Science.gov

Sample records for aminoglycoside resistance genes

  1. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  3. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  4. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  5. High level aminoglycoside resistance and distribution of aminoglycoside resistant genes among clinical isolates of Enterococcus species in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Padmasini, Elango; Padmaraj, R; Ramesh, S Srivani

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) by MIC for gentamicin (GM), streptomycin (SM) and both (GM + SM) antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME) in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia; aph(2'')-Ib; aph(2'')-Ic; aph(2'')-Id and aph(3')-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3')-IIIa gene. aph(2'')-Ib; aph(2'')-Ic; aph(2'')-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia and aph(3')-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  6. Identification of aminoglycoside resistance genes by Triplex PCR in Enterococcus spp. isolated from ICUs.

    PubMed

    Mirnejad, Reza; Sajjadi, Nikta; Masoumi Zavaryani, Sara; Piranfar, Vahhab; Hajihosseini, Maryam; Roshanfekr, Maliheh

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of antibiotic-resistant enterococci is an important part of patient treatment. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the resistance patterns and simultaneously identify and characterise the resistance genes in Enterococcus spp. using a triplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. In all, 150 consecutive Enterococcus spp were collected from several hospitals in Tehran (Iran) from January to December 2015. The Enterococcus species were identified by standard phenotypic/biochemical tests and PCR. The antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined using a disk diffusion method. The triplex PCR method was designed to identify gentamicin and other aminoglycoside resistance genes. Among the 150 Enterococcus specimens, 87 cases (58%) were Enterococcus faecalis, and 63 cases (42%) were Enterococcus faecium. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for tetracycline while the lowest was found for vancomycin. Among the identified samples, 56.9% contained the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia gene, 22.2% contained the aph(3')-IIIa gene, and 38.8% contained the ant(4')-?a gene. Eight percent of the isolates contained the three aminoglycoside resistance genes. Data analysis showed that there was a significant correlation between the phenotypic gentamicin resistance and the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance genes (18.9%, p <0.05), while the correlation between the phenotypic streptomycin resistance and the corresponding genes was not significant (2.8%, p ≥0.5). Nearly half of the identified Enterococcus strains had increased aminoglycoside resistance. The direct correlation between resistance genes, such as the aminoglycoside resistance factor, and phenotypic resistance was not significant (p > 0.05). PMID:27668903

  7. Identification of aminoglycoside resistance genes by Triplex PCR in Enterococcus spp. isolated from ICUs.

    PubMed

    Mirnejad, Reza; Sajjadi, Nikta; Masoumi Zavaryani, Sara; Piranfar, Vahhab; Hajihosseini, Maryam; Roshanfekr, Maliheh

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of antibiotic-resistant enterococci is an important part of patient treatment. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the resistance patterns and simultaneously identify and characterise the resistance genes in Enterococcus spp. using a triplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. In all, 150 consecutive Enterococcus spp were collected from several hospitals in Tehran (Iran) from January to December 2015. The Enterococcus species were identified by standard phenotypic/biochemical tests and PCR. The antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined using a disk diffusion method. The triplex PCR method was designed to identify gentamicin and other aminoglycoside resistance genes. Among the 150 Enterococcus specimens, 87 cases (58%) were Enterococcus faecalis, and 63 cases (42%) were Enterococcus faecium. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for tetracycline while the lowest was found for vancomycin. Among the identified samples, 56.9% contained the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia gene, 22.2% contained the aph(3')-IIIa gene, and 38.8% contained the ant(4')-?a gene. Eight percent of the isolates contained the three aminoglycoside resistance genes. Data analysis showed that there was a significant correlation between the phenotypic gentamicin resistance and the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance genes (18.9%, p <0.05), while the correlation between the phenotypic streptomycin resistance and the corresponding genes was not significant (2.8%, p ≥0.5). Nearly half of the identified Enterococcus strains had increased aminoglycoside resistance. The direct correlation between resistance genes, such as the aminoglycoside resistance factor, and phenotypic resistance was not significant (p > 0.05).

  8. Characterization of aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes among Enterococcus spp. isolated from a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-03-11

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as "other" Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  9. Genome-Scale Identification Method Applied to Find Cryptic Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Struble, Julie M.; Gill, Ryan T.

    2009-01-01

    Background The ability of bacteria to rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics is a critical public health problem. Resistance leads to increased disease severity and death rates, as well as imposes pressure towards the discovery and development of new antibiotic therapies. Improving understanding of the evolution and genetic basis of resistance is a fundamental goal in the field of microbiology. Results We have applied a new genomic method, Scalar Analysis of Library Enrichments (SCALEs), to identify genomic regions that, given increased copy number, may lead to aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the genome scale. We report the result of selections on highly representative genomic libraries for three different aminoglycoside antibiotics (amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin). At the genome-scale, we show significant (p<0.05) overlap in genes identified for each aminoglycoside evaluated. Among the genomic segments identified, we confirmed increased resistance associated with an increased copy number of several genomic regions, including the ORF of PA5471, recently implicated in MexXY efflux pump related aminoglycoside resistance, PA4943-PA4946 (encoding a probable GTP-binding protein, a predicted host factor I protein, a δ 2-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase, and DNA mismatch repair protein mutL), PA0960–PA0963 (encoding hypothetical proteins, a probable cold shock protein, a probable DNA-binding stress protein, and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase), a segment of PA4967 (encoding a topoisomerase IV subunit B), as well as a chimeric clone containing two inserts including the ORFs PA0547 and PA2326 (encoding a probable transcriptional regulator and a probable hypothetical protein, respectively). Conclusions The studies reported here demonstrate the application of new a genomic method, SCALEs, which can be used to improve understanding of the evolution of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa. In our demonstration studies, we identified a

  10. Frequency of Aminoglycoside-Resistance Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiyoun, Seyed Mohsen; Kazemian, Hossein; Ahanjan, Mohammad; Houri, Hamidreza; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causative agents in community- and hospital-acquired infections. Aminoglycosides are powerful bactericidal drugs that are often used in combination with beta-lactams or glycopeptides to treat staphylococcal infections. Objectives The main objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in hospitalized patients in Sari and Tehran, Iran. Methods In this study, 174 MRSA strains isolated from different clinical samples, such as blood, sputum, tracheal exudates, bronchus, pleura, urine, wounds, and catheters, were collected from hospitalized patients in Tehran and Sari during 2014. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed against nine antibiotics with the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. The MRSA strains were examined with oxacillin and cefoxitin disks. MRSA was then validated by detection of the mecA gene. PCR was used to evaluate the prevalence of the aminoglycoside-resistance genes aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’) among the MRSA isolates. Results The results of drug susceptibility testing showed that the highest rate of resistance was against erythromycin in Tehran (84.4%) and gentamicin (71.7%) in Sari. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, and all strains harbored the mecA gene. The aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’)-Ia genes were detected among 134 (77%), 119 (68.4%), and 122 (70.1%) of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions The present study showed a high prevalence of aminoglycoside-resistance genes among MRSA isolates in two cities in Iran. PMID:27800135

  11. Involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3')-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3')-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99-100% sequence identity with aph(3')-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3')-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants.

  12. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates. PMID:27514959

  13. Virulence and the presence of aminoglycoside resistance genes of Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Krzymińska, Sylwia; Szczuka, Ewa; Dudzińska, Kinga; Kaznowski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We examined thirty methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolates cultured from clinical specimens for antibiotic resistance, various important interactions of the bacteria with epithelial cells and putative virulence determinants. All strains were resistant to oxacillin and carried the mecA gene. Aminocyclitol-3'-phosphotransferase (aph(3')-IIIa) gene encoding nucleotidyltransferases was detected in 43 %, aminocyclitol-6'-acetyltransferase-aminocyclitol-2″-phosphotransferase (aac(6')/aph(2″)) gene encoding bifunctional acetyltransferases/phosphotransferases in 33 %, aminocyclitol-4'-adenylyltransferase (ant(4')-Ia) gene encoding phosphotransferases in 20 %. The coexistence of resistance to methicillin and aminoglycosides was investigated in multi-resistant strains. Coexisting (aac(6')/aph(2″)) and (aph(3')-IIIa) genes were detected in 33 % of isolates, whereas 63 % of isolates had at least one of these genes. All strains revealed adherence ability and most of them (63 %) were invasive to epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria were found in vacuoles inside the cells. We observed that the contact of the bacteria with host epithelial cells is a prerequisite to their cytotoxicity at 5 h-incubation. Culture supernatant of the strains induced a low effect of cytotoxicity at the same time of incubation. Cell-free supernatant of all isolates expressed cytotoxic activity which caused destruction of HEp-2 cells at 24 h. None of the strains was cytotonic towards CHO cells. Among thirty strains, 27 % revealed lipolytic activity, 43 % produced lecithinase and 20 % were positive for proteinase activity. Analyses of cellular morphology and DNA fragmentation exhibited typical characteristic features of those undergoing apoptosis. The Pearson linear test revealed positive correlations between the apoptotic index at 24 h and percentage of cytotoxicity. Our results provided new insights into the mechanisms contributing to the

  14. Review of epidemic aminoglycoside resistance worldwide.

    PubMed

    Mayer, K H

    1986-06-30

    Epidemic aminoglycoside resistance may be caused by the spread of a species with distinctive chromosomal genes (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa), or it may be due to the dissemination of plasmids or transposons between genera. Although strains of P. aeruginosa resistant to aminoglycosides because of impermeability may cause nosocomial outbreaks, most of the acute increases in aminoglycoside resistance are due to the spread of inactivating enzymes by plasmids. The index species for intergeneric outbreaks is usually Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying the ANT(2") or AAC(3) gene; however, the distribution of resistance varies greatly by location and species. The AAC(6')-I gene is most common in Serratia marcescens and in East Asian isolates of other species, whereas the AAC(3) gene is common in Chile. In the United States, the ANT(2") and AAC(3) genes are particularly common among Enterobacteriaceae, except for Proteus and Providencia, which often carry the AAC(2') gene. The most common patterns of epidemic resistance lead to the inactivation of gentamicin and, less frequently, tobramycin, but only rarely affect amikacin.

  15. Detecting the frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Shokravi, Zahra; Mehrad, Laleh; Ramazani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays an important role in causing many serious nosocomial infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibility and the frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was investigated from two university hospitals of Zanjan province of Iran. Methods: In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates to various antibiotics was investigated by the disk diffusion method. Multiplex PCR assays were used for the determination of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme (AME) genes and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types in MRSA strains. Results: All 58 MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. Resistance to penicillin G, oxacilin, gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, kanamycin, and tobramycin was found in 96.4%, 98.3%, 51.7%, 53.4%, 55.2%, 62% and 58.6% of the isolates, respectively. The most prevalent AME genes were aac(6′)/aph(2′′) (48.3 %) followed by ant(4)-Ia (24%). The aph(3′)-Ia gene was the least frequent AME gene among MRSA isolates (19%). Of the 58 tested MRSA isolates, 5 (8.6%) were harboured SCCmec type I, 11 (19%) SCCmec type II, 20 (34.5%) SCCmec type III, 17 (29.3%) SCCmec type IVa, 1 (1.7%) SCCmec type IVb, 2 (3.4%) SCCmec type IVc, 11 (19%) SCCmec type IVd, and, 18 (31%) SCCmec type V. Nineteen isolates were not typeable. Conclusion: In conclusion, the aac (6′)/aph (2′′) was the most common aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene and SCCmec type II and V were the most frequent types detected in hospital isolates, respectively. PMID:26191502

  16. Identification of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes from within an infant gut functional metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Fouhy, Fiona; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Jones, Brian V; Ross, R Paul; Ryan, Anthony C; Dempsey, Eugene M; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    The infant gut microbiota develops rapidly during the first 2 years of life, acquiring microorganisms from diverse sources. During this time, significant opportunities exist for the infant to acquire antibiotic resistant bacteria, which can become established and constitute the infant gut resistome. With increased antibiotic resistance limiting our ability to treat bacterial infections, investigations into resistance reservoirs are highly pertinent. This study aimed to explore the nascent resistome in antibiotically-naïve infant gut microbiomes, using a combination of metagenomic approaches. Faecal samples from 22 six-month-old infants without previous antibiotic exposure were used to construct a pooled metagenomic library, which was functionally screened for ampicillin and gentamicin resistance. Our library of ∼220Mb contained 0.45 ampicillin resistant hits/Mb and 0.059 gentamicin resistant hits/Mb. PCR-based analysis of fosmid clones and uncloned metagenomic DNA, revealed a diverse and abundant aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir within the infant gut, with resistance determinants exhibiting homology to those found in common gut inhabitants, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Clostridium difficile, as well as to genes from cryptic environmental bacteria. Notably, the genes identified differed from those revealed when a sequence-driven PCR-based screen of metagenomic DNA was employed. Carriage of these antibiotic resistance determinants conferred substantial, but varied (2-512x), increases in antibiotic resistance to their bacterial host. These data provide insights into the infant gut resistome, revealing the presence of a varied aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir even in the absence of selective pressure, confirming the infant resistome establishes early in life, perhaps even at birth. PMID:25247417

  17. Identification of Aminoglycoside and β-Lactam Resistance Genes from within an Infant Gut Functional Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Fouhy, Fiona; Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Jones, Brian V.; Ross, R. Paul; Ryan, Anthony C.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The infant gut microbiota develops rapidly during the first 2 years of life, acquiring microorganisms from diverse sources. During this time, significant opportunities exist for the infant to acquire antibiotic resistant bacteria, which can become established and constitute the infant gut resistome. With increased antibiotic resistance limiting our ability to treat bacterial infections, investigations into resistance reservoirs are highly pertinent. This study aimed to explore the nascent resistome in antibiotically-naïve infant gut microbiomes, using a combination of metagenomic approaches. Faecal samples from 22 six-month-old infants without previous antibiotic exposure were used to construct a pooled metagenomic library, which was functionally screened for ampicillin and gentamicin resistance. Our library of ∼220Mb contained 0.45 ampicillin resistant hits/Mb and 0.059 gentamicin resistant hits/Mb. PCR-based analysis of fosmid clones and uncloned metagenomic DNA, revealed a diverse and abundant aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir within the infant gut, with resistance determinants exhibiting homology to those found in common gut inhabitants, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Clostridium difficile, as well as to genes from cryptic environmental bacteria. Notably, the genes identified differed from those revealed when a sequence-driven PCR-based screen of metagenomic DNA was employed. Carriage of these antibiotic resistance determinants conferred substantial, but varied (2–512x), increases in antibiotic resistance to their bacterial host. These data provide insights into the infant gut resistome, revealing the presence of a varied aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir even in the absence of selective pressure, confirming the infant resistome establishes early in life, perhaps even at birth. PMID:25247417

  18. Identification of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes from within an infant gut functional metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Fouhy, Fiona; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Jones, Brian V; Ross, R Paul; Ryan, Anthony C; Dempsey, Eugene M; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    The infant gut microbiota develops rapidly during the first 2 years of life, acquiring microorganisms from diverse sources. During this time, significant opportunities exist for the infant to acquire antibiotic resistant bacteria, which can become established and constitute the infant gut resistome. With increased antibiotic resistance limiting our ability to treat bacterial infections, investigations into resistance reservoirs are highly pertinent. This study aimed to explore the nascent resistome in antibiotically-naïve infant gut microbiomes, using a combination of metagenomic approaches. Faecal samples from 22 six-month-old infants without previous antibiotic exposure were used to construct a pooled metagenomic library, which was functionally screened for ampicillin and gentamicin resistance. Our library of ∼220Mb contained 0.45 ampicillin resistant hits/Mb and 0.059 gentamicin resistant hits/Mb. PCR-based analysis of fosmid clones and uncloned metagenomic DNA, revealed a diverse and abundant aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir within the infant gut, with resistance determinants exhibiting homology to those found in common gut inhabitants, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Clostridium difficile, as well as to genes from cryptic environmental bacteria. Notably, the genes identified differed from those revealed when a sequence-driven PCR-based screen of metagenomic DNA was employed. Carriage of these antibiotic resistance determinants conferred substantial, but varied (2-512x), increases in antibiotic resistance to their bacterial host. These data provide insights into the infant gut resistome, revealing the presence of a varied aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance reservoir even in the absence of selective pressure, confirming the infant resistome establishes early in life, perhaps even at birth.

  19. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  20. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain that caused an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward and its aac(6')-Iae gene cassette encoding a novel aminoglycoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Fujino, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Morita, Koji; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2005-09-01

    We characterized multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients involved in an outbreak of catheter-associated urinary tract infections that occurred in a neurosurgery ward of a hospital in Sendai, Japan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-, XbaI-, or HpaI-digested genomic DNAs from the isolates revealed that clonal expansion of a P. aeruginosa strain designated IMCJ2.S1 had occurred in the ward. This strain possessed broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and chlorhexidine. Strain IMCJ2.S1 showed a level of resistance to some kinds of disinfectants similar to that of a control strain of P. aeruginosa, ATCC 27853. IMCJ2.S1 contained a novel class 1 integron, In113, in the chromosome but not on a plasmid. In113 contains an array of three gene cassettes of bla(IMP-1), a novel aminoglycoside resistance gene, and the aadA1 gene. The aminoglycoside resistance gene, designated aac(6')-Iae, encoded a 183-amino-acid protein that shared 57.1% identity with AAC(6')-Iq. Recombinant AAC(6')-Iae protein showed aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase activity by thin-layer chromatography. Escherichia coli expressing exogenous aac(6')-Iae showed resistance to amikacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not to arbekacin, gentamicins, or streptomycin. Alterations of gyrA and parC at the amino acid sequence level were detected in IMCJ2.S1, suggesting that such mutations confer the resistance to fluoroquinolones observed for this strain. These results indicate that P. aeruginosa IMCJ2.S1 has developed multidrug resistance by acquiring resistance determinants, including a novel member of the aac(6')-I family and mutations in drug resistance genes.

  1. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases

    PubMed Central

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair IH

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA. PMID:23880830

  2. Whole-genome sequencing of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter coli isolated from U.S. retail meats reveals novel plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuansha; Mukherjee, Sampa; Hoffmann, Maria; Kotewicz, Michael L; Young, Shenia; Abbott, Jason; Luo, Yan; Davidson, Maureen K; Allard, Marc; McDermott, Patrick; Zhao, Shaohua

    2013-11-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance in Campylobacter has been routinely monitored in the United States in clinical isolates since 1996 and in retail meats since 2002. Gentamicin resistance first appeared in a single human isolate of Campylobacter coli in 2000 and in a single chicken meat isolate in 2007, after which it increased rapidly to account for 11.3% of human isolates and 12.5% of retail isolates in 2010. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that gentamicin-resistant C. coli isolates from retail meat were clonal. We sequenced the genomes of two strains of this clone using a next-generation sequencing technique in order to investigate the genetic basis for the resistance. The gaps of one strain were closed using optical mapping and Sanger sequencing, and this is the first completed genome of C. coli. The two genomes are highly similar to each other. A self-transmissible plasmid carrying multiple antibiotic resistance genes was revealed within both genomes, carrying genes encoding resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, streptothricin, and tetracycline. Bioinformatics analysis and experimental results showed that gentamicin resistance was due to a phosphotransferase gene, aph(2")-Ig, not described previously. The phylogenetic relationship of this newly emerged clone to other Campylobacter spp. was determined by whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which showed that it clustered with the other poultry isolates and was separated from isolates from livestock.

  3. Interaction Between Aminoglycoside Uptake and Ribosomal Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M. H.; Rechenmacher, Angelika; Böck, August

    1980-01-01

    Mutants resistant to the 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides hygromycin B and gentamicin were analyzed biochemically and genetically. In hygromycin B-resistant strains, ribosomal alterations were not detectable by electrophoretic or genetic experiments. Rather, as was demonstrated for one strain in detail, resistance to this drug seems to be the consequence of several mutations, each impairing drug accumulation, namely of a deletion of a gene close to the proC marker which potentiates the effect of a second mutation in the unc gene cluster. Three mutants resistant to gentamicin which were previously demonstrated to harbor an altered ribosomal protein, L6, were shown in addition to contain unc. Both the unc and the ribosomal mutation greatly impair the drug accumulation ability of the mutants. Further evidence for the direct effect of ribosomal mutations on the uptake of aminoglycosides was obtained with strains that possess ribosomes with increased affinity for dihydrostreptomycin. Dihydrostreptomycin transport by these cells is greatly stimulated; thus, the hypersensitivity of these mutants is caused by increased binding affinity for dihydrostreptomycin and its secondary effect on the uptake process. Experiments were also performed on the biochemical basis of the third phase of aminoglycoside transport (acceleration phase). The condition for its onset is that ribosomes are active in protein synthesis irrespective of whether the proteins synthesized are functional. This, and the failure to observe the synthesis of new proteins upon the addition of aminoglycosides, do not support the view of autoinduction of a cognate or related transport system. Images PMID:7004349

  4. Membrane Proteases and Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Resistance ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Aaron; Lee, Samuel; Jacoby, Kyle; Manoil, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We present genetic studies that help define the functional network underlying intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our analysis shows that proteolysis, particularly that controlled by the membrane protease FtsH, is a major determinant of resistance. First, we examined the consequences of inactivating genes controlled by AmgRS, a two-component regulator required for intrinsic tobramycin resistance. Three of the gene products account for resistance: a modulator of FtsH protease (YccA), a membrane protease (HtpX), and a membrane protein of unknown function (PA5528). Second, we screened mutations inactivating 66 predicted proteases and related functions. Insertions inactivating two FtsH protease accessory factors (HflK and HflC) and a cytoplasmic protease (HslUV) increased tobramycin sensitivity. Finally, we generated an ftsH deletion mutation. The mutation dramatically increased aminoglycoside sensitivity. Many of the functions whose inactivation increased sensitivity appeared to act independently, since multiple mutations led to additive or synergistic effects. Up to 500-fold increases in tobramycin sensitivity were observed. Most of the mutations also were highly pleiotropic, increasing sensitivity to a membrane protein hybrid, several classes of antibiotics, alkaline pH, NaCl, and other compounds. We propose that the network of proteases provides robust protection from aminoglycosides and other substances through the elimination of membrane-disruptive mistranslation products. PMID:21764915

  5. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M.; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3’-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  6. Gene homogeneity for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, H; Derlot, E; Carlier, C; Courvalin, P

    1990-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-resistant strains of Staphylococcus and Enterococcus, approximately 500 of each, were screened by dot blot hybridization for the presence of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. The MICs of various aminoglycosides for the strains were determined, and the enzyme contents of the cells were inferred from the resistance phenotypes. The agreements (in percent) of the hybridization results with the deduced enzyme contents for Staphylococcus and Enterococcus species were, respectively, 80 and 87.6 for ANT(6) (aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase), 99.8 and 100 for both APH(3') (aminoglycoside phosphotransferase) and APH(2")-AAC(6') (aminoglycoside acetyltransferase), and 100 and 100 for ANT(4'). The weak correlation obtained with the probe for ANT(6) was due to the fact that gram-positive cocci can also be streptomycin resistant by synthesis of APH(3") or ANT(3")(9) and by ribosomal mutation. The remaining probes appeared to be specific: they hybridized with all the resistant clinical isolates but not with the susceptible strains. These results indicate that, except for streptomycin, nucleic acid hybridization is a valid approach for the detection and characterization of aminoglycoside resistance in gram-positive cocci. PMID:1963528

  7. Emerging resistance to aminoglycosides in lactic acid bacteria of food origin-an impending menace.

    PubMed

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2016-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are the most preferred choice of therapy against serious infections in humans. Therefore, its use in animal husbandry has been strictly regulated in the EU, UK, and USA to avoid the hazards of aminoglycoside resistance in gut microflora. Nevertheless, aminoglycosides are recommended for prophylaxis and therapeutics in food animals and agriculture owing to its bactericidal nature. In the recent past, the global surge in aminoglycoside-resistant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from food sources has been noticed that might question its continued use in animal husbandry. Upon antibiotic administration, a selective pressure is created in the gut environment; in such instances, LAB could act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance which may facilitate their transfer to pathogenic organisms contradicting its probiotic and industrial significance. This may be a risk to human health as the presence of one aminoglycoside resistance gene renders the bacteria tolerant to almost all antibiotics of the same class, thereby challenging its therapeutic efficacy. Low doses of aminoglycosides are recommended in farm animals due to its toxic nature and insolubility in blood. However, recent investigations indicate that use of aminoglycosides in sub-lethal concentrations can trigger the selection and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance in probiotic LAB. Resistance to erythromycin, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones in LAB were reported earlier to which immediate regulatory measures were adopted by some countries. Paradoxically, lack of regulations on antibiotic use in farms in most developing countries makes them a potential source of antibiotic resistance and its uncontrolled spread around the globe. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance was observed in enterococci from food origin earlier; however, its emergence in lactobacilli and pediococci suggests its spread in probiotic cultures which prompts immediate precautionary methods. This review highlights the

  8. Prospects for circumventing aminoglycoside kinase mediated antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Caldwell, Shane J.; Fong, Desiree H.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, resistance in clinical isolates is pervasive, rendering many aminoglycosides ineffective. The most widely disseminated means of resistance to this class of antibiotics is inactivation of the drug by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). There are two principal strategies to overcoming the effects of AMEs. The first approach involves the design of novel aminoglycosides that can evade modification. Although this strategy has yielded a number of superior aminoglycoside variants, their efficacy cannot be sustained in the long term. The second approach entails the development of molecules that interfere with the mechanism of AMEs such that the activity of aminoglycosides is preserved. Although such a molecule has yet to enter clinical development, the search for AME inhibitors has been greatly facilitated by the wealth of structural information amassed in recent years. In particular, aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases (APHs) have been studied extensively and crystal structures of a number of APHs with diverse regiospecificity and substrate specificity have been elucidated. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the available APH structures and recent progress in APH inhibitor development, with a focus on the structure-guided strategies. PMID:23805415

  9. Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin.

    PubMed Central

    Coria-Jiménez, R.; Ortiz-Torres, C.

    1994-01-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of 147 Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin were studied. All strains analysed belonged to three different bacterial populations. The periods of study and the institutions the strains were isolated from correlated significantly with the resistance patterns shown by the strains. The most frequent resistance patterns found were the following: ACC (6')-I at the Hospital Infantil de México (Children's Hospital of México), and ANT (2'') + AAC(6')-I at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INPed or National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Furthermore, the isolation frequency of aminoglycoside-sensitive strains decreased remarkably at the INPed over a 12-year period. These results suggest that there has been a selection of Serratia marcescens strains that are very resistant to aminoglycosides. PMID:8119351

  10. Genetic relatedness of high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci isolated from poultry carcasses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Barrett, John B; Ladely, Scott R

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 46% (75/162) or poultry enterococci collected between 1999 and 2000 exhibited high-level resistance to gentamicin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] > or = 500 microg/ml), kanamycin (MIC > or = 500 microg/ml), or streptomycin (MIC > or = 1000 microg/ml). Forty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to kanamycin (n = 67), whereas 23% and 19% were resistant to genramicin (n = 37) and streptomycin (n = 31), respectively. The predominant species identified was Enterococcus faecium (n = 105), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (n = 40) and Enterococcus durans (n = 8). Using polymerase chain reaction, the isolates were examined for the presence of 10 aminoglycoside resistance genes [ant(6)-Ia, ant(9)-Ia, ant(4')-Ia, aph(3')-IIIa, aph(2")-Ib, aph(2")-Ic, aph(2")-Id, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia, and aac(6')-Ii]. Five aminoglycoside resistance genes were detected, most frequently aac(6')-Ii and ant(6)-Ia from E. faecium. Seven E. faecalis isolates resistant to gentamicin, kanamycin, or streptomycin were negative for all genes tested, indicating that additional resistance genes may exist. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates were genetically different with little clonality. These data indicate that enterococci from poultry are diverse and contain potentially unidentified aminoglycoside resistance genes.

  11. Genetic analysis of new 16S rRNA mutations conferring aminoglycoside resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Nessar, Rachid; Reyrat, Jean Marc; Murray, Alan; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We studied the development and fitness cost of 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance of Mycobacterium abscessus. Methods Spontaneous 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside-resistant mutants were selected and the frequency of their appearance was determined. The 3′ part of the rrs gene was sequenced to characterize mutations. Additionally, we determined the MICs of aminoglycoside drugs for the different mutants obtained. The dominance/recessivity traits of the different mutations were examined and we explored the potential cost conferred by the mutations selected in vitro on the fitness of these isolates compared with the wild-type strain. Results The in vitro mutation rate for 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance was ∼10−7 mutations/cell division. In addition to the known rrs A→G substitution at position 1408 (Escherichia coli numbering), which confers kanamycin resistance (KanR), three new substitutions in rrs were identified in M. abscessus KanR mutants, i.e. T→A at 1406, C→T at 1409 and G→T at 1491. Heterodiploids carrying genomic mutations T→A at 1406 and A→G at 1408 with the wild-type rrs gene carried by the pNBV1 vector showed a resistant phenotype. In contrast, heterodiploids carrying genomic mutations C→T at 1409 and G→T at 1491 with the wild-type rrs gene carried by the pNBV1 vector had a susceptible phenotype. No burden on fitness was observed for the different mutations. Conclusion Mutations in the rrs gene that confer high-level 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance on M. abscessus differ in their dominance/recessivity traits and have no biological cost under our experimental conditions. PMID:21652621

  12. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  13. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  14. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  15. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  16. Regenerated hair cells exhibit a transient resistance to aminoglycoside toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashino, E; Salvi, R J

    1996-05-13

    Recent studies have demonstrated that sensory hair cells in the avian inner ear are reproduced by cell proliferation in response to the death of the original hair cell population. The regenerated hair cells appear to construct functional synaptic contacts, thereby transmitting acoustic signals to the peripheral nervous system. One of the most extraordinary, but overlooked characteristics of these regenerated hair cells, is their ability to survive in a highly ototoxic environment. Here, we report that hair cells regenerated after kanamycin induced hair cell loss can survive for a substantially longer time period than their predecessors during prolonged exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. The prolonged survival, however, belongs solely to the immature status of regenerated hair cells. Once the regenerated hair cells reach morphological maturation, they become vulnerable to aminoglycoside toxicity. Immunohistochemical evaluation of kanamycin suggested that kanamycin may be taken up into hair cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis at their apical surfaces. By contrast, kanamycin was rarely incorporated into the cytoplasm of the regenerated hair cells. These results suggest that the process of a receptor-mediated transmembrane transport at the apical surface of hair cells is developmentally regulated, and that the lack of some of the assembly involved in the transmembrane transport could be responsible for the inhibition of aminoglycoside uptake, leading immature hair cells to be aminoglycoside resistant. PMID:8782910

  17. The genetic basis of aminoglycoside ototoxicity: The search for susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Prezant, T.R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity appears to be genetically determined. Recently we identified a mutation in the small ribosomal RNA gene of the mitochondrial DNA that can cause deafness after aminoglycoside treatment in families with maternally-inherited susceptibility to the ototoxic effect of these antibiotics. The mutation produces a structural change in the 12S rRNA, which allows increased binding of aminoglycosides, mistranslation of mitochondrial proteins, decreased energy production, and cell death. Because only a minority of sporadic patients have mutations in the 12S rRNA gene, we anticipate the involvement of other genes in ototoxic deafness. We have developed a model system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionally identify genes whose products interact with aminoglycosides. Besides its small genome size and well-developed genetic tools, a unique advantage of using this haploid organism is that recessive drug-responsive mutations will not be missed. An additional advantage is that yeast can be grown in either fermentative or respiratory media, allowing the functional categorization of mutants. Over 100 antibiotic-resistant mutants have now been isolated. The majority of these mutations (69%) are dominant and are being sorted by segregation tests. The 31% of mutations that are recessive have been sorted into two major complementation groups, indicating that two genes appear to be responsible for most of the recessive cases. Our strategy is to isolate the yeast genes that most commonly acquire mutations, clone the human homologs, and screen patients for susceptibility mutations.

  18. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  19. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of aminoglycoside-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Bauskenieks, Matiss; Pole, Ilva; Skenders, Girts; Jansone, Inta; Broka, Lonija; Nodieva, Anda; Ozere, Iveta; Kalvisa, Adrija; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2015-03-01

    Mutations causing resistance to aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin (KAN), amikacin (AMK), and streptomycin, are not completely understood. In this study, polymorphisms of aminoglycoside resistance influencing genes such as rrs, eis, rpsL, and gidB in 41 drug-resistant and 17 pan-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Latvia were analyzed. Mutation A1400G in rrs gene was detected in 92% isolates with high resistance level to KAN and diverse MIC level to AMK. Mutations in promoter region of eis were detected in 80% isolates with low-level MIC of KAN. The association of K43R mutation in rpsL gene, a mutation in the rrs gene at position 513, and various polymorphisms in gidB gene with distinct genetic lineages of M. tuberculosis was observed. The results of this study suggest that association of different controversial mutations of M. tuberculosis genes to the drug resistance phenotype should be done in respect to genetic lineages.

  20. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients. PMID:27403451

  1. Structural Basis of APH(3)-IIIa-Mediated Resistance to N1-Substituted Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Butirosin is unique among the naturally occurring aminoglycosides, having a substituted amino group at position 1 (N1) of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring with an (S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) group. While bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides can be ascribed chiefly to drug inactivation by plasmid-encoded aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, the presence of an AHB group protects the aminoglycoside from binding to many resistance enzymes, and hence, the antibiotic retains its bactericidal properties. Consequently, several semisynthetic N1-substituted aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, isepamicin, and netilmicin, were developed. Unfortunately, butirosin, amikacin, and isepamicin are not resistant to inactivation by 3'-aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferase type IIIa [APH(3')-IIIa]. We report here the crystal structure of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with an ATP analog, AMPPNP [adenosine 5'-(?,{gamma}-imido)triphosphate], and butirosin A to 2.4-A resolution. The structure shows that butirosin A binds to the enzyme in a manner analogous to other 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides, and the flexible antibiotic-binding loop is key to the accommodation of structurally diverse substrates. Based on the crystal structure, we have also constructed a model of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with amikacin, a commonly used semisynthetic N1-substituted 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside. Together, these results suggest a strategy to further derivatize the AHB group in order to generate new aminoglycoside derivatives that can elude inactivation by resistance enzymes while maintaining their ability to bind to the ribosomal A site.

  2. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  3. Low prevalence of vancomycin- and bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci isolated from poultry farms in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yean Yean; Abd Nasir, Mohd Hafiz B; Yahaya, Mohd Azli B; Salleh, Noor Mohamad Amin B; Md Dan, Azril Deenor B; Musa, Abd Majid B; Ravichandran, M

    2008-02-29

    A total of 225 samples from poultry farms and the surrounding environment were screened for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci using conventional microbiological tests and a nanoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Three (1.3%) of the samples were found to contain vancomycin-resistant isolates (MIC>256 microg/mL) that had a vanA genotype. The three vanA positive VRE isolates were identified as different species. Only one isolate (Enterococcus faecium F 4/13_54) was sensitive to teicoplanin (MIC<0. 12-0.35 microg/mL); the other two VRE (E. faecalis A 21_35 and E. gallinarum F 5/10_1) were resistant to teicoplanin (MIC 3.6-->16 microg/mL). The vanC genotype was observed in nine (4%) of the samples collected. High-level gentamicin-resistant (HLGR) enterococci (with MIC ranging between 100 and 500 microg/mL) were detected in 44 samples. However, only 40 of these were found to possess the aac(6')-aph(2'') gene. The overall prevalence of VRE among the samples from the poultry farms and environment was 5.3%, but the prevalence of the clinically significant vanA VRE was 1.3%, and the prevalence of bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci was slightly higher, at 19.5%.

  4. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci. PMID:11230937

  5. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci.

  6. Inhibition of aminoglycoside acetyltransferase resistance enzymes by metal salts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D; Johnson, Brooke R; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn(2+) metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Au(3+) with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2')-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6')-Ib', AAC(6')-Ie, AAC(6')-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  7. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  8. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  9. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3’)-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. Previously we demonstrated that eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, due to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. As well, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. Here, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3’)-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds – anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrazolopyrimidine (PP) – and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3’)-Ia versus ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP-derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3’)-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant E. coli strain. The structures presented here and these inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  10. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance.

  11. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  12. Molecular identification of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid isolated in Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Miró, Elisenda; Ortega, Adriana; Bou, Germán; González-López, Juan José; Oliver, Antonio; Pascual, Alvaro; Cercenado, Emilia; Oteo, Jesús; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran

    2015-08-01

    The activity of eight aminoglycosides (amikacin, apramycin, arbekacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin and tobramycin) against a collection of 257 amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates was determined by microdilution. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, the relationship between AME gene detection and resistance phenotype to aminoglycosides, and the association of AME genes with mechanisms of AMC resistance in E. coli isolates in Spain were investigated. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of genes encoding common AMEs [aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IIa, aac(3)-IVa, aac(6')-Ib, ant(2″)-Ia, ant(4')-IIa and aph(3')-Ia] or 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtB, rmtC and npmA). In total, 105 isolates (40.9%) were resistant to at least one of the aminoglycosides tested. Amikacin, apramycin and arbekacin showed better activity, with MIC90 values of 2mg/L (arbekacin) and 8mg/L (amikacin and apramycin). Kanamycin presented the highest MIC90 (128mg/L). The most common AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (36 strains; 34.3%), followed by aph(3')-Ia (31 strains; 29.5%), ant(2″)-Ia (29 strains; 27.6%) and aac(3)-IIa (23 strains; 21.9%). aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IVa, ant(4')-IIa and the four methylases were not detected. The ant(2″)-Ia gene was usually associated with OXA-1 [21/30; 70%], whilst 23/25 (92%) strains producing CTX-M-15 had the aac(6')-Ib gene. The most prevalent AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (18/41; 44%) in nosocomial isolates, whilst ant(2″)-Ia and aph(3')-Ia genes (20/64; 31%) were more frequent in strains of community origin. In 64.6% isolates the phenotypic profile correlated with the presence of commonly encountered AMEs.

  13. Aminoglycosides for Treatment of Bacteremia Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Ryan K.; Press, Ellen G.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside treatment of carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia was associated with a 70% rate (23/33) of 30-day survival. Successful treatment was associated with sources of bacteremia amenable to reliable aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics (P = 0.037), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores of <20 (P = 0.16), and nonfatal underlying diseases (P = 0.015). Success rates were 78% and 100% if ≥2 and all 3 factors were present, respectively. Clinicians may consider the use of aminoglycosides against CR K. pneumoniae bacteremia if strains are susceptible and the sources of infection are amenable to reliable pharmacokinetics. PMID:26926642

  14. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  15. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant. PMID:15963296

  16. In vitro effect of levofloxacin and vancomycin combination against high level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ilknur; Cicek-Senturk, Gonul; Yucesoy-Dede, Behiye; Yuksel-Kocdogan, Funda; Yuksel, Saim; Karagul, Emin

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro effects of levofloxacin and vancomycin in combination were evaluated against high level aminoglycoside-resistant (HLAR) enterococci using chequerboard and time-kill curve techniques. We examined 28 strains of enterococci comprising 17 Enterococcus faecalis, 10 E. faecium and one E. durans. The combination of vancomycin and levofloxacin had indifferent activity against all isolates according to chequerboard microdilution method, but was synergistic for two isolates, one E. faecium and one E. faecalis, using the time-kill curve method. Both strains were levofloxacin resistant and had high level aminoglycoside resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin. Antagonism was not detected in any strain. The results of this study suggested that the combination of vancomycin with levofloxacin does not often show synergistic effect against high level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci.

  17. Mutations in eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA affect translational fidelity and resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, Y O; Vincent, A; Liebman, S W

    1994-02-15

    Mutations have been created in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 18S rRNA gene that correspond to those known to be involved in the control of translational fidelity or antibiotic resistance in prokaryotes. Yeast strains, in which essentially all chromosomal rDNA repeats are deleted and all cellular rRNAs are encoded by plasmid, have been constructed that contain only mutant 18S rRNA. In Escherichia coli, a C-->U substitution at position 912 of the small subunit rRNA causes streptomycin resistance. Eukaryotes normally carry U at the corresponding position and are naturally resistant to streptomycin. We show that a U-->C transition (rdn-4) at this position of the yeast 18S rRNA gene decreases resistance to streptomycin. The rdn-4 mutation also increases resistance to paromomycin and G-418, and inhibits nonsense suppression induced by paromomycin. The same phenotypes, as well as a slow growth phenotype, are also associated with rdn-2, whose prokaryotic counterpart, 517 G-->A, manifests itself as a suppressor rather than an antisuppressor. Neither rdn-2- nor rdn-4-related phenotypes could be detected in the presence of the normal level of wild-type rDNA repeats. Our data demonstrate that eukaryotic rRNA is involved in the control of translational fidelity, and indicate that rRNA features important for interactions with aminoglycosides have been conserved throughout evolution.

  18. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact.

  19. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  20. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study.

  1. Identification of genes involved in low aminoglycoside-induced SOS response in Vibrio cholerae: a role for transcription stalling and Mfd helicase

    PubMed Central

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Babosan, Anamaria; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of antibiotics play a very important role in selection and development of resistances. Unlike Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae induces its SOS response in presence of sub-MIC aminoglycosides. A role for oxidized guanine residues was observed, but the mechanisms of this induction remained unclear. To select for V. cholerae mutants that do not induce low aminoglycoside-mediated SOS induction, we developed a genetic screen that renders induction of SOS lethal. We identified genes involved in this pathway using two strategies, inactivation by transposition and gene overexpression. Interestingly, we obtained mutants inactivated for the expression of proteins known to destabilize the RNA polymerase complex. Reconstruction of the corresponding mutants confirmed their specific involvement in induction of SOS by low aminoglycoside concentrations. We propose that DNA lesions formed on aminoglycoside treatment are repaired through the formation of single-stranded DNA intermediates, inducing SOS. Inactivation of functions that dislodge RNA polymerase leads to prolonged stalling on these lesions, which hampers SOS induction and repair and reduces viability under antibiotic stress. The importance of these mechanisms is illustrated by a reduction of aminoglycoside sub-MIC. Our results point to a central role for transcription blocking at DNA lesions in SOS induction, so far underestimated. PMID:24319148

  2. Identification of genes involved in low aminoglycoside-induced SOS response in Vibrio cholerae: a role for transcription stalling and Mfd helicase.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Babosan, Anamaria; Mazel, Didier

    2014-02-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of antibiotics play a very important role in selection and development of resistances. Unlike Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae induces its SOS response in presence of sub-MIC aminoglycosides. A role for oxidized guanine residues was observed, but the mechanisms of this induction remained unclear. To select for V. cholerae mutants that do not induce low aminoglycoside-mediated SOS induction, we developed a genetic screen that renders induction of SOS lethal. We identified genes involved in this pathway using two strategies, inactivation by transposition and gene overexpression. Interestingly, we obtained mutants inactivated for the expression of proteins known to destabilize the RNA polymerase complex. Reconstruction of the corresponding mutants confirmed their specific involvement in induction of SOS by low aminoglycoside concentrations. We propose that DNA lesions formed on aminoglycoside treatment are repaired through the formation of single-stranded DNA intermediates, inducing SOS. Inactivation of functions that dislodge RNA polymerase leads to prolonged stalling on these lesions, which hampers SOS induction and repair and reduces viability under antibiotic stress. The importance of these mechanisms is illustrated by a reduction of aminoglycoside sub-MIC. Our results point to a central role for transcription blocking at DNA lesions in SOS induction, so far underestimated.

  3. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Justin L; Holley, Concerta L; Reimche, Jennifer L; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W; Shafer, William M

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity.

  4. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Justin L; Holley, Concerta L; Reimche, Jennifer L; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W; Shafer, William M

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity. PMID:27216061

  5. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses.

    PubMed

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  6. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses

    PubMed Central

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V.; Bentin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  7. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses.

    PubMed

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance.

  8. [High level of aminoglycoside resistance among Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains].

    PubMed

    Kozuszko, Sylwia; Białucha, Agata; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Enterococcus sp. strains are believed as important reason of serious nosocomial infections currently. These infections are cured by using combination of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides for their treatment. Enterococcus sp. resistant to high-level doses of aminoglycosides, beta-lactams and vancomycin are responsible for therapeutic failure. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of HLAR Enterococcus sp. strains isolated between 2007 and 2010 from the patients of University Hospital No. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Amongst 6137 Enterococcus sp. strains 1124 (18,3%) presented HLAR phenotype; 53,1% of them was identified as E. faecalis and 46,9% as E. faecium. The highest percentage of all examined strains was isolated from the patients of different surgery clinics, Intensive Care Units, and Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology Clinic. HLAR and HLSR phenotypes were noted in E. faecalis, for 45,7% and 27,5% strains, in E. faecium - 29,8% and 9,5%, respectively. HLGR phenotype was presented twice more often in E. faecium than E. faecalis. Highest percentages of E. faecium resistant to glycopeptides and rifampicin were observed when compared with E. faecalis. The highest percentages of strains intermediate, resistant to vancomycin and resistant to glycopeptides were noted for E. faecium strains with phenotypes HLAR, HLGR and HLSR.

  9. Chromogenic Detection of Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Amoroso, Ana M.; Gutkind, Gabriel O.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled chromogenic reaction (based on an agar overlay combining NADH, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate, ATP, and kanamycin sulfate with thiazolyl blue-phenazine methosulfate for detection of NADH consumption) was optimized for the detection of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). When used after analytical isoelectrofocusing of bacterial extracts from APH-producing strains, this method revealed one band in each of two strains with a genetically confirmed APH (3′) I and two bands in another strain with both APH (3′) I and APH (3′) VI, whereas no bands were detected in susceptible control strains or in aminoglycoside-resistant microorganisms without APH genes. PMID:9527764

  10. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  11. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  12. Structural and Molecular Basis for Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by the Adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg2+ ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4′)-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. Importance   To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a

  13. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  14. Eukaryotic ribosomal RNA determinants of aminoglycoside resistance and their role in translational fidelity.

    PubMed

    Fan-Minogue, Hua; Bedwell, David M

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of prokaryotic ribosomes have dramatically increased our knowledge of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structure, functional centers, and their interactions with antibiotics. However, much less is known about how rRNA function differs between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. The core decoding sites are identical in yeast and human 18S rRNAs, suggesting that insights obtained in studies with yeast rRNA mutants can provide information about ribosome function in both species. In this study, we examined the importance of key nucleotides of the 18S rRNA decoding site on ribosome function and aminoglycoside susceptibility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing homogeneous populations of mutant ribosomes. We found that residues G577, A1755, and A1756 (corresponding to Escherichia coli residues G530, A1492, and A1493, respectively) are essential for cell viability. We also found that residue G1645 (A1408 in E. coli) and A1754 (G1491 in E. coli) both make significant and distinct contributions to aminoglycoside resistance. Furthermore, we found that mutations at these residues do not alter the basal level of translational accuracy, but influence both paromomycin-induced misreading of sense codons and readthrough of stop codons. This study represents the most comprehensive mutational analysis of the eukaryotic decoding site to date, and suggests that many fundamental features of decoding site function are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. High genetic homology between plasmids of human and animal origins conferring resistance to the aminoglycosides gentamicin and apramycin.

    PubMed Central

    Chaslus-Dancla, E; Pohl, P; Meurisse, M; Marin, M; Lafont, J P

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains resistant to gentamicin and apramycin were isolated from cattle in France and Belgium and from patients in hospitals. Homology between plasmids of both human and animal origins encoding aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase was revealed by digestion with several restriction endonucleases and confirmed by hybridization with different replicon-specific probes. Images PMID:2039212

  16. Occurrence of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase subclass I and II structural genes among Enterobacteriaceae spp. isolated from meat samples.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, A H; Collins-Thompson, D L; Trevors, J T

    1990-08-01

    3'-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase [APH(3')] enzymes are a group responsible for resistance to the antibiotics kanamycin (Km) and neomycin (Nm) in bacteria. Escherichia coli ECT24, originally isolated from a meat sample, harboured an 83-kb conjugative R-plasmid (pRPJ24) that carries transferable resistance to Km and Nm. Plasmid pRPJ24 was transferred by conjugation to Enterobacter cloacae 94R, which was used as the source of plasmid DNA in development of a probe for the Km-resistance determinant. Random cloning of BamHI and HindIII double-digest restriction fragments of pRPJ24 in the pUC18 vector plasmid produced clones resistant to both Nm and Km carrying a 1.9-kb DNA insert. Southern hybridization of pRPJ24 cloned chimeric plasmid DNA (pKPJ94) showed homology with the APH(3')II gene from transposon Tn5. A PstI digest of pKPJ94 produced a 920-bp fragment which hybridized with the APH(3')II structural gene, and was used as a DNA probe for the APH(3')II subclass gene. A 980-bp BamHI fragment from plasmid pGH54 carrying the APH(3')I gene from transposon Tn903 was used as a subclass I probe. Total DNA from 206 randomly screened Km-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates from raw ground beef and chicken meat samples were examined for the occurrence of APH(3') subclass I and II using non-radioactively-labelled DNA probes. Thirty-six percent and 60% of the isolates examined carried subclass I and II resistances, respectively, in the isolates from chicken meat samples. The corresponding values for bacterial strains from raw ground beef samples were 51% and 72%, respectively. Four percent of the resistant bacterial isolates from chicken samples did not display homology to either probe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Transferable Resistance to Aminoglycosides by Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA and to Hydrophilic Fluoroquinolones by QepA-Mediated Efflux in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Périchon, Bruno; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid pIP1206 was detected in Escherichia coli strain 1540 during the screening of clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae for high-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The sequence of this IncFI conjugative plasmid of ca. 100 kb was partially determined. pIP1206 carried the rmtB gene for a ribosome methyltransferase that was shown to modify the N7 position of nucleotide G1405, located in the A site of 16S rRNA. It also contained the qepA (quinolone efflux pump) gene that encodes a 14-transmembrane-segment putative efflux pump belonging to the major facilitator superfamily of proton-dependent transporters. Disruption of membrane proton potential by the efflux pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in a transconjugant harboring the qepA gene resulted in elevation of norfloxacin accumulation. The transporter conferred resistance to the hydrophilic quinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. PMID:17470656

  18. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  19. Ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression engineered by genetic selection in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Benedikt; Atanasov, Janina; Siewert, Lena K; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-05-15

    Systems for conditional gene expression are powerful tools in basic research as well as in biotechnology. For future applications, it is of great importance to engineer orthogonal genetic switches that function reliably in diverse contexts. RNA-based switches have the advantage that effector molecules interact immediately with regulatory modules inserted into the target RNAs, getting rid of the need of transcription factors usually mediating genetic control. Artificial riboswitches are characterized by their simplicity and small size accompanied by a high degree of modularity. We have recently reported a series of hammerhead ribozyme-based artificial riboswitches that allow for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via switching mRNA, tRNA, or rRNA functions. A more widespread application was so far hampered by moderate switching performances and a limited set of effector molecules available. Here, we report the re-engineering of hammerhead ribozymes in order to respond efficiently to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We first established an in vivo selection protocol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that enabled us to search large sequence spaces for optimized switches. We then envisioned and characterized a novel strategy of attaching the aptamer to the ribozyme catalytic core, increasing the design options for rendering the ribozyme ligand-dependent. These innovations enabled the development of neomycin-dependent RNA modules that switch gene expression up to 25-fold. The presented aminoglycoside-responsive riboswitches belong to the best-performing RNA-based genetic regulators reported so far. The developed in vivo selection protocol should allow for sampling of large sequence spaces for engineering of further optimized riboswitches. PMID:24871672

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid enhances the activities of aminoglycosides against methicillin- sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Oakes, Edward; Soren, Odel; Moussa, Caroline; Rathor, Getika; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony; Hu, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are prevalent. MRSA infections are difficult to treat and there are no new classes of antibiotics produced to the market to treat infections caused by the resistant bacteria. Therefore, using antibiotic enhancers to rescue existing classes of antibiotics is an attractive strategy. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is an antioxidant compound found in extracts from plant Larrea Tridentata. It exhibits antimicrobial activity and may target bacterial cell membrane. Combination efficacies of NDGA with many classes of antibiotics were examined by chequerboard method against 200 clinical isolates of MRSA and MSSA. NDGA in combination with gentamicin, neomycin, and tobramycin was examined by time-kill assays. The synergistic combinations of NDGA and aminoglycosides were tested in vivo using a murine skin infection model. Calculations of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) showed that NDGA when combined with gentamicin, neomycin, or tobramycin displayed synergistic activities in more than 97% of MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Time kill analysis demonstrated that NDGA significantly augmented the activities of these aminoglycosides against MRSA and MSSA in vitro and in murine skin infection model. The enhanced activity of NDGA resides on its ability to damage bacterial cell membrane leading to accumulation of the antibiotics inside bacterial cells. We demonstrated that NDGA strongly revived the therapeutic potencies of aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo. This combinational strategy could contribute major clinical implications to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. PMID:26579101

  1. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  2. Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Inactivating Enzymes in Actinomycetes Similar to Those Present in Clinical Isolates of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, Raoul; Davies, Julian

    1973-01-01

    Various species of Streptomyces possess aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Streptomyces kanamyceticus contains an enzyme that acetylates the 6′-amino group of kanamycin A and B, gentamicin C1a, and neomycin. Streptomyces spectabilis produces an enzyme that acetylates the 2′-amino group of the hexose ring of gentamicin C1a. These enzymes catalyze reactions identical to those catalyzed by enzymes found in gram-negative bacteria containing R(antibiotic resistance)-factors. The discovery of these enzymes suggests the possibility of an evolutionary relationship between the aminoglycosideinactivating enzymes (produced by resistance determinants) in bacteria containing R-factors and similar enzymes found in the actinomycetes. PMID:4209515

  3. Multiple Mutations Lead to MexXY-OprM-Dependent Aminoglycoside Resistance in Clinical Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guénard, Sophie; Muller, Cédric; Monlezun, Laura; Benas, Philippe; Broutin, Isabelle; Jeannot, Katy

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive overproduction of the pump MexXY-OprM is recognized as a major cause of resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and zwitterionic cephalosporins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, 57 clonally unrelated strains recovered from non-cystic fibrosis patients were analyzed to characterize the mutations resulting in upregulation of the mexXY operon. Forty-four (77.2%) of the strains, classified as agrZ mutants were found to harbor mutations inactivating the local repressor gene (mexZ) of the mexXY operon (n = 33; 57.9%) or introducing amino acid substitutions in its product, MexZ (n = 11; 19.3%). These sequence variations, which mapped in the dimerization domain, the DNA binding domain, or the rest of the MexZ structure, mostly affected amino acid positions conserved in TetR-like regulators. The 13 remaining MexXY-OprM strains (22.8%) contained intact mexZ genes encoding wild-type MexZ proteins. Eight (14.0%) of these isolates, classified as agrW1 mutants, overexpressed the gene PA5471, which codes for the MexZ antirepressor AmrZ, with 5 strains exhibiting growth defects at 37°C and 44°C, consistent with mutations impairing ribosome activity. Interestingly, one agrW1 mutant appeared to harbor a 7-bp deletion in the coding sequence of the leader peptide, PA5471.1, involved in ribosome-dependent, translational attenuation of PA5471 expression. Finally, DNA sequencing and complementation experiments revealed that 5 (8.8%) strains, classified as agrW2 mutants, harbored single amino acid variations in the sensor histidine kinase of ParRS, a two-component system known to positively control mexXY expression. Collectively, these results demonstrate that clinical strains of P. aeruginosa exploit different regulatory circuitries to mutationally overproduce the MexXY-OprM pump and become multidrug resistant, which accounts for the high prevalence of MexXY-OprM mutants in the clinical setting. PMID:24145539

  4. Increased prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Norway is associated with the acquisition of AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib.

    PubMed

    Haldorsen, Bjørg C; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Samuelsen, Orjan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that the increasing prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance observed in Norway among clinical Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates is mainly due to the presence of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib. A frequent co-association of aminoglycoside resistance with Cefotaximase-München group 1 extended-spectrum β-lactamases was also observed.

  5. The Pathogen-Derived Aminoglycoside Resistance 16S rRNA Methyltransferase NpmA Possesses Dual m1A1408/m1G1408 Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zelinskaya, Natalia; Witek, Marta A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of 16S rRNA can confer exceptionally high-level resistance to a diverse set of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Here, we show that the pathogen-derived enzyme NpmA possesses dual m1A1408/m1G1408 activity, an unexpected property apparently unique among the known aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferases. Although the biological significance of this activity remains to be determined, such mechanistic variation in enzymes acquired by pathogens has significant implications for development of inhibitors of these emerging resistance determinants. PMID:26416864

  6. Aminoglycoside Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Gram Negative Bacilli at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica: Comparison of Two Time Periods

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds-Campbell, G; Nicholson, A; Christian, N; Hardie, R; Cook, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Aminoglycosides were introduced into use over 60 years ago. The University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), a tertiary care teaching hospital, in Kingston, Jamaica, introduced the use of gentamicin in 1973 and amikacin in 1980. This report examined the susceptibility patterns to these agents in 1547 consecutive isolates of Gram negative bacilli (GNB) encountered between September 1 and November 30, 2011, at UHWI and compares the data with that observed previously in 1981 at the same institution. Methods: The Vitek 2 (bioMeriéux, Durham, NC) was used for isolate identification, minimum inhibitory concentration determination and aminoglycoside susceptibility testing. Quality control was done using American Type Culture Collection standard strains of E coli (ATCC 25922) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853). Results: Of the 1547 organisms, 267 had resistance to one or both aminoglycosides. Amikacin resistance increased from 0.6% (1981) to 7.2% [2011] (p < 0.05), while gentamicin resistance increased from 6.7% to 14.8% (p < 0.05) for the corresponding period. The majority of samples with aminoglycoside resistant organisms came from the intensive care unit and surgical inpatients. Urine samples persistently produced the largest amount of gentamicin resistant isolates. Conclusions: Although there has been a statistically significant rise in aminoglycoside resistance, aminoglycosides continue to remain highly effective against approximately 83% of GNB despite continuous usage at this institution for over three decades. Continued national surveillance, implementation of infection control policies and antibiotic stewardship are all essential in retaining low resistance levels. PMID:26360679

  7. Characterization of carbapenemases, extended spectrum β-lactamases, quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible Escherichia coli from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanming; Xu, Xiuyu; Pu, Shuli; Huang, Shifeng; Sun, Jide; Yang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Liping

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Escherichiacoli isolates harboring carbapenemases or combining an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzyme with loss of porins present an increasingly urgent clinical danger. Combined resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS) isolates will inevitably create problems. In the current study, we characterized the carbapenemases and ESBLs, and the prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible (CNS) E.coli isolates from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China in 2012. Thirty non-duplicated CNS E.coli isolates were screened via antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the drug resistance profiles of the 30 strains were analyzed. Carbapenemase genes blaKPC-2, ESBL genes including blaCTX-M-3, blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM, ARD genes including aac(6')-Ib, armA and rmtB, and QRD genes including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS and aac(6')-Ib-cr were identified and clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Of the 30 isolates, 2 (6.7%) harbored carbapenemase gene blaKPC-2; 29 (96.7%) carried ESBLs; 20 (66.7%) were QRD positive; and 11 (36.7%) were ARD positive. Between the two blaKPC-2 positive strains, one contained ESBL, QRD and ARD genes, while the other expressed ESBL genes but was negative for both QRD and ARD genes. Of the 29 ESBLs positive isolates, 2 (6.9%) were carbapenemase positive, 19 (65.5%) were QRD positive, and 11 (37.9%) were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 30 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. coli isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. Production of ESBLs was associated with the carbapenem resistance and QRD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. coli isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. This is the first report of a multidrug resistant carbapenem-non-susceptible E.coli co

  8. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-mediated amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by zinc and copper pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A; Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  9. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib-Mediated Amikacin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Zinc and Copper Pyrithione

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A.; Lin, David L.; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn2+ or Cu2+ in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  10. Aminoglycoside-stimulated readthrough of premature termination codons in selected genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Bukowy-Bieryllo, Zuzanna; Dabrowski, Maciej; Witt, Michał; Zietkiewicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Translational readthrough of premature termination codons (PTCs) induced by pharmacological compounds has proven to be an effective way of restoring functional protein expression and reducing symptoms in several genetic disorders. We tested the potential of different concentrations of several aminoglycosides (AAGs) for promoting PTC-readthrough in 5 genes involved in the pathogenesis of primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder caused by the dysfunction of motile cilia and flagella. The efficiency of readthrough stimulation of PTCs cloned in dual reporter vectors was examined in 2 experimental settings: in vitro (transcription/translation system) and ex vivo (transiently transfected epithelial cell line). PTC-readthrough was observed in 5 of the 16 mutations analyzed. UGA codons were more susceptible to AAG-stimulated readthrough than UAG; no suppression of UAA was observed. The efficiency of PTC-readthrough in vitro (from less than 1% to ∼28% of the translation from the corresponding wild-type constructs) differed with the AAG type and concentration, and depended on the combination of AAG and PTC, indicating that each PTC has to be individually tested with a range of stimulating compounds. The maximal values of PTC suppression observed in the ex vivo experiments were, depending on AAG used, 3–5 times lower than the corresponding values in vitro, despite using AAG concentrations that were 2 orders of magnitude higher. This indicates that, while the in vitro system is sufficient to examine the readthrough-susceptibility of PTCs, it is not sufficient to test the compounds potential to stimulate PTC-readthrough in the living cells. Most of the tested compounds (except for G418) at their highest concentrations did not disturb ciliogenesis in the cultures of primary respiratory epithelial cells from healthy donors. PMID:27618201

  11. Structural Basis for the Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA by Aminoglycoside Resistance Methyltransferase Sgm from an Antibiotic Producer: a Diversity of Active Sites in m7G Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, N.; Tkaczuk, K; Tulsidas, S; Kaminska, K; Cubrilo, S; Maravic -Vlahovicek, G; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Sgm (Sisomicin-gentamicin methyltransferase) from antibiotic-producing bacterium Micromonospora zionensis is an enzyme that confers resistance to aminoglycosides like gentamicin and sisomicin by specifically methylating G1405 in bacterial 16S rRNA. Sgm belongs to the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase (Arm) family of enzymes that have been recently found to spread by horizontal gene transfer among disease-causing bacteria. Structural characterization of Arm enzymes is the key to understand their mechanism of action and to develop inhibitors that would block their activity. Here we report the structure of Sgm in complex with cofactors S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.0 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, and results of mutagenesis and rRNA footprinting, and protein-substrate docking. We propose the mechanism of methylation of G1405 by Sgm and compare it with other m{sup 7}G methyltransferases, revealing a surprising diversity of active sites and binding modes for the same basic reaction of RNA modification. This analysis can serve as a stepping stone towards developing drugs that would specifically block the activity of Arm methyltransferases and thereby re-sensitize pathogenic bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  12. Structural basis for the methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA by aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase Sgm from an antibiotic producer: a diversity of active sites in m7G methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nilofer; Tkaczuk, Karolina L.; Tulsidas, Shenoy Rajesh; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Čubrilo, Sonja; Sivaraman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Sgm (Sisomicin-gentamicin methyltransferase) from antibiotic-producing bacterium Micromonospora zionensis is an enzyme that confers resistance to aminoglycosides like gentamicin and sisomicin by specifically methylating G1405 in bacterial 16S rRNA. Sgm belongs to the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase (Arm) family of enzymes that have been recently found to spread by horizontal gene transfer among disease-causing bacteria. Structural characterization of Arm enzymes is the key to understand their mechanism of action and to develop inhibitors that would block their activity. Here we report the structure of Sgm in complex with cofactors S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.0 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and results of mutagenesis and rRNA footprinting, and protein-substrate docking. We propose the mechanism of methylation of G1405 by Sgm and compare it with other m7G methyltransferases, revealing a surprising diversity of active sites and binding modes for the same basic reaction of RNA modification. This analysis can serve as a stepping stone towards developing drugs that would specifically block the activity of Arm methyltransferases and thereby re-sensitize pathogenic bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:20194115

  13. Comparative in vitro activities of enoxacin (CI-919, AT-2266) and eleven antipseudomonal agents against aminoglycoside-susceptible and -resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Bassey, C M; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P; Conley, P E

    1984-09-01

    The in vitro activity of enoxacin (CI 919, AT 2266), a new oral quinolone carboxylic acid compound, was compared with those of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, azlocillin, piperacillin, aztreonam, moxalactam, imipenem, cefsulodin, ceftazidime, and cefoperazone against 101 aminoglycoside-susceptible and 105 aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Among these 206 P. aeruginosa isolates were 25 strains with known mechanisms of resistance to amikacin. The activity of enoxacin was similar to that of tobramycin against aminoglycoside-susceptible strains, with MICs of 1.0 to 2.0 micrograms/ml and 0.5 to 1.0 microgram/ml, respectively, for 90% of the strains. Enoxacin was the most active agent in this in vitro study against aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, with MICs of 2.0 to 4.0 micrograms/ml for 90% of the strains. Strains with enzymatic resistance to amikacin were more resistant to beta-lactams (except enoxacin and imipenem) than were strains with decreased permeability.

  14. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Seema; Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  15. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  16. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Seema; Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated.

  17. High-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection: Twelve-year surveillance in the Minami Ibaraki Area.

    PubMed

    Osuka, Hanako; Nakajima, Jun; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Funayama, Yasunori; Ebihara, Tsugio; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Saito, Kazuto; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2016-01-01

    We examined prevalence of high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection in the Minami Ibaraki Area. Ten strains of both species each, recovered from the blood or the cerebrospinal fluid between 2003 and 2014, were randomly selected every year. High-level resistance to gentamicin (HLR-GM) and streptomycin (HLR-SM) was detected in 34% (41 of 120 strains) and 18% (21) of E. faecalis and 9% (11) and 39% (48) of E. faecium, respectively. In comparisons of the proportions among three four-year periods, HLR-SM among E. faecium was significantly lower in the 2011-2014 period. All strains with HLR-GM were positive for the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The ant(6')-Ia gene was detected in all with HLR-SM except for one E. faecalis strain. The present study showed that prevalence of HLR-GM among E. faecalis and E. faecium causing invasive infection in this area was nearly equivalent to that described in previous studies in Japan and that proportions of strains with HLAR did not vary during the study period except for that of HLR-SM among E. faecium.

  18. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  19. Domain Dissection and Characterization of the Aminoglycoside Resistance Enzyme ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Green, Keith D.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose constant use and presence in growth environment has led bacteria to develop resistance mechanisms to aid in their survival. A common mechanism of resistance to AGs is their chemical modification (nucleotidylation, phosphorylation, or acetylation) by AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Through evolution, fusion of two AME-encoding genes has resulted in bifunctional enzymes with broader spectrum of activity. Serratia marcescens, a human enteropathogen, contains such a bifunctional enzyme, ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId. To gain insight into the role, effect, and importance of the union of ANT(3″)-Ii and AAC(6′)-IId in this bifunctional enzyme, we separated the two domains and compared their activity to that of the full-length enzyme. We performed a thorough comparison of the substrate and cosubstrate profiles as well as kinetic characterization of the bifunctional ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId and its individually expressed components. PMID:23485681

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM.

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  2. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  3. An outbreak of infections caused by strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides. II. Epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Crossley, K; Landesman, B; Zaske, D

    1979-03-01

    Studies to determine the epidemiologic behavior of strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides (MARS) were conducted over a period of two and one-half years, during which MARS were isolated from 201 patients at a hospital in the midwestern United States. Most cases of infection or colonization with MARS (156 of 201) occurred in patients with burns. In the burn unit, MARS were recovered from the air, from the hair and hands of personnel, and from inanimate objects. Nasal (72%) and rectal (66%) colonization were common among burned patients with infected or colonized burn wounds but occurred in only six of 74 burn unit personnel. When compared with two control periods, the prophylactic use of antistaphylococcal agents in patients with burns increased markedly at the time the outbreak began. Of the 45 patients without burns from whom MARS were isolated, 42 (93%) were surgical patients. MARS were not demonstrated in the air or environment of patients with infected surgical wounds. None of 334 non-burn unit hospital personnel were found to be carriers of MARS. Four phage types (83A, 6/75/85, 29/52/80, and 92) were recovered during the outbreak. A determinant of antibiotic resistance was probably transmitted among strains of S. aureus. PMID:255553

  4. Enhancement of the antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by extracts from Anadenanthera colubrine (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Humberto M; Coelho, Kivia M R N; Ferreira, Josie H L; Dos Santos, Bernadete H C; de Abreu, Aislan P L; Coutinho, Henrique D M; da Silva, Romezio A C; de Sousa, Taciana O; Citó, Antonia M das G L; Lopes, José A D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol (EEAC) and hexane (HFAC) extracts from the stem bark of Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil alone or in combination with aminoglycosides against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined by using microdilution assay. For the evaluation of extracts as modulators of antibiotic resistance, MICs of neomycin and amikacin were determined in presence or absence of each compound at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Both EEAC and HFAC did not show antimicrobial activity against MDR strains tested. However, the addition of EEAC and HFAC enhanced the activity of neomycin and amikacin against Staphylococcus aureus SA10 strain. When the natural products were replaced by chlorpromazine, the same effect was observed. Anadenanthera colubrine var. cebil may be a source of phytochemicals able to potentiate the aminoglycoside activity against MDR S. aureus by the inhibition of efflux pump.

  5. Aminoglycosides: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kevin M; Serio, Alisa W; Kane, Timothy R; Connolly, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are natural or semisynthetic antibiotics derived from actinomycetes. They were among the first antibiotics to be introduced for routine clinical use and several examples have been approved for use in humans. They found widespread use as first-line agents in the early days of antimicrobial chemotherapy, but were eventually replaced in the 1980s with cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones. Aminoglycosides synergize with a variety of other antibacterial classes, which, in combination with the continued increase in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of the class through optimized dosing regimens, has led to a renewed interest in these broad-spectrum and rapidly bactericidal antibacterials. PMID:27252397

  6. Inactivation of antibiotics and the dissemination of resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Davies, J

    1994-04-15

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a phenomenon of concern to the clinician and the pharmaceutical industry, as it is the major cause of failure in the treatment of infectious diseases. The most common mechanism of resistance in pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics of the aminoglycoside, beta-lactam (penicillins and cephalosporins), and chloramphenicol types involves the enzymic inactivation of the antibiotic by hydrolysis or by formation of inactive derivatives. Such resistance determinants most probably were acquired by pathogenic bacteria from a pool of resistance genes in other microbial genera, including antibiotic-producing organisms. The resistance gene sequences were subsequently integrated by site-specific recombination into several classes of naturally occurring gene expression cassettes (typically "integrons") and disseminated within the microbial population by a variety of gene transfer mechanisms. Although bacterial conjugation once was believed to be restricted in host range, it now appears that this mechanism of transfer permits genetic exchange between many different bacterial genera in nature.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E.; Barry, Clifton E.; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition.

  9. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  10. Luteolin potentiates the effects of aminoglycoside and β-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JOUNG, DAE-KI; KANG, OK-HWA; SEO, YUN-SOO; ZHOU, TIAN; LEE, YOUNG-SEOB; HAN, SIN-HEE; MUN, SU-HYUN; KONG, RYONG; SONG, HO-JUN; SHIN, DONG-WON; KWON, DONG-YEUL

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious clinical problem worldwide, and alternative natural or combination drug therapies are required for its treatment. The aim of the present study was to examined the antimicrobial activity of luteolin (LUT) against MRSA. Luteolin is a polyphenolic flavonoid compound with a wide spectrum of biological activities. The antimicrobial activities of LUT and the antibiotics ampicillin (AM), oxacillin (OX) and gentamicin (GT), used alone or in combination, were evaluated against five clinical MRSA isolates and two reference strains using a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, MTT colorimetric assay, checkerboard dilution test and time-kill assay. The MIC of LUT against all strains was found to be 62.5 µg/ml. The combinations of LUT and antibiotics exhibited a synergistic effect against MRSA in the majority of cases, as determined by the checkerboard method. Time-kill curves revealed that a combination of LUT with AM, OX or GT significantly reduced bacterial counts, which dropped below the lowest detectable limit after 24 h. These results indicate that LUT potentiates the effects of β-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics against MRSA. PMID:27284353

  11. Structural insights into the function of aminoglycoside-resistance A1408 16S rRNA methyltransferases from antibiotic-producing and human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Macmaster, Rachel; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Savic, Miloje; Rankin, C. Robert; Conn, Graeme L.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures were determined of the broad-spectrum aminoglycoside-resistance A1408 16S rRNA methyltransferases KamB and NpmA, from the aminoglycoside-producer Streptoalloteichus tenebrarius and human pathogenic Escherichia coli, respectively. Consistent with their common function, both are Class I methyltransferases with additional highly conserved structural motifs that embellish the core SAM-binding fold. In overall structure, the A1408 rRNA methyltransferase were found to be most similar to a second family of Class I methyltransferases of distinct substrate specificity (m7G46 tRNA). Critical residues for A1408 rRNA methyltransferase activity were experimentally defined using protein mutagenesis and bacterial growth assays with kanamycin. Essential residues for SAM coenzyme binding and an extended protein surface that likely interacts with the 30S ribosomal subunit were thus revealed. The structures also suggest potential mechanisms of A1408 target nucleotide selection and positioning. We propose that a dynamic extended loop structure that is positioned adjacent to both the bound SAM and a functionally critical structural motif may mediate concerted conformational changes in rRNA and protein that underpin the specificity of target selection and activation of methyltransferase activity. These new structures provide important new insights that may provide a starting point for strategies to inhibit these emerging causes of pathogenic bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides. PMID:20639535

  12. Further involvement of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in aminoglycoside-induced deafness: A novel type of heteroplasmy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.; Prezant, T.R.; Bu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been linked recently to a predisposing mutation in the 3{prime} end of the small ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of human mitochondria (1555 A{yields}G) that makes the mitochondrial rRNA structurally more similar to its bacterial counterpart. This mutation was found in Chinese families in which the susceptibility to develop ototoxic deafness was inherited through the maternal lineage. However, the 1555 A{yields}G mutation was rarely found in sporadic patients in China, where aminoglycosides are commonly used. To further characterize the mutations predisposing to aminoglycoside ototoxicity, we analyzed the 12S rRNA gene in 35 sporadic patients without the 1555 mutation. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, heteroduplex (HD) analysis, sequencing, and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, we found that 3 of 35 sporadic patients had unique sequence changes in the 12S rRNA gene. Two of these changes were homoplasmic. One of the patients displayed a novel type of heteroplasmy, which we term multiplasmy, with one base deletion at nt 961 and different populations of mitochondrial DNA with varying numbers of inserted cytosines at that site.

  13. Combinations of β-lactam or aminoglycoside antibiotics with plectasin are synergistic against methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87-89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  14. Combinations of β-Lactam or Aminoglycoside Antibiotics with Plectasin Are Synergistic against Methicillin-Sensitive and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M.; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87–89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  15. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs.

  16. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Akiko; Taura, Kojiro; Koyama, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. While this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. While γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 hrs after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1–43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  17. Heterologous Expression and Functional Characterization of the Exogenously Acquired Aminoglycoside Resistance Methyltransferases RmtD, RmtD2, and RmtG

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Laís L.; Witek, Marta A.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Picão, Renata C.

    2015-01-01

    The exogenously acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases RmtD, RmtD2, and RmtG were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified to near homogeneity. Each methyltransferase conferred an aminoglycoside resistance profile consistent with m7G1405 modification, and this activity was confirmed by in vitro 30S methylation assays. Analyses of protein structure and interaction with S-adenosyl-l-methionine suggest that the molecular mechanisms of substrate recognition and catalysis are conserved across the 16S rRNA (m7G1405) methyltransferase family. PMID:26552988

  18. Interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics with rRNA.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna; Kulik, Marta

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are protein synthesis inhibitors applied to treat infections caused mainly by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Due to their adverse side effects they are last resort antibiotics typically used to combat pathogens resistant to other drugs. Aminoglycosides target ribosomes. We describe the interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics containing a 2-deoxystreptamine (2-DOS) ring with 16S rRNA. We review the computational studies, with a focus on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on RNA models mimicking the 2-DOS aminoglycoside binding site in the small ribosomal subunit. We also briefly discuss thermodynamics of interactions of these aminoglycosides with their 16S RNA target. PMID:27528743

  19. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aimée M; Patel, Sanket; Forsberg, Kevin J; Wang, Bin; Bentley, Gayle; Razia, Yasmin; Qin, Xuan; Tarr, Phillip I; Dantas, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome), yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure), and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000), and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301). We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway). This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective antibiotic

  20. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  1. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides.

  2. Cloning, sequencing, and use as a molecular probe of a gene encoding an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase of broad substrate profile.

    PubMed Central

    Terán, F J; Suárez, J E; Mendoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase that was able to modify amikacin was cloned from a plasmid isolated from a clinical strain of Enterobacter cloacae. Sequencing of a 955-bp segment which mediates the modifying activity revealed a single open reading frame of 432 nucleotides that predicted a polypeptide of 144 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 16,021. Putative ribosomal binding sites and -10 and -35 sequences were located at the 5' end of the gene. The size of the polypeptide was confirmed through minicell analysis of the expression products of plasmids containing the sequence. The use of the gene as a molecular probe revealed its specificity toward strains harboring genes coding for related enzymes. This probe is therefore useful for epidemiological studies. Images PMID:2069376

  3. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-10-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and enterococcal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6')-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2'')-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2'')-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2'')-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2'')-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia enzyme.

  4. Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyger, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides exert their cytotoxic effect at three different locations: at the cell surface, in the cytosol, or in the nucleus. At the cell surface, aminoglycoside binding can cause temporary hearing loss, motor paralysis at the neuromuscular junction, ion wasting in kidneys, or analgesia in mechano- and nocioreceptors (touch and pain sensory…

  5. Chromosomal aadD2 encodes an aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase in Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Gerbaud, Guy; Courvalin, Patrice; Leclercq, Roland

    2003-04-01

    Bacillus clausii SIN is one of the four strains of B. clausii composing a probiotic administered to humans for the prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic therapy. The strain is resistant to kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. A gene conferring aminoglycoside resistance was cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. The gene, called aadD2, encoding a putative 246-amino acid protein, shared 47% identity with ant(4')-Ia from Staphylococcus aureus, which encodes an aminoglycoside 4'-O-nucleotidyltransferase. Phosphocellulose paper-binding assays indicated that the gene product was responsible for nucleotidylation of kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. The aadD2 gene was detected by DNA-DNA hybridization in the three other strains of the probiotic mixture and in the reference strain B. clausii DSM8716, although it did not confer resistance in these strains. Mutations in the sequence of the putative promoter for aadD2 from B. clausii SIN resulted in higher identity with consensus promoter sequences and may account for aminoglycoside resistance in that strain. The aadD2 gene was chromosomally located in all strains and was not transferable by conjugation. These data indicate that chromosomal aadD2 is specific to B. clausii. PMID:12654668

  6. Aminoglycosides: Molecular Insights on the Recognition of RNA and Aminoglycoside Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Chittapragada, Maruthi; Roberts, Sarah; Ham, Young Wan

    2009-01-01

    RNA is increasingly recognized for its significant functions in biological systems and has recently become an important molecular target for therapeutics development. Aminoglycosides, a large class of clinically significant antibiotics, exert their biological functions by binding to prokaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and interfering with protein translation, resulting in bacterial cell death. They are also known to bind to viral mRNAs such as HIV-1 RRE and TAR. Consequently, aminoglycosides are accepted as the single most important model in understanding the principles that govern small molecule-RNA recognition, which is essential for the development of novel antibacterial, antiviral or even anti-oncogenic agents. This review outlines the chemical structures and mechanisms of molecular recognition and antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides and various aminoglycoside mimics that have recently been devised to improve biological efficacy, binding affinity and selectivity, or to circumvent bacterial resistance. PMID:19812740

  7. Antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis from diseased farm animals: pigs, cattle and poultry.

    PubMed

    Seputiene, V; Bogdaite, A; Ruzauskas, M; Suziedeliene, E

    2012-01-01

    Eighty enterococcal isolates (E. faecium, n = 38, E. faecalis, n = 42) from diseased farm animals (swine, cattle, poultry) in Lithuania have been studied for the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and for resistance and virulence genetic determinants. 86% of E. faecium and 71% of E. faecalis isolates were multidrug resistant (resistant to three or more unrelated antibiotics). Resistance to aminoglycosides, tetracycline and erythromycin was found most frequently in both species (61%, 69%) and was linked to aph(3')-IIIa, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia, ant(6)-Ia (aminoglycoside resistance), tetM, tetL (tetracycline resistance), ermA, ermB (erythromycin resistance) gene combinations, which were supplemented with chloramphenicol resistance genes catA7, catA8 (E. faecalis) and catA9 (E. faecium). All E. faecalis isolates harboured genes coding for virulence factors agg, esp, fsr gelE alone or in combinations with the high prevalence of esp gene in isolates from cattle (63%) and pigs (79%). The origin-dependent incidence of agg gene variants prgB and asp1 was observed. The results indicate the existence of a large pool of potentially virulent and multidrug resistant E. faecalis in diseased farm animals posing risk to humans.

  8. Functional Metagenome Mining of Soil for a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyunjoo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics over recent decades has led to bacterial resistance against antibiotics, including gentamicin, one of the most effective aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistance is problematic for hospitals, since gentamicin is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic for the control of bacterial pathogens in the clinic. Previous study to identify gentamicin resistance genes from environmental samples have been conducted using culture-dependent screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we employed a metagenome-based culture-independent protocol to identify gentamicin resistance genes. Through functional screening of metagenome libraries derived from soil samples, a fosmid clone was selected as it conferred strong gentamicin resistance. To identify a specific functioning gene conferring gentamicin resistance from a selected fosmid clone (35-40 kb), a shot-gun library was constructed and four shot-gun clones (2-3 kb) were selected. Further characterization of these clones revealed that they contained sequences similar to that of the RNA ligase, T4 rnlA that is known as a toxin gene. The overexpression of the rnlA-like gene in Escherichia coli increased gentamicin resistance, indicating that this toxin gene modulates this trait. The results of our metagenome library analysis suggest that the rnlA-like gene may represent a new class of gentamicin resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrate that the soil metagenome can provide an important resource for the identification of antibiotic resistance genes, which are valuable molecular targets in efforts to overcome antibiotic resistance. PMID:26699755

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Netilmicin, a New Aminoglycoside Antibiotic, Compared with That of Gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ian; Smith, Anne; Shannon, Kevin

    1977-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of netilmicin (Sch 20569), a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was compared with that of gentamicin against a variety of gram-negative bacteria, staphylococci, and streptococci. Both antibiotics had similar activity against most organisms, but netilmicin had appreciably greater activity against gram-negative organisms that were resistant to gentamicin because these species synthesized aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase I or aminoglycoside 2″-O-nucleotidyltransferase. Netilmicin was also more active than gentamicin against gentamicin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus that produced two enzymes–aminoglycoside-2″-O-phosphotransferase and aminoglycoside-6′-N-acetyltransferase. PMID:301004

  10. New trends in aminoglycosides use

    PubMed Central

    Fosso, Marina Y.; Li, Yijia; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Despite their inherent toxicity and the acquired bacterial resistance that continuously threaten their long-term clinical use, aminoglycosides (AGs) still remain valuable components of the antibiotic armamentarium. Recent literature shows that the AGs’ role has been further expanded as multi-tasking players in different areas of study. This review aims at presenting some of the new trends observed in the use of AGs in the past decade, along with the current understanding of their mechanisms of action in various bacterial and eukaryotic cellular processes. PMID:25071928

  11. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  12. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, Dennis; D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance. PMID:26153129

  13. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  14. NMR-based analysis of aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4'): the pattern of OH/NH3(+) substitution determines the preferred antibiotic binding mode and is critical for drug inactivation.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Julia; Vacas, Tatiana; Torrado, Mario; Corzana, Francisco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Menendez, Margarita; Bastida, Agatha; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2008-04-16

    The most significant mechanism of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides is the enzymatic inactivation of the drug. Herein, we analyze several key aspects of the aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus, employing NMR complemented with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and measurements of the enzymatic activity on newly synthesized kanamycin derivatives. From a methodological perspective, this analysis provides the first example reported for the use of transferred NOE (trNOE) experiments in the analysis of complex molecular recognition processes, characterized by the existence of simultaneous binding events of the ligand to different regions of a protein receptor. The obtained results show that, in favorable cases, these overlapping binding processes can be isolated employing site-directed mutagenesis and then independently analyzed. From a molecular recognition perspective, this work conclusively shows that the enzyme ANT(4') displays a wide tolerance to conformational variations in the drug. Thus, according to the NMR data, kanamycin-A I/II linkage exhibits an unusual anti-Psi orientation in the ternary complex, which is in qualitative agreement with the previously reported crystallographic complex. In contrast, closely related, kanamycin-B is recognized by the enzyme in the syn-type arrangement for both glycosidic bonds. This observation together with the enzymatic activity displayed by ANT(4') against several synthetic kanamycin derivatives strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of positive charges within the aminoglycoside scaffold is the key feature that governs its preferred binding mode to the protein catalytic region and also the regioselectivity of the adenylation reaction. In contrast, the global shape of the antibiotic does not seem to be a critical factor. This feature represents a qualitative difference between the target A-site RNA and the resistance enzyme ANT(4') as aminoglycoside

  15. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-01

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored. PMID:27409235

  16. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-01

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored.

  17. Gene amplification and insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Field, Linda M

    2011-08-01

    Pesticide resistance in arthropods has been shown to evolve by two main mechanisms, the enhanced production of metabolic enzymes, which bind to and/or detoxify the pesticide, and mutation of the target protein, which makes it less sensitive to the pesticide. One route that leads to enhanced metabolism is the duplication or amplification of the structural gene(s) encoding the detoxifying enzyme, and this has now been described for the three main families (esterases, glutathione S-transferases and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) implicated in resistance. More recently, a direct or indirect role for gene duplication or amplification has been described for target-site resistance in several arthropod species. This mini-review summarises the involvement of gene duplication/amplification in the insecticide/acaricide resistance of insect and mite pests and highlights recent developments in this area in relation to P450-mediated and target-site resistance.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bora; Park, Woojun

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin). Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline) have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii. PMID:26360766

  19. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in two Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Yi; Liao Zhisu; Li Zhiyuan; Chen Jianfu; Qian Yaping; Tang Xiaowen; Wang Jindan; Yang Li; Li Ronghua; Ji Jinzhang; Choo, Daniel I. |; Lu Jianxin . E-mail: jx@mail.wz.zj.cn; Guan Minxin |||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-14

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  20. Versatile nourseothricin and streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance gene cassettes and their use in chromosome integration vectors.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Stephanie S; Mladinich, Katherine M; Boonyakanog, Angkana; Mima, Takehiko; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn R; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-10-01

    An obstacle for the development of genetic systems for many bacteria is the limited number of antibiotic selection markers, especially for bacteria that are intrinsically antibiotic resistant or where utilization of such markers is strictly regulated. Here we describe the development of versatile cassettes containing nourseothricin, streptomycin/spectinomycin, and spectinomycin selection markers. The antibiotic resistance genes contained on these cassettes are flanked by loxP sites with allow their in vivo excision from the chromosome of target bacteria using Cre recombinase. The respective selection marker cassettes were used to derive mini-Tn7 elements that can be used for single-copy insertion of genes into bacterial chromosomes. The utility of the selection markers was tested by insertion of the resulting mini-Tn7 elements into the genomes of Burkholderia thailandensis and B. pseudomallei efflux pump mutants susceptible to aminoglycosides, aminocyclitols, and streptothricins, followed by Cre-mediated antibiotic resistance marker excision. The versatile nourseothricin, streptomycin/spectinomycin and spectinomycin resistance loxP cassette vectors described here extend the repertoire of antibiotic selection markers for genetic manipulation of diverse bacteria that are susceptible to aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols.

  1. Human isolates of apramycin-resistant Escherichia coli which contain the genes for the AAC(3)IV enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J. E.; Hart, C. A.; Shelley, J. C.; Walton, J. R.; Bennett, M.

    1993-01-01

    Gentamicin-resistant Escherichia coli isolated at different periods from patients in two hospitals were tested for resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotic apramycin. Twenty-four of 93 (26%) gentamicin-resistant isolates collected from the Royal Liverpool Hospital between 1981 and 1990 were resistant to apramycin. Thirteen isolates were highly resistant to apramycin (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) > or = 1024 micrograms/ml), were also resistant to gentamicin, netilmicin and tobramycin, and hybridized with a DNA probe derived from the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)IV (AAC(3)IV) gene. The proportion of gentamicin-resistant isolates which had high level resistance to apramycin increased from 7% in 1981-5 to 24% in 1986-90. Twelve gentamicin-resistant E. coli from Guy's and St Thomas's Hospital isolated between 1977 and 1980 were also tested for resistance to apramycin. For five of these isolates the MICs of apramycin was 32-256 micrograms/ml. None was shown to have a conjugative plasmid carrying resistance to apramycin and only one hybridized with the DNA probe for the AAC(3)IV enzyme. PMID:8472768

  2. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming.

  3. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming. PMID:26976842

  4. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  5. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut.

  6. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  7. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  8. Gene expression and fractionation resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous work on whole genome doubling in plants established the importance of gene functional category in provoking or suppressing duplicate gene loss, or fractionation. Other studies, particularly in Paramecium have correlated levels of gene expression with vulnerability or resistance to duplicate loss. Results Here we analyze the simultaneous effect of function category and expression in two plant data sets, rosids and asterids. Conclusion We demonstrate function category and expression level have independent effects, though expression does not play the dominant role it does in Paramecium. PMID:25573431

  9. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  10. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib by zinc: reversal of amikacin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli by a zinc ionophore.

    PubMed

    Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Alam, Jamal Y; Herron, Steven R; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2014-07-01

    In vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by ZnCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 15 μM. Growth of Acinetobacter baumannii or Escherichia coli harboring aac(6')-Ib in cultures containing 8 μg/ml amikacin was significantly inhibited by the addition of 2 μM Zn(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione (ZnPT). PMID:24820083

  11. Metagenomic and network analysis reveal wide distribution and co-occurrence of environmental antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Ma, Liping; Ju, Feng; Guo, Feng; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A metagenomic approach and network analysis was used to investigate the wide-spectrum profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their co-occurrence patterns in 50 samples from 10 typical environments. In total, 260 ARG subtypes belonging to 18 ARG types were detected with an abundance range of 5.4 × 10(-6)-2.2 × 10(-1) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The trend of the total ARG abundances in environments matched well with the levels of anthropogenic impacts on these environments. From the less impacted environments to the seriously impacted environments, the total ARG abundances increased up to three orders of magnitude, that is, from 3.2 × 10(-3) to 3.1 × 10(0) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The abundant ARGs were associated with aminoglycoside, bacitracin, β-lactam, chloramphenicol, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, quinolone, sulphonamide and tetracycline, in agreement with the antibiotics extensively used in human medicine or veterinary medicine/promoters. The widespread occurrences and abundance variation trend of vancomycin resistance genes in different environments might imply the spread of vancomycin resistance genes because of the selective pressure resulting from vancomycin use. The simultaneous enrichment of 12 ARG types in adult chicken faeces suggests the coselection of multiple ARGs in this production system. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that samples belonging to the same environment generally possessed similar ARG compositions. Based on the co-occurrence pattern revealed by network analysis, tetM and aminoglycoside resistance protein, the hubs of the ARG network, are proposed to be indicators to quantitatively estimate the abundance of 23 other co-occurring ARG subtypes by power functions.

  12. Reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Salyers, Abigail; Shoemaker, Nadja B

    2006-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of antibiotics in animal husbundary is that, as antibiotic resistant bacteria move from the farm into the human diet, they may pass antibiotic resistance genes to bacteria that normally reside in a the human intestinal tract and from there to bacteria that cause human disease (reservoir hypothesis). In this article various approaches to evaluating the risk of agricultural use of antibiotics are assessed critically. In addition, the potential benefits of applying new technology and using new insights from the field of microbial ecology are explained.

  13. Obesity genes and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of ‘metabolically healthy but obese’ (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. Recent findings The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Summary Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients. PMID:20585247

  14. Engineering of ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression by in vivo genetic selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Benedikt; Rehm, Charlotte; Summerer, Daniel; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic RNA-based switches are a growing class of genetic controllers applied in synthetic biology to engineer cellular functions. In this chapter, we detail a protocol for the selection of posttranscriptional controllers of gene expression in yeast using the Schistosoma mansoni hammerhead ribozyme as a central catalytic unit. Incorporation of a small molecule-sensing aptamer domain into the ribozyme renders its activity ligand-dependent. Aptazymes display numerous advantages over conventional protein-based transcriptional controllers, namely, the use of little genomic space for encryption, their modular architecture allowing for easy reprogramming to new inputs, the physical linkage to the message to be controlled, and the ability to function without protein cofactors. Herein, we describe the method to select ribozyme-based switches of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that we successfully implemented to engineer neomycin- and theophylline-responsive switches. We also highlight how to adapt the protocol to screen for switches responsive to other ligands. Reprogramming of the sensor unit and incorporation into any RNA of interest enables the fulfillment of a variety of regulatory functions. However, proper functioning of the aptazyme is largely dependent on optimal connection between the aptamer and the catalytic core. We obtained functional switches from a pool of variants carrying randomized connection sequences by an in vivo selection in MaV203 yeast cells that allows screening of a large sequence space of up to 1×10(9) variants. The protocol given explains how to construct aptazyme libraries, carry out the in vivo selection and characterize novel ON- and OFF-switches. PMID:25605392

  15. [Investigation of integrons, sul1-2 and dfr genes in trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esra; Aydin, Faruk; Bayramoglu, Gülçin; Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Sandalli, Cemal

    2014-04-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, which is a non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus, has an increasing importance in nosocomial and opportunistic infections. Since it exhibits resistance to numerous broad-spectrum antibiotics such as aminoglycosides, beta-lactams and tetracyclines, it may considerably limit empirical treatment options. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) is recommended as the first-line therapy in the treatment of S.maltophilia infections thanks to its high potency and usefulness in a range of patients. In recent years, however, studies in different geographical regions have started to report resistance to SXT. In this study, we aimed to investigate the genes sul1, sul2, dfrA9, dfrA10, dfrA20 and class I, class II integron gene cassettes which are known to play role in SXT resistance among SXT-resistant S.maltophilia strains. A total of 618 S.maltophilia strains isolated from various clinical samples of 339 patients between January 2006 and October 2011 at the laboratory of Medical Microbiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon, Turkey, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by both conventional methods and the Phoenix automated identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA). SXT resistance was determined in the isolates of 32 patients (32/339, 9.4%) by both the automated system and agar dilution method of them 29 (90.6%) were hospital-acquired, and 3 (9.4%) were community-acquired. The genes which are known as SXT resistance determining genes including sul1, sul2, dfr genes, and class I and class II integron gene cassettes were analyzed by using specific primers with polymerase chain reaction in the 32 SXT-resistant isolates. Subsequently, nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified materials was performed. As a result of this assay, the presence of class I integron gene cassette and sul1 gene were detected in one isolate. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene cassette revealed oxacilinase

  16. [Spontaneous spectinomycin resistance mutations of the chloroplast rrn16 gene in Daucus carota callus lines].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, E A; Sidorchuk, Iu V; Deĭneko, E V

    2011-01-01

    Bioballistic transformation of carrot Daucus carota L. callus cultures with a plasmid containing the aadA (aminoglycoside 3'-adenyltransferase) gene and subsequent selection oftransformants on a selective medium containing spectinomycin (100-500 mg/l) yielded ten callus lines resistant to this antibiotic. PCR analysis did not detect exogenous DNA in the genomes of spectinomycin-resistant calluses. Resistance proved to be due to spontaneous mutations that occurred in two different regions of the chloroplast rrn16 gene, which codes for the 16S rRNA. Six lines displayed the G > T or G > C transverions in position 1012 of the rrn16 gene, and three lines had the A > G transition in position 1138 of the gene. Chloroplast mutations arising during passages of callus cultures in the presence of spectinomycin were described in D. carota for the first time. The cause of spectinomycin resistance was not identified in one line. The mutations observed in the D. carota plastid genome occurred in the region that is involved in the formation of a double-stranded region at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and coincided in positions with the nucleotide substitutions found in spectinomycin-resistant plants of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. and bladderpod Lesquerella fendleri L.

  17. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M.; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and entero­coccal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6′)-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2′′)-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2′′)-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2′′)-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme. PMID:25286858

  18. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Coproducing ArmA and CTX-M-15 Mediated High Levels of Resistance to Aminoglycoside and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Batah, Rima; Loucif, Lotfi; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Boutefnouchet, Nafissa; Allag, Hamoudi; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is one of the most important pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we have investigated the molecular support of antibiotic resistance and genetic relationships in a series of 54 S. marcescens clinical isolates collected from Eastern Algeria between December 2011 and July 2013. The 54 isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance was performed by conjugation using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain, and plasmid analysis was done by PCR-based replicon typing. The relatedness of our isolates was determined by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of four protein-encoding genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB, and atpD) and then compared to MALDI-TOF MS clustering. Thirty-five out of 54 isolates yielded an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried bla(CTX-M-15) (n=32), bla(TEM-1) (n=26), bla(TEM-71) (n=1), bla(SHV-1a) (n=1), and bla(PER-2) (n=12). Among these isolates, we identified a cluster of 15 isolates from a urology unit that coharbored ESBL and the 16S rRNA methyltransferase armA. Conjugation was successful for five selected strains, demonstrating the transferability of a conjugative plasmid of incompatibility group incL/M type. Phylogenetic analysis along with MALDI-TOF clustering likely suggested an outbreak of such isolates in the urology unit. In this study, we report for the first time the co-occurrence of armA methyltransferase with ESBL in S. marcescens clinical isolates in Eastern Algeria.

  19. Detection of 140 clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes in the plasmid metagenome of wastewater treatment plant bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to selected antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Linke, Burkhard; Krahn, Irene; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Gützkow, Tim; Eichler, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    To detect plasmid-borne antibiotic-resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria, 192 resistance-gene-specific PCR primer pairs were designed and synthesized. Subsequent PCR analyses on total plasmid DNA preparations obtained from bacteria of activated sludge or the WWTP's final effluents led to the identification of, respectively, 140 and 123 different resistance-gene-specific amplicons. The genes detected included aminoglycoside, beta-lactam, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, macrolide, rifampicin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfonamide resistance genes as well as multidrug efflux and small multidrug resistance genes. Some of these genes were only recently described from clinical isolates, demonstrating genetic exchange between clinical and WWTP bacteria. Sequencing of selected resistance-gene-specific amplicons confirmed their identity or revealed that the amplicon nucleotide sequence is very similar to a gene closely related to the reference gene used for primer design. These results demonstrate that WWTP bacteria are a reservoir for various resistance genes. Moreover, detection of about 64 % of the 192 reference resistance genes in bacteria obtained from the WWTP's final effluents indicates that these resistance determinants might be further disseminated in habitats downstream of the sewage plant.

  20. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment.

  1. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment. PMID:26850160

  2. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes of wastewater and surface water in livestock farms of Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Hao, Lijun; Guo, Xinyan; Wang, Na; Ye, Boping

    2015-09-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in livestock farms is general, leading to a wide distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in aquatic environment adjacent to livestock farms. However, researches of the distribution and types of ARGs in aquatic environment of China are still in the initial stage. In this study, wastewater and surface water samples were collected from 12 livestock farms (four pig farms, four cattle farms, and four chicken farms) in Jiangsu Province of China. The prevalence, abundance, and distribution of 22 ARGs were investigated, which were categorized into six groups, including nine tetracyclin resistance genes, three sulfonamides resistance genes, three quinolone resistance genes, two macrolide resistance genes, three aminoglycoside resistance genes, and two multidrug resistance genes, employing quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The results suggested that all of the 22 ARGs were detected in samples. Sul1, sul2, and tetM were the most abundant with the average concentration of 3.84 × 10(1) copies/16S recombinant RNA (rRNA) gene copies, 1.62 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, 2.33 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Principle component analysis revealed that the comprehensive pollution of ARGs in northern Jiangsu was more serious. ARGs in wastewater were more abundant when compared to that in surface water. A preliminary study regarding the fate of ARGs after an aerobiotic process showed that tetA, tetC, sul1, sul2, oqxB, and qnrS were significantly increased. And, among the tetracycline resistance genes, the efflux pump genes were enriched while the ribosomal protection protein encoding genes were decreased in the aerobiotic process. The prevalance of ARGs in water environment is of concern; more surveillance is required to determine the pollution level and pattern of antibiotic resistance genes.

  3. Metagenomic profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) between human impacted estuary and deep ocean sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Ximei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-11-19

    Knowledge of the origins and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential for understanding modern resistomes in the environment. The mechanisms of the dissemination of ARGs can be revealed through comparative studies on the metagenomic profiling of ARGs between relatively pristine and human-impacted environments. The deep ocean bed of the South China Sea (SCS) is considered to be largely devoid of anthropogenic impacts, while the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in south China has been highly impacted by intensive human activities. Commonly used antibiotics (sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) have been detected through chemical analysis in the PRE sediments, but not in the SCS sediments. In the relatively pristine SCS sediments, the most prevalent and abundant ARGs are those related to resistance to macrolides and polypeptides, with efflux pumps as the predominant mechanism. In the contaminated PRE sediments, the typical ARG profiles suggest a prevailing resistance to antibiotics commonly used in human health and animal farming (including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides), and higher diversity in both genotype and resistance mechanism than those in the SCS. In particular, antibiotic inactivation significantly contributed to the resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, and macrolides observed in the PRE sediments. There was a significant correlation in the levels of abundance of ARGs and those of mobile genetic elements (including integrons and plasmids), which serve as carriers in the dissemination of ARGs in the aquatic environment. The metagenomic results from the current study support the view that ARGs naturally originate in pristine environments, while human activities accelerate the dissemination of ARGs so that microbes would be able to tolerate selective environmental stress in response to anthropogenic impacts.

  4. Hypoionic shock treatment enables aminoglycosides antibiotics to eradicate bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Jiafeng, Liu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually being considered as dormant cells that are tolerant to antibiotics, are an important source for recurrent infection and emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Clinical eradication of pathogenic persisters is highly desired but greatly difficult mainly due to the substantial reduction in antibiotics uptake as well as the non-active state of the drug targets. Here we report that bacterial persisters (normal growing cells as well) can be effectively eradicated by aminoglycoside antibiotics upon hypoionic shock (e.g. pure water treatment) even for less than one minute. Such hypoionic shock potentiation effect on aminoglycosides is proton motive force-independent, and is apparently achieved by promoting the entrance of aminoglycosides, speculatively through the mechanosensitive ion channels. Our revelations may provide a simple and powerful strategy to eradicate pathogen persisters. PMID:26435063

  5. Enhancing Plant Disease Resistance without R Genes.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur; Fernando, Dilantha; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Gupta, Vijai Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Crop plants encounter constant biotic challenges, and these challenges have historically been best managed with resistance (R) genes. However, the rapid evolution of new pathogenic strains along with the nonavailability or nonidentification of R genes in cultivated crop species against a large number of plant pathogens have led researchers to think beyond R genes. Biotechnological tools have shown promise in dealing with such challenges. Technologies such as transgenerational plant immunity, interspecies transfer of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), pathogen-derived resistance (PDR), gene regulation, and expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in host plants from other plant species have led to enhanced disease resistance and increased food security. PMID:27113633

  6. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bello González, Teresita de J.; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3′ phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  7. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals.

    PubMed

    Bello González, Teresita de J; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3' phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  8. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    PubMed Central

    Bardien, Soraya; Human, Hannique; Harris, Tashneem; Hefke, Gwynneth; Veikondis, Rene; Schaaf, H Simon; van der Merwe, Lize; Greinwald, John H; Fagan, Johan; de Jong, Greetje

    2009-01-01

    Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n) and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n) variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n) variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will continue to be used

  9. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms.

  10. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms. PMID:27166215

  11. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters.

  12. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  13. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens' resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed.

  14. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.J.; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  15. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  16. Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from squabs reveal multidrug resistance and a distinct pathogenicity gene repertoire.

    PubMed

    Osman, K M; Marouf, S H; Mehana, O A; AlAtfeehy, N

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of squab (young unfledged pigeons) as part of the cuisine of many countries, together with the observation that squabs are vectors of zoonotic agents, may make them a public health risk. This study was designed to determine the serotypes, distribution of 11 virulence genes (invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB, gipA, sodC1, sopE1, spvC, bcfC) and the antimicrobial resistance profiles of salmonellae recovered from squabs. Six isolates were identified from among 45 (13.3%) squabs sampled. Three serotypes were identified according to the Kauffmann-White serotyping scheme: Salmonella Typhimurium (4/6; 66.7%), S. Braenderup (1/6; 16.7%) and S. Lomita (1/6; 16.7%). Polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed the presence of invA, sopB and bcfC in all six isolates, whereas sopE1 and gipA were absent. All six isolates were resistant to lincomycin and streptomycin, but all were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, colistin sulphate and gentamicin. Among the S. Typhimurium isolates, seven resistance profiles were identified: penicillins,aminoglycosides,fluoroquinolones, lincosamides,phenicols, tetracyclines and sulphonamides; four resistance profiles were identified in the isolates of S. Braenderup and S. Lomita: aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, lincosamides and polymyxin. Thus, the distribution of resistance to the antibiotics was largely dependent on serotype identity. The presence of invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB and bcfC was associated with resistance to chloramphenicol; invA, sopB and bcfC with resistance to streptomycin and lincosamide; and invA and sodC1 with resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The identification of serotypes S. Typhimurium, S. Braenderup and S. Lomita in the squab samples has important implications because these serotypes are significant causes of food poisoning and enteric fever in humans.

  17. Antibiotic resistance genes and human bacterial pathogens: Co-occurrence, removal, and enrichment in municipal sewage sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Liping; Wang, Yubo; Huang, Danping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-15

    Understanding which/how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) contribute to increased acquisition of resistance by pathogens in aquatic environments are challenges of profound significance. We explored the co-occurrence and removal versus enrichment of ARGs and human bacterial pathogens (HBPs) in municipal sewage sludge digesters. We combined metagenomic detection of a wide spectrum of 323 ARGs and 83 HBPs with a correlation-based statistical approach and charted a network of their co-occurrence relationships. The results indicate that most ARGs and a minor proportion of HBPs (mainly Collinsella aerofaciens, Streptococcus salivarius and Gordonia bronchialis) could not be removed by anaerobic digestion, revealing a biological risk of post-digestion sludge in disseminating antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. Moreover, preferential co-occurrence patterns were evident within one ARG type (e.g., multidrug, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside) and between two different ARG types (i.e., aminoglycoside and beta-lactam), possibly implicating co-effects of antibiotic selection pressure and co-resistance on shaping antibiotic resistome in sewage sludge. Unlike beta-lactam resistance genes, ARGs of multidrug and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin tended to co-occur more with HBPs. Strikingly, we presented evidence that the most straightforward biological origin of an ARG-species co-occurring event is a hosting relationship. Furthermore, a significant and robust HBP-species co-occurrence correlation provides a proper scenario for nominating HBP indicators (e.g., Bifidobacterium spp. are perfect indicators of C. aerofaciens; r = 0.92-0.99 and P-values < 0.01). Combined, this study demonstrates a creative and effective network-based metagenomic approach for exploring ARG hosts and HBP indicators and assessing ARGs acquisition by HBPs in human-impacted environments where ARGs and HBPs may co-thrive.

  18. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. PMID:26232739

  19. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems.

  20. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. Methods: A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Results: Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional

  1. High throughput profiling of antibiotic resistance genes in urban park soils with reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Qiao, Min; Su, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Xue; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Reclaimed water irrigation (RWI) in urban environments is becoming popular, due to rapid urbanization and water shortage. The continuous release of residual antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from reclaimed water could result in the dissemination of ARGs in the downstream environment. This study provides a comprehensive profile of ARGs in park soils exposed to RWI through a high-throughput quantitative PCR approach. 147 ARGs encoding for resistance to a broad-spectrum of antibiotics were detected among all park soil samples. Aminoglycoside and beta-lactam were the two most dominant types of ARGs, and antibiotic deactivation and efflux pump were the two most dominant mechanisms in these RWI samples. The total enrichment of ARGs varied from 99.3-fold to 8655.3-fold compared to respective controls. Six to 60 ARGs were statistically enriched among these RWI samples. Four transposase genes were detected in RWI samples. TnpA-04 was the most enriched transposase gene with an enrichment was up to 2501.3-fold in Urumqi RWI samples compared with control soil samples. Furthermore, significantly positive correlation was found between ARGs and transposase abundances, indicating that transposase might be involved in the propagation of ARGs. This study demonstrated that RWI resulted in the enrichment of ARGs in urban park soils. PMID:25057898

  2. High throughput profiling of antibiotic resistance genes in urban park soils with reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Qiao, Min; Su, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Xue; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Reclaimed water irrigation (RWI) in urban environments is becoming popular, due to rapid urbanization and water shortage. The continuous release of residual antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from reclaimed water could result in the dissemination of ARGs in the downstream environment. This study provides a comprehensive profile of ARGs in park soils exposed to RWI through a high-throughput quantitative PCR approach. 147 ARGs encoding for resistance to a broad-spectrum of antibiotics were detected among all park soil samples. Aminoglycoside and beta-lactam were the two most dominant types of ARGs, and antibiotic deactivation and efflux pump were the two most dominant mechanisms in these RWI samples. The total enrichment of ARGs varied from 99.3-fold to 8655.3-fold compared to respective controls. Six to 60 ARGs were statistically enriched among these RWI samples. Four transposase genes were detected in RWI samples. TnpA-04 was the most enriched transposase gene with an enrichment was up to 2501.3-fold in Urumqi RWI samples compared with control soil samples. Furthermore, significantly positive correlation was found between ARGs and transposase abundances, indicating that transposase might be involved in the propagation of ARGs. This study demonstrated that RWI resulted in the enrichment of ARGs in urban park soils.

  3. Geographical differences associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nine gene targets among resistant clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hoshide, Matt; Qian, Lishi; Rodrigues, Camilla; Warren, Rob; Victor, Tommie; Evasco, Henry B; Tupasi, Thelma; Crudu, Valeriu; Douglas, James T

    2014-05-01

    Alternative diagnostic methods, such as sequence-based techniques, are necessary for increasing the proportion of tuberculosis cases tested for drug resistance. Despite the abundance of data on drug resistance, isolates can display phenotypic resistance but lack any distinguishable markers. Furthermore, because resistance-conferring mutations develop under antibiotic pressure, different drug regimens could favor unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different geographical regions. A total of 407 isolates were collected from four geographical regions with a high prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (India, Moldova, the Philippines, and South Africa). The "hot spot" or promoter sequences of nine genes (rpoB, gyrA, gyrB, katG, inhA promoter, ahpC promoter, eis promoter, rrs, and tlyA) associated with resistance to four types of antibiotics (rifampin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides) were analyzed for markers. Four genes contributed largely to resistance (rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and katG), two genes contributed moderately to resistance (the eis and inhA promoters), and three genes contributed little or no resistance (gyrB, tlyA, and the ahpC promoter) in clinical isolates. Several geographical differences were found, including a double mutation in rpoB found in 37.1% of isolates from South Africa, the C→T mutation at position -12 of the eis promoter found exclusively in 60.6% of isolates from Moldova, and the G→A mutation at position -46 of the ahpC promoter found only in India. These differences in polymorphism frequencies emphasize the uniqueness of isolates found in different geographical regions. The inclusion of several genes provided a moderate increase in sensitivity, and elimination of the examination of other genes might increase efficiency.

  4. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus spp. isolated from retail meats in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mueen; Diarra, Moussa S; Checkley, Sylvia; Bohaychuk, Valerie; Masson, Luke

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and virulence genotypes of Enterococcus spp. particularly Enterococcus faecalis isolated from retail meats purchased (2007-2008) in Alberta, Canada. Unconditional statistical associations between AMR pheno- and genotypes and virulence genotypes were determined. A total of 532 enterococci comprising one isolate from each positive sample were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility. A customized enterococcal microarray was used for species identification and the detection of AMR and virulence genes. E. faecalis was found in >94% of poultry samples and in about 73% of beef and 86% of pork samples. Enterococcus faecium was not found in turkey meat and its prevalence was 2% in beef and pork and 4% in chicken samples. None of the enterococci isolates were resistant to the clinically important drugs ciprofloxacin, daptomycin, linezolid and vancomycin. Multiresistance (≥3 antimicrobials) was more common in E. faecalis (91%) isolated from chicken and turkey (91%) than those isolated from beef (14%) or pork (45%). Resistance to aminoglycosides was also noted at varying degrees. The most common resistance genes found in E. faecalis were aminoglycosides (aac, aphA3, aadE, sat4, aadA), macrolides (ermB, ermA), tetracyclines (tetM, tetL, tetO), streptogramin (vatE), bacitracin (bcrR) and lincosamide (linB). Virulence genes expressing aggregation substances (agg) and cytolysin (cylA, cylB, cylL, cylM) were found more frequently in poultry E. faecalis and were unconditionally associated with tetM, linB and bcrR resistance genes. Other virulence genes coding for adhesion (ace, efaAfs), gelatinase (gelE) were also found in the majority of E. faecalis. Significant statistical associations were found between resistance and virulence genotypes, suggesting their possible physical link on a common genetic element. This study underscores the importance of E. faecalis as a reservoir of resistance and

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with post-weaning diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, M G; Jordan, D; Chapman, T A; Chin, J J-C; Barton, M D; Do, T N; Fahy, V A; Fairbrother, J M; Trott, D J

    2010-10-26

    This study aimed to characterize antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates (n=117) collected from porcine post-weaning diarrhoea cases in Australia (1999-2005). Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for 12 antimicrobial agents and genotyped by PCR for 30 plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), 22 intestinal and 38 extraintestinal E. coli virulence genes (VGs). Nine serogroups were identified, the most prevalent being O149 (46.2%), O141 (11.2%) and Ont (31.6%). None of the isolates showed resistance to ceftiofur or enrofloxacin and 9.4% were resistant to florfenicol. No corresponding extended-spectrum/AmpC β-lactamase, fluoroquinolone or floR ARGs were detected. An antimicrobial resistance index (ARI) was calculated from the combined data with a weighting for each antimicrobial agent dependent upon its significance to human health. Serogroup O141 isolates had a significantly higher ARI due to an elevated prevalence of aminoglycoside ARGs and possession of more virulence genes (VGs), including ExPEC or EHEC adhesins (bmaE, sfa/focDE, fimH, ihA) in toxin-producing strains that lacked the normally associated F4 and F18 fimbriae. Few associations between ARGs and VGs were apparent, apart from tetC, sfa/focDE and ompT which, for a sub-set of O141 isolates, suggest possible plasmid acquisition from ExPEC. The multi-drug resistant ETEC ARG/VG profiles indicate a high probability of considerable strain and plasmid diversity, reflecting various selection pressures at the individual farm level rather than emergence and lateral spread of MDR resistant/virulent clones. PMID:20688440

  6. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  7. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E; Díaz, Paula L; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E; Díaz, Paula L; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. PMID:26988047

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E.; Díaz, Paula L.; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. PMID:26988047

  11. Antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of Tunisian and Spanish wastewaters as markers to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns in each population.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Calero-Cáceres, William; Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

    2014-12-01

    The emergence and increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment may pose a serious global health concern. This study evaluates the abundance of several ARGs in bacterial and bacteriophage DNA via real-time qPCR in samples from five different sampling points in Tunisia; three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP 1, 2 and 3) and wastewater from two abattoirs slaughtering different animals. Results are compared with those obtained in the Barcelona area, in northeast Spain. Eight ARGs were quantified by qPCR from total and phage DNA fraction from the samples. Three β-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) cluster 1 and bla(CTX-M) cluster 9), two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS), the mecA gene that confers resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging armA gene, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and sul1, the most extended gene conferring resistance to sulfonamides, were evaluated. Sul1 and bla(TEM) were the most prevalent ARGs detected at all five Tunisian sampling points, similarly with the observations in Barcelona. bla(CTX-M-9) was more prevalent than bla(CTX-M-1) both in bacterial and DNA within phage particles in all samples analysed. mecA and armA were almost absent in Tunisian waters from human or animal origin in contrast with Barcelona that showed a medium prevalence. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS in bacterial and phage DNA from all sampling points. In conclusion, our study shows that ARGs are found in the bacterial and is reflected in the phage DNA fraction of human and animal wastewaters. The densities of each ARGs vary depending on the ARGs shed by each population and is determined by the characteristics of each area. Thus, the evaluation of ARGs in wastewaters seems to be suitable as marker reflecting the antibiotic resistance patterns of a population.

  12. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes.

  13. Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography of Aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Schmitt, Stefanie; Wienen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The components of the aminoglycosides, e.g., gentamicin, sisomicin, netilmicin, kanamycin, amikacin, and tobramycin, and related impurities of these antibiotics can be separated by means of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde and thioglycolic acid is found to be appropriate for these antibiotics. The background electrolyte was composed of sodium tetraborate (100 mM), sodium deoxycholate (20 mM), and β-cyclodextrin (15 mM) having a pH value of 10.0. This method is valid for evaluation of gentamicin, kanamycin, and tobramycin. It has to be adopted for amikacin, paromomycin, neomycin, and netilmicin. PMID:27645732

  14. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  15. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium blaPER-1-Carrying Plasmid pSTI1 Encodes an Extended-Spectrum Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase of Type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Casin, Isabelle; Hanau-Berçot, Beatrice; Podglajen, Isabelle; Vahaboglu, Haluk; Collatz, Ekkehard

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the aminoglycoside resistance gene, which confers high levels of resistance to both amikacin and gentamicin, that is carried by plasmid pSTI1 in the PER-1 β-lactamase-producing strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium previously isolated in Turkey. This gene, called aac(6′)-Ib11, was found in a class 1 integron and codes for a protein of 188 amino acids, a fusion product between the N-terminal moiety (8 amino acids) of the signal peptide of the β-lactamase OXA-1 and the acetyltransferase. The gene lacked a plausible Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence and was located 45 nucleotides downstream from a small open reading frame, ORF-18, with a coding capacity of 18 amino acids and a properly spaced SD sequence likely to direct the initiation of aac(6′)-Ib11 translation. AAC(6′)-Ib11 had Leu118 and Ser119 as opposed to Gln and Leu or Gln and Ser, respectively, which were observed in all previously described enzymes of this type. We have evaluated the effect of Leu or Gln at position 118 by site-directed mutagenesis of aac(6′)-Ib11 and two other acetyltransferase gene variants, aac(6′)-Ib7 and -Ib8, which naturally encode Gln118. Our results show that the combination of Leu118 and Ser119 confers an extended-spectrum aminoglycoside resistance, with the MICs of all aminoglycosides in clinical use, including gentamicin, being two to eight times higher for strains with Leu118 and Ser119 than for those with Gln118 and Ser119. PMID:12543680

  16. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline.

  17. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. PMID:26988048

  18. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1+/−) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1+/− mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1+/− mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  19. Identification of Hopanoid Biosynthesis Genes Involved in Polymyxin Resistance in Burkholderia multivorans

    PubMed Central

    Steen-Kinnaird, Barbara R.; Lee, Tracy D.; Speert, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge to clinical therapy of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) pulmonary infections is their innate resistance to a broad range of antimicrobials, including polycationic agents such as aminoglycosides, polymyxins, and cationic peptides. To identify genetic loci associated with this phenotype, a transposon mutant library was constructed in B. multivorans ATCC 17616 and screened for increased susceptibility to polymyxin B. Compared to the parent strain, mutant 26D7 exhibited 8- and 16-fold increases in susceptibility to polymyxin B and colistin, respectively. Genetic analysis of mutant 26D7 indicated that the transposon inserted into open reading frame (ORF) Bmul_2133, part of a putative hopanoid biosynthesis gene cluster. A strain with a mutation in another ORF in this cluster, Bmul_2134, was constructed and named RMI19. Mutant RMI19 also had increased polymyxin susceptibility. Hopanoids are analogues of eukaryotic sterols involved in membrane stability and barrier function. Strains with mutations in Bmul_2133 and Bmul_2134 showed increased permeability to 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine in the presence of increasing concentrations of polymyxin, suggesting that the putative hopanoid biosynthesis genes are involved in stabilizing outer membrane permeability, contributing to polymyxin resistance. Results from a dansyl-polymyxin binding assay demonstrated that polymyxin B does not bind well to the parent or mutant strains, suggesting that Bmul_2133 and Bmul_2134 contribute to polymyxin B resistance by a mechanism that is independent of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Through this work, we propose a role for hopanoid biosynthesis as part of the multiple antimicrobial resistance phenotype in Bcc bacteria. PMID:22006009

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  1. Metagenomic Assembly Reveals Hosts of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and the Shared Resistome in Pig, Chicken, and Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Xia, Yu; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Li, Li-Guan; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The risk associated with antibiotic resistance disseminating from animal and human feces is an urgent public issue. In the present study, we sought to establish a pipeline for annotating antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) based on metagenomic assembly to investigate ARGs and their co-occurrence with associated genetic elements. Genetic elements found on the assembled genomic fragments include mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and metal resistance genes (MRGs). We then explored the hosts of these resistance genes and the shared resistome of pig, chicken and human fecal samples. High levels of tetracycline, multidrug, erythromycin, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were discovered in these fecal samples. In particular, significantly high level of ARGs (7762 ×/Gb) was detected in adult chicken feces, indicating higher ARG contamination level than other fecal samples. Many ARGs arrangements (e.g., macA-macB and tetA-tetR) were discovered shared by chicken, pig and human feces. In addition, MGEs such as the aadA5-dfrA17-carrying class 1 integron were identified on an assembled scaffold of chicken feces, and are carried by human pathogens. Differential coverage binning analysis revealed significant ARG enrichment in adult chicken feces. A draft genome, annotated as multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, was retrieved from chicken feces metagenomes and was determined to carry diverse ARGs (multidrug, acriflavine, and macrolide). The present study demonstrates the determination of ARG hosts and the shared resistome from metagenomic data sets and successfully establishes the relationship between ARGs, hosts, and environments. This ARG annotation pipeline based on metagenomic assembly will help to bridge the knowledge gaps regarding ARG-associated genes and ARG hosts with metagenomic data sets. Moreover, this pipeline will facilitate the evaluation of environmental risks in the genetic context of ARGs. PMID:26650334

  2. Effect of aminoglycoside concentration on reaction rates of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Bongaerts, G P; Vliegenthart, J S

    1988-01-01

    Reaction rates of several reference aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes were studied at various substrate concentrations. The resulting concentration-response curves showed wide variation in threshold concentration, in curve slope, in enzyme saturation, and in substrate inhibition. Together, the curves of a defined aminoglycoside panel yielded more specific information for each individual aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme tested than did conventional substrate profiles obtained at a single substrate concentration. PMID:2840015

  3. MexXY-OprM Efflux Pump Is Required for Antagonism of Aminoglycosides by Divalent Cations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Weimin; Warren, Mark S.; Lee, Angela; Mistry, Anita; Lomovskaya, Olga

    2001-01-01

    Antagonism of aminoglycosides by divalent cations is well documented for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is regarded as one of the problems in aminoglycoside therapy. It is generally considered that divalent cations interfere with uptake of aminoglycosides at both the outer and inner membranes. It has been demonstrated recently that aminoglycosides can be removed from cells of P. aeruginosa by the three-component multidrug resistance efflux pump MexXY-OprM. We sought to investigate the interplay between efflux and uptake in resistance to aminoglycosides in P. aeruginosa. To do so, we studied the effects of the divalent cations Mg2+ and Ca2+ on susceptibility to aminoglycosides in a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa and in mutants either overexpressing or lacking the MexXY-OprM efflux pump. MICs of gentamicin, streptomycin, amikacin, apramycin, netilmicin, and arbekacin were determined in Mueller-Hinton broth in the presence of cations added at concentrations that varied from 0.125 to 8 mM. We found, unexpectedly, that while both Mg2+ and Ca2+ antagonized aminoglycosides (up to a 64-fold decrease in susceptibility at 8 mM), antagonism was seen only in the strains of P. aeruginosa that contained the functional MexXY-OprM efflux pump. Our results indicate that inhibition of the MexXY-OprM efflux pump should abolish the antagonism of aminoglycosides by divalent cations, regardless of its precise mechanism. This may significantly increase the therapeutic index of aminoglycosides and improve the clinical utility of this important class of antibiotics. PMID:11408215

  4. Accumulation of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes, bacterial load, and metals in freshwater lake sediments in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Graham, Neil D; Meijer, Maria; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Elongo, Vicky; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan Willem; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-06-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) receive the effluents from various sources (communities, industrial, and hospital effluents) and are recognized as reservoir for antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) that are associated with clinical pathogens. The aquatic environment is considered a hot-spot for horizontal gene transfer, and lake sediments offer the opportunity for reconstructing the pollution history and evaluating the impacts. In this context, variation with depth and time of the total bacterial load, the abundance of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB; E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (ENT)), Pseudomonas spp., and ARGs (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaNDM, and aadA) were quantified in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva using quantitative PCR. The abundance of bacterial marker genes was identified in sediments contaminated by WWTP following eutrophication of the lake. Additionally, ARGs, including the extended-spectrum ß-lactam- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes, were identified in the surface sediments. The ARG and FIB abundance strongly correlated (r ≥ 0.403, p < 0.05, n = 34) with organic matter and metal concentrations in the sediments, indicating a common and contemporary source of contamination. The contamination of sediments by untreated or partially treated effluent water can affect the quality of ecosystem. Therefore, the reduction of contaminants from the source is recommended for further improvement of water quality. PMID:25933054

  5. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3'')(9) adenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I; Selmer, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3'')(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding. PMID:26527143

  6. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  7. Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Paratyphi B (dT+) and Heidelberg Strains from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    PubMed

    Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Bernal, Johan F; Rodríguez, Fernando; Gomez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a pathogen of significant public health importance that is frequently associated with foodborne illness. We report the whole-genome sequences of four multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B and Heidelberg strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and trimethoprim.

  8. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan D G; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO₂ emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  9. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO2 emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  10. Antibiotic resistance genes in water environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P

    2009-03-01

    The use of antibiotics may accelerate the development of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacteria which shade health risks to humans and animals. The emerging of ARGs in the water environment is becoming an increasing worldwide concern. Hundreds of various ARGs encoding resistance to a broad range of antibiotics have been found in microorganisms distributed not only in hospital wastewaters and animal production wastewaters, but also in sewage, wastewater treatment plants, surface water, groundwater, and even in drinking water. This review summarizes recently published information on the types, distributions, and horizontal transfer of ARGs in various aquatic environments, as well as the molecular methods used to detect environmental ARGs, including specific and multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction), real-time PCR, DNA sequencing, and hybridization based techniques. PMID:19130050

  11. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus carrying multiple drug resistance genes on a plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2013-12-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6')/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  12. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus Carrying Multiple Drug Resistance Genes on a Plasmid Encoding Exfoliative Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6′)/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6′)/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  13. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus carrying multiple drug resistance genes on a plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2013-12-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6')/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment.

  14. Aminoglycoside Nephrotoxicity: Modeling, Simulation, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Florent; Claude, Daniel; Maurin, Michel; Sedoglavic, Alexandre; Ducher, Michel; Corvaisier, Stéphane; Jelliffe, Roger; Maire, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The main constraints on the administration of aminoglycosides are the risks of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, which can lead to acute, renal, vestibular, and auditory toxicities. In the present study we focused on nephrotoxicity. No reliable predictor of nephrotoxicity has been found to date. We have developed a deterministic model which describes the pharmacokinetic behavior of aminoglycosides (with a two-compartment model), the kinetics of aminoglycoside accumulation in the renal cortex, the effects of aminoglycosides on renal cells, the resulting effects on renal function by tubuloglomerular feedback, and the resulting effects on serum creatinine concentrations. The pharmacokinetic parameter values were estimated by use of the NPEM program. The estimated pharmacodynamic parameter values were obtained after minimization of the least-squares objective function between the measured and the calculated serum creatinine concentrations. A simulation program assessed the influences of the dosage regimens on the occurrence of nephrotoxicity. We have also demonstrated the relevancy of modeling of the circadian rhythm of the renal function. We have shown the ability of the model to fit with 49 observed serum creatinine concentrations for a group of eight patients treated for endocarditis by comparison with 49 calculated serum creatinine concentrations (r2 = 0.988; P < 0.001). We have found that for the same daily dose, the nephrotoxicity observed with a thrice-daily administration schedule appears more rapidly, induces a greater decrease in renal function, and is more prolonged than those that occur with less frequent administration schedules (for example, once-daily administration). Moreover, for once-daily administration, we have demonstrated that the time of day of administration can influence the incidence of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity. The lowest level of nephrotoxicity was observed when aminoglycosides were administered at 1:30 p.m. Clinical application of this

  15. Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity: modeling, simulation, and control.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Florent; Claude, Daniel; Maurin, Michel; Sedoglavic, Alexandre; Ducher, Michel; Corvaisier, Stéphane; Jelliffe, Roger; Maire, Pascal

    2003-03-01

    The main constraints on the administration of aminoglycosides are the risks of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, which can lead to acute, renal, vestibular, and auditory toxicities. In the present study we focused on nephrotoxicity. No reliable predictor of nephrotoxicity has been found to date. We have developed a deterministic model which describes the pharmacokinetic behavior of aminoglycosides (with a two-compartment model), the kinetics of aminoglycoside accumulation in the renal cortex, the effects of aminoglycosides on renal cells, the resulting effects on renal function by tubuloglomerular feedback, and the resulting effects on serum creatinine concentrations. The pharmacokinetic parameter values were estimated by use of the NPEM program. The estimated pharmacodynamic parameter values were obtained after minimization of the least-squares objective function between the measured and the calculated serum creatinine concentrations. A simulation program assessed the influences of the dosage regimens on the occurrence of nephrotoxicity. We have also demonstrated the relevancy of modeling of the circadian rhythm of the renal function. We have shown the ability of the model to fit with 49 observed serum creatinine concentrations for a group of eight patients treated for endocarditis by comparison with 49 calculated serum creatinine concentrations (r(2) = 0.988; P < 0.001). We have found that for the same daily dose, the nephrotoxicity observed with a thrice-daily administration schedule appears more rapidly, induces a greater decrease in renal function, and is more prolonged than those that occur with less frequent administration schedules (for example, once-daily administration). Moreover, for once-daily administration, we have demonstrated that the time of day of administration can influence the incidence of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity. The lowest level of nephrotoxicity was observed when aminoglycosides were administered at 1:30 p.m. Clinical application of this

  16. Electrostatic Interactions in Aminoglycoside-RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M.; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  17. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  18. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity.

  19. DNA microarray detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Detection and Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes is essential for research and an important tool for clinical diagnostics. Most techniques used to identify resistance genes can only detect one or a few genes per assay, whereas DNA microarray technology can detect thousands of genes in a single assay. Sev...

  20. Genetic characteristics of vancomycin resistance gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Chunhui, Chen; Xiaogang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci has become an important nosocomial pathogen since it is discovered in late 1980s. The products, encoded by vancomycin resistant gene cluster in enterococci, catalyze the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity with glycopeptide antibiotics including vancomycin and teicoplanin and lead to resistance. These vancomycin resistant gene clusters are classified into nine types according to their gene sequences and organization, or D-Ala:D-Lac (VanA, VanB, VanD and VanM) and D-Ala:D-Ser (VanC, VanE, VanG, VanL and VanN) ligase gene clusters based on the differences of their encoded ligases. Moreover, these gene clusters are characterized by their different resistance levels and infection models. In this review, we summarize the classification, gene organization and infection model of vancomycin resistant gene cluster in Enterococcus spp.

  1. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China.

  2. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  3. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  4. Lantana montevidensis Briq improves the aminoglycoside activity against multiresistant Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Erlanio O.; Almeida, Thiago S.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F.G.; Campos, Adriana R.; Lima, Sidney G.; Costa, José G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this work, we report the antibacterial and modulatory activity of Lantana montevidensis Briq. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activities of leaf (LELm) and root (RELm) extracts alone or in association with aminoglycosides were determined by a microdilution test. Multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli (Ec 27) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa 358) were used. Results: The results show the inhibitory activity of LELm against E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 μg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC 128 μg/mL). The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was verified too. The maximum effects were obtained with RELm with gentamicin against E. coli with MIC reduction (312 to 2 μL). Conclusion: The data from this study are indicative of the activity antibacterial of extracts of L. montevidensis and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides. PMID:21572654

  5. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-10-31

    The crystal structure of the aminoglycoside-adenylating enzyme AadA is reported together with functional experiments providing insights into its oligomeric state, ligand binding and catalysis. Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding.

  6. First Report of an OXA-48-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Strain from Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the blaOXA-48-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene blaOXA-48, extended spectrum β-lactamase gene blaCTX-M-14, and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3′)-VIb. PMID:25896692

  7. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  8. Antibiotic resistance gene discovery in food-producing animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous environmental reservoirs contribute to the widespread antibiotic resistance problem in human pathogens. One environmental reservoir of particular importance is the intestinal bacteria of food-producing animals. In this review I examine recent discoveries of antibiotic resistance genes in ...

  9. [PK/PD modeling of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Rougier, F; Corvaisier, S; Ducher, M; Claude, D; Jelliffe, R W; Maire, P

    2003-06-01

    Aminoglycosides are bactericidial antibiotics with a serum concentration-dependent activity. They are mainly eliminated by the kidneys and the main difficulty arising in clinical use is their uptake by the renal cortex which leads to nephrotoxicity. An ototoxicity is also reported. We propose a PK/PD modelling of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity which unifies more fourty years of physiological knowledge. This deterministic model successively describes the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides, their storage into renal cortex, their effect on renal cells, their consequences on the renal function through tubuloglomerular feedback and the changes in the serum concentrations of creatinine that is considered as a toxicity marker. The simulation of the model displays the leading effect of the shape and daily-time of administration schedule on the search for minimizing toxicity.

  10. Dominant gene for rust resistance in pearl millet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.; Wells, H.D.; Burton, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Rust (Puccinia substriata var. indica) resistance was discovered in three Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke subspecies monodii (Maire) Brunken accessions from Senegal. Resistant plant were free of rust, although the bottom one or two leaves of some plants did develop a brown discoloration without pustules. Resistance was controlled by a dominant gene assigned the gene symbol Rr1. Backcrossing has been effective in transferring resistance from the wild grassy, monodii to cultivated pearl millet. The Rr1 gene should be useful in the production of rust resistant pearl millet hybrids and cultivars. 6 references, 1 table.

  11. [Identification of Sorghum genes responsible for resistance to Green bug].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E E

    2000-04-01

    Genes responsible for resistance to greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rond.) were identified in sorghum. The dominant (Sgr1) and recessive (Sgr2) genes for resistance were revealed in sample k-457 (PI264453, United States). The samples i-589430 (PI264453, Spain) and k-3852 (Sarvasi, Hungary) carry gene Sgr1. These accessions are assumed to also have gene Sgr2. The samples k-9921 (Shallu, United States) and k-9922 (KS-30, United States) have incompletely dominant resistance gene Sgr3. A symbol Sgr4 was assigned to the dominant gene from sample k-6694 (Deer, United States). The dominant Sgr5 and recessive Sgr6 genes were revealed in the samples k-1362 (Durra Belaya, Syria) and k-1240 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). The cultivar Sorgogradskoe (k-9436, Rostovskaya oblast) has gene Sgr5. The samples k-10092 (Odesskii 360, Ukraine) and k-5091 (Cherhata, Marocco) are assumed to have genes Sgr5 and Sgr6. Sample k-924 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) is protected by the dominant gene Srg7 and recessive gene Sgr8. Sample k-923 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) has at least one of these genes. Two dominant complementary genes for resistance (Sgr9 and Sgr10) were revealed in sample k-930 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). One of two dominant genes of sample k-1237 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) was assigned the symbol Sgr11. Genes Sgr5-Sgr11 responsible for resistance to greenbug are new and were not previously used in breeding. PMID:10822813

  12. Antibiotic resistance gene discovery in food-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Allen, Heather K

    2014-06-01

    Numerous environmental reservoirs contribute to the widespread antibiotic resistance problem in human pathogens. One environmental reservoir of particular importance is the intestinal bacteria of food-producing animals. In this review I examine recent discoveries of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural animals. Two types of antibiotic resistance gene discoveries will be discussed: the use of classic microbiological and molecular techniques, such as culturing and PCR, to identify known genes not previously reported in animals; and the application of high-throughput technologies, such as metagenomics, to identify novel genes and gene transfer mechanisms. These discoveries confirm that antibiotics should be limited to prudent uses.

  13. Erythromycin resistance genes in group A streptococci in Finland. The Finnish Study Group for Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kataja, J; Huovinen, P; Skurnik, M; Seppälä, H

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes isolates (group A streptococcus) of different erythromycin resistance phenotypes were collected from all over Finland in 1994 and 1995 and studied; they were evaluated for their susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobial agents (396 isolates) and the presence of different erythromycin resistance genes (45 isolates). The erythromycin-resistant isolates with the macrolide-resistant but lincosamide- and streptogramin B-susceptible phenotype (M phenotype) were further studied for their plasmid contents and the transferability of resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial agents other than macrolides, clindamycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol was not found. When compared to our previous study performed in 1990, the rate of resistance to tetracycline increased from 10 to 93% among isolates with the inducible resistance (IR) phenotype of macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was also found among 75% of the MLSB-resistant isolates with the constitutive resistance (CR) phenotype. Resistance to chloramphenicol was found for the first time in S. pyogenes in Finland; 3% of the isolates with the IR phenotype were resistant. All the chloramphenicol-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline. Detection of erythromycin resistance genes by PCR indicated that, with the exception of one isolate with the CR phenotype, all M-phenotype isolates had the macrolide efflux (mefA) gene and all the MLSB-resistant isolates had the erythromycin resistance methylase (ermTR) gene; the isolate with the CR phenotype contained the ermB gene. No plasmid DNA could be isolated from the M-phenotype isolates, but the mefA gene was transferred by conjugation.

  14. What is a resistance gene? Ranking risk in resistomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Metagenomic studies have shown that antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment, which has led to the suggestion that there is a high risk that these genes will spread to bacteria that cause human infections. If this is true, estimating the real risk of dissemination of resistance genes from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens is therefore very difficult. In this Opinion article, we analyse the current definitions of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes, and we describe the bottlenecks that affect the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to human pathogens. We propose rules for estimating the risks associated with genes that are present in environmental resistomes by evaluating the likelihood of their introduction into human pathogens, and the consequences of such events for the treatment of infections.

  15. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  16. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  17. The Ocean as a Global Reservoir of Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hatosy, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of natural environments have revealed vast genetic reservoirs of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Soil bacteria and human pathogens share AR genes, and AR genes have been discovered in a variety of habitats. However, there is little knowledge about the presence and diversity of AR genes in marine environments and which organisms host AR genes. To address this, we identified the diversity of genes conferring resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, nitrofurantoin, and sulfadimethoxine in diverse marine environments using functional metagenomics (the cloning and screening of random DNA fragments). Marine environments were host to a diversity of AR-conferring genes. Antibiotic-resistant clones were found at all sites, with 28% of the genes identified as known AR genes (encoding beta-lactamases, bicyclomycin resistance pumps, etc.). However, the majority of AR genes were not previously classified as such but had products similar to proteins such as transport pumps, oxidoreductases, and hydrolases. Furthermore, 44% of the genes conferring antibiotic resistance were found in abundant marine taxa (e.g., Pelagibacter, Prochlorococcus, and Vibrio). Therefore, we uncovered a previously unknown diversity of genes that conferred an AR phenotype among marine environments, which makes the ocean a global reservoir of both clinically relevant and potentially novel AR genes. PMID:26296734

  18. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; Coleman, David C; Deasy, Emily C; Brennan, Gráinne I; O' Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs) within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%). SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9%) and CpA (54.5%). Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts) were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4]) was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof), mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K)], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  19. Antibiotic Binding Drives Catalytic Activation of Aminoglycoside Kinase APH(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Shane J; Huang, Yue; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    APH(2″)-Ia is a widely disseminated resistance factor frequently found in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and pathogenic enterococci, where it is constitutively expressed. APH(2″)-Ia confers high-level resistance to gentamicin and related aminoglycosides through phosphorylation of the antibiotic using guanosine triphosphate (GTP) as phosphate donor. We have determined crystal structures of the APH(2″)-Ia in complex with GTP analogs, guanosine diphosphate, and aminoglycosides. These structures collectively demonstrate that aminoglycoside binding to the GTP-bound kinase drives conformational changes that bring distant regions of the protein into contact. These changes in turn drive a switch of the triphosphate cofactor from an inactive, stabilized conformation to a catalytically competent active conformation. This switch has not been previously reported for antibiotic kinases or for the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases. This catalytic triphosphate switch presents a means by which the enzyme can curtail wasteful hydrolysis of GTP in the absence of aminoglycosides, providing an evolutionary advantage to this enzyme.

  20. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, F; Saino, Y; Koshi, T; Hattori, Y

    1980-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside, was compared with that of amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. Sporaricin A showed a broad spectrum of activity against various gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including amikacin-, dibekacin-, or gentamicin-resistant strains. Sporaricin A inhibited more than 90% of clinical isolates of staphylococci, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Proteus, except for P. morganii and P. inconstans, at the concentration of 3.13 microgram/ml. This activity, except for that against Serratia, was similar to that of amikacin. Against P. inconstans and S. marcescens, sporaricin A was more effective than amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. However, its activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was relatively weak in comparison with three other aminoglycosides. Sporaricin A was highly effective against bacteria that had various aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes and that were resistant to the other drugs tested, but it was not active against those with aminoglycoside 3-acetyltransferase-I. The activity of sporaricin A tended to be greater with a reduction in inoculum size of bacteria and an increase in medium pH and decreased slightly in the presence of 10 to 50% horse serum. The in vitro activity was confirmed by in vivo tests in experimental infections with various bacteria. Its protective effect seemed to be equal to or greater than that of amikacin or dibekacin. PMID:7425599

  1. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato.

  2. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  3. Antimicrobial resistance gene distribution: a socioeconomic and sociocultural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K.; Sapkota, Amy R.; Ojo, Tokunbo B.; Pottinger, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of resistance to many first-line antimicrobial agents presents a critical challenge to the successful treatment of bacterial infections. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria and resistance genes are globally distributed, but significant variations in prevalence have been observed in different geographical regions. This article discusses possible relationships between socioeconomic and sociocultural factors and regional differences in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their associated resistance genes. Findings indicate that the few studies that have been conducted to understand relationships between socioeconomic and sociocultural factors and antimicrobial resistance have focused on patterns of phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Yet, a critical need exists for molecular studies of human influences on bacterial resistance and adaptation. We propose that the results of these studies, coupled with well-coordinated culturally appropriate interventions that address specific socioeconomic and sociocultural needs may be necessary to reduce the scourge of antimicrobial resistance in both developing and developed countries. PMID:20204098

  4. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  5. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body.

  6. Audiological Management of Patients Receiving Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Wilmington, Debra J.; Gordon, Jane S.; Reavis, Kelly M.; Fausti, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, commonly prescribed for adults and children to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, are potentially ototoxic, often causing irreversible damage to the auditory and vestibular systems. Ototoxic hearing loss usually begins at the higher frequencies and can progress to lower frequencies necessary for understanding…

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Badarau, Adriana; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2008-02-01

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  8. Ancient hot and cold genes and chemotherapy resistance emergence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Gatenby, Robert A.; Kim, Hyunsung John; Pourmand, Nader; Bussey, Kimberly; Davies, Paul C. W.; Sturm, James C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    We use a microfabricated ecology with a doxorubicin gradient and population fragmentation to produce a strong Darwinian selective pressure that drives forward the rapid emergence of doxorubicin resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. RNA sequencing of the resistant cells was used to examine (i) emergence of genes with high de novo substitution densities (i.e., hot genes) and (ii) genes never substituted (i.e., cold genes). The set of cold genes, which were 21% of the genes sequenced, were further winnowed down by examining excess expression levels. Both the most highly substituted genes and the most highly expressed never-substituted genes were biased in age toward the most ancient of genes. This would support the model that cancer represents a revision back to ancient forms of life adapted to high fitness under extreme stress, and suggests that these ancient genes may be targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26240372

  9. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  10. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  11. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27383577

  12. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  14. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P M

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes). The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  15. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    SciTech Connect

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter; Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  17. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  18. Crystal structures of two aminoglycoside kinases bound with a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fong, Desiree H; Xiong, Bing; Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3')-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3')-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eukaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides.

  19. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  20. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  1. Antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms along a whole river.

    PubMed

    Winkworth, Cynthia L

    2013-06-01

    A key problem challenging public health officials' efforts to stem the spread of antibiotic resistance is the potential increase of resistance in the environment. Yet, despite recent and significant changes to agricultural land in New Zealand, as well as the sector's high antibiotic use, the influence on antibiotic resistance in the environment remained uncharacterised. Spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms from NZ's fourth longest river as it transitioned between low and high intensity farming were examined for 1 year. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to gauge the level of resistance present. Biofilms were screened for 10 genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in humans only and both humans and agricultural animals. Three genes were detected, one which conferred resistance to the important human-only use antibiotic vancomycin. Detected at the two downstream sites only, and those subject to the highest combined land-use stressors, the three genes indicated an elevated presence of antibiotic resistance in relation to surrounding land use; 7.7% versus 2% across the whole river system. The detection of a gene conferring resistance to an important human-only use antibiotic was particularly concerning and highlighted human-based contamination sources along the river, in addition to those of agricultural origin.

  2. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleo­tidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding. PMID:26527143

  3. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  4. Amikacin Resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Isolated from Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gold, R. M.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most common microorganism isolated from canine pyoderma and postoperative wound infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has increased, and recently, isolates that are resistant not only to methicillin but also to other classes of antibiotic drugs, including aminoglycosides, have become common. A total of 422 S. pseudintermedius isolates collected from 413 dogs were analyzed for amikacin and methicillin resistance using broth microdilution and disk diffusion testing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to be resistant to amikacin (37%, 31/84) than were methicillin-susceptible isolates (7%, 22/338). Additionally, resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was significantly associated with resistance to amikacin irrespective of methicillin resistance. Among the 422 isolates, 32 that tested positive for amikacin resistance by broth microdilution or disk diffusion testing were investigated further for the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes using multiplex PCR. Of these isolates, 66% (21/32) were methicillin resistant. In contrast to previous studies of Staphylococcus aureus, the most prevalent gene detected was aph(3′)-IIIa found in 75% (24/32) of isolates followed by aac(6′)/aph(2″) and ant(4′)-Ia in 12% (4/32) and 3% (1/32), respectively. Understanding the differences in antimicrobial resistance gene carriage between different species of Staphylococcus may improve antimicrobial drug selection for clinical therapy and provide insights into how resistance develops in S. pseudintermedius. PMID:25078911

  5. Amikacin resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Gold, R M; Cohen, N D; Lawhon, S D

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most common microorganism isolated from canine pyoderma and postoperative wound infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has increased, and recently, isolates that are resistant not only to methicillin but also to other classes of antibiotic drugs, including aminoglycosides, have become common. A total of 422 S. pseudintermedius isolates collected from 413 dogs were analyzed for amikacin and methicillin resistance using broth microdilution and disk diffusion testing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to be resistant to amikacin (37%, 31/84) than were methicillin-susceptible isolates (7%, 22/338). Additionally, resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was significantly associated with resistance to amikacin irrespective of methicillin resistance. Among the 422 isolates, 32 that tested positive for amikacin resistance by broth microdilution or disk diffusion testing were investigated further for the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes using multiplex PCR. Of these isolates, 66% (21/32) were methicillin resistant. In contrast to previous studies of Staphylococcus aureus, the most prevalent gene detected was aph(3')-IIIa found in 75% (24/32) of isolates followed by aac(6')/aph(2") and ant(4')-Ia in 12% (4/32) and 3% (1/32), respectively. Understanding the differences in antimicrobial resistance gene carriage between different species of Staphylococcus may improve antimicrobial drug selection for clinical therapy and provide insights into how resistance develops in S. pseudintermedius.

  6. Occurrence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from twelve bovine farms in the north-east of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D J; Ennis, C; McDowell, D

    2014-03-01

    Cattle faecal samples (n = 480) were collected from a cluster of 12 farms, and PCR screened for the presence of the intimin gene (eae). Positive samples were cultured, and colonies were examined for the presence of eae and verocytotoxin (vtx) genes. Colonies which were positive for the intimin gene and negative for the verocytotoxin genes were further screened using PCR for a range of virulence factors including bfpA, espA, espB, tir ehxA, toxB, etpD, katP, saa, iha, lpfAO157/OI-141 and lpfAO157/OI-154. Of the 480 faecal samples, 5.8% (28/480) were PCR positive, and one isolate was obtained from each. All 28 isolates obtained were bfpA negative and therefore atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The serotypes detected included O2:H27, O8:H36, O15:H2, O49:H+, O84:H28, O105:H7 and O132:H34 but half of the isolates could not be serogrouped using currently available antisera. Twenty-two (79%) of the isolates carried the tir gene but only 25% were espB positive, and all other virulence genes tested for were scarce or absent. Several isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, minocycline and tetracycline; full resistance to nalidixic acid or tetracycline with one isolate (O-:H8) displaying resistance to aminoglycosides (kanamycin and streptomycin), quinolones (nalidixic acid) and sulphonamides. This study provides further evidence that cattle are a potential source of aEPEC and add to the very limited data currently available on virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in this pathogenic E. coli group in animals.

  7. Characterization of antibiotic-resistance genes in antibiotic resistance Escherichia coli isolates from a lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Gu, Xiucong; Zhang, Songhe; Wang, Peifang; Guo, Chuan; Gu, Ju; Hou, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistance bacteria and antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) has been of concern worldwide. In this study, 114 Escherichia coli isolates were isolated from surface water samples of a lake to identify their susceptibility to antibiotics, including tetracycline (TC), gentamicin (GN), ampicillin (AMP), streptomycin (ST), oxytetracycline (OC), levofloxacin (LEV), nalidixic acid (NA), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SFT). Isolates showing resistance to TC, GN, AMP, ST, OC, LEV, NA, and SFT occurred in 50, 76, 68, 71, 55, 32, 82, and 85 % of the total isolates, respectively. Thirty-seven different resistance patterns were identified, and the most abundant resistance profile (28 of 104) was TC/GN/AMP/ST/OC/LEV/NA/SFT. The occurrence of 29 ARGs were detected in their corresponding resistance clones, and 88 % of TC-resistance, 94 % of SFT-resistance, 90 % of AMP-resistance, 78 % of ST-resistance, and 72 % of quinolone-resistance clones can be described by their corresponding ARGs. It should be noted that most of these antibiotic-resistance clones harbored at least two corresponding ARGs, indicating that high frequencies of combined ARGs occurred in these isolates. In addition, 9 new types of DNA sequence of qnr(B) gene were obtained and were clustered into the same group as showed by phylogenetic trees analysis. These results suggest that the development of antibiotic resistance can be ascribed to the high frequency in the recombination of ARGs through horizontal gene transfer.

  8. Memantine's action against aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Pavlos; Maurer, Jan; Apostolidou, Eirini; Kekes, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the protective role of NMDA antagonists against the ototoxic effects of aminoglycosides, (2) to provide any possible evidence between ototoxicity due to aminoglycosides and excitotoxicity. An animal experiment was conducted. Twenty-eight, 3-month-old female New Zealand rabbits, weighing 1,000-1,500 g, were studied prospectively for 28 days after intramuscular administration of amikacin (15 mg/kg/day divided into two equal doses) for 14 days. Twenty-one rabbits were categorized into three equal treatment groups and seven animals received no medication and served as the control group. The animals of A, B and C groups were injected, intramuscularly, with amikacin 15 mg/kg/day, divided into two equal doses every day for 14 days. Animals of group A received in parallel memantine (per os) and those of group B received p.o. the same volume of placebo solution. The rabbits of the third group (group C) received on the 15th day and every 2 days for the next 2 weeks, until the day 28, memantine of the same quantity as the members of group A. Differences in DPOAE amplitudes, and therefore in cochlear activity, between group A and group B were revealed. DPOAE amplitudes of group B were further reduced compared to the respective amplitudes in rabbits of group A. No improvement was observed in DPOAE measurements performed after the discontinuation of injections. The findings in group C should be examined separately. The measurements showed apparent reversal ototoxic effects in four of the animals. The development of aminoglycoside otoprotective strategies is a primary goal in ototoxicity research. The administration of NMDA antagonists has been shown to prevent, at least to some extent, toxic damage to hair cells in guinea pigs, treated with aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  9. Detection of integron-associated gene cassettes and other antimicrobial resistance genes in enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Dharanidharan, Ramamurthy; Ghosh, Amit; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2015-06-01

    Twenty seven Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains isolated from children in Kolkata, India, were tested for their antimicrobial resistance, presence of integrons and resistance encoding genes. Almost all the strains (>90%) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. About 59-92% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. Most of these antimicrobial agents have been used in the treatment of diarrhea and other infectious diseases. In addition, about half a number of strains (48-55%) were resistant to clindamycin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ampicillin/sulbactam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Moxifloxacin and metronidazole resistance ranged from 30 to 40%. All strains however, were found to be susceptible to chloramphenicol and imipenem. Class 1 integrase (intI1) was detected in seven and class 2 integrase (intI2) in one of the twenty seven ETBF strains. Resistance gene cassettes carried by these integrons had different alleles of dfr or aad genes. Beside these integron-borne genes, other genes encoding different antimicrobial resistance were also detected. Resistance genes such as cep(A) and tet(Q) were detected in most of the ETBF strains. To the best of our knowledge, this work constituted the first extensive report from India on the detection of integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes in ETBF. PMID:25634362

  10. Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance Mechanisms to Modern Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P.; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  11. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  12. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well.

  13. Molecular Characterization of High-Level Mupirocin Resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Roth, Eduardo; Pintarić, Selma; Šeol Martinec, Branka

    2013-01-01

    The genetic analysis of high-level mupirocin resistance (Hi-Mupr) in a Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolate from a dog is presented. The Hi-Mupr ileS2 gene flanked by a novel rearrangement of directly repeated insertion sequence IS257 elements was located, together with the aminoglycoside resistance aacA-aphD determinant, on a conjugative plasmid related to the pSK41/pGO1 family plasmids. PMID:23269741

  14. Natural selection mapping of the warfarin-resistance gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Michael H.; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    In theory, genes under natural selection can be revealed by unique patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and polymorphism at physically linked loci. However, given the effects of recombination and mutation, the physical extent and persistence of LD patterns in natural populations is uncertain. To assess the LD signature of selection, we survey variation in 26 microsatellite loci spanning an ≈32-cM region that includes the warfarin-resistance gene (Rw) in five wild rat populations having resistance levels between 0 and 95%. We find a high frequency of heterozygote deficiency at microsatellite loci in resistant populations, and a negative association between gene diversity (H) and resistance. Contrary to previous studies, these data suggest that directional rather than overdominant selection may predominate during periods of intense anticoagulant treatment. In highly resistant populations, extensive LD was observed over a chromosome segment spanning ≈14% of rat chromosome 1. In contrast, LD in a moderately resistant population was more localized and, in conjunction with likelihood ratios, allowed assignment of Rw to a 2.2-cM interval. Within this genomic window, a diagnostic marker, D1Rat219, assigned 91% of rats to the correct resistance category. These results further demonstrate that “natural selection mapping” in field populations can detect and map major fitness-related genes, and question overdominance as the predominant mode of selection in anticoagulant-resistant rat populations. PMID:10884423

  15. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2011-02-01

    The potato gene RB, cloned from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to better characterize this partial resistance phenotype, we have compared host resistance responses mediated by RB with those mediated by the S. demissum-derived R gene R9, which confers immunity to P. infestans carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrR9. We found that both RB and R9 genes were capable of eliciting a hypersensitive cell death response (HR). However, in RB plants, the pathogen escaped HR lesions and continued to grow beyond the inoculation sites. We also found that callose deposition was negatively correlated with resistance levels in tested plants. Transcription patterns of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 basic, PR-2 acidic, and PR-5 indicated that P. infestans inoculation induced transcription of these defense-related genes regardless of the host genotype; however, transcription was reduced in both the susceptible and partially resistant plants later in the infection process but remained elevated in the immune host. Most interestingly, transcription of the HR-associated gene Hin1 was suppressed in both Katahdin and RB-transgenic Katahdin but not in R9 4 days after inoculation. Together, this suggests that suppression of certain defense-related genes may allow P. infestans to spread beyond the site of infection in the partially resistant host despite elicitation of hypersensitive cell death.

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Campedelli, Ilenia; Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E.; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  18. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Campedelli, Ilenia; Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  19. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  20. In Vitro Emergence of High Persistence upon Periodic Aminoglycoside Challenge in the ESKAPE Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran Elie; Van den Bergh, Bram; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Health care-associated infections present a major threat to modern medical care. Six worrisome nosocomial pathogens-Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.-are collectively referred to as the "ESKAPE bugs." They are notorious for extensive multidrug resistance, yet persistence, or the phenotypic tolerance displayed by a variant subpopulation, remains underappreciated in these pathogens. Importantly, persistence can prevent eradication of antibiotic-sensitive bacterial populations and is thought to act as a catalyst for the development of genetic resistance. Concentration- and time-dependent aminoglycoside killing experiments were used to investigate persistence in the ESKAPE pathogens. Additionally, a recently developed method for the experimental evolution of persistence was employed to investigate adaptation to high-dose, extended-interval aminoglycoside therapy in vitro We show that ESKAPE pathogens exhibit biphasic killing kinetics, indicative of persister formation. In vitro cycling between aminoglycoside killing and persister cell regrowth, evocative of clinical high-dose extended-interval therapy, caused a 37- to 213-fold increase in persistence without the emergence of resistance. Increased persistence also manifested in biofilms and provided cross-tolerance to different clinically important antibiotics. Together, our results highlight a possible drawback of intermittent, high-dose antibiotic therapy and suggest that clinical diagnostics might benefit from taking into account persistence. PMID:27185802

  1. A Nomadic Subtelomeric Disease Resistance Gene Cluster in Common Bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The B4 resistance (R)-gene cluster, located in subtelomeric region of chromosome 4, is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Pv). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich...

  2. Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

  3. Prediction of antibiotic resistance by gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Although many mutations contributing to antibiotic resistance have been identified, the relationship between the mutations and the related phenotypic changes responsible for the resistance has yet to be fully elucidated. To better characterize phenotype–genotype mapping for drug resistance, here we analyse phenotypic and genotypic changes of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli strains obtained by laboratory evolution. We demonstrate that the resistances can be quantitatively predicted by the expression changes of a small number of genes. Several candidate mutations contributing to the resistances are identified, while phenotype–genotype mapping is suggested to be complex and includes various mutations that cause similar phenotypic changes. The integration of transcriptome and genome data enables us to extract essential phenotypic changes for drug resistances. PMID:25517437

  4. Ultraviolet reduction of erythromycin and tetracycline resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their resistance genes in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance in wastewater is becoming a major public health concern, but poorly understood about impact of disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. The UV disinfection of antibiotic resistant heterotrophic bacteria and their relevant genes in the wastewater of a municipal wastewater treatment plant has been evaluated. Two commonly used antibiotics, erythromycin and tetracycline were selected because of their wide occurrences in regard to the antibiotic resistance problem. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2), the log reductions of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in the wastewater were found to be 1.4±0.1 and 1.1±0.1, respectively. The proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (5%) was nearly double of that before UV disinfection (3%). Tetracycline-resistant bacteria exhibited more tolerance to UV irradiation compared to the erythromycin-resistant bacteria (p<0.05). Gene copy numbers were quantified via qPCR and normalized to the volume of original sample. The total concentrations of erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistance genes were (3.6±0.2)×10(5) and (2.5±0.1)×10(5) copies L(-1), respectively. UV treatment at a fluence of 5mJcm(-2) removed the total erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistance genes by 3.0±0.1 log and 1.9±0.1 log, respectively. UV treatment was effective in reducing antibiotic resistance in the wastewater.

  5. Structural basis for dual nucleotide selectivity of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa provides insight on determinants of nucleotide specificity of aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-13

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes.

  6. Hygromycin-resistance vectors for gene expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Nie, Lei; Chen, Biao; Liu, Yingmiao; Kong, Yimeng; Wang, Haibin; Diao, Liuyang

    2014-04-01

    Pichia pastoris is a common host organism for heterologous protein expression and metabolic engineering. Zeocin-, G418-, nourseothricin- and blasticidin-resistance genes are the only dominant selectable markers currently available for selecting P. pastoris transformants. We describe here new P. pastoris expression vectors that confer a hygromycin resistance base on the Klebsiella pneumoniae hph gene. To demonstrate the application of the vectors for intracellular and secreted protein expression, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human serum albumin (HSA) were cloned into the vectors and transformed into P. pastoris cells. The resulting strains expressed GFP and HSA constitutively or inducibly. The hygromycin resistance marker was also suitable for post-transformational vector amplication (PTVA) for obtaining strains with high plasmid copy numbers. A strain with multiple copies of the HSA expression cassette after PTVA had increased HSA expression compared with a strain with a single copy of the plasmid. To demonstrate compatibility of the new vectors with other vectors bearing antibiotic-resistance genes, P. pastoris was transformed with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes GSH1, GSH2 or SAM2 on plasmids containing genes for resistance to Zeocin, G418 or hygromycin. The resulting strain produced glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine at levels approximately twice those of the parent strain. The new hygromycin-resistance vectors allow greater flexibility and potential applications in recombinant protein production and other research using P. pastoris. PMID:24822243

  7. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J; Cochrane, Guy; De Ganck, Sandra; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2016-04-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become imperative to unify AR gene data resources for easy accessibility for researchers. However, due to the absence of a centralized platform for AR gene resources, availability, consistency, and accuracy of information vary considerably across different databases. In this article, we explore existing AR gene data resources in order to make them more visible to the clinical microbiology community, to identify their limitations, and to propose potential solutions.

  8. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J.; Cochrane, Guy; De Ganck, Sandra; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Goossens, Herman

    2016-01-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become imperative to unify AR gene data resources for easy accessibility for researchers. However, due to the absence of a centralized platform for AR gene resources, availability, consistency, and accuracy of information vary considerably across different databases. In this article, we explore existing AR gene data resources in order to make them more visible to the clinical microbiology community, to identify their limitations, and to propose potential solutions. PMID:26818666

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-06-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  10. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  11. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  12. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  13. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  14. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  15. Cycloheximide resistance in yeast: the gene and its protein.

    PubMed Central

    Käufer, N F; Fried, H M; Schwindinger, W F; Jasin, M; Warner, J R

    1983-01-01

    Mutations in the yeast gene CYH2 can lead to resistance to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis. The gene product of CYH2 is ribosomal protein L29, a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit. We have cloned the wild-type and resistance alleles of CYH2 and determined their nucleotide sequence. Transcription of CYH2 appears to initiate and terminate at multiple sites, as judged by S1 nuclease analysis. The gene is transcribed into an RNA molecule of about 1082 nucleotides, containing an intervening sequence of 510 nucleotides. The splice junction of the intron resides within a codon near the 5' end of the gene. In confirmation of peptide analysis by Stocklein et al. (1) we find that resistance to cycloheximide is due to a transversion mutation resulting in the replacement of a glutamine by glutamic acid in position 37 of L29. Images PMID:6304624

  16. Antibiotic preparations contain DNA: a source of drug resistance genes?

    PubMed Central

    Webb, V; Davies, J

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements and polymerase chain reaction amplification of streptomycete 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were used to show that a number of antibiotic preparations employed for human and animal use are contaminated with chromosomal DNA of the antibiotic-producing organism. The DNA contains identifiable antibiotic resistance gene sequences; the uptake of this DNA by bacteria and its functional incorporation into bacterial replicons would lead to the generation of antibiotic resistance determinants. We propose that the presence of DNA encoding drug resistance in antibiotic preparations has been a factor in the rapid development of multiple antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Images PMID:8285621

  17. Influence of very short patch mismatch repair on SOS inducing lesions after aminoglycoside treatment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Low concentrations of aminoglycosides induce the SOS response in Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli. In order to determine whether a specific factor present in E. coli prevents this induction, we developed a genetic screen where only SOS inducing mutants are viable. We identified the vsr gene coding for the Vsr protein of the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPR) pathway. The effect of mismatch repair (MMR) mutants was also studied. We propose that lesions formed upon aminoglycoside treatment are preferentially repaired by VSPR without SOS induction in E. coli and by MMR when VSPR is impaired.

  18. Metagenomics shows that low-energy anaerobic-aerobic treatment reactors reduce antibiotic resistance gene levels from domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Christgen, Beate; Yang, Ying; Ahammad, S Z; Li, Bing; Rodriquez, D Catalina; Zhang, Tong; Graham, David W

    2015-02-17

    Effective domestic wastewater treatment is among our primary defenses against the dissemination of infectious waterborne disease. However, reducing the amount of energy used in treatment processes has become essential for the future. One low-energy treatment option is anaerobic-aerobic sequence (AAS) bioreactors, which use an anaerobic pretreatment step (e.g., anaerobic hybrid reactors) to reduce carbon levels, followed by some form of aerobic treatment. Although AAS is common in warm climates, it is not known how its compares to other treatment options relative to disease transmission, including its influence on antibiotic resistance (AR) in treated effluents. Here, we used metagenomic approaches to contrast the fate of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARG) in anaerobic, aerobic, and AAS bioreactors treating domestic wastewater. Five reactor configurations were monitored for 6 months, and treatment performance, energy use, and ARG abundance and diversity were compared in influents and effluents. AAS and aerobic reactors were superior to anaerobic units in reducing ARG-like sequence abundances, with effluent ARG levels of 29, 34, and 74 ppm (198 ppm influent), respectively. AAS and aerobic systems especially reduced aminoglycoside, tetracycline, and β-lactam ARG levels relative to anaerobic units, although 63 persistent ARG subtypes were detected in effluents from all systems (of 234 assessed). Sulfonamide and chloramphenicol ARG levels were largely unaffected by treatment, whereas a broad shift from target-specific ARGs to ARGs associated with multi-drug resistance was seen across influents and effluents. AAS reactors show promise for future applications because they can reduce more ARGs for less energy (32% less energy here), but all three treatment options have limitations and need further study.

  19. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiardi, Dominic A.; Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are commonly used because of their ability to treat bacterial infections, yet they also are a major cause of deafness. Aminoglycosides selectively damage the cochlea's sensory hair cells, the receptors that respond to the fluid movement in the cochlea to produce neural signals that are relayed to the brain. Sensory hair…

  20. Molecular Responses of the Spiral Ganglion to Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Carey D.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are toxic to both the inner ear hair cells and the ganglion cells that give rise to the eighth cranial nerve. According to recent studies, these cells have a repertoire of molecular responses to aminoglycoside exposure that engages multiple neuroprotective mechanisms. The responses appear to involve regulation of ionic homeostasis,…

  1. Occurrence of sulfonamide and tetracycline-resistant bacteria and resistance genes in aquaculture environment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Panpan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi; Wang, Limei; Xu, Bingjie; Xu, Lin

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance and their pollution profile in the aquaculture environment of Tianjin, northern China, were investigated. The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was identified and the corresponding antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were quantified at 6 aquaculture farms in Tianjin. Sulfonamide-resistance genes were prevalent and their concentrations were the highest detected (3.0 × 10(-5) to 3.3 × 10(-4) for sul1/16S rDNA, 2.0 × 10(-4) to 1.8 × 10(-3) for sul2/16S rDNA) among the various ARGs, most likely because the use of sulfonamides is more prevalent than tetracyclines in this area. Bacillus was the most dominant bacterial genus in both sulfamethoxazole resistant bacteria (63.27% of the total resistant bacteria) and tetracycline-resistant bacteria (57.14% of the total resistant bacteria). At least two of those genes (tetM, tetO, tetT, tetW, sul1 and sul2) were detected in the isolates of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium and Acinetobacter lwofii, and all of the above genes were detected in B. cereus, suggesting the occurrence of multi-resistance in the studied area. The genetic transfer of sul1 between intestinal bacteria (e.g., Enterococcus spp.) and indigenous bacteria (e.g., Bacillus spp.) was implied by phylogenetic analysis. Several strains of resistant opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Acinetobacter spp.) were found in indigenous bacteria, which increase the risk of ARGs to public health. Overall, this is the first study to comprehensively investigate the antibiotic resistance profile by analyzing the species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and adopting qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate ARGs at a typical aquaculture area in northern China.

  2. Vancomycin-resistance phenotypes, vancomycin-resistance genes, and resistance to antibiotics of enterococci isolated from food of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Bozidis, Petros; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, 500 raw beef, pork, and chicken meat samples and 100 pooled egg samples were analyzed for the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci, vancomycin-resistance phenotypes, and resistance genes. Of 141 isolates of enterococci, 88 strains of Enterococcus faecium and 53 strains of E. faecalis were identified. The most prevalent species was E. faecium. Resistance to ampicillin (n = 93, 66%), ciprofloxacin (n = 74, 52.5%), erythromycin (n = 73, 51.8%), penicillin (n = 59, 41.8%) and tetracycline (n = 52, 36.9%) was observed, while 53.2% (n = 75) of the isolates were multiresistant and 15.6% (n = 22) were susceptible to all antibiotics. Resistance to vancomycin was exhibited in 34.1% (n = 30) of the E. faecium isolates (n = 88) and 1.9% (n = 1) of the E. faecalis isolates (n = 53) using the disc-diffusion test and the E-test. All isolates were tested for vanA and vanB using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex PCR, and for vanC, vanD, vanE, vanG genes using multiplex PCR only. Among E. faecalis isolates, no resistance genes were identified. Among the E. faecium isolates, 28 carried the vanA gene when tested by multiplex PCR and 29 when tested with real-time PCR. No isolate carrying the vanC, vanD, vanE, or vanG genes was identified. Melting-curve analysis of the positive real-time PCR E. faecium isolates showed that 22 isolates carried the vanA gene only, 2 isolates the vanB2,3 genes only, and seven isolates carried both the vanA and vanB2,3 genes. Enterococci should be considered a significant zoonotic pathogen and a possible reservoir of genes encoding resistance potentially transferred to other bacterial species. PMID:25562594

  3. Characterization and isolation of mutants producing increased amounts of isoamyl acetate derived from hygromycin B-resistant sake yeast.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toyohisa; Iefuji, Haruyuki; Katsumata, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Hygromycin B is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Twenty-four hygromycin B-resistants mutants were isolated from sake yeast, and were divided into three different degrees of strength according to hygromycin B resistance. Three of four hygromycin B strongly resistant mutants produced increased amounts of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing test, although isoamyl alcohol levels remained unchanged. Many hygromycin B-resistants mutants showed higher E/A ratios than K-701 in culture with koji extract medium. Strain HMR-18 produced the largest amount of isoamyl acetate, and its alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) activity was 1.3-fold that of K-701. DNA microarray analysis showed that many genes overexpressed in HMR-18 were involved in stress responses (heat shock, low pH, and so on) but HMR-18 showed thermo- and acid-sensitivity. It was strongly resistant to hygromycin B and another aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. PMID:22232249

  4. Soil metatranscriptomics for mining eukaryotic heavy metal resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lehembre, Frédéric; Doillon, Didier; David, Elise; Perrotto, Sandrine; Baude, Jessica; Foulon, Julie; Harfouche, Lamia; Vallon, Laurent; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Richaud, Pierre; Colpaert, Jan V; Chalot, Michel; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Blaudez, Damien; Marmeisse, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Heavy metals are pollutants which affect all organisms. Since a small number of eukaryotes have been investigated with respect to metal resistance, we hypothesize that many genes that control this phenomenon remain to be identified. This was tested by screening soil eukaryotic metatranscriptomes which encompass RNA from organisms belonging to the main eukaryotic phyla. Soil-extracted polyadenylated mRNAs were converted into cDNAs and 35 of them were selected for their ability to rescue the metal (Cd or Zn) sensitive phenotype of yeast mutants. Few of the genes belonged to families known to confer metal resistance when overexpressed in yeast. Several of them were homologous to genes that had not been studied in the context of metal resistance. For instance, the BOLA ones, which conferred cross metal (Zn, Co, Cd, Mn) resistance may act by interfering with Fe homeostasis. Other genes, such as those encoding 110- to 130-amino-acid-long, cysteine-rich polypeptides, had no homologues in databases. This study confirms that functional metatranscriptomics represents a powerful approach to address basic biological processes in eukaryotes. The selected genes can be used to probe new pathways involved in metal homeostasis and to manipulate the resistance level of selected organisms.

  5. Diversity of plasmids and antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from healthy companion animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of gene...

  6. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  7. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  8. Synergy characterization for Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level gentamicin and streptomycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Bantar, C E; Micucci, M; Fernandez Canigia, L; Smayevsky, J; Bianchini, H M

    1993-01-01

    Synergy of 14 Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance (MICs, 500 and 256 to 1,000 micrograms/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin, respectively) was characterized by time-kill studies. All strains proved resistant to penicillin plus the respective aminoglycoside. Strains with moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance should be considered to exhibit high-level resistance in severe infections. PMID:8349776

  9. Synergy characterization for Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level gentamicin and streptomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bantar, C E; Micucci, M; Fernandez Canigia, L; Smayevsky, J; Bianchini, H M

    1993-07-01

    Synergy of 14 Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance (MICs, 500 and 256 to 1,000 micrograms/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin, respectively) was characterized by time-kill studies. All strains proved resistant to penicillin plus the respective aminoglycoside. Strains with moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance should be considered to exhibit high-level resistance in severe infections.

  10. Molecular Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Determinants and Plasmids in Malaysian Isolates of Multidrug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marzooq, Farah; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Tay, Sun Tee

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have been increasingly reported in many parts of the world. A total of 93 Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolated from patients attending to University of Malaya Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 2010-2012 were investigated for antibiotic resistance determinants including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), aminoglycoside and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes and plasmid replicons. CTX-M-15 (91.3%) was the predominant ESBL gene detected in this study. aacC2 gene (67.7%) was the most common gene detected in aminoglycoside-resistant isolates. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance (90.3%) was attributed to the presence of sul1 (53.8%) and dfrA (59.1%) genes in the isolates. Multiple plasmid replicons (1-4) were detected in 95.7% of the isolates. FIIK was the dominant replicon detected together with 13 other types of plasmid replicons. Conjugative plasmids (1-3 plasmids of ~3-100 kb) were obtained from 27 of 43 K. pneumoniae isolates. An ESBL gene (either CTX-M-15, CTX-M-3 or SHV-12) was detected from each transconjugant. Co-detection with at least one of other antibiotic resistance determinants [sul1, dfrA, aacC2, aac(6ˊ)-Ib, aac(6ˊ)-Ib-cr and qnrB] was noted in most conjugative plasmids. The transconjugants were resistant to multiple antibiotics including β-lactams, gentamicin and cotrimoxazole, but not ciprofloxacin. This is the first study describing the characterization of plasmids circulating in Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. The results of this study suggest the diffusion of highly diverse plasmids with multiple antibiotic resistance determinants among the Malaysian isolates. Effective infection control measures and antibiotic stewardship programs should be adopted to limit the spread of the multidrug resistant bacteria in healthcare settings. PMID:26203651

  11. Molecular Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Determinants and Plasmids in Malaysian Isolates of Multidrug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Al-Marzooq, Farah; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Tay, Sun Tee

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have been increasingly reported in many parts of the world. A total of 93 Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolated from patients attending to University of Malaya Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 2010-2012 were investigated for antibiotic resistance determinants including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), aminoglycoside and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes and plasmid replicons. CTX-M-15 (91.3%) was the predominant ESBL gene detected in this study. aacC2 gene (67.7%) was the most common gene detected in aminoglycoside-resistant isolates. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance (90.3%) was attributed to the presence of sul1 (53.8%) and dfrA (59.1%) genes in the isolates. Multiple plasmid replicons (1-4) were detected in 95.7% of the isolates. FIIK was the dominant replicon detected together with 13 other types of plasmid replicons. Conjugative plasmids (1-3 plasmids of ~3-100 kb) were obtained from 27 of 43 K. pneumoniae isolates. An ESBL gene (either CTX-M-15, CTX-M-3 or SHV-12) was detected from each transconjugant. Co-detection with at least one of other antibiotic resistance determinants [sul1, dfrA, aacC2, aac(6')-Ib, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrB] was noted in most conjugative plasmids. The transconjugants were resistant to multiple antibiotics including β-lactams, gentamicin and cotrimoxazole, but not ciprofloxacin. This is the first study describing the characterization of plasmids circulating in Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. The results of this study suggest the diffusion of highly diverse plasmids with multiple antibiotic resistance determinants among the Malaysian isolates. Effective infection control measures and antibiotic stewardship programs should be adopted to limit the spread of the multidrug resistant bacteria in healthcare settings.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer of stress resistance genes through plasmid transport.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Erum; Badar, Uzma; Akhter, Jameela; Shams, Hina; Sultana, Maria; Ansari, Maqsood A

    2012-03-01

    The horizontal gene transfer of plasmid-determined stress tolerance was achieved under lab conditions. Bacterial isolates, Enterobacter cloacae (DGE50) and Escherichia coli (DGE57) were used throughout the study. Samples were collected from contaminated marine water and soil to isolate bacterial strains having tolerance against heavy metals and antimicrobial agents. We have demonstrated plasmid transfer, from Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(-) strain (DGE50) to Amp(-)Cu(-)Zn(+) strain (DGE57), producing Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(+) transconjugants (DGE(TC50→57)) and Amp(+)Cu(-)Zn(+) transformants (DGE(TF50→57)). DGE57 did not carry any plasmid, therefore, it can be speculated that zinc tolerance gene in DGE57 is located on chromosome. DGE50 was found to carry three plasmids, out of which two were transferred through conjugation into DGE57, and only one was transferred through transformation. Plasmid transferred through transformation was one out of the two transferred through conjugation. Through the results of transformation it was revealed that the genes of copper and ampicillin tolerance in DGE50 were located on separate plasmids, since only ampicillin tolerance genes were transferred through transformation as a result of one plasmid transfer. By showing transfer of plasmids under lab conditions and monitoring retention of respective phenotype via conjugation and transformation, it is very well demonstrated how multiple stress tolerant strains are generated in nature. PMID:22805823

  13. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    PubMed Central

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1–2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1–2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a “core TC-resistome” of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID

  14. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a "core TC-resistome" of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26074912

  15. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  16. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34.

  17. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  18. Breaking restricted taxonomic functionality by dual resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Imamura, Jun; Ezura, Hiroshi; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tabei, Yutaka; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2013-06-01

    NB-LRR-type disease resistance (R) genes have been used in traditional breeding programs for crop protection. However, functional transfer of NB-LRR-type R genes to plants in taxonomically distinct families to establish pathogen resistance has not been successful. Here we demonstrate that a pair of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae) NB-LRR-type R genes, RPS4 and RRS1, properly function in two other Brassicaceae, Brassica rapa and B. napus, but also in two Solanaceae, Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The solanaceous plants transformed with RPS4/RRS1 confer bacterial effector-specific immunity responses. Furthermore, RPS4 and RRS1, which confer resistance to a fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum in Brassicaceae, also protect against Colletotrichum orbiculare in cucumber (Cucurbitaceae). Thus the successful transfer of two R genes at the family level overcomes restricted taxonomic functionality. This implies that the downstream components of R genes must be highly conserved and interfamily utilization of R genes can be a powerful strategy to combat pathogens.

  19. Quantification of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and corresponding resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Hashimoto, Reina; Mekata, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and their resistance genes, vanA and vanB, to examine their presence in sewage treatment systems. Water samples were collected from primary sedimentation tank inlet, aeration tank, final sedimentation tank overflow outlet, and disinfection tank. Enterococcal strains were determined their vancomycin susceptibility by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. Vancomycin-resistance genes (vanA and vanB) were quantified by real-time PCR. The sewage treatment process indeed decreased the number of most enterococci contained in the entering sewage, with a removal rate of ≥ 5 log. The MIC test showed that two enterococcal strains resistant to a high concentration of vancomycin (>128 μg mL(-1)). However, most of the enterococcal strains exhibited sensitivity to vancomycin, indicating that VRE were virtually absent in the sewage treatment systems. On the other hand, vancomycin-resistance genes were detected in all the sewage samples, including those collected from the chlorination disinfection tank. The highest copy numbers of vanA (1.5 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) and vanB (1.0 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) were detected from the water sample of effluent water and chlorinated water, respectively. Therefore, antibiotic resistance genes remain in the sewage treatment plant and might discharged into water environments such as rivers and coastal areas. PMID:26121014

  20. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  1. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  2. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  3. Paleo-evolutionary plasticity of plant disease resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent access to a large set of genome sequences, combined with a robust evolutionary scenario of modern monocot (i.e. grasses) and eudicot (i.e. rosids) species from their founder ancestors, offered the opportunity to gain insights into disease resistance genes (R-genes) evolutionary plasticity. Results We unravel in the current article (i) a R-genes repertoire consisting in 7883 for monocots and 15758 for eudicots, (ii) a contrasted R-genes conservation with 23.8% for monocots and 6.6% for dicots, (iii) a minimal ancestral founder pool of 384 R-genes for the monocots and 150 R-genes for the eudicots, (iv) a general pattern of organization in clusters accounting for more than 60% of mapped R-genes, (v) a biased deletion of ancestral duplicated R-genes between paralogous blocks possibly compensated by clusterization, (vi) a bias in R-genes clusterization where Leucine-Rich Repeats act as a ‘glue’ for domain association, (vii) a R-genes/miRNAs interome enriched toward duplicated R-genes. Conclusions Together, our data may suggest that R-genes family plasticity operated during plant evolution (i) at the structural level through massive duplicates loss counterbalanced by massive clusterization following polyploidization; as well as at (ii) the regulation level through microRNA/R-gene interactions acting as a possible source of functional diploidization of structurally retained R-genes duplicates. Such evolutionary shuffling events leaded to CNVs (i.e. Copy Number Variation) and PAVs (i.e. Presence Absence Variation) between related species operating in the decay of R-genes colinearity between plant species. PMID:24617999

  4. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  5. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    DOE PAGES

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; et al

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and hasmore » yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.« less

  6. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  7. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds.

  8. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-09-30

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3: , as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  9. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  10. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  11. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  12. Positional cloning of the murine flavivirus resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Perelygin, Andrey A; Scherbik, Svetlana V; Zhulin, Igor B; Stockman, Bronislava M; Li, Yan; Brinton, Margo A

    2002-07-01

    Inbred mouse strains exhibit significant differences in their susceptibility to viruses in the genus Flavivirus, which includes human pathogens such as yellow fever, Dengue, and West Nile virus. A single gene, designated Flv, confers this differential susceptibility and was mapped previously to a region of mouse chromosome 5. A positional cloning strategy was used to identify 22 genes from the Flv gene interval including 10 members of the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene family. One 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene, Oas1b, was identified as Flv by correlation between genotype and phenotype in nine mouse strains. Susceptible mouse strains produce a protein lacking 30% of the C-terminal sequence as compared with the resistant counterpart because of the presence of a premature stop codon. The Oas1b gene differs from all the other murine Oas genes by a unique four-amino acid deletion in the P-loop located within the conserved RNA binding domain. Expression of the resistant allele of Oas1b in susceptible embryo fibroblasts resulted in partial inhibition of the replication of a flavivirus but not of an alpha togavirus.

  13. Systemic acquired resistance delays race shifts to major resistance genes in bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Romero, A M; Ritchie, D F

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of durability of host plant disease resistance is a major problem in disease control. Genotype-specific resistance that involves major resistance (R) genes is especially prone to failure. The compatible (i.e., disease) host-pathogen interaction with systemic acquired resistance (SAR) has been studied extensively, but the incompatible (i.e., resistant) interaction less so. Using the pepper-bacterial spot (causal agent, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria) pathosystem, we examined the effect of SAR in reducing the occurrence of race-change mutants that defeat R genes in laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments. Pepper plants carrying one or more R genes were sprayed with the plant defense activator acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and challenged with incompatible strains of the pathogen. In the greenhouse, disease lesions first were observed 3 weeks after inoculation. ASM-treated plants carrying a major R gene had significantly fewer lesions caused by both the incompatible (i.e., hypersensitive) and compatible (i.e., disease) responses than occurred on nonsprayed plants. Bacteria isolated from the disease lesions were confirmed to be race-change mutants. In field experiments, there was a delay in the detection of race-change mutants and a reduction in disease severity. Decreased disease severity was associated with a reduction in the number of race-change mutants and the suppression of disease caused by the race-change mutants. This suggests a possible mechanism related to a decrease in the pathogen population size, which subsequently reduces the number of race-change mutants for the selection pressure of R genes. Thus, inducers of SAR are potentially useful for increasing the durability of genotype-specific resistance conferred by major R genes.

  14. Gene expression patterns in near isogenic lines for wheat rust resistance gene lr34/yr18.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S H; Bai, J; Fellers, J P; Pacheco, M G; Bowden, R L

    2007-09-01

    ABSTRACT The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow rusting resistance to leaf rust, yellow rust, and several other diseases of wheat. Flag leaves may exhibit spontaneous leaf tip necrosis and tips are more resistant than leaf bases. Despite the importance of this gene, the mechanism of resistance is unknown. Patterns of expression for 55,052 transcripts were examined by microarray analysis in mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of wheat near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Jupateco 73S/Jupateco 73R and Thatcher/Thatcher-Lr34). The Thatcher isolines were also examined for patterns of expression after inoculation with leaf rust. Mock-inoculated leaf tips of resistant plants showed up-regulation of 57 transcripts generally associated with ABA inducibility, osmotic stress, cold stress, and/or seed maturation. Several transcripts may be useful as expression markers for Lr34/Yr18. Five transcripts were also up-regulated in resistant leaf bases. The possible role of these transcripts in resistance is discussed. In mock-inoculated plants, pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were not up-regulated in resistant flag leaves compared with that in susceptible flag leaves. In inoculated plants, the same set of PR proteins was up-regulated in both resistant and susceptible flag leaves. However, expression was often higher in resistant plants, suggesting a possible role for Lr34/Yr18 in priming of defense responses.

  15. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA.

  16. Identification of wheat chromosomal regions containing expressed resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and physically localize expressed resistance (R) genes on wheat chromosomes. Irrespective of the host or pest type, most of the 46 cloned R genes from 12 plant species share a strong sequence similarity, especially for protein domains and motifs. By utilizing this structural similarity to perform modified RNA fingerprinting and data mining, we identified 184 putative expressed R genes of wheat. These include 87 NB/LRR types, 16 receptor-like kinases, and 13 Pto-like kinases. The remaining were seven Hm1 and two Hs1(pro-1) homologs, 17 pathogenicity related, and 42 unique NB/kinases. About 76% of the expressed R-gene candidates were rare transcripts, including 42 novel sequences. Physical mapping of 121 candidate R-gene sequences using 339 deletion lines localized 310 loci to 26 chromosomal regions encompassing approximately 16% of the wheat genome. Five major R-gene clusters that spanned only approximately 3% of the wheat genome but contained approximately 47% of the candidate R genes were observed. Comparative mapping localized 91% (82 of 90) of the phenotypically characterized R genes to 18 regions where 118 of the R-gene sequences mapped. PMID:15020436

  17. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  18. 4′-O-substitutions determine selectivity of aminoglycoside antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Fernandez, Déborah; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Matt, Tanja; Leong, Ng Chyan; Kudyba, Iwona; Duscha, Stefan; Boukari, Heithem; Patak, Rashmi; Dubbaka, Srinivas Reddy; Lang, Kathrin; Meyer, Martin; Akbergenov, Rashid; Freihofer, Pietro; Vaddi, Swapna; Thommes, Pia; Ramakrishnan, V.; Vasella, Andrea; Böttger, Erik C.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical use of 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the bacterial ribosome, is compromised by adverse effects related to limited drug selectivity. Here we present a series of 4′,6′-O-acetal and 4′-O-ether modifications on glucopyranosyl ring I of aminoglycosides. Chemical modifications were guided by measuring interactions between the compounds synthesized and ribosomes harbouring single point mutations in the drug-binding site, resulting in aminoglycosides that interact poorly with the drug-binding pocket of eukaryotic mitochondrial or cytosolic ribosomes. Yet, these compounds largely retain their inhibitory activity for bacterial ribosomes and show antibacterial activity. Our data indicate that 4′-O-substituted aminoglycosides possess increased selectivity towards bacterial ribosomes and little activity for any of the human drug-binding pockets. PMID:24473108

  19. Tagging and mapping of rice sheath blight resistant gene.

    PubMed

    Che, K P; Zhan, Q C; Xing, Q H; Wang, Z P; Jin, D M; He, D J; Wang, B

    2003-01-01

    Sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) is one of the severe rice diseases worldwide. In this study, an F(2) population from a cross between "4011" and "Xiangzaoxian19" is used to identify molecular markers linked with the resistant trait. "4011" was a transgenic rice cultivar carrying a resistant gene to sheath blight, while "Xiangzaoxian19" is a highly susceptible one. As a result, five molecular markers, including three RFLP markers converted from RAPD and AFLP markers, and two SSR markers were identified to link with the sheath blight resistant gene. This dominant resistant gene was named as R sb 1 and mapped on rice chromosome 5. The linkage distance between the markers (E-AT:M-CAC(120), E-AT:M-CTA(230), OPN-16(2000), RM164(320) and RM39(300)) and R sb 1 was 1.6 cM, 9.9 cM, 1.6 cM, 15.2 cM and 1.6 cM, respectively.

  20. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  1. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  2. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the "perfect microbial storm". Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  3. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  4. High Levels of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Their Correlations with Bacterial Community and Mobile Genetic Elements in Pharmaceutical Wastewater Treatment Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wenda; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Fuzheng; Huang, Kailong; Ma, Haijun; Wang, Zhu; Ye, Lin; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment bioreactors, the ARGs in sludge from two full-scale pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants (PWWTPs) were investigated and compared with sludge samples from three sewage treatment plants (STPs) using metagenomic approach. The results showed that the ARG abundances in PWWTP sludge ranged from 54.7 to 585.0 ppm, which were higher than those in STP sludge (27.2 to 86.4 ppm). Moreover, the diversity of ARGs in PWWTP aerobic sludge (153 subtypes) was higher than that in STP aerobic sludge (118 subtypes). In addition, it was found that the profiles of ARGs in PWWTP aerobic sludge were similar to those in STP aerobic sludge but different from those in PWWTP anaerobic sludge, suggesting that dissolve oxygen (DO) could be one of the important factors affecting the profiles of ARGs. In PWWTP aerobic sludge, aminoglycoside, sulfonamide and multidrug resistance genes were frequently detected. While, tetracycline, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin and polypeptide resistance genes were abundantly present in PWWTP anaerobic sludge. Furthermore, we investigated the microbial community and the correlation between microbial community and ARGs in PWWTP sludge. And, significant correlations between ARG types and seven bacterial genera were found. In addition, the mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were also examined and correlations between the ARGs and MGEs in PWWTP sludge were observed. Collectively, our results suggested that the microbial community and MGEs, which could be affected by DO, might be the main factors shaping the profiles of ARGs in PWWTP sludge. PMID:27294780

  5. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shao-Kuang; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Wei, Hen-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  6. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Shao-Kuang; LO, Dan-Yuan; WEI, Hen-Wei; KUO, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  7. Designer aminoglycosides prevent cochlear hair cell loss and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Huth, Markus E; Han, Kyu-Hee; Sotoudeh, Kayvon; Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Effertz, Thomas; Vu, Andrew A; Verhoeven, Sarah; Hsieh, Michael H; Greenhouse, Robert; Cheng, Alan G; Ricci, Anthony J

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial infections represent a rapidly growing challenge to human health. Aminoglycosides are widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, but they inflict permanent hearing loss in up to ~50% of patients by causing selective sensory hair cell loss. Here, we hypothesized that reducing aminoglycoside entry into hair cells via mechanotransducer channels would reduce ototoxicity, and therefore we synthesized 9 aminoglycosides with modifications based on biophysical properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel and interactions between aminoglycosides and the bacterial ribosome. Compared with the parent aminoglycoside sisomicin, all 9 derivatives displayed no or reduced ototoxicity, with the lead compound N1MS 17 times less ototoxic and with reduced penetration of hair cell mechanotransducer channels in rat cochlear cultures. Both N1MS and sisomicin suppressed growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with N1MS exhibiting superior activity against extended spectrum β lactamase producers, despite diminished activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Moreover, systemic sisomicin treatment of mice resulted in 75% to 85% hair cell loss and profound hearing loss, whereas N1MS treatment preserved both hair cells and hearing. Finally, in mice with E. coli-infected bladders, systemic N1MS treatment eliminated bacteria from urinary tract tissues and serially collected urine samples, without compromising auditory and kidney functions. Together, our findings establish N1MS as a nonototoxic aminoglycoside and support targeted modification as a promising approach to generating nonototoxic antibiotics.

  8. Evaluating the mobility potential of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes without metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Hultman, Jenni; Paulin, Lars; Virta, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment. However, only a fraction of them are mobile and able to spread to pathogenic bacteria. Until now, studying the mobility of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes has been challenging due to inadequate sensitivity and difficulties in contig assembly of metagenome based methods. We developed a new cost and labor efficient method based on Inverse PCR and long read sequencing for studying mobility potential of environmental resistance genes. We applied Inverse PCR on sediment samples and identified 79 different MGE clusters associated with the studied resistance genes, including novel mobile genetic elements, co-selected resistance genes and a new putative antibiotic resistance gene. The results show that the method can be used in antibiotic resistance early warning systems. In comparison to metagenomics, Inverse PCR was markedly more sensitive and provided more data on resistance gene mobility and co-selected resistances. PMID:27767072

  9. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance and characterization of resistant genes and integrons in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are still widely applied in animal husbandry to prevent diseases and used as feed additives to promote animal growth. This could result in antibiotic resistance to bacteria and antibiotic residues in animals. In this paper, Enterobacteriaceae isolated from four integrated fish farms in Zhongshan, South China were tested for antibiotic resistance, tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and class 1 integrons. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were carried out to test antibiotic susceptibility and resistance genes, respectively. Relatively high antibiotic resistance frequencies were found, especially for ampicillin (80%), tetracycline (52%), and trimethoprim (50%). Out of 203 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 98.5% were resistant to one or more antibiotics tested. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) was found highest in animal manures with a MAR index of 0.56. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(C)) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul2) were detected in more than 50% of the isolates. The intI1 gene was found in 170 isolates (83.7%). Both classic and non-classic class 1 integrons were found. Four genes, aadA5, aadA22, dfr2, and dfrA17, were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms in China and the first time that gene cassette array dfrA17-aadA5 has been detected in such fish farms. Results of this study indicated that fish farms may be a reservoir of highly diverse and abundant antibiotic resistant genes and gene cassettes. Integrons may play a key role in multiple antibiotic resistances posing potential health risks to the general public and aquaculture.

  10. The consequences of a sudden demographic change on the seroprevalence pattern, virulence genes, identification and characterisation of integron-mediated antibiotic resistance in the Salmonella enterica isolated from clinically diarrhoeic humans in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Osman, K M; Hassan, W M M; Mohamed, R A H

    2014-08-01

    class 1 integrons carrying gene cassettes conferring resistance mainly to aminoglycosides are widespread among the MDR Salmonella serovars isolated from humans in Egypt, indicating the important role of these genetic elements in the dissemination of multidrug resistance.

  11. A Novel Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene Confers High-Level Resistance to Indolmycin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vecchione, James J.; Sello, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Indolmycin, a potential antibacterial drug, competitively inhibits bacterial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases. An effort to identify indolmycin resistance genes led to the discovery of a gene encoding an indolmycin-resistant isoform of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. Overexpression of this gene in an indolmycin-sensitive strain increased the indolmycin MIC 60-fold. Its transcription and distribution in various bacterial genera were assessed. The level of resistance conferred by this gene was compared to that of a known indolmycin resistance gene and to those of genes with resistance-conferring point mutations. PMID:19546369

  12. Detection of Multi-drug Resistant Acinetobacter Lwoffii Isolated from Soil of Mink Farm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Wen, Yong Jun; Zhang, Shu Qin; Zhu, Hong Wei; Guo, Li; Wang, Feng Xue; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Hong Xia; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2016-07-01

    There were 4 Acinetobacter lwoffii obtained from soil samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains to 16 antimicrobial agents was investigated using K-B method. Three isolates showed the multi-drug resistance. The presence of resistance genes and integrons was determined using PCR. The aadA1, aac(3')-IIc, aph(3')-VII, aac(6')-Ib, sul2, cat2, floR, and tet(K) genes were detected, respectively. Three class 1 integrons were obtained. The arr-3-aacA4 and blaPSE-1 gene cassette, which cause resistance to aminoglycoside and beta-lactamase antibiotics. Our results reported the detection of multi-drug resistant and carried resistant genes Acinetobacter lwoffii from soil. The findings suggested that we should pay close attention to the prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial species of environment. PMID:27554122

  13. New plasmid-mediated nucleotidylation of aminoglycoside antibiotics in Staphlococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Le Goffic, F; Martel, A; Capmau, M L; Baca, B; Goebel, P; Chardon, H; Soussy, C J; Duval, J; Bouanchaud, D H

    1976-08-01

    A wild-type strain of Staphylococcus aureus, which inactivates a wide variety of aminoglycosides (except the gentamicin components), has been found to harbor a plasmid (RAp01) that mediates the biosynthesis of a nucleotidyltransferase. This enzyme modifies the 4'-hydroxy function of these antibiotics. The plasmid has been studied, the enzyme responsible for this resistance pattern has been isolated by affinity chromatography, and its kinetics and physicochemistry have been characterized. The target of this enzyme has also been located by demonstrating the structure of one inactivated compound, 4'-(O)-adenylyltobramycin.

  14. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Summary A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  15. [Sensitivity of Salmonella strains to Augmentin and new generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides].

    PubMed

    Dolna, I; Gościniak, G; Ruczkowska, J

    1989-01-01

    The authors evaluated the sensitivity of Salmonella rods to augmentin (amoxicilin and clavulanic acid) and 23 antibiotics routinely used in antibiograms. Salmonella strains were isolated in the years 1987-88 from the faeces of children and adults. It was found that 94% of strains were sensitive to augmentin. Among cephalosporins the most effective were cefotaxime and cephtriaxone (100% of sensitive strains) and among aminoglycosides--amikacin (100%) and netilmicin (93%). S. typhimurium revealed greater resistance to antibiotics than S. enteritidis, which points to the need of making antibiograms before starting a therapy of infections induced by S. typhimurium.

  16. Accumulation of plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance genes, qepA and qnrS1, in Enterobacter aerogenes co-producing RmtB and class A beta-lactamase LAP-1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon-Joon; Yu, Jin Kyung; Kim, Sang-Il; Lee, Kyungwon; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2009-01-01

    A new plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone efflux pump gene, qepA, is known to be associated with the rmtB gene, which confers high-level resistance to aminoglycosides. We investigated the qepA gene in 573 AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae including one Citrobacter freundii known to harbor rmtB. Of them, two clonally unrelated E. aerogenes harbored qepA. Both isolates co-harbored rmtB, qnrS1, qepA, and bla(LAP-1) on an IncFI type plasmid. The qepA was flanked by two copies of IS26 containing ISCR3C, tnpA, tnpR, bla(TEM), and rmtB. The qnrS1 and bla(LAP-1) were located upstream of qepA. All the resistance determinants (qepA, qnrS1, rmtB, and bla(LAP-1)) were co-transferred to E. coli J53 by filter mating from both isolates. Although the prevalence of qepA is currently low, considering the presence of ISCR3C and the possibility of co-selection and co-transferability of plasmids, more active surveillance for these multi-drug resistant bacteria and prudent use of antimicrobials are needed.

  17. Beta-lactamase gene expression in a penicillin-resistant Bacillus anthracis strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yahua; Tenover, Fred C; Koehler, Theresa M

    2004-12-01

    Expression of the bla1 and bla2 genes in an archetypal Bacillus anthracis strain is insufficient for penicillin resistance. In a penicillin-resistant clinical isolate, both genes are highly transcribed, but bla1 is the major contributor to high-level resistance to ampicillin. Differential expression of the bla genes is dependent upon strain background. PMID:15561870

  18. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  19. Whole-genome analysis of an extensively drug-resistant clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii AC12: insights into the mechanisms of resistance of an ST195 clone from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lean, Soo-Sum; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Suhaili, Zarizal; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen owing to its increasing resistance to most, if not all, antibiotics in clinical use. We recently reported the occurrence of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii isolates in a Malaysian tertiary hospital. The genome of one of these XDR isolates (A. baumannii AC12) was completely sequenced and comparative genome analyses were performed to elucidate the genetic basis of its antimicrobial resistance. The A. baumannii AC12 genome consists of a 3.8 Mbp circular chromosome and an 8731 bp cryptic plasmid, pAC12. It belongs to the ST195 lineage and is most closely related to A. baumannii BJAB0715 as well as other strains of the international clone III (IC-III) group. Two antibiotic resistance islands (RIs), designated AC12-RI1 and AC12-RI2, were found in the AC12 chromosome along with a 7 kb Tn1548::armA island conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. The 22.8 kb AC12-RI1 interrupts the comM gene and harbours the carbapenem resistance gene blaOXA-23 flanked by ISAba1 within a Tn2006-like structure. AC12-RI1 also harbours resistance determinants for aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The 10.3 kb IS26-flanked AC12-RI2 is a derivative of AbGRI2-1, containing aphA1b and blaTEM genes (conferring aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance, respectively). The presence of numerous genes mediating resistance to various antibiotics in novel RI structures as well as other genes encoding drug transporters and efflux pumps in A. baumannii AC12 most likely contributed to its XDR characteristics.

  20. Whole-genome analysis of an extensively drug-resistant clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii AC12: insights into the mechanisms of resistance of an ST195 clone from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lean, Soo-Sum; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Suhaili, Zarizal; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen owing to its increasing resistance to most, if not all, antibiotics in clinical use. We recently reported the occurrence of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii isolates in a Malaysian tertiary hospital. The genome of one of these XDR isolates (A. baumannii AC12) was completely sequenced and comparative genome analyses were performed to elucidate the genetic basis of its antimicrobial resistance. The A. baumannii AC12 genome consists of a 3.8 Mbp circular chromosome and an 8731 bp cryptic plasmid, pAC12. It belongs to the ST195 lineage and is most closely related to A. baumannii BJAB0715 as well as other strains of the international clone III (IC-III) group. Two antibiotic resistance islands (RIs), designated AC12-RI1 and AC12-RI2, were found in the AC12 chromosome along with a 7 kb Tn1548::armA island conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. The 22.8 kb AC12-RI1 interrupts the comM gene and harbours the carbapenem resistance gene blaOXA-23 flanked by ISAba1 within a Tn2006-like structure. AC12-RI1 also harbours resistance determinants for aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The 10.3 kb IS26-flanked AC12-RI2 is a derivative of AbGRI2-1, containing aphA1b and blaTEM genes (conferring aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance, respectively). The presence of numerous genes mediating resistance to various antibiotics in novel RI structures as well as other genes encoding drug transporters and efflux pumps in A. baumannii AC12 most likely contributed to its XDR characteristics. PMID:25481460

  1. Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rpp4 (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi 4) confers resistance to P. pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). By combining expression profiling and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), we are developing a genetic framework for Rpp4-mediated resistance. We measured gene expression i...

  2. M. tuberculosis ferritin (Rv3841): Potential involvement in Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Lata, Manju; Faheem, Mohammad; Khan, Asad Ullah; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-09-16

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease, caused by one of the most successful human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Aminoglycosides, Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) are commonly used to treat drug resistant tuberculosis. They target the protein synthesis machinery by interacting with several steps of translation. Several explanations have been proposed to explain the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance but still our information is inadequate. Iron storing/interacting proteins were found to be overexpressed in aminoglycosides resistant isolates. Iron assimilation and utilization in M. tuberculosis plays a crucial role in growth, virulence and latency. To establish the relationship of ferritin with AK & KM resistance ferritin (Rv3841/bfrB) was cloned, expressed and antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing (DST) was carried out. Rv3841/bfrB gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21 using pQE2 expression vector. Etest results for DST against AK & KM showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ferritin recombinant cells was changed. Recombinants showed two fold changes in MIC with AK and three fold with KM E-strips. Overexpression of ferritin reflect the MIC shift which might be playing a critical role in the survival of mycobacteria by inhibiting/modulating the effects of AK & KM. String analysis also suggests that ferritin interacted with few proteins which are directly and indirectly involved in M. tuberculosis growth, Iron assimilation, virulence, resistance, stresses and latency. PMID:27521892

  3. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  4. Co-resistance to different classes of antibiotics among ESBL-producers from aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Moura, Alexandra; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the co-occurrence of resistance to non-beta-lactams among cefotaxime-resistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers (ESBL(+)) versus non-ESBL producers (ESBL(-)), from aquatic environments. Higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides were observed in ESBL(+). Among ESBL(+) resistant to tetracycline (n = 18), tet(A) was detected in 88.9% and tet(B) in 16.7%. Among fluoroquinolone-resistant-ESBL(+) (n = 15), aacA4-cr and qnrVC4 were identified in 26.6% and 40% strains, respectively. The qnrVC4 gene was detected for the first time in Pseudomonas sp. and Escherichia coli. Class 1 integrase genes were detected in 56.41% of ESBL(+) and in 27.67% ESBL(-). Gene cassette arrays identified conferred resistance to aminoglycosides (aadA-type genes and aacA4), trimethoprim (dfrA17), chloramphenicol (catB8), fluoroquinolones (qnrVC4) and beta-lactams (blaOXA-10). Conjugation experiments were performed with CTX-M-producers. Transconjugants showed multiresistance to 3 or more classes of antibiotics, and conjugative plasmids were assigned to IncF, IncK and IncI1 replicons. Results obtained showed that co-selection of resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and tetracyclines is prevalent among ESBL-producers and that these features are successfully mobilized by IncF, IncK and IncI1 conjugative plasmids. This study reinforces the importance of natural aquatic systems as reservoir of mobile genetic platforms carrying multiple resistance determinants. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this constitutes the first observation of IncK::CTX-M-3 in Aeromonas hydrophila and the first report of IncK plasmids in Portugal. PMID:24091187

  5. Aminoglycoside-induced cochlear pathology in man.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, L G; Hawkins, J E; Kingsley, T C; Black, F O; Matz, G J

    1981-01-01

    Temporal bones from five patients with hearing loss as a result of aminoglycoside treatment were examined by the method of microdissection and surface preparations, followed by celloidin embedding and serial sectioning of the modiolus. Three patients had received the newer antibiotics, gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin; the other two neomycin. In the cochleas from two patients of the first group there was only a small loss of hair cells, restricted to the lower end of the basal turn. The third, who had been treated with several antibiotics over a longer period of time, showed more extensive but strikingly asymmetrical patterns of degeneration in the two ears. This patient, as well as the fourth, who had received neomycin during peritoneal lavage, had numerous patchy areas of complete disappearance of Corti's organ in the basal turn, with incipient degeneration of the distal ends of the nerve fibers in adjacent portions of the osseous spiral lamina. The fifth patient, who had become deaf after prolonged treatment with neomycin by mouth, showed a complete loss of cochlear hair cells. Nerve fibers were present only in the middle and upper turns, where supporting cells remained. Midmodiolar sections showed a proportionately much greater loss of the distal than of the proximal processes of the cells of the spiral ganglion. These findings underscore once again the special hazard for the inner ear that is associated with the clinical use of neomycin, regardless of the route of administration. PMID:6282040

  6. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA (+) cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a novel

  7. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  8. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique DM; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2009-01-01

    Background Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Methods Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. Results The MIC and MBC values were ≥1024 μg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Conclusion Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19761599

  9. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice. PMID:26471973

  10. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice.

  11. The expression of antibiotic resistance genes in antibiotic-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mak, Stefanie; Xu, Ye; Nodwell, Justin R

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic-producing bacteria encode antibiotic resistance genes that protect them from the biologically active molecules that they produce. The expression of these genes needs to occur in a timely manner: either in advance of or concomitantly with biosynthesis. It appears that there have been at least two general solutions to this problem. In many cases, the expression of resistance genes is tightly linked to that of antibiotic biosynthetic genes. In others, the resistance genes can be induced by their cognate antibiotics or by intermediate molecules from their biosynthetic pathways. The regulatory mechanisms that couple resistance to antibiotic biosynthesis are mechanistically diverse and potentially relevant to the origins of clinical antibiotic resistance.

  12. In vitro antimicrobial production of beta-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase by and susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed Central

    Vila, J; Marcos, A; Marco, F; Abdalla, S; Vergara, Y; Reig, R; Gomez-Lus, R; Jimenez de Anta, T

    1993-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 54 epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii by using a standard agar dilution technique. On the basis of the in vitro activities, imipenem and doxycycline were the most active agents, whereas amikacin, isepamicin, and the new fluorquinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin presented moderate activity. Cephalosporinase activity was found in 98% of the strains, whereas lactamases of TEM type 1 and one with a pI of 7 to 7.5 were present in 16 and 11% of the strains, respectively. Resistance to aminoglycosides was explained by the production of the three classes of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, with predominance of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase VI in 28% of the strains. PMID:8431011

  13. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zijian; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation in penA (A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutated penA gene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutated ftsX increased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, while pilM, pilN, and pilQ were downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Heidemann Olsen, Rikke; Ye, Lei; Yan, He; Nie, Qing; Meng, Hecheng; Shi, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance, integrons, and transferability of resistance markers in 243 aerobic bacteria recovered from pork at slaughter in the People's Republic of China. The organisms belonged to 22 genera of gram-negative bacteria (92.2%) and gram-positive bacteria (7.8%). High levels of resistance were detected to tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and ampicillin (36.2 to 54.3%), and lower levels were detected to nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol (7.8 to 29.2%). Across species, genes conferring antimicrobial resistance were observed with the following frequencies: blaTEM, 40.7%; blaCMY-2, 15.2%; blaCTX-M, 11.5%; sul2, 27.2%; sul1, 14.4%; tet(A), 5.4%; tet(L), 5.4%; tet(M), 5.0%; tet(E), 3.7%; tet(C), 3.3%; tet(S), 2.5%; and tet(K), 0.8%. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were found in new carriers: blaTEM in Lactococcus garvieae, Myroides odoratimimus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sciuri, Raoultella terrigena, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Acinetobacter ursingii, Sphingobacterium sp., and Oceanobacillus sp.; blaCMY-2 in Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Myroides phaeus; tet(L) in M. caseolyticus; sul1 in Vibrio cincinnatiensis; sul2 in Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and V. cincinnatiensis; and the class 1 integron and gene cassette aadA2 in V. cincinnatiensis. Approximately 6.6% of isolates contained class 1 integrons, and one isolate harbored class 2 integrons. Plasmid associated intI1 and androgen receptor- encoding genes were transferred into Escherichia coli J53 and E. coli DH5α by conjugation and transformation experiments, respectively. Our study highlights the importance of aerobic bacteria from pork as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes and mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies. PMID:27052863

  15. High throughput LSPR and SERS analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    McKeating, Kristy S; Couture, Maxime; Dinel, Marie-Pier; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, and are often dispensed only in severe cases due to their adverse side effects. Patients undergoing treatment with these antibiotics are therefore commonly subjected to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to ensure a safe and effective personalised dosage. The ability to detect these antibiotics in a rapid and sensitive manner in human fluids is therefore of the utmost importance in order to provide effective monitoring of these drugs, which could potentially allow for a more widespread use of this class of antibiotics. Herein, we report on the detection of various aminoglycosides, by exploiting their ability to aggregate gold nanoparticles. The number and position of the amino groups of aminoglycoside antibiotics controlled the aggregation process. We investigated the complementary techniques of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) for dual detection of these aminoglycoside antibiotics and performed an in-depth study of the feasibility of carrying out TDM of tobramycin using a platform amenable to high throughput analysis. Herein, we also demonstrate dual detection of tobramycin using both LSPR and SERS in a single platform and within the clinically relevant concentration range needed for TDM of this particular aminoglycoside. Additionally we provide evidence that tobramycin can be detected in spiked human serum using only functionalised nanoparticles and SERS analysis. PMID:27412506

  16. Monitoring and Comparison of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Their Resistance Genes in Municipal and Hospital Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Aali, Rahim; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmad, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) is a public health concern which could occur in a number of ways. Wastewaters seem to play an important role in the dissemination of bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) in our environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of three groups of ARB and their resistance genes in hospital and municipal wastewaters (MWs) as possible sources. Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected from raw MWs and hospital wastewaters (HWs) and final effluents of related wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Samples were analyzed for the detection of three groups of ARB including gentamicin (GM), chloramphenicol (CHL) and ceftazidime resistant bacteria and their ARGs (aac (3)-1, cmlA1 and ctx-m-32, respectively). Results: The mean concentration of GM, CHL and ceftazidime resistant bacteria in raw wastewater samples was 1.24 × 107, 3.29 × 107 and 5.54 × 107 colony forming unit/100 ml, respectively. There is a variation in prevalence of different groups of ARB in MWs and HWs. All WWTPs decreased the concentration of ARB. However, high concentration of ARB was found in the final effluent of WWTPs. Similar to ARB, different groups of ARGs were found frequently in both MWs and HWs. All genes also detected with a relative high frequency in effluent samples of MWs WWTPs. Conclusions: Discharge of final effluent from conventional WWTPs is a potential route for dissemination of ARB and ARGs into the natural environment and poses a hazard to environmental and public health. PMID:25105001

  17. Occurence of ArmA and RmtB Aminoglycoside Resistance 16S rRNA Methylases in Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Producing Escherichia coli in Algerian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Amel; Drissi, Mourad; de Curraize, Claire; Dupont, Chloé; Hartmann, Alain; Solanas, Sébastien; Siebor, Eliane; Amoureux, Lucie; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study, was to characterize the extended-spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing clinical strains of Escherichia coli isolated between January 2009 and June 2012 from Algerian hospitals and to determine the prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase among them. Sixty-seven ESBL-producers were detected among the 239 isolates included: 52 CTX-M-15-producers, 5 CTX-M-3-producers, 5 CTX-M-1-producers, 2 CTX-M-14-producers, 2 SHV-12-producers and one TEM-167-producer. Among the ESBL-producing strains twelve harbored 16S rRNA methylase genes: 8 rmtB and 4 armA. rmtB was located on a IncFIA plasmid and armA was located either on a IncL/M or a IncFIA plasmid. RmtB-producing isolates were genotypically related and belonged to the sequence type ST 405 whereas ArmA-producing isolates belonged to ST10, ST 167, and ST 117. This first description of 16S rRNA methylases among E. coli in Algerian hospitals pointed out the necessity to establish control measures to avoid their dissemination. PMID:27672380

  18. Occurence of ArmA and RmtB Aminoglycoside Resistance 16S rRNA Methylases in Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Producing Escherichia coli in Algerian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Amel; Drissi, Mourad; de Curraize, Claire; Dupont, Chloé; Hartmann, Alain; Solanas, Sébastien; Siebor, Eliane; Amoureux, Lucie; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study, was to characterize the extended-spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing clinical strains of Escherichia coli isolated between January 2009 and June 2012 from Algerian hospitals and to determine the prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase among them. Sixty-seven ESBL-producers were detected among the 239 isolates included: 52 CTX-M-15-producers, 5 CTX-M-3-producers, 5 CTX-M-1-producers, 2 CTX-M-14-producers, 2 SHV-12-producers and one TEM-167-producer. Among the ESBL–producing strains twelve harbored 16S rRNA methylase genes: 8 rmtB and 4 armA. rmtB was located on a IncFIA plasmid and armA was located either on a IncL/M or a IncFIA plasmid. RmtB-producing isolates were genotypically related and belonged to the sequence type ST 405 whereas ArmA-producing isolates belonged to ST10, ST 167, and ST 117. This first description of 16S rRNA methylases among E. coli in Algerian hospitals pointed out the necessity to establish control measures to avoid their dissemination.

  19. Occurence of ArmA and RmtB Aminoglycoside Resistance 16S rRNA Methylases in Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Producing Escherichia coli in Algerian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Amel; Drissi, Mourad; de Curraize, Claire; Dupont, Chloé; Hartmann, Alain; Solanas, Sébastien; Siebor, Eliane; Amoureux, Lucie; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study, was to characterize the extended-spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing clinical strains of Escherichia coli isolated between January 2009 and June 2012 from Algerian hospitals and to determine the prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase among them. Sixty-seven ESBL-producers were detected among the 239 isolates included: 52 CTX-M-15-producers, 5 CTX-M-3-producers, 5 CTX-M-1-producers, 2 CTX-M-14-producers, 2 SHV-12-producers and one TEM-167-producer. Among the ESBL–producing strains twelve harbored 16S rRNA methylase genes: 8 rmtB and 4 armA. rmtB was located on a IncFIA plasmid and armA was located either on a IncL/M or a IncFIA plasmid. RmtB-producing isolates were genotypically related and belonged to the sequence type ST 405 whereas ArmA-producing isolates belonged to ST10, ST 167, and ST 117. This first description of 16S rRNA methylases among E. coli in Algerian hospitals pointed out the necessity to establish control measures to avoid their dissemination. PMID:27672380

  20. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs.

  1. Characterization of Stripe Rust Resistance in Wheat Lines with Resistance Gene Yr17 and Implications for Evaluating Resistance and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Milus, Eugene A; Lee, Kevin D; Brown-Guedira, Gina

    2015-08-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has been the most important foliar wheat disease in south central United States since 2000 when a new strain of the pathogen emerged. The resistance gene Yr17 was used by many breeding programs to develop resistant cultivars. Although Yr17 was classified as a seedling (all-stage) resistance gene conferring a low infection type, seedlings with Yr17 frequently had intermediate to high infection types when inoculated with isolates that caused little or no disease on adult plants of the same wheat lines. The objectives of this study were to determine how to best evaluate Yr17 resistance in wheat lines and to determine which factors made seedling tests involving Yr17 so variable. Stripe rust reactions on wheat seedlings with Yr17 were influenced by temperature, wheat genotype, pathogen isolate, and the leaf (first or second) used to assess the seedling reaction. The most critical factors for accurately evaluating Yr17 reactions at the seedling stage were to avoid night temperatures below 12°C, to use the first leaf to assess the seedling reaction, to use multiple differentials with Yr17 and known avirulent, partially virulent and virulent isolates as controls, and to recognize that intermediate infection types likely represent a level of partial virulence in the pathogen that is insufficient to cause disease on adult plants in the field.

  2. Functional cloning and characterization of antibiotic resistance genes from the chicken gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ying; Lin, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Culture-independent sampling in conjunction with a functional cloning approach identified diverse antibiotic resistance genes for different classes of antibiotics in gut microbiomes from both conventionally raised and free-range chickens. Many of the genes are phylogenetically distant from known resistance genes. Two unique genes that conferred ampicillin and spectinomycin resistance were also functional in Campylobacter, a distant relative of the Escherichia coli host used to generate the genomic libraries.

  3. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  4. Fertilizing with Animal Manure Disseminates Antibiotic Resistance Genes to the Farm Environment.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, Matti; Muurinen, Johanna; Meierjohan, Axel; Pärnänen, Katariina; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Kronberg, Leif; Virta, Marko

    2016-03-01

    The dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the environment is an important factor causing increased prevalence of resistant pathogens. Manure is an important fertilizer, but it contains diverse resistance genes. Therefore, its application to fields may lead to increased abundance of resistance genes in the environment. Farming environments exposed to animal manure have not been studied extensively in countries with comparably low antibiotic use, such as Finland. The effects of manure storage and application to fields on the abundance of resistance genes were studied on two dairy cattle farms and two swine farms in southern Finland. Samples were taken from farms during the 2013 cropping season. Copy numbers of carbapenem (), sulfonamide (), and tetracycline () resistance genes were measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the data were analyzed using linear mixed models. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased about fourfold in soil after manure application. Carbapenemase encoding was detected on all of the studied farms, which indicated that the gene is dispersed in the farm environment. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased in stored manure compared with fresh manure roughly fivefold. This study shows that antibiotic resistance genes are disseminated on Finnish production animal farms. The spreading of resistance genes in farm-associated environments could possibly be limited by experimenting with new manure handling methods that could reduce the abundance of the genes in manure used for land application. PMID:27065395

  5. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  6. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry.

  7. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  8. In Vitro Studies with Sch 21420 and Sch 22591: Activity in Comparison with Six Other Aminoglycosides and Synergy with Penicillin Against Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Christine C.; Sanders, W. Eugene; Goering, Richard V.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro tests were performed with Sch 21420 and Sch 22591 to determine (i) their activity in comparison to six other aminoglycosides against 343 clinical isolates, and (ii) whether synergy with penicillin G could be demonstrated with enterococci. In broth dilution tests, Sch 22591 was more active than the seven other aminoglycosides against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae, and most nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli. Sch 22591 was as active as tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The activity of Sch 21420 was comparable to gentamicin, sisomicin, netilmicin, and tobramycin but greater than amikacin or kanamycin against S. aureus and most genera of Enterobacteriaceae. Sch 21420, amikacin, and kanamycin were (i) more active than the other five aminoglycosides against Proteus rettgeri and Providencia stuartii, but (ii) less active than the other five aminoglycosides against Neisseria gonorrhoeae, enterococci, most nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli, Proteus mirabilis, and Proteus morganii. Studies on the bactericidal activity of Sch 22591 with penicillin indicated a synergistic interaction against enterococci, including strains highly resistant to streptomycin and kanamycin. This could be demonstrated with combinations containing 3.0 to 6.0 μg of Sch 22591 per ml and was comparable to that observed with penicillin/gentamicin. Penicillin plus Sch 21420 (25 μg/ml) also demonstrated synergy against enterococci, including strains highly resistant to streptomycin. However, synergy did not occur against strains highly resistant to kanamycin. These latter results were similar to those obtained in tests with penicillin/kanamycin. PMID:697346

  9. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  10. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  11. Distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria across agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Durso, Lisa M; Miller, Daniel N; Wienhold, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described. Few details are known about the ecology of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria in food production systems, or how antibiotic resistance genes in food animals compare to antibiotic resistance genes in other ecosystems. Here we report the distribution of antibiotic resistant genes in publicly available agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomic samples and identify which bacteria are likely to be carrying those genes. Antibiotic resistance, as coded for in the genes used in this study, is a process that was associated with all natural, agricultural, and human-impacted ecosystems examined, with between 0.7 to 4.4% of all classified genes in each habitat coding for resistance to antibiotic and toxic compounds (RATC). Agricultural, human, and coastal-marine metagenomes have characteristic distributions of antibiotic resistance genes, and different bacteria that carry the genes. There is a larger percentage of the total genome associated with antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal-associated and agricultural metagenomes compared to marine and Antarctic samples. Since antibiotic resistance genes are a natural part of both human-impacted and pristine habitats, presence of these resistance genes in any specific habitat is therefore not sufficient to indicate or determine impact of anthropogenic antibiotic use. We recommend that baseline studies and control samples be taken in order to determine natural background levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or antibiotic resistance genes when investigating the impacts of veterinary use of antibiotics on human health. We raise questions regarding whether the underlying biology of each type of bacteria contributes to the likelihood of transfer via the food chain.

  12. Review of Cellular Changes in the Cochlea Due to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Aminoglycoside damage progresses from cochlear base to apex and from outer to inner hair cells. Aminoglycoside antibiotics enter hair cells at the apical pole and are taken up into lysosomes and mitochondria.…

  13. Inhibitors of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] identified by in silico molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Adams, Christina; Alam, Jamal Y; Herron, Steven R; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2013-10-15

    AAC(6')-Ib is an important aminoglycoside resistance enzyme to target with enzymatic inhibitors. An in silico screening approach was used to identify potential inhibitors from the ChemBridge library. Several compounds were identified, of which two of them, 4-[(2-{[1-(3-methylphenyl)-4,6-dioxo-2-thioxotetrahydro-5(2H)-pyrimidinylidene]methyl}phenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid and 2-{5-[(4,6-dioxo-1,3-diphenyl-2-thioxotetrahydro-5(2H)-pyrimidinylidene)methyl]-2-furyl}benzoic acid, showed micromolar activity in inhibiting acetylation of kanamycin A. These compounds are predicted to bind the aminoglycoside binding site of AAC(6')-Ib and exhibited competitive inhibition against kanamycin A.

  14. Apramycin resistance as a selective marker for gene transfer in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Paget, E; Davies, J

    1996-01-01

    We have explored the potential of using the apramycin resistance gene as a marker in mycobacterial gene transfer studies. Shuttle plasmids available for both electroporation and conjugation studies have been constructed, and we have successfully validated the use of the apramycin resistance gene as a component of cloning vectors for Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG, and M. tuberculosis. PMID:8892841

  15. Gene expression patterns of wheat rust resistance gene Lr34/Yr18 indicate novel mode of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow-rusting resistance to leaf rust and yellow rust of wheat. Patterns of gene expression were examined by microarray analysis in inoculated and mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Thatcher/Thatc...

  16. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them.

  17. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them. PMID:27192478

  18. Natural products from the termite Nasutitermes corniger lowers aminoglycoside minimum inhibitory concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Freire-Pessôa, Hilzeth L.; Gadelha, Carlos A.; Gadelha, Tatiane S.; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infectious agents present a risk to populations, as they are responsible for high morbidity and mortality. For combating these pathogens, our main line of defense is the use of antibiotics. However, indiscriminate use of these drugs develops resistant strains to these same drugs. The present study has tested the antibacterial and modifying antibiotic activity of natural products from Nasutitermes corniger (Termitidae) (Motschulsky), a termite used in folk medicine in Northeast Brazil, by the microdilution and checkerboard methods, respectively. In this study, the aqueous extract from the nest of N. corniger (ANCE) was prepared and tested with chlorpromazine (CPZ) for its antimicrobial activity, using the microdilution method. CPZ and ANCE were used independently and also in combination with aminoglycosides, against a strain of Escherichia coli resistant to these antibiotics, to determine the participation of efflux systems in resistance mechanisms. The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index was calculated and evaluated for the occurrence of synergism, using the checkerboard method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) values were ≥ 2048 μg/mL for both strains of E. coli assayed, indicating low antibacterial activity. However, synergism was observed with kanamycin when the decoction was used, but when chlorpromazine was used, synergism was observed with kanamycin, amikacin, and neomycin. This synergism with CPZ indicated the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to these aminoglycosides. Therefore, it was suggested that the natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with kanamycin-modifying activity, resulting in a new approach against bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:20548928

  19. Clusters of antibiotic resistance genes enriched together stay together in swine agriculture

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Timothy A.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Wang, Qiong; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Looft, Torey; Zhu, Yong -Guan; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-04-12

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundancemore » of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk.Agricultural antibiotic use results in clusters of cooccurring resistance genes that together confer resistance to multiple antibiotics. The use of a single antibiotic could select for an entire suite of resistance

  20. Close linkage of a blast resistance gene, Pias(t), with a bacterial leaf blight resistance gene, Xa1-as(t), in a rice cultivar 'Asominori'.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Kaji, Ryota; Nakagomi, Koji; Kataoka, Tomomori; Yokogami, Narifumi; Nakamura, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Goro; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    It has long been known that a bacterial leaf blight-resistant line in rice obtained from a crossing using 'Asominori' as a resistant parent also has resistance to blast, but a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori' has not been investigated in detail. In the present study, a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori', tentatively named Pias(t), was revealed to be located within 162-kb region between DNA markers YX4-3 and NX4-1 on chromosome 4 and to be linked with an 'Asominori' allele of the bacterial leaf blight resistance gene Xa1, tentatively named Xa1-as(t). An 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) was found to be dominant and difference of disease severity between lines having the 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) and those without it was 1.2 in disease index from 0 to 10. Pias(t) was also closely linked with the Ph gene controlling phenol reaction, suggesting the possibility of successful selection of blast resistance using the phenol reaction. Since blast-resistant commercial cultivars have been developed using 'Asominori' as a parent, Pias(t) is considered to be a useful gene in rice breeding for blast resistance. PMID:23341747

  1. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Björn; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Lindberg, Richard; Fick, Jerker; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8 × 10(4) copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances. PMID:25247418

  2. Usefulness of gene pg10 as a source of stem rust resistance in oat breeding.

    PubMed

    Harder, D E

    1999-12-01

    ABSTRACT Infection types produced by Puccinia graminis f. sp. avenae on plants of Avena sativa with the stem rust resistance gene Pg10 are characterized by moderate-sized uredinia surrounded by an area of chlorosis and a larger variable zone of dark brown necrosis. This study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of gene Pg10 as a source of resistance to stem rust and to determine the interactions of this gene with other common Pg genes. A derived Pg10 line was tested with 58 distinct pathotypes of P. graminis f. sp. avenae and was crossed to substituted single-gene lines carrying the resistance gene Pg1, Pg2, Pg3, Pg4, Pg8, Pg9, Pg13, Pg15, Pg16, or Pga. The Pg10 line showed moderate resistance to all 58 patho-types, and there was no indication of specificity in virulence by any isolate. Gene Pg10 was inherited independently of the other Pg genes and had a complementary effect on the expression of resistance by these genes. An effective level of resistance conferred by Pg10 was demonstrated in a field nursery artificially inoculated with P. graminis f. sp. avenae. It was concluded that Pg10 is a potentially useful source of stem rust resistance in oat breeding, with its main attributes being an apparent broad base of resistance, ease of combining with other Pg genes, and complementary effects on the expression of other Pg genes.

  3. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  4. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  5. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  6. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23662150

  7. Prevention of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity: From the Laboratory to the Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talaska, Andra E.; Schacht, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The search for protection from aminoglycoside ototoxicity is nearly as old as their use as antibiotics. However, only in recent years has focused research on the mechanisms underlying the insults to the inner ear led to coherent attempts at protection, such as antioxidant therapy or interference with cell death signaling pathways. Successful…

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant isolates identifies genes associated with colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Lee, J-Y; Ko, K S

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is concerning, as colistin is often regarded as the last option for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii infections. Using mRNA sequencing, we compared whole transcriptomes of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains, with the aim of identifying genes involved in colistin resistance. A clinical colistin-susceptible strain (06AC-179) and a colistin-resistant strain (07AC-052) were analysed in this study. In addition, a colistin-resistant mutant (06AC-179-R1) derived from 06AC-179 was also included in this study. High throughput mRNA sequencing was performed with an Illumina HiSeq TM 2000. In total, six genes were identified as associated with colistin resistance in A. baumannii. These six genes encode PmrAB two-component regulatory enzymes, PmrC (a lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase), a glycosyltransferase, a poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase, and a putative membrane protein. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry revealed that all three colistin-resistant strains used in this study had modified lipid A structure by addition of phosphoethanolamine. As genes found in our results are all associated with either lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or electrostatic changes in the bacterial cell membrane, lipopolysaccharide modification might be one of the principal modes of acquisition of colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains.

  9. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, P. K.; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N. K.; Singh, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1–24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  10. Pharmacokinetic Changes and Dosing Modification of Aminoglycosides in Critically Ill Obese Patients: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Marangos, Markos; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to review the literature and provide recommendations for use of aminoglycoside antibiotics in critically ill obese patients. Literature search in PubMed for all articles on the use of aminoglycosides in critically ill obese patients was conducted, and all articles related to pharmacokinetics in obesity were reviewed. Bibliographies of all searched manuscripts were also reviewed in an attempt to find additional references. Although aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics have been described in detail, data on aminoglycoside use and appropriate dose modification in critically ill obese patients are very limited. Knowledge on aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics and use in critically ill obese patients is incomplete. Pathophysiologic changes in obesity can result in sub- or supra-therapeutic aminoglycoside plasma concentrations, especially in the presence of sepsis. Rigorous clinical studies are needed to establish aminoglycoside dosing guidelines in critically ill obese patients with sepsis. PMID:24883145

  11. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  12. SYNTHESIS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF NEW 5H-INDOLO[2,3-B]QUINOLINE O-AMINOGLYCOSIDES.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Małgorzata; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Novel 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline O-aminoglycosides were synthesized in order to check the hypothesis that the construction of hybrids composed of the active 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline chromophore and daunosaminyl or acosaminyl moiety may result in the cytotoxic activity of the obtained derivatives that is much higher than the one of the parent DIMIQ (5,11-dimethyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) and 6H-indoloquinoline analogs. Actually, 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides showed the anti-proliferative activity in vitro against human lung adenocarcinoma A549, breast cancer MCF-7, melanoma Hs294T, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, uterine sarcoma MES-SA and colon cancer LoVo cell lines, which was 10 times higher than that of the 6H-analogs and comparable to the one of the referential DIMIQ. Unexpectedly, it appeared that except for HL-60/MX2 (P-gp-independent and topoisomerase II-dependent resistance), other MDR tumor cell lines (LoVo/DX. P-gp-dependent, MRP-, LRP-dependent multidrug resistance) and MES-SA/DX5 (P-gp-dependent resistance to doxorubicin) are also resistant to the 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides tested. This is surprising because 6H-analogs, in general, 10 times less active against non-MDR tumor cell lines, as well as the DIMIQ itself, are able to overcome drug resistance in all MDR cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds against tumor cell lines and against normal cells (mice fibroblasts BALB/3T3) was comparable. PMID:27476287

  13. Functional variability of the Lr34 durable resistance gene in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Risk, Joanna M; Selter, Liselotte L; Krattinger, Simon G; Viccars, Libby A; Richardson, Terese M; Buesing, Gabriele; Herren, Gerhard; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2012-05-01

    Breeding for durable disease resistance is challenging, yet essential to improve crops for sustainable agriculture. The wheat Lr34 gene is one of the few cloned, durable resistance genes in plants. It encodes an ATP binding cassette transporter and has been a source of resistance against biotrophic pathogens, such as leaf rust (Puccinina triticina), for over 100 years. As endogenous Lr34 confers quantitative resistance, we wanted to determine the effects of transgenic Lr34 with specific reference to how expression levels affect resistance. Transgenic Lr34 wheat lines were made in two different, susceptible genetic backgrounds. We found that the introduction of the Lr34 resistance allele was sufficient to provide comparable levels of leaf rust resistance as the endogenous Lr34 gene. As with the endogenous gene, we observed resistance in seedlings after cold treatment and in flag leaves of adult plants, as well as Lr34-associated leaf tip necrosis. The transgene-based Lr34 resistance did not involve a hypersensitive response, altered callose deposition or up-regulation of PR genes. Higher expression levels compared to endogenous Lr34 were observed in the transgenic lines both at seedling as well as adult stage and some improvement of resistance was seen in the flag leaf. Interestingly, in one genetic background the transgenic Lr34-based resistance resulted in improved seedling resistance without cold treatment. These data indicate that functional variability in Lr34-based resistance can be created using a transgenic approach.

  14. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jadali, Azadeh; Kwan, Kelvin Y

    2016-01-01

    Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss.

  15. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. PMID:27142333

  16. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  17. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Cristian; Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Bortolomasi, Marco; Segala, Matilde; Sartori, Riccardo; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2010-08-16

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is a serious mental illness that is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. In addition, approximately 15% of depression patients are defined treatment-resistant (TRD). Preclinical and genetic studies show that serotonin modulation dysfunction exists in patients with TRD. Some polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis/treatment of MDD; however, no data are available concerning TRD. Therefore, in order to investigate the possible influence of SLC6A4 polymorphisms on the risk of TRD, we genotyped 310 DSM-IV MDD treatment-resistant patients and 284 healthy volunteers. We analysed the most studied polymorphism 5-HTTLPR (L/S) and a single nucleotide substitution, rs25531 (A/G), in relation to different functional haplotype combinations. However the correct mapping of rs25531 is still debated whether it is within or outside the insertion. Our sequencing analysis showed that rs25531 is immediately outside of the 5-HTTLPR segment. Differences in 5-HTTLPR allele (p=0.04) and in L allele carriers (p<0.05) were observed between the two groups. Concerning the estimated haplotype analyses, L(A)L(A) homozygote haplotype was more represented among the control subjects (p=0.01, OR=0.64 95%CI: 0.45-0.91). In conclusion, this study reports a protective effect of the L(A)L(A) haplotype on TRD, supporting the hypothesis that lower serotonin transporter transcription alleles are correlated to a common resistant depression mechanism.

  18. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to Aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baozhu; Fedorova, Natalie D; Chen, Xiaoping; Wan, Chun-Hua; Wang, Wei; Nierman, William C; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang

    2011-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are resistant to fungal infection and/or aflatoxin production. To identify peanut Aspergillus-interactive and peanut Aspergillus-resistance genes, we carried out a large scale peanut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) project which we used to construct a peanut glass slide oligonucleotide microarray. The fabricated microarray represents over 40% of the protein coding genes in the peanut genome. For expression profiling, resistant and susceptible peanut cultivars were infected with a mixture of Aspergillusflavus and parasiticus spores. The subsequent microarray analysis identified 62 genes in resistant cultivars that were up-expressed in response to Aspergillus infection. In addition, we identified 22 putative Aspergillus-resistance genes that were constitutively up-expressed in the resistant cultivar in comparison to the susceptible cultivar. Some of these genes were homologous to peanut, corn, and soybean genes that were previously shown to confer resistance to fungal infection. This study is a first step towards a comprehensive genome-scale platform for developing Aspergillus-resistant peanut cultivars through targeted marker-assisted breeding and genetic engineering. PMID:22069737

  19. Identification of candidate genes for Fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage by differential expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ying, Hua; Pu, Zi-jing; Ebe, Yusuke; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Saeki, Natsumi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans is an important disease of Brassica worldwide. To identify a resistance (R) gene against Fusarium yellows in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), we analyzed differential expression at the whole genome level between resistant and susceptible inbred lines using RNA sequencing. Four hundred and eighteen genes were significantly differentially expressed, and these were enriched for genes involved in response to stress or stimulus. Seven dominant DNA markers at putative R-genes were identified. Presence and absence of the sequence of the putative R-genes, Bra012688 and Bra012689, correlated with the resistance of six inbred lines and susceptibility of four inbred lines, respectively. In F(2) populations derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible inbred lines, presence of Bra012688 and Bra012689 cosegregated with resistance, suggesting that Bra012688 and Bra012689 are good candidates for fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage.

  20. Ultraviolet disinfection of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes in water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Chad W; Pruden, Amy

    2012-12-18

    Disinfection of wastewater treatment plant effluent may be an important barrier for limiting the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARBs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). While ideally disinfection should destroy ARGs, to prevent horizontal gene transfer to downstream bacteria, little is known about the effect of conventional water disinfection technologies on ARGs. This study examined the potential of UV disinfection to damage four ARGs, mec(A), van(A), tet(A), and amp(C), both in extracellular form and present within a host ARBs: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), Escherichia coli SMS-3-5, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01, respectively. An extended amplicon-length quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to enhance capture of ARG damage events and also to normalize to an equivalent length of target DNA (∼1000 bp) for comparison. It was found that the two Gram-positive ARBs (MRSA and VRE) were more resistant to UV disinfection than the two Gram-negative ARBs (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). The two Gram-positive organisms also possessed smaller total genome sizes, which could also have reduced their susceptibility to UV because of fewer potential pyrimidine dimer targets. An effect of cell type on damage to ARGs was only observed in VRE and P. aeruginosa, the latter potentially because of extracellular polymeric substances. In general, damage of ARGs required much greater UV doses (200-400 mJ/cm² for 3- to 4-log reduction) than ARB inactivation (10-20 mJ/cm² for 4- to 5-log reduction). The proportion of amplifiable ARGs following UV treatment exhibited a strong negative correlation with the number of adjacent thymines (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001). ARBs surviving UV treatment were negatively correlated with total genome size (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001) and adjacent cytosines (Pearson r < -0.88; p < 0.0001) but positively correlated with adjacent thymines (Pearson r

  1. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  2. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Baker, Barbara; Mcgrath, Des J; Jones, David A

    2016-04-01

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 has been identified previously on chromosome 7 and encodes an S-receptor-like kinase, but little is known about I-7. Molecular markers have been developed for the marker-assisted breeding of I-3, but none are available for I-7. We used an RNA-seq and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis approach to map I-7 to a small introgression of S. pennellii DNA (c. 210 kb) on chromosome 8, and identified I-7 as a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP), thereby expanding the repertoire of resistance protein classes conferring resistance to Fol. Using an eds1 mutant of tomato, we showed that I-7, like many other LRR-RLPs conferring pathogen resistance in tomato, is EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1) dependent. Using transgenic tomato plants carrying only the I-7 gene for Fol resistance, we found that I-7 also confers resistance to Fol races 1 and 2. Given that Fol race 1 carries Avr1, resistance to Fol race 1 indicates that I-7-mediated resistance, unlike I-2- or I-3-mediated resistance, is not suppressed by Avr1. This suggests that Avr1 is not a general suppressor of Fol resistance in tomato, leading us to hypothesize that Avr1 may be acting against an EDS1-independent pathway for resistance activation. The identification of I-7 has allowed us to develop molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding of both genes currently known to confer Fol race 3 resistance (I-3 and I-7). Given that I-7-mediated resistance is not suppressed by Avr1, I-7 may be a useful addition to I-3 in the tomato breeder's toolbox.

  3. Functional metagenomic analysis reveals rivers are a reservoir for diverse antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Amos, G C A; Zhang, L; Hawkey, P M; Gaze, W H; Wellington, E M

    2014-07-16

    The environment harbours a significant diversity of uncultured bacteria and a potential source of novel and extant resistance genes which may recombine with clinically important bacteria disseminated into environmental reservoirs. There is evidence that pollution can select for resistance due to the aggregation of adaptive genes on mobile elements. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent disposal to a river by using culture independent methods to study diversity of resistance genes downstream of the WWTP in comparison to upstream. Metagenomic libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli and screened for phenotypic resistance to amikacin, gentamicin, neomycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Resistance genes were identified by using transposon mutagenesis. A significant increase downstream of the WWTP was observed in the number of phenotypic resistant clones recovered in metagenomic libraries. Common β-lactamases such as blaTEM were recovered as well as a diverse range of acetyltransferases and unusual transporter genes, with evidence for newly emerging resistance mechanisms. The similarities of the predicted proteins to known sequences suggested origins of genes from a very diverse range of bacteria. The study suggests that waste water disposal increases the reservoir of resistance mechanisms in the environment either by addition of resistance genes or by input of agents selective for resistant phenotypes.

  4. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  5. Ribosome hibernation facilitates tolerance of stationary-phase bacteria to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    McKay, Susannah L; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    Upon entry into stationary phase, bacteria dimerize 70S ribosomes into translationally inactive 100S particles by a process called ribosome hibernation. Previously, we reported that the hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) of Listeria monocytogenes is required for 100S particle formation and facilitates adaptation to a number of stresses. Here, we demonstrate that HPF is required for the high tolerance of stationary-phase cultures to aminoglycosides but not to beta-lactam or quinolone antibiotics. The sensitivity of a Δhpf mutant to gentamicin was suppressed by the bacteriostatic antibiotics chloramphenicol and rifampin, which inhibit translation and transcription, respectively. Disruption of the proton motive force by the ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone or mutation of genes involved in respiration also suppressed the sensitivity of the Δhpf mutant. Accordingly, Δhpf mutants had aberrantly high levels of ATP and reducing equivalents during prolonged stationary phase. Analysis of bacterial uptake of fluorescently labeled gentamicin demonstrated that the Δhpf mutant harbored increased intracellular levels of the drug. Finally, deletion of the main ribosome hibernation factor of Escherichia coli, ribosome modulation factor (rmf), rendered these bacteria susceptible to gentamicin. Taken together, these data suggest that HPF-mediated ribosome hibernation results in repression of the metabolic activity that underlies aminoglycoside tolerance. HPF is conserved in nearly every bacterial pathogen, and the role of ribosome hibernation in antibiotic tolerance may have clinical implications.

  6. Mathematical modelling of antimicrobial resistance in agricultural waste highlights importance of gene transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michelle; Hobman, Jon L; Dodd, Christine E R; Ramsden, Stephen J; Stekel, Dov J

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is of global concern. Most antimicrobial use is in agriculture; manures and slurry are especially important because they contain a mix of bacteria, including potential pathogens, antimicrobial resistance genes and antimicrobials. In many countries, manures and slurry are stored, especially over winter, before spreading onto fields as organic fertilizer. Thus, these are a potential location for gene exchange and selection for resistance. We develop and analyse a mathematical model to quantify the spread of antimicrobial resistance in stored agricultural waste. We use parameters from a slurry tank on a UK dairy farm as an exemplar. We show that the spread of resistance depends in a subtle way on the rates of gene transfer and antibiotic inflow. If the gene transfer rate is high, then its reduction controls resistance, while cutting antibiotic inflow has little impact. If the gene transfer rate is low, then reducing antibiotic inflow controls resistance. Reducing length of storage can also control spread of resistance. Bacterial growth rate, fitness costs of carrying antimicrobial resistance and proportion of resistant bacteria in animal faeces have little impact on spread of resistance. Therefore, effective treatment strategies depend critically on knowledge of gene transfer rates. PMID:26906100

  7. Spread of Enterobacter cloacae carrying blaNDM-1, blaCTX-M-15, blaSHV-12 and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in a surgical intensive care unit in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, N; Vranić-Ladavac, M; Feudi, C; Villa, L; Fortini, D; Barišić, N; Bedenić, B; Ladavac, R; D'Arezzo, S; Andrašević, A Tambić; Capone, A

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a hospital cluster of NDM-1-producing Enterobacter cloacae infections observed in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary-care hospital at Pula, Croatia. NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains isolated from clinical samples were screened by PCR for the presence of carbapenemases. Genetic relatedness of NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains was determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). During the period October 2013 to April 2014, four patients, with overlapping hospital stay in the surgical ICU, developed severe infections caused by E. cloacae demonstrated to produce carbapenemases. According to MLST, all strains belonged to ST133 and were positive by PCR for the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene, for blaCTX-M-15 and blaSHV-12 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes, and for blaTEM-1 and blaOXA-1 narrow-spectrum β-lactamase genes. They were negative for other carbapenemases genes including blaOXA-48, blaVIM and blaKPC as well as for AmpC and the armA and rmtB aminoglycoside resistance genes. All strains were positive for the HI2 replicon, suggesting that an IncHI2 plasmid is likely the plasmid carrying the blaNDM-1 gene. Infection control measures were implemented after the first case although they were not effective in avoiding spread of this organism to other patients in the surgical ICU. In conclusion, the evolving epidemiology of NDM-producing micro-organisms and the interspecies diffusion of this resistance mechanism to emerging pathogens such as E. cloacae necessitate the setting up of strong and urgent joint measures to control the spread of NDM carbapenemase especially in the ICU setting. PMID:27436392

  8. No fitness cost of glyphosate resistance endowed by massive EPSPS gene amplification in Amaranthus palmeri.

    PubMed

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Goh, Sou S; Gaines, Todd A; Han, Heping; Busi, Roberto; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-04-01

    Amplification of the EPSPS gene has been previously identified as the glyphosate resistance mechanism in many populations of Amaranthus palmeri, a major weed pest in US agriculture. Here, we evaluate the effects of EPSPS gene amplification on both the level of glyphosate resistance and fitness cost of resistance. A. palmeri individuals resistant to glyphosate by expressing a wide range of EPSPS gene copy numbers were evaluated under competitive conditions in the presence or absence of glyphosate. Survival rates to glyphosate and fitness traits of plants under intra-specific competition were assessed. Plants with higher amplification of the EPSPS gene (53-fold) showed high levels of glyphosate resistance, whereas less amplification of the EPSPS gene (21-fold) endowed a lower level of glyphosate resistance. Without glyphosate but under competitive conditions, plants exhibiting up to 76-fold EPSPS gene amplification exhibited similar height, and biomass allocation to vegetative and reproductive organs, compared to glyphosate susceptible A. palmeri plants with no amplification of the EPSPS gene. Both the additive effects of EPSPS gene amplification on the level of glyphosate resistance and the lack of associated fitness costs are key factors contributing to EPSPS gene amplification as a widespread and important glyphosate resistance mechanism likely to become much more evident in weed plant species.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Two Novel blaKLUC Resistance Genes through Large-Scale Resistance Plasmids Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoding; Song, Yulong; Ma, Ping; Bao, Bokan; Jiang, Weiyan; Wu, Xinmei; Tou, Huifen; Li, Peizhen; Ren, Ping; Fei, Jingxian; Yang, Lei; Liu, Qi; Xu, Zuyuan; Zhou, Tieli; Ni, Liyan; Bao, Qiyu

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids are important antibiotic resistance determinant carriers that can disseminate various drug resistance genes among species or genera. By using a high throughput sequencing approach, two groups of plasmids of Escherichia coli (named E1 and E2, each consisting of 160 clinical E. coli strains isolated from different periods of time) were sequenced and analyzed. A total of 20 million reads were obtained and mapped onto the known resistance gene sequences. As a result, a total of 9 classes, including 36 types of antibiotic resistant genes, were identified. Among these genes, 25 and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) appeared, of which 9 and 12 SNPs are nonsynonymous substitutions in the E1 and E2 samples. It is interesting to find that a novel genotype of blaKLUC, whose close relatives, blaKLUC-1 and blaKLUC-2, have been previously reported as carried on the Kluyvera cryocrescens chromosome and Enterobacter cloacae plasmid, was identified. It shares 99% and 98% amino acid identities with Kluc-1 and Kluc-2, respectively. Further PCR screening of 608 Enterobacteriaceae family isolates yielded a second variant (named blaKLUC-4). It was interesting to find that Kluc-3 showed resistance to several cephalosporins including cefotaxime, whereas blaKLUC-4 did not show any resistance to the antibiotics tested. This may be due to a positively charged residue, Arg, replaced by a neutral residue, Leu, at position 167, which is located within an omega-loop. This work represents large-scale studies on resistance gene distribution, diversification and genetic variation in pooled multi-drug resistance plasmids, and provides insight into the use of high throughput sequencing technology for microbial resistance gene detection. PMID:23056610

  10. Multi-drug resistance in Salmonella enterica: efflux mechanisms and their relationships with the development of chromosomal resistance gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Teresa; O'Mahony, Rebecca; Baird, Alan W; Drudy, Denise; Whyte, Paul; Fanning, Séamus

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial drug resistance represents one of the most crucial problems in present day antibacterial chemotherapy. Of particular concern to public health is the continuing worldwide epidemic spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 harbouring a genomic island called Salmonella genomic island I (SGI-1). This island contains an antibiotic gene cluster conferring resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. These resistance genes are assembled in a mosaic pattern, indicative of several independent recombinational events. The mobility of SGI-1 coupled with the ability of various antibiotic resistance genes to be integrated and lost from the chromosomal resistance locus allows for the transfer of stable antibiotic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and adaptation to new antibiotic challenges. This, coupled with the incidence of increasing fluoroquinolone resistance in these strains increases the risk of therapeutic failure in cases of life-threatening salmonellosis. Fluoroquinolone resistance has largely been attributed to mutations occurring in the genes coding for intracellular targets of these drugs. However, efflux by the AcrAB-TolC multi-drug efflux pump has recently been shown to directly contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance. Furthermore, the resistance to chloramphenicol-florfenicol and tetracyclines in DT104 isolates, is due to interaction between specific transporters for these antibiotics encoded by genes mapping to the SGI-1 and the AcrAB-TolC tripartite efflux pump. The potential for the use of efflux pump inhibitors to restore therapeutic efficacy to fluoroquinolones and other antibiotics offers an exciting developmental area for drug discovery. PMID:16842216

  11. The Biopesticide Paenibacillus popilliae Has a Vancomycin Resistance Gene Cluster Homologous to the Enterococcal VanA Vancomycin Resistance Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Robin; Piper, Kerryl; Cockerill, Franklin R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Yousten, Allan A.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously identified, in Paenibacillus popilliae, a 708-bp sequence which has homology to the sequence of the enterococcal vanA gene. We have performed further studies revealing five genes encoding homologues of VanY, VanZ, VanH, VanA, and VanX in P. popilliae. The predicted amino acid sequences are similar to those in VanA vancomycin-resistant enterococci: 61% identity for VanY, 21% for VanZ, 74% for VanH, 77% for VanA, and 79% for VanX. The genes in P. popilliae may have been a precursor to or have had ancestral genes in common with vancomycin resistance genes in enterococci. The use of P. popilliae biopesticidal preparations in agricultural practice may have an impact on bacterial resistance in human pathogens. PMID:10681342

  12. Diversity of tet resistance genes in tetracycline-resistant bacteria isolated from a swine lagoon with low antibiotic impact.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John J; Adams, Craig D; Mormile, Melanie R

    2007-12-01

    Tetracycline resistance has been extensively studied and shown to be widespread. A number of previous studies have clearly demonstrated that a variety of tetracycline resistance genes are present in swine fecal material, treatment lagoons, and the environments surrounding concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The diversity of tetracycline resistance within a swine lagoon located at a CAFO that used only bacitricin methylene disalicylate as an antibiotic was evaluated by screening 85 tetracycline-resistant isolates for the presence of 18 different genes by performing PCR with primers that target tetracycline efflux genes of Gram-negative bacteria and ribosomal protection proteins. In addition, partial 16S rRNA sequences from each of these isolates were sequenced to determine the identity of these isolates. Of the 85 isolates examined, 17 may represent potential novel species based on BLAST results. Greater than 50% of the isolates (48 out of 85) were found to not contain targeted tet efflux genes. Though minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged widely (16 - >256 mg/L), these values did not give an indication of the tet genes present. Ten new genera were identified that contain at least one tet efflux gene. Five other genera possessed tet efflux genes that were not found in these organisms previously. Interestingly, none of the isolates possessed any of the selected ribosomal protection protein genes. Though tetracycline resistance was found in bacteria isolated from a swine CAFO lagoon, it appears that the limited antibiotic use at this CAFO might have impacted the presence and diversity of tetracycline resistance genes. PMID:18059563

  13. Benzothiadiazole, a novel class of inducers of systemic acquired resistance, activates gene expression and disease resistance in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, J; Volrath, S; Knauf-Beiter, G; Hengy, G; Beckhove, U; Kogel, K H; Oostendorp, M; Staub, T; Ward, E; Kessmann, H; Ryals, J

    1996-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is an important component of the disease resistance repertoire of plants. In this study, a novel synthetic chemical, benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), was shown to induce acquired resistance in wheat. BTH protected wheat systemically against powdery mildew infection by affecting multiple steps in the life cycle of the pathogen. The onset of resistance was accompanied by the induction of a number of newly described wheat chemically induced (WCI) genes, including genes encoding a lipoxygenase and a sulfur-rich protein. With respect to both timing and effectiveness, a tight correlation existed between the onset of resistance and the induction of the WCI genes. Compared with other plant activators, such as 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid and salicylic acid, BTH was the most potent inducer of both resistance and gene induction. BTH is being developed commercially as a novel type of plant protection compound that works by inducing the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:8624439

  14. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  15. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kristine T; Caprio, Michael A; Allen, K Clint; Musser, Fred R

    2013-02-01

    Recent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decisions regarding resistance management in Bt-cropping systems have prompted concern in some experts that dual-gene Bt-corn (CrylA.105 and Cry2Ab2 toxins) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than single-gene Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-corn (CrylAb toxin). The concern is that Bt-toxin longevity could be significantly reduced with recent adoption of a natural refuge for dual-gene Bt-cotton (CrylAc and Cry2Ab2 toxins) and concurrent reduction in dual-gene corn refuge from 50 to 20%. A population genetics framework that simulates complex landscapes was applied to risk assessment. Expert opinions on effectiveness of several transgenic corn and cotton varieties were captured and used to assign probabilities to different scenarios in the assessment. At least 350 replicate simulations with randomly drawn parameters were completed for each of four risk assessments. Resistance evolved within 30 yr in 22.5% of simulations with single-gene corn and cotton with no volunteer corn. When volunteer corn was added to this assessment, risk of resistance evolving within 30 yr declined to 13.8%. When dual-gene Bt-cotton planted with a natural refuge and single-gene corn planted with a 50% structured refuge was simulated, simultaneous resistance to both toxins never occurred within 30 yr, but in 38.5% of simulations, resistance evolved to toxin present in single-gene Bt-corn (CrylAb). When both corn and cotton were simulated as dual-gene products, cotton with a natural refuge and corn with a 20% refuge, 3% of simulations evolved resistance to both toxins simultaneously within 30 yr, while 10.4% of simulations evolved resistance to CrylAb/c toxin.

  16. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  17. Molecular characterization of the CRa gene conferring clubroot resistance in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Etsuo; Aruga, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Matsumura, Hideo; Hayashida, Nobuaki

    2012-12-01

    Clubroot disease is one of the major diseases affecting Brassicaceae crops, and a number of these crops grown commercially, such as Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis), are known to be highly susceptible to clubroot disease. To provide protection from this disease, plant breeders have introduced genes for resistance to clubroot from the European turnip into susceptible lines. The CRa gene confers specific resistance to the clubroot pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae isolate M85. Fine mapping of the CRa locus using synteny to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome and partial genome sequences of B. rapa revealed a candidate gene encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein. Several structural differences in this candidate gene were found between susceptible and resistant lines, and CRa expression was observed only in the resistant line. Four mutant lines lacking clubroot resistance were obtained by the UV irradiation of pollen from a resistant line, and all of these mutant lines carried independent mutations in the candidate TIR-NBS-LRR gene. This genetic and molecular evidence strongly suggests that the identified gene is CRa. This is the first report on the molecular characterization of a clubroot Resistance gene in Brassicaceae and of the disease resistance gene in B. rapa.

  18. Identification and mapping of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene analogs in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) disease resistance gene homologs (BRGH) were cloned and sequenced from diploid, triploid, and hexaploid bermudagrass using degenerate primers to target the nucleotide binding site (NBS) of the NBS- leucine rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Alignment of ...

  19. Isolation of an Yr5 candidate gene for resistance to wheat stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Yr5 gene from the Triticum spelta album wheat confers resistance to all races of the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) identified so far in the US. To cloneYr5, a sequence tagged site (STS) marker developed from resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) markers co...

  20. Identification of disease resistance genes for enhancement of existing potato cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant’s ability to defend itself against host-specific microbes is specified by disease resistance (R) genes. Upon recognition of an invading pathogen, R proteins are responsible for the activation of a multitude of responses ultimately leading to resistance. The majority of R genes are dominant a...

  1. High-Throughput Screening of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistant Genes in CML.

    PubMed

    Ma, Leyuan; Roderick, Justine; Kelliher, Michelle A; Green, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in mammalian cells has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying new genes and molecular pathways relevant to many cellular processes and diseases. For example, screening for genes that, when inactivated, lead to resistance to cancer therapeutic drugs can reveal new mechanisms for how resistance develops and identify potential targetable strategies to overcome drug resistance. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for performing a high-throughput RNAi screen using a genome-wide human short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library for identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistance genes in a human CML cell line model. PMID:27581147

  2. Identification and mapping of resistance gene analogs and a white rust resistance locus in Brassica rapa ssp. oleifera.

    PubMed

    Tanhuanpää, P

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this investigation was to tag a locus for white rust resistance in a Brassica rapa ssp. oleifera F(2) population segregating for this trait, using bulked segregant analysis with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, linkage mapping and a candidate gene approach based on resistance gene analogs (RGAs). The resistance source was the Finnish line Bor4109. The reaction against white rust races 7a and 7v was scored in 20 seedlings from each self-pollinated F(2 )individual. The proportion of resistant plants among these F(3) families varied from 0 to 67%. Bulked segregant analysis did not reveal any markers linked with resistance and, therefore, a linkage map with 81 markers was created. A locus that accounted for 18.4% of the variation in resistance to white rust was mapped to linkage group (LG) 2 near the RAPD marker Z19a. During the study, a bacterial resistance gene homologous to Arabidopsis RPS2 and six different RGAs were sequenced. RPS2 and five of the RGAs were mapped to linkage groups LG1, LG4 and LG9. Unfortunately, none of the RGAs could be shown to be associated with white rust resistance.

  3. Tetracycline resistance and Class 1 integron genes associated with indoor and outdoor aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ling, Alison L; Pace, Norman R; Hernandez, Mark T; LaPara, Timothy M

    2013-05-01

    Genes encoding tetracycline resistance and the integrase of Class 1 integrons were enumerated using quantitative PCR from aerosols collected from indoor and outdoor environments. Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and human-occupied indoor environments (two clinics and a homeless shelter) were found to be a source of airborne tet(X) and tet(W) genes. The CAFOs had 10- to 100-times higher concentrations of airborne 16S rRNA, tet(X), and tet(W) genes than other environments sampled, and increased concentrations of aerosolized bacteria correlated with increased concentrations of airborne resistance genes. The two CAFOs studied had statistically similar c