety of antimicrobials, including beta-lactams, chloramphenicol, macrolides, quinolones, and tetracycline. The MexX-MexY linker-pump combination has been shown to be involved in intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides, but the identity of the cognate outer membrane channel component remains under debate. Fourteen uncharacterized OprM homologs identified in the genome of P. aeruginosa were examined as candidates for this role by assessing the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in P. aeruginosa strain PAK knockout mutants lacking the corresponding genes. Insertional inactivation of OpmG, OpmI, and OpmH resulted in decreases of various degrees in the MICs of streptomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin. When reintroduced into P. aeruginosa on multicopy plasmids, OpmG was able to complement the susceptibility of an opmG::miniTn5 mutant; however, cloned opmH, the proposed ortholog of Escherichia coli tolC according to our phylogenetic analysis, was able to only partially complement the opmH::miniTn5 mutant. Mini-microarray hybridization analysis demonstrated that opmG disruption does not affect expression of OpmI or OpmH (ruling out such indirect effects on aminoglycoside resistance); however, opmH disruption did have possible effects on expression of OpmG and OpmI. Based on the data, we propose that OpmG is a major outer membrane efflux channel involved in aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa PAK and that OpmI, its most related paralog, may share an overlapping function.

  18. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes and plasmids from commensal Escherichia coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Escherichia coli are commonly associated with various animal and environmental sources. They often acquire antimicrobial resistance (AR) to classes of drugs that are used to treat Gram-negative infections such as aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and sulfonamides. Plasmi...

  19. The bacterial paromomycin resistance gene, aphH, as a dominant selectable marker in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Jakobiak, Thomas; Mages, Wolfgang; Scharf, Birgit; Babinger, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schmitt, Rüdiger

    2004-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin that is highly toxic to the green alga Volvox carteri is efficiently inactivated by aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase from Streptomyces rimosus. Therefore, we made constructs in which the bacterial aphH gene encoding this enzyme was combined with Volvox cis-regulatory elements in an attempt to develop a new dominant selectable marker--paromomycin resistance (PmR)--for use in Volvox nuclear transformation. The construct that provided the most efficient transformation was one in which aphH was placed between a chimeric promoter that was generated by fusing the Volvox hsp70 and rbcS3 promoters and the 3' UTR of the Volvox rbcS3 gene. When this plasmid was used in combination with a high-impact biolistic device, the frequency of stable PmR transformants ranged about 15 per 106 target cells. Due to rapid and sharp selection, PmR transformants were readily isolated after six days, which is half the time required for previously used markers. Co-transformation of an unselected marker ranged about 30%. The chimeric aphH gene was stably integrated into the Volvox genome, frequently as tandem multiple copies, and was expressed at a level that made selection of PmR transformants simple and unambiguous. This makes the engineered bacterial aphH gene an efficient dominant selection marker for the transformation and co-transformation of a broad range of V. carteri strains without the recurring need for using auxotrophic recipient strains.

  20. Identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster and an additional gene for resistance to the antituberculosis drug capreomycin.

    PubMed

    Felnagle, Elizabeth A; Rondon, Michelle R; Berti, Andrew D; Crosby, Heidi A; Thomas, Michael G

    2007-07-01

    Capreomycin (CMN) belongs to the tuberactinomycin family of nonribosomal peptide antibiotics that are essential components of the drug arsenal for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Members of this antibiotic family target the ribosomes of sensitive bacteria and disrupt the function of both subunits of the ribosome. Resistance to these antibiotics in Mycobacterium species arises due to mutations in the genes coding for the 16S or 23S rRNA but can also arise due to mutations in a gene coding for an rRNA-modifying enzyme, TlyA. While Mycobacterium species develop resistance due to alterations in the drug target, it has been proposed that the CMN-producing bacterium, Saccharothrix mutabilis subsp. capreolus, uses CMN modification as a mechanism for resistance rather than ribosome modification. To better understand CMN biosynthesis and resistance in S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus, we focused on the identification of the CMN biosynthetic gene cluster in this bacterium. Here, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of the CMN biosynthetic gene cluster from S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus ATCC 23892. We provide evidence for the heterologous production of CMN in the genetically tractable bacterium Streptomyces lividans 1326. Finally, we present data supporting the existence of an additional CMN resistance gene. Initial work suggests that this resistance gene codes for an rRNA-modifying enzyme that results in the formation of CMN-resistant ribosomes that are also resistant to the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin. Thus, S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus may also use ribosome modification as a mechanism for CMN resistance.

  1. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  2. PAHs accelerate the propagation of antibiotic resistance genes in coastal water microbial community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Zelong; Chen, Jingwen; Lu, Hong; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Guan, Xiaoyan

    2017-09-06

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have been regarded as emerging contaminants and have attracted growing attention owing to their widespread presence in the environment. In addition to the well-documented selective pressure of antibiotics, ARGs have also become prevalent because of anthropogenic impacts. Coastal habitats are located between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, which are a hotspot for anthropogenic impacts. Excessive accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has posed a serious threat to coastal habitats, but no information is available on the effect of PAHs on antibiotic resistance in the microbial community of coastal environments. In this study, the effect of two typical PAHs, naphthalene and phenanthrene, on antibiotic resistance propagation was investigated in a coastal microbial community. The results indicated that the presence of 100 mg/L of naphthalene or 10 mg/L of phenanthrene significantly enhanced the abundance of class I integrase gene (intI1), sulfanilamide resistance gene (sulI), and aminoglycosides resistance gene (aadA2) in the microbial community. Horizontal gene transfer experiment demonstrated that increased abundance of ARGs was primarily a result of conjugative transfer mediated by class I integrons. These findings provided direct evidence that coastal microbial community exposed to PAHs might have resulted in the dissemination of ARGs and implied that a more comprehensive risk assessment of PAHs to natural ecosystems and public health is necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of some virulence genes with antibiotic resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection patients in Alexandria, Egypt: A hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Alabsi, Mogeeb S; Ghazal, Abeer; Sabry, Soraya A; Alasaly, Monasr M

    2014-06-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the infecting agent most frequently involved in urinary tract infections (UTIs) worldwide. UPEC resistance to commonly used antibiotics represents a major health problem all over the world. Several factors have been associated with UPEC resistance to antibiotics. The present study deployed a molecular approach to explore the association between some UPEC virulence genes and antibiotic resistance among patients with UTI in Alexandria, Egypt. The study revealed a significant association between presence of the pap gene and resistance to gentamicin; however, it was not significantly associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, quinolones, aminoglycosides, nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The genes sfa, aer and cnf1 were not significantly associated with UPEC resistance to any of the tested antibiotics. In conclusion, resistance of UPEC isolates in the present study could be attributed to other virulence factors.

  4. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb.

  5. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Coproducing ArmA and CTX-M-15 Mediated High Levels of Resistance to Aminoglycoside and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Batah, Rima; Loucif, Lotfi; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Boutefnouchet, Nafissa; Allag, Hamoudi; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is one of the most important pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we have investigated the molecular support of antibiotic resistance and genetic relationships in a series of 54 S. marcescens clinical isolates collected from Eastern Algeria between December 2011 and July 2013. The 54 isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance was performed by conjugation using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain, and plasmid analysis was done by PCR-based replicon typing. The relatedness of our isolates was determined by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of four protein-encoding genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB, and atpD) and then compared to MALDI-TOF MS clustering. Thirty-five out of 54 isolates yielded an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried bla(CTX-M-15) (n=32), bla(TEM-1) (n=26), bla(TEM-71) (n=1), bla(SHV-1a) (n=1), and bla(PER-2) (n=12). Among these isolates, we identified a cluster of 15 isolates from a urology unit that coharbored ESBL and the 16S rRNA methyltransferase armA. Conjugation was successful for five selected strains, demonstrating the transferability of a conjugative plasmid of incompatibility group incL/M type. Phylogenetic analysis along with MALDI-TOF clustering likely suggested an outbreak of such isolates in the urology unit. In this study, we report for the first time the co-occurrence of armA methyltransferase with ESBL in S. marcescens clinical isolates in Eastern Algeria.

  6. Early in vitro development of daptomycin non-susceptibility in high-level aminoglycoside-resistant Enterococcus faecalis predicts the efficacy of the combination of high-dose daptomycin plus ampicillin in an in vivo model of experimental endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Pericàs, J M; García-de-la-Mària, C; Brunet, M; Armero, Y; García-González, J; Casals, G; Almela, M; Quintana, E; Falces, C; Ninot, S; Fuster, D; Llopis, J; Marco, F; Moreno, A; Miró, J M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies showed development of daptomycin non-susceptibility (DNS: MIC >4 mg/L) in Enterococcus faecalis infections. However, no studies have assessed the efficacy of the combination of daptomycin/ampicillin against E. faecalis strains developing DNS in the experimental endocarditis (EE) model. To assess the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of daptomycin at 10 mg/kg/day, daptomycin/ampicillin and ampicillin/ceftriaxone against two high-level aminoglycoside-resistant E. faecalis strains, one developing DNS after in vitro exposure to daptomycin and another that did not (DS). Subculture of 82 E. faecalis strains from patients with endocarditis with daptomycin MICs, time-kill and in vivo experiments using the EE model. 33% of the strains (27 of 82) displayed DNS after subculture with daptomycin. Daptomycin MIC rose from 0.5-2 to 8-16 mg/L. In time-kill experiments, when using a high inoculum (10 8 cfu/mL), daptomycin/ampicillin was synergistic for one-third of DS strains and none of DNS strains, while ampicillin/ceftriaxone retained synergy in all cases. In the EE model, daptomycin did not significantly reduce cfu/g from vegetations compared with control against either strain, while daptomycin/ampicillin reduced significantly more cfu/g than daptomycin against the DS strain, but not against the DNS strain [2.9 (2.0-4.1) versus 6.1 (4.5-8.0); P  =   0.002]. Ampicillin/ceftriaxone was synergistic and bactericidal against both strains, displaying the same activity as daptomycin/ampicillin against the DS strain. Performance of an Etest for daptomycin MIC after subculture with daptomycin inhibitory doses on strains of high-level aminoglycoside-resistant E. faecalis endocarditis may be an easy test to predict the in vivo efficacy of daptomycin/ampicillin.

  7. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M.; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and entero­coccal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6′)-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2′′)-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2′′)-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2′′)-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme. PMID:25286858

  8. [Spontaneous spectinomycin resistance mutations of the chloroplast rrn16 gene in Daucus carota callus lines].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, E A; Sidorchuk, Iu V; Deĭneko, E V

    2011-01-01

    Bioballistic transformation of carrot Daucus carota L. callus cultures with a plasmid containing the aadA (aminoglycoside 3'-adenyltransferase) gene and subsequent selection oftransformants on a selective medium containing spectinomycin (100-500 mg/l) yielded ten callus lines resistant to this antibiotic. PCR analysis did not detect exogenous DNA in the genomes of spectinomycin-resistant calluses. Resistance proved to be due to spontaneous mutations that occurred in two different regions of the chloroplast rrn16 gene, which codes for the 16S rRNA. Six lines displayed the G > T or G > C transverions in position 1012 of the rrn16 gene, and three lines had the A > G transition in position 1138 of the gene. Chloroplast mutations arising during passages of callus cultures in the presence of spectinomycin were described in D. carota for the first time. The cause of spectinomycin resistance was not identified in one line. The mutations observed in the D. carota plastid genome occurred in the region that is involved in the formation of a double-stranded region at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and coincided in positions with the nucleotide substitutions found in spectinomycin-resistant plants of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. and bladderpod Lesquerella fendleri L.

  9. Resistance Gene Analogs in Cherries (Prunus spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic studies have shown that NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) tend to occur in clusters and often map to major resistances gene or QTL. The identification and use of specific RGAs as molecular markers among plant material displaying differential resistance phenotypes has the potential to di...

  10. Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Biofilms May Reflect Influences from High-Intensity Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Winkworth-Lawrence, Cynthia; Lange, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health concern with growing evidence of environmental gene reservoirs, especially in freshwater. However, the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater, in addition to the wide spectrum of land use contaminants like nitrogen and phosphate, that waterways are subjected to is inconclusive. Using molecular analyses, freshwater benthic rock biofilms were screened for genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in both humans and farmed animals (aacA-aphD to aminoglycosides; mecA to ß-lactams; ermA and ermB to macrolides; tetA, tetB, tetK, and tetM to tetracyclines; vanA and vanB to glycopeptides). We detected widespread low levels of antibiotic resistance genes from 20 waterways across southern New Zealand throughout the year (1.3 % overall detection rate; 480 samples from three rocks per site, 20 sites, eight occasions; July 2010-May 2011). Three of the ten genes, ermB, tetK, and tetM, were detected in 62 of the 4800 individual screens; representatives confirmed using Sanger sequencing. No distinction could be made between human and agricultural land use contamination sources based on gene presence distribution alone. However, land use pressures are suggested by moderate correlations between antibiotic resistance genes and high-intensity farming in winter. The detection of antibiotic resistance genes at several sites not subject to known agricultural pressures suggests human sources of resistance, like waterway contamination resulting from unsatisfactory toilet facilities at recreational sites.

  11. Resistome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Identification of aminoglycoside 2'-Nacetyltransferase (AAC) as co-target for drug desigining

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Jamdhade, Mahendra D; Sonawane, Mahesh S; Giri, Ashok P

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) highlights the urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance to the drugs and to develop a new arena of therapeutics to treat the disease. Ethambutol, isonazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin are first line of drugs against TB, whereas aminoglycoside, polypeptides, fluoroquinolone, ethionamide are important second line of bactericidal drugs used to treat MDRTB, and resistance to one or both of these drugs are defining characteristic of extensively drug resistant TB. We retrieved 1,221 resistant genes from Antibiotic Resistance Gene Database (ARDB), which are responsible for resistance against first and second line antibiotics used in treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. From network analysis of these resistance genes, 53 genes were found to be common. Phylogenetic analysis shows that more than 60% of these genes code for acetyltransferase. Acetyltransferases detoxify antibiotics by acetylation, this mechanism plays central role in antibiotic resistance. Seven acetyltransferase (AT-1 to AT-7) were selected from phylogenetic analysis. Structural alignment shows that these acetyltransferases share common ancestral core, which can be used as a template for structure based drug designing. From STRING analysis it is found that acetyltransferase interact with 10 different proteins and it shows that, all these interaction were specific to M. tuberculosis. These results have important implications in designing new therapeutic strategies with acetyltransferase as lead co-target to combat against MDR as well as Extreme drug resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. Abbreviations AA - amino acid, AT - Acetyltransferase, AAC - Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase, XDR - Extreme drug-resistant, MDR - Multidrug-resistant, Mtb - Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TB - Tuberculosis. PMID:23519100

  12. Analysis of resistance genes in pan-resistant Myroides odoratimimus clinical strain PR63039 using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ming, Desong; Chen, Qing-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Tin

    2017-09-12

    To clarify the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of Myroides odoratimimus, pan-resistant M. odoratimimus strain PR63039 was isolated and its genome sequenced and analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and the Phoenix-100 Automated Microbiology System with a NMIC/ID-4 panel including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, polypeptides, quinolones, sulfonamides, chloramphenicols, and tetracyclines. Single-molecule real-time whole genome sequencing was conducted using the PacBio RSII system, and genome annotation was performed using RAST and IMG ER. To characterize the genome features, a number of databases and software programs, including GC-Profile, CG viewer, the VFDB database, ISfinder, RADB, CARD, ResFinder, and PHAST, were used. M. odoratimimus isolate PR63039 was resistant to almost all antibiotics tested, suggesting pan-drug resistance. The genome consisted of a 4,366,950-bp chromosome and a 90,798-bp plasmid (p63039), which contained a large number of resistance genes and virulence factors. The distribution of the resistance genes was distinctive, and a resistance region, designated MY63039-RR, was identified. RAST analysis indicated that 108 of the annotated genes were potentially involved in virulence, disease, and defense, all of which could be associated with resistance and pathogenicity. Prophage analysis also identified two incomplete prophages in the genome of M. odoratimimus PR63039. Multiple antibiotic-resistance genes were identified, including those associated with resistance to tetracycline (tetX), macrolides (ereB, cfrA, lasE), sulfonamides (sul2, sul3), β-lactams (blaMUS-1, blaTUS-1, blaSFB-1, blaSLB-1, blaOXA-209, blaOXA-347), and chloramphenicol (cat). Further, the presence of 18 antibiotic efflux pump-encoding resistance genes, including acrB, acrD, acrF, adeB, adeG, adeJ, amrB, ceoB, cmeB, mdsB, mexB, mexD, mexF, mtrD, smeE, mdtF, macB, likely accounts for the observed quinolone

  13. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes of wastewater and surface water in livestock farms of Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Hao, Lijun; Guo, Xinyan; Wang, Na; Ye, Boping

    2015-09-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in livestock farms is general, leading to a wide distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in aquatic environment adjacent to livestock farms. However, researches of the distribution and types of ARGs in aquatic environment of China are still in the initial stage. In this study, wastewater and surface water samples were collected from 12 livestock farms (four pig farms, four cattle farms, and four chicken farms) in Jiangsu Province of China. The prevalence, abundance, and distribution of 22 ARGs were investigated, which were categorized into six groups, including nine tetracyclin resistance genes, three sulfonamides resistance genes, three quinolone resistance genes, two macrolide resistance genes, three aminoglycoside resistance genes, and two multidrug resistance genes, employing quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The results suggested that all of the 22 ARGs were detected in samples. Sul1, sul2, and tetM were the most abundant with the average concentration of 3.84 × 10(1) copies/16S recombinant RNA (rRNA) gene copies, 1.62 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, 2.33 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Principle component analysis revealed that the comprehensive pollution of ARGs in northern Jiangsu was more serious. ARGs in wastewater were more abundant when compared to that in surface water. A preliminary study regarding the fate of ARGs after an aerobiotic process showed that tetA, tetC, sul1, sul2, oqxB, and qnrS were significantly increased. And, among the tetracycline resistance genes, the efflux pump genes were enriched while the ribosomal protection protein encoding genes were decreased in the aerobiotic process. The prevalance of ARGs in water environment is of concern; more surveillance is required to determine the pollution level and pattern of antibiotic resistance genes.

  14. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment.

  15. Conjugal transfer of aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia gene from native species and mechanism of regulation and cross resistance in Enterococcus faecalis MCC3063 by real time-PCR.

    PubMed

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2017-09-01

    High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) derived from food animals is detrimental. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance genes, aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa in different Enterococcus species. The cross resistance patterns in Enterococcus faecalis MCC3063 to clinically important aminoglycosides by real time PCR were also studied. Southern hybridization experiments revealed the presence of aac(6')Ie-aph(2(″))Ia and aph(3')IIIa genes conferring HLAR in high molecular weight plasmids except in Lactobacillus plantarum. The plasmid encoded bifunctional aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia gene was transferable from Enterococcus avium (n = 2), E. cecorum (n = 1), E. faecalis (n = 1) and Pediococcus lolii (n = 1) species into the recipient strain; E. faecalis JH2-2 by filter mating experiments thus indicating the possible risks of gene transfer into pathogenic strains. Molecular analysis of cross resistance patterns in native isolate of E. faecalis MCC3063 carrying aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa gene was displayed by quantification of the mRNA levels in this study. For this, the culture was induced with increasing concentrations of gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin (2048, 4096, 8192, 16384 μg/mL) individually. The increasing concentrations of gentamicin and kanamycin induced the expression of the aac(6')Ie-aph(2″)Ia and aph(3')IIIa resistance genes, respectively. Interestingly, it was observed that induction with streptomycin triggered a significant fold increase in the expression of the aph(3')IIIa gene which otherwise was not known to modify the aminoglycoside. This is noteworthy as streptomycin was found to confer cross resistance to structurally unrelated kanamycin. Also, expression of the aph(3')IIIa gene when induced with streptomycin, revealed that bacteria harbouring this gene will be able to overcome streptomycin bactericidal action at

  16. Virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and integrons in Escherichia coli strains isolated from synanthropic birds from Spain.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, C; Esperón, F; Herrera-León, S; Iglesias, I; Neves, E; Nogal, V; Muñoz, M J; de la Torre, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance profiles in 164 Escherichia coli strains isolated from birds (feral pigeons, hybrid ducks, house sparrows and spotless starlings) inhabiting urban and rural environments. A total of eight atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strains were identified: one in a house sparrow, four in feral pigeons and three in spotless starlings. Antibiotic resistance was present in 32.9% (54) of E. coli strains. The dominant type of resistance was to tetracycline (21.3%), ampicillin (19.5%) and sulfamethoxazole (18.9%). Five isolates had class 1 integrons containing gene cassettes encoding for dihydrofolate reductase A (dfrA) and aminoglycoside adenyltransferase A (aadA), one in a feral pigeon and four in spotless starlings. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first detection of virulence genes from E. coli in spotless starlings and house sparrows, and is also the first identification worldwide of integrons containing antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in E. coli strains from spotless starlings and pigeons.

  17. Coexistence of SFO-1 and NDM-1 β-lactamase genes and fosfomycin resistance gene fosA3 in an Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Li, Yan-nian; Mu, Xiao-dong; You, Li-ping; Xu, Cha; Qin, Ping; Ma, Jin-long

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to characterize antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial resistance genetic determinants of an Escherichia coli clinical isolate HD0149 from China in 2012. This strain displayed high-level resistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides and fosfomycin. A range of antimicrobial resistance genes was detected responsible for its multiple antimicrobial resistances, involving the blaCMY-2, blaCTX-M-65, blaNDM-1, blaSFO-1, blaTEM-1, fosA3, rmtB, sul1 and sul2 genes. Four amino acid substitutions were detected in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L and D87N), ParC (S80I) and ParE (S458A). Conjugation experiments revealed two multiresistance plasmids present in E. coli HD0149. The blaSFO-1 gene associated with blaNDM-1 gene was located in a 190 kb IncA/C plasmid and the blaCTX-M-65, fosA3 and rmtB genes were located in a 110 kb IncF plasmid. This is the first identification of the blaSFO-1 gene in an E. coli isolate and on a conjugative IncA/C plasmid. This may dramatically enhance the international prevalence and dissemination of blaSFO-1 among Enterobacteriaceae.

  18. Abundance and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in a full-scale anaerobic-aerobic system alternately treating ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei; Dou, Xiaomin; Wang, Chunyan; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu

    2017-05-27

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) has been intensively investigated for wastewater treatment systems treating single class of antibiotic in recent years. However, the impacts of alternately occurring antibiotics in antibiotic production wastewater on the behavior of ARGs in biological treatment systems were not well understood yet. Herein, techniques including high-capacity quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to investigate the behavior of ARGs in an anaerobic-aerobic full-scale system. The system alternately treated three kinds of antibiotic production wastewater including ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin, which referred to stages 1, 2 and 3. The aminoglycoside ARGs (52.1-79.3%) determined using high-capacity quantitative PCR were the most abundant species in all sludge samples of the three stages. The total relative abundances of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes and aminoglycoside resistance genes measured using qPCR were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in aerobic sludge than in sewage sludge. However, the comparison of ARGs acquired from three alternate stages revealed that MLS genes and the aminoglycoside ARGs did not vary significantly (P > 0.05) in both aerobic and anaerobic sludge samples. In aerobic sludge, one acetyltransferase gene (aacA4) and the other three nucleotidyltransferase genes (aadB, aadA and aadE) exhibited positive correlations with intI1 (r (2) = 0.83-0.94; P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation. These results and facts will be helpful to understand the abundance and distribution of ARGs from antibiotic production wastewater treatment systems.

  19. Linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 1128105, the first known clinical isolate possessing the cfr multidrug resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Deane, Jennifer; Sahm, Daniel F; Denys, Gerald A; Goering, Richard V; Shaw, Karen J

    2014-11-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers resistance to six classes of drugs which target the peptidyl transferase center of the 50S ribosomal subunit, including some oxazolidinones, such as linezolid (LZD). The mobile cfr gene was identified in European veterinary isolates from the late 1990s, although the earliest report of a clinical cfr-positive strain was the 2005 Colombian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate CM05. Here, through retrospective analysis of LZD(r) clinical strains from a U.S. surveillance program, we identified a cfr-positive MRSA isolate, 1128105, from January 2005, predating CM05 by 5 months. Molecular typing of 1128105 revealed a unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile most similar to that of USA100, spa type t002, and multilocus sequence type 5 (ST5). In addition to cfr, LZD resistance in 1128105 is partially attributed to the presence of a single copy of the 23S rRNA gene mutation T2500A. Transformation of the ∼37-kb conjugative p1128105 cfr-bearing plasmid from 1128105 into S. aureus ATCC 29213 background strains was successful in recapitulating the Cfr antibiogram, as well as resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim. A 7-kb cfr-containing region of p1128105 possessed sequence nearly identical to that found in the Chinese veterinary Proteus vulgaris isolate PV-01 and in U.S. clinical S. aureus isolate 1900, although the presence of IS431-like sequences is unique to p1128105. The cfr gene environment in this early clinical cfr-positive isolate has now been identified in Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains of clinical and veterinary origin and has been associated with multiple mobile elements, highlighting the versatility of this multidrug resistance gene and its potential for further dissemination.

  20. Gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Mallory-Smith, Carol; Zapiola, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Gene flow from transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops can result in the adventitious presence of the transgene, which may negatively impact markets. Gene flow can also produce glyphosate-resistant plants that may interfere with weed management systems. The objective of this article is to review the gene flow literature as it pertains to glyphosate-resistant crops. Gene flow is a natural phenomenon not unique to transgenic crops and can occur via pollen, seed and, in some cases, vegetative propagules. Gene flow via pollen can occur in all crops, even those that are considered to be self-pollinated, because all have low levels of outcrossing. Gene flow via seed or vegetative propagules occurs when they are moved naturally or by humans during crop production and commercialization. There are many factors that influence gene flow; therefore, it is difficult to prevent or predict. Gene flow via pollen and seed from glyphosate-resistant canola and creeping bentgrass fields has been documented. The adventitious presence of the transgene responsible for glyphosate resistance has been found in commercial seed lots of canola, corn and soybeans. In general, the glyphosate-resistant trait is not considered to provide an ecological advantage. However, regulators should consider the examples of gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops when formulating rules for the release of crops with traits that could negatively impact the environment or human health. Copyright (c) 2008 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Molecular Transfer of Nematode Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, V. M.; Ho, J.-Y.; Ma, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have been used to introduce agronomically valuable traits, including resistance to viruses, herbicides, and insects, into crop plants. Introduction of these genes into plants frequently involves Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. The potential exists for applying this technology to nematode control by introducing genes conferring resistance to nematodes. Transferred genes could include those encoding products detrimental to nematode development or reproduction as well as cloned host resistance genes. Host genes that confer resistance to cyst or root-knot nematode species have been identified in many plants. The best characterized is Mi, a gene that confers resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato. A map-based cloning approach is being used to isolate the gene. For development of a detailed map of the region of the genome surrounding Mi, DNA markers genetically linked to Mi have been identified and analyzed in tomato lines that have undergone a recombination event near Mi. The molecular map will be used to identify DNA corresponding to Mi. We estimate that a clone of Mi will be obtained in 2-5 years. An exciting prospect is that introduction of this gene will confer resistance in plant species without currently available sources of resistance. PMID:19282989

  2. [Correlations of integrons and resistance gene cassettes in Gram-negative bacteria with multi-drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Ma, Yun-xia; Zhang, Quan-bin; Zhou, Yong-an; Shang, Run-ping; Li, Peng-li; Hao, Zi-qi

    2013-12-01

    To explore the correlations of integrons, gene cassettes and drug resistance phenotypes in 90 multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Class I/II/III integron and variable region of positive strains of 90 Gram-negative bacteria were amplified by PCR and types of integron variable region gene cassettes analyzed by DNA sequence. And the resistant rates of integron positive and negative strains were tested by drug susceptibility. The detection rate of integron was 81.1% (73/90) in 90 Gram-negative bacteria. The integron types were class I (n = 70), class II (n = 3) and class III (n = 0). Based on the BLAST analysis by GenBank database, in the amplified fragments of Class I integron positive strains variable region gene ranging from 730 to 3300 bp, 8 types of integron structure were identified. And there were aadB (n = 11), aac (6')-II (n = 7), aadA5 (n = 10), dfrA17-aadA5 (n = 14), dfrA12-OrfF-aadA2(n = 1), aacA4-catB8-aadA1(n = 24), aacC1-OrfA-OrfB-aadA1 (n = 3), catB3-aadB-dhfrV-aacA4-nit1-nit2 (n = 1), in which catB3-aadB-dhfrV-aacA4-nit1-nit2 was a new resistance gene cassette; the variable region fragment of class II integron positive strain was 1600 bp, with 3 carrier strains of sat2-aadA1 gene cassette.Susceptibility testing showed that the antimicrobial resistance rate of integron positive strains to aminoglycosides and sulfa were significantly higher than those of integron negative strains and accorded with the results of integration variable region gene cassettes; the positive strains were more sensitive to amikacin with a resistance rate of 32.9% (24/73); and the drug resistance rates of all beta-lactam strains were ≥ 80%. There is a higher carrier rates of classI integron in Gram-negative bacteria. And the resistant phenotype is related with the types of resistance gene cassettes of integron variable region.

  3. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional phenotypic methods, when needed.

  4. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bello González, Teresita de J.; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3′ phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  5. Trafficking of Aminoglycosides Into Endolymph in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Steyger, Peter S.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro, aminoglycosides increase the stiffness of cochlear hair cell stereocilia, altering bundle motion and transduction kinetics. Aminoglycosides also permeate the mechanosensitive transduction channel and rapidly initiate cytotoxicity in hair cells. If these effects occur in vivo, aminoglycosides would need to enter endolymph. The most direct route for systemically-administered aminoglycosides to enter endolymph is by trafficking from strial capillaries across the stria vascularis. An as-yet-unidentified active transporter is required to translocate aminoglycosides from the intra-strial space into the cytoplasm of marginal cells. Once in marginal cells, aminoglycosides would passively flow down the electrochemical gradient into endolymph. We present data that support a trans-strial trafficking route of aminoglycosides into endolymph, where they can then interfere with the mechanosensitive hair bundles.

  6. [Isolation of antibiotic resistance bacterial strains from East Siberia permafrost sediments].

    PubMed

    Mindlin, S Z; Soina, V S; Ptrova, M A; Gorlenko, Zh M

    2008-01-01

    A collection of bacterial antibiotic resistance strains isolated from arctic permafrost subsoil sediments of various age and genesis was created. The collection included approximately 100 strains of Gram-positive (Firmicutes, Arthrobacter) and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacteroidetes, gamma-Proteobacteria, and alpha-Proteobacteria) resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamycin, kanamycin, and streptomycin), chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Antibiotic resistance spectra were shown to differ in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Multidrug resistance strains were found for the first time in ancient bacteria. In studies of the molecular nature of determinants for streptomycin resistance, determinants of the two types were detected: strA-strB genes coding for aminoglycoside phosphotransferases and genes aadA encoding aminoglycoside adenylyltransferases. These genes proved to be highly homologous to those of contemporary bacteria.

  7. Crystal structure and kinetic mechanism of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase-2″-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Smith, Clyde A; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2010-01-01

    Acquired resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics primarily results from deactivation by three families of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Here, we report the kinetic mechanism and structure of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase 2″-IVa (APH(2″)-IVa), an enzyme responsible for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical enterococcal and staphylococcal isolates. The enzyme operates via a Bi-Bi sequential mechanism in which the two substrates (ATP or GTP and an aminoglycoside) bind in a random manner. The APH(2″)-IVa enzyme phosphorylates various 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside antibiotics with catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) of 1.5 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 (M−1 s−1). The enzyme uses both ATP and GTP as the phosphate source, an extremely rare occurrence in the phosphotransferase and protein kinase enzymes. Based on an analysis of the APH(2″)-IVa structure, two overlapping binding templates specifically tuned for hydrogen bonding to either ATP or GTP have been identified and described. A detailed understanding of the structure and mechanism of the GTP-utilizing phosphotransferases is crucial for the development of either novel aminoglycosides or, more importantly, GTP-based enzyme inhibitors which would not be expected to interfere with crucial ATP-dependent enzymes. PMID:20556826

  8. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms.

  9. Detection of a novel aph(2") allele (aph[2"]-Ie) conferring high-level gentamicin resistance and a spectinomycin resistance gene ant(9)-Ia (aad 9) in clinical isolates of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mahbub Alam, Mohammed; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Ishino, Masaho; Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Uehara, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) are major factors that confer aminoglycoside resistance to enterococci. In an epidemiologic study on distribution of 12 AME genes in 534 recent clinical strains isolated from a Japanese hospital, two uncommon AME genes, ant(9)-Ia and a novel aph(2") allele, aph(2")-Ie, were detected. ant(9)-Ia had been reported only in Staphylococcus aureus and encodes spectinomycin adenylyltransferase ANT(9)-I, which confers resistance to spectinomycin. The ant(9)-Ia gene was detected in three strains, a single strain each of Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and E. avium. Nucleotide sequences of ant(9)-Ia from these three enterococcal species were identical to that reported for S. aureus and considered to be located on Tn 554. The new aph(2") allele, designated aph(2")-Ie, was identified in three E. faecium strains. The aph(2")-Ie allele was genetically close to aph(2")-Id reported in E. casseliflavus (93.7% amino acid sequence identity; 96.3% similarity), while distant from aph(2")-Ia, aph(2")-Ib, or aph(2")-Ic (26.3-29.5% amino acid sequence identity). Sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie was mostly located in amino-terminal half. In contrast, sequences corresponding to the three motifs required for aminoglycoside phosphotransferase were conserved except for a single amino acid. Three E. faecium strains having aph(2")-Ie showed high-level resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin, but not to kanamycin, dibekacin, and tobramycin, unlike enzyme specificity described for aph(2")-Id in E. casseliflavus. Such a difference in resistance phenotype was suggested to be related to amino acid sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie.

  10. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters.

  11. ARG-ANNOT, a New Bioinformatic Tool To Discover Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Padmanabhan, Babu Roshan; Diene, Seydina M.; Lopez-Rojas, Rafael; Kempf, Marie; Landraud, Luce

    2014-01-01

    ARG-ANNOT (Antibiotic Resistance Gene-ANNOTation) is a new bioinformatic tool that was created to detect existing and putative new antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in bacterial genomes. ARG-ANNOT uses a local BLAST program in Bio-Edit software that allows the user to analyze sequences without a Web interface. All AR genetic determinants were collected from published works and online resources; nucleotide and protein sequences were retrieved from the NCBI GenBank database. After building a database that includes 1,689 antibiotic resistance genes, the software was tested in a blind manner using 100 random sequences selected from the database to verify that the sensitivity and specificity were at 100% even when partial sequences were queried. Notably, BLAST analysis results obtained using the rmtF gene sequence (a new aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene sequence that is not included in the database) as a query revealed that the tool was able to link this sequence to short sequences (17 to 40 bp) found in other genes of the rmt family with significant E values. Finally, the analysis of 178 Acinetobacter baumannii and 20 Staphylococcus aureus genomes allowed the detection of a significantly higher number of AR genes than the Resfinder gene analyzer and 11 point mutations in target genes known to be associated with AR. The average time for the analysis of a genome was 3.35 ± 0.13 min. We have created a concise database for BLAST using a Bio-Edit interface that can detect AR genetic determinants in bacterial genomes and can rapidly and easily discover putative new AR genetic determinants. PMID:24145532

  12. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ellen G.; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G.

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan. PMID:21746948

  13. Detection of sulfonamide resistant bacteria and resistance genes in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Zhang, Weiyu; Liu, Huifen; Wang, Xiaobo; Yang, Fan; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Pinpin; Wang, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Manure application could accelerate the environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soils. In this study, the prevalence of sulfonamide resistant bacteria and resistance genes was investigated in agricultural soils to which organic manures had been applied in Tianjin, China. Anti-sulfonamide bacteria were found in the range of 3.29 × 104 to 1.70 × 105 CFU/g dry soil, occupying 1.5% to 2.2% of total viable counts. And sulI and sulII genes were detected in all sampling sites, with relative abundances of 5.69 × 10-5 to 6.95 × 10-4 and 4.28 × 10-4 to 1.25 × 10-3 respectively. No significant correlations between cultivable sulfonamide resistant bacteria and sul genes were found in this study. While sulI showed significant positive correlation with soil organic matter. Overall, the results highlight that soil plays an important role in resistance genes capture as the environmental reservoir.

  14. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.J.; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  15. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  16. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M

    2015-08-14

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens' resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and resistance genes in Salmonella strains isolated from broiler chickens along the slaughtering process in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanting; Lai, Haimei; Zou, Likou; Yin, Sheng; Wang, Chengtao; Han, Xinfeng; Xia, Xiaolong; Hu, Kaidi; He, Li; Zhou, Kang; Chen, Shujuan; Ao, Xiaolin; Liu, Shuliang

    2017-10-16

    A total of 189 Salmonella isolates were recovered from 627 samples which were collected from cecal contents of broilers, chicken carcasses, chicken meat after cutting step and frozen broiler chicken products along the slaughtering process at a slaughterhouse in Sichuan province of China. The Salmonella isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 10 categories of antimicrobial agents using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Those antibiotics-resistant isolates were further investigated for the occurrence of resistance genes, the presence of class 1 integron as well as the associated gene cassettes, and the mutations within the gyrA and parC genes. Consequently, the prevalence of Salmonella was 30.14% (47.96% for cecal content, 18.78% for chicken carcasses, 31.33% for cutting meat and 14.00% for frozen meat, respectively). The predominant serotypes were S. Typhimurium (15.34%) and S. Enteritidis (69.84%). High resistance rates to the following drugs were observed: nalidixic acid (99.5%), ampicillin (87.8%), tetracycline (51.9%), ciprofloxacin (48.7%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (48.1%), and spectinomycin (34.4%). Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed that 60.8% of isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and MDR strains increased from 44.7% to 78.6% along the slaughtering line. 94.6% (n=157) of beta-lactam-resistant isolates harbored at least one resistance gene of blaTEM or blaCTX-M. The relatively low prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes (aac(3)-II, aac(3)-IV, and ant(2″)-I) was found in 49 (66.2%) of antibiotic-resistant isolates. The tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), and tet(G) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2, and sul3) were identified in 84 (85.7%) and 89 (97.8%) antibiotic-resistant isolates respectively. floR was identified in 44 (97.8%) florfenicol-resistant isolates. Class 1 integron was detected in 37.4% (n=43) of the MDR isolates. Two different gene cassettes, blaOXA-30-aadA1

  18. The potential for discovery and development of improved aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Price, K E

    1986-06-30

    Following the development of amikacin, pharmaceutical companies made intensive efforts to find even more potent and broader-spectrum aminoglycosides. This effort was justifiable in view of the fact that over the preceding decade, these agents, because of their unique properties, had proven to be the primary weapons in the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of seriously ill patients. Since the toxicities associated with the aminoglycosides were beginning to limit their use in general medicine, researchers ultimately shifted their emphasis from probing for higher-potency, broader-spectrum agents to finding those with a reduced potential for toxicity. This article addresses the issue of whether superior aminoglycoside derivatives will reach the marketplace in the future. A comparison is made of several key properties of virtually all aminoglycosides that have reached an advanced preclinical development stage, gone into the clinic, or been registered for commercial use over the past 10 years. The following parameters are used for comparisons with already marketed aminoglycosides: antibacterial potency, as measured by relative minimum inhibitory concentrations for 50 percent of the strains tested, against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa; degree of resistance to inactivation by microbial enzymes; and potential for toxicity utilizing comparative acute intravenous lethal doses for 50 percent of the population in mice, values that appear to predict the maximum recommended daily doses in man. An assessment of a number of compounds, including three structurally related to gentamicin, two to sisomicin, two to kanamycin A, three to kanamycin B, and two to fortimicin, revealed that none had overall properties superior to those already being utilized commercially. In no case did a compound prove to be less toxic, and in many instances, the antibacterial potency of the newer agents was lower than that exhibited by the older aminoglycosides. Some increase in resistance to

  19. High Prevalence of Multidrug-Tolerant Bacteria and Associated Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Isolated from Ornamental Fish and Their Carriage Water

    PubMed Central

    Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; Welch, Timothy J.; Schwarz, Tamar; Pond, Michelle J.; Woodward, Martin J.; Haig, Sarah J.; Rimmer, Georgina S. E.; Roberts, Edward; Morrison, Victoria; Baker-Austin, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background Antimicrobials are used to directly control bacterial infections in pet (ornamental) fish and are routinely added to the water these fish are shipped in to suppress the growth of potential pathogens during transport. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the potential effects of this sustained selection pressure, 127 Aeromonas spp. isolated from warm and cold water ornamental fish species were screened for tolerance to 34 antimicrobials. Representative isolates were also examined for the presence of 54 resistance genes by a combination of miniaturized microarray and conventional PCR. Forty-seven of 94 Aeromonas spp. isolates recovered from tropical ornamental fish and their carriage water were tolerant to ≥15 antibiotics, representing seven or more different classes of antimicrobial. The quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance gene, qnrS2, was detected at high frequency (37% tested recent isolates were positive by PCR). Class 1 integrons, IncA/C broad host range plasmids and a range of other antibiotic resistance genes, including floR, blaTEM−1, tet(A), tet(D), tet(E), qacE2, sul1, and a number of different dihydrofolate reductase and aminoglycoside transferase coding genes were also detected in carriage water samples and bacterial isolates. Conclusions These data suggest that ornamental fish and their carriage water act as a reservoir for both multi-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. PMID:20027306

  20. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  1. Deciphering interactions of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa with its ligands.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingzhi; Serpersu, Engin H

    2009-09-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa (APH) is the enzyme with broadest substrate range among the phosphotransferases that cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. In this study, the thermodynamic characterization of interactions of APH with its ligands are done by determining dissociation constants of enzyme-substrate complexes using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Metal binding studies showed that three divalent cations bind to the apo-enzyme with low affinity. In the presence of AMPPCP, binding of the divalent cations occurs with 7-to-37-fold higher affinity to three additional sites dependent on the presence and absence of different aminoglycosides. Surprisingly, when both ligands, AMPPCP and aminoglycoside, are present, the number of high affinity metal binding sites is reduced to two with a 2-fold increase in binding affinity. The presence of divalent cations, with or without aminoglycoside present, shows only a small effect (<3-fold) on binding affinity of the nucleotide to the enzyme. The presence of metal-nucleotide, but not nucleotide alone, increases the binding affinity of aminoglycosides to APH. Replacement of magnesium (II) with manganese (II) lowered the catalytic rates significantly while affecting the substrate selectivity of the enzyme such that the aminoglycosides with 2'-NH(2) become better substrates (higher V(max)) than those with 2'-OH.

  2. Antibiotic resistance genes and human bacterial pathogens: Co-occurrence, removal, and enrichment in municipal sewage sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Liping; Wang, Yubo; Huang, Danping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-15

    Understanding which/how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) contribute to increased acquisition of resistance by pathogens in aquatic environments are challenges of profound significance. We explored the co-occurrence and removal versus enrichment of ARGs and human bacterial pathogens (HBPs) in municipal sewage sludge digesters. We combined metagenomic detection of a wide spectrum of 323 ARGs and 83 HBPs with a correlation-based statistical approach and charted a network of their co-occurrence relationships. The results indicate that most ARGs and a minor proportion of HBPs (mainly Collinsella aerofaciens, Streptococcus salivarius and Gordonia bronchialis) could not be removed by anaerobic digestion, revealing a biological risk of post-digestion sludge in disseminating antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. Moreover, preferential co-occurrence patterns were evident within one ARG type (e.g., multidrug, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside) and between two different ARG types (i.e., aminoglycoside and beta-lactam), possibly implicating co-effects of antibiotic selection pressure and co-resistance on shaping antibiotic resistome in sewage sludge. Unlike beta-lactam resistance genes, ARGs of multidrug and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin tended to co-occur more with HBPs. Strikingly, we presented evidence that the most straightforward biological origin of an ARG-species co-occurring event is a hosting relationship. Furthermore, a significant and robust HBP-species co-occurrence correlation provides a proper scenario for nominating HBP indicators (e.g., Bifidobacterium spp. are perfect indicators of C. aerofaciens; r = 0.92-0.99 and P-values < 0.01). Combined, this study demonstrates a creative and effective network-based metagenomic approach for exploring ARG hosts and HBP indicators and assessing ARGs acquisition by HBPs in human-impacted environments where ARGs and HBPs may co-thrive.

  3. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. Methods: A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Results: Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional

  4. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The novel kasugamycin 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene aac(2')-IIa, carried by the IncP island, confers kasugamycin resistance to rice-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Atsushi; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    Kasugamycin (KSM), a unique aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been used in agriculture for many years to control not only rice blast caused by the fungus Magnaporthe grisea but also rice bacterial grain and seedling rot or rice bacterial brown stripe caused by Burkholderia glumae or Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae, respectively. Since both bacterial pathogens are seed-borne and cause serious injury to rice seedlings, the emergence of KSM-resistant B. glumae and A. avenae isolates highlights the urgent need to understand the mechanism of resistance to KSM. Here, we identified a novel gene, aac(2')-IIa, encoding a KSM 2'-N-acetyltransferase from both KSM-resistant pathogens but not from KSM-sensitive bacteria. AAC(2')-IIa inactivates KSM, although it reveals no cross-resistance to other aminoglycosides. The aac(2')-IIa gene from B. glumae strain 5091 was identified within the IncP genomic island inserted into the bacterial chromosome, indicating the acquisition of this gene by horizontal gene transfer. Although excision activity of the IncP island and conjugational gene transfer was not detected under the conditions tested, circular intermediates containing the aac(2')-IIa gene were detected. These results indicate that the aac(2')-IIa gene had been integrated into the IncP island of a donor bacterial species. Molecular detection of the aac(2')-IIa gene could distinguish whether isolates are resistant or susceptible to KSM. This may contribute to the production of uninfected rice seeds and lead to the effective control of these pathogens by KSM.

  6. Overexpression and characterization of the chromosomal aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Franklin, K; Clarke, A J

    2001-08-01

    The gene coding for aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase Ia [AAC(2')-Ia] from Providencia stuartii was amplified by PCR and cloned. The resulting construct, pACKF2, was transferred into Escherichia coli for overexpression of AAC(2')-Ia as a fusion protein with an N-terminal hexa-His tag. The fusion protein was isolated and purified by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose and gel permeation chromatography on Superdex 75. Comparison of the specific activity of this enzyme with that of its enterokinase-digested derivative lacking the His tag indicated that the presence of the extra N-terminal peptide does not affect activity. The temperature and pH optima for activity of both forms of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase were 20 degrees C and pH 6.0, respectively, while the enzymes were most stable at 15 degrees C and pH 8.1. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for AAC(2')-Ia at 20 degrees C and pH 6.0 were determined using a series of aminoglycoside antibiotics possessing a 2'-amino group and a concentration of acetyl coenzyme A fixed at 10 times its K(m) value of 8.75 microM. Under these conditions, gentamicin was determined to be the best substrate for the enzyme in terms of both K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) values, whereas neomycin was the poorest. Comparison of the kinetic parameters obtained with the different aminoglycosides indicated that their hexopyranosyl residues provided the most important binding sites for AAC(2')-Ia activity, while the enzyme exhibits greater tolerance further from these sites. No correlation was found between these kinetic parameters and MICs determined for P. stuartii PR50 expressing the 2'-N-acetyltransferase, suggesting that its true in vivo function is not as a resistance factor.

  7. Resistance Genes in Global Crop Breeding Networks.

    PubMed

    Garrett, K A; Andersen, K F; Asche, F; Bowden, R L; Forbes, G A; Kulakow, P A; Zhou, B

    2017-08-31

    Resistance genes are a major tool for managing crop diseases. The networks of crop breeders who exchange resistance genes and deploy them in varieties help to determine the global landscape of resistance and epidemics, an important system for maintaining food security. These networks function as a complex adaptive system, with associated strengths and vulnerabilities, and implications for policies to support resistance gene deployment strategies. Extensions of epidemic network analysis can be used to evaluate the multilayer agricultural networks that support and influence crop breeding networks. Here, we evaluate the general structure of crop breeding networks for cassava, potato, rice, and wheat. All four are clustered due to phytosanitary and intellectual property regulations, and linked through CGIAR hubs. Cassava networks primarily include public breeding groups, whereas others are more mixed. These systems must adapt to global change in climate and land use, the emergence of new diseases, and disruptive breeding technologies. Research priorities to support policy include how best to maintain both diversity and redundancy in the roles played by individual crop breeding groups (public versus private and global versus local), and how best to manage connectivity to optimize resistance gene deployment while avoiding risks to the useful life of resistance genes. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  8. Novel Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase Identified in a Gram-Negative Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Antunes, Nuno T.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases are the major aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in clinical isolates of enterococci and staphylococci. We describe a novel aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase from the Gram-negative pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, which shares 78% amino acid sequence identity with the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside (6′) acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase-Ia or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia from Gram-positive cocci, which we called APH(2″)-If. This enzyme confers resistance to the 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides kanamycin, tobramycin, dibekacin, gentamicin, and sisomicin, but not to arbekacin, amikacin, isepamicin, or netilmicin, but not to any of the 4,5-disubstituted antibiotics tested. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate for APH(2″)-If. The enzyme phosphorylates the majority of 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km = 105 to 107 M−1 s−1), while the catalytic efficiencies against the 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics amikacin and isepamicin are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower, due mainly to the low apparent affinities of these substrates for the enzyme. Both 4,5-disubstituted antibiotics and the atypical aminoglycoside neamine are not substrates of APH(2″)-If, but are inhibitors. The antibiotic susceptibility and substrate profiles of APH(2″)-If are very similar to those of the APH(2″)-Ia phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme. PMID:23129050

  9. High throughput profiling of antibiotic resistance genes in urban park soils with reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Qiao, Min; Su, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Xue; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Reclaimed water irrigation (RWI) in urban environments is becoming popular, due to rapid urbanization and water shortage. The continuous release of residual antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from reclaimed water could result in the dissemination of ARGs in the downstream environment. This study provides a comprehensive profile of ARGs in park soils exposed to RWI through a high-throughput quantitative PCR approach. 147 ARGs encoding for resistance to a broad-spectrum of antibiotics were detected among all park soil samples. Aminoglycoside and beta-lactam were the two most dominant types of ARGs, and antibiotic deactivation and efflux pump were the two most dominant mechanisms in these RWI samples. The total enrichment of ARGs varied from 99.3-fold to 8655.3-fold compared to respective controls. Six to 60 ARGs were statistically enriched among these RWI samples. Four transposase genes were detected in RWI samples. TnpA-04 was the most enriched transposase gene with an enrichment was up to 2501.3-fold in Urumqi RWI samples compared with control soil samples. Furthermore, significantly positive correlation was found between ARGs and transposase abundances, indicating that transposase might be involved in the propagation of ARGs. This study demonstrated that RWI resulted in the enrichment of ARGs in urban park soils.

  10. Geographical Differences Associated with Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in Nine Gene Targets among Resistant Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshide, Matt; Qian, Lishi; Rodrigues, Camilla; Warren, Rob; Victor, Tommie; Evasco, Henry B.; Tupasi, Thelma; Crudu, Valeriu

    2014-01-01

    Alternative diagnostic methods, such as sequence-based techniques, are necessary for increasing the proportion of tuberculosis cases tested for drug resistance. Despite the abundance of data on drug resistance, isolates can display phenotypic resistance but lack any distinguishable markers. Furthermore, because resistance-conferring mutations develop under antibiotic pressure, different drug regimens could favor unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different geographical regions. A total of 407 isolates were collected from four geographical regions with a high prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (India, Moldova, the Philippines, and South Africa). The “hot spot” or promoter sequences of nine genes (rpoB, gyrA, gyrB, katG, inhA promoter, ahpC promoter, eis promoter, rrs, and tlyA) associated with resistance to four types of antibiotics (rifampin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides) were analyzed for markers. Four genes contributed largely to resistance (rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and katG), two genes contributed moderately to resistance (the eis and inhA promoters), and three genes contributed little or no resistance (gyrB, tlyA, and the ahpC promoter) in clinical isolates. Several geographical differences were found, including a double mutation in rpoB found in 37.1% of isolates from South Africa, the C→T mutation at position −12 of the eis promoter found exclusively in 60.6% of isolates from Moldova, and the G→A mutation at position −46 of the ahpC promoter found only in India. These differences in polymorphism frequencies emphasize the uniqueness of isolates found in different geographical regions. The inclusion of several genes provided a moderate increase in sensitivity, and elimination of the examination of other genes might increase efficiency. PMID:23784122

  11. Co-occurrence of resistance genes to antibiotics, biocides and metals reveals novel insights into their co-selection potential.

    PubMed

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2015-11-17

    Antibacterial biocides and metals can co-select for antibiotic resistance when bacteria harbour resistance or tolerance genes towards both types of compounds. Despite numerous case studies, systematic and quantitative data on co-occurrence of such genes on plasmids and chromosomes is lacking, as is knowledge on environments and bacterial taxa that tend to carry resistance genes to such compounds. This effectively prevents identification of risk scenarios. Therefore, we aimed to identify general patterns for which biocide/metal resistance genes (BMRGs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that tend to occur together. We also aimed to quantify co-occurrence of resistance genes in different environments and taxa, and investigate to what extent plasmids carrying both types of genes are conjugative and/or are carrying toxin-antitoxin systems. Co-occurrence patterns of resistance genes were derived from publicly available, fully sequenced bacterial genomes (n = 2522) and plasmids (n = 4582). The only BMRGs commonly co-occurring with ARGs on plasmids were mercury resistance genes and the qacE∆1 gene that provides low-level resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds. Novel connections between cadmium/zinc and macrolide/aminoglycoside resistance genes were also uncovered. Several clinically important bacterial taxa were particularly prone to carry both BMRGs and ARGs. Bacteria carrying BMRGs more often carried ARGs compared to bacteria without (p < 0.0001). BMRGs were found in 86 % of bacterial genomes, and co-occurred with ARGs in 17 % of the cases. In contrast, co-occurrences of BMRGs and ARGs were rare on plasmids from all external environments (<0.7 %) but more common on those of human and domestic animal origin (5 % and 7 %, respectively). Finally, plasmids with both BMRGs and ARGs were more likely to be conjugative (p < 0.0001) and carry toxin-antitoxin systems (p < 0.0001) than plasmids without resistance genes. This is the first large-scale identification of

  12. Myosin VIIA is required for aminoglycoside accumulation in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G P; Forge, A; Kros, C J; Fleming, J; Brown, S D; Steel, K P

    1997-12-15

    Myosin VIIA is expressed by sensory hair cells and has a primary structure predicting a role in membrane trafficking and turnover, processes that may underlie the susceptibility of hair cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. [3H]Gentamicin accumulation and the effects of aminoglycosides were therefore examined in cochlear cultures of mice with different missense mutations in the myosin VIIA gene, Myo7a, to see whether myosin VIIA plays a role in aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells from homozygous mutant Myo7ash1 mice, with a mutation in a nonconserved region of the myosin VIIA head, respond rapidly to aminoglycoside treatment and accumulate high levels of gentamicin. Hair cells from homozygous mutant Myo7a6J mice, with a mutation at a highly conserved residue close to the ATP binding site of the myosin VIIA head, do not accumulate [3H]gentamicin and are protected from aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells from heterozygotes of both alleles accumulate [3H]gentamicin and respond to aminoglycosides. Although aminoglycoside uptake is thought to be via apical surface-associated endocytosis, coated pit numbers on the apical membrane of heterozygous and homozygous Myo7a6J hair cells are similar. Pulse-chase experiments with cationic ferritin confirm that the apical endocytotic pathway is functional in homozygous Myo7a6J hair cells. Transduction currents can be recorded from both heterozygous and homozygous Myo7a6J hair cells, suggesting it is unlikely that the drug enters via diffusion through the mechanotransducer channel. The results show that myosin VIIA is required for aminoglycoside accumulation in hair cells. Myosin VIIA may transport a putative aminoglycoside receptor to the hair cell surface, indirectly translocate it to sites of membrane retrieval, or retain it in the endocytotic pathway.

  13. Macrolide Resistance Genes in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Zarazaga, Myriam; Alonso, Ana; Martinez, Jose Luis; Torres, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Seventy-eight isolates of different Enterococcus species (E. faecalis, n = 27; E. faecium, n = 23; E. durans, n = 8; E. avium, n = 6; E. hirae, n = 9; E. gallinarum, n = 3; and E. casseliflavus, n = 2) with a variety of erythromycin resistance phenotypes were examined for the presence of macrolide resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, ermTR, mefA/E, and msrA). Positive PCR amplifications of ermB were obtained for 39 of 40 highly erythromycin-resistant Enterococcus isolates (MICs, >128 μg/ml) of different species; the remaining highly resistant E. faecium isolate was positive for PCR amplification of ermA but was negative for PCR amplification of the ermB and ermC genes. For all enterococcal strains for which erythromycin MICs were ≤32 μg/ml PCRs were negative for erm methylase genes. For all E. faecium isolates PCR amplified products of the expected size of 400 bp were obtained when msrA primers were used, with the results being independent of the erythromycin resistance phenotype. All the other enterococcal species gave negative results by msrA PCRs. Sequencing of the msrA PCR products from either erythromycin-susceptible, low-level-resistant, or highly resistant E. faecium strains showed that the amplicons did not correspond to the msrA gene described for Staphylococcus epidermidis but corresponded to a new putative efflux determinant, which showed 62% identity with the msrA gene at the DNA level and 72% similarity at the amino acid level. This new gene was named msrC. PMID:10722498

  14. Inhibition of vancomycin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci strains and Listeria monocytogenes by bacteriocin-like substance produced by Enterococcus faecium E86.

    PubMed

    Lemos Miguel, Marco Antônio; Dias de Castro, Angela Cristina; Ferreira Gomes Leite, Selma

    2008-11-01

    Three hundred and thirty nine lactic bacteria strains isolated from food samples were screened for antimicrobial activity. Only one strain isolated from meat pie and identified as Enterococcus faecium produced a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) showing activity against Enterococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Listeria, Corynebacterium and Staphylococcus aureus. The BLIS produced was resistant to acid and alkali treatment and 121 masculineC for 15 min. The addition of BLIS in BHI contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes decreased the contamination in 4.8 log cycles in 24 h. The inhibition of listeria was also obtained in milk. Forty multiresistant enterococci strains were inhibited in the well-diffusion test. Two vancomycin resistant strains tested in liquid with BLIS were also inhibited. The BLIS producer showed no pathogenicity marker.

  15. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    PubMed Central

    May, Ian; Abu-Khdeir, Maha; Blackwood, Roland Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection. PMID:24470950

  16. Genetic environment of the multi-resistance gene cfr in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from chickens, ducks, and pigs in China.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan; Zhao, Qin; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2014-05-01

    The present study focussed on the analysis of the genetic environment of the multi-resistance gene cfr detected among 21, mostly methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) isolates obtained from chickens, ducks and pigs in China. It included sequencing of the regions up- and downstream of the cfr gene on various plasmid types in 13 isolates, such as pSS-02 and pSS-02-like (n=7), pSS-03-like (n=1), pJP1-like (n=3), pSS-04 (n=1) and pJP2 (n=1). This analysis revealed that insertion sequences (IS21-558, IS256, IS257, or IS1216E) and other resistance genes (aacA-aphD and aadD for aminoglycoside resistance, ble for bleomycin resistance, fosD for fosfomycin resistance, erm(B) and erm(C) for macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, or fexA for phenicol resistance) coexisted on the respective plasmids. In the chromosomal copies of cfr identified in eight S. lentus isolates, the cfr gene was found to be bracketed by insertion sequences, such as IS256 or ISEnfa5. Stability tests confirmed that all chromosomal cfr-containing regions could be looped out via IS-mediated recombination. The observations made in this study extend the rather rudimentary knowledge about the genetic environment of cfr in staphylococci from chickens and ducks and confirmed that insertion sequences play an important role in the dissemination of cfr, not only among different types of plasmids, but also for the integration in the chromosomal DNA.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance genes in multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovars isolated most frequently from animals, retail meat, and humans in the U.S. and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, LaShanda M.; Lindsey, Rebecca L.; Folster, Jason P.; Whichard, Jean M.; Pecic, Gary; Boerlin, Patrick; Gilmour, Mathew W.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Harbottle, Heather; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Frye, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a prevalent food-borne pathogen which can carry multi-drug resistance (MDR) and could pose a threat to human health. Identifying the genetic elements associated with MDR in Salmonella isolated from animals, food, and humans can help determine the sources of MDR in food animals and their impact on human health. Representatives of MDR S. enterica serovars most frequently isolated from healthy animals, retail meat, and human infections in the U.S. and Canada were subjected to detailed genetic analysis (n=56). These included U.S. slaughter (n=12), retail (n=9), and human (9) isolates, and Canadian slaughter (n=9), retail (n=9), and human (n=8) isolates. These isolates were assayed by microarray for antimicrobial resistance and MDR plasmid genes. Genes detected encoded resistance to aminoglycosides (alleles of aac, aad, aph, strA/B); beta-lactams (blaTEM, blaCMY, blaPSE-1); chloramphenicol (cat, flo, cmlA); sulfamethoxazole (sulI); tetracycline (tet(A, B, C, D) and tetR); and trimethoprim (dfrA). Similar resistance genes were detected regardless of serovar, source, or location. Hybridization with IncA/C plasmid gene probes indicated that 27/56 isolates carried a member of this plasmid family; however these plasmids differed in several highly variable regions. Cluster analysis based on genes detected separated most of the isolates into two groups, one with IncA/C plasmids and one without IncA/C plasmids. Other plasmid replicons were detected in all but one isolate, and included I1 (25/56), N (23/56) and FIB (10/56). The presence of different mobile elements along with similar resistance genes suggest that these genetic elements may acquire similar resistance cassettes, and serve as multiple sources for MDR in Salmonella from food animals, retail meat, and human infections. PMID:23350745

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics, toxicity and cost effectiveness analysis of aminoglycosides and aminoglycoside dosing services.

    PubMed

    Mathews, A; Bailie, G R

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the clinical pharmacokinetics, clinical toxicity and cost-effectiveness analysis of aminoglycosides and of dosing services for aminoglycosides. The reader is referred elsewhere for a review of the pharmacology, antimicrobial spectrum of activity and clinical use of these drugs. A critique of the more commonly used methods of aminoglycoside dosage determinations is included, based on the inter-individual variation in aminoglycoside disposition parameters. The advantages and disadvantages of arbitrary, predictive, and pharmacokinetic methods of dosing determination are summarized. Justification for the routine determination of serum aminoglycoside concentrations is reviewed. We review the lack of standardization of definitions for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in published studies, and studies which illustrate these differences are highlighted. Evidence for the association between serum aminoglycoside concentrations and nephrotoxicity is examined. Ototoxicity is similarly reviewed. The concept of cost-effectiveness analysis is examined extensively in this review. We discuss the literature concerning the cost benefit analysis of drug dosing services.

  19. A microcomputer spreadsheet for aminoglycoside kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kiacz, B J

    1990-05-01

    Development of an aminoglycoside monitoring program need not entail large capital expenditures for pharmacokinetic software. Microsoft's Excel spreadsheet was used to develop a single compartment, first-order kinetics template for individualized aminoglycoside dosing. The formulas employed may be adapted to virtually any other microcomputer spreadsheet package to provide accurate professional results.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E.; Díaz, Paula L.; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. PMID:26988047

  1. Enzymatic Modification of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: a New 3-N-Acetylating Enzyme from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Biddlecome, S.; Haas, M.; Davies, J.; Miller, G. H.; Rane, D. F.; Daniels, P. J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A new 3-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase is described, which possesses a wider substrate range than any such enzyme so far discovered in clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:820250

  2. Acquired macrolide resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Christopher T; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of specific acquired macrolide resistance genes previously reported as present in clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. A collection of 172 clinical respiratory isolates of H. influenzae, including 59 isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and 27 from non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients with significant prior macrolide use, was established. This collection was tested for azithromycin susceptibility using Etest and screened for the presence of erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) and mef(E) using locked nucleic acid dual-labelled hydrolysis probes. The azithromycin MICs ranged from 0.09 to >256 mg/L, with 2 (1.2%) isolates susceptible, 163 (94.8%) intermediate and 7 (4%) resistant according to EUCAST breakpoints (susceptible, ≤0.12 mg/L; resistant, >4 mg/L). None of the acquired macrolide resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) or mef(E) was detected in any of the isolates. The specific acquired macrolide resistance genes are not widespread in H. influenzae and the high prevalence of these genes previously reported might be unique to the specific circumstances of that study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Aminoglycoside toxicity: pH dependent inhibition of ADH response.

    PubMed

    Goodman, D B; Souliere, C R; Forrest, J N

    1986-05-01

    The effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the response of the isolated toad urinary bladder to antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was investigated. Gentamicin and neomycin both acidify the serosal bathing solution and cause a dose-dependent inhibition of the hydroosmotic response to ADH, while streptomycin has minimal effect on media pH and causes no inhibition of the response to ADH. Detailed studies employing gentamicin indicate that acidification stimulates production of PGE2, a known inhibitor of the hydroosmotic response of the toad bladder to ADH. When media pH is rigidly controlled or PGE2 production is inhibited by indomethacin, the inhibitory effect of gentamicin on the response to ADH is ameliorated. These studies suggest that the defect in renal concentrating ability seen as part of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity could be due, in part, to an acidification-induced, prostaglandin-mediated resistance to the action of ADH.

  4. Expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gentamicin Resistance Gene aacC3 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Renée A. J.; van de Klundert, Jos A. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa aacC3 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning of the single gene behind the strong tac promoter. In the original Pseudomonas strain, aacC3 is preceded by cysC; together they form a single transcription unit. The ribosome-binding site and start codon of aacC3 are involved in a putative intercistronic hairpin, the stability of which interfered with the aminoglycoside resistance level. In Northern blots, full-length transcripts comprising both cysC and aacC3 could not be detected either in the original Pseudomonas strain or in E. coli harboring a plasmid with the cloned operon. In contrast, cysC transcripts were abundant. Cloning of the operon between the tac promoter and a transcription termination signal resulted in higher mRNA levels and phenotypic expression in E. coli. The absence of a transcription termination signal in the wild-type cysC-aacC3 sequence is associated with transcripts of heterogeneous size that were undetected in Northern blots. Our results shed more light on the expression of this gentamicin resistance determinant, although the discrepancies between its expression in E. coli and Pseudomonas are not fully solved. PMID:9835511

  5. Antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from animals, retail meats, and humans in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Glenn, LaShanda M; Lindsey, Rebecca L; Folster, Jason P; Pecic, Gary; Boerlin, Patrick; Gilmour, Mathew W; Harbottle, Heather; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Frye, Jonathan G

    2013-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is a prevalent foodborne pathogen that can carry multidrug resistance (MDR) and pose a threat to human health. Identifying the genetics associated with MDR in Salmonella isolated from animals, foods, and humans can help determine sources of MDR in food animals and their impact on humans. S. enterica serovars most frequently carrying MDR from healthy animals, retail meats, and human infections in the United States and Canada were identified and isolates resistant to the largest number of antimicrobials were chosen. Isolates were from U.S. slaughter (n=12), retail (9), and humans (9), and Canadian slaughter (9), retail (9), and humans (8; total n=56). These isolates were assayed by microarray for antimicrobial resistance and MDR plasmid genes. Genes detected encoded resistance to aminoglycosides (alleles of aac, aad, aph, strA/B); beta-lactams (bla(TEM), bla(CMY), bla(PSE-1)); chloramphenicol (cat, flo, cmlA); sulfamethoxazole (sulI); tetracycline (tet(A, B, C, D) and tetR); and trimethoprim (dfrA). Hybridization with IncA/C plasmid gene probes indicated that 27/56 isolates carried one of these plasmids; however, they differed in several variable regions. Cluster analysis based on genes detected separated most of the isolates into two groups, one with IncA/C plasmids and one without IncA/C plasmids. Other plasmid replicons were detected in all but one isolate, and included I1 (25/56), N (23/56), and FIB (10/56). The presence of different mobile elements along with similar resistance genes suggest that these genetic elements may acquire similar resistance cassettes, and serve as multiple sources for MDR in Salmonella from food animals, retail meats, and human infections.

  6. Antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of Tunisian and Spanish wastewaters as markers to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns in each population.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Calero-Cáceres, William; Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

    2014-12-01

    The emergence and increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment may pose a serious global health concern. This study evaluates the abundance of several ARGs in bacterial and bacteriophage DNA via real-time qPCR in samples from five different sampling points in Tunisia; three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP 1, 2 and 3) and wastewater from two abattoirs slaughtering different animals. Results are compared with those obtained in the Barcelona area, in northeast Spain. Eight ARGs were quantified by qPCR from total and phage DNA fraction from the samples. Three β-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) cluster 1 and bla(CTX-M) cluster 9), two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS), the mecA gene that confers resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging armA gene, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and sul1, the most extended gene conferring resistance to sulfonamides, were evaluated. Sul1 and bla(TEM) were the most prevalent ARGs detected at all five Tunisian sampling points, similarly with the observations in Barcelona. bla(CTX-M-9) was more prevalent than bla(CTX-M-1) both in bacterial and DNA within phage particles in all samples analysed. mecA and armA were almost absent in Tunisian waters from human or animal origin in contrast with Barcelona that showed a medium prevalence. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS in bacterial and phage DNA from all sampling points. In conclusion, our study shows that ARGs are found in the bacterial and is reflected in the phage DNA fraction of human and animal wastewaters. The densities of each ARGs vary depending on the ARGs shed by each population and is determined by the characteristics of each area. Thus, the evaluation of ARGs in wastewaters seems to be suitable as marker reflecting the antibiotic resistance patterns of a population.

  7. High level of cross-resistance between kanamycin, amikacin, and capreomycin among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Georgia and a close relation with mutations in the rrs gene.

    PubMed

    Jugheli, Levan; Bzekalava, Nino; de Rijk, Pim; Fissette, Krista; Portaels, Françoise; Rigouts, Leen

    2009-12-01

    The aminoglycosides kanamycin and amikacin and the macrocyclic peptide capreomycin are key drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The increasing rates of resistance to these drugs and the possible cross-resistance between them are concerns for MDR-TB therapy. Mutations in the 16S rRNA gene (rrs) have been associated with resistance to each of the drugs, and mutations of the tlyA gene, which encodes a putative rRNA methyltransferase, are thought to confer capreomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Studies of possible cross-resistance have shown variable results. In this study, the MICs of these drugs for 145 clinical isolates from Georgia and the sequences of the rrs and tlyA genes of the isolates were determined. Of 78 kanamycin-resistant strains, 9 (11.5%) were susceptible to amikacin and 16 (20.5%) were susceptible to capreomycin. Four strains were resistant to capreomycin but were susceptible to the other drugs, whereas all amikacin-resistant isolates were resistant to kanamycin. Sequencing revealed six types of mutations in the rrs gene (A514C, C517T, A1401G, C1402T, C1443G, T1521C) but no mutations in the tlyA gene. The A514C, C517T, C1443G, and T1521C mutations showed no association with resistance to any of the drugs. The A1401G and C1402T mutations were observed in 65 kanamycin-resistant isolates and the 4 capreomycin-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas none of the susceptible isolates showed either of those mutations. The four mutants with the C1402T mutations showed high levels of resistance to capreomycin but no resistance to kanamycin and amikacin. Detection of the A1401G mutation appeared to be 100% specific for the detection of resistance to kanamycin and amikacin, while the sensitivities reached 85.9% and 94.2%, respectively.

  8. Identification of antibiotic resistance genes in the multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain, MDR-SHH02, using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualiang; Wang, Jinghua; Yu, Peijuan; Ge, Ping; Jiang, Yanqun; Xu, Rong; Chen, Rong; Liu, Xuejie

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance genes in the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumanii) strain, MDR-SHH02, using whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The antibiotic resistance of MDR-SHH02 isolated from a patient with breast cancer to 19 types of antibiotics was determined using the Kirby-Bauer method. WGS of MDR-SHH02 was then performed. Following quality control and transcriptome assembly, functional annotation of genes was conducted, and the phylogenetic tree of MDR-SHH02, along with another 5 A. baumanii species and 2 Acinetobacter species, was constructed using PHYLIP 3.695 and FigTree v1.4.2. Furthermore, pathogenicity islands (PAIs) were predicted by the pathogenicity island database. Potential antibiotic resistance genes in MDR-SHH02 were predicted based on the information in the Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB). MDR-SHH02 was found to be resistant to all of the tested antibiotics. The total draft genome length of MDR-SHH02 was 4,003,808 bp. There were 74.25% of coding sequences to be annotated into 21 of the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of protein terms, such as 'transcription' and 'amino acid transport and metabolism'. Furthermore, there were 45 PAIs homologous to the sequence MDRSHH02000806. Additionally, a total of 12 gene sequences in MDR-SHH02 were highly similar to the sequences of antibiotic resistance genes in ARDB, including genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes [e.g., aac(3)-Ia, ant(2″)-Ia, aph33ib and aph(3′)-Ia], β-lactamase genes (bl2b_tem and bl2b_tem1), sulfonamide-resistant dihydropteroate synthase genes (sul1 and sul2), catb3 and tetb. These results suggest that numerous genes mediate resistance to various antibiotics in MDR-SHH02, and provide a clinical guidance for the personalized therapy of A. baumannii-infected patients. PMID:28035408

  9. [Cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism and aspirin resistance].

    PubMed

    Bondar', T N; Kravchenko, N A

    2012-01-01

    The literature data concerning structure of cyclo-oxigenase-1--the key enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis and the main target of anti-platelet therapy with the use of acetylsalicilic acid are presented in the review. The data on cyclooxigenase-1 gene polymorphism, distribution of the revealed variants in various populations and their possible correlation with biochemical and functional aspirin resistance are presented.

  10. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections.

  11. Novel small molecules potentiate premature termination codon readthrough by aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Balgi, Aruna D.; Zimmerman, Carla; Choi, Kunho; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S.; Tan, Jason S.; Bergeaud, Célia; Krause, Alexandra; Flibotte, Stéphane; Shimizu, Yoko; Anderson, Hilary J.; Mouly, Vincent; Jan, Eric; Pfeifer, Tom; Jaquith, James B.; Roberge, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense mutations introduce premature termination codons and underlie 11% of genetic disease cases. High concentrations of aminoglycosides can restore gene function by eliciting premature termination codon readthrough but with low efficiency. Using a high-throughput screen, we identified compounds that potentiate readthrough by aminoglycosides at multiple nonsense alleles in yeast. Chemical optimization generated phthalimide derivative CDX5-1 with activity in human cells. Alone, CDX5-1 did not induce readthrough or increase TP53 mRNA levels in HDQ-P1 cancer cells with a homozygous TP53 nonsense mutation. However, in combination with aminoglycoside G418, it enhanced readthrough up to 180-fold over G418 alone. The combination also increased readthrough at all three nonsense codons in cancer cells with other TP53 nonsense mutations, as well as in cells from rare genetic disease patients with nonsense mutations in the CLN2, SMARCAL1 and DMD genes. These findings open up the possibility of treating patients across a spectrum of genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:27407112

  12. Functional characterization of MexXY and OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2008-01-01

    MexXY is an active efflux system that contributes to intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexXY can function in combination with OprM in aminoglycoside efflux but may also functionally associate with another as yet unidentified outer membrane channel. The possible role of OpmG as a third component of MexXY in aminoglycoside efflux was investigated by construction of unmarked opmG mutants. Loss of OpmG did not have any impact on minimum inhibitory concentrations for aminoglycosides regardless of the presence of oprM, indicating that MexXY does not interact with OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux. In a clinical isolate PAJ010, (mexXY) enhanced streptomycin susceptibility but neither oprM nor opmG could, suggesting that MexXY functionally associates with an unidentified outer membrane protein for aminoglycoside efflux. Expression of an opmG-lacZ transcriptional fusion revealed that OpmG expression was neither constitutive nor inducible by gentamicin. Growth rates of wildtype P. aeruginosa and opmG mutant derivatives were not different, indicating that expression of opmG is not essential for P. aeruginosa growth.

  13. Intra-cochlear trafficking of aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear sensory hair cells are pharmacologically sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics that are used for treating life-threatening bacterial sepsis. Cochlear tissues are compartmentalized behind an impermeable paracellular barrier called the blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB). Most macromolecules cannot cross the blood-labyrinth barrier; however, aminoglycosides can cross this barrier into the cochlear fluids and enter hair cells, inducing hair cell death and consequent permanent hearing loss or deafness. The trafficking routes and cellular mechanisms required for aminoglycoside trafficking across the blood-labyrinth barrier remain unknown. Aminoglycosides enter cochlear hair cells across their apical membranes that are bathed in endolymph, a hitherto unexpected trafficking route. The stria vascularis, a component of the blood- labyrinth barrier, preferentially loads with aminoglycosides. Our recent work demonstrates that the stria vascularis exhibits high expression of the cation-selective ion channel TRPV4, and that this channel is permeable to aminoglycosides. However, aminoglycosides must employ more than one cellular mechanism to cross the blood-labyrinth barrier into endolymph against the electrical gradient. PMID:19704872

  14. Intra-cochlear trafficking of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Steyger, Peter S; Karasawa, Takatoshi

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear sensory hair cells are pharmacologically sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics that are used for treating life-threatening bacterial sepsis. Cochlear tissues are compartmentalized behind an impermeable paracellular barrier called the blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB). Most macromolecules cannot cross the blood-labyrinth barrier; however, aminoglycosides can cross this barrier into the cochlear fluids and enter hair cells, inducing hair cell death and consequent permanent hearing loss or deafness. The trafficking routes and cellular mechanisms required for aminoglycoside trafficking across the blood-labyrinth barrier remain unknown.Aminoglycosides enter cochlear hair cells across their apical membranes that are bathed in endolymph, a hitherto unexpected trafficking route. The stria vascularis, a component of the blood- labyrinth barrier, preferentially loads with aminoglycosides. Our recent work demonstrates that the stria vascularis exhibits high expression of the cation-selective ion channel TRPV4, and that this channel is permeable to aminoglycosides. However, aminoglycosides must employ more than one cellular mechanism to cross the blood-labyrinth barrier into endolymph against the electrical gradient.

  15. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  16. Novel and uncommon antimicrobial resistance genes in livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kadlec, K; Fessler, A T; Hauschild, T; Schwarz, S

    2012-08-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates have been the subject of numerous studies during recent years. The characterization of such isolates has usually also included the determination of their resistance phenotypes and associated resistance genotypes. Analysis of the resistance genes present in LA-MRSA isolates has revealed a number of genes commonly found in S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci of humans and animals. In addition, novel resistance genes and/or resistance genes that have been rarely detected in staphylococci so far have been encountered. These include the phenicol exporter gene fexA, the multiresistance gene cfr, the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L), the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK, the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(T), the lincosamide-streptogramin A-pleuromutilin resistance genes vga(C) and vga(E), and the apramycin resistance gene apmA. Most of these genes were located on multiresistance plasmids in LA-MRSA. The co-localization of these resistance genes with other resistance genes enables their co-selection and persistence. LA-MRSA can therefore act as a donor and a recipient of antimicrobial resistance genes within the Gram-positive gene pool. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. New developments in aminoglycoside therapy and ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Talaska, Andra E.; Schacht, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    After almost seven decades in clinical use, aminoglycoside antibiotics still remain indispensible drugs for acute infections and specific indications such as tuberculosis or the containment of pseudomonas bacteria in patients with cystic fibrosis. The review will describe the pathology and pathophysiology of aminoglycoside-induced auditory and vestibular toxicity in humans and experimental animals and explore contemporary views of the mechanisms of cell death. It will also outline the current state of protective therapy and recent advances in the development of aminoglycoside derivatives with low toxicity profiles for antimicrobial treatment and for stop-codon suppression in the attenuation of genetic disorders. PMID:21640178

  18. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1+/−) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1+/− mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1+/− mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  19. Short communication: Genetic characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter isolates recovered from bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Tamang, M D; Gurung, M; Nam, H M; Kim, S R; Jang, G C; Jung, S C; Lim, S K

    2014-02-01

    A total of 176 Acinetobacter isolates, including 57 Acinetobacter baumannii originally obtained from 2,287 bulk tank milk (BTM) samples in Korea was investigated for the genetic basis of antimicrobial resistance using molecular methods. In addition, the occurrence and cassette content of integrons were examined and the genetic diversity of A. baumannii strains identified was evaluated. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected in 15 (88.2%) of the 17 aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter isolates tested. The most common aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene identified was adenylyltransferase gene aadB (n = 9), followed by phosphotransferase genes aphA6 (n = 7) and aphA1 (n = 5). Of the 31 isolates resistant to tetracycline, tet(39) was detected in 20 of them. The genetic basis of resistance to sulfonamide was identified in 15 (53.6%) of 28 trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates and 9 (32.1%) of them carried both sul1 and sul2 genes. A blaADC-7-like gene was detected in 1 β-lactam-resistant A. baumannii. Furthermore, class 1 integron was identified in 11 Acinetobacter isolates. Two gene cassettes dfrA15, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA2, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, were identified in 8 Acinetobacter isolates. None of the isolates was positive for class 2 or class 3 integrons. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that most of the A. baumannii strains from BTM samples were genetically diverse, indicating that the occurrence of A. baumannii strains in BTM was not the result of dissemination of a single clone. Elucidation of resistance mechanisms associated with the resistance phenotype and a better understanding of resistance genes may help in the development of strategies to control infections, such as mastitis, and to prevent further dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from

  20. Genomic characterization of an extensively-drug resistance Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana strain harboring blaNDM-1 gene isolated from a chicken carcass in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Zixin; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenhui; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to genetically characterize the antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 isolated from a chicken carcass in China in 2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility against a panel of 23 antimicrobial agents was carried out on Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 and assessed according to CLSI standards. Whole-genome sequencing of this isolate was conducted to obtain the complete genome of S. Indiana. Salmonella Indiana C629 expressed an XDR phenotype being resistant to more than 20 antimicrobial agents, including imipenem and meropenem. From the analysis of the resistance mechanisms, two mutations were identified in subunit A of DNA gyrase within the quinolone resistance determining region, in addition to the acquisition of mobile efflux pumps encoding oqxA/B/R. Additionally, four beta-lactamases resistance genes (blaCTX-M-65, blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaNDM-1), five aminoglycosides resistance genes (aac(3)-IV, aac(6')-Ib-cr, aadA2, aadA5, and aph(4)-Ia), two phenicol resistance genes (catB3 and floR), and five trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes (sul1/2/3 and dfrA12/17) were also identified. A total of 191 virulence genes were identified. Among them, 57 belonged to type-three secretion system (T3SS) encoding genes, 55 belonged to fimbrial adherence encoding genes, and 39 belonged to flagella-encoding genes CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that multi-resistance mechanisms consistent with an XDR-phenotype, along with various virulence encoding genes of a S. Indiana strain in China These findings highlight the importance of cooperation among different sectors in order to monitor the spread of resistant pathogens among food animal, foods of animal origin and human beings that might further take measures to protect consumers' health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of linezolid resistance due to the optrA gene in Enterococcus faecalis from poultry meat from the American continent (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Cavaco, L M; Bernal, J F; Zankari, E; Léon, M; Hendriksen, R S; Perez-Gutierrez, E; Aarestrup, F M; Donado-Godoy, P

    2017-03-01

    Three Enterococcus isolates obtained from retail chicken collected in 2010-11 as part of the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (COIPARS) showed reduced susceptibility towards linezolid (MIC 8 mg/L). This study aimed at characterizing the isolates resistant to linezolid and detecting the resistance mechanism. Strains were analysed in 2011-12 without successful detection of the resistance mechanism. All isolates were found negative for the cfr gene and no 23S rRNA mutations were detected. In 2016, with the novel resistance gene optrA being described, the WGS data were re-analysed using in silico genomic tools for confirmation of species, detection of virulence and resistance genes, MLST and SNP analyses and comparison of the genetic environment with the previously published plasmid pE349. : Three Enterococcus faecalis isolates were found positive for the optrA gene encoding resistance to linezolid and phenicols. Additional screening of 37 enterococci strains from the same study did not detect any further positives. Typing showed that two of the isolates belong to ST59, while the last belongs to ST489. All isolates carry genes encoding resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B, tetracycline and phenicols. In addition, the ST489 isolate also carries genes conferring aminoglycoside resistance and is resistant to quinolones, but no plasmid-mediated gene was detected. The optrA gene regions of the three plasmids showed high similarity to the originally reported optrA -carrying plasmid pE349. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the optrA gene in E. faecalis isolated from poultry meat in the Americas.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  3. RNA expression analysis of efflux pump genes in clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae Sang; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Hee Yoon; Kim, Chang-Ki; Cho, Sun Young; Lee, Hee Joo

    2017-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an important communicable disease. Various mechanisms of resistance to antituberculosis drugs have been reported; these are principally mutations in target genes. However, not all M. tuberculosis resistance can be explained by mutations in such genes. Other resistance mechanisms associated with drug transport, such as efflux pumps, have also been reported. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of three putative efflux pumps and mutations in target genes associated with injectable agents and fluoroquinolones with clinical MDR and XDR-TB isolates. Thirty clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis that had been phenotypically characterized were obtained from the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis. Of these, 14 were MDR-TB isolates resistant to at least one injectable aminoglycoside (amikacin; AMK, kanamycin; KAN, and/or capreomycin; CPM) and 16 were XDR-TB isolates. M. tuberculosis H37Rv (ATCC 27249) was used as a reference strain. Five putative genes (Rv1258c, Rv2686c, Rv2687c, Rv2688c and pstB) were selected for analysis in this study. Sequencing was performed to detect mutations in rrs and eis genes. qRT-PCR was performed to investigate expression levels of five efflux pump genes. Of the 30 isolates, 25 strains had mutations in rrs associated with resistance to KAN, CPM and AMK and two strains had eis mutations, as well as mutations in rrs. pstB (Rv0933) exhibited increased expression and Rv2687c and Rv2688c exhibited decreased expression compared to the reference strain. Increased expression of pstB in clinical drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates may contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. In our case, overexpression of Rv1258c may have been associated with resistance to kanamycin. No correlation was evident between Rv2686c, Rv2687c or Rv2688c expression and fluoroquinolone resistance. To explore the details of efflux pump drug-resistance mechanisms, further studies on

  4. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. PMID:26988048

  5. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. Copyright © 2016 Bernal et al.

  6. Metagenomic Assembly Reveals Hosts of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and the Shared Resistome in Pig, Chicken, and Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Xia, Yu; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Li, Li-Guan; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-05

    The risk associated with antibiotic resistance disseminating from animal and human feces is an urgent public issue. In the present study, we sought to establish a pipeline for annotating antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) based on metagenomic assembly to investigate ARGs and their co-occurrence with associated genetic elements. Genetic elements found on the assembled genomic fragments include mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and metal resistance genes (MRGs). We then explored the hosts of these resistance genes and the shared resistome of pig, chicken and human fecal samples. High levels of tetracycline, multidrug, erythromycin, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were discovered in these fecal samples. In particular, significantly high level of ARGs (7762 ×/Gb) was detected in adult chicken feces, indicating higher ARG contamination level than other fecal samples. Many ARGs arrangements (e.g., macA-macB and tetA-tetR) were discovered shared by chicken, pig and human feces. In addition, MGEs such as the aadA5-dfrA17-carrying class 1 integron were identified on an assembled scaffold of chicken feces, and are carried by human pathogens. Differential coverage binning analysis revealed significant ARG enrichment in adult chicken feces. A draft genome, annotated as multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, was retrieved from chicken feces metagenomes and was determined to carry diverse ARGs (multidrug, acriflavine, and macrolide). The present study demonstrates the determination of ARG hosts and the shared resistome from metagenomic data sets and successfully establishes the relationship between ARGs, hosts, and environments. This ARG annotation pipeline based on metagenomic assembly will help to bridge the knowledge gaps regarding ARG-associated genes and ARG hosts with metagenomic data sets. Moreover, this pipeline will facilitate the evaluation of environmental risks in the genetic context of ARGs.

  7. Removal of selected PPCPs, EDCs, and antibiotic resistance genes in landfill leachate by a full-scale constructed wetlands system.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xinzhu; Tran, Ngoc Han; Yin, Tingru; He, Yiliang; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2017-09-15

    Landfill leachate could be a significant source of emerging contaminants (ECs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into the environment. This study provides the first information on the occurrence of selected ECs and ARGs in raw leachate from 16-year old closed landfill site in Singapore. Among the investigated ECs, acetaminophen (ACT), bisphenol A (BPA), clofibric acid (CA), caffeine (CF), crotamiton (CTMT), diclofenac (DCF), N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), gemfibrozil (GFZ), lincomycin (LIN), salicylic acid (SA), and sulfamethazine (SMZ) were the most frequently detected compounds in raw landfill leachate. The concentrations of detected ECs in raw landfill leachate varied significantly, from below quantification limit to 473,977 ng/L, depending on the compound. In this study, Class I integron (intl1) gene and ten ARGs were detected in raw landfill leachate. Sulfonamide resistance (sul1, sul2, and dfrA), aminoglycoside resistance (aac6), tetracycline resistance (tetO), quinolone resistance (qnrA), and intl1 were ubiquitously present in raw landfill leachate. Other resistance genes, such as beta-lactam resistance (blaNMD1, blaKPC, and blaCTX) and macrolide-lincosamide resistance (ermB) were also detected, detection frequency of <50%. The removal of target ECs and ARGs by a full-scale hybrid constructed wetland (CW) was also evaluated. The vast majority of ECs exhibited excellent removal efficiencies (>90%) in the investigated hybrid CW system. This hybrid CW system was also found to be effective in the reduction of several ARGs (intl1, sul1, sul2, and qnrA). Aeration lagoons and reed beds appeared to be the most important treatment units of the hybrid CW for removing the majority of ECs from the leachate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  9. Accumulation of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes, bacterial load, and metals in freshwater lake sediments in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Graham, Neil D; Meijer, Maria; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Elongo, Vicky; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan Willem; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-06-02

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) receive the effluents from various sources (communities, industrial, and hospital effluents) and are recognized as reservoir for antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) that are associated with clinical pathogens. The aquatic environment is considered a hot-spot for horizontal gene transfer, and lake sediments offer the opportunity for reconstructing the pollution history and evaluating the impacts. In this context, variation with depth and time of the total bacterial load, the abundance of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB; E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (ENT)), Pseudomonas spp., and ARGs (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaNDM, and aadA) were quantified in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva using quantitative PCR. The abundance of bacterial marker genes was identified in sediments contaminated by WWTP following eutrophication of the lake. Additionally, ARGs, including the extended-spectrum ß-lactam- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes, were identified in the surface sediments. The ARG and FIB abundance strongly correlated (r ≥ 0.403, p < 0.05, n = 34) with organic matter and metal concentrations in the sediments, indicating a common and contemporary source of contamination. The contamination of sediments by untreated or partially treated effluent water can affect the quality of ecosystem. Therefore, the reduction of contaminants from the source is recommended for further improvement of water quality.

  10. [Ca2+ -dependent modulation of antibiotic resistance in Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)].

    PubMed

    Bekker, O B; Elizarov, S M; Alekseeva, M T; Liubimova, I K; Danilenko, V N

    2008-01-01

    The level of resistance to antibiotics of various chemical structure in actinobacteria of the genus Streptomyces is shown to be regulated by Ca2+ ions. The inhibitors of Ca2+/calmodulin and Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases (STPK) are found to reduce antibiotic resistance of actinobacteria. The effect of Ca2+ -dependent phosphorylation on the activity of the enzymatic aminoglycoside phosphotransferase system protecting actinobacteria from aminoglycoside antibiotics was studied. It is shown that inhibitors of Ca2+/calmodulin and Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent STPK reduced the Ca2+ -induced kanamycin resistance in Streptomyces lividans cells transformed by a hybrid plasmid which contained the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase VIII (APHVIII) gene. In S. coelicolor A3(2) cells, the protein kinase PK25 responsible for APHVIII phosphorylation in vitro was identified. It is suggested that STPK play a major role in the regulation of antibiotic resistance in actinobacteria.

  11. mtDNA mutations, hearing loss and aminoglycoside treatment in Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Meza, G; Torres-Ruíz, N M; Tirado-Gutiérrez, C; Aguilera, P

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycin and aminoglycoside derivatives are commonly used to treat tuberculosis and other stubborn infections; these drugs may alter auditory and/or vestibular function. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been associated with hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides; no studies have been conducted in Mexicans, which are very prone to such alterations because aminoglycosides have been prescribed carelessly for many years, irrespective of the ailment to be treated. We investigated "hot spot" mutations described previously as causing inner ear alterations. Hot spot mutations at the 12S rRNA gene and the tRNA Serine (UCN) gene were screened by PCR-RFLP and sequencing in 65 subjects undergoing audiological and vestibular testing. Experimental. 32 individuals had healthy auditory and vestibular function, whereas 33 subjects had auditory affections. We found none of the previously reported mutations related to aminoglycoside hypersensitivity, or non-syndromic hearing loss. Two hearing-impaired patients that had been treated with streptomycin had the T1189C variant of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA region. Mutations related to hearing loss in other ethnic backgrounds were not found in Mexicans. However, the T1189C variant is possibly a putative mutation related to aminoglycoside hypersensitivity and was present in 2 patients.

  12. Aerobic composting reduces antibiotic resistance genes in cattle manure and the resistome dissemination in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Gou, Min; Hu, Hang-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Hayden, Helen; Tang, Yue-Qin; He, Ji-Zheng

    2017-09-08

    Composting has been suggested as a potential strategy to eliminate antibiotic residues and pathogens in livestock manure before its application as an organic fertilizer in agro-ecosystems. However, the impacts of composting on antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock manure and their temporal succession following the application of compost to land are not well understood. We examined how aerobic composting affected the resistome profiles of cattle manure, and by constructing laboratory microcosms we compared the effects of manure and compost application to agricultural soils on the temporal succession of a wide spectrum of ARGs. The high-throughput quantitative PCR array detected a total of 144 ARGs across all the soil, manure and compost samples, with Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B, aminoglycoside, multidrug, tetracycline, and β-lactam resistance as the most dominant types. Composting significantly reduced the diversity and relative abundance of ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in the cattle manure. In the 120-day microcosm incubation, the diversity and abundance of ARGs in manure-treated soils were significantly higher than those in compost-treated soils at the beginning of the experiment. The level of antibiotic resistance rapidly declined over time in all manure- and compost-treated soils, coupled with similar temporal patterns of manure- and compost-derived bacterial communities as revealed by SourceTracker analysis. The network analysis revealed more intensive interactions/associations among ARGs and MGEs in manure-treated soils than in compost-treated soils, suggesting that mobility potential of ARGs was lower in soils amended with compost. Our results provide evidence that aerobic composting of cattle manure may be an effective approach to mitigate the risk of antibiotic resistance propagation associated with land application of organic wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Organization of a resistance gene cluster linked to rhizomania resistance in sugar beet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic resistance to rhizomania has been in use for over 40 years. Characterization of the molecular basis for susceptibility and resistance has proved challenging. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NB-LRR) genes have been implicated in numerous gene-for-gene resistance interaction...

  14. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO2 emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  15. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus Carrying Multiple Drug Resistance Genes on a Plasmid Encoding Exfoliative Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6′)/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6′)/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  16. Indigenous and acquired modifications in the aminoglycoside binding sites of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Belen; Douthwaite, Stephen; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics remain the drugs of choice for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, particularly for respiratory complications in cystic-fibrosis patients. Previous studies on other bacteria have shown that aminoglycosides have their primary target within the decoding region of 16S rRNA helix 44 with a secondary target in 23S rRNA helix 69. Here, we have mapped P. aeruginosa rRNAs using MALDI mass spectrometry and reverse transcriptase primer extension to identify nucleotide modifications that could influence aminoglycoside interactions. Helices 44 and 45 contain indigenous (housekeeping) modifications at m (4)Cm1402, m (3)U1498, m (2)G1516, m (6) 2A1518, and m (6) 2A1519; helix 69 is modified at m (3)Ψ1915, with m (5)U1939 and m (5)C1962 modification in adjacent sequences. All modifications were close to stoichiometric, with the exception of m (3)Ψ1915, where about 80% of rRNA molecules were methylated. The modification status of a virulent clinical strain expressing the acquired methyltransferase RmtD was altered in two important respects: RmtD stoichiometrically modified m (7)G1405 conferring high resistance to the aminoglycoside tobramycin and, in doing so, impeded one of the methylation reactions at C1402. Mapping the nucleotide methylations in P. aeruginosa rRNAs is an essential step toward understanding the architecture of the aminoglycoside binding sites and the rational design of improved drugs against this bacterial pathogen.

  17. The Novel Kasugamycin 2′-N-Acetyltransferase Gene aac(2′)-IIa, Carried by the IncP Island, Confers Kasugamycin Resistance to Rice-Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Kasugamycin (KSM), a unique aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been used in agriculture for many years to control not only rice blast caused by the fungus Magnaporthe grisea but also rice bacterial grain and seedling rot or rice bacterial brown stripe caused by Burkholderia glumae or Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae, respectively. Since both bacterial pathogens are seed-borne and cause serious injury to rice seedlings, the emergence of KSM-resistant B. glumae and A. avenae isolates highlights the urgent need to understand the mechanism of resistance to KSM. Here, we identified a novel gene, aac(2′)-IIa, encoding a KSM 2′-N-acetyltransferase from both KSM-resistant pathogens but not from KSM-sensitive bacteria. AAC(2′)-IIa inactivates KSM, although it reveals no cross-resistance to other aminoglycosides. The aac(2′)-IIa gene from B. glumae strain 5091 was identified within the IncP genomic island inserted into the bacterial chromosome, indicating the acquisition of this gene by horizontal gene transfer. Although excision activity of the IncP island and conjugational gene transfer was not detected under the conditions tested, circular intermediates containing the aac(2′)-IIa gene were detected. These results indicate that the aac(2′)-IIa gene had been integrated into the IncP island of a donor bacterial species. Molecular detection of the aac(2′)-IIa gene could distinguish whether isolates are resistant or susceptible to KSM. This may contribute to the production of uninfected rice seeds and lead to the effective control of these pathogens by KSM. PMID:22660700

  18. Lantana montevidensis Briq improves the aminoglycoside activity against multiresistant Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Erlanio O.; Almeida, Thiago S.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F.G.; Campos, Adriana R.; Lima, Sidney G.; Costa, José G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this work, we report the antibacterial and modulatory activity of Lantana montevidensis Briq. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activities of leaf (LELm) and root (RELm) extracts alone or in association with aminoglycosides were determined by a microdilution test. Multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli (Ec 27) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa 358) were used. Results: The results show the inhibitory activity of LELm against E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 μg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC 128 μg/mL). The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was verified too. The maximum effects were obtained with RELm with gentamicin against E. coli with MIC reduction (312 to 2 μL). Conclusion: The data from this study are indicative of the activity antibacterial of extracts of L. montevidensis and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides. PMID:21572654

  19. BacMet: antibacterial biocide and metal resistance genes database

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Rensing, Christopher; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major human health concern due to widespread use, misuse and overuse of antibiotics. In addition to antibiotics, antibacterial biocides and metals can contribute to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities through co-selection. Information on metal and biocide resistance genes, including their sequences and molecular functions, is, however, scattered. Here, we introduce BacMet (http://bacmet.biomedicine.gu.se)—a manually curated database of antibacterial biocide- and metal-resistance genes based on an in-depth review of the scientific literature. The BacMet database contains 470 experimentally verified resistance genes. In addition, the database also contains 25 477 potential resistance genes collected from public sequence repositories. All resistance genes in the BacMet database have been organized according to their molecular function and induced resistance phenotype. PMID:24304895

  20. Antibiotic resistant enterococci-tales of a drug resistance gene trafficker.

    PubMed

    Werner, Guido; Coque, Teresa M; Franz, Charles M A P; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Hegstad, Kristin; Jensen, Lars; van Schaik, Willem; Weaver, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Enterococci have been recognized as important hospital-acquired pathogens in recent years, and isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium are the third- to fourth-most prevalent nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Acquired resistances, especially against penicilin/ampicillin, aminoglycosides (high-level) and glycopeptides are therapeutically important and reported in increasing numbers. On the other hand, isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium are commensals of the intestines of humans, many vertebrate and invertebrate animals and may also constitute an active part of the plant flora. Certain enterococcal isolates are used as starter cultures or supplements in food fermentation and food preservation. Due to their preferred intestinal habitat, their wide occurrence, robustness and ease of cultivation, enterococci are used as indicators for fecal pollution assessing hygiene standards for fresh- and bathing water and they serve as important key indicator bacteria for various veterinary and human resistance surveillance systems. Enterococci are widely prevalent and genetically capable of acquiring, conserving and disseminating genetic traits including resistance determinants among enterococci and related Gram-positive bacteria. In the present review we aimed at summarizing recent advances in the current understanding of the population biology of enterococci, the role mobile genetic elements including plasmids play in shaping the population structure and spreading resistance. We explain how these elements could be classified and discuss mechanisms of plasmid transfer and regulation and the role and cross-talk of enterococcal isolates from food and food animals to humans.

  1. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  2. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-10-31

    The crystal structure of the aminoglycoside-adenylating enzyme AadA is reported together with functional experiments providing insights into its oligomeric state, ligand binding and catalysis. Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding.

  3. Origin in Acinetobacter guillouiae and dissemination of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme Aph(3')-VI.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Touchon, Marie; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Murphy, Cheryl; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr; Courvalin, Patrice

    2014-10-21

    The amikacin resistance gene aphA6 was first detected in the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii and subsequently in other genera. Analysis of 133 whole-genome sequences covering the taxonomic diversity of Acinetobacter spp. detected aphA6 in the chromosome of 2 isolates of A. guillouiae, which is an environmental species, 1 of 8 A. parvus isolates, and 5 of 34 A. baumannii isolates. The gene was also present in 29 out of 36 A. guillouiae isolates screened by PCR, indicating that it is ancestral to this species. The Pnative promoter for aphA6 in A. guillouiae and A. parvus was replaced in A. baumannii by PaphA6, which was generated by use of the insertion sequence ISAba125, which brought a -35 sequence. Study of promoter strength in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii indicated that PaphA6 was four times more potent than Pnative. There was a good correlation between aminoglycoside MICs and aphA6 transcription in A. guillouiae isolates that remained susceptible to amikacin. The marked topology differences of the phylogenetic trees of aphA6 and of the hosts strongly support its recent direct transfer within Acinetobacter spp. and also to evolutionarily remote bacterial genera. Concomitant expression of aphA6 must have occurred because, contrary to the donors, it can confer resistance to the new hosts. Mobilization and expression of aphA6 via composite transposons and the upstream IS-generating hybrid PaphA6, followed by conjugation, seems the most plausible mechanism. This is in agreement with the observation that, in the recipients, aphA6 is carried by conjugative plasmids and flanked by IS that are common in Acinetobacter spp. Our data indicate that resistance genes can also be found in susceptible environmental bacteria. Importance: We speculated that the aphA6 gene for an enzyme that confers resistance to amikacin, the most active aminoglycoside for the treatment of nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter spp., originated in this genus before

  4. [Detection of resistance phenotypes in gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ferran; Calvo, Jorge; Cantón, Rafael; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Detecting resistance in gram-negative microorganisms has a strong clinical and epidemiological impact, but there is still a great deal of debate about the most sensitive phenotypic method and whether in vitro susceptibility results should be interpreted. The present work reviews the phenotypes and mechanisms of resistance to beta-lactams, quinolones and aminoglycosides in gram-negative bacilli and also revises the different phenotypic methods used for their detection. A clinical interpretation of in vitro susceptibility results is also discussed. Extended-spectrum and inhibitor resistant beta-lactamases, AmpC type beta-lactamases and carbapenemases are thoroughly reviewed. As regards quinolones, the resistance mediated both by plasmids and by mutations in the DNA gyrase and the topoisomerase IV genes is also reviewed. This report includes resistance patterns to aminoglycosides caused by modifying enzymes. Phenotypic detection of beta-lactam resistance in Neisseria spp. and Haemophilus influenzae is also reviewed in a separate section.

  5. [In vitro susceptibility of Enterococcus strains to high level aminoglycosides and heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Nakipoğlu, Yaşar; Gümüş, Defne; Sertel Selale, Deniz; Küçüker, Mine Ang

    2009-10-01

    The widespread use of antimicrobial agents in the hospitals and environmental contamination with heavy metals are increasingly related to resistance progression in microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance of enterococci to high level aminoglycosides and some heavy metals [lead (Pb+2), cadmium (Cd+2), mercury (Hg+2), arsenic (As+5)]. A total of 39 Enterococcus strains, isolated from stool and rectal swabs of hospitalized patients were included to the study. Twenty of the strains were resistant to glycopeptides (11 were resistant to vancomycin + teicoplanin and 9 were resistant to only vancomycin). Disk diffusion method was performed to determine the high level resistance to aminoglycosides (gentamicin 120 microg and streptomycin 300 microg), and agar dilution method was used to detect the sensitivities of the strains against different concentrations (0.005-20 mM) of heavy metals. Since there is no specified minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints for heavy metals, resistance criteria described in previous studies were used. Accordingly, enterococci which exhibited MIC > or = 1 mM for lead and cadmium, MIC > or = 0.1 mM for mercury, and MIC > or = 10 mM for arsenic were accepted as resistant. High level aminoglycoside (HLAG) resistance rates were found as 91% (10/11) for vancomycin (V) + teicoplanin (T) resistant and 42% (8/19) for glycopeptide susceptible strains. While all of the isolates were resistant to lead (100%), arsenic (2.6%) and mercury (2.6%) resistance was detected in one isolate for each metal. No cadmium resistance has been detected. In our study, enterococci have exhibited seven different resistance profiles (10 strains were resistant to V + T + HLAG + Pb; 1 was resistant to V + T + Pb; 1 was resistant to V + As + Pb; 1 was resistant to HLAG + Hg + Pb; 8 were resistant to V + Pb; 7 were resistant to HLAG + Pb; 11 were only resistant to Pb). Resistance to antibiotics (aminoglycosides and/or vancomycin and

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China.

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  8. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  9. Dominant gene for rust resistance in pearl millet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.; Wells, H.D.; Burton, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Rust (Puccinia substriata var. indica) resistance was discovered in three Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke subspecies monodii (Maire) Brunken accessions from Senegal. Resistant plant were free of rust, although the bottom one or two leaves of some plants did develop a brown discoloration without pustules. Resistance was controlled by a dominant gene assigned the gene symbol Rr1. Backcrossing has been effective in transferring resistance from the wild grassy, monodii to cultivated pearl millet. The Rr1 gene should be useful in the production of rust resistant pearl millet hybrids and cultivars. 6 references, 1 table.

  10. Recognition of aminoglycoside antibiotics by enterococcal-staphylococcal aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase type IIIa: role of substrate amino groups.

    PubMed Central

    McKay, G A; Roestamadji, J; Mobashery, S; Wright, G D

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of the aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase IIIa with aminoglycoside antibiotics lacking specific amino groups were examined by steady-state kinetic analyses. The results demonstrate that an amino group on C-1 and either an amino or a hydroxyl group at the 2' and 6' positions are important for detoxification of aminoglycosides by this enzyme. PMID:8913482

  11. Horizontal gene transfer and antibiotic resistance plasmids in multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens pose serious public health concerns and increase the burden of disease treatment. Antibiotic resistance genes can reside on the bacterial chromosome or on other self-replicating DNA molecules such as plasmids. The resistance genes/DNA can be transferred int...

  12. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  13. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  14. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  15. Audiological Management of Patients Receiving Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Wilmington, Debra J.; Gordon, Jane S.; Reavis, Kelly M.; Fausti, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, commonly prescribed for adults and children to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, are potentially ototoxic, often causing irreversible damage to the auditory and vestibular systems. Ototoxic hearing loss usually begins at the higher frequencies and can progress to lower frequencies necessary for understanding…

  16. Audiological Management of Patients Receiving Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Wilmington, Debra J.; Gordon, Jane S.; Reavis, Kelly M.; Fausti, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, commonly prescribed for adults and children to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, are potentially ototoxic, often causing irreversible damage to the auditory and vestibular systems. Ototoxic hearing loss usually begins at the higher frequencies and can progress to lower frequencies necessary for understanding…

  17. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body.

  18. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  19. Spread of ISCR1 Elements Containing blaDHA-1 and Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Leading to Increase of Flomoxef Resistance in Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Li, Chia-Chin; Chien, Chun-Chih; Tang, Ya-Fen; Su, Lin-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Increasing resistance to quinolones, aminoglycosides, and/or cephamycins in extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae exacerbates the already limited antibiotic treatment options for infections due to these microbes. In this study, the presence of resistance determinants for these antimicrobial agents was examined by PCR among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) isolates that caused bacteremia. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to differentiate the clonal relationship among the isolates studied. Transferability and the location of the resistance genes were analyzed by conjugation experiments, followed by DNA-DNA hybridization. Among the 94 ESBL-KP isolates studied, 20 isolates of flomoxef-resistant ESBL-KP were identified. They all carried a DHA-1 gene and were genetically diverse. CTX-M genes were found in 18 of the isolates. Among these DHA-1/CTX-M-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, ISCR1 was detected in 13 (72%) isolates, qnr genes (1 qnrA and 17 qnrB genes) were detected in 18 (100%), aac(6′)-Ib-cr was detected in 11 (61%), and 16S rRNA methylase (all armA genes) was detected in 14 (78%). Four transconjugants were available for further analysis, and qnrB4, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, armA, and blaDHA-1 were all identified on these self-transferable blaCTX-M-carrying plasmids. The genetic environments of ISCR1 associated with armA, blaDHA-1, and qnrB4 genes in the four transconjugants were identical. Replicon-type analysis revealed a FIIA plasmid among the four self-transferable plasmids, although the other three were nontypeable. The cotransfer of multiple resistance genes with the ISCR1 element-carrying plasmids has a clinical impact and warrants close monitoring and further study. PMID:21746945

  20. Neomycin resistance as a selectable marker in Methanococcus maripaludis

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, J.L.; Leigh, J.A.; Tumbula, D.L.

    1996-11-01

    The authors cloned the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase genes APH3{prime}I and APH3{prime}II between the Methanococcus voltae methyl reductase promoter and terminator in a plasmid containing a fragment of Methanococcus maripaludis chromosomal DNA. The resulting plasmids encoding neomycin resistance transformed M. maripaludis at frequencies similar to those observed for pKAS102 encoding puromycin resistance. The antibiotic geneticin was not inhibitory to M. maripaludis. 22 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Genetic basis of persister tolerance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yue; Lazinski, David; Rowe, Sarah; Camilli, Andrew; Lewis, Kim

    2015-04-07

    Persisters are dormant variants that form a subpopulation of drug-tolerant cells largely responsible for the recalcitrance of chronic infections. However, our understanding of the genetic basis of antibiotic tolerance remains incomplete. In this study, we applied transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) to systematically investigate the mechanism of aminoglycoside tolerance in Escherichia coli. We constructed a highly saturated transposon library that covered the majority of E. coli genes and promoter regions and exposed a stationary-phase culture to a lethal dose of gentamicin. Tn-Seq was performed to evaluate the survival of each mutant to gentamicin exposure. We found that the disruption of several distinct pathways affected gentamicin tolerance. We identified 105 disrupted gene/promoter regions with a more than 5-fold reduction in gentamicin tolerance and 37 genes with a more than 5-fold increased tolerance. Functional cluster analysis suggests that deficiency in motility and amino acid synthesis significantly diminished persisters tolerant to gentamicin, without changing the MIC. Amino acid auxotrophs, including serine, threonine, glutamine, and tryptophan auxotrophs, exhibit strongly decreased tolerance to gentamicin, which cannot be restored by supplying the corresponding amino acids to the culture. Interestingly, supplying these amino acids to wild-type E. coli sensitizes stationary-phase cells to gentamicin, possibly through the inhibition of amino acid synthesis. In addition, we found that the deletion of amino acid synthesis genes significantly increases gentamicin uptake in stationary phase, while the deletion of flagellar genes does not affect gentamicin uptake. We conclude that activation of motility and amino acid biosynthesis contributes to the formation of persisters tolerant to gentamicin. Persisters are responsible for the recalcitrance of chronic infections to antibiotics. The pathways of persister formation in E. coli are redundant, and our understanding

  2. What is a resistance gene? Ranking risk in resistomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Metagenomic studies have shown that antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment, which has led to the suggestion that there is a high risk that these genes will spread to bacteria that cause human infections. If this is true, estimating the real risk of dissemination of resistance genes from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens is therefore very difficult. In this Opinion article, we analyse the current definitions of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes, and we describe the bottlenecks that affect the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to human pathogens. We propose rules for estimating the risks associated with genes that are present in environmental resistomes by evaluating the likelihood of their introduction into human pathogens, and the consequences of such events for the treatment of infections.

  3. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  4. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  5. Aminoglycosides restore full-length type VII collagen by overcoming premature termination codons: therapeutic implications for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Jon; Weinstein, Jacqueline; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingping; Martin, Sabrina; South, Andrew P; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have severe, incurable skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7), the major component of anchoring fibrils mediating epidermal-dermal adherence. Nearly 10-25% of RDEB patients carry nonsense mutations leading to premature stop codons (PTCs) that result in truncated C7. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using aminoglycosides to suppress PTCs and induce C7 expression in two RDEB keratinocyte cell lines (Q251X/Q251X and R578X/R906) and two primary RDEB fibroblasts (R578X/R578X and R163X/R1683X). Incubation of these cells with aminoglycosides (geneticin, gentamicin, and paromomycin) resulted in the synthesis and secretion of a full-length C7 in a dose-dependent and sustained manner. Importantly, aminoglycoside-induced C7 reversed the abnormal RDEB cell phenotype and incorporated into the dermal-epidermal junction of skin equivalents. We further demonstrated the general utility of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough in 293 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors encoding 22 different RDEB nonsense mutations. This is the first study demonstrating that aminoglycosides can induce PTC readthrough and restore functional C7 in RDEB caused by nonsense mutations. Therefore, aminoglycosides may have therapeutic potential for RDEB patients and other inherited skin diseases caused by nonsense mutations.

  6. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato.

  7. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  8. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Brenda A.; Coleman, David C.; Deasy, Emily C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O’ Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs) within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%). SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9%) and CpA (54.5%). Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts) were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4]) was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof), mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K)], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  9. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; Coleman, David C; Deasy, Emily C; Brennan, Gráinne I; O' Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs) within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%). SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9%) and CpA (54.5%). Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts) were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4]) was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof), mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K)], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Badarau, Adriana; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2008-02-01

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  11. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of novel fluoroquinolone-aminoglycoside hybrid antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Belakhov, Valery; Hainrichson, Mariana; Yaron, Sima; Baasov, Timor

    2009-04-23

    A series of new hybrid structures containing fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycoside (neomycin) antibiotics linked via 1,2,3-triazole moiety were designed and synthesized, and their antibacterial activities were determined against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including resistant strains. The nature of spacers in both the ciprofloxacin and neomycin parts greatly influenced the antibacterial activity. The majority of hybrids was significantly more potent than the parent neomycin and overcame most prevalent types of resistance associated with aminoglycosides. Selected hybrids inhibited bacterial protein synthesis with the potencies similar to or better than that of neomycin and were up to 32-fold more potent inhibitors than ciprofloxacin for the fluoroquinolone targets, DNA gyrase and toposiomerase IV, indicating a balanced dual mode of action. Significant delay of resistance formation was observed in both E. coli and B. subtilis to the treatment with ciprofloxacin-neomycin hybrid in comparison to that of each drug separately or their 1:1 mixture.

  13. An extracellular factor regulating expression of the chromosomal aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Parojcic, M M; Paradise, M R

    1997-08-01

    The chromosomal aac(2')-Ia gene in Providencia stuartii encodes a housekeeping 2'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(2')-Ia] involved in the acetylation of peptidoglycan. In addition, the AAC(2')-Ia enzyme also acetylates and confers resistance to the clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin, tobramycin, and netilmicin. Expression of the aac(2')-Ia gene was found to be strongly influenced by cell density, with a sharp decrease in aac(2')-Ia mRNA accumulation as cells approached stationary phase. This decrease was mediated by the accumulation of an extracellular factor, designated AR (for acetyltransferase repressing)-factor. AR-factor was produced in both minimal and rich media and acted in a manner that was strongly dose dependent. The activity of AR-factor was also pH dependent, with optimal activity at pH 8.0 and above. Biochemical characterization of conditioned media from P. stuartii has shown that AR-factor is between 500 and 1,000 Da in molecular size and is heat stable. In addition, AR-factor was inactivated by a variety of proteases, suggesting that it may be a small peptide.

  14. A high G418-resistant neo(R) transgenic mouse and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder layers for cytotoxicity and gene targeting in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Jiri; Goad, Mary E P; Czopik, Agnieszka K; Lerner, Charles P; Johnson, Kevin A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Schiestl, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics have been in use since 1944 with the discovery of streptomycin. The aim of this study was to derive a new, highly resistant multicopy neo(R) transgenic mouse strain, named TgN3Ems, by random insertion of the plasmid, pPGKneobpA, and compare the level of drug resistance of wild-type and transgenic mice in vivo and corresponding primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in vitro to a model neomycin analog, G418. The expression neoR in transgenic animals caused a 5-fold increase in the approximate lethal dose of G418, compared to wild type. No adverse pathological changes were found for the transgenic mice treated with G418, as they all died within minutes after injection. In contrast, the G418 treatment of wild-type mice resulted in a marked liver and kidney toxicity detected microscopically and via increases of serum biomarkers for liver and kidney damage. In addition, there was a mild bone marrow and lymphoid depletion. In in vitro studies, the transgenic MEFs survived 20-fold higher G418 levels, compared to the wild-type MEF cells. Therefore, TgN3Ems transgenic mice could be used as a source of G418-resistant feeder cells for gene targeting. Since the expression of drug-resistance genes in transgenic animals confers resistance to toxicity, the TgN3Ems mice might serve as a tool applicable in drug design.

  15. Gene-for-gene disease resistance: bridging insect pest and pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2004-12-01

    Active plant defense, also known as gene-for-gene resistance, is triggered when a plant resistance (R) gene recognizes the intrusion of a specific insect pest or pathogen. Activation of plant defense includes an array of physiological and transcriptional reprogramming. During the past decade, a large number of plant R genes that confer resistance to diverse group of pathogens have been cloned from a number of plant species. Based on predicted protein structures, these genes are classified into a small number of groups, indicating that structurally related R genes recognize phylogenetically distinct pathogens. An extreme example is the tomato Mi-1 gene, which confers resistance to potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). While Mi-1 remains the only cloned insect R gene, there is evidence that gene-for-gene type of plant defense against piercing-sucking insects exists in a number of plant species.

  16. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  17. Sponge Microbiota Are a Reservoir of Functional Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, Dennis; Rodriguez de Evgrafov, Mari; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Sipkema, Detmer; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional resistance genes in the sponges Aplysina aerophoba, Petrosia ficiformis, and Corticium candelabrum. We obtained 37 insert sequences facilitating resistance to D-cycloserine (n = 6), gentamicin (n = 1), amikacin (n = 7), trimethoprim (n = 17), chloramphenicol (n = 1), rifampicin (n = 2) and ampicillin (n = 3). Fifteen of 37 inserts harbored resistance genes that shared <90% amino acid identity with known gene products, whereas on 13 inserts no resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance genes that may be harnessed by phylogenetically distinct bacteria. PMID:27909433

  18. Complex Interactions between Fungal Avirulence Genes and Their Corresponding Plant Resistance Genes and Consequences for Disease Resistance Management

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Houdenot, Yohann; Fudal, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    During infection, pathogens secrete an arsenal of molecules, collectively called effectors, key elements of pathogenesis which modulate innate immunity of the plant and facilitate infection. Some of these effectors can be recognized directly or indirectly by resistance (R) proteins from the plant and are then called avirulence (AVR) proteins. This recognition usually triggers defense responses including the hypersensitive response and results in resistance of the plant. R—AVR gene interactions are frequently exploited in the field to control diseases. Recently, the availability of fungal genomes has accelerated the identification of AVR genes in plant pathogenic fungi, including in fungi infecting agronomically important crops. While single AVR genes recognized by their corresponding R gene were identified, more and more complex interactions between AVR and R genes are reported (e.g., AVR genes recognized by several R genes, R genes recognizing several AVR genes in distinct organisms, one AVR gene suppressing recognition of another AVR gene by its corresponding R gene, two cooperating R genes both necessary to recognize an AVR gene). These complex interactions were particularly reported in pathosystems showing a long co-evolution with their host plant but could also result from the way agronomic crops were obtained and improved (e.g., through interspecific hybridization or introgression of resistance genes from wild related species into cultivated crops). In this review, we describe some complex R—AVR interactions between plants and fungi that were recently reported and discuss their implications for AVR gene evolution and R gene management. PMID:28670324

  19. Distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in glacier environments.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Rivera, Andres; Yamada, Akinori; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Barcaza, Gonzalo; Shinbori, Kunio; Motoyama, Hideaki; Kohshima, Shiro; Ushida, Kazunari

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are biologically transmitted from microorganism to microorganism in particular micro-environments where dense microbial communities are often exposed to an intensive use of antibiotics, such as intestinal microflora, and the soil microflora of agricultural fields. However, recent studies have detected antibiotic-resistant bacteria and/or antibiotic resistance genes in the natural environment geographically isolated from such areas. Here we sought to examine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in 54 snow and ice samples collected from the Arctic, Antarctic, Central Asia, North and South America and Africa, to evaluate the level of these genes in environments supposedly not affected by anthropogenic factors. We observed a widespread distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in samples from various glaciers in Central Asia, North and South America, Greenland and Africa. In contrast, Antarctic glaciers were virtually free from these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes, of both clinical (i.e. aac(3), blaIMP) and agricultural (i.e. strA and tetW) origin, were detected. Our results show regional geographical distribution of antibiotic resistance genes, with the most plausible modes of transmission through airborne bacteria and migrating birds.

  20. Synergistic ototoxicity due to noise exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic exposure to high intensity and/or prolonged noise causes temporary or permanent threshold shifts in auditory perception, reflected by reversible or irreversible damage in the cochlea. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, used for treating or preventing life-threatening bacterial infections, also induce cytotoxicity in the cochlea. Combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure, particularly in neonatal intensive care units, can lead to auditory threshold shifts greater than simple summation of the two insults. The synergistic toxicity of acoustic exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics is not limited to simultaneous exposures. Prior acoustic insult which does not result in permanent threshold shifts potentiates aminoglycoside ototoxicity. In addition, exposure to sub-damaging doses of aminoglycosides aggravates noise-induced cochlear damage. The mechanisms by which aminoglycosides cause auditory dysfunction are still being unraveled, but likely include the following: 1) penetration into the endolymphatic fluid of the scala media, 2) permeation of non-selective cation channels on the apical surface of hair cells and 3) generation of toxic reactive oxygen species and interference with other cellular pathways. Here we discuss the synergistic effect of combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure to identify pivotal synergistic events that can potentiate ototoxicity, in addition to a current understanding of aminoglycoside trafficking within the cochlea. Preventing the ototoxic synergy of noise and aminoglycosides is best achieved by using non-ototoxic bactericidal drugs, and by attenuating perceived noise intensity when life-saving aminoglycoside therapy is required. PMID:19265251

  1. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  2. Class 1 Integron-Associated Tobramycin-Gentamicin Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from the Broiler Chicken House Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Margie D.; Sanchez, Susan; Zimmer, Martha; Idris, Umelaalim; Berrang, Mark E.; McDermott, Patrick F.

    2002-01-01

    Using PCR, we screened 105 isolates of poultry-associated Campylobacter jejuni for the presence of class 1 integrons. Of those isolates, 21% (22 of 105) possessed the integrase gene, but only 5 isolates produced an amplicon in a 5′-3′ conserved sequence PCR directed toward amplification of the resistance cassettes. DNA sequencing demonstrated that all five isolates possessed the aminoglycoside resistance gene, aacA4. PMID:12384387

  3. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Crystal Structures of Two Aminoglycoside Kinases Bound with a Eukaryotic Protein Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3′)-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3′)-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eurkaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides. PMID:21573013

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    SciTech Connect

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter; Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  6. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  7. Potential impact of environmental bacteriophages in spreading antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-06-01

    The idea that bacteriophage transduction plays a role in the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is gaining momentum. Such transduction might be vital in horizontal transfer from environmental to human body-associated biomes and here we review many lines of evidence supporting this notion. It is well accepted that bacteriophages are the most abundant entities in most environments, where they have been shown to be quite persistent. This fact, together with the ability of many phages to infect bacteria belonging to different taxa, makes them suitable vehicles for gene transfer. Metagenomic studies confirm that substantial percentages of the bacteriophage particles present in most environments contain bacterial genes, including mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistance genes. When specific genes of resistance to antibiotics are detected by real-time PCR in the bacteriophage populations of different environments, only tenfold lower numbers of these genes are observed, compared with those found in the corresponding bacterial populations. In addition, the antibiotic resistance genes from these bacteriophages are functional and generate resistance to the bacteria when these genes are transfected. Finally, reports about the transduction of antibiotic resistance genes are on the increase.

  8. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sodium nitrite blocks the activity of aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zemke, Anna C; Gladwin, Mark T; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Sodium nitrite has broad antimicrobial activity at pH 6.5, including the ability to prevent biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surfaces of airway epithelial cells. Because of its antimicrobial activity, nitrite is being investigated as an inhaled agent for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. However, the interaction between nitrite and commonly used aminoglycosides is unknown. This paper investigates the interaction between nitrite and tobramycin in liquid culture, abiotic biofilms, and a biotic biofilm model simulating the conditions in the cystic fibrosis airway. The addition of nitrite prevented killing by aminoglycosides in liquid culture, with dose dependence between 1.5 and 15 mM. The effect was not blocked by the nitric oxide scavenger CPTIO or dependent on efflux pump activity. Nitrite shifted the biofilm minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC-biofilm) from 256 μg/ml to >1,024 μg/ml in an abiotic biofilm model. In a biotic biofilm model, the addition of 50 mM nitrite decreased the antibiofilm activity of tobramycin by up to 1.2 log. Respiratory chain inhibition recapitulated the inhibition of aminoglycoside activity by nitrite, suggesting a potential mechanism of inhibition of energy-dependent aminoglycoside uptake. In summary, sodium nitrite induces resistance to both gentamicin and tobramycin in P. aeruginosa grown in liquid culture, as an abiotic biofilm, or as a biotic biofilm.

  10. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  11. Structural analysis of a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2011-01-01

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally, using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium’s aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the PDB, namely YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic_NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analysis showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic_NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies. PMID:21601576

  12. Isolation of a gene encoding a novel spectinomycin phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Suter, T M; Viswanathan, V K; Cianciotto, N P

    1997-01-01

    A gene capable of conferring spectinomycin resistance was isolated from Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease. The gene (aph) encoded a 36-kDa protein which has similarity to aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. Biochemical analysis confirmed that aph encodes a phosphotransferase which modifies spectinomycin but not hygromycin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. The strain that was the source of aph demonstrated resistance to spectinomycin, and Southern hybridizations determined that aph also exists in other legionellae. PMID:9174205

  13. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a "dream technology" to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by ...

  14. [Ototoxicity of locally administered aminoglycoside antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Heidemüller, B

    1994-06-01

    In 7 children impairment of hearing was observed after local therapy with neomycin and gentamicin because of scalding wounds. In all cases the hearing loss depends on the duration of treatment with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Deep and well vascularised wounds strikingly enhance the absorption rates of the ototoxic drugs. 3 adults locally treated with aminoglycoside antibiotics (neomycin, framycetin, gentamicin) for ulcera cruris displayed a delayed development of hearing loss. The hearing impairment occurs several weeks after therapy and leads to deafness in severe cases even if the treatment had been discontinued a long time ago. The most relevant factors in preventing such damage are: strictest possible indication, taking into account all contraindications, as well as shortest possible duration of therapy.

  15. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleo­tidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding. PMID:26527143

  16. Enzyme structural plasticity and the emergence of broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Frédérique; Broutin, Isabelle; Podglajen, Isabelle; Benas, Philippe; Collatz, Ekkehard; Dardel, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    The emergence of multi-resistant pathogenic bacteria is a worldwide health issue. Recently, clinical variants of a single antibiotic-modifying acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ib-a variant of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase-have been identified that confer extended resistance to most aminoglycosides and, more surprisingly, to structurally unrelated fluoroquinolones. The corresponding gene is carried by mobile genetic elements and is present in most multi-resistant pathogenic strains, hence making it a serious threat to current therapies. Here, we report the crystal structures of both narrow- and broad-spectrum resistance variants of this enzyme, which reveal the structural basis for the emergence of extended resistance. The active site shows an important plasticity and has adapted to new substrates by a large-scale gaping process. We have also obtained co-crystals with both substrates, and with a simple transition state analogue, which provides new clues for the design of inhibitors of this resistance mechanism.

  17. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  18. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  19. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  20. Antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms along a whole river.

    PubMed

    Winkworth, Cynthia L

    2013-06-01

    A key problem challenging public health officials' efforts to stem the spread of antibiotic resistance is the potential increase of resistance in the environment. Yet, despite recent and significant changes to agricultural land in New Zealand, as well as the sector's high antibiotic use, the influence on antibiotic resistance in the environment remained uncharacterised. Spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms from NZ's fourth longest river as it transitioned between low and high intensity farming were examined for 1 year. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to gauge the level of resistance present. Biofilms were screened for 10 genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in humans only and both humans and agricultural animals. Three genes were detected, one which conferred resistance to the important human-only use antibiotic vancomycin. Detected at the two downstream sites only, and those subject to the highest combined land-use stressors, the three genes indicated an elevated presence of antibiotic resistance in relation to surrounding land use; 7.7% versus 2% across the whole river system. The detection of a gene conferring resistance to an important human-only use antibiotic was particularly concerning and highlighted human-based contamination sources along the river, in addition to those of agricultural origin.

  1. Use of a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene microarray for the identification of resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Garneau, P; Labrecque, O; Maynard, C; Messier, S; Masson, L; Archambault, M; Harel, J

    2010-11-01

    As diagnostic and surveillance activities are vital to determine measures needed to control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), new and rapid laboratory methods are necessary to facilitate this important effort. DNA microarray technology allows the detection of a large number of genes in a single reaction. This technology is simple, specific and high-throughput. We have developed a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene DNA microarray that will allow rapid antimicrobial resistance gene screening for all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A prototype microarray was designed using a 70-mer based oligonucleotide set targeting AMR genes of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the present version, the microarray consists of 182 oligonucleotides corresponding to 166 different acquired AMR gene targets, covering most of the resistance genes found in both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. A test study was performed on a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from milk samples from dairy farms in Québec, Canada. The reproducibility of the hybridizations was determined, and the microarray results were compared with those obtained by phenotypic resistance tests (either MIC or Kirby-Bauer). The microarray genotyping demonstrated a correlation between penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance phenotypes with the corresponding acquired resistance genes. The hybridizations showed that the 38 antimicrobial resistant S. aureus isolates possessed at least one AMR gene. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  3. Exploiting natural variation to identify insect-resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Snoeren, Tjeerd A L; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2011-10-01

    Herbivorous insects are widespread and often serious constraints to crop production. The use of insect-resistant crops is a very effective way to control insect pests in agriculture, and the development of such crops can be greatly enhanced by knowledge on plant resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. Plants have evolved diverse ways to cope with insect attack that has resulted in natural variation for resistance towards herbivorous insects. Studying the molecular genetics and transcriptional background of this variation has facilitated the identification of resistance genes and processes that lead to resistance against insects. With the development of new technologies, molecular studies are not restricted to model plants anymore. This review addresses the need to exploit natural variation in resistance towards insects to increase our knowledge on resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. We will discuss how this knowledge can be exploited in breeding programmes to provide sustainable crop protection against insect pests. Additionally, we discuss the current status of genetic research on insect-resistance genes. We conclude that insect-resistance mechanisms are still unclear at the molecular level and that exploiting natural variation with novel technologies will contribute greatly to the development of insect-resistant crop varieties.

  4. Prevalence of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene and its linkage to Tn5281 in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates from Tabriz hospitals.

    PubMed

    Behnood, Amir; Farajnia, Safar; Moaddab, Seyed Reza; Ahdi-Khosroshahi, Shiva; Katayounzadeh, Aliakbar

    2013-09-01

    High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR: MIC ≥ 500 µg/ml) in Enterococci is mediated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes which is mainly encoded by aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene in clinical isolates of Enterococcus facium and Enterococcus faecalis collected from hospitals in northwest of Iran. In the present study a total of 111 enterococcus isolates were collected from 4 hospitals during a two year period (July 2009-August 2011). Bacterial identification and species determination were carried out by standard biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. MICs were determined by agar dilution method. The frequency of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene in the isolates was determined by PCR. The carriage of resistance gene on Tn5281 transposon was identified by long PCR and dot-blot hybridization methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests revealed that the highest resistance was against streptomycin (74.77%) and erythromycin (67.58%) whereas the highest susceptibility was observed to vancomycin (81.1%). 36 isolates (32.43%) were identified as HLGR, 34(94.44%) of them had resistant gene in their genome. Long PCR studies revealed that 88% of HLGR clinical isolates harboured Tn5281. The aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene was present on Tn5281 transposon in all 32 isolates according to dot blot hybridization test. The results of this study indicated that aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene is highly prevalent in gentamicin resistant isolates. Carriage of aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia resistance gene on Tn5281 transposable element suggests possible contribution of this transposone on dissemination of resistance gene among enterococcus isolates.

  5. Readthrough of stop codons by use of aminoglycosides in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; Khan, Sikandar G; Enk, Benedikt; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    Readthrough of premature termination (stop) codons (PTC) is a new approach to treatment of genetic diseases. We recently reported that readthrough of PTC in cells from some xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) patients could be achieved with the aminoglycosides geneticin or gentamicin. We found that the response depended on several factors including the PTC sequence, its location within the gene and the aminoglycoside used. Here, we extended these studies to investigate the effects of other aminoglycosides that are already on the market. We reasoned that topical treatment could deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the skin, the therapeutic target, and thus increase the therapeutic effect while reducing renal or ototoxicity in comparison with systemic treatment. Our prior clinical studies indicated that only a few percent of normal XPC expression was associated with mild clinical disease. We found minimal cell toxicity in the XP-C cells with several aminoglycosides. We found increased XPC mRNA expression in PTC-containing XP-C cells with G418, paromomycin, neomycin and kanamycin and increased XPC protein expression with G418. We conclude that in selected patients with XP, topical PTC therapy can be investigated as a method of personalized medicine to alleviate their cutaneous symptoms.

  6. Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: New Insights into the Biosynthetic Machinery of Old Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    2-Deoxystreptamine (2DOS) is the unique chemically stable aminocyclitol scaffold of clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics such as neomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin, which are produced by Actinomycetes. The 2DOS core can be decorated with various deoxyaminosugars to make structurally diverse pseudo-oligosaccharides. After the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for 2DOS-containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, the function of each biosynthetic enzyme has been extensively elucidated. The common biosynthetic intermediates 2DOS, paromamine and ribostamycin are constructed by conserved enzymes encoded in the gene clusters. The biosynthetic intermediates are then converted to characteristic architectures by unique enzymes encoded in each biosynthetic gene cluster. In this Personal Account, we summarize both common biosynthetic pathways and the pathways used for structural diversification. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity and Targets of Hair Cell Protection

    PubMed Central

    Huth, M. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Cheng, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are commonly prescribed antibiotics with deleterious side effects to the inner ear. Due to their popular application as a result of their potent antimicrobial activities, many efforts have been undertaken to prevent aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Over the years, understanding of the antimicrobial as well as ototoxic mechanisms of aminoglycosides has increased. These mechanisms are reviewed in regard to established and potential future targets of hair cell protection. PMID:22121370

  8. Amikacin resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Gold, R M; Cohen, N D; Lawhon, S D

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most common microorganism isolated from canine pyoderma and postoperative wound infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has increased, and recently, isolates that are resistant not only to methicillin but also to other classes of antibiotic drugs, including aminoglycosides, have become common. A total of 422 S. pseudintermedius isolates collected from 413 dogs were analyzed for amikacin and methicillin resistance using broth microdilution and disk diffusion testing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to be resistant to amikacin (37%, 31/84) than were methicillin-susceptible isolates (7%, 22/338). Additionally, resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was significantly associated with resistance to amikacin irrespective of methicillin resistance. Among the 422 isolates, 32 that tested positive for amikacin resistance by broth microdilution or disk diffusion testing were investigated further for the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes using multiplex PCR. Of these isolates, 66% (21/32) were methicillin resistant. In contrast to previous studies of Staphylococcus aureus, the most prevalent gene detected was aph(3')-IIIa found in 75% (24/32) of isolates followed by aac(6')/aph(2") and ant(4')-Ia in 12% (4/32) and 3% (1/32), respectively. Understanding the differences in antimicrobial resistance gene carriage between different species of Staphylococcus may improve antimicrobial drug selection for clinical therapy and provide insights into how resistance develops in S. pseudintermedius.

  9. Chromate-resistance genes in plasmids from antibiotic-resistant nosocomial enterobacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Flores, Gustavo G; Acosta-Navarrete, Yaned M; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Silva-Sánchez, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    The presence of chromate-resistance genes in enterobacteria was evaluated in a collection of 109 antibiotic-resistant nosocomial isolates from nine major cities in México. Results were compared with the presence of mercury-resistance genes. Susceptibility tests showed that 21% of the isolates were resistant to chromate (Cr(R)), whereas 36% were resistant to mercury (Hg(R)). Cr(R) levels were high in Klebsiella pneumoniae (61%), low in Enterobacter cloacae (12%) and Escherichia coli (4%), and null in Salmonella sp. isolates. Colony hybridization demonstrated that the majority of metal-resistant isolates hybridized with chrA gene (87% of Cr(R) isolates), encoding a CHR transporter homologue, and merA gene (74% of Hg(R) isolates), encoding MerA mercuric reductase, suggesting that most isolates expressed these widespread metal-resistance systems. Southern blot hybridization of Cr(R) isolates showed that plasmids of 80, 85, and 95 kb from K. pneumoniae isolates, and of 100 kb from an E. cloacae isolate, contained chrA-related sequences. These plasmids belonged to IncN or IncP incompatibility groups, and conferred Cr(R), as well as multiple antibiotic resistance, when transferred by conjugation to an E. coli standard strain. These data indicated that Cr(R) genes may be distributed among clinical enterobacteria via conjugative plasmids, probably by coselection with antibiotic-resistant genes. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mapping of the apple scab-resistance gene Vb.

    PubMed

    Erdin, N; Tartarini, S; Broggini, G A L; Gennari, F; Sansavini, S; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2006-10-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the major production constraint in temperate zones with humid springs. Normally, its control relies on frequent and regular fungicide applications. Because this control strategy has come under increasing criticism, major efforts are being directed toward the breeding of scab-resistant apple cultivars. Modern apple breeding programs include the use of molecular markers, making it possible to combine several different scab-resistance genes in 1 apple cultivar (pyramiding) and to speed up the breeding process. The apple scab-resistance gene Vb is derived from the Siberian crab apple 'Hansen's baccata #2', and is 1 of the 6 "historical" major apple scab-resistance genes (Vf, Va, Vr, Vbj, Vm, and Vb). Molecular markers have been published for all these genes, except Vr. In testcross experiments conducted in the 1960s, it was reported that Vb segregated independently from 3 other major resistance genes, including Vf. Recently, however, Vb and Vf have both been mapped on linkage group 1, a result that contrasts with the findings from former testcross experiments. In this study, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify the precise position of Vb in a cross of 'Golden Delicious' (vbvb) and 'Hansen's baccata #2' (Vbvb). A genome scanning approach, a fast method already used to map apple scab-resistance genes Vr2 and Vm, was used, and the Vb locus was identified on linkage group 12, between the SSR markers Hi02d05 and Hi07f01. This finding confirms the independent segregation of Vb from Vf. With the identification of SSR markers linked to Vb, another major apple scab-resistance gene has become available; breeders can use it to develop durable resistant cultivars with several different resistance genes.

  11. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature. PMID:28296933

  12. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  13. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing.

    PubMed

    Gal-On, Amit; Fuchs, Marc; Gray, Stewart

    2017-08-09

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a 'dream technology' to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by disrupting host susceptibility genes, or by increasing the expression of viral resistance genes. However, precise targets must be identified and their roles understood to minimize potential negative effects on the plant. Nonetheless, the opportunities for genome editing are expanding, as are the technologies to generate effective and broad-spectrum resistance against plant viruses. Here we provide insights into recent progress related to gene targets and gene editing technologies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-07-20

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality.

  15. Abundance of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community composition in wastewater effluents from different Romanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Edina; Baricz, Andreea; Chiriac, Cecilia Maria; Farkas, Anca; Opris, Ocsana; Soran, Maria-Loredana; Andrei, Adrian-Stefan; Rudi, Knut; Balcázar, Jose Luis; Dragos, Nicolae; Coman, Cristian

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a growing and significant public health threat, which requires a global response to develop effective strategies and mitigate the emergence and spread of this phenomenon in clinical and environmental settings. We investigated, therefore, the occurrence and abundance of several antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), as well as bacterial community composition in wastewater effluents from different hospitals located in the Cluj County, Romania. Antibiotic concentrations ranged between 3.67 and 53.05 μg L(-1), and the most abundant antibiotic classes were β-lactams, glycopeptides, and trimethoprim. Among the ARGs detected, 14 genes confer resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines. Genes encoding quaternary ammonium resistance and a transposon-related element were also detected. The sulI and qacEΔ1 genes, which confer resistance to sulfonamides and quaternary ammonium, had the highest relative abundance with values ranging from 5.33 × 10(-2) to 1.94 × 10(-1) and 1.94 × 10(-2) to 4.89 × 10(-2) copies/16 rRNA gene copies, respectively. The dominant phyla detected in the hospital wastewater samples were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Among selected hospitals, one of them applied an activated sludge and chlorine disinfection process before releasing the effluent to the municipal collector. This conventional wastewater treatment showed moderate removal efficiency of the studied pollutants, with a 55-81% decrease in antibiotic concentrations, 1-3 order of magnitude lower relative abundance of ARGs, but with a slight increase of some potentially pathogenic bacteria. Given this, hospital wastewaters (raw or treated) may contribute to the spread of these emerging pollutants in the receiving environments. To the best of our knowledge, this study quantified for the first time

  16. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well.

  17. Resistance gene management: concepts and practice

    Treesearch

    Christopher C. Mundt

    2012-01-01

    There is now a very long history of genetics/breeding for disease resistance in annual crops. These efforts have resulted in conceptual advances and frustrations, as well as practical successes and failures. This talk will review this history and its relevance to the genetics of resistance in forest species. All plant breeders and pathologists are familiar with boom-...

  18. Whence Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Antimicrobial resistance results from a complex interaction between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, antimicrobial pressure, and genes, which together comprise the total body of potential resistance elements. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the importance of antimicrobial pressure on the development of resistance in a single surgical intensive care unit. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively collected dataset of all intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in surgical and trauma patients over a 6-y period at a single hospital. Resistant gram-negative pathogens (rGNR) included those resistant to all aminoglycosides, quinolones, penicillins, cephalosporins, or carbapenems; resistant gram-positive infections (rGPC) included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Each resistant infection was evaluated for prior or concomitant antibiotic use, previous treatment for the same (non-resistant) organism, and concurrent infection with the same organism (genus and species, although not necessarily resistant) in another ICU patient. Results: Three hundred and thirty resistant infections were identified: 237 rGNR and 93 rGPC. Infections with rGNR occurred frequently while receiving antibiotic therapy (65%), including the sensitive form of the subsequent resistant pathogen (42.2%). Infections with rGPC were also likely to occur on antimicrobial therapy (50.6%). Treatment of a different patient for an infection with the same resistant pathogen in the ICU at the time of diagnosis, implying potential patient-to-patient transmission occurred more frequently with rGNR infections (38.8%). Conclusion: Antimicrobial pressure exerts a substantial effect on the development of subsequent infection. Our data demonstrate a high estimated rate of de novo emergence of resistance after treatment, which appears to be more common than patient-to-patient transmission. These data support

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E; Díaz, Paula L; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Copyright © 2016 Bernal et al.

  20. Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance Mechanisms to Modern Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P.; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  1. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  2. Novel metal resistance genes from microorganisms: a functional metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    González-Pastor, José E; Mirete, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Most of the known metal resistance mechanisms are based on studies of cultured microorganisms, and the abundant uncultured fraction could be an important source of genes responsible for uncharacterized resistance mechanisms. A functional metagenomic approach was selected to recover metal resistance genes from the rhizosphere microbial community of an acid-mine drainage (AMD)-adapted plant, Erica andevalensis, from Rio Tinto, Spain. A total of 13 nickel resistant clones were isolated and analyzed, encoding hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions, or well-characterized proteins, but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance. The resistance clones were classified into two groups according to their nickel accumulation properties: those preventing or those favoring metal accumulation. Two clones encoding putative ABC transporter components and a serine O-acetyltransferase were found as representatives of each group, respectively.

  3. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: management through gene monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an acknowledged crisis for humanity. Its genetic origins and dire potential outcomes are increasingly well understood. However, diagnostic techniques for monitoring the crisis are currently largely limited to enumerating the increasing incidence of resistant pathogens. Being the end-stage of the evolutionary process that produces antimicrobial resistant pathogens, these measurements, while diagnostic, are not prognostic, and so are not optimal in managing this crisis. A better test is required. Here, using insights from an understanding of evolutionary processes ruling the changing abundance of genes under selective pressure, we suggest a predictive framework for the AMR crisis. We then discuss the likely progression of resistance for both existing and prospective antimicrobial therapies. Finally, we suggest that by the environmental monitoring of resistance gene frequency, resistance may be detected and tracked presumptively, and how this tool may be used to guide decision-making in the local and global use of antimicrobials. PMID:27831476

  4. In Vitro Emergence of High Persistence upon Periodic Aminoglycoside Challenge in the ESKAPE Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Health care-associated infections present a major threat to modern medical care. Six worrisome nosocomial pathogens—Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.—are collectively referred to as the “ESKAPE bugs.” They are notorious for extensive multidrug resistance, yet persistence, or the phenotypic tolerance displayed by a variant subpopulation, remains underappreciated in these pathogens. Importantly, persistence can prevent eradication of antibiotic-sensitive bacterial populations and is thought to act as a catalyst for the development of genetic resistance. Concentration- and time-dependent aminoglycoside killing experiments were used to investigate persistence in the ESKAPE pathogens. Additionally, a recently developed method for the experimental evolution of persistence was employed to investigate adaptation to high-dose, extended-interval aminoglycoside therapy in vitro. We show that ESKAPE pathogens exhibit biphasic killing kinetics, indicative of persister formation. In vitro cycling between aminoglycoside killing and persister cell regrowth, evocative of clinical high-dose extended-interval therapy, caused a 37- to 213-fold increase in persistence without the emergence of resistance. Increased persistence also manifested in biofilms and provided cross-tolerance to different clinically important antibiotics. Together, our results highlight a possible drawback of intermittent, high-dose antibiotic therapy and suggest that clinical diagnostics might benefit from taking into account persistence. PMID:27185802

  5. In Vitro Emergence of High Persistence upon Periodic Aminoglycoside Challenge in the ESKAPE Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran Elie; Van den Bergh, Bram; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Health care-associated infections present a major threat to modern medical care. Six worrisome nosocomial pathogens-Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.-are collectively referred to as the "ESKAPE bugs." They are notorious for extensive multidrug resistance, yet persistence, or the phenotypic tolerance displayed by a variant subpopulation, remains underappreciated in these pathogens. Importantly, persistence can prevent eradication of antibiotic-sensitive bacterial populations and is thought to act as a catalyst for the development of genetic resistance. Concentration- and time-dependent aminoglycoside killing experiments were used to investigate persistence in the ESKAPE pathogens. Additionally, a recently developed method for the experimental evolution of persistence was employed to investigate adaptation to high-dose, extended-interval aminoglycoside therapy in vitro We show that ESKAPE pathogens exhibit biphasic killing kinetics, indicative of persister formation. In vitro cycling between aminoglycoside killing and persister cell regrowth, evocative of clinical high-dose extended-interval therapy, caused a 37- to 213-fold increase in persistence without the emergence of resistance. Increased persistence also manifested in biofilms and provided cross-tolerance to different clinically important antibiotics. Together, our results highlight a possible drawback of intermittent, high-dose antibiotic therapy and suggest that clinical diagnostics might benefit from taking into account persistence. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Apple contains receptor-like genes homologous to the Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene family of tomato with a cluster of genes cosegregating with Vf apple scab resistance.

    PubMed

    Vinatzer, B A; Patocchi, A; Gianfranceschi, L; Tartarini, S; Zhang, H B; Gessler, C; Sansavini, S

    2001-04-01

    Scab caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis is the most common disease of cultivated apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Monogenic resistance against scab is found in some small-fruited wild Malus species and has been used in apple breeding for scab resistance. Vf resistance of Malus floribunda 821 is the most widely used scab resistance source. Because breeding a high-quality cultivar in perennial fruit trees takes dozens of years, cloning disease resistance genes and using them in the transformation of high-quality apple varieties would be advantageous. We report the identification of a cluster of receptor-like genes with homology to the Cladosporium fulvum (Cf) resistance gene family of tomato on bacterial artificial chromosome clones derived from the Vf scab resistance locus. Three members of the cluster were sequenced completely. Similar to the Cf gene family of tomato, the deduced amino acid sequences coded by these genes contain an extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain and a transmembrane domain. The transcription of three members of the cluster was determined by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction to be constitutive, and the transcription and translation start of one member was verified by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. We discuss the parallels between Cf resistance of tomato and Vf resistance of apple and the possibility that one of the members of the gene cluster is the Vf gene. Cf homologs from other regions of the apple genome also were identified and are likely to present other scab resistance genes.

  7. Molecular Characterization of High-Level Mupirocin Resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Roth, Eduardo; Pintarić, Selma; Šeol Martinec, Branka

    2013-01-01

    The genetic analysis of high-level mupirocin resistance (Hi-Mupr) in a Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolate from a dog is presented. The Hi-Mupr ileS2 gene flanked by a novel rearrangement of directly repeated insertion sequence IS257 elements was located, together with the aminoglycoside resistance aacA-aphD determinant, on a conjugative plasmid related to the pSK41/pGO1 family plasmids. PMID:23269741

  8. Different impacts of manure and chemical fertilizers on bacterial community structure and antibiotic resistance genes in arable soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Jia, Shuyu; He, Xiwei; Zhang, Xuxiang; Ye, Lin

    2017-09-04

    Both manure and chemical fertilizers are widely used in modern agriculture. However, the impacts of different fertilizers on bacterial community structure and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in arable soils still remain unclear. In this study, high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR were employed to investigate the bacterial community structure, ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) influenced by the application of different fertilizers, including chemical fertilizers, piggery manure and straw ash. The results showed that the application of fertilizers could significantly change the soil bacterial community and the abundance of Gaiella under phylum Actinobacteria was significantly reduced from 12.9% in unfertilized soil to 4.1%-7.4% in fertilized soil (P < 0.05). It was also found that the application of manure could cause a transient effect on soil resistome composition and the relative abundance of ARGs increased from 7.37 ppm to 32.10 ppm. The abundance of aminoglycoside, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes greatly increased after manure fertilization and then gradually returned to normal levels with the decay of some intestinal bacteria carrying ARGs. In contrast, the application of chemical fertilizers and straw ash significantly changed the bacterial community structure but exerted little effect on soil resistome. Overall, the results of this study illustrated the different effects of different fertilizers on the soil resistome and revealed that the changes of soil resistome induced by manure application mainly resulted from alteration of bacteria community rather than the horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aminoglycoside 2′′-Phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)-IIIa) Prefers GTP over ATP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Byrnes, Laura J.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted dogma that ATP is the canonical phosphate donor in aminoglycoside kinases and protein kinases, it was recently demonstrated that all members of the bacterial aminoglycoside 2′′-phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)) aminoglycoside kinase family are unique in their ability to utilize GTP as a cofactor for antibiotic modification. Here we describe the structural determinants for GTP recognition in these enzymes. The crystal structure of the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa shows that although this enzyme has templates for both ATP and GTP binding superimposed on a single nucleotide specificity motif, access to the ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine residue. Substitution of this tyrosine by a smaller amino acid opens access to the ATP template. Similar GTP binding templates are conserved in other bacterial aminoglycoside kinases, whereas in the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases this template is less conserved. The aminoglycoside kinases are important antibiotic resistance enzymes in bacteria, whose wide dissemination severely limits available therapeutic options, and the GTP binding templates could be exploited as new, previously unexplored targets for inhibitors of these clinically important enzymes. PMID:22367198

  10. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, Konstantin M.; Gorbacheva, Marina A.; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A.; Alekseeva, Maria G.; Mavletova, Dilara A.; Zakharevich, Natalia V.; Elizarov, Sergey M.; Rudakova, Natalia N.; Danilenko, Valery N.; Popov, Vladimir O.

    2016-09-02

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3′-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. - Highlights: • 3D structure of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII was obtained. • AphVIII activation loop is clearly identified in the electron density. • AphVIII has some unique structural features in its substrate C-ring binding pocket.

  11. Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To enhance resistance to Sclerotinia head and stalk rot in cultivated sunflower, mining and introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower has been conducted using backcrossing method since 2004. During the last four years, numerous in...

  12. In vitro comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with various susceptibilities to aminoglycosides and ten beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D H; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P

    1984-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 98 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including 33 strains with known mechanisms of amikacin resistance, were tested by the agar dilution method against 10 beta-lactam drugs. Ceftazidime, imipenem, and cefsulodin had the greatest activity, regardless of the aminoglycoside susceptibilities. The strains which were highly resistant to amikacin appeared to be less susceptible to some beta-lactam drugs, especially if their resistance was related to amikacin-inactivating enzymes; statistical significance, however, was observed for aztreonam only. PMID:6428308

  13. Effect of Mutation to Streptomycin Resistance on Amber Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Nozomu; Aono, Hiroyuki

    1968-01-01

    Three classes of nonidentical streptomycin-resistant mutations were distinguished in Escherichia coli by their effect on the efficiency of suppression by an amber suppressor gene, sup E. The first class of mutation caused a strong restriction in efficiency of suppression of an amber codon in various cistrons of phage λ and in an alkaline phosphatase structural gene of E. coli. The second class caused weak restriction, and the third class caused no restriction. The restrictive effect of the streptomycin resistance mutation of the first class on the sup E gene was reduced by addition of streptomycin. This mutation had little effect on efficiencies of suppression by amber suppressor genes sup D and sup F. Analyses on the alkaline phosphatase formed in the suppressor strain indicated that mutation to restrictive streptomycin resistance causes a reduction in translation of the amber codon in the alkaline phosphatase structural gene. Images PMID:4874314

  14. Identification of docetaxel resistance genes in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marín-Aguilera, Mercedes; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Kalko, Susana G; Fernández, Pedro L; Bermudo, Raquel; Buxo, Elvira; Ribal, María José; Gascón, Pedro; Mellado, Begoña

    2012-02-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line therapy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, most patients eventually develop resistance to this treatment. In this study, we aimed to identify key molecular genes and networks associated with docetaxel resistance in two models of docetaxel-resistant CRPC cell lines and to test for the most differentially expressed genes in tumor samples from patients with CRPC. DU-145 and PC-3 cells were converted to docetaxel-resistant cells, DU-145R and PC-3R, respectively. Whole-genome arrays were used to compare global gene expression between these four cell lines. Results showed differential expression of 243 genes (P < 0.05, Bonferroni-adjusted P values and log ratio > 1.2) that were common to DU-145R and PC-3R cells. These genes were involved in cell processes like growth, development, death, proliferation, movement, and gene expression. Genes and networks commonly deregulated in both DU-145R and PC-3R cells were studied by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis. Exposing parental cells to TGFB1 increased their survival in the presence of docetaxel, suggesting a role of the TGF-β superfamily in conferring drug resistance. Changes in expression of 18 selected genes were validated by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in all four cell lines and tested in a set of 11 FFPE and five optimal cutting temperature tumor samples. Analysis in patients showed a noteworthy downexpression of CDH1 and IFIH1, among others, in docetaxel-resistant tumors. This exploratory analysis provides information about potential gene and network involvement in docetaxel resistance in CRPC. Further clinical validation of these results is needed to develop targeted therapies in patients with CRPC that can circumvent such resistance to treatment.

  15. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2011-02-01

    The potato gene RB, cloned from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to better characterize this partial resistance phenotype, we have compared host resistance responses mediated by RB with those mediated by the S. demissum-derived R gene R9, which confers immunity to P. infestans carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrR9. We found that both RB and R9 genes were capable of eliciting a hypersensitive cell death response (HR). However, in RB plants, the pathogen escaped HR lesions and continued to grow beyond the inoculation sites. We also found that callose deposition was negatively correlated with resistance levels in tested plants. Transcription patterns of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 basic, PR-2 acidic, and PR-5 indicated that P. infestans inoculation induced transcription of these defense-related genes regardless of the host genotype; however, transcription was reduced in both the susceptible and partially resistant plants later in the infection process but remained elevated in the immune host. Most interestingly, transcription of the HR-associated gene Hin1 was suppressed in both Katahdin and RB-transgenic Katahdin but not in R9 4 days after inoculation. Together, this suggests that suppression of certain defense-related genes may allow P. infestans to spread beyond the site of infection in the partially resistant host despite elicitation of hypersensitive cell death.

  16. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  17. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K.; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  18. Structural Basis for Dual Nucleotide Selectivity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IVa Provides Insight on Determinants of Nucleotide Specificity of Aminoglycoside Kinases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes. PMID:22371504

  19. Structural basis for dual nucleotide selectivity of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa provides insight on determinants of nucleotide specificity of aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-13

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-06-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E.; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  2. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Campedelli, Ilenia; Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  3. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  4. Coexistence of blaOXA-23 with armA in quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from a Chinese university hospital.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Luan, Guangxin; Wang, Yanhong; Chang, Yaowen; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Jingni; Deng, Shanshan; Ling, Baodong; Jia, Xu

    2016-03-01

    A total of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected to determine the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and investigate the occurrence of carbapenem and high-level aminoglycoside resistance genes among quinolone-resistant strains. Among 77 quinolone-resistant A. baumannii harbored mutations of gyrA and parC, 41 isolates, which belonged to European clone II, had resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems due to the expression of armA and acquisition of blaOXA-23. Most of sequence type belonged to clonal complex 92. These results suggested hospital dissemination of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii carrying blaOXA-23, armA, and mutations of quinolone resistance-determining regions in western China.

  5. Susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Silva, Freddy Alejandro; Conde-Felipe, Magnolia; Rosario, Inmaculada; Ferrer, Otilia; Real, Fernando; Déniz, Soraya; Acosta, Félix; Padilla, Daniel; Acosta-Hernández, Begoña

    2017-09-19

    Previous studies have evaluated the action of gentamicin against Malassezia pachydermatis. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro susceptibility of M. pachydermatis to the aminoglycosides- gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmicin and framycetin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin was determined following methods M27-A3 microdilution and Etest(®) . The Etest(®) was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the tobramycin and netilmicin. The Kirby-Bauer test was used to determine the antibiotic susceptibility to the framycetin. The MIC50 and MIC90 were 8.12 μg/mL and 32.5 μg/mL by microdilution method for gentamicin. The MIC50, determined by the Etest(®) , was 8 μg/mL for gentamicin and netilmicin and 64 μg/mL for tobramycin. The MIC90 was 16 and 32 μg/mL for gentamicin and netilmicin respectively. The MIC90 was outside of the detectable limits for tobramycin. To framycetin, 28 strains (40%) of the 70 M. pachydermatis isolates tested showed a diameter of 22 mm, 22 strains (31.42%) showed a diameter of 20 mm, 16 strains showed a diameter of ≤ 18 mm, and only 5.71% of the isolates showed a diameter of ≥ 22 mm. This study provides evidence of high in vitro activity of the aminoglycosides-gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmicin and framycetin against M. pachydermatis. For gentamicin Etest(®) showed similar values of MIC50 y MIC90 that the obtained by microdilution method. We considered Etest(®) method could be a good method for these calculations with aminoglycosides. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. PRGdb: a bioinformatics platform for plant resistance gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanseverino, Walter; Roma, Guglielmo; De Simone, Marco; Faino, Luigi; Melito, Sara; Stupka, Elia; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2010-01-01

    PRGdb is a web accessible open-source (http://www.prgdb.org) databas