Science.gov

Sample records for ammonia nitrite nitrate

  1. Toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to fishes. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.C.; Thurston, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, with ammonia occurring in surface waters more commonly than nitrite. Nitrate is a related compound but is not significantly toxic to fishes. The acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms is affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, concentration fluctuations, degree of salinity, presence of other chemicals, and prior acclimation. The acute toxicity of nitrite is known to be affected by water pH and the presence of chloride and calcium. More research is needed on the effects of these and other variables on the acute toxicity of both ammonia and nitrite, as well as the chronic effects of both of these toxins.

  2. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  3. Utilization of urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate by crop plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Rains, D. W.; Qualset, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization of nitrogen compounds by crop plants is studied. The selection of crop varieties for efficient production using urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, and the assimilation of mixed nitrogen sources by cereal leaves and roots are discussed.

  4. Ammonia Formation by the Reduction of Nitrite/Nitrate by FeS: Ammonia Formation Under Acidic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    FeS reduces nitrite to, ammonia at pHs lower than the corresponding reduction by aqueous Fe+2. The reduction follows a reasonable first order decay, in nitrite concentration, with a half life of about 150 min (room temperature, CO2, pH 6.25). The highest ammonia product yield measured was 53%. Under CO2, the product yield decreases from pH 5.0 to pH 6.9. The increasing concentration of bicarbonate at higher pH interferes with the reaction. Bicarbonate interference is shown by comparing runs under N2 and CO2. The reaction proceeds well in the presence of such species as chloride, sulfate, and phosphate though the yield drops significantly with phosphate. FeS also reduces nitrate and, unlike with Fe+2, the reduction shows more reproducibility. Again, the product yield decreases with increasing pH, from 7% at pH 4.7 to 0% at pH 6.9. It appears as if nitrate is much more sensitive to the presence of added species, perhaps not competing as well for binding sites on the FeS surface. This may be the cause of the lack of reproducibility of nitrate reduction by Fe+2 (which also can be sensitive to binding by certain species).

  5. [Spatial Variation of Ammonia-N, Nitrate-N and Nitrite-N in Groundwater of Dongshan Island].

    PubMed

    Wiu, Hai-yan; Fu, Shi-feng; Cai, Xiao-qiong; Tang, Kun-xian; Cao, Chao; Chen, Qing-hui; Liang, Xiu-yu

    2015-09-01

    In Dongshan Island, groundwater is the main resource of the local residents' drinking water, domestic water, agriculture irrigation and freshwater aquaculture. This study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution characteristic and its variation pattern of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, as well as its pollution source and influence factors. It is very important to understand the pollution level of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island, the control and prevention of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N pollution, which is of great significance to the residents' health. In this study, the spatial variability characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island was analysed by geo- statistic method, the values of the non-observation points were determined by Kriging method, and the pollution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island was also analyzed. Our results showed that the ammonia-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island were at low levels, but their spatial variability were high, and their autocorrelation were poor; however, the nitrate-N concentration was general high, its spatial variability was moderate, and the autocorrelation was much good. The distribution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island were similar that the high concentration areas were all located in the coastal land. The domestic pollutants and human and animal wastes from towns and villages were the main sources of nitrogen pollution, which would be the first step to control the nitrogen pollution of Dongshan Island. Land use pattern, soil type, groundwater depth, pH, dissolved oxygen, season, and the existence of Fe2+, were the impact factors that influence the distribution and transformation of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, which could be the considerable

  6. [Spatial Variation of Ammonia-N, Nitrate-N and Nitrite-N in Groundwater of Dongshan Island].

    PubMed

    Wiu, Hai-yan; Fu, Shi-feng; Cai, Xiao-qiong; Tang, Kun-xian; Cao, Chao; Chen, Qing-hui; Liang, Xiu-yu

    2015-09-01

    In Dongshan Island, groundwater is the main resource of the local residents' drinking water, domestic water, agriculture irrigation and freshwater aquaculture. This study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution characteristic and its variation pattern of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, as well as its pollution source and influence factors. It is very important to understand the pollution level of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island, the control and prevention of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N pollution, which is of great significance to the residents' health. In this study, the spatial variability characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island was analysed by geo- statistic method, the values of the non-observation points were determined by Kriging method, and the pollution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island was also analyzed. Our results showed that the ammonia-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island were at low levels, but their spatial variability were high, and their autocorrelation were poor; however, the nitrate-N concentration was general high, its spatial variability was moderate, and the autocorrelation was much good. The distribution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island were similar that the high concentration areas were all located in the coastal land. The domestic pollutants and human and animal wastes from towns and villages were the main sources of nitrogen pollution, which would be the first step to control the nitrogen pollution of Dongshan Island. Land use pattern, soil type, groundwater depth, pH, dissolved oxygen, season, and the existence of Fe2+, were the impact factors that influence the distribution and transformation of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, which could be the considerable

  7. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.).

    PubMed

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Brune, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using (15)N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N(2) at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8 nmol h(-1) (g fresh wt.)(-1). However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of (15)N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N(2) O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9 nmol h(-1) (g fresh wt.)(-1), providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils.

  8. [Characteristics and Transport Patterns of Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates and Inorganic Nitrogen Flux at Epikarst Springs and a Subterranean Stream in Nanshan, Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-zhu; He, Qiu-fang; Jiang, Yong-jun; Li, Yong

    2016-04-15

    In a karst groundwater system, it develops complex multiple flows because of its special geological structure and unique physical patterns of aquifers. In order to investigate the characteristics and transport patterns of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in epikarst water and subterranean stream, the water samples were collected monthly in a fast-urbanizing karst region. The results showed distinctive characteristics of three forms of inorganic nitrogen. The concentration of inorganic nitrogen was stable in the epikarst water while it was fluctuant in the subterranean stream. Epikarst water was less affected by rainfall and sewage compared with subterranean stream. In epikarst water, the nitrate concentration was much higher than the ammonia concentration. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, mainly from non-point source pollution related to agricultural activities, passed in and out of the epikarst water based on a series of physical; chemical and biological processes in the epikarst zone, such as ammonification, adsorption and nitrification. On the contrary, subterranean stream showed a result of NH₄⁺-N > NO₃⁻-N in dry seasons and NO₃⁻-N > NH₄⁺-N in rainy seasons. This can be due to the fact that sanitary and industrial sewage flowed into subterranean river through sinkholes, fissures and grikes in dry season. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen in subterranean river was mainly from the non-point source pollution in wet season. Non-point source pollutants entered into subterranean water by two transport ways, one by penetration along with vadose flow through fissures and grikes, and the other by conduit flow through sinkholes from the surface runoff, soil water flow and epikarst flow. The export flux of DIN was 56.05 kg · (hm² · a)⁻¹, and NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N accounted for 46.03% and 52.51%, respectively. The contributions of point-source pollution and non point-source pollution to the export flux of DIN were 25.08% and 74.92%, respectively, based on run

  9. [Characteristics and Transport Patterns of Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates and Inorganic Nitrogen Flux at Epikarst Springs and a Subterranean Stream in Nanshan, Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-zhu; He, Qiu-fang; Jiang, Yong-jun; Li, Yong

    2016-04-15

    In a karst groundwater system, it develops complex multiple flows because of its special geological structure and unique physical patterns of aquifers. In order to investigate the characteristics and transport patterns of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in epikarst water and subterranean stream, the water samples were collected monthly in a fast-urbanizing karst region. The results showed distinctive characteristics of three forms of inorganic nitrogen. The concentration of inorganic nitrogen was stable in the epikarst water while it was fluctuant in the subterranean stream. Epikarst water was less affected by rainfall and sewage compared with subterranean stream. In epikarst water, the nitrate concentration was much higher than the ammonia concentration. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, mainly from non-point source pollution related to agricultural activities, passed in and out of the epikarst water based on a series of physical; chemical and biological processes in the epikarst zone, such as ammonification, adsorption and nitrification. On the contrary, subterranean stream showed a result of NH₄⁺-N > NO₃⁻-N in dry seasons and NO₃⁻-N > NH₄⁺-N in rainy seasons. This can be due to the fact that sanitary and industrial sewage flowed into subterranean river through sinkholes, fissures and grikes in dry season. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen in subterranean river was mainly from the non-point source pollution in wet season. Non-point source pollutants entered into subterranean water by two transport ways, one by penetration along with vadose flow through fissures and grikes, and the other by conduit flow through sinkholes from the surface runoff, soil water flow and epikarst flow. The export flux of DIN was 56.05 kg · (hm² · a)⁻¹, and NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N accounted for 46.03% and 52.51%, respectively. The contributions of point-source pollution and non point-source pollution to the export flux of DIN were 25.08% and 74.92%, respectively, based on run

  10. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  11. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  12. The abiotic fixation of nitrogen on mars and other terrestrial planets: conversion of nitrogen, through NO, into nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and nitrous oxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, David; Basa, Ranor; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    The abiotic fixation of nitrogen is critical to understanding habitability, planetary evolution and the potential origin of life on terrestrial planets such as Mars. A non-biological source of biochemically accessible nitrogen is necessary for the origin and early evolution of life. The Martian surface has become uninhabitable, in part due to loss of atmospheric gases, such as nitrogen, resulting in an incapacity to sustain liquid surface water. Chemical sequestration in the crust is one possible mechanism for such loss. The products of nitrogen fixation also impact the climate and geochemistry of the planet. Shock heating of a non-reducing atmosphere will produce NO. This process has been well studied. We have been experimentally studying the pathways possible from NO to more stable forms in the atmosphere and crust. Our work has observed that there are multiple pathways for the fixation. One pathway observed is consistent with the theoretically predicted route via photochemical formation of HNO. Inter-estingly, this pathway is coupled to the formation of formaldehyde from CO. With liquid water, this pathway leads to nitrate and nitrite. In the presence of just water vapor, HNO appears to mostly dimerize to form N2 O. A second pathway involves the formation of NO2 from CO2 and NO. This pathway becomes more dominant without water, but the reaction of NO2 with any form of water, even just adsorbed water, can lead to nitric acid. Finally, with FeS suspended in liquid water, the direct reduction of NO to ammonia is observed. This last pathway represents the most efficient way to reduced nitrogen, with product yields in excess of 50 % in a single step. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface, converting NO to NO2 and N2 O, providing an abiotic source of nitrous oxide. This chemistry has implications for a number epochs in Martian history. For example, chemistry in the presence of water is relevant to

  13. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  14. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  15. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  16. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  17. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  18. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  19. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  20. A Novel Nitrate/Nitrite Permease in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Bryant, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The nrtP and narB genes, encoding nitrate/nitrite permease and nitrate reductase, respectively, were isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and characterized. NrtP is a member of the major facilitator superfamily and is unrelated to the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate transporters that previously have been described for freshwater strains of cyanobacteria. However, NrtP is similar to the NRT2-type nitrate transporters found in diverse organisms. An nrtP mutant strain consumes nitrate at a 4.5-fold-lower rate than the wild type, and this mutant grew exponentially on a medium containing 12 mM nitrate at a rate approximately 2-fold lower than that of the wild type. The nrtP mutant cells could not consume nitrite as rapidly as the wild type at pH 10, suggesting that NrtP also functions in nitrite uptake. A narB mutant was unable to grow on a medium containing nitrate as a nitrogen source, although this mutant could grow on media containing urea or nitrite with rates similar to those of the wild type. Exogenously added nitrite enhanced the in vivo activity of nitrite reductase in the narB mutant; this suggests that nitrite acts as a positive effector of nitrite reductase. Transcripts of the nrtP and narB genes were detected in cells grown on nitrate but were not detected in cells grown on urea or ammonia. Transcription of the nrtP and narB genes is probably controlled by the NtcA transcription factor for global nitrogen control. The discovery of a nitrate/nitrite permease in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 suggests that significant differences in nutrient transporters may occur in marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. PMID:10572142

  1. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  2. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  3. Influence of dietary nitrate on nitrite level of human saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Cingi, M.I.; Cingi, C.; Cingi, E. )

    1992-01-01

    The amount of nitrite in saliva depends directly on the amount of nitrate and nitrite ingested. Ingested nitrate and nitrite are absorbed by the upper gastrointestinal tract, concentrated from the plasma and excreted into the saliva by salivary glands. The presence of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the mouth caused nitrite to be formed, resulting in higher nitrite concentration. In recent years it has been shown that the measurement of some drugs and agents in mixed saliva might be a reliable guide to blood or body levels of those agents. In this present study the level of nitrite in mixed and parotid saliva in Eskisehir (Western part of middle Anatolia) and the correction between sex, smoking and age was determined. The effects of drinking water and meat products on nitrite levels were determined.

  4. A comparison of organic and inorganic nitrates/nitrites.

    PubMed

    Omar, Sami A; Artime, Esther; Webb, Andrew J

    2012-05-15

    Although both organic and inorganic nitrates/nitrites mediate their principal effects via nitric oxide, there are many important differences. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite have simple ionic structures and are produced endogenously and are present in the diet, whereas their organic counterparts are far more complex, and, with the exception of ethyl nitrite, are all medicinally synthesised products. These chemical differences underlie the differences in pharmacokinetic properties allowing for different modalities of administration, particularly of organic nitrates, due to the differences in their bioavailability and metabolic profiles. Whilst the enterosalivary circulation is a key pathway for orally ingested inorganic nitrate, preventing an abrupt effect or toxic levels of nitrite and prolonging the effects, this is not used by organic nitrates. The pharmacodynamic differences are even greater; while organic nitrates have potent acute effects causing vasodilation, inorganic nitrite's effects are more subtle and dependent on certain conditions. However, in chronic use, organic nitrates are considerably limited by the development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, whereas inorganic nitrate/nitrite may compensate for diminished endothelial function, and tolerance has not been reported. Also, while inorganic nitrate/nitrite has important cytoprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injury, continuous use of organic nitrates may increase injury. While there are concerns that inorganic nitrate/nitrite may induce carcinogenesis, direct evidence of this in humans is lacking. While organic nitrates may continue to dominate the therapeutic arena, this may well change with the increasing recognition of their limitations, and ongoing discovery of beneficial effects and specific advantages of inorganic nitrate/nitrite.

  5. Selection of denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms in IFAS systems: comparison of nitrite with nitrate as an electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Pouria; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2014-08-01

    Nitrite and nitrate were compared as electron acceptors to select for denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms (DPAO) in two integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS 1 and IFAS 2) systems operated as sequencing batch reactors. The bench-scale experiment lasted one year and synthetic wastewater was used as feed. During anoxic conditions 20mgNO3(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-1 and 20mgNO2(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-2. Long term phosphorous and ammonia removal via nitritation were achieved in both systems and both attached and suspended biomass contributed to phosphorous and ammonia removal. DPAO showed no specific adaptation to the electron acceptor as evidenced by short term switch of feeding with nitrate or nitrite. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate was significantly higher with nitrite than with nitrate. Results showed that DPAO activity with nitrite could be integrated into attached and suspended biomass of IFAS systems in long term operation.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Nitrate/Nitrite Exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjin; Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mineral nitrogen in nature is often found in the form of nitrate (NO3-). Numerous microorganisms evolved to assimilate nitrate and use it as a major source of mineral nitrogen uptake1. Nitrate, which is central in nitrogen metabolism, is first reduced to nitrite (NO2-) through a two-electron reduction reaction2,3. The accumulation of cellular nitrite can be harmful because nitrite can be reduced to the cytotoxic nitric oxide. Instead, nitrite is rapidly removed from the cell by channels and transporters, or reduced to ammonium or dinitrogen through the action of assimilatory enzymes3. Despite decades of effort no structure is currently available for any nitrate transport protein and the mechanism by which nitrate is transported remains largely obscure. Here we report the structure of a bacterial nitrate/nitrite transport protein, NarK, from Escherichia coli, with and without substrate. The structures reveal a positively charged substrate-translocation pathway lacking protonatable residues, suggesting that NarK functions as a nitrate/nitrite exchanger and that H+s are unlikely to be co-transported. Conserved arginine residues form the substrate-binding pocket, which is formed by association of helices from the two halves of NarK. Key residues that are important for substrate recognition and transport are identified and related to extensive mutagenesis and functional studies. We propose that NarK exchanges nitrate for nitrite by a rocker-switch mechanism facilitated by inter-domain H-bond networks. PMID:23665960

  7. Reduction of Nitrite and Nitrate to Ammonium on Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singireddy, Soujanya; Gordon, Alexander D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Vance, Michael A.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2012-08-01

    An important constraint on the formation of the building blocks of life in the Hadean is the availability of small, activated compounds such as ammonia (NH3) relative to its inert dinitrogen source. Iron-sulfur particles and/or mineral surfaces have been implicated to provide the catalytic active sites for the reduction of dinitrogen. Here we provide a combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational modeling study for an alternative source of ammonia from water soluble nitrogen oxide ions. The adsorption of aqueous nitrite (NO{2/-}) and nitrate (NO{3/-}) on pyrite (FeS2) and subsequent reduction chemistry to ammonia was investigated at 22°C, 70°C, and 120°C. Batch geochemical and in situ Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were used to determine the reduction kinetics to NH3 and to elucidate the identity of the surface complexes, respectively, during the reaction chemistry of NO{2/-} and NO{3/-}. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations aided the interpretation of the vibrational data for a representative set of surface species. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we detected the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO) intermediate on the pyrite surface. NH3 production from NO{2/-} occurred at 70 and 120°C and from NO{3/-} occurred only at 120°C.

  8. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  9. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  10. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170.60... Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are food.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  11. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  12. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  13. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species. PMID:20213158

  14. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  15. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  16. Nitrate and Nitrite Content of Human, Formula, Bovine, and Soy Milks: Implications for Dietary Nitrite and Nitrate Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hord, Norman G.; Ghannam, Janine S.; Garg, Harsha K.; Berens, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Estimation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations of milk sources may provide insight into potential health risks and benefits of these food sources for infants, children, and adults. The World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive consumption of human milk for the first 6 months of life. Human milk is known to confer significant nutritional and immunological benefits for the infant. Consumption of formula, cow's, and soy milk may be used as alternatives to human milk for infants. Methods We sought to estimate potential exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human, formula, bovine, and soy milk to inform total dietary exposure estimates and recommendations. Using sensitive quantitative methodologies, nitrite and nitrate were analyzed in different samples of milk. Results Human milk concentrations of colostrum (expressed days 1–3 postpartum; n = 12), transition milk (expressed days 3–7 postpartum; n = 17), and mature milk (expressed >7 days postpartum; n = 50) were 0.08 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.19 mg/100 mL nitrate, 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.52 mg/100 mL nitrate, and 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.3 mg/100 mL nitrate, respectively, revealing that the absolute amounts of these anions change as the composition of milk changes. When expressed as a percentage of the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake limits, Silk® Soy Vanilla (WhiteWave Foods, Broomfield, CO) intake could result in high nitrate intakes (104% of this standard), while intake of Bright Beginnings Soy Pediatric® formula (PBM Nutritionals, Georgia, VT) could result in the highest nitrite intakes (383% of this standard). Conclusions The temporal relationship between the provision of nitrite in human milk and the development of commensal microbiota capable of reducing dietary nitrate to nitrite supports a hypothesis that humans are adapted to provide nitrite to the gastrointestinal tract from birth

  17. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  18. Nitrates and nitrites in the treatment of ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Vaughn E; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure since the birth of modern pharmacology. Their clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator activity in large veins and arteries through an as yet unidentified method of delivering nitric oxide (NO), or a NO-like compound. The major drawback is the development of tolerance with NTG, and the duration and route of administration with amyl of nitrite. Although the nitrites are no longer used in the treatment of hypertension or ischemic heart disease, the nitrite anion has recently been discovered to possess novel pharmacologic actions, such as modulating hypoxic vasodilation, and providing cytoprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the actions of these 2 similar chemical classes (nitrites and organic nitrates) have often been considered to be alike, we still do not understand their mechanism of action. Finally, the nitrite anion, either from sodium nitrite or an intermediate NTG form, may act as a storage form for NO and provide support for investigating the use of these agents in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular states. We review what is presently known about the use of nitrates and nitrites including the historical, current, and potential uses of these agents, and their mechanisms of action.

  19. Ultrasonic Treatment Enhanced Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial (AOB) Activity for Nitritation Process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Liu, Yan-Chen; Xin, Jia; Zuo, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-19

    Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite rather than nitrate is critical for nitritation process for wastewater treatment. We proposed a promising approach by using controlled ultrasonic treatment to enhance the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppress that of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Batch activity assays indicated that when ultrasound was applied, AOB activity reached a peak level and then declined but NOB activity deteriorated continuously as the power intensity of ultrasound increased. Kinetic analysis of relative microbial activity versus ultrasonic energy density was performed to investigate the effect of operational factors (power, sludge concentration, and aeration) on AOB and NOB activities and the test parameters were selected for reactor tests. Laboratory sequential batch reactor (SBR) was further used to test the ultrasonic stimulus with 8 h per day operational cycle and synthetic waste urine as influent. With specific ultrasonic energy density of 0.09 kJ/mg VSS and continuously fed influent containing above 200 mg NH3-N/L, high AOB reproductive activity was achieved and nearly complete conversion of ammonia-N to nitrite was maintained. Microbial structure analysis confirmed that the treatment changed community of AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs. Known AOB Nitrosomonas genus remained at similar level in the biomass while typical NOB Nitrospira genus disappeared in the SBR under ultrasonic treatment and after the treatment was off for 30 days.

  20. Ultrasonic Treatment Enhanced Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial (AOB) Activity for Nitritation Process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Liu, Yan-Chen; Xin, Jia; Zuo, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-19

    Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite rather than nitrate is critical for nitritation process for wastewater treatment. We proposed a promising approach by using controlled ultrasonic treatment to enhance the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppress that of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Batch activity assays indicated that when ultrasound was applied, AOB activity reached a peak level and then declined but NOB activity deteriorated continuously as the power intensity of ultrasound increased. Kinetic analysis of relative microbial activity versus ultrasonic energy density was performed to investigate the effect of operational factors (power, sludge concentration, and aeration) on AOB and NOB activities and the test parameters were selected for reactor tests. Laboratory sequential batch reactor (SBR) was further used to test the ultrasonic stimulus with 8 h per day operational cycle and synthetic waste urine as influent. With specific ultrasonic energy density of 0.09 kJ/mg VSS and continuously fed influent containing above 200 mg NH3-N/L, high AOB reproductive activity was achieved and nearly complete conversion of ammonia-N to nitrite was maintained. Microbial structure analysis confirmed that the treatment changed community of AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs. Known AOB Nitrosomonas genus remained at similar level in the biomass while typical NOB Nitrospira genus disappeared in the SBR under ultrasonic treatment and after the treatment was off for 30 days. PMID:26678011

  1. Salivary nitrate, nitrite and nitrate reductase activity in relation to risk of oral cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A F; Hosny, G; el-Hadary, M; Mostafa, M H

    1998-10-01

    It has been suggested that nitrate and nitrite may play a role in the etiology of human oral cancer. We investigated whether salivary nitrate and nitrite and the activity of nitrate reductase (NRase) may affect the risk of oral cancer in Egypt, an area with high levels of environmental nitrosating agents. Levels of salivary nitrite (8.3 +/- 1.0 micrograms/ml) and nitrate (44 +/- 3.7 micrograms/ml) and activity of NRase (74 +/- 10 nmol/ml/min) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in oral cancer patients (n = 42) compared to control Egyptian healthy individuals (n = 40, nitrite = 5.3 +/- 0.3 micrograms/ml, nitrate = 27 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml, and NRase activity = 46 +/- 4 nmol/ml/min). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) for risk of oral cancer, categorized by the levels of salivary nitrate and nitrite and NRase activity, showed a higher cancer risk associated with nitrite > 7.5 micrograms/ml (OR: 3.0, C.I.: 1.0-9.3), nitrite > 40 micrograms/ml (OR: 4.3, C.I.: 1.4-13.3) and NRase activity > 50 nmol/ml/min (OR: 2.9, C.I.: 1.1-7.4). Our findings suggest that increased consumption of dietary nitrate and nitrite is associated with elevated levels of salivary nitrite. Together with the increased activity of salivary NRase, these observations may explain, at least in part, the role of nitrate and nitrite in the development of oral cancer in individuals from an area with a high burden of N-nitroso precursors.

  2. Nitrite reduction in paracoccus halodenitrificans: Evidence for the role of a cd-type cytochrome in ammonia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Cronin, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia in the presence of dithionite and methyl viologen. Enzyme activity was located in the soluble fraction and was associated with a cytochrome whose spectral properties resembled those of a cd-type cytochrome. Unlike the sissimilatory cd-cytochrome nitrate reductase associated with the membrane fraction of P. halodenitrificans, this soluble cd-cytochrome did not reduce nitrite to nitrous oxide.

  3. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  4. Prebiotic ammonia from reduction of nitrite by iron (II) on the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Summers, D P; Chang, S

    1993-10-14

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced (or 'fixed') nitrogen-containing compounds, in particular ammonia. In reducing atmospheres, such compounds are readily formed by electrical discharges, but geochemical evidence suggests that the early Earth had a non-reducing atmosphere, in which discharges would have instead produced NO. This would have been converted into nitric and nitrous acids and delivered to the early oceans as acid rain. It is known, however, that Fe(II) was present in the early oceans at much higher concentrations than are found today, and thus the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) provides a possible means for reducing nitrites and nitrates to ammonia. Here we explore this possibility in a series of experiments which mimic a broad range of prebiotic seawater conditions (the actual conditions on the early Earth remain poorly constrained). We find that the reduction by Fe(II) of nitrites and nitrates to ammonia could have been a significant source of reduced nitrogen on the early Earth, provided that the ocean pH exceeded 7.3 and is favoured for temperatures greater than about 25 degrees C.

  5. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of (15)N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of (15)N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290-300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  6. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, 15N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of 15N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290–300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  7. Acute toxicity of ammonia and nitrite to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The 96-h median-lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of total ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N) to fingerling shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum was 149.8 ?? 55.20 mg/L (mean ?? SD, 17.9 ?? 0.62??C, pH = 6.8-7.3). Calculated 96-h LC50 for un-ionized ammonia-N was 0.58 ?? 0.213 mg/L. The 96-h LC50 of nitrite nitrogen to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings was 11.3 ?? 8.17 mg/L (17.9 ?? 0.31??C, <1.0 mg chloride/L, <1.0 mg magnesium/L, 1.8 mg calcium/L, 7.7 mg sodium/L).

  8. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are food additives when combined in curing... nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in curing premixes, may continue to be...

  9. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples. PMID:25673480

  10. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples.

  11. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  12. Ammonia on the prebiotic Earth: Iron(II) reduction of nitrite. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Chang, Sherwood

    1994-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen. In the non-reducing atmosphere suggested by geochemical evidence, production in the atmosphere and survival of NH3 against photochemical destruction are problematic. Electric discharges and impact shocks would produce NO rather than HCN or NH3. Conversion of NO to nitrous and nitric acid (by way of HNO) and precipitation in acid rain would provide a source of fixed nitrogen to the early ocean. One solution to the NH3 problem may have been the reduction of nitrite/nitrate in the ocean with aqueous ferrous iron, Fe(2+): 6Fe(+2) + 7 H2O + NO2(-) yields 3Fe2O3 + 11 H(+) + NH3. We have measured the kinetics of this reaction as a function of temperature, pH, and concentrations of salts, Fe(+2), and NO2(-). Cations (Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+)) and anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-)) increase the rate by factors of 4 to 8. Although a competing pathway yields N2, the efficiency of the conversion of nitrite to ammonia ranges from 25% to 85%. Nitrate reduction was not consistently reproducible; however, when it was observed, its rate was slower by at least 8X than that of nitrite reduction. If the prebiotic atmosphere contained 0.2 to 10 atmospheres CO2 as suggested by Walker (1985), the Fe(+2) concentration and the rate would have been limited by siderite (FeCO3) solubility.

  13. Evolutionary relationships among ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Teske, A; Alm, E; Regan, J M; Toze, S; Rittmann, B E; Stahl, D A

    1994-01-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing was used to evaluate phylogenetic relationships among selected strains of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. All characterized strains were shown to be affiliated with the proteobacteria. The study extended recent 16S rRNA-based studies of phylogenetic diversity among nitrifiers by the comparison of eight strains of the genus Nitrobacter and representatives of the genera Nitrospira and Nitrospina. The later genera were shown to be affiliated with the delta subdivision of the proteobacteria but did not share a specific relationship to each other or to other members of the delta subdivision. All characterized Nitrobacter strains constituted a closely related assemblage within the alpha subdivision of the proteobacteria. As previously observed, all ammonia-oxidizing genera except Nitrosococcus oceanus constitute a monophyletic assemblage within the beta subdivision of the proteobacteria. Errors in the 16S rRNA sequences for two strains previously deposited in the databases by other investigators (Nitrosolobus multiformis C-71 and Nitrospira briensis C-128) were corrected. Consideration of physiology and phylogenetic distribution suggested that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the alpha and gamma subdivisions are derived from immediate photosynthetic ancestry. Each nitrifier retains the general structural features of the specific ancestor's photosynthetic membrane complex. Thus, the nitrifiers, as a group, apparently are not derived from an ancestral nitrifying phenotype. PMID:7961414

  14. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  15. Total salivary nitrates and nitrites in oral health and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Miozza, Valeria A; Delgado, Alejandra; Busch, Lucila

    2014-01-30

    It is well known that nitrites are increased in saliva from patients with periodontal disease. In the oral cavity, nitrites may derive partly from the reduction of nitrates by oral bacteria. Nitrates have been reported as a defence-related mechanism. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the salivary levels of total nitrate and nitrite and their relationship, in unstimulated and stimulated saliva from periodontal healthy subjects, and from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Nitrates and nitrites were determined in saliva from thirty healthy subjects and forty-four patients with periodontal disease. A significant increase in salivary nitrates and nitrites was observed. Nitrates and nitrites concentration was related to clinical attachment level (CAL). A positive and significant Pearson's correlation was found between salivary total nitrates and nitrites. Periodontal treatment induced clinical improvement and decreased nitrates and nitrites. It is concluded that salivary nitrates and nitrites increase, in patients with periodontal disease, could be related to defence mechanisms. The possibility that the salivary glands respond to oral infectious diseases by increasing nitrate secretion should be explored further.

  16. Food sources of nitrates and nitrites: the physiologic context for potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G; Tang, Yaoping; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-07-01

    The presence of nitrates and nitrites in food is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and, in infants, methemoglobinemia. Despite the physiologic roles for nitrate and nitrite in vascular and immune function, consideration of food sources of nitrates and nitrites as healthful dietary components has received little attention. Approximately 80% of dietary nitrates are derived from vegetable consumption; sources of nitrites include vegetables, fruit, and processed meats. Nitrites are produced endogenously through the oxidation of nitric oxide and through a reduction of nitrate by commensal bacteria in the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. As such, the dietary provision of nitrates and nitrites from vegetables and fruit may contribute to the blood pressure-lowering effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. We quantified nitrate and nitrite concentrations by HPLC in a convenience sample of foods. Incorporating these values into 2 hypothetical dietary patterns that emphasize high-nitrate or low-nitrate vegetable and fruit choices based on the DASH diet, we found that nitrate concentrations in these 2 patterns vary from 174 to 1222 mg. The hypothetical high-nitrate DASH diet pattern exceeds the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake for nitrate by 550% for a 60-kg adult. These data call into question the rationale for recommendations to limit nitrate and nitrite consumption from plant foods; a comprehensive reevaluation of the health effects of food sources of nitrates and nitrites is appropriate. The strength of the evidence linking the consumption of nitrate- and nitrite-containing plant foods to beneficial health effects supports the consideration of these compounds as nutrients.

  17. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation. PMID:26720140

  18. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation.

  19. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  20. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    SciTech Connect

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L.

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  1. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... and carbon dioxide, and gas cartridge uses of sulfur, and opens a public comment period on this... occur for all inorganic nitrates- nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide uses, as well as gas...

  2. Low serum total nitrite and nitrate levels in severe leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between inducible nitric oxide synthatase activity and disease severity in leptospirosis is unclear. Nitric oxide is converted to nitrites and nitrates, thus nitrite and nitrate levels (NOx) in serum are considered surrogate markers for nitric oxide. NOx are excreted through the kidneys, and elimination is diminished in renal impairment. We assessed the correlation of NOx with disease severity in patients with leptospirosis, compared with healthy controls and non-leptospirosis fever patients. Methods All patients admitted over a two-month period to the National Hospital, Colombo, Sri Lanka with a clinical picture suggestive of leptospirosis were included. Leptospirosis was confirmed by the microscopic agglutination test (titre≥400). Severe leptospirosis was defined by the presence of two or more of the following criteria: jaundice (bilirubin> 51.3 μmol/l), oliguria (urine output < 400 ml/day), serum creatinine> 133 μmol/l or blood urea > 25.5 mmol/l, or the presence of organ dysfunction. Non-leptospirosis fever patients and healthy volunteers were used as control groups. NOx levels were measured using a modified Griess reaction. Results Forty patients were confirmed as having leptospirosis and 26 of them had severe disease. NOx levels were significantly higher in confirmed leptospirosis patients compared to healthy controls, MAT equivocal patients and non-leptospirosis fever patients (p<0.001). NOx concentrations were also significantly higher in patients with severe compared to mild leptospirosis (p<0.001). Once NOx levels were corrected for renal function, by using the ratio NOx/creatinine, NOx levels were actually significantly lower in patients with severe disease compared to other patients, and values were similar to those of healthy controls. Conclusions We postulate that high NOx levels may be protective against severe leptospirosis, and that finding low NOx levels (when corrected for renal function) in patients with

  3. Effects of agriculture production systems on nitrate and nitrite accumulation on baby-leaf salads

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are widespread contaminants of vegetables, fruits, and waters. The levels of these compounds are increased as a result of using organic wastes from chemical industries, domestic wastes, effluents, nitrogenous fertilizers, and herbicides in agriculture. Therefore, determining the nitrate and nitrite levels in biological, food, and environmental samples is important to protect human health and the environment. In this context, we set this study, in which we report the effect of production system (conventional and organic) on the accumulation of nitrates and nitrites in fresh baby-leaf samples. The average levels of the nitrate () and nitrite () contents in six different baby-leaf salads of a single species (green lettuce, red lettuce, watercress, rucola, chard, and corn salad) produced in organic and conventional agriculture system were evaluated. Spectrophotometric analytical method recently published was validated and used. Nitrates and nitrites were detected in all samples. The nitrates levels from organic production varied between 1.45 and 6.40 mg/kg fresh weight (FW), whereas those from conventional production ranged from 10.5 to 45.19 mg/kg FW. The nitrites content was lower than nitrates and ranged from 0.32 to 1.89 mg/kg FW in organic production system and between 0.14 and 1.41 mg/kg FW in conventional production system. Our results showed that the nitrate content was dependent on the agricultural production system, while for nitrites, this dependency was less pronounced. PMID:24804008

  4. Automated, colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate ions in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Patton, Charles J.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1996-01-01

    The apparatus and methods used for the automatic, colorimetric determinations of dissolved nutrients (nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate) in natural waters are described. These techniques allow for the determination of nitrate plus nitrite for the concentration range 0.02 to 8 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as N (nitrogen); for nitrite, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as N; for ammonium, the range is 0.006 to 2.0 mg/L as N; and for orthophosphate, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as P (phosphorus). Data are presented that demonstrate the accuracy, precision and quality control of the methods.

  5. Therapeutic effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Omar, S A; Webb, A J; Lundberg, J O; Weitzberg, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated endogenously by NO synthases to regulate a number of physiological processes including cardiovascular and metabolic functions. A decrease in the production and bioavailability of NO is a hallmark of many major chronic diseases including hypertension, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This NO deficiency is mainly caused by dysfunctional NO synthases and increased scavenging of NO by the formation of reactive oxygen species. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite are emerging as substrates for in vivo NO synthase-independent formation of NO bioactivity. These anions are oxidation products of endogenous NO generation and are also present in the diet, with green leafy vegetables having a high nitrate content. The effects of nitrate and nitrite are diverse and include vasodilatation, improved endothelial function, enhanced mitochondrial efficiency and reduced generation of reactive oxygen species. Administration of nitrate or nitrite in animal models of cardiovascular disease shows promising results, and clinical trials are currently ongoing to investigate the therapeutic potential of nitrate and nitrite in hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, peripheral artery disease and myocardial infarction. In addition, the nutritional aspects of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway are interesting as diets suggested to protect against cardiovascular disease, such as the Mediterranean diet, are especially high in nitrate. Here, we discuss the potential therapeutic opportunities for nitrate and nitrite in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  6. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during...

  7. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  8. Prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its effect on edible bird nest's color.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Kadir, Noraniza Abd; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2013-12-01

    Edible bird nests (EBNs) are important ethnomedicinal commodity in the Chinese community. Recently, But and others showed that the white EBNs could turn red by vapors from sodium nitrite (NaNO2) in acidic condition or from bird soil, but this color-changing agent remained elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its affects on EBN's color. EBNs were collected from swiftlet houses or caves in Southeast Asia. White EBNs were exposed to vapor from NaNO2 in 2% HCl, or bird soil. The levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in EBNs were determined through ion chromatography analysis. Vapors from NaNO2 in 2% HCl or bird soil stained white bird nests to brown/red colors, which correlated with increase nitrite and nitrate levels. Moreover, naturally formed cave-EBNs (darker in color) also contained higher nitrite and nitrate levels compared to white house-EBNs, suggesting a relationship between nitrite and nitrate with EBN's color. Of note, we detected no presence of hemoglobin in red "blood" nest. Using infrared spectra analysis, we demonstrated that red/brown cave-EBNs contained higher intensities of C-N and N-O bonds compared to white house-EBNs. Together, our study suggested that the color of EBNs was associated with the prevalence of the nitrite and nitrate contents. PMID:24279333

  9. Determining Nitrate and Nitrite Content in Beverages, Fruits, Vegetables, and Stews Marketed in Arak, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Fani, Ali; Moini, A. Latif; Mirzajani, Parisa; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rafiei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Presence of excessive nitrite and nitrate in foodstuff can have toxic and carcinogenic effects on humans. This study is aimed at measuring nitrate and nitrite in different foodstuffs available in Arak city market, Iran, in 2013. Methods. Totally 323 samples including stew (102 samples), beverage (116 samples), fruit (55 samples), and vegetables (50 samples) were randomly collected and analyzed according to official AOAC method 973 and ISO 6635 through spectrophotometric method. Results. Average concentration of nitrate and nitrite in the samples was 6.58–136.76, 1.52–38.22 mg kg−1 or liter, respectively. Presence of nitrate and nitrite was confirmed in all samples. High levels of nitrate and nitrite were observed in celery and ghormeh stew; and lower level of nitrate and nitrite was found in traditionally produced vinegar, verjuice, and tomato. Conclusions. It was found that the mean values for nitrite in investigated products were higher than ADI levels of WHO. PMID:27379270

  10. Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations and Metabolism in Breast Milk, Infant Formula, and Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesica A.; Ninnis, Janet R.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T. Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ∼64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. PMID:23894175

  11. Method 353.4 Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for determining nitrate and nitrite concentrations in estuarine and coastal waters. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium,1-3 and the resulting nitrite determined by formation of an azo dye.4-6

  12. Transformation of bisphenol A and alkylphenols by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria through nitration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Li, Yan; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Peng, Po-Yi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2012-04-17

    Transformation of bisphenol A (BPA) by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 was investigated. On the basis of the ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, we found N. europaea could transform BPA into nitro- and dinitro-BPA, suggesting that abiotic nitration between the biogenic nitrite and BPA played a major role in the transformation of BPA in the batch AOB system. Nitrite concentrations, temperature, and pH values were the major factors to influence the reaction rate. Furthermore, the yeast estrogenic screening assay showed that the formed nitro- and dinitro-BPA had much less estrogenic activity as compared with its parent compound BPA. Similar reactions of abiotic nitration were considered for 4-n-nonylphenol (nNP) and 4-n-octylphenol (nOP) since nitro-nNP and nitro-nOP were detected by UPLC-Q-TOF MS. In addition, results from the local wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) showed the occurrence of nitro-BPA and dinitro-BPA during the biological treatment process and in the effluent, indicating that nitration of BPA is also a pathway for removal of BPA. Results of this study provided implication that AOB in the WWTPs might contribute to removal of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) through abiotic nitritation.

  13. Catalyst free, base free microwave irradiated synthesis of aryl nitrites from potassium aryltrifluoroborates and bismuth nitrate.

    PubMed

    Al-Masum, Mohammad; Welch, Rebecca L

    2014-03-01

    A mixture of bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and potassium aryltrifluoroborate in toluene under microwave heating at 120 °C for 20 min provides an interesting and mild reaction protocol for the synthesis of aryl nitrite. The conversion to aryl nitrites from aryltrifluoroborates without transition metal catalyst and base in high yields is remarkable. PMID:25242828

  14. Green Alternatives to Nitrates and Nitrites in Meat-based Products-A Review.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Kouassi, Anne Patricia; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Several food additives are added in food for their preservation to maintain the freshness of food (antioxidants) or to slow down or stop the growth of microorganisms (preservative agents). Nitrites and nitrates are used as preservative agents in meat. Nitrites give a smoked taste, a pinkish color in the meat and protect the consumers against the risk of bacterial deterioration. Their addition is however very limited as, in high dose, it can have risks on human health and the environment. Nitrites may also combine with secondary or tertiary amines to form N-nitroso derivatives. Certain N-nitroso compounds have been shown to produce cancers in a wide range of laboratory animals. Thus, alternatives of nitrates and nitrites are the object of numerous research studies. Alternatives, such as the addition of vitamins, fruits, chemicals products, natural products containing nitrite or spices, which have similar properties of nitrites, are in evaluation. In fact, spices are considered to have several organoleptic and anti-microbial properties which would be interesting to study. Several spices and combinations of spices are being progressively evaluated. This review discusses the sources of nitrites and nitrates, their use as additives in food products, their physicochemical properties, their negatives effects and the use of alternatives of nitrites and nitrates in preserving meat products.

  15. Oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, Norimichi; Daimon, Tohru; Sato, Keiichi

    1996-12-31

    Nitrite is known to be oxidized to nitrate by freezing much more rapidly than in solution. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency of nitrite to nitrate by freezing is varied by pH or kinds and concentration of coexistences. We report here the oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples. The field rain samples were collected at Mt. Ikoma, which is located at about 20 km east of Osaka city, and Osaka Prefecture University. Concentration of nitrite was usually sub to a few {mu}mol/L order in rain and {mu}mol/L order in fog and less than 1 {mu}mol/L in snow. The highest value of nitrite concentration was 43 {mu}mol/L in rain and 620 {mu}mol/L in fog. Nitrite was oxidized immediately to nitrate by freezing at pH lower than 5.2, even when the sample droplet (about 1 mm diameter) was frozen very quickly in liquid nitrogen (77K). The oxidation efficiency was higher at lower pH. However, the efficiency varied from sample to sample. This is probably due to that kinds and concentration of coexistences were difference between samples. The effect of solutes will be also reported. Freezing of rain droplets are observed in freezing of super cooled droplets, growing of graupel and hail, growing of cumulonimbus, and so on. Ratio of nitrate to nitrite was higher in snow than that in rain or fog.

  16. Short-term nitrate (nitrite) inhibition of nitrogen fixation in Azotobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Cejudo, F.J.; Paneque, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate-grown Azotobacter chroococcum ATCC 4412 cells lack the ability to fix N/sub 2/. Nitrogenase activity developed after the cells were suspended in a combined nitrogen-free medium and was paralleled by a concomitant decrease in nitrate assimilation capacity. In such treated cells exhibiting transitory nitrate assimilation and N/sub 2/-fixation capacity, nitrate or nitrite caused a short-term inhibitory effect on nitrogenase activity which ceased once the anion was exhausted from the medium. The glutamate analog L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented inhibition of nitrogenase activity by nitrate or nitrite without affecting the uptake of these anions, which were reduced and stoichiometrically released into the external medium as ammonium. Inhibition of nitrogenase by nitrate (nitrite) did not take place in A. chroococcum MCD1, which is unable to assimilate either. The authors conclude that the short-term inhibitory effect of nitrate (nitrite) on nitrogenase activity is due to some organic product(s) formed during the assimilation of the ammonium resulting from nitrate (nitrite) reduction.

  17. Interdependence of two NarK domains in a fused nitrate/nitrite transporter.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Alan D; Moir, James W B; Richardson, David J; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2008-11-01

    Nitrate uptake is essential for various bacterial processes and combines with nitrite export to form the usual initial steps of denitrification, a process that reduces nitrate to dinitrogen gas. Although many bacterial species contain NarK-like transporters that are proposed to function as either nitrate/proton symporters or nitrate/nitrite antiporters based on sequence homology, these transporters remain, in general, poorly characterized. Several bacteria appear to contain a transporter that is a fusion of two NarK-like proteins, although the significance of this arrangement remains elusive. We demonstrate that NarK from Paracoccus denitrificans is expressed as a fusion of two NarK-like transporters. NarK1 and NarK2 are separately capable of supporting anaerobic denitrifying growth but with growth defects that are partially mitigated by coexpression of the two domains. NarK1 appears to be a nitrate/proton symporter with high affinity for nitrate and NarK2 a nitrate/nitrite antiporter with lower affinity for nitrate. Each transporter requires two conserved arginine residues for activity. A transporter consisting of inactivated NarK1 fused to active NarK2 has a dramatically increased affinity for nitrate compared with NarK2 alone, implying a functional interaction between the two domains. A potential model for nitrate and nitrite transport in P. denitrificans is proposed. PMID:18823285

  18. Nitrogen isotope fractionation during archaeal ammonia oxidation: Coupled estimates from isotopic measurements of ammonium and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Bayer, Barbara; Jochum, Lara; Melcher, Michael; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments and knowledge about the nitrogen (N) isotope effect associated with their ammonia oxidation activity will allow a better understanding of natural abundance isotope ratios, and therefore N transformation processes, in the environment. Here we examine the kinetic isotope effect for ammonia oxidation in a pure soil AOA culture (Ca. Nitrososphaera viennensis) and a marine AOA enrichment culture. We estimated the isotope effect from both isotopic signatures of ammonium and nitrite over the course of ammonia oxidation. Estimates of the isotope effect based on the change in the isotopic signature of ammonium give valuable insight, because these estimates are not subject to the same concerns (e.g., accumulation of an intermediate) as estimates based on isotopic measurements of nitrite. Our results show that both the pure soil AOA culture and a marine AOA enrichment culture have similar but substantial isotope effect during ammonia consumption (31-34 per mill; based on ammonium) and nitrite production (43-45 per mill; based on nitrite). The 15N fractionation factors of both cultures tested fell in the upper range of the reported isotope effects for archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation (10-41 per mill) or were even higher than those. The isotope fractionation for nitrite production was significantly larger than for ammonium consumption, indicating that (1) some intermediate (e.g., hydroxylamine) of ammonia oxidation accumulates, allowing for a second 15N fractionation step to be expressed, (2) a fraction of ammonia oxidized is lost via gaseous N forms (e.g., NO or N2O), which is 15N-enriched or (3) a fraction of ammonium is assimilated into AOA biomass, biomass becoming 15N-enriched. The significance of these mechanisms will be explored in more detail for the soil AOA culture, based on isotope modeling and isotopic measurements of biomass and N2O.

  19. Sensitivity to nitrate and nitrite in pond-breeding amphibians from the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Marco, A.; Quilchano, C.; Blaustein, A.R.

    1999-12-01

    In static experiments, the authors studied the effects of nitrate and nitrate solutions on newly hatched larvae of five species of amphibians, namely Rana pretiosa, Rana aurora, Bufo boreas, Hyla regilla, and Ambystoma gracile. When nitrate or nitrite ions were added to the water, some larvae of some species reduced feeding activity, swam less vigorously, showed disequilibrium and paralysis, suffered abnormalities and edemas, and eventually died. The observed effects increased with both concentration and time, and there were significant differences in sensitivity among species. Ambrystoma gracile displayed the highest acute effect in water with nitrate and nitrite. The three ranid species had acute effects in water with nitrite. In chronic exposures, R. pretiosa was the most sensitive species to nitrates and nitrites. All species showed 15-d LC50s lower than 2 mg N-NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}}/L. For both N ions, B. boreas was the least sensitive amphibian. All species showed a high morality at the US Environmental Protection Agency-recommended limits of nitrite for warm-water fishes and a significant larval mortality at the recommended limits of nitrite concentration for drinking water. The recommended levels of nitrate for warm-water fishes were highly toxic for R. pretiosa and A. gracile larvae.

  20. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  1. Pharmacology and therapeutic role of inorganic nitrite and nitrate in vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J C; Feelisch, M; Horowitz, J D; Frenneaux, M P; Madhani, M

    2014-12-01

    Nitrite has emerged as an important bioactive molecule that can be biotransformed to nitric oxide (NO) related metabolites in normoxia and reduced to NO under hypoxic and acidic conditions to exert vasodilatory effects and confer a variety of other benefits to the cardiovascular system. Abundant research is currently underway to understand the mechanisms involved and define the role of nitrite in health and disease. In this review we discuss the impact of nitrite and dietary nitrate on vascular function and the potential therapeutic role of nitrite in acute heart failure.

  2. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Song, Weibo; Lu, Lu; Alan, Warren

    2005-09-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32 x 9.51 ( R 2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was found to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86 x+0.89 ( R 2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2 862.85 e -0.08 x ( R 2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=127.15 e -0.13 x ( R 2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  3. Dietary intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite and gastric cancer risk in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Galván-Portillo, Marcia V.; Ward, Mary H.; Agudo, Antonio; González, Carlos A.; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F.; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Palma-Coca, Oswaldo; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2009-01-01

    N-Nitroso compounds (NOC) are potent animal carcinogens and potential human carcinogens. The primary source of exposure for most individuals may be endogenous formation, a process that can be inhibited by dietary polyphenols. To estimate the risk of gastric cancer (GC) in relation to the individual and combined consumption of polyphenols and NOC precursors (nitrate and nitrite), a population-based case–control study was carried out in Mexico City from 2004 to 2005 including 257 histologically confirmed GC cases and 478 controls. Intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. High intakes of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol were associated with an ~50% reduction in GC risk. A high intake of total nitrite as well as nitrate and nitrite from animal sources doubled the GC risk. Odds ratios around 2-fold were observed among individuals with both low intake of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol or coumestrol and high intake of animal-derived nitrate or nitrite, compared to high intake of the polyphenols and low animal nitrate or nitrite intake, respectively. Results were similar for both the intestinal and diffuse types of GC. Our results show, for the first time, a protective effect for GC because of higher intake of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol, and suggest that these polyphenols reduce GC risk through inhibition of endogenous nitrosation. The main sources of these polyphenols were pears, mangos and beans for cinnamic acids; beans, carrots and squash for secoisolariciresinol and legumes for coumestrol. PMID:19449378

  4. [Evaluation of nitrites and nitrates food intake in the students' group].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Agata; Hamułka, Jadwiga; Pankowska, Iwona

    2010-01-01

    The aim of study was to determine the intake of nitrites and nitrates in daily food rations of the students' group in 2008 using 3-day dietary food records method and literature mean values of nitrates and nitrites in food products. Intakes of these compounds were calculated and compared to acceptable daily intake (ADI). The average intake of nitrites was 1.7 mg NaNO2/per person/day (28.0% of ADI), nitrates 77.3 mg NaNO3/per person/day that means 25.4% of ADI. The largest nitrites food intake was noticed for meat products supplied 56.5% of nitrites and cereals (20%). Whereas vegetables and their products supplied 76.1% of nitrates: potatoes 17.1%, cabbage 15.5%, beetroots 13.7%. Calculated nitrites intake for men was 2.4 higher than for women. There were no significant differences of nitrates intake between men and women groups.

  5. Decreased steroid hormone synthesis from inorganic nitrite and nitrate: studies in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Panesar, N S; Chan, K W

    2000-12-15

    Nitrites and nitrates are consumed nonchalantly in diet. Organic nitrates are also used as vasodilators in angina pectoris, but the therapy is associated with tolerance whose mechanism remains elusive. Previously, we found inorganic nitrate inhibited steroidogenesis in vitro. Because adrenocorticoids regulate water and electrolyte metabolism, tolerance may ensue from steroid deficiency. We have studied the effects of nitrite and nitrate on in vitro synthesis and in vivo blood levels of steroid hormones. In vitro, nitrite was more potent than nitrate in inhibiting human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated androgen synthesis by Mouse Leydig Tumor cells. At concentrations above 42 mM, nitrite completely inhibited androgen synthesis, and, unlike nitrate, the inhibition was irreversible by increasing hCG concentration. The cAMP production remained intact but reduced with both ions. The nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide (c-PTIO) significantly increased hCG- or cAMP-stimulated androgen synthesis in all buffers, suggesting that NO is a chemical species directly involved in the nitrite/nitrate-induced inhibition. This is further supported by c-PTIO countering the inhibitory action of methylene blue on androgen synthesis. Rats given distilled water containing 50 mg/L NaNO(2) or NaNO(3) for 4 weeks drank significantly less daily. At the end, their blood corticosterone and testosterone levels were significantly decreased. The adrenocortical histology showed bigger lipid droplets, which are pathogonomic of impaired steroidogenesis. Nitrite and nitrate are metabolized to NO, which binds heme in cytochrome P450 enzymes, thereby inhibiting steroidogenesis. Therapeutic nitrates likewise may decrease adrenal (and gonadal) steroidogenesis. Cortisol deficiency would impair water excretion causing volume expansion, and aldosterone deficiency would cause sodium loss and raised renin. Paradoxically, volume expansion without

  6. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  7. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  8. Nitrate and nitrite levels in commonly consumed vegetables in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen W C; Tran, Jeff C H; Tong, Katherine S K; Chen, Melva Y Y; Xiao, Ying; Ho, Y Y; Chan, Constance H Y

    2011-01-01

    Levels of nitrate and nitrite in 73 different vegetables, a total of 708 individual samples grouped into leafy, legumes, root and tuber, and fruiting vegetables, which are traded mainly in Hong Kong, were measured. Where available, five samples of each vegetable type were purchased from different commercial outlets during the winter of 2008 and summer of 2009. Levels of nitrate and nitrite were determined by ion chromatography and flow injection analysis, respectively. Nitrate and nitrite levels of all samples ranged <4-6300 and <0.8-9.0 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. Nitrate concentrations for the different groups, in descending order, were leafy > root and tuber > fruiting and legume vegetables. More than 80% of vegetables had mean nitrate concentrations less than 2000 mg kg⁻¹, but mean nitrate concentrations of three types of leafy vegetables, namely Chinese spinach, Shanghai cabbage and Chinese white cabbage, were >3500 mg kg⁻¹. On the other hand, nitrite concentrations were generally low - <1 mg kg⁻¹ on average. Nitrate in vegetables (i.e. Chinese flowering cabbage, Chinese spinach and celery) can be reduced significantly (12-31%) after blanching for 1-3 min, but not after soaking.

  9. Nitrate to Ammonia Ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    SciTech Connect

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. At INEL alone there are 800,000 gallons. The largest quantity of these wastes is the 149 single shell tanks (SSTs) tanks at Hanford which can hold 1 million gallons each. The nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) process has been developed to remove a majority of the nitrate content from the wastes.

  10. [The evaluation of nitrate and nitrite contents in diets of preschool children].

    PubMed

    Markowska, A; Furmanek, W; Gackowska, L; Siwek, B

    1999-01-01

    The contents of nitrites and nitrates in whole day's food of children at preschool age have been examined. Meals consisted of three dishes were taken from one of the day nurseries in Lódź in January 1996. In the evaluation of the degree of exposure the highest permissible daily intake was considered of nitrites (0.2 mg NaNO2) and nitrates (5 mg KNO3) for kg of body weight and assumed average body weight was 20 kg for children. The contents of nitrites and nitrates were determined spectrophotometrically on the basis of Griess reaction. Nitrates were reduced to nitrites passing anaquelos extract of the studied sample through a column filled with cadium dust. The range of quality of collected nitrates in meals in wide and the quantity oscillate between 8.9 and 127, mg KNO3, the average quantity is 55.01 mg KNO3. The quantity of collected nitrites is between 0.5 and 3.8 mg NaNO2 and the average quantity is 1.58 mg NaNO2.

  11. Levels of Nitrates and Nitrites in Chili Pepper and Ventricina Salami

    PubMed Central

    Piccirilli, Michele; Iafigliola, Luigi; Amadoro, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in the organic chilli pepper was 531.0±94.6 mg/kg and less than 5.0 mg, respectively, in the traditional chilli pepper it was 394.0±39.6 and less than 5.0 mg, while in the commercial it was 325.0±115.0 and less than 5.0 mg. The determination of nitrites and nitrates was carried out by high performance ion chromatography. In ventricina samples produced without added sodium nitrate, nitrates and nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at the case-filling time (t0) and after 50 days of aging (t50). In the samples of ventricina with added sodium nitrate, nitrate concentration values were 134.0±20.9 mg/kg at t0 and 129.0±15.4 mg/kg at t50, while the nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at t0 and 28.8±15.8 mg/kg at t50. Although in ventricina the amount of chilli pepper is quite relevant, it did not lead to a detectable concentration of nitrates. The maximum allowed amount was never exceeded. PMID:27800331

  12. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  13. Reduction of nitrite and nitrate on nano-dimensioned FeS.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Alexander D; Smirnov, Alexander; Shumlas, Samantha L; Singireddy, Soujanya; DeCesare, Matthew; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2013-10-01

    The reaction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) on nanometer-sized FeS particles was investigated in alkaline (initial pH = 10.3) solutions at reaction temperatures of 22, 70, and 120 °C using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy that allowed an analysis of adsorbate complexation on the FeS and reaction product in the aqueous phase, respectively. ATR-FTIR showed that NO was a surface-bound intermediate on FeS during its exposure to NO2(-) at all three reaction temperatures. Ammonia/ammonium (NH3/NH4(+)) product was also produced when FeS was exposed to NO2(-) at the 70 °C and 120 °C reaction temperatures. Activation of NO3(-) to form surface-bound NO was experimentally observed to occur at 120 °C on FeS, but not at the lower reaction temperatures. Furthermore, NH3/NH4(+) product in the aqueous phase was only present during the reaction of FeS with NO3(-) at the highest temperature used in this study. PMID:23955667

  14. Reduction of nitrite and nitrate on nano-dimensioned FeS.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Alexander D; Smirnov, Alexander; Shumlas, Samantha L; Singireddy, Soujanya; DeCesare, Matthew; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2013-10-01

    The reaction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) on nanometer-sized FeS particles was investigated in alkaline (initial pH = 10.3) solutions at reaction temperatures of 22, 70, and 120 °C using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy that allowed an analysis of adsorbate complexation on the FeS and reaction product in the aqueous phase, respectively. ATR-FTIR showed that NO was a surface-bound intermediate on FeS during its exposure to NO2(-) at all three reaction temperatures. Ammonia/ammonium (NH3/NH4(+)) product was also produced when FeS was exposed to NO2(-) at the 70 °C and 120 °C reaction temperatures. Activation of NO3(-) to form surface-bound NO was experimentally observed to occur at 120 °C on FeS, but not at the lower reaction temperatures. Furthermore, NH3/NH4(+) product in the aqueous phase was only present during the reaction of FeS with NO3(-) at the highest temperature used in this study.

  15. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite in concentrated sodium hydroxide at platinum and nickel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lin Li; Robertson, D.H.; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes the electrochemical reduction of nitrate in alkaline solutions. Conditions which maximize the current efficiency for the production of dinitrogen and/or ammonia gases could be very important for the treatment of radioactive waste solutions.

  16. [The characteristic state of health of ammonia nitrate producing workers].

    PubMed

    Tsimakuridze, M; Saakadze, V; Tsereteli, M

    2005-05-01

    The workers producing ammonia nitrate have professional contact with ammonia nitrate aerosol and nitrogenous gases. The state of health of ammonia producing workers has been examined. The morbidity, the therapeutic, neurological and laryngeal status have been inspected. Electrocardiography and examination by peak flow meter by Wotchall has been conducted. Peripheral blood test and radiography of backbone has been carried out as been required. It has been estimated that the illnesses of respiratory apparatus and musculoskeletal system predominate in the morbidity structure. The clinical examination of the workers with basic professions of the production of ammonia nitrate shows the frequent cases of chronic bronchitis and radiculoneuropathy. The results of function study show the damage of airways, the myocardiodystrophy and the changes of T wave. The nitrogen containing particulate pollutants that irritate respiratory systems and hard manual labor at these working places determine these illnesses. This fact corresponds with the hygiene and sanitary conditions of labor at major working places of production. This confirms the major role of occupational-productional factors in the etiology of these pathological conditions. In order to prevent the remote structural lesion of respiratory and cardiovascular systems it is required to amend the functional damage. On the basis of carefully performed study a complex of recreation measures has been carried out in order to improve the service conditions.

  17. The reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide towards nitrate and nitrite salts

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1991-09-01

    Beginning in late 1988, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began an experimental program at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to investigate the effects of temperature on the oxidation reaction between synthetic nickel cesium ferrocyanide (FeCN) and nitrates and nitrites representative of materials present in some of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). After completing a preliminary series of experiments in 1988, the program was expanded to include five tasks to evaluate the effect of selected compositional and operational parameters on the reaction and explosion temperatures of FeCN and nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures. 10 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site.

  19. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site. PMID:25959928

  20. Effect of high oral doses of nitrate on salivary recirculation of nitrates and nitrites and on bacterial diversity in the saliva of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Casini, L; Nisi, I; Messori, S; Bosi, P

    2011-04-01

    Ingested nitrate is absorbed in the small intestine, recirculated into the saliva and reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. In pigs receiving a moderate dietary addition of nitrate, the recirculation into the saliva is modest, so we aimed to assess the effect of higher nitrate doses to find out how the animal reacts to this new situation and to evaluate if a higher nitrate level could enhance the nitrate reduction process, improving the nitrite production Trial 1. Six piglets received 100 g of a commercial diet with 2.45% KNO(3) . In relation to baseline values, nitrate in blood serum and saliva increased 15 times, and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Salivary nitrite increased seven times after the addition and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Trial 2. Six piglets were fed a diet with or without 1.22% KNO(3) for 2 weeks. Salivary nitrate and nitrite increased with the addition of KNO3: nitrate increased from d0 to the end of the trial, nitrite increased 15 times after 1 week, but decreased after 2 weeks to 4.5-fold the control. After 2 weeks, nitrate reduced Shan diversity index of salivary microbiota. The present results indicate that the long exposure to high quantities of nitrates impairs the oral reduction of nitrate to nitrite and engenders a reduction of the mouth's microbiota diversity.

  1. Performance and microbial ecology of a nitritation sequencing batch reactor treating high-strength ammonia wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjing; Dai, Xiaohu; Cao, Dawen; Wang, Sha; Hu, Xiaona; Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai

    2016-01-01

    The partial nitrification (PN) performance and the microbial community variations were evaluated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for 172 days, with the stepwise elevation of ammonium concentration. Free ammonia (FA) and low dissolved oxygen inhibition of nitrite-oxidized bacteria (NOB) were used to achieve nitritation in the SBR. During the 172 days operation, the nitrogen loading rate of the SBR was finally raised to 3.6 kg N/m3/d corresponding the influent ammonium of 1500 mg/L, with the ammonium removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate were 94.12% and 83.54%, respectively, indicating that the syntrophic inhibition of FA and low dissolved oxygen contributed substantially to the stable nitrite accumulation. The results of the 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing revealed that Nitrospira, the only nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the system, were successively inhibited and eliminated, and the SBR reactor was dominated finally by Nitrosomonas, the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, which had a relative abundance of 83%, indicating that the Nitrosomonas played the primary roles on the establishment and maintaining of nitritation. Followed by Nitrosomonas, Anaerolineae (7.02%) and Saprospira (1.86%) were the other mainly genera in the biomass. PMID:27762325

  2. [Presence of nitrates and nitrites in baker's products and in certain other flour products].

    PubMed

    Nabrzyski, M; Gajewska, R; Ganowiak, Z

    1990-01-01

    The results of the study demonstrated that the content of nitrates and nitrites in various baker's products varied from 0.96 (in wheat rolls and baguettes) to 44.07 mg KO3/kg in pumpernickel bread. In wholemeal bread, village bread, tourist bread, rye brown bread and Graham bread the content of these compounds was from 1.46 to 27.10 mg KNO3/kg. The mean content of nitrites in these bread sorts was 1.76 mg NaNo2/kg, range 0.10-4.40 mg NaNo2/kg. In white wheat flours (Wrocław flour, cake flour and Poznań flour) the content of nitrates ranged from 1.10 to 19.08 mg KNO3/kg, and in the dishes produced from them in household was from 0.50 to 16.33 mg KNO3/kg. The content of nitrites in these flours was in the range from 0.00 to 4.16 mg NaNo2/kg, and in the products prepared from them it was from 0.00 to 1.60 mg NaNO2/kg. Eleven types were tested also of popular biscuits, wafers, gingerbread and hard cakes in which the content of nitrates was from 3.66 to 17.72 mg/kg, and that of nitrites was from 0.00 to 8.80 mg NaNo2/kg. Considering the average consumption of these products per one person in the seashore region and the mean values of nitrates and nitrites it was calculated that they provided daily about 3.9 mg KNO3 and 0.4 NaNo2, that is about 1.8% of nitrates and 7.7% of nitrites consumed by adults in daily food ration.

  3. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate and nitrite at Nafion-coated electrodes in concentrated sodium hydroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. |; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1988-12-31

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions in alkaline solution has been studied using various cathode materials and is the basis for a patent describing the conversion of nitrate into hydroxide ion in carbonate solutions. Recently, Taniguchi et al. have reported that certain well studied transition metal cyclic amine complexes, namely Co(III)-cyclam and Ni(II)-cyclam where cyclam is 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, efficiently electrocatalyze the reduction of nitrate and nitrite to hydroxylamine at mercury electrodes. Here the authors report that the metal cyclam catalyst can be incorporated into a Nafion film electrode, and that the reduction of nitrate and nitrite proceeds efficiently at these electrodes in concentrated NaOH solution. Nafion is a perfluoroalkanesulfonated cation exchange material that has been widely used to immobilize redox couples at electrode surfaces, including electrocatalysis species.

  4. Nitrate/Nitrite as Critical Mediators to Limit Oxidative Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Paul; Escobar, Daniel; Botero, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule marked by complex chemistry and varied biological responses depending on the context of the redox environment. In the setting of inflammation, NO can not only contribute to tissue injury and be causative of oxidative damage but can also signal as an adaptive molecule to limit inflammatory signaling in multiple cell types and tissues. Recent Advances: An advance in our understanding of NO biology was the recognition of the nitrate-nitrite-NO axis, whereby nitrate (predominantly from dietary sources) could be converted to nitrite and nitrite could be reduced to NO. Critical Issues: Intriguingly, the recognition of multiple enzymes that serve as nitrite reductases in the setting of hypoxia or ischemia established the concept of nitrite as a circulating endocrine reservoir of NO, with the selective release of NO at sites that were primed for this reaction. This review highlights the anti-inflammatory roles of nitrite in numerous clinical conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion, transplant, cardiac arrest, and vascular injury, and in gastrointestinal inflammation. Future Directions: These preclinical and clinical investigations set up further clinical trials and studies that elucidate the endogenous role this pathway plays in protection against inflammatory signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 328–339. PMID:26140517

  5. Photolysis of Nitrate and Nitrite in Artificial Snow and Artificial Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, W.; Green, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    It is well known that nitrate and nitrite undergo photolysis in aqueous solution. Recent studies show that these reactions are likely to occur in natural snow as well. Therefore it is of interest to measure rates of photolysis of nitrate and nitrite in snow and ice. In this study artificial snow was made by spraying a solution onto the wall of a reservoir containing liquid nitrogen. Artificial snow and ice were irradiated in a sealed quartz tube with a UV lamp and production of hydroxyl radicals was quantified. Hydroxyl radicals produced in these processes react with dimethyl sulfoxide to release methyl radicals, which were trapped by 3-amino-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy free radical (3AP). The 3AP-CH3 compound was later derivatized to produce a highly fluorescent adduct, which was measured by HPLC. Snow produced the highest yield of hydroxyl radicals and ice the lowest. Nitrite had higher yield than nitrate. The calculation of photolysis rates for nitrate and nitrite in snow and ice is discussed.

  6. A Crp-Dependent Two-Component System Regulates Nitrate and Nitrite Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangyang; Wang, Jixuan; Fu, Huihui; Zhou, Guangqi; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2012-01-01

    We have previously illustrated the nitrate/nitrite respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis, which is renowned for its remarkable versatility in respiration. Here we investigated the systems regulating the pathway with a reliable approach which enables characterization of mutants impaired in nitrate/nitrite respiration by guaranteeing biomass. The S. oneidensis genome encodes an Escherichia coli NarQ/NarX homolog SO3981 and two E. coli NarP/NarL homologs SO1860 and SO3982. Results of physiological characterization and mutational analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis possesses a single two-component system (TCS) for regulation of nitrate/nitrite respiration, consisting of the sensor kinase SO3981(NarQ) and the response regulator SO3982(NarP). The TCS directly controls the transcription of nap and nrfA (genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, respectively) but regulates the former less tightly than the latter. Additionally, phosphorylation at residue 57 of SO3982 is essential for its DNA-binding capacity. At the global control level, Crp is found to regulate expression of narQP as well as nap and nrfA. In contrast to NarP-NarQ, Crp is more essential for nap rather than nrfA. PMID:23240049

  7. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p < 0.05). Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p < 0.05). Additionally, a strong positive correlation was detected between saliva and plasma nitrate levels (p < 0.005). However, both nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease

  8. Nitrate and nitrite ingestion and risk of ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women in Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Jones, Rena R.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cerhan, James R.; Krasner, Stuart; Robien, Kim; Weyer, Peter J.; Ward, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds (NOC), potential human carcinogens. We evaluated the association of nitrate and nitrite ingestion with postmenopausal ovarian cancer risk in the Iowa Women’s Health Study. Among 28,555 postmenopausal women, we identified 315 incident epithelial ovarian cancers from 1986 to 2010. Dietary nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using food frequency questionnaire data. Drinking water source at home was obtained in a 1989 follow-up survey. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and total trihalomethane (TTHM) levels for Iowa public water utilities were linked to residences and average levels were computed based on each woman’s duration at the residence. We computed multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. We tested interactions of nitrate with TTHMs and dietary factors known to influence NOC formation. Ovarian cancer risk was 2.03 times higher (CI=1.22–3.38, ptrend=0.003) in the highest quartile (≥2.98 mg/L) compared with the lowest quartile (≤0.47 mg/L; reference) of NO3-N in public water, regardless of TTHM levels. Risk among private well users was also elevated (HR=1.53, CI=0.93–2.54) compared with the same reference group. Associations were stronger when vitamin C intake was nitrate was inversely associated with ovarian cancer risk (ptrend=0.02); whereas, dietary nitrite from processed meats was positively associated with the risk (ptrend=0.04). Our findings indicate that high nitrate levels in public drinking water and private well use may increase ovarian cancer risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:25430487

  9. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in freshwaters using flow-injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Folgado Biot, Beatriz; Nabi, Abdul; Worsfold, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive flow-injection (FI) method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural waters, based on luminol chemiluminescence (CL) detection, is reported. Nitrate was reduced online to nitrite via a copperized cadmium (Cu-Cd) column and then reacted with acidic hydrogen peroxide to form peroxynitrous acid. CL emission was observed from the oxidation of luminol in an alkaline medium in the presence of the peroxynitrite anion. The limits of detection (S:N = 3) were 0.02 and 0.01 µg N/L, with sample throughputs of 40 and 90 /h for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. Calibration graphs were linear over the range 0.02-50 and 0.01-50 µg N/L [R2  = 0.9984 (n = 8) and R2  = 0.9965 (n = 7)] for nitrate and nitrite, respectively, with relative standard deviations (RSDs; n = 3) in the range 1.8-4.6%. The key chemical and physical variables (reagent concentrations, buffer pH, flow rates, sample volume, Cu-Cd reductor column length) were optimized and potential interferences investigated. The effect of cations [Ca(II), Mg(II), Co(II), Fe(II) and Cu(II)] was masked online with EDTA. Common anions (PO4(3-) , SO4(2-) and HCO3-) did not interfere at their maximum admissible concentrations in freshwaters. The effect of salinity on the luminol CL reaction with and without nitrate and nitrite (2 and 0.5 µg N/L, respectively) was also investigated. The method was successfully applied to freshwaters and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by an automated segmented flow analyser reference method. PMID:23044772

  10. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Wu, Lei; Guan, Wenxian

    2015-12-01

    The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles consisting of 49 studies-19 studies for nitrates, 19 studies for nitrites, and 11 studies for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-were included. The summary relative risk of stomach cancer for the highest categories, compared with the lowest, was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-0.93) for dietary nitrates intake, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.13-1.52) for nitrites, and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02-1.76) for NDMA (p for heterogeneity was 0.015, 0.013 and <0.001, respectively). The study type was found as the main source of heterogeneity for nitrates and nitrites. The heterogeneity for NDMA could not be eliminated completely through stratified analysis. Although significant associations were all observed in case-control studies, the cohort studies still showed a slight trend. The dose-response analysis indicated similar results as well. High nitrates intake was associated with a weak but statistically significant reduced risk of gastric cancer. Whereas increased consumption of nitrites and NDMA seemed to be risk factors for cancer. Due to the lack of uniformity for exposure assessment across studies, further prospective researches are warranted to verify these findings.

  11. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  12. Chemoselective Nitration of Phenols with tert-Butyl Nitrite in Solution and on Solid Support

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Dipankar; Colón, Olvia C.; Savinov, Sergey N

    2009-01-01

    tert-Butyl nitrite was identified as a safe and chemoselective nitrating agent that provides preferentially mononitro derivatives of phenolic substrates in the presence of potentially competitive functional groups. On the basis of our control experiments, we propose that the reaction proceeds through the formation of O-nitrosyl intermediates prior to C-nitration via homolysis and oxidation. The reported nitration method is compatible with tyrosine-containing peptides on solid support in the synthesis of fluorogenic substrates for characterization of proteases. PMID:19697919

  13. Flow injection analysis of nitrate and nitrite in commercial baby foods.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Adrian A; Prasad, Surendra

    2016-04-15

    Commercial baby foods are an easy alternative to home-made meals especially for working parents in a nuclear family therefore it is imperative to determine the nitrate and nitrite content in commercially available baby foods varieties marketed in Fiji. A total of 108 baby food samples were analyzed for nitrate and nitrite using our standardized flow injection analysis (FIA) technique with colorimetric detection technique employing sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as color reagents where the samples throughput was 38 h(-1). The commercial baby food varieties chosen comprised of vegetables, cereals, fruits and milk. The study shows that the nitrate content of the baby foods studied ranges from 2.10 to 220.67 mg kg(-1) whereas the nitrite content ranges from 0.44 to 3.67 mg kg(-1). Typical recoveries of spiked nitrate residues ranged from 92% to 106%. The study shows that the average nitrate content of commercially available baby foods in Fiji descends below the maximum level proposed by the European Union Legislation. PMID:26616981

  14. Flow injection analysis of nitrate and nitrite in commercial baby foods.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Adrian A; Prasad, Surendra

    2016-04-15

    Commercial baby foods are an easy alternative to home-made meals especially for working parents in a nuclear family therefore it is imperative to determine the nitrate and nitrite content in commercially available baby foods varieties marketed in Fiji. A total of 108 baby food samples were analyzed for nitrate and nitrite using our standardized flow injection analysis (FIA) technique with colorimetric detection technique employing sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as color reagents where the samples throughput was 38 h(-1). The commercial baby food varieties chosen comprised of vegetables, cereals, fruits and milk. The study shows that the nitrate content of the baby foods studied ranges from 2.10 to 220.67 mg kg(-1) whereas the nitrite content ranges from 0.44 to 3.67 mg kg(-1). Typical recoveries of spiked nitrate residues ranged from 92% to 106%. The study shows that the average nitrate content of commercially available baby foods in Fiji descends below the maximum level proposed by the European Union Legislation.

  15. Nitrite reduction in Veillonella alcalescens.

    PubMed Central

    Yordy, D M; Delwiche, E A

    1979-01-01

    Nitrite reduction was examined in Veillonella alcalescens C-1, and obligate anaerobe with an ATP-yielding nitrate-reducing system. Hydrogen donors for nitrite reduction included hydrosulfite, hydrogen gas, and pyruvate, but not pyridine nucleotides, in the presnece or absence of flavins. Pyruvate-linked nitrite reduction was not inhibited by 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl) 1,3-butanedione, dicoumarol, or 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide. The noninvolvement of membrane-bound factors was supported by the fact that 100% of pyruvate-linked activity remained in the soluble fraction after fractionation of crude extracts by ultracentrifugation. Using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, however, the participation of ferredoxin in nitrite reduction was demonstrated. The product of nitrite reduction appeared to be ammonia, as determined from H2-to-NO2- ratios. Nitrite reductase was induced by nitrate or nitrite and was repressed by increased levels of reduced nitrogenous compounds. PMID:422515

  16. Colorimetric determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water by enzymatic reduction, automated discrete analyzer methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to operational details and performance benchmarks for these new DA-AtNaR2 nitrate + nitrite assays, this report also provides results of interference studies for common inorganic and organic matrix constituents at 1, 10, and 100 times their median concentrations in surface-water and groundwater samples submitted annually to the NWQL for nitrate + nitrite analyses. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical analyses of results determined by CFA-CdR methods and DA-AtNaR2 methods indicate that nitrate concentration differences between population means or sign ranks were either statistically equivalent to zero at the 95 percent confidence level (p ≥ 0.05) or analytically equivalent to zero-that is, when p < 0.05, concentration differences between population means or medians were less than MDLs.

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation study: Formation of ammonia from nitrate and nitrate in hydrogen generating systems

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1996-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Departrnent of Energy (DOE) to immobilize pretreated highly radioactive wastes in glass for permanent disposal in the HWVP, formic acid is added to the waste before vitrification to adjust glass redox and melter feed rheology. The operation of the glass melter and durability of the glass are affected by the glass oxidation state. Formation of a conductive metallic sludge in an over-reduced melt can result in a shortened melter lifetime. An over-oxidized melt may lead to foaming and loss of ruthenium as volatile RuO{sub 4}. Historically, foaming in the joule heated ceramic melter has been attributed to gas generation in the melt which is controlled by instruction of a reductant such as formic acid into the melter feed. Formic acid is also found to decrease the melter feed viscosity thereby facilitating pumping. This technical report discusses the noble metal catalyzed formic acid reduction of nitrite and/or nitrate to ammonia, a problem of considerable concern because of the generation of a potential ammonium nitrate explosion hazard in the plant ventilation system.

  18. Simultaneous Nitrite/Nitrate Imagery at Millimeter Scale through the Water-Sediment Interface.

    PubMed

    Metzger, E; Thibault de Chanvalon, A; Cesbron, F; Barbe, A; Launeau, P; Jézéquel, D; Mouret, A

    2016-08-01

    The present study describes new procedures to obtain at millimeter resolution the spatial distribution of nitrite and nitrate in porewaters, combining diffusive equilibrium in thin films (DET), colorimetry and hyperspectral imagery. Nitrite distribution can be easily achieved by adapting the well-known colorimetric method from Griess (1879) and using a common flatbed scanner with a limit of detection about 1.7 μmol L(-1). Nitrate distribution can be obtained after reduction into nitrite by a vanadium chloride reagent. However, the concentration of vanadium chloride used in this protocol brings coloration with a wide spectral signature that creates interference only deconvolvable by imaging treatment from an entire visible spectrum for each pixel (spectral analysis). This can be achieved by hyperspectral imaging. The protocol retained in the present study allows obtaining a nitrite/nitrate image with micromolar limit of detection. The methods were applied in sediments from the Loire Estuary after different treatments and allowed to precisely describe two-dimensional millimeter features. The present technique adds to the combination of gel-colorimetry and hyperspectral imagery a very promising new application of wide interest for environmental issues in the context of early diagenesis and benthic fluxes.

  19. Nutritional epidemiology in the context of nitric oxide biology: a risk-benefit evaluation for dietary nitrite and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Milkowski, Andrew; Garg, Harsha K; Coughlin, James R; Bryan, Nathan S

    2010-02-15

    The discovery of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the 1980s represented a critical advance in understanding cardiovascular disease, and today a number of human diseases are characterized by NO insufficiency. In the interim, recent biomedical research has demonstrated that NO can be modulated by the diet independent of its enzymatic synthesis from l-arginine, e.g., the consumption of nitrite- and nitrate-rich foods such as fruits, leafy vegetables, and cured meats along with antioxidants. Regular intake of nitrate-containing food such as green leafy vegetables may ensure that blood and tissue levels of nitrite and NO pools are maintained at a level sufficient to compensate for any disturbances in endogenous NO synthesis. However, some in the public perceive that dietary sources of nitrite and nitrate are harmful, and some epidemiological studies reveal a weak association between foods that contain nitrite and nitrate, namely cured and processed meats, and cancer. This paradigm needs revisiting in the face of undisputed health benefits of nitrite- and nitrate-enriched diets. This review will address and interpret the epidemiological data and discuss the risk-benefit evaluation of dietary nitrite and nitrate in the context of nitric oxide biology. The weak and inconclusive data on the cancer risk of nitrite, nitrate and processed meats are far outweighed by the health benefits of restoring NO homeostasis via dietary nitrite and nitrate. This risk/benefit balance should be a strong consideration before there are any suggestions for new regulatory or public health guidelines for dietary nitrite and nitrate exposures.

  20. Modeling pitting corrosion of iron exposed to alkaline solutions containing nitrate and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lifeng

    2001-07-01

    Pitting corrosion could be extremely serious for dilute high-level radioactive waste stored or processed in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site. In these solutions, nitrate is an aggressive ion with respect to pitting of carbon steel while nitrite can be used as an inhibitor. Excessive additions of nitrite increase the risk of generating unstable nitrogen compounds during waste processing, and insufficient additions of nitrite could increase the risk of corrosion-induced failure. Thus there are strong incentives to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in pitting corrosion prevention with these solution chemistries. In this dissertation, both a 1-D and a 2-D model are used to study the pitting mechanism as a function of nitrite/nitrate ratios. The 1-D model used BAND(J) to test a reaction mechanism for the passivation behavior by comparing the predicted Open Circuit Potential (OCP) with OCP data from experiments at different NO2-/NO3- ratio. The model predictions are compared with Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) experiments. A 2-D model was developed for the propagation of a pit in iron by writing subroutines for finite element software of GAMBIT and FIDAP. Geometrically distributed anodic and cathodic reactions are assumed. The results show three partial explanations describing the inhibition influence of nitrite to iron corrosion: the competing reduction reaction of nitrate to nitrite, the formation of Fe(OH)+, and the function of the porous film. The current distributions and the effect of porosity of the film on pH are also explained. The calculation results also show that rate of pit growth decreases as the pit diameter increases until it reaches a constant value. The profile of the local current density on the pit wall is parabolic for small pits and it changes to a linear distribution for large pits. The model predicts that addition of nitrite will decrease the production of ferrous ions and those can prevent iron from

  1. Synthesis of nano-structured polypyrrole/copper electrodes for nitrate and nitrite electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Nguyen Bui, Nhat; Do, Duong Kim Bao; Pham, Anh Minh

    2010-09-01

    Nanostructured polypyrrole film was synthesized onto a copper electrode in solutions of oxalic and salicylic acids and their buffers. The electrooxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied using chronoamperometry. The nanoporous structure of the synthesized Ppy films was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrate and nitrite reduction were performed by an electrochemical method under potentiostatic conditions. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in the oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than that for the electrodes prepared in oxalic acid solution. After 20 h of electrolysis, the nitrite was reduced completely with 100% efficiency and the nitrate was reduced with 35% efficiency. Report submitted to the 5th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN, Hanoi, 9-12 November 2010.

  2. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Bioelectrode-based approach for enhancing nitrate and nitrite removal and electricity generation from eutrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate and nitrite contamination of surface waters (e.g. lakes) has become a severe environmental and health problem, especially in developing countries. The recent demonstration of nitrate reduction at the cathode of microbial fuel cell (MFC) provides an opportunity to develop a new technology for nitrogen removal from surface waters. In this study, a sediment-type MFC based on two pieces of bioelectrodes was employed as a novel in situ applicable approach for nitrogen removal, as well as electricity production from eutrophic lakes. Maximum power density of 42 and 36 mW/m(2) was produced respectively from nitrate- and nitrite-rich synthetic lake waters at initial concentration of 10 mg-N/L. Along with the electricity production a total nitrogen removal of 62% and 77% was accomplished, for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. The nitrogen removal was almost 4 times higher under close-circuit condition with biocathode, compared to either the open-circuit operation or with abiotic cathode. The mass balance on nitrogen indicates that most of the removed nitrate and nitrite (84.7 ± 0.1% and 81.8 ± 0.1%, respectively) was reduced to nitrogen gas. The nitrogen removal and power generation was limited by the dissolved oxygen (DO) level in the water and acetate level injected to the sediment. Excessive oxygen resulted in dramatically decrease of nitrogen removal efficiency and only 7.8% removal was obtained at DO level of 7.8 mg/l. The power generation and nitrogen removal increased with acetate level and was nearly saturated at 0.84 mg/g-sediment. This bioelectrode-based in situ approach is attractive not only due to the electricity production, but also due to no need of extra reactor construction, which may broaden the application possibilities of sediment MFC technology.

  4. Nitrite and nitrate content in meat products and estimated intake in Denmark from 1998 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Fagt, S; Nielsen, S; Andersen, R

    2008-10-01

    The content of nitrite and nitrate in cured meat products has been monitored in Denmark seven times between 1995 and 2006. The maximum permitted added amounts of sodium nitrite in Denmark (60 mg kg(-1) for most products up to 150 mg kg(-1) for special products) have not been exceeded, except for a few samples back in 2002. The intake, mean and intake distribution of sodium nitrite have been calculated from 1998 to 2006 with data from the Danish dietary survey conducted in 2000-02 on Danes from four to 75 years of age. The amounts used by industry have been relatively stable through the whole period with levels varying between 6 and 20 mg sodium nitrite kg(-1) with sausages, meat for open sandwiches and salami-type sausages being the greatest contributors. The mean intake of sodium nitrate was around 1 mg day(-1), which is very low compared with the total intake of 61 mg day(-1). The mean intake of sodium nitrite was 0.017 and 0.014, 0.009 and 0.008, and 0.007 and 0.003 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for men and women in the age groups 4-5, 6-14 and 15-75 years, respectively, which was much lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.09 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The 99th percentile for the group of 4-year-olds was 0.107 and 0.123 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, and the 95th percentile was 0.057 and 0.073 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, highest for the girls. With fewer than 100 boys and girls in the 4-5-year age group, only very few persons were responsible for the high intake. The conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the saliva and the degradation of nitrite during production and storage must also be considered when evaluating the intake of nitrite. PMID:18608491

  5. Differential contributions of ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers to nitrification in four paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baozhan; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Zhiying; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Jia, Zhongjun

    2015-05-01

    Rice paddy fields are characterized by regular flooding and nitrogen fertilization, but the functional importance of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers under unique agricultural management is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to nitrification in four paddy soils from different geographic regions (Zi-Yang (ZY), Jiang-Du (JD), Lei-Zhou (LZ) and Jia-Xing (JX)) that are representative of the rice ecosystems in China. In urea-amended microcosms, nitrification activity varied greatly with 11.9, 9.46, 3.03 and 1.43 μg NO3(-)-N g(-1) dry weight of soil per day in the ZY, JD, LZ and JX soils, respectively, over the course of a 56-day incubation period. Real-time quantitative PCR of amoA genes and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed significant increases in the AOA population to various extents, suggesting that their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation activity decreased from ZY to JD to LZ. The opposite trend was observed for AOB, and the JX soil stimulated only the AOB populations. DNA-based stable-isotope probing further demonstrated that active AOA numerically outcompeted their bacterial counterparts by 37.0-, 10.5- and 1.91-fold in (13)C-DNA from ZY, JD and LZ soils, respectively, whereas AOB, but not AOA, were labeled in the JX soil during active nitrification. NOB were labeled to a much greater extent than AOA and AOB, and the addition of acetylene completely abolished the assimilation of (13)CO2 by nitrifying populations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal ammonia oxidation was predominantly catalyzed by soil fosmid 29i4-related AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage. Nitrosospira cluster 3-like AOB performed most bacterial ammonia oxidation in the ZY, LZ and JX soils, whereas the majority of the (13)C-AOB in the JD soil was affiliated with the Nitrosomona communis lineage. The (13)C-NOB was

  6. Differential contributions of ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers to nitrification in four paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baozhan; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Zhiying; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Jia, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    Rice paddy fields are characterized by regular flooding and nitrogen fertilization, but the functional importance of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers under unique agricultural management is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to nitrification in four paddy soils from different geographic regions (Zi-Yang (ZY), Jiang-Du (JD), Lei-Zhou (LZ) and Jia-Xing (JX)) that are representative of the rice ecosystems in China. In urea-amended microcosms, nitrification activity varied greatly with 11.9, 9.46, 3.03 and 1.43 μg NO3−-N g−1 dry weight of soil per day in the ZY, JD, LZ and JX soils, respectively, over the course of a 56-day incubation period. Real-time quantitative PCR of amoA genes and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed significant increases in the AOA population to various extents, suggesting that their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation activity decreased from ZY to JD to LZ. The opposite trend was observed for AOB, and the JX soil stimulated only the AOB populations. DNA-based stable-isotope probing further demonstrated that active AOA numerically outcompeted their bacterial counterparts by 37.0-, 10.5- and 1.91-fold in 13C-DNA from ZY, JD and LZ soils, respectively, whereas AOB, but not AOA, were labeled in the JX soil during active nitrification. NOB were labeled to a much greater extent than AOA and AOB, and the addition of acetylene completely abolished the assimilation of 13CO2 by nitrifying populations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal ammonia oxidation was predominantly catalyzed by soil fosmid 29i4-related AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage. Nitrosospira cluster 3-like AOB performed most bacterial ammonia oxidation in the ZY, LZ and JX soils, whereas the majority of the 13C-AOB in the JD soil was affiliated with the Nitrosomona communis lineage. The 13C-NOB was overwhelmingly

  7. The napF and narG Nitrate Reductase Operons in Escherichia coli Are Differentially Expressed in Response to Submicromolar Concentrations of Nitrate but Not Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henian; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli synthesizes two biochemically distinct nitrate reductase enzymes, a membrane-bound enzyme encoded by the narGHJI operon and a periplasmic cytochrome c-linked nitrate reductase encoded by the napFDAGHBC operon. To address why the cell makes these two enzymes, continuous cell culture techniques were used to examine napF and narG gene expression in response to different concentrations of nitrate and/or nitrite. Expression of the napF-lacZ and narG-lacZ reporter fusions in strains grown at different steady-state levels of nitrate revealed that the two nitrate reductase operons are differentially expressed in a complementary pattern. The napF operon apparently encodes a “low-substrate-induced” reductase that is maximally expressed only at low levels of nitrate. Expression is suppressed under high-nitrate conditions. In contrast, the narGHJI operon is only weakly expressed at low nitrate levels but is maximally expressed when nitrate is elevated. The narGHJI operon is therefore a “high-substrate-induced” operon that somehow provides a second and distinct role in nitrate metabolism by the cell. Interestingly, nitrite, the end product of each enzyme, had only a minor effect on the expression of either operon. Finally, nitrate, but not nitrite, was essential for repression of napF gene expression. These studies reveal that nitrate rather than nitrite is the primary signal that controls the expression of these two nitrate reductase operons in a differential and complementary fashion. In light of these findings, prior models for the roles of nitrate and nitrite in control of narG and napF expression must be reconsidered. PMID:10464201

  8. On the optimum conditions for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Nydahl, F

    1976-05-01

    The variables of direct importance in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by a metallic reductant such as cadmium used in a reductor column are discussed with special reference to the determination of nitrate as nitrite in very dilute solutions, e.g., natural waters. As a result of these considerations the effect of flow-rate (expressed as bed-volumes min ), pH, temperature, chloride concentration and various types of reductor cadmium on the yield of nitrite is investigated. The effect of dissolved oxygen in the sample solution on pH and cadmium concentration in the reduced solution is demonstrated. At constant pH a maximum yield of nitrite is obtained at a certain flow-rate, which is explained as the result of a rapid formation and simultaneously proceeding slow reduction of nitrite. With increasing pH this maximum is shifted to lower flow-rates, and grows broader whilst the yield at maximum approaches 100%; at pH 9.5 a yield of 99.9 +/- 0.1% is obtained. The temperature has little effect on the reduction rate in the interval 20-30 degrees but at 10 degrees the reduction is noticeably slower. Chloride ions have a strongly retarding effect on the reduction rate but the yield at maximum is not affected. Electrolytically precipitated cadmium, filings of pure cadmium or amalgamated pure cadmium all give practically the same yield at maximum though some differences in reduction rate are observed. Impure cadmium or copper-cadmium and silver-cadmium, owing to the formation of galvanic cells with higher reducing power, give a high reduction rate, which also applies to nitrite, causing a poorer yield at maximum. The practical consequences of the results are thoroughly discussed.

  9. On the optimum conditions for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Nydahl, F

    1976-05-01

    The variables of direct importance in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by a metallic reductant such as cadmium used in a reductor column are discussed with special reference to the determination of nitrate as nitrite in very dilute solutions, e.g., natural waters. As a result of these considerations the effect of flow-rate (expressed as bed-volumes min ), pH, temperature, chloride concentration and various types of reductor cadmium on the yield of nitrite is investigated. The effect of dissolved oxygen in the sample solution on pH and cadmium concentration in the reduced solution is demonstrated. At constant pH a maximum yield of nitrite is obtained at a certain flow-rate, which is explained as the result of a rapid formation and simultaneously proceeding slow reduction of nitrite. With increasing pH this maximum is shifted to lower flow-rates, and grows broader whilst the yield at maximum approaches 100%; at pH 9.5 a yield of 99.9 +/- 0.1% is obtained. The temperature has little effect on the reduction rate in the interval 20-30 degrees but at 10 degrees the reduction is noticeably slower. Chloride ions have a strongly retarding effect on the reduction rate but the yield at maximum is not affected. Electrolytically precipitated cadmium, filings of pure cadmium or amalgamated pure cadmium all give practically the same yield at maximum though some differences in reduction rate are observed. Impure cadmium or copper-cadmium and silver-cadmium, owing to the formation of galvanic cells with higher reducing power, give a high reduction rate, which also applies to nitrite, causing a poorer yield at maximum. The practical consequences of the results are thoroughly discussed. PMID:18961874

  10. Industrial use of molten nitrate/nitrite salts

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Nitrate salts have been used for years as a high-temperature heat transfer medium in the chemical and metal industries. This experience is often cited as an argument for the use of these salts in large-scale solar energy systems. However, this industrial experience has not been well documented and a study was carried out to provide such information to the solar community and to determine the applicability of this data base. Seven different industrial plants were visited and the plant operators were interviewed with regard to operating history and experience. In all cases the molten salt systems operate without problems. However, it is not possible to apply the base of industrial experience directly to solar thermal energy applications because of differences in operating temperature, salt composition, alloys used, and thermal/mechanical conditions.

  11. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. PMID:26700884

  12. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated.

  13. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes using natural antimicrobials in no-nitrate-or-nitrite-added ham.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Niebuhr, Steven E; Xi, Yuan; Schrader, Kohl D; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-06-01

    Consumer demand for foods manufactured without the direct addition of chemical preservatives, such as sodium nitrite and organic acid salts, has resulted in a unique class of "naturally" cured meat products. Formulation with a natural nitrate source and nitrate-reducing bacteria results in naturally cured processed meats that possess traits similar to conventionally cured meats. However, previous research has shown that the naturally cured products are more susceptible to pathogen growth. This study evaluated Listeria monocytogenes growth on ham manufactured with natural curing methods and with commercially available clean-label antimicrobials (cultured sugar and vinegar blend; lemon, cherry, and vinegar powder blend) and assessed impacts on physicochemical characteristics of the product. Hams made with either of the antimicrobials supported L. monocytogenes growth similar to that in the traditionally cured control (P > 0.05). Hams made with prefermented celery juice powder had the lowest residual nitrite concentrations (P < 0.05), and when no antimicrobial was added, L. monocytogenes growth was similar to that of the uncured control (P > 0.05). Aside from residual nitrite and nitrate concentrations, few physicochemical differences were identified. These findings show that ham can be produced with natural curing methods and antimicrobials to provide similar L. monocytogenes inhibition and physicochemical traits as in traditionally cured ham. PMID:22691474

  14. Nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamines exposure and the risk of type 1 diabetes: A review of current data

    PubMed Central

    Bahadoran, Zahra; Ghasemi, Asghar; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    The potential toxic effects of nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamine on pancreatic β cell have remained a controversial issue over the past two decades. In this study, we reviewed epidemiological studies investigated the associations between nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamines exposure, from both diet and drinking water to ascertain whether these compounds may contribute to development of type 1 diabetes. To identify relevant studies, a systematic search strategy of PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct was conducted using queries including the key words “nitrate”, “nitrite”, “nitrosamine” with “type 1 diabetes” or “insulin dependent diabetes mellitus”. All searches were limited to studies published in English. Ecologic surveys, case-control and cohort studies have indicated conflicting results in relation to nitrate-nitrite exposure from drinking water and the risk of type 1 diabetes. A null, sometimes even negative association has been mainly reported in regions with a mean nitrate levels < 25 mg/L in drinking water, while increased risk of type 1 diabetes was observed in those with a maximum nitrate levels > 40-80 mg/L. Limited data are available regarding the potential diabetogenic effect of nitrite from drinking water, although there is evidence indicating dietary nitrite could be a risk factor for development of type 1 diabetes, an effect however that seems to be significant in a higher range of acceptable limit for nitrate/nitrite. Current data regarding dietary exposure of nitrosamine and development of type 1 diabetes is also inconsistent. Considering to an increasing trend of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) along with an elevated nitrate-nitrite exposure, additional research is critical to clarify potential harmful effects of nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamine exposure on β-cell autoimmunity and the risk of T1DM. PMID:27795817

  15. Nitrite survival and nitrous oxide production of denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges in long-term nitrite/nitrate-fed sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Ye, Liu; Wang, Hong; Stephenson, Tom; Jiang, Xuxin

    2014-12-15

    Nitrite-based phosphorus (P) removal could be useful for innovative biological P removal systems where energy and carbon savings are a priority. However, using nitrite for denitrification may cause nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation and emissions. A denitrifying nitrite-fed P removal system [Formula: see text] was successfully set up in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and was run for 210 days. The maximum pulse addition of nitrite to [Formula: see text] was 11 mg NO2(-)-N/L in the bulk, and a total of 34 mg NO2(-)-N/L of nitrite was added over three additions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results indicated that the P-accumulating organisms (PAOs) abundance was 75 ± 1.1% in [Formula: see text] , approximately 13.6% higher than that in a parallel P removal SBR using nitrate [Formula: see text] . Type II Accumulibacter (PAOII) (unable to use nitrate as an electron acceptor) was the main PAOs species in [Formula: see text] , contributing 72% to total PAOs. Compared with [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] biomass had enhanced nitrite/free nitrous acid (FNA) endurance, as demonstrated by its higher nitrite denitrification and P uptake rates. N2O accumulated temporarily in [Formula: see text] after each pulse of nitrite. Peak N2O concentrations in the bulk for [Formula: see text] were generally 6-11 times higher than that in [Formula: see text] ; these accumulations were rapidly denitrified to nitrogen gases. N2O concentration increased rapidly in nitrate-cultivated biomass when 5 or 10 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Whereas, N2O accumulation did not occur in nitrite-cultivated biomass until up to 30 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Long-term acclimation to nitrite and pulse addition of nitrite in [Formula: see text] reduced the risk of nitrite accumulation, and mitigated N2O accumulation and emissions from denitrifying P removal by nitrite.

  16. Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey R. J.

    Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate

  17. Study of Cobalt(III) Corrole as the Neutral Ionophore for Nitrite and Nitrate Detection via Polymeric Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Cobalt(III) 5, 10, 15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole was synthesized and incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes and studied as a neutral carrier ionophore via potentiometry. This cobalt(III) complex has binding affinity to nitrite, and the resulting membrane electrode yields reversible and Nernstian response toward nitrite. Enhanced nitrite selectivity is observed over other anions, including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate when an appropriate amount of lipophilic cationic sites are added to the membrane phase. Detection limit to nitrite is ca. 5 µM. Using tributylphosphate as the plasticizer with the cobalt(III) corrole species yields electrodes with enhanced nitrate selectivity.

  18. Nitrites, nitrates and N-nitrosoamines in Estonian cured meat products: intake by Estonian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Reinik, M; Tamme, T; Roasto, M; Juhkam, K; Jurtsenko, S; Tenńo, T; Kiis, A

    2005-11-01

    The contents of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines in commercial cured meat products on the Estonian market were determined for 2000-01 and 2003-04 as part of the Estonian food safety monitoring programme and the Estonian Science Foundation grant research activities. The maximum permitted levels of residual nitrites and nitrates were not exceeded in the samples analysed. However, a great variation in the content of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines was found for all the products. The concentrations of these compounds in domestic cured meat products showed a decrease from year to year. The mean intake of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines by Estonian children (n=346) from cured meat products was calculated on the basis of individual intake data. The mean daily intake of nitrates was 1.7 mg, that of nitrites was 0.83 mg and that of N-nitrosoamines was 0.073 microg. In the 2000-01 study, the calculated nitrite intake exceeded the acceptable daily intake by up to 140% for 1-6-year-old children and up to 105% in 2003-04.

  19. Investigating quality attributes and consumer acceptance of uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added commercial hams, bacons, and frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, J J; Cordray, J C; Olson, D G; Sebranek, J G; Love, J A

    2007-10-01

    Increasing demands for natural, organic, and/or preservative-free foods have resulted in the consumer availability of uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added processed meat and poultry products. A comprehensive understanding about the quality and sensory attributes of commercially available uncured products is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if quality and sensory differences exist between uncured and cured meat products. Five different commercial brands (Brands A to E; 4 uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added, and 1 nitrite-added) of 3 product types (hams, frankfurters, and bacons) were obtained from retail supermarkets. The samples were evaluated for color, pigment content, pH, lipid oxidation, residual nitrate and nitrite content, and consumer acceptance. All brands from all product types evaluated, except for 1 bacon (Brand B), had cured color, aroma, and flavor attributes similar to the nitrite-added control (Brand E). All product types and brands contained residual nitrate and residual nitrite except for Brands B and D bacons (< 1 ppm nitrite). Lipid oxidation as measured by 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances revealed a large variation in the occurrence of lipid oxidation both between and within product types, with frankfurters reporting the highest levels. Color measurements indicated the majority of the brands within each product type were similar to the control. Consumer sensory ratings for surface/lean color, aroma, flavor, texture, and overall acceptance determined that variation existed. Brand E (nitrite-added control) and 1 uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added brand for each product type were not different (P > 0.05) for overall acceptance and received higher scores (P < 0.05) than all other brands within each product type. PMID:17995620

  20. Molecular and biokinetic characterization of methylotrophic denitrification using nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Kim, Sungpyo; Yu, Ran; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2008-01-01

    Although methanol is a widely employed carbon source for denitrification, relatively little is known on the abundance and diversity of methylotrophic bacteria in activated sludge. The primary aim of this study was to specifically identify bacteria that metabolized methanol in a sequencing batch denitrifying reactor (SBDR), using a novel technique, stable isotope probing (SIP) of 13C labeled DNA. A secondary aim was to quantitatively track dominant methylotrophic bacteria in the SBDR exposed to different terminal electron acceptors. SIP enabled 13C 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SBDR methylotrophic populations were related to Methyloversatilis spp. and Hyphomicrobium spp. Based on newly developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays, Hyphomicrobium spp. were more abundant than Methyloversatilis spp. throughout the period of SBDR operation. The relative population abundance was stable despite a shift in electron acceptor from nitrate to nitrite (keeping the same methanol dose). However, the shift to nitrite resulted in a significant decrease in denitrification biokinetics on both nitrate and nitrite. PMID:18701786

  1. Development of a method to manufacture uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added whole muscle jerky.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Terns, Matthew J; Meyn, Elizabeth; Boles, Jane A

    2010-10-01

    "Natural curing" is accomplished by use of vegetable juice/powder high in naturally occurring nitrates combined with a nitrate reducing starter culture to result in indirectly "cured" products. Since the starter culture used is not water soluble, making "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky with current manufacturing techniques has been found ineffective. The objective was to investigate processes for whole muscle beef jerky that might provide cured meat characteristics similar to those of a nitrite-added control. Treatments where jerky was placed in a barrier bag during incubation were found to be the least similar to the nitrite-added control. Jerky placed in a 40.6 degrees C smokehouse during incubation resulted in significantly more (P<0.05) converted cured pigment than the barrier bag treatments but less (P<0.05) than the control. The processing methods investigated to manufacture "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky in this study were ineffective in resulting in products similar to those cured with sodium nitrite.

  2. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-07-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  3. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, R. T.; Sadowsky, M.; Breuillin-Sessoms, F.; Wang, P.; Clough, T. J.; Coulter, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  4. Chemical reactivity of nitrates and nitrites towards TBP and potassium nickel ferrocyanide between 30 and 300 deg

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertin, D.; Chartier, D.; Joussot-Dubien, C.

    2007-07-01

    Since the late sixties, bitumen has been widely used by the nuclear industry as a matrix for the immobilization of low- and intermediate level radioactive waste originating mainly from the nuclear activities: precipitation or evaporator concentrates, ion exchange resins, incinerator ashes, and filter materials. Depending on bitumen and operating conditions, bituminization of radioactive waste can be operated between 130 and 180 deg. C, so chemical reaction can be induced with nitrate or nitrite towards elements contained in waste (TPB, potassium nickel ferrocyanide and cobalt compound) and bitumen. These reactions are mainly exothermic this is the reason why the enthalpy reaction and their temperature of initiation have to be determined independently of their concentration in waste. In this work, we have studied by Calvet Calorimetry at 0.1 deg. C/min heating rates, the behaviour of chemical elements especially oxido-reduction couples that can react at a temperature range 100- 300 deg. C (Nitrate/PPFeNi, Nitrite/PPFeNi, Nitrate/TBP, Nitrite/TBP, Nitrate/bitumen and Nitrite/bitumen). The initial temperature reaction of nitrates or nitrites towards potassium nickel ferrocyanide (PPFeNi) has been studied and is equal respectively to 225 deg. C and 175 deg. C. Because of the large scale temperature reaction of nitrate and PPFeNi, enthalpy reaction can not be calculated, although enthalpy reaction of nitrite and PPFeNi is equal to 270 kJ/mol of nitrite. Sodium Nitrate and TBP behaviour has been investigated, and an exothermic reaction at 135 deg. C until 250 deg. C is evidenced. The exothermic energy reaction is a function of TBP concentration and the enthalpy reaction has been determined. (authors)

  5. Endogenous levels of nitrites and nitrates in wide consumption foodstuffs: Results of five years of official controls and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Iammarino, Marco; Di Taranto, Aurelia; Cristino, Marianna

    2013-10-15

    The massive introduction of nitrogen fertilisers, necessary to maximise the global food production, has brought about an increase of the residual amounts of nitrites and nitrates in the products. Notoriously, these compounds may exercise toxic effects. In this work the results obtained from 5years of official controls and monitoring focused on tracing quantifiable amounts of nitrites and nitrates in 1785 samples of meat, dairy, fish products and leafy vegetables are reported. A widespread presence of nitrates at low concentrations in foodstuffs was verified. High concentrations of nitrates were registered in some leafy vegetables and mussels samples, while high nitrites concentrations were registered in some spinach samples. The results confirmed the necessity to develop most controls and suggest the introduction of new legal limits related to some combinations contaminant/matrix. Such new limits may fill legislative gaps that may cause wrong interpretations of the results obtained during official controls.

  6. The Nitrate-Nitrite-NO Pathway and Its Implications for Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Chirinos, Julio A; Zamani, Payman

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is likely multifactorial. In addition to cardiac abnormalities (diastolic dysfunction, abnormal contractile reserve, chronotropic incompetence), several peripheral abnormalities are likely to be involved. These include abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics, abnormal arterial vasodilatory responses to exercise, and abnormal peripheral O2 delivery, extraction, and utilization. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as a potential target to modify key physiologic abnormalities, including late systolic left ventricular (LV) load from arterial wave reflections (which has deleterious short- and long-term consequences for the LV), arterial vasodilatory reserve, muscle O2 delivery, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. In a recently completed randomized trial, the administration of a single dose of exogenous inorganic nitrate has been shown to exert various salutary arterial hemodynamic effects, ultimately leading to enhanced aerobic capacity in patients with HFpEF. These effects have the potential for both immediate improvements in exercise tolerance and for long-term "disease-modifying" effects. In this review, we provide an overview of key mechanistic contributors to exercise intolerance in HFpEF, and of the potential therapeutic role of drugs that target the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway.

  7. Nitrite

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrite ; CASRN 14797 - 65 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  9. Thyroid cancer risk and dietary nitrate and nitrite intake in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ji, Bu-Tian; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chow, Wong-Ho; Zheng, Wei; Ward, Mary H.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds and nitrate can disrupt thyroid homeostasis by inhibiting iodide uptake. We evaluated nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of thyroid cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study that included 73,317 women, aged 40–70 years enrolled in 1996–2000. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline using a food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 11 years of follow-up, 164 incident thyroid cancer cases with complete dietary information were identified. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relatives risks (RRs). We determined the nitrate and nitrite contents of foods using values from the published literature and focusing on regional values for Chinese foods. Nitrate intake was not associated with thyroid cancer risk (RRQ4 = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.42–2.07; p for trend = 0.40). Compared with the lowest quartile, women with the highest dietary nitrite intake had about a two-fold risk of thyroid cancer (RRQ4 = 2.05; 95%CI: 1.20–3.51;) but there was not a monotonic trend with increasing intake (p for trend= 0.36). The trend with increasing nitrite intake from animal sources was significant (p for trend = 0.02) and was stronger for nitrite from processed meats (RRQ4 = 1.96; 95%CI: 1.28–2.99; p for trend <0.01). Although we did not observe an association for nitrate as hypothesized, our results suggest that women consuming higher levels of nitrite from animal sources, particularly from processed meat, may have an increased risk of thyroid cancer. PMID:22674227

  10. Plasma Levels of Nitrite and Nitrate in Early and Recent Classes of Fish

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H; Lewis, Debra A; Miller, Virginia M; Krause, William J

    2008-01-01

    The stable metabolite of nitric oxide in plasma is NOx, the sum of nitrite plus nitrate. Measures of plasma NOx may provide information about the nitric oxide tonus of the entire endothelium including capillary microvessels. Although data are available for mammalian species, plasma NOx measurements in early vertebrate species are scarce. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that plasma NOx would be similar to the NOx in the water environment for fish in early classes (Agnatha and Chondrichthye) and would exceed water NOx levels in the known nitrite-sensitive fish (Osteichthye). Plasma samples were obtained from 18 species of adult fish (n = 167) and from their housing or natural water environment. NOx was measured by using chemiluminescence. Plasma NOx was detected in all species and ranged from 0.5 nmol/ml (skate) to 453.9 nmol/ml (shortnose gar). Average plasma NOx was significantly higher in sea lamprey than in Atlantic hagfish whereas that of little skate was 3-fold lower than in spiny dogfish shark. Plasma NOx differed significantly among early bony fish (paddlefish, pallid sturgeon, gar) yet was similar among modern bony fish, with the exception of rainbow trout. Plasma NOx reflected water NOx in only 2 species (hagfish and shark), and levels did not coincide with nitrite sensitivity. This study provides an expanded comparative view of plasma NOx levels across 3 groups of early fish. The data obtained suggest a nitric oxide system in early and modern fish. PMID:19004368

  11. Plasma levels of nitrite and nitrate in early and recent classes of fish.

    PubMed

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H; Lewis, Debra A; Miller, Virginia M; Krause, William J

    2008-10-01

    The stable metabolite of nitric oxide in plasma is NOx, the sum of nitrite plus nitrate. Measures of plasma NOx may provide information about the nitric oxide tonus of the entire endothelium including capillary microvessels. Although data are available for mammalian species, plasma NOx measurements in early vertebrate species are scarce. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that plasma NOx would be similar to the NO in the water environment for fish in early classes (Agnatha and Chondrichthye) and would exceed water NOx levels in the known nitrite-sensitive fish (Osteichthye). Plasma samples were obtained from 18 species of adult fish (n=167) and from their housing or natural water environment. NOx was measured by using chemiluminescence. Plasma NO was detected in all species and ranged from 0.5 nmol/ml (skate) to 453.9 nmol/ml (shortnose gar). Average plasma NOx was significantly higher in sea lamprey than in Atlantic hagfish whereas that of little skate was 3-fold lower than in spiny dogfish shark. Plasma NO differed significantly among early bony fish (paddlefish, pallid sturgeon, gar) yet was similar among modern bony fish, with the exception of rainbow trout. Plasma NOx reflected water NO in only 2 species (hagfish and shark), and levels did not coincide with nitrite sensitivity. This study provides an expanded comparative view of plasma NO, levels across 3 groups of early fish. The data obtained suggest a nitric oxide system in early and modern fish. PMID:19004368

  12. Nitrite- and Nitrate-Dependent Methanotrophs - Environmental Detection and Relevance in Freshwater Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Humans continue to have an enormous impact on global C and N cycles. While a clear stimulation of methane emissions through human activities is evident, the role of also increasingly released nitrogenous compounds as electron acceptors for microbial methane oxidation is not well constrained. We have developed diverse methods for environmental detection of nitrate(NO3-)- and - predominantly - nitrite(NO2-)-dependent methanotrophs, which have been applied to several freshwater environments. In contrast to most metabolically flexible heterotrophic denitrifiers, the microorganisms responsible for methane-dependent nitrate/nitrite reduction seem to be specialized to use methane only, grow slowly and employ pathways different from each other and from model organisms, which necessitate new approaches for the assessment of their environmental relevance. Nitrite-dependent methane oxidation is carried out by bacteria of the NC10 phylum, whereas nitrate-dependent methane oxidizers are close relatives of methanogenic archaea and sulfate-dependent anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-2). Laboratory enrichment cultures of the nitrite-reducing methanotroph Methylomirabilis oxyfera (NC10 phylum) have formed the basis for its genetic and physiological characterization and the development of several independent methods for its sensitive detection. M. oxyfera differs from all known microorganisms by encoding an incomplete denitrification pathway, in which the last 2 steps, the reduction of NO via N2O to N2, apparently is replaced by the dismutation of NO to N2 and O2. The intracellularly produced O2 is used for methane oxidation via a methane monooxygenase, analogously to the phylogenetically unrelated proteobacterial methanotrophs. But unlike in proteobacteria, C is not assimilated from methane, but rather CO2, with important consequences for the interpretation of environmental isotope labelling studies. In addition, M. oxyfera is characterized by a distinct PLFA profile, including

  13. Nitrate reductase and nitrite as additional components of defense system in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) against Helicoverpa armigera herbivory.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Taggar, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Amylase inhibitors serve as attractive candidates of defense mechanisms against insect attack. Therefore, the impediment of Helicoverpa armigera digestion can be the effective way of controlling this pest population. Nitrite was found to be a potent mixed non-competitive competitive inhibitor of partially purified α-amylase of H. armigera gut. This observation impelled us to determine the response of nitrite and nitrate reductase (NR) towards H. armigera infestation in nine pigeonpea genotypes (four moderately resistant, three intermediate and two moderately susceptible). The significant upregulation of NR in moderately resistant genotypes after pod borer infestation suggested NR as one of the factors that determine their resistance status against insect attack. The pod borer attack caused greater reduction of nitrate and significant accumulation of nitrite in moderately resistant genotypes. The activity of nitrite reductase (NiR) was also enhanced more in moderately resistant genotypes than moderately susceptible genotypes on account of H. armigera herbivory. Expression of resistance to H. armigera was further revealed when significant negative association between NR, NiR, nitrite and percent pod damage was observed. This is the first report that suggests nitrite to be a potent inhibitor of H. armigera α-amylase and also the involvement of nitrite and NR in providing resistance against H. armigera herbivory. PMID:25307464

  14. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. PMID:26435258

  15. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer.

  16. Effect of Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations on the Performance of AFB-MFC Enriched with High-Strength Synthetic Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Sheng; Yang, Ping; Li, Chong-Ming; Guo, Yong; Lai, Bo; Wang, Ye; Feng, Li; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate on the performance of microbial fuel cell, a system combining an anaerobic fluidized bed (AFB) and a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was employed for high-strength nitrogen-containing synthetic wastewater treatment. Before this study, the AFB-MFC had been used to treat high-strength organic wastewater for about one year in a continuous flow mode. The results showed that when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased from 1700 mg/L to 4045 mg/L and 545 mg/L to 1427 mg/L, respectively, the nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen removal efficiencies were both above 99%; the COD removal efficiency went up from 60.00% to 88.95%; the voltage was about 375 ± 15 mV while the power density was at 70 ± 5 mW/m(2). However, when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were above 4045 mg/L and 1427 mg/L, respectively, the removal of nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, COD, voltage, and power density were decreased to be 86%, 88%, 77%, 180 mV, and 17 mW/m(2) when nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased to 4265 mg/L and 1661 mg/L. In addition, the composition of biogas generated in the anode chamber was analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Nitrogen gas, methane, and carbon dioxide were obtained. The results indicated that denitrification happened in anode chamber. PMID:26495144

  17. Effect of Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations on the Performance of AFB-MFC Enriched with High-Strength Synthetic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-sheng; Yang, Ping; Li, Chong-ming; Guo, Yong; Lai, Bo; Wang, Ye; Feng, Li; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate on the performance of microbial fuel cell, a system combining an anaerobic fluidized bed (AFB) and a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was employed for high-strength nitrogen-containing synthetic wastewater treatment. Before this study, the AFB-MFC had been used to treat high-strength organic wastewater for about one year in a continuous flow mode. The results showed that when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased from 1700 mg/L to 4045 mg/L and 545 mg/L to 1427 mg/L, respectively, the nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen removal efficiencies were both above 99%; the COD removal efficiency went up from 60.00% to 88.95%; the voltage was about 375 ± 15 mV while the power density was at 70 ± 5 mW/m2. However, when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were above 4045 mg/L and 1427 mg/L, respectively, the removal of nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, COD, voltage, and power density were decreased to be 86%, 88%, 77%, 180 mV, and 17 mW/m2 when nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased to 4265 mg/L and 1661 mg/L. In addition, the composition of biogas generated in the anode chamber was analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Nitrogen gas, methane, and carbon dioxide were obtained. The results indicated that denitrification happened in anode chamber. PMID:26495144

  18. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  19. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  20. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford defense waste(HDW) by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE)method

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-10

    This paper describes the first application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford Defense Waste (HDW). The method development was carried out by using Synthetic Hanford Waste (SHW), followed by the analysis of 4 real HDW samples. Hexamethonium bromide (HMB) was used as electroosmotic flow modifier in borate buffer at pH 9.2 to decrease the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in order to enhance the speed of analysis and the resolution of nitrate and nitrite in high ionic strength HDW samples. The application of this capillary zone electrophoresis method, when compared with ion chromatography for two major components of HDW, nitrate and nitrite slightly reduced analysis time, eliminated most pre-analysis handling of the highly radioactive sample, and cut analysis wastes by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The analysis of real HDW samples that were validated by using sample spikes showed a concentration range of 1.03 to 1.42 M for both nitrate. The migration times of the real HDW and the spiked HDW samples were within a precision of less than 3% relative standard deviation. The selectivity ratio test used for peak confirmation of the spiked samples was within 96% of the real sample. Method reliability was tested by spiking the matrix with 72.4 mM nitrate and nitrite. Recoveries for these spiked samples were 93-103%.

  1. Effects of Nitrite, Chlorate, and Chlorite on Nitrate Uptake and Nitrate Reductase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, M. Yaeesh; King, Bryan J.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of NO2−, ClO3−, and ClO2− on the induction of nitrate transport and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) as well as their effects on NO3− influx into roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Klondike) seedlings were investigated. A 24-h pretreatment with 0.1 mol m−3 NO2− fully induced NO3− transport but failed to induce NRA. Similar pretreatments with ClO3− and ClO2− induced neither NO3− transport nor NRA. Net ClO3− uptake was induced by NO3− but not by ClO3− itself, indicating that NO3− and ClO3− transport occur via the NO3− carrier. At the uptake step, NO2− and ClO2− strongly inhibited NO3− influx; the former exhibited classical competitive kinetics, whereas the latter exhibited complex mixed-type kinetics. ClO3− proved to be a weak inhibitor of NO3− influx (Ki = 16 mol m−3) in a noncompetitive manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the suitability of these NO3− analogs as screening agents for the isolation of mutants defective in NO3− transport. PMID:16653041

  2. Simultaneous electrochemical determination of nitrate and nitrite in aqueous solution using Ag-doped zeolite-expanded graphite-epoxy electrode.

    PubMed

    Manea, Florica; Remes, Adriana; Radovan, Ciprian; Pode, Rodica; Picken, Stephen; Schoonman, Joop

    2010-11-15

    In this work a new electrochemical sensor based on an Ag-doped zeolite-expanded graphite-epoxy composite electrode (AgZEGE) was evaluated as a novel alternative for the simultaneous quantitative determination of nitrate and nitrite in aqueous solutions. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the electrode in the presence of individual or mixtures of nitrate and nitrite anions in 0.1M Na(2)SO(4) supporting electrolyte. Linear dependences of current versus nitrate and nitrite concentrations were obtained for the concentration ranges of 1-10mM for nitrate and 0.1-1mM for nitrite using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and multiple-pulsed amperometry (MPA) procedures. The comparative assessment of the electrochemical behavior of the individual anions and mixtures of anions on this modified electrode allowed determining the working conditions for the simultaneous detection of the nitrite and nitrate anions. Applying MPA allowed enhancement of the sensitivity for direct and indirect nitrate detection and also for nitrite detection. The proposed sensor was applied in tap water samples spiked with known nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the results were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method. This work demonstrates that using multiple-pulse amperometry with the Ag-doped zeolite-expanded graphite-epoxy composite electrode provides a real opportunity for the simultaneous detection of nitrite and nitrate in aqueous solutions. PMID:21035645

  3. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  4. Health implications of nitrate and nitrite in drinking water: an update on methemoglobinemia occurrence and reproductive and developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, A M; Steinberg, V E

    1996-02-01

    In 1987, an evaluation of the nitrate drinking water standard was performed with a primary focus on the effects of nitrate on methemoglobinemia and reproductive/developmental effects (Fan et al. (1987). Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 7, 135-148). The present review presents an updated overview and evaluation of the available information on the same health effects of nitrate and nitrite with an emphasis on data not included in the previous review, which should be used as a compendium to this report. Recent epidemiologic data have suggested an association between developmental effects in offspring and the maternal ingestion of nitrate from drinking water, but a definite conclusion on the cause and effect relationship cannot be drawn. Animal experimental data have shown reproductive toxicity associated with high exposure levels to nitrate or nitrite, which are not likely to be encountered in drinking water. No teratogenic effects were observed in rats, mice, rabbits, and hamsters tested. Several cases of methemoglobinemia have been reported in infants in the United States using water containing nitrate at levels higher than the current maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 45 ppm (mg/liter) nitrate (NO3) or 10 ppm nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate-N), but none at or lower than the MCL. The uncertainties in the data base are discussed, noting that no uncertainty factor was applied in deriving the MCL in order to account for the uncertainties that exist in the data base.

  5. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    PubMed Central

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3−) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2−) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2− oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2− was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2−. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2− oxidization leading to greater NO2− levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2−, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2− levels and N2O production. PMID:26179972

  6. Development of a cost-effective method for nitrate and nitrite determination in leafy plants and nitrate and nitrite contents of some green leafy vegetables grown in the Aegean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdestan, Ozgül; Uren, Ali

    2010-05-12

    An accurate, fast, easily applicable, and cost-effective method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite was developed. This method was much more reliable than the cadmium column reduction method, which is a tedious and time-consuming procedure and not easily applicable. The principle of the method was reduction of nitrate to nitrite with cadmium acetate solution and zinc powder and then treatment with Griess reagent. Recovery of the method changed from 92.9 to 102.8%, and detection limit was found as 31.4 mg/kg. Coefficient of variation was 3.16% for intraday precision. Nitrate and nitrite contents of 10 types of leafy vegetables native to the Aegean region of Turkey were determined. Wild radish, chicory, fennel, blessed thistle, blue mallow, and chard were analyzed for the first time. Nitrate contents were found between 354.8 mg/kg for iceberg lettuce and 4653 mg/kg for wild radish. Tested vegetables contained <26.33 mg/kg nitrite. PMID:20384339

  7. Can summary nitrite+nitrate content serve as an indicator of NO synthesis intensity in body tissues?

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Ivanova, A V; Petrov, V A; Serezhenkov, V A; Mikoyan, V D; Vanin, A F; Osipov, A N

    2012-10-01

    Studies with the use of a highly specific enzymatic sensor demonstrated that, contrary to the common opinion, normally nitrate is in fact not present in the most important physiological fluids. NO metabolites in the amniotic fluid and semen are mainly presented by NO donor compounds. Therefore, the intensity of NO synthesis can be evaluated by the total content of all its metabolites, but not by the widely used summary nitrite+nitrate content. PMID:23113298

  8. Denitrification of high concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in synthetic medium with different sources of organic carbon. III. Methanol.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, M; Gałka, E; Sakowicz, E; Mycielski, R

    1985-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrites and nitrates (1000 mg N/l) in medium containing methanol as a source of organic carbon was studied. Continuous cultures of mixed population of autochtonic microflora from bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir were set up in a chemostat-type column and packed bed reactor. The efficiency of denitrification of nitrates in packed bed reactor was 506.7 mg N/l/h whereas denitrification of nitrites was from 8.7 to 16.0 mg N/l/h depending on the granulation of the filing material. In the latter case 83% nitrogen was removed from the medium. One of the factors causing low efficiency of denitrification of nitrites is excessive alkalization of the medium in the bed. The use of a three-step bed with adjusted pH resulted in complete denitrification of nitrites with efficiency 60 mg N/l/h. The bacteria inside the bed were dominated by Paracoccus denitrificans and by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when nitrates were present. The sensitivity of P. denitrificans to high concentrations of nitrites seems to be the second factor contributing to low efficiency of denitrification with methanol as organic substrate. PMID:2412408

  9. Successful application of nitritation/anammox to wastewater with elevated organic carbon to ammonia ratios.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Sarina; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2014-02-01

    The nitritation/anammox process has been mainly applied to high-strength nitrogenous wastewaters with very low biodegradable organic carbon content (<0.5 g COD∙g N(-1)). However, several wastewaters have biodegradable organic carbon to nitrogen (COD/N) ratios between 0.5 and 1.7 g COD∙g N(-1) and thus, contain elevated amounts of organic carbon but not enough for heterotrophic denitrification. In this study, the influence of elevated COD/N ratios was studied on a nitritation/anammox process with suspended sludge. In a step-wise manner, the influent COD/N ratio was increased to 1.4 g COD∙g N(-1) by supplementing digester supernatant with acetate. The increasing availability of COD led to an increase of the nitrogen removal efficiency from around 85% with pure digester supernatant to >95% with added acetate while the nitrogen elimination rate stayed constant (275 ± 40 mg N∙L(-1)∙d(-1)). Anammox activity and abundance of anammox bacteria (AMX) were strongly correlated, and with increasing influent COD/N ratio both decreased steadily. At the same time, heterotrophic denitrification with nitrite and the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) gradually increased. Simultaneously, the sludge retention time (SRT) decreased significantly with increasing COD loading to about 15 d and reached critical values for the slowly growing AMX. When the SRT was increased by reducing biomass loss with the effluent, AMX activity and abundance started to rise again, while the AOB activity remained unaltered. Fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH) showed that the initial AMX community shifted within only 40 d from a mixed AMX community to "Candidatus Brocadia fulgida" as the dominant AMX type with an influent COD/N ratio of 0.8 g COD∙g N(-1) and higher. "Ca. Brocadia fulgida" is known to oxidise acetate, and its ability to outcompete other types of AMX indicates that AMX participated in acetate oxidation. In a later phase, glucose was added to the influent

  10. Different responses to nitrate and nitrite by the model organism Escherichia coli and the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, R N; Cole, J A

    2006-02-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli to use both nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic growth is mediated by the dual-acting two-component regulatory systems NarX-NarL and NarQ-NarP. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae responds only to nitrite: it expresses only NarQ-NarP. We have shown that although N. gonorrhoeae NarQ can phosphorylate E. coli NarL and NarP, the N. gonorrhoeae NarP is unable to regulate gene expression in E. coli. Mutagenesis experiments have revealed residues in E. coli NarQ that are essential for nitrate and nitrite sensing. Chimaeric proteins revealed domains of NarQ that are important for ligand sensing.

  11. Formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX in Parma-like ham without nitrate or nitrite.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Uemura, Juichi; Odagiri, Hiroko; Okui, Jun; Hayashi, Nobutaka; Hioki, Shoji; Nishimura, Takanori; Hattori, Akihito

    2009-04-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) is a characteristic red pigment in meat products that are manufactured without the addition of a curing agent such as nitrate or nitrite. To examine the effects of impurities such as mineral components in sea salt on the formation of ZPP, we manufactured Parmatype dry-cured hams that were salted with refined salt or sea salt and examined the involvement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the formation of ZPP. The content of ZPP was increased drastically after 40 weeks. Microscopic observation showed strong fluorescence caused by ZPP muscle fiber after 40 weeks. Conversely, heme content varied considerably during processing. ORP increased during processing. However, there was no obvious difference between ham salted with refined salt and that salted with sea salt. Therefore, it was concluded that impurities in sea salt were not involved in the formation of ZPP.

  12. Simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in potato and water samples using negative electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Torki, F; Saraji, M

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, nitrite and nitrate ions are analyzed in biological samples using laborious and expensive methods; such as HPLC, CE, MS-MS. In this work, the simultaneous analysis of nitrite and nitrate ions was conducted by electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS), without using any complicated or laborious derivitization step. Ion mobility spectrometry with low cost, inexpensive maintenance and very fast analysis makes an attractive technique for the simultaneous determination of these ions in foodstuff and drinking water samples. The analyte interference was systematically investigated for binary mixture analysis. The obtained results provided detection limits of 3.8 and 4.7 µg/L for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. A linear dynamic range of about 2 orders of magnitude, and relative standard deviations below 5% were obtained by the proposed method for the analysis of both ions. Also, the proposed method was used to analyze various real samples of potato and drinking water samples, and the obtained results confirmed the capability of negative ESI-IMS for the simultaneous detection of nitrite and nitrate.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence of nitrate and nitrite in meat reveals its response to nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Aurore; de la Foye, Anne; Loux, Valentin; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation because of its crucial role in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite which contributes to color and flavor development. Despite longstanding use of these additives, their impact on the physiology of S. xylosus has not yet been explored. We present the first in situ global gene expression profile of S. xylosus in meat supplemented with nitrate and nitrite at the levels used in the meat industry. More than 600 genes of S. xylosus were differentially expressed at 24 or 72 h of incubation. They represent more than 20% of the total genes and let us to suppose that addition of nitrate and nitrite to meat leads to a global change in gene expression. This profile revealed that S. xylosus is subject to nitrosative stress caused by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated from nitrate and nitrite. To overcome this stress, S. xylosus has developed several oxidative stress resistance mechanisms, such as modulation of the expression of several genes involved in iron homeostasis and in antioxidant defense. Most of which belong to the Fur and PerR regulons, respectively. S. xylosus has also counteracted this stress by developing DNA and protein repair. Furthermore, it has adapted its metabolic response—carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy production and cell wall biogenesis—to the alterations produced by nitrosative stress. PMID:25566208

  14. Study of Cobalt(III) Corrole as the Neutral Ionophore for Nitrite and Nitrate Detection via Polymeric Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt(III) 5, 10, 15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole was synthesized and incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes and studied as a neutral carrier ionophore via potentiometry. This cobalt(III) complex has binding affinity to nitrite, and the resulting membrane electrode yields reversible and Nernstian response toward nitrite. Enhanced nitrite selectivity is observed over other anions, including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate when an appropriate amount of lipophilic cationic sites are added to the membrane phase. Detection limit to nitrite is ca. 5 µM. Using tributylphosphate as the plasticizer with the cobalt(III) corrole species yields electrodes with enhanced nitrate selectivity. PMID:25422577

  15. Comparative induction of nitrate reductase by nitrate and nitrite in barley leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Rosichan, J. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    The comparative induction of nitrate reductase (NR) by ambient NO3- and NO2- as a function of influx, reduction (as NR was induced) and accumulation in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was determined. The dynamic interaction of NO3- influx, reduction and accumulation on NR induction was shown. The activity of NR, as it was induced, influenced its further induction by affecting the internal concentration of NO3-. As the ambient concentration of NO3- increased, the relative influences imposed by influx and reduction on NO3- accumulation changed with influx becoming a more predominant regulant. Significant levels of NO3- accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. When the leaves were supplied cycloheximide or tungstate along with NO2-, about 60% more NO3- accumulated in the leaves than in the absence of the inhibitors. In NO3(-)-supplied leaves NR induction was observed at an ambient concentration of as low as 0.02 mM. No NR induction occurred in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 mM. In fact, NR induction from NO2- solutions was not seen until NO3- was detected in the leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating from NO3(-)-fed leaves. In all cases the internal concentration of NO3-, but not NO2-, was highly correlated with the amount of NR induced. The evidence indicated that NO3- was a more likely inducer of NR than was NO2-.

  16. Effect of chlorine demand on the ammonia breakpoint curve: model development, validation with nitrite, and application to municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Jensen, J N

    2001-01-01

    Chlorine added during wastewater disinfection may be consumed through reactions with chlorine-demanding chemical species. In this study, a mechanistically based kinetic model for chlorine demand in the presence of ammonia was developed and validated with laboratory studies on ammonia-nitrite systems, and then applied to breakpoint curves obtained with wastewater samples. The model is a modification of kinetic models for chlorine-ammonia systems to include hypochlorous acid-demand and monochloramine-demand reactions. The model accurately describes both laboratory-generated breakpoint curves with added nitrite and literature data. In a plant thought to be undergoing partial nitrification, breakpoint curves were consistent with high chlorine demand (i.e., small initial slopes and large doses to achieve the total chlorine maximum and breakpoint). A simplified kinetic model was also developed. Chlorine demand calculated from the simplified model was similar to chlorine demand from plant data. The simplified model was used to generate operating guidelines to calculate chlorine doses needed to overcome demand from nitrite or other sources. PMID:11833766

  17. Effect of chlorine demand on the ammonia breakpoint curve: model development, validation with nitrite, and application to municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Jensen, J N

    2001-01-01

    Chlorine added during wastewater disinfection may be consumed through reactions with chlorine-demanding chemical species. In this study, a mechanistically based kinetic model for chlorine demand in the presence of ammonia was developed and validated with laboratory studies on ammonia-nitrite systems, and then applied to breakpoint curves obtained with wastewater samples. The model is a modification of kinetic models for chlorine-ammonia systems to include hypochlorous acid-demand and monochloramine-demand reactions. The model accurately describes both laboratory-generated breakpoint curves with added nitrite and literature data. In a plant thought to be undergoing partial nitrification, breakpoint curves were consistent with high chlorine demand (i.e., small initial slopes and large doses to achieve the total chlorine maximum and breakpoint). A simplified kinetic model was also developed. Chlorine demand calculated from the simplified model was similar to chlorine demand from plant data. The simplified model was used to generate operating guidelines to calculate chlorine doses needed to overcome demand from nitrite or other sources.

  18. Development of estimates of dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for use with the short willet food frequency questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Griesenbeck, John S; Steck, Michelle D; Huber, John C; Sharkey, Joseph R; Rene, Antonio A; Brender, Jean D

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines have an etiologic role in adverse pregnancy outcomes and chronic diseases such as cancer. Although an extensive body of literature exists on estimates of these compounds in foods, the extant data varies in quality, quantified estimates, and relevance. Methods We developed estimates of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for food items listed in the Short Willet Food Frequency Questionnaire (WFFQ) as adapted for use in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Multiple reference databases were searched for published literature reflecting nitrate, nitrite, and nitrosamine values in foods. Relevant published literature was reviewed; only publications reporting results for items listed on the WFFQ were selected for inclusion. The references selected were prioritized according to relevance to the U.S. population. Results Based on our estimates, vegetable products contain the highest levels of nitrate, contributing as much as 189 mg/serving. Meat and bean products contain the highest levels of nitrites with values up to 1.84 mg/serving. Alcohol, meat and dairy products contain the highest values of nitrosamines with a maximum value of 0.531 μg/serving. The estimates of dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines generated in this study are based on the published values currently available. Conclusion To our knowledge, these are the only estimates specifically designed for use with the adapted WFFQ and generated to represent food items available to the U.S. population. The estimates provided may be useful in other research studies, specifically in those exploring the relation between exposure to these compounds in foods and adverse health outcomes. PMID:19348679

  19. Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase and nitrate reductase coimmobilized bienzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Madasamy, Thangamuthu; Pandiaraj, Manickam; Balamurugan, Murugesan; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Karunakaran, Chandran

    2014-02-15

    This work presents a novel bienzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous determination of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) ions using copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and nitrate reductase (NaR) coimmobilized on carbon nanotubes (CNT)-polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite modified platinum electrode. Morphological changes of the PPy and CNT modified electrodes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the bienzymatic electrode (NaR-SOD1-CNT-PPy-Pt) was characterized by cyclic voltammetry exhibiting quasi-reversible redox peak at +0.06 V and reversible redox peaks at -0.76 and -0.62V vs. Ag/AgCl, for the immobilized SOD1 and NaR respectively. The electrocatalytic activity of SOD1 towards NO2(-) oxidation observed at +0.8 V was linear from 100 nM to 1mM with a detection limit of 50 nM and sensitivity of 98.5 ± 1.7 nA µM(-1)cm(-2). Similarly, the coimmobilized NaR showed its electrocatalytic activity towards NO3(-) reduction at -0.76 V exhibiting linear response from 500 nM to 10mM NO3(-) with a detection limit of 200 nM and sensitivity of 84.5 ± 1.56 nA µM(-1)cm(-2). Further, the present bienzymatic biosensor coated with cellulose acetate membrane for the removal of non-specific proteins was used for the sensitive and selective determinations of NO2(-) and NO3(-) present in human plasma, whole blood and saliva samples.

  20. Dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    DellaValle, Curt T.; Xiao, Qian; Yang, Gong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Zheng, Wei; Li, Hong Lan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ward, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of endogenously formed N-nitroso compounds (NOC), known animal carcinogens. Nitrosation reactions forming NOCs can be inhibited by vitamin C and other antioxidants. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study, a cohort of 73,118 women ages 40 to 70 residing in Shanghai. We evaluated effect modification by factors that affect endogenous formation of NOCs: vitamin C (at or above/below median) and red meat intake (at or above/below median). Nitrate, nitrite and other dietary intakes were estimated from a 77-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Over a mean of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 619 colorectal cancer cases (n=383, colon; n=236, rectum). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. Overall, nitrate intake was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.73–1.59). However, among women with vitamin C intake below the median (83.9 mg/day) and hence higher potential exposure to NOCs, risk of colorectal cancer increased with increasing quintiles of nitrate intake (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 2.45; 95% CI: 1.15–5.18; p-trend = 0.02). There was no association among women with higher vitamin C intake. We found no association between nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer overall or by intake level of vitamin C. Our findings suggest that high dietary nitrate intake among subgroups expected to have higher exposure to endogenously-formed NOCs increases risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:24242755

  1. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  2. UPTAKE OF NITRATE AND NITRITE BY DITYLUM BRIGHTWELLII-KINETICS AND MECHANISMS(1) (2).

    PubMed

    Eppley, R W; Coatsworth, J L

    1968-06-01

    Ditylum brightwellii grown on NO2 - as a nitrogen source took up and assimilated NO2 - only in the light, apparently via a photosynthetic nitrite reductase. Assimilation was inhibited by dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU), KCN, partially by 2,4 dinitrophenol, and by NO3 -. Kinetics of inhibition of NO2 - assimilation by NO3 - appeared to be "competitive." D. brightwellii cells grown on NO2 - took up NO3 - in both light and dark and in both cases the uptake was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, but not by DCMU, KCN, or by NO2 -. Most of the NO3 - taken up in the dark was recovered unchanged from the cells. However only 40% of NO3 - taken up in light was recovered from the cells and no NO2 - was found. This suggests that a photosynthetic nitrate reduction mechanism was active in these cells. DCMU inhibited the light-induced NO3 - reduction. This mechanism of NO3 - reduction is distinct from that involving NADH nitrate reductase in D. brightwellii since the concentration of the latter enzyme is very low in cells grown on NO2 -. Saturation kinetics were observed for NO2 - and NO3 - uptake. Half-saturation concentrations (Ks values) were 4 and 2 μM, respectively. These values are compared with those obtained for NO2 - and NO3 - assimilation by other unicellular algae. The comparisons show lower Ks values in oceanic species compared with tide-pool or freshwater algae and they support the idea that Ks values for NO3 - assimilation may provide a key to understanding species succession when this is due to declining: nitrate concentrations in the sea. PMID:27067951

  3. Coupling Between and Among Ammonia Oxidizers and Nitrite Oxidizers in Grassland Mesocosms Submitted to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Supply.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Marie; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Lerondelle, Catherine; Hungate, Bruce A; Nunan, Naoise; Niboyet, Audrey

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements.

  4. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. PMID:25989520

  5. Heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on Al2O3: the effect of temperature on the nitrite and nitrate formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyan; Tong, Shengrui; Ge, Maofa

    2013-06-13

    Although recent evidence suggests that the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of mineral aerosol plays an important role in the atmospheric chemistry, a fundamental understanding of how temperature influences the rate and extent of nitrate formation processes remains unclear. This work presents the first laboratory study of the effect of temperature on heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of γ-Al2O3 in the temperature range of 250-318 K at ambient pressure. From the analysis of IR spectra, nitrite was found to be an intermediate product at temperatures between 250 and 318 K. It is proved by our experiments that nitrite would convert to the bidentate nitrate as the reaction proceeded. In addition, it is interesting to find that the rate of conversion increased with decreasing temperature. Along with nitrite decrease, the initial rate of nitrate formation increased while the rate of nitrate formation in the steady region decreased with decreasing temperature. The uptake coefficients at seasonal temperatures were determined for the first time and were found to be sensitive to temperature. Finally, atmospheric implications of the role of temperature on the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with mineral aerosol are discussed.

  6. Influence of Nitrate and Ammonia on Photosynthetic Characteristics and Leaf Anatomy of Moricandia arvensis1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Usuda, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Schmitt, Mark; Edwards, Gerald E.; Thomas, Richard J.; Evert, Ray F.

    1982-01-01

    The leaf anatomy and certain photosynthetic properties of nitrate- and ammonia-grown plants of Moricandia arvensis (L.) DC., a species previously reported to be a C3-C4 intermediate, were investigated. Nitrate-grown plants had a high level of malate in the leaves while ammonia-grown plants had low levels of malate. In young leaves of nitrate-grown plants, there was a diurnal fluctuation of malate content, increasing during the day and decreasing during the night. Titratable acidity remained low in leaves of both nitrate- and ammonia-grown plants. In nitrate-grown plants, the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase was about 2-fold higher than in ammonia-grown plants, the latter having activity typical of C3 species. Also, in nitrate-grown plants, the ratio of activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/PEP carboxylase was lower than in ammonia-grown plants. Nitrate reductase activities were higher in nitrate- than in ammonia-grown plants and the greatest activity was found in younger leaves. With nitrate-grown plants, during a pulse-chase experiment the label in malate, as a percentage of the total labeled products, increased from about 7% after a 10-second pulse with 14CO2 up to 17% during a 5-minute chase with 12CO2. The pattern of 14C labeling in various metabolites suggests the primary carboxylation is through RuBP carboxylase with a secondary carboxylation through PEP carboxylase. In similar experiments, with ammonia-grown plants, the percentage label in malate was only 0% to 4% with no increase in malate labeling during the chase period. The CO2 compensation point was lower in nitrate-grown than ammonia-grown plants. There was no evidence of Kranz-like anatomy in either the nitrate or ammonia-grown plants. Mitochondria of bundle-sheath cells were strikingly positioned along the inner tangential wall. This might allow the chloroplasts of these cells to fix the mitochondrial photorespired CO2 more effectively and contribute to the low

  7. Use of Griess reagent containing vanadium(III) for post-column derivatization and simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in baby food.

    PubMed

    Casanova, John A; Gross, Lois K; McMullen, Sarah E; Schenck, Frank J

    2006-01-01

    An ion chromatographic method with post-column derivatization and spectrophotometric detection is presented for the determination of nitrate and nitrite (NOx) in baby food. NOx residues found naturally or added as preservatives were extracted from baby foods and determined by using ion chromatography with post-column derivatization and spectrophotometric detection. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite online by post-column reduction using vanadium(lll) chloride and heat. Nitrite reacted with Griess reagent to produce a dye that was detected at 525 nm. The use of V(III) and heat to promote the reduction of nitrate to nitrite online is a novel feature of this detection system. The determination of incurred NOx residues in samples by using AOAC Method 993.03 yielded results comparable to those obtained by ion chromatography with spectrophotometric detection. The toxic and carcinogenic metal cadmium used in the AOAC Method to reduce the nitrate to nitrite was avoided. The proposed method provides simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite. Average recoveries of nitrate and nitrite residues ranged from 82 to 107% for fortification levels of 25-400 ppm.

  8. Simazine biodegradation and community structures of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in bioaugmented soil: impact of ammonia and nitrate nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Wan, Rui; Yang, Yuyin; Sun, Weimin; Wang, Zhao; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of ammonia and nitrate nitrogen sources on simazine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. strain SD1 and the community structures of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in non-agricultural soil. Soil microcosms with different treatments were constructed for herbicide biodegradation test. The relative abundance of the strain SD1 and the structures of AOA and AOB communities were assessed using quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), respectively. The co-existence of two inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonia and nitrate) had certain impact on simazine dissipation by the strain SD1. Bioaugmentation could induce a shift in the community structures of both AOA and AOB, but AOA were more responsive. Nitrogen application had significant impacts on AOA and AOB communities in bioaugmented soils. Moreover, in non-bioaugmented soil, the community structure of AOA, instead of AOB, could be quickly recovered after herbicide application. This study could add some new insights towards the impacts of nitrogen sources on s-triazine bioremediation and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil ecosystem.

  9. The chemistry, waste form development, and properties of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-06-01

    A process for the conversion of alkaline, aqueous nitrate wastes to ammonia gas at low temperature, based upon the use of the active metal reductant aluminum, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process is also well suited for the removal of low-level waste (LLW) radioelements and hazardous metals which report to the solid, alumina-based by-product. ne chemistry of the interaction of aluminum powders with nitrate, and other waste stream metals is presented.

  10. Formation of vascular S-nitrosothiols and plasma nitrates/nitrites following inhalation of diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Knuckles, Travis L; Buntz, Jennifer G; Paffett, Michael; Channell, Meghan; Harmon, Molly; Cherng, Tom; Lucas, Selita N; McDonald, Jacob D; Kanagy, Nancy L; Campen, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated traffic-related airborne pollution with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Nitric oxide (NO) is a common component of fresh diesel and gasoline engine emissions that rapidly transforms both in the atmosphere and once inhaled. Because of this rapid transformation, limited information is available in terms of potential human exposures and adverse health effects. Young rats were exposed to whole diesel emissions (DE) adjusted to 300 μg/m(3) of particulate matter (containing 3.5 ppm NO) or 0, 3, or 10 ppm NO as a positive control. Animals were also pre-injected (ip) with either saline or N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. Predictably, pure NO exposures led to a concentration-dependent increase in plasma nitrates compared to controls, which lasted for roughly 4 h postexposure. Whole DE exposure for 1 h also led to a doubling of plasma NOx. NAC injection increased the levels of plasma nitrates and nitrites (NOx) in the DE exposure group. Inhibition of nitric oxide symthase (NOS) by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) did not block the rise in plasma NOx, demonstrating that the increase was entirely due to exogenous sources. Both DE and pure NO exposures paradoxically led to elevated eNOS expression in aortic tissue. Furthermore, coronary arterioles from NO-exposed animals exhibited greater constriction to endothelin-1 compared to controls, consistent with a derangement of the NOS system. Thus, NO may be an important contributor to traffic-related cardiovascular morbidity, although further research is necessary for proper hazard identification.

  11. Long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate fed to dairy cows on enteric methane emission and nitrate and nitrite residuals in milk.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Gérard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2016-07-01

    A previous study showed the additive methane (CH4)-mitigating effect of nitrate and linseed fed to non-lactating cows. Before practical application, the use of this new strategy in dairy cows requires further investigation in terms of persistency of methanogenesis reduction and absence of residuals in milk products. The objective of this experiment was to study the long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate on enteric CH4 emission and performance in dairy cows. We also assessed the effect of this feeding strategy on the presence of nitrate residuals in milk products, total tract digestibility, nitrogen (N) balance and rumen fermentation. A total of 16 lactating Holstein cows were allocated to two groups in a randomised design conducted in parallel for 17 weeks. Diets were on a dry matter (DM) basis: (1) control (54% maize silage, 6% hay and 40% concentrate; CON) or (2) control plus 3.5% added fat from linseed and 1.8% nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were equivalent in terms of CP (16%), starch (28%) and NDF (33%), and were offered twice daily. Cows were fed ad libitum, except during weeks 5, 16 and 17 in which feed was restricted to 95% of dry matter intake (DMI) to ensure complete consumption of meals during measurement periods. Milk production and DMI were measured weekly. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations in milk and milk products were determined monthly. Daily CH4 emission was quantified in open circuit respiration chambers (weeks 5 and 16). Total tract apparent digestibility, N balance and rumen fermentation parameters were determined in week 17. Daily DMI tended to be lower with LIN+NIT from week 4 to 16 (-5.1 kg/day on average). The LIN+NIT diet decreased milk production during 6 non-consecutive weeks (-2.5 kg/day on average). Nitrate or nitrite residuals were not detected in milk and associated products. The LIN+NIT diet reduced CH4 emission to a similar extent at the beginning and end of the trial (-47%, g/day; -30%, g/kg DMI; -33%, g/kg fat- and protein

  12. Simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate ions by air-segmented amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Haruka; Inui, Koji; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tanaka, Hideji

    2012-01-01

    The concept of amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis has been extended to the simultaneous determination of multiple analytes in a sample. A sample solution containing nitrite and nitrate ions is delivered from two channels, but the flow rates are varied at different frequencies. One of the channels has a reduction column for converting nitrate ions to nitrite ions. Downstream, the absorbance of the diazo-coupling product is monitored after the merging of both solutions with a Griess reagent. The signal is analyzed by a fast Fourier transform (FFT) in real time. From the thus-obtained amplitude, a µmol dm(-3) level of the ions can be determined. The introduction of air bubbles is effective to reduce any axial dispersion, and hence to improve the sensitivity.

  13. A parallel-plate electrochemical reactor model for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite in alkaline waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.H.; White, R.E.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1995-04-01

    The electrochemical treatment of nuclear waste is the subject of much current interest. After radioactive decontamination, the liquid waste from nuclear fuel processing still contains many hazardous substances, among them nitrate and nitrite. A parallel-plate electrochemical reactor model with multiple reactions at both electrodes and anolyte and catholyte recirculation tanks was modeled for the electrochemical destruction of nitrate and nitrite species in an alkaline solution. The model can be used to predict electrochemical reaction current efficiencies and outlet concentrations of species from the reactor, given inlet feed conditions and cell operating conditions. Also, predictions are made for off-gas composition and liquid-phase composition in the recirculation tanks. The results of case studies at different applied potentials are shown here. At lower applied potentials, the model predictions show that the destruction process is more energy efficient, but the time required to destroy a given amount of waste is increased.

  14. Comparative bioavailability of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and urea to typically harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Zhang, Jibiao; Huang, Wei; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Xi, Min; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-15

    Phosphorus is generally considered as the prime limiting nutrient responsible for cyanobacterial blooms. However, recent research is drawing attention to the importance of bioavailable nitrogen (N) in freshwater eutrophication. This study investigated the bioavailability of NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N and Urea-N under different concentrations of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.0mgL(-1) to Microcystis aeruginosa. Overall, Urea-N ranked the first in promoting M. aeruginosa growth, followed by NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N. However, the algal growth cultured in NH4(+)-N was depressed under test N levels. The bioavailability of N to M. aeruginosa was seriously influenced by both N forms and N concentrations (p<0.01). Total N concentrations in Urea-N treatment decreased the fastest, which were corresponding with the μ values of M. aeruginosa. The high enzymic activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase indicated that the decomposition process for urea is effective, which contributed in N assimilation and utilization in M. aeruginosa cells. PMID:27357916

  15. Comparative bioavailability of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and urea to typically harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Zhang, Jibiao; Huang, Wei; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Xi, Min; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-15

    Phosphorus is generally considered as the prime limiting nutrient responsible for cyanobacterial blooms. However, recent research is drawing attention to the importance of bioavailable nitrogen (N) in freshwater eutrophication. This study investigated the bioavailability of NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N and Urea-N under different concentrations of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.0mgL(-1) to Microcystis aeruginosa. Overall, Urea-N ranked the first in promoting M. aeruginosa growth, followed by NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N. However, the algal growth cultured in NH4(+)-N was depressed under test N levels. The bioavailability of N to M. aeruginosa was seriously influenced by both N forms and N concentrations (p<0.01). Total N concentrations in Urea-N treatment decreased the fastest, which were corresponding with the μ values of M. aeruginosa. The high enzymic activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase indicated that the decomposition process for urea is effective, which contributed in N assimilation and utilization in M. aeruginosa cells.

  16. Detection of nitrite and nitrate ions in water by graphene oxide as a potential fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ing Hua; Sundari, Rita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was used as a new fluorescence sensor for detection of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) ions. The GO was synthesized via an improved Hummers’ method, and the properties of GO were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD pattern showed the presence of (002) plane at 2θ of 9.5o while the FTIR spectrum showed the presence of C-OH, C=O, C=C, C-O chemical bonds in the GO. The layer structure of the GO was confirmed from the TEM image. The sensing performance of the GO for NO2- and NO3- was evaluated by monitoring the emission sites of the GO at 567 nm, which was corresponded to the oxygen functional groups. Fluorescence quenching was observed, suggesting that the GO interacted well with both NO2- and NO3- ions. The linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained in the concentration range of 1-10 mM, indicating the potential ability of the GO as the fluorescence sensor. The quenching constants for the detections of NO2- and NO3- were 4.8 × 10-2 and 1.2 × 10-2 mM-1, respectively, suggesting that the GO has greater sensitivity towards the NO2- than the NO3- ion.

  17. Nitrate and nitrite content of well water in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, Innocent S I; Echebiri, Vitalis C

    2003-09-01

    Water samples from 20 artesian wells, chosen by the multistage sampling procedure from 5 zones in the city of Enugu, Southeast Nigeria, were analyzed by the disulfonic acid method in duplicate for the presence of nitrate (NO3) and nitrite (NO2). The zonal mean values for NO3 were 0.45 mmol/l, 0.46 mmol/l, 0.55 mmol/l, 0.59 mmol/l, and 0.65 mmol/l (mean = 0.54 mmol/l), and for NO2 the values were 0.34 mmol/l, 0.32 mmol/l, 0.21 mmol/l, 0.14 mmol/l, and 0.20 mmol/l (mean = 0.24 mmol/l), respectively. The mean values were reciprocally related (r = -.7356, p = 0.0002), indicating fecal contamination of well water. There were no significant differences between the mean values and the sum of the NO3 and NO2 values of the samples (p > 0.05), indicating uniform nitrogen content in the region. The mean value for NO3 (0.54 mmol/l) was below the guideline values set by the World Health Organization, but the mean NO2 concentration of 0.24 mmol/l was much higher (290%) than what is considered safe for humans.

  18. Effects of simulated microgravity on arterial nitric oxide synthase and nitrate and nitrite content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jin; Kahwaji, Chadi I.; Ni, Zhenmin; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the alterations in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and nitrate and nitrite (NOx) content of different arteries from simulated microgravity rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either a control group or simulated microgravity group. For simulating microgravity, animals were subjected to hindlimb unweighting (HU) for 20 days. Different arterial tissues were removed for determination of NOS expression and NOx. Western blotting was used to measure endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) protein content. Total concentrations of NOx, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, were determined by the chemiluminescence method. Compared with controls, isolated vessels from simulated microgravity rats showed a significant increase in both eNOS and iNOS expression in carotid arteries and thoracic aorta and a significant decrease in eNOS and iNOS expression of mesenteric arteries. The eNOS and iNOS content of cerebral arteries, as well as that of femoral arteries, showed no differences between the two groups. Concerning NOx, vessels from HU rats showed an increase in cerebral arteries, a decrease in mesenteric arteries, and no change in carotid artery, femoral artery and thoracic aorta. These data indicated that there were differential alterations in NOS expression and NOx of different arteries after hindlimb unweighting. We suggest that these changes might represent both localized adaptations to differential body fluid redistribution and other factors independent of hemodynamic shifts during simulated microgravity.

  19. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on key comparison CCQM-K59: Determination of nitrite and nitrate in calibration solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máriássy, Michal; Hioki, Akiharu; Konopelko, Leonid A.; Dimchoglo, Irina; Winchester, Michael; Butler, Therese; Case, Ryan; Hernández, Ana; Galli, Ariel; Alvarez, Pablo; Hae Lee, Joung; Royer, Chantal; Shi, Naijie; Chao, Jingbo; Wu, Bing; Li, Haifeng

    2008-01-01

    In this key comparison anion calibration solutions of nitrate and nitrite were investigated. The mass fractions of the anions in both solutions were about 1 g/kg. For the nitrate comparison 8 participants provided results; 3 analytical techniques were used: ion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and coulometry after ion exchange. The nitrite amount content was determined by 7 participants using one of the following 3 techniques: ion chromatography, titrimetry and capillary electrophoresis. The following institutes participated in this key comparison: INTI (Argentina), KRISS (Korea), LNE (France), NIM (Pepole's Republic of China), NIST (USA), NMIJ (Japan), SMU (Slovakia) and VNIIM (Russia). The variability (RSD) of the results is about 0.75% for both the nitrite and the nitrate solutions. Compared to the key comparison CCQM-K29 the results of CCQM-K59 were significantly worse. This is in part due to the measurement methods used, possibly also due to the standards used by the institutes. A pilot study (P89) was performed in parallel on the same calibration solutions used in this K59 comparison study by laboratories preferring to participate in the pilot study and on a seawater sample containing about 0.1 mg/kg nitrite and 1 mg/kg nitrate. The results of the pilot study are reported separately. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  20. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Kutvonen, Heini; Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using 15N-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and enrichment with 14∕15N-ammonium or 14∕15N-nitrate complemented with methane. Twenty-eight days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG) gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG) from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium, and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. 15N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used 15N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system. PMID:26528251

  1. The Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Human Urine and Blood by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Cloud-Point Extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yaling; Lu, Yunhui

    2015-08-01

    A simple efficient and practical separation/preconcentration coupled with HPLC method for the determination nitrate and low concentrations of nitrite in human urine and blood was investigated. The method is based on precolumn derivatization using the Griess reaction and cloud-point extraction (CPE) of nitrite anion and direct determination of nitrate using its UV absorbance by ion-pair HPLC. The chromatographic process with detection at two wavelengths (510 and 220 nm) allows the determination of nitrite and nitrate. Decolorization and protein precipitation of urine and blood was applied to overcome the interference of matrix and enhance the sensitivity. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy and precision. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range of nitrite from 10 to 1,000 ng/mL and nitrate from 0.1 to 10 µg/mL. Product recoveries ranged from 92.4 to 99.9%. The limits of detection were 1 ng/mL and 0.1 µg/mL for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, the technique was simple and reliable, with potential application in biological sample analysis of nitrate and nitrite.

  2. Nitrate and nitrite inhibition of methanogenesis during denitrification in granular biofilms and digested domestic sludges.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Qais; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2009-11-01

    Anaerobic bioreactors that can support simultaneous microbial processes of denitrification and methanogenesis are of interest to nutrient nitrogen removal. However, an important concern is the potential toxicity of nitrate (NO(3) (-)) and nitrite (NO(2) (-)) to methanogenesis. The methanogenic toxicity of the NO (x) (-) compounds to anaerobic granular biofilms and municipal anaerobic digested sludge with two types of substrates, acetate and hydrogen, was studied. The inhibition was the severest when the NO (x) (-) compounds were still present in the media (exposure period). During this period, 95% or greater inhibition of methanogenesis was evident at the lowest concentrations of added NO(2) (-) tested (7.6-10.2 mg NO(2) (-)-N l(-1)) or 8.3-121 mg NO(3) (-)-N l(-1) of added NO(3) (-), depending on substrate and inoculum source. The inhibition imparted by NO(3) (-) was not due directly to NO(3) (-) itself, but instead due to reduced intermediates (e.g., NO(2) (-)) formed during the denitrification process. The toxicity of NO (x) (-) was found to be reversible after the exposure period. The recovery of activity was nearly complete at low added NO (x) (-) concentrations; whereas the recovery was only partial at high added NO (x) (-) concentrations. The recovery is attributed to the metabolism of the NO (x) (-) compounds. The assay substrate had a large impact on the rate of NO(2) (-) metabolism. Hydrogen reduced NO(2) (-) slowly such that NO(2) (-) accumulated more and as a result, the toxicity was greater compared to acetate as a substrate. The final methane yield was inversely proportional to the amount of NO (x) (-) compounds added indicating that they were the preferred electron acceptors compared to methanogenesis.

  3. SNOW2002: NOx Production From Nitrate-In-Ice Photolysis at Two pHs and Comparison with NOx Levels From Nitrite-In-Ice Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M.; Dibb, J.

    2002-12-01

    We conducted experiments using artificial snow, synthetic air, and sunlight during January, 2002 (the SNOW2002 study) in order to test the influence of neutral and basic pH on the amount of NO, NO2, and NOx emitted from artificial snow during nitrate photolysis. We also conducted the first tests demonstrating that illumination of consolidated, sub-millimeter diameter ice particles (e.g., artificial snow) doped with nitrite produces NOx, confirming that nitrite photolysis occurs in ice and snow. Innovations in NOx instrument design were also implemented in order to estimate gaseous HONO levels using UV lamp photolysis. Nitrate was introduced into solution as sodium nitrate, pH was controlled using sodium hydroxide. Artificial snow particles were formed by spraying tiny water droplets down into a tall (3 meter) column chilled by a pool of liquid nitrogen at the column base. Although this method of creating artificial snow results in snow that is certainly different than natural snow, the tiny ice particles formed are powdery and sinter quickly. This artificial snow is relatively easy to make and is well suited for determining whether photolysis of nitrate or nitrite is occurring, and whether changes occur at various pH levels. The amounts of NO and NO2 produced by nitrate ion photolysis in aqueous solution depends on pH such that NO production is greatly enhanced in basic solutions. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH of the solutions used to make artificial snow does not effect the levels or partitioning of NOx produced from nitrate-in-ice photolysis. This result suggests that aqueous photochemical analogs of nitrate photolysis may not apply to nitrate-in-ice photochemistry and that more experiments are needed in order to understand nitrate-in-ice photochemistry. Experiments exploring nitrite-in-ice photolysis demonstrate that there is one to two orders of magnitude more NOx produced by nitrite photolysis than by nitrate photolysis at equivalent conditions

  4. Spatial Interaction of Archaeal Ammonia-Oxidizers and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria in an Unfertilized Grassland Soil.

    PubMed

    Stempfhuber, Barbara; Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Regan, Kathleen M; Kölbl, Angelika; Wüst, Pia K; Marhan, Sven; Sikorski, Johannes; Overmann, Jörg; Friedrich, Michael W; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups - the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m(2). Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira) selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onward, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation. PMID:26834718

  5. Spatial Interaction of Archaeal Ammonia-Oxidizers and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria in an Unfertilized Grassland Soil

    PubMed Central

    Stempfhuber, Barbara; Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Regan, Kathleen M.; Kölbl, Angelika; Wüst, Pia K.; Marhan, Sven; Sikorski, Johannes; Overmann, Jörg; Friedrich, Michael W.; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups – the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m2. Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira) selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onward, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation. PMID:26834718

  6. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  7. Intracellular Conversion of Environmental Nitrate and Nitrite to Nitric Oxide with Resulting Developmental Toxicity to the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Hannas, Bethany R.; Das, Parikshit C.; Li, Hong; LeBlanc, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nitrate and nitrite (jointly referred to herein as NOx) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which aquatic organisms are at particularly high risk of exposure. We tested the hypothesis that NOx undergo intracellular conversion to the potent signaling molecule nitric oxide resulting in the disruption of endocrine-regulated processes. Methodology/Principal Findings These experiments were performed with insect cells (Drosophila S2) and whole organisms Daphnia magna. We first evaluated the ability of cells to convert nitrate (NO3−) and nitrite (NO2−) to nitric oxide using amperometric real-time nitric oxide detection. Both NO3− and NO2− were converted to nitric oxide in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. Further, nitric oxide trapping and fluorescent visualization studies revealed that perinatal daphnids readily convert NO2− to nitric oxide. Next, daphnids were continuously exposed to concentrations of the nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside (positive control) and to concentrations of NO3− and NO2−. All three compounds interfered with normal embryo development and reduced daphnid fecundity. Developmental abnormalities were characteristic of those elicited by compounds that interfere with ecdysteroid signaling. However, no compelling evidence was generated to indicate that nitric oxide reduced ecdysteroid titers. Conclusions/Significance Results demonstrate that nitrite elicits developmental and reproductive toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations due likely to its intracellular conversion to nitric oxide. PMID:20805993

  8. Dynamics of nitrate and nitrite content during storage of home-made and small-scale industrially produced raw vegetable juices and their dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Tamme, T; Reinik, M; Püssa, T; Roasto, M; Meremäe, K; Kiis, A

    2010-04-01

    The influence of storage conditions on nitrate and nitrite contents, pH, and total viable bacterial count of raw vegetable juices was studied. Three different types of juices from an Estonian small-scale producer and five different types of home-made juices were analysed. Analyses were performed immediately after opening the commercial juice packages and immediately after preparation of a home-made juice. Additionally, samples were taken after open storage of a juice at the refrigerator and ambient temperatures during 24 and 48 h. The biggest changes in nitrate and nitrite contents were found during storage of carrot, beetroot and radish juices. During 48 h of storage at ambient temperature, the mean increases of nitrite content in home-made carrot, beetroot and radish juices were from 0.1 to 187, from 2.1 to 578, and from 0.5 to 259 mg l(-1), respectively. In the case of commercial lightly pasteurized products, the biggest increase of nitrite content, from 3.2 to 11 mg l(-1), was found in red beetroot juice. After 48 h of storage at refrigerator temperature, the changes of nitrite and nitrate were smaller. In the case of consumption of 300 ml of home-made carrot juice, with a nitrate and nitrite content of 64 and 110 mg l(-1), respectively, stored for 24 h at ambient temperature, the average intake was 8% and 846% of the acceptable daily intake of nitrates and nitrites, respectively. After consumption of 50 ml of the same carrot juice by children (1-2 years of age) the average intake of nitrates and nitrites was 7% and 733% of the acceptable daily intake, respectively. PMID:20127545

  9. Nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and vegetable-based products and their intakes by the Estonian population.

    PubMed

    Tamme, T; Reinik, M; Roasto, M; Juhkam, K; Tenno, T; Kiis, A

    2006-04-01

    The content of nitrates were determined in 1,349 samples of vegetables and ready-made food in 2003-2004 as a part of the Estonian food safety monitoring programme and the Estonian Science Foundation grant research activities. The results of manufacturers' analyses carried out for internal monitoring were included in the study. The highest mean values of nitrates were detected in dill, spinach, lettuce and beet root. The mean concentrations were 2,936, 2,508, 2,167 and 1,446 mg kg(-1), respectively. The content of nitrites in samples was lower than 5 mg kg(-1). In total, the mean intake of nitrates by the Estonian population was 58 mg day(-1). The mean content of nitrates in vegetable-based infant foods of Estonian origin was 88 mg kg(-1). The average daily intake of nitrates by children in the age group of 4-6 years was 30 mg. The infants' average daily intake of nitrates from consumption of vegetable-based foods was 7.8 mg.

  10. Unraveling Pathways of Guaiacol Nitration in Atmospheric Waters: Nitrite, A Source of Reactive Nitronium Ion in the Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-08-01

    The tropospheric aqueous-phase aging of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol, GUA), a lignocellulosic biomass burning pollutant, is addressed in this work. Pathways of GUA nitration in aqueous solution under atmospherically relevant conditions are proposed and critically discussed. The influence of NaNO2 and H2O2, hydroxyl radical scavenger, and sunlight was assessed by an experimental-modeling approach. In the presence of the urban pollutant, nitrite, GUA is preferentially nitrated to yield 4- and 6-nitroguaiacol. After a short lag-time, 4,6-dinitroguaiacol is also formed. Its production accelerates after guaiacol is completely consumed, which is nicely described by the model function accounting for NO2(•) and NO2(+) as nitrating agents. Although the estimated second-order kinetic rate constants of methoxyphenol nitration with NO2(•) are substantially higher than the corresponding rate constants of nitration with NO2(+), nitration rates are competitive under nighttime and liquid atmospheric aerosol-like conditions. In contrast to concentrations of radicals, which are governed by the interplay between diffusion-controlled reactions and are therefore mostly constant, concentrations of electrophiles are very much dependent on the ratio of NO2(-) to activated aromatics in solution. These results contribute substantially to the understanding of methoxyphenol aging in the atmospheric waters and underscore the importance of including electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions in atmospheric models.

  11. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in

  12. Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction in Anaerobic Sediments Leading to River Nitrite Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, B.; Smith, R. V.; Laughlin, R. J.; Lennox, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies on Northern Ireland rivers have shown that summer nitrite (NO(inf2)(sup-)) concentrations greatly exceed the European Union guideline of 3 (mu)g of N liter(sup-1) for rivers supporting salmonid fisheries. In fast-flowing aerobic small streams, NO(inf2)(sup-) is thought to originate from nitrification, due to the retardation of Nitrobacter strains by the presence of free ammonia. Multiple regression analyses of NO(inf2)(sup-) concentrations against water quality variables of the six major rivers of the Lough Neagh catchment in Northern Ireland, however, suggested that the high NO(inf2)(sup-) concentrations found in the summer under warm, slow-flow conditions may result from the reduction of NO(inf3)(sup-). This hypothesis was supported by field observations of weekly changes in N species. Here, reduction of NO(inf3)(sup-) was observed to occur simultaneously with elevation of NO(inf2)(sup-) levels and subsequently NH(inf4)(sup+) levels, indicating that dissimilatory NO(inf3)(sup-) reduction to NH(inf4)(sup+) (DNRA) performed by fermentative bacteria (e.g., Aeromonas and Vibrio spp.) is responsible for NO(inf2)(sup-) accumulation in these large rivers. Mechanistic studies in which (sup15)N-labelled NO(inf3)(sup-) in sediment extracts was used provided further support for this hypothesis. Maximal concentrations of NO(inf2)(sup-) accumulation (up to 1.4 mg of N liter(sup-1)) were found in sediments deeper than 6 cm associated with a high concentration of metabolizable carbon and anaerobic conditions. The (sup15)N enrichment of the NO(inf2)(sup-) was comparable to that of the NO(inf3)(sup-) pool, indicating that the NO(inf2)(sup-) was predominantly NO(inf3)(sup-) derived. There is evidence which suggests that the high NO(inf2)(sup-) concentrations observed arose from the inhibition of the DNRA NO(inf2)(sup-) reductase system by NO(inf3)(sup-). PMID:16535749

  13. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34... nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite are subject to prior sanctions issued... without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat and poultry products....

  14. NITRATE CONTAMINATION OF GROUND WATER (GW-761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of nitrate and related compounds in ground water is discussed from the perspectives of its natural as well as anthropogenic origins. A brief explanation of the nitrogen cycle touches on the production as well as utilization of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and nitrog...

  15. Incubation of curing brines for the production of ready-to-eat, uncured, no-nitrite-or-nitrate-added, ground, cooked and sliced ham.

    PubMed

    Krause, B L; Sebranek, J G; Rust, R E; Mendonca, A

    2011-12-01

    Salt concentration, vegetable juice powder (VJP) concentration and temperature were investigated to determine necessary conditions for incubation of curing brines including VJP and a starter culture containing Staphylococcus carnosus prior to production of naturally cured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added meat products. Subsequently, incubated brines were utilized to produce no-nitrate/nitrite-added sliced ham in which quality characteristics and residual nitrite concentrations were measured to determine feasibility of brine incubation for nitrate conversion prior to injection. Two ham treatments (one with VJP and starter culture; one with pre-converted VJP) and a nitrite-added control were used. No differences (P>0.05) were found for color in the VJP treatments. Control sliced ham was redder after 42 days of storage, retaining significantly (P<0.05) greater a* (redness) than either of the VJP treatments. Residual nitrite concentration was greater (P<0.05) in the control hams during the first week of storage. While the nitrite-added control retained greater red color and initially had more residual nitrite than the VJP treatments, the two VJP treatments did not differ from each other. PMID:21664056

  16. THE NONLINEAR RESPONSE OF NITRATE REPLACEMENT THAT MITIGATES SULFATE REDUCTIONS: THE GAS RATIO AS AN INDICATOR AND SENSITIVITY TO ERRORS IN TOTAL AMMONIA AND TOTAL NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poster presents an assessment, using the CMAQ air quality model, showing the inorganic gas ratio (the ratio of free ammonia to total nitrate) can function as a screening indicator of the winter replacement of sulfate by nitrate when sulfate is reduced. It also presents an as...

  17. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  18. Reflectance spectroscopy of low atomic weight and Na-rich minerals: Borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E.; Berg, B.; Mann, P.; Applin, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured reflectance spectra (0.35-20 μm) of a suite of minerals and synthetic compounds that contain low-Z (⩽Na) elements as the major cation and/or the major anion in oxides/oxyhydroxides, and are relevant to planetary geology and astrobiology. The suite comprises Na-borates, Na-, K-, Ca-hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides. Na-borate spectra exhibit B-O fundamental vibrations between 7 and 14 μm, and overtones/combinations of these bands in the 1.55, 1.75, 2.15, and 2.25 μm regions. Na-, K-, and Ca-hydroxide reflectance spectra are characterized by OH and metal-OH fundamental vibrations near 3, 8, and 18 μm, and a number of overtone and combination absorption bands at shorter wavelengths, and a characteristic metal-OH band near 2.35 μm. The nitrate and nitrite spectra exhibit fundamental N-O vibrations in the 7-14 μm region and numerous combinations and overtones that are still detectable to as low as ∼1.8 μm. Na-peroxide is largely spectrally featureless below 24 μm, making its detection problematic, while H-peroxide has many OH-related absorption features below 2.5 μm that differ in position from those of H2O ice and liquid. The results of this study indicate that the borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide can all be uniquely identified using characteristic absorption features that are present below 2.5 μm. However, some of these features are weak, and their detectability will depend on the types and abundances of any accessory phases that may be present.

  19. Exogenous nitrate attenuates nitrite toxicity to anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangbin; Vilcherrez, David; Carvajal-Arroyo, Jose Maria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox) can be severely inhibited by one of its main substrates, nitrite (NO2(-)). At present, there is limited information on the processes by which anammox bacteria are able to tolerate toxic NO2(-). Intracellular consumption or electrochemically driven (transmembrane proton motive force) NO2(-) export are considered the main mechanisms of NO2(-) detoxification. In this work, we evaluated the potential of exogenous nitrate (NO3(-)) on relieving NO2(-) toxicity, putatively facilitated by NarK, a NO3(-)/NO2(-) transporter encoded in the anammox genome. The relative contribution of NO3(-) to NO2(-) detoxification was found to be pH dependent. Exposure of anammox cells to NO2(-) in absence of their electron donating substrate, ammonium (NH4(+)), causes NO2(-) stress. At pH 6.7 and 7.0, the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells was respectively 0 and 27% of the non-stressed control activity (NO2(-) and NH4(+) fed simultaneously). Exogenous NO3(-) addition caused the recovery to 42% and 80% of the control activity at pH 6.7 and 7.0, respectively. The recovery of the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells improved with increasing NO3(-) concentration, the maximum recovery being achieved at 0.85 mM. The NO3(-) pre-incubation time is less significant at pH 7.0 than at pH 6.7 due to a more severe NO2(-) toxicity at lower pH. Additionally, NO3(-) caused almost complete attenuation of NO2(-) toxicity in cells exposed to the proton gradient disruptor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone at pH 7.5, providing evidence that the NO3(-) attenuation is independent of the proton motive force. The absence of a measurable NO3(-) consumption (or NO3(-) dependent N2 production) during the batch tests leaves NO3(-) dependent active transport of NO2(-) as the only plausible explanation for the relief of NO2(-) inhibition. We suggest that anammox cells can use a secondary transport system facilitated by exogenous NO3(-) to alleviate NO2(-) toxicity. PMID

  20. Acute effect of nitric oxide supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables in resistance trained men.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Williams, Sara A; Canale, Robert E; Farney, Tyler M; Kabir, Mohammad M

    2010-10-01

    Nitric oxide dietary supplements are extremely popular within the sport and bodybuilding community. Most products contain l-arginine, for which there is no direct evidence that oral L-arginine increases circulating nitric oxide or blood flow. A new molecule (2-[nitrooxy]thyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) is being marketed as a sport supplement for purposes of delivering "real nitric oxide" to the circulation. In the present study, we measured the acute effects of this supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables. Ten resistance trained men (26 ± 4 years old; 8 ± 6 years of resistance exercise training) reported to the laboratory in random order after a 10-hour overnight fast on 2 occasions separated by 1 week and were provided the supplement (2-[nitrooxy]ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) or placebo. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded, and venous blood samples were collected before and at 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after complete breakdown of the supplement (5 minutes post intake) or placebo. Blood samples were assayed for plasma nitrate/nitrite. No interaction (p = 0.99), condition (p = 0.18), or time (p = 0.98) effects were noted for plasma nitrate/nitrite, with values remaining nearly identical across time for placebo (∼27 μmol·L(-1)) and increasing a maximum of ∼6.7% (from 32.9 to 35.1 μmol·L(-1)) at the 15-minute collection period for the supplement. In regards to hemodynamic variables, no interaction, condition, or time effects were noted for heart rate, systolic, or diastolic blood pressure (p > 0.05), with values near identical between conditions and virtually unchanged across time. These findings indicate that 2-(nitrooxy)ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate has a small effect on increasing circulating nitrate/nitrite and does not cause any change in hemodynamic variables within the 1 hour postingestion period in a sample of resistance trained men.

  1. Selective determination method for measurement of nitrite and nitrate in water samples using high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column photochemical reaction and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Shigeo; Saito, Keiitsu; Tomiyasu, Takashi; Komatsu, Yu

    2009-04-10

    A simple, sensitive and selective method for the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in water samples has been developed. The method is based on ion-exchange separation, online photochemical reaction, and luminol chemiluminescence detection. The separation of nitrite and nitrate was achieved using an anion-exchange column with a 20mM borate buffer (pH 10.0). After the separation, these ions were converted to peroxynitrite by online UV irradiation using a low-pressure mercury lamp and then mixed with a luminol solution prepared with carbonate buffer (pH 10.0). The calibration graphs of the nitrite and nitrate were linear in the range from 2.0 x 10(-9) to 2.5 x 10(-6)M and 2.0 x 10(-8) to 2.5 x 10(-5)M, respectively. Since the sensitivity of nitrite was about 10 times higher than that of nitrate, the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in the water samples could be efficiently achieved. This method was successfully applied to various water samples--river water, pond water, rain water, commercial mineral water, and tap water--with only filtration and dilution steps.

  2. Nitrate reduction by organotrophic Anammox bacteria in a nitritation/anammox granular sludge and a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Mari K H; Yang, Jingjing; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Plaza, Elzbieta; Trela, Jozef; Hultman, Bengt; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on nitrogen removal and microbial community structure in nitritation/anammox process were compared within a granular sludge reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor. Nitrate productions in both systems were lower by 40-68% in comparison with expected nitrate production. Expected sludge production on VFAs was estimated to be 67-77% higher if heterotrophs were the main acetate degraders suggesting that Anammox bacteria used its organotrophic capability and successfully competed with general heterotrophs for organic carbon, which led to a reduced sludge production. FISH measurements showed a population consisting of mainly Anammox and AOB in both reactors and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests also confirmed that flocculent biomass consisted of a minor proportion of heterotrophs with a large proportion of AOBs. The dominant Anammox bacterium was Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" with a minor fraction of Candidatus "Anammoxoglobus propionicus", both known to be capable of oxidizing VFAs.

  3. Thermal fluids for CSP systems: Alkaline nitrates/nitrites thermodynamics modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzoni, A. C.; Sau, S.; Corsaro, N.; Giaconia, A.; D'Ottavi, C.; Licoccia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molten salt (MS) mixtures are used for the transport (HTF-heat transfer fluid) and storage of heat (HSM-heat storage material) in Concentration Solar Plants (CSP). In general, alkaline and earth-alkaline nitrate/nitrite mixtures are employed. Along with its upper stability temperature, the melting point (liquidus point) of a MS mixture is one of the main parameters which defines its usefulness as a HTF and HSM medium. As a result, we would like to develop a predictive model which will allow us to forecast freezing points for different MS mixture compositions; thus circumventing the need to determine experimentally the phase diagram for each MS mixture. To model ternary/quaternary phase diagram, parameters for the binary subsystems are to be determined, which is the purpose of the concerned work. In a binary system with components A and B, in phase equilibrium conditions (e.g. liquid and solid) the chemical potentials (partial molar Gibbs energy) for each component in each phase are equal. For an ideal solution it is possible to calculate the mixing (A+B) Gibbs energy:ΔG = ΔH - TΔS = RT(xAlnxA + xBlnxB) In case of non-ideal solid/liquid mixtures, such as the nitrates/nitrites compositions investigated in this work, the actual value will differ from the ideal one by an amount defined as the "mixing" (mix) Gibbs free energy. If the resulting mixtures is assumed, as indicated in the previous literature, to follow a "regular solution" model, where all the non-ideality is considered included in the enthalpy of mixing value and considering, for instance, the A component:Δ G ≡0 =(Δ HA-T Δ SA)+(ΔH¯ m i x AL-T ΔS¯ m i x AL)-(ΔH¯ m i x AS-T ΔS¯ m i x AS)where the molar partial amounts can be calculated from the total value by the Gibbs Duhem equation: (ΔH¯m i x AL=ΔHm i x-XB Ld/Δ Hm i x d XB L ) L;(ΔH¯m i x AS=ΔHm i x-XB Sd/Δ Hm i x d XB S ) S and, in general, it is possible to express the mixing enthalpy for solids and liquids as a function of the mol

  4. Reversible intercalation of ammonia molecules into a layered double hydroxide structure without exchanging nitrate counter-ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Wypych, Fernando; Castillon Barraza, Felipe; Contreras Lopez, Oscar Edel

    2010-10-15

    A zinc/aluminum LDH was precipitated with recycled ammonia from a chemical vapor deposition reaction. The LDH presented a crystalline phase with basal distance of 8.9 A, typical for nitrate-containing LDHs, and another phase with a basal distance of 13.9 A. Thermal treatment at 150 {sup o}C eliminated the phase with the bigger basal distance leaving only the anhydrous nitrate-intercalated LDH structure with 8.9 A. Intense N-H stretching modes in the FTIR spectra suggested that the expansion was due to intercalation of ammonia in the form of [NH{sub 4}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}]{sup +} species. When additional samples were precipitated with pure ammonia, the conventional LDH nitrate structure was obtained (8.9 A basal distance) at pH=7, as well as a pure crystalline phase with 13.9 A basal distance at pH=10 due to ammonia intercalation that can be removed by heating at 150 {sup o}C or by stirring in acetone, confirming a unusual sensu stricto intercalation process into a LDH without exchanging nitrate ions. - Graphical abstract: LDH-nitrate precipitated with ammonia expands the interlayer space if ammonia is bubbled up to pH 10. The basal distance decreased when the compound was heated at 150 {sup o}C or stirred in acetone. Nitrate ions are not exchanged.

  5. Nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) are endocrine disruptors to downregulate expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and motor behavior through conversion to nitric oxide in early development of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jannat, Meshkatul; Fatimah, Ratu; Kishida, Mitsuyo

    2014-09-26

    With a view to consider the increasing concern over nitrogen pollution in the aquatic environment, we investigated effects of nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) on the activity of dopaminergic neuron in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Both nitrate and nitrite exposure decreased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in dopaminergic neurons at 48hpf. Only nitrite decreased the response to tactile stimulation at 72hpf, whereas both nitrate and nitrite decreased the swimming activity at 6dpf. When the embryos were exposed to nitrate or nitrite together with an estrogen receptor blocker (ICI 182,780), the decreases in TH expression and motor behavior caused by nitrate or nitrite alone were reversed suggesting the effects of nitrate and nitrite were mediated through estrogen receptor (ER). The result of co-incubation with an oxidoreductase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium, indicated the conversion to nitric oxide (NO) is likely to be responsible for the effects of nitrate and nitrite, which was further supported by the increased staining for NO after exposure. The present study demonstrates that nitrate and nitrite are neurotoxicants acting as an endocrine disruptor possibly through conversion to NO to downregulate the activity of dopaminergic neuron in early development of zebrafish. PMID:25173937

  6. Ammonia from iron(II) reduction of nitrite and the Strecker synthesis: do iron(II) and cyanide interfere with each other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.; Lerner, N.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, effect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The reduction of nitrite and the Strecker can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, to yield glycine from a mixture of nitrite, Fe+2, formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  7. Nitrate and ammonia contaminations in drinking water and the affecting factors in Hailun, northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinfeng; Chen, Liding; Zhang, Haiping

    2013-03-01

    Drinking water samples (N = 228) from domestic tube wells (DTWs) and seven samples from public water supply wells (PWSWs) were collected and tested in Hailun, northeast China. The percentage of samples with nitrate and ammonia concentrations above the maximum acceptable concentration of nitrate, 10 mg N/L, and the maximum ensure concentration of ammonia, 1.5 mg/L, for the DTWs were significantly higher than for the PWSWs. Of the DTWs, an important observation was that the occurrence of groundwater nitrate contamination was directly related to well tube material with different joint pathways. Nitrate in seamless-tube wells was lower statistically significantly than those in multiple-section-tube wells (p < .001). Furthermore, well depth and hydrogeological setting might have some impacts on nitrogen contamination and the major sources of inorganic nitrogen contamination may be nitrogenous chemical fertilizer. Therefore, PWSWs built for all families are the best way to ensure the drinking water safety in villages. For DTWs it is necessary to use seamless tubes and to dig deep enough according to the depth of groundwater level. Improving the efficiency of chemical fertilizer use would also reduce the risk of groundwater contamination.

  8. Analysis of nitrites and nitrates in hams and sausages by open-tubular capillary electrochromatography with a nanolatex-coated capillary column.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhao; Tian, Xiangyu; Guo, Yaxiao; Li, Haibin; Yu, Ajuan; Deng, Zhifen; Sun, Barry Baoguo; Zhang, Shusheng

    2014-04-16

    In this work, a new open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) method with the nanolatex-coated column was proposed for the determination of nitrites and nitrates in foodstuffs. The method was simple and repeatable as a result of avoiding the introduction of an electroosmotic flow reverse additive (such as cetyltrimethylammonium chloride) in electrophoretic buffer. The limits of quantitation were 0.89 and 1.05 mg kg⁻¹ for nitrate and nitrite, respectively, whereas the overall recoveries ranged from 94 to 103%. The developed OT-CEC method was successfully applied for 12 samples, and the residue profiles of nitrites and nitrates in hams and sausages were obtained and evaluated.

  9. Magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: an efficient adsorbent for the separation and removal of nitrate and nitrite ions from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ensieh; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of magnetic nanosorbent, hydroxyapatite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles was synthesized and used for the adsorption and removal of nitrite and nitrate ions from environmental samples. The properties of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. After the adsorption process, the separation of γ-Fe2O3@hydroxyapatite nanoparticles from the aqueous solution was simply achieved by applying an external magnetic field. The effects of different variables on the adsorption efficiency were studied simultaneously using an experimental design. The variables of interest were amount of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, sample volume, pH, stirring rate, adsorption time, and temperature. The experimental parameters were optimized using a Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology after a Plackett-Burman screening design. Under the optimum conditions, the adsorption efficiencies of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles adsorbents toward NO3(-) and NO2(-) ions (100 mg/L) were in the range of 93-101%. The results revealed that the magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles adsorbent could be used as a simple, efficient, and cost-effective material for the removal of nitrate and nitrite ions from environmental water and soil samples.

  10. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Cady, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site`s evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL`s thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  11. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D. ); Cady, H.H. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site's evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL's thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  12. Nitrate Transport System in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a Km for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with Ki values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate. PMID:4274457

  13. Endogenous superoxide production and the nitrite/nitrate ratio control the concentration of bioavailable free nitric oxide in leaves.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Mikoyan, Vasak D; Serezhenkov, Vladimir A; Fryer, Michael J; Baker, Neil R; Cooper, Chris E

    2004-06-01

    We have quantitatively measured nitric oxide production in the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Vicia faba by adapting ferrous dithiocarbamate spin tapping methods previously used in animal systems. Hydrophobic diethyldithiocarbamate complexes were used to measure NO interacting with membranes, and hydrophilic N-methyl-d-glucamine dithiocarbamate was used to measure NO released into the external solution. Both complexes were able to trap levels of NO, readily detectable by EPR spectroscopy. Basal rates of NO production (in the order of 1 nmol g(-) (1) h(-1)) agreed with previous studies. However, use of methodologies that corrected for the removal of free NO by endogenously produced superoxide resulted in a significant increase in trapped NO (up to 18 nmol g(-) (1) h(-1)). Basal NO production in leaves is therefore much higher than previously thought, but this is masked by significant superoxide production. The effects of nitrite (increased rate) and nitrate (decreased rate) are consistent with a role for nitrate reductase as the source of this basal NO production. However, rates under physiologically achievable nitrite concentrations never approach that reported following pathogen induction of plant nitric-oxide synthase. In Hibiscus rosa sinensis, the addition of exogenous nitrite generated sufficient NO such that EPR could be used to detect its production using endogenous spin traps (forming paramagnetic dinitrosyl iron complexes). Indeed the levels of this nitrosylated iron pool are sufficiently high that they may represent a method of maintaining bioavailable iron levels under conditions of iron starvation, thus explaining the previously observed role of NO in preventing chlorosis under these conditions. PMID:15056652

  14. Development of a simple method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Pereira, Raimundo N; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it was developed a method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry of NO produced by thermal decomposition of nitrate in a graphite furnace. The NO line at 215.360 nm was used for all analytical measurements and the signal obtained by integrated absorbance of three pixels. A volume of 20 μL of standard solution or groundwater sample was injected into graphite furnace and 5 μL of a 1% (m/v) Ca solution was co-injected as chemical modifier. The pyrolisis and vaporization temperatures established were of 150 and 1300°C, respectively. Under these conditions, it was observed a difference of thermal stability among the two nitrogen species in the presence of hydrochloric acid co-injected. While that the nitrite signal was totally suppressed, nitrate signal remained nearly stable. This way, nitrogen can be quantified only as nitrate. The addition of hydrogen peroxide provided the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate, which allowed the total quantification of the species and nitrite obtained by difference. A volume of 5 μL of 0.3% (v/v) hydrochloric acid was co-injected for the elimination of nitrite, whereas that hydrogen peroxide in the concentration of 0.75% (v/v) was added to samples or standards for the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Analytical curve was established using standard solution of nitrate. The method described has limits of detection and quantification of 0.10 and 0.33 μg mL(-1) of nitrogen, respectively. The precision, estimated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was of 7.5 and 3.8% (n=10) for groundwater samples containing nitrate-N concentrations of 1.9 and 15.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of 10 groundwater samples and the results were compared with those obtained by ion chromatography method. In all samples analyzed, the concentration of nitrite-N was always below of the limit of

  15. [Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Two Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite Systems].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing-feng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Shu-jun; Fan, Xiao-yan; Pan, Kai-ling; Ma, Qian; Yuan, Ya-lin

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which was thought to be only performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In recent years, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was also confirmed to take part in ammonia oxidation. The diversity and abundance of AOA have been investigated in various environments, however, little is known regarding the AOA in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) wastewater treatment process. In this study, the abundance and diversity of AOA were investigated in the biofilm and flocculent activated sludge collected in a lab-scale (L) CANON system and a pilot-scale (P) CANON systems, respectively. The quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied to investigate the abundance of AOA and the diversity of AOA was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and sequencing. The qPCR results showed that the average abundance of AOA amoA gene of L and P was 2.42 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge and 6.51 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge, respectively. The abundance of AOA in biofilm was 10.1-14.1 times higher than that in flocculent activated sludge. For P system, the abundance of AOA in flocculent activated sludge was 1.8 times higher than that in biofilm. The results indicated that the abundance of AOA might be affected by different sludge morphology. The diversity of AOA in P system was extremely limited, only one OTU was observed, which was classified into Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity of AOA in L system was higher, eight OTUs were observed, which were classified into five genera: Nitrososphaera subcluster 9, subcluster 8.1, subcluster 4.1, subcluster 1.1 and Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity and abundance of AOA were different in CANON systems with different sludge morphology. AOA may play an important role in ammonia oxidation in CANON system.

  16. [Nitrates and nitrites content in the samples taken from the dug and drilled wells from the area of Podkarpacie region as a methemoglobinemia risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Rybakowa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the nitrates and nitrites content in water samples taken from fourteen dug and drilled wells from the area of Podkarpacie, as well as a summary of the previously performed analysis. Private water intakes are not under the supervision of the State Sanitary Inspection. So in the case of exceeding the standards provided by the Regulation of the Minister of Health, regulating the requirements for drinking water, private water intakes can be a serious threat to the health of consumers. Particularly at risk are infants, in whom nitrates and especially nitrites can cause, among others, methemoglobinemia. The analysis was performed by ion chromatography method, making it possible to simultaneously determining the concentrations of nitrates and nitrites. As it turned out there was no presence of nitrites in the water of the tested wells. In five samples taken from the dug wells nitrates concentration exceeding the norm of 50 mg/L have been reported. In two cases, exceeding the nitrate concentrations were significant: 96.53 mg L and 204.65 mg/L.

  17. Effect of various sources of organic carbon and high nitrite and nitrate concentrations on the selection of denitrifying bacteria. II. Continuous cultures in packed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of different organic compounds, nitrites and nitrates at the concentration of 1,000 mg N/l on the quantitative and strain-specific selection of denitrifying bacteria was determined in anaerobic packed bed reactors. Both the source of carbon and nitrogen form influenced strain specificity and the frequency of occurrence of denitrifying bacteria. The frequency of denitrifying bacteria within packed bed reactor ranged in different media from 11% (glucose and nitrates) to 100% (methanol and ethanol with nitrates). A single species selection was observed in the presence of nitrites within packed bed reactor: Pseudomonas aeruginosa in medium with acetate. Pseudomonas stutzeri in medium with ethanol, Pseudomonas mendocina in medium with methanol and Pseudomonas fluorescens in medium with glucose. When nitrates were present in packed bed reactor, the dominating bacteria were: P. stutzeri in medium with acetate, P. fluorescens in medium with ethanol, Paracoccus denitrificans in medium with methanol and Alcaligenes faecalis in medium with glucose. PMID:6194668

  18. Expression of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductase Activities under Various Forms of Nitrogen Nutrition in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Timpo, E E; Neyra, C A

    1983-05-01

    The main objectives of this work were to study the effect of different N sources on plant growth, N accumulation, and on the expression of nitrate reductase activity in Phaseolus vulgaris L. leaves. Plants were grown under greenhouse conditions (15 to 25 kilolux; 16/8 hour day/night cycles) in plastic pots filled with perlite: vermiculite (1:1) and watered daily with a minus N solution (N(2) plants) or supplemented with either KNO(3), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), or urea as combined N sources.Significant levels of nitrate reductase activity in trifoliolate leaves of N(2)-, NH(4) (+)-, urea-, or NO(3) (-)-dependent plants was demonstrated throughout this work. Leaves from the urea- or NH(4) (+)-grown plants accumulated NO(2) (-) in the dark but not in the light when NO(2) (-) was supplied by vacuum infiltration. These results indicated that the potential for reduction of NO(3) (-) or NO(2) (-) was not impaired by growing the plants on NH(4) (+) or urea and, in addition, provided evidence for the occurrence of a non-nitrate-inducible nitrite reductase. The nitrate reductase activities associated with N(2)-, NH(4) (+)-, or urea-dependent plants are tentatively regarded as ;constitutive' to differentiate from the widely occurring NO(3) (-)-inducible nitrate reductase activity.Plants grown on NO(3) (-) or urea accumulated significantly larger amounts of reduced N and dry matter as compared to NH(4) (+)- and N(2)-dependent plants. Regardless of N treatment, or size of plants, about 50% of the N accumulated by the plant was allocated to the leaves. PMID:16662985

  19. Nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway during wastewater co-treatment with ammonia-rich landfill leachates in a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Fudala-Ksiazek, S; Luczkiewicz, A; Fitobor, K; Olanczuk-Neyman, K

    2014-06-01

    The biological treatment of ammonia-rich landfill leachates due to an inadequate C to N ratio requires expensive supplementation of carbon from an external carbon source. In an effort to reduce treatment costs, the objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway during landfill leachate co-treatment with municipal wastewater. Initially, the laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was inoculated with nitrifying activated sludge and fed only raw municipal wastewater (RWW) during a start-up period of 9 weeks. Then, in the co-treatment period, consisting of the next 17 weeks, the system was fed a mixture of RWW and an increasing quantity of landfill leachates (from 1 to 10% by volume). The results indicate that landfill leachate addition of up to 10% (by volume) influenced the effluent quality, except for BOD5. During the experiment, a positive correlation (r(2) = 0.908) between ammonia load in the influent and nitrite in the effluent was observed, suggesting that the second step of nitrification was partially inhibited. The partial nitrification (PN) was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of nitrifying bacteria. Nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway was observed when the oxygen concentration ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 mg O2/dm(3) and free ammonia (FA) ranged from 2.01 to 35.86 mg N-NH3/dm(3) in the aerobic phase. Increasing ammonia load in wastewater influent was also correlated with an increasing amount of total nitrogen (TN) in the effluent, which suggested insufficient amounts of assimilable organic carbon to complete denitrification. Because nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway is beneficial for carbon-limited and highly ammonia-loaded mixtures, obtaining PN can lead to a reduction in the external carbon source needed to support denitrification.

  20. Monitoring of nitrite, nitrate, chloride and sulfate in environmental samples using electrophoresis microchips coupled with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Camilla Benevides; Moreira, Roger Cardoso; de Oliveira Tavares, Maria Gizelda; Coltro, Wendell K T

    2016-01-15

    This report describes the development of an analytical methodology on microchip electrophoresis (ME) devices coupled with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) to monitor inorganic anions in environmental samples. The buffer composition as well as detection operating parameters were optimized to achieve the best separation selectivity and detector sensitivity, respectively. Electrophoretic separations of Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NO2(-) were successfully performed within 60s using a running buffer composed of 30mmol L(-1) latic acid and 15mmol L(-1)l-histidine (His). The best detectability levels were found applying a sinusoidal wave with 1100-kHz-frequency and 60-Vpp amplitude. Quantitative analyzes of inorganic anions were carried out in the presence of Cr2O7(2-) ion as internal standard (IS), which ensured great repeatability in terms of migration times (<1%) and peak areas (6.2-7.6%) for thirty consecutive injections. The analytical performance revealed a linear behavior for concentration ranges between 0-120μmol L(-1) (Cl(-), NO2(-) and NO3(-)) and 0-60μmol L(-1) (SO4(2-)) and limits of detection (LODs) varying from 2.0 to 4.9μmol L(-1). The concentration levels of anionic species were determined in aquarium, river and biofertilizer samples with recovery values between 91% and 105%. The nitrification steps associated with conversion of ammonium to nitrite followed by the conversion of nitrite to nitrate were successfully monitored in a simulated environment without fishes during a period of twelve weeks. Lastly, the monitoring of anionic species was carried out during eight weeks in an aquarium environment containing ten fishes from Danio rerio (Ciprynidae). The recorded data revealed the absence of nitrite and a gradual increase on the ammonium and nitrate concentration levels during eight weeks, thus suggesting the direct conversion of ammonium to nitrate. Based on the data herein reported, the proposed analytical methodology

  1. Diagnostic Role of Salivary and GCF Nitrite, Nitrate and Nitric Oxide to Distinguish Healthy Periodontium from Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Poorsattar Bejeh-Mir, Arash; Parsian, Hadi; Akbari Khoram, Maryam; Ghasemi, Nafiseh; Bijani, Ali; Khosravi-Samani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of subclinical and early stage clinical periodontal dysfunction could prevent from further socioeconomic burden. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic applicability of nitric oxide and its end-metabolites in periodontal tissue health and disease. Forty-two patients were enrolled and divided into three groups according to gingivitis (GI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) indices: a healthy group (GI<1, CAL<1), b: gingivitis (GI>1, CAL>1) and c: periodontitis (CAL>1) with 14 patients in each group. Unstimulated saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were collected. Samples were evaluated for nitrite, nitrate and total nitric oxide contents with the ELISA method. In addition, CAL, GI, plaque index (PI), decay, missing, filling (DMFT) and bleeding index (BI) scores were also recorded. Except for GCF nitrite content (P= 0.89), there was an increasing trend for measured biomarkers in both saliva and GCF (Periodontitis> gingivitis> healthy periodontium, P< 0.05). Data remained stable after simultaneous adjustment for DMFT and BI scores as confounding factors. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, cut point and p- value were as the followings: GCF nitrate (0.71, 0.11, 0.29,0.43, 4.97, P= 0.04), nitric oxide GCF ( 0.64, 0.18, 0.28, 0.5, 10.12, P= 0.04), nitrite saliva (0.93, 0.96,0.93,0.96,123.48, P< 0.001), salivary nitrate (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 123.6, P< 0.001), salivary nitric oxide (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 246.65, P <0.001). Our results revealed that NO plays an important role in the process of destruction of periodontal tissues. Within the limitation of our study, detecting NO biomarker and its end metabolites in saliva is of more value to assess the periodontal health comparing to GCF. PMID:25317400

  2. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  3. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  4. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  5. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  6. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  7. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  8. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  9. Rheological properties of the product slurry of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mattus, A.J.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing the liquid from Low Level radioactive Waste (LLW). An experimental study was conducted to measure the rheological properties of the pipe flow of the NAC product slurry. Test results indicate that the NAC product slurry has a profound rheological behavior. At low solids concentration, the slurry exhibits a typical dilatant fluid (or shear thinning)fluid. The transition from dilatant fluid to pseudo-plastic fluid will occur at between 25% to 30% solids concentration in temperature ranges of 50--80{degree}C. Correlation equations are developed based on the test data.

  10. Selection of Crop Varieties for Efficient Production Using Urea, Ammonia, Nitrite, and Nitrate in Celss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of NO2(-) in the external solution increased the overall efficiency of the mixed N sources by cereal leaves. The NH4(+) in the substrate solution decreased the efficiency of NO3(-) reduction, while NO3(-) in the substrate solution increased the efficiency of NH4(+) assimilation.

  11. Enzyme-level interconversion of nitrate and nitrite in the fall mixed layer of the Antarctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, P. C.; Weigand, M. A.; Zhang, R.; Carter, B. R.; Karsh, K. L.; Fawcett, S. E.; Sigman, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    In the Southern Ocean, the nitrogen (N) isotopes of organic matter and the N and oxygen (O) isotopes of nitrate (NO3-) have been used to investigate NO3- assimilation and N cycling in the summertime period of phytoplankton growth, both today and in the past. However, recent studies indicate the significance of processes in other seasons for producing the annual cycle of N isotope changes. This study explores the impact of fall conditions on the 15N/14N (δ15N) and 18O/16O (δ18O) of NO3- and nitrite (NO2-) in the Pacific Antarctic Zone using depth profiles from late summer/fall of 2014. In the mixed layer, the δ15N and δ18O of NO3- + NO2- increase roughly equally, as expected for NO3- assimilation; however, the δ15N of NO3--only (measured after NO2- removal) increases more than does NO3--only δ18O. Differencing indicates that NO2- has an extremely low δ15N, often < -70‰ versus air. These observations are consistent with the expression of an equilibrium N isotope effect between NO3- and NO2-, likely due to enzymatic NO3--NO2- interconversion. Specifically, we propose reversibility of the nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR) enzyme of nitrite oxidizers that, having been entrained from the subsurface during late summer mixed layer deepening, are inhibited by light. Our interpretation suggests a role for NO3--NO2- interconversion where nitrifiers are transported into environments that discourage NO2- oxidation. This may apply to surface regions with upwelling, such as the summertime Antarctic. It may also apply to oxygen-deficient zones, where NXR-catalyzed interconversion may explain previously reported evidence of NO2- oxidation.

  12. Occurrence of herbicides, nitrite plus nitrate, and selected trace elements in ground water from northwestern and northeastern Missouri, July 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, Donald H.; Maley, Randall D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri Department of Health collected water samples for analysis of nitrite plus nitrate and herbicides from rural domestic wells in northwestern and northeastern Missouri in 1991 and 1992. In July 1991, samples were collected from 130 wells in Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, Gentry, and Nodaway Counties in northwestern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations as nitrogen ranged from less than 0.05 to 63 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations exceeded the State drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter in water samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides--alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine; metribuzin, metolachlor, and trifluralin--were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to 0.05 micrograms per liter in 19 samples. Atrazine was detected in water samples from 16 wells. In July 1992, water samples were collected from 147 wells in Audrain, Clark, Lewis, Monroe, Scotland, and Shelby Counties in northeastern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in samples ranged from less than 0.05 to 60 milligrams per liter and exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides-alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metribuzin, and metolachlor-were detected at concentrations greater than 0.10 microgram per liter in water samples from 19 of the wells sampled. Atrazine was detected in water from 18 wells.

  13. Development and validation of an ionic chromatography method for the determination of nitrate, nitrite and chloride in meat.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moreno, Cristina; Perez, Isabel Viera; Urbano, Ana M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the validation of a method for the analysis of certain preservatives in meat and to obtain a suitable Certified Reference Material (CRM) to achieve this task. The preservatives studied were NO3(-), NO2(-) and Cl(-) as they serve as important antimicrobial agents in meat to inhibit the growth of bacteria spoilage. The meat samples were prepared using a treatment that allowed the production of a known CRM concentration that is highly homogeneous and stable in time. The matrix effects were also studied to evaluate the influence on the analytical signal for the ions of interest, showing that the matrix influence does not affect the final result. An assessment of the signal variation in time was carried out for the ions. In this regard, although the chloride and nitrate signal remained stable for the duration of the study, the nitrite signal decreased appreciably with time. A mathematical treatment of the data gave a stable nitrite signal, obtaining a method suitable for the validation of these anions in meat. A statistical study was needed for the validation of the method, where the precision, accuracy, uncertainty and other mathematical parameters were evaluated obtaining satisfactory results.

  14. Development and validation of an ionic chromatography method for the determination of nitrate, nitrite and chloride in meat.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moreno, Cristina; Perez, Isabel Viera; Urbano, Ana M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the validation of a method for the analysis of certain preservatives in meat and to obtain a suitable Certified Reference Material (CRM) to achieve this task. The preservatives studied were NO3(-), NO2(-) and Cl(-) as they serve as important antimicrobial agents in meat to inhibit the growth of bacteria spoilage. The meat samples were prepared using a treatment that allowed the production of a known CRM concentration that is highly homogeneous and stable in time. The matrix effects were also studied to evaluate the influence on the analytical signal for the ions of interest, showing that the matrix influence does not affect the final result. An assessment of the signal variation in time was carried out for the ions. In this regard, although the chloride and nitrate signal remained stable for the duration of the study, the nitrite signal decreased appreciably with time. A mathematical treatment of the data gave a stable nitrite signal, obtaining a method suitable for the validation of these anions in meat. A statistical study was needed for the validation of the method, where the precision, accuracy, uncertainty and other mathematical parameters were evaluated obtaining satisfactory results. PMID:26471608

  15. Ammonia from Iron(II) Reduction of Nitrite and the Strecker Synthesis: Do Iron(II) and Cyanide Interfere with Each Other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Lerner, Narcinda; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, affect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The two reactions can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, forming glycine from nitrite, Fe(+2), formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  16. Effects of Waterborne Copper, Cyanide, Ammonia, and Nitrite on Stress Parameters and Changes in Susceptibility to Saprolegniosis in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, M.; Munoz, M. J.; Cuellar, M.; Tarazona, J. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of toxic exposures on the susceptibility of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to saprolegniosis were evaluated. Fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of copper (0.25 mg/liter), cyanide (0.07 mg/liter), ammonia (0.5 mg/liter), and nitrite (0.24 mg/liter) for 24 h. After exposure, the fish were challenged by Saprolegnia parasitica (3.6 x 10(sup6) zoospores per liter) for 10 min. Cortisol and cholesterol were used to indicate stress response. Similar increases of cortisol were found for the four tested chemicals. All fish with cortisol levels higher than 370 ng/ml developed the disease, while only 24% of the fish with cortisol levels lower than 370 ng/ml were infected. Cholesterol levels remained unchanged after toxic exposure. Increased susceptibilities to the pathogen were observed for ammonia (71%), copper (57%), nitrite (50%), and cyanide (33%). The increases in susceptibility as a result of cyanide and nitrite exposure could be explained by the stress response. For copper and ammonia, the combination of two different effects, the stress response and specific impairments of the defense mechanism of trout against saprolegniosis, should be considered. PMID:16535039

  17. Influence of Nitrate and Nitrite on Thyroid Hormone Responsive and Stress-Associated Gene Expression in Cultured Rana catesbeiana Tadpole Tail Fin Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hinther, Ashley; Edwards, Thea M.; Guillette, Louis J.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signaling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin) assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO3–N) and 0.5 and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO2–N) in the absence and presence of 10 nM T3. Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI), both of which are TH-responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signaling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30, and catalase (CAT) transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T3. Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action. PMID:22493607

  18. Effect of 6-months of physical exercise on the nitrate/nitrite levels in hypertensive postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Zaros, Pedro R; Pires, Carla EM Romero; Bacci, Mauricio; Moraes, Camila; Zanesco, Angelina

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidences have showed that the incidence of arterial hypertension is greater in postmenopausal women as compared to premenopausal. Physical inactivity has been implicated as a major contributor to weight gain and abdominal obesity in postmenopausal women and the incidence of cardiovascular disease increases dramatically after menopause. Additionally, more women than men die each year of coronary heart disease and are twice as likely as men to die within the first year after a heart attack. A healthy lifestyle has been strongly associated with the regular physical activity and evidences have shown that physically active subjects have more longevity with reduction of morbidity and mortality. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial cells has been implicated in this beneficial effect with improvement of vascular relaxing and reduction in blood pressure in both laboratory animals and human. Although the effect of exercise training in the human cardiovascular system has been largely studied, the majority of these studies were predominantly conducted in men or young volunteers. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the effects of 6 months of dynamic exercise training (ET) on blood pressure and plasma nitrate/nitrite concentration (NOx-) in hypertensive postmenopausal women. Methods Eleven volunteers were submitted to the ET consisting in 3 days a week, each session of 60 minutes during 6 months at moderate intensity (50% of heart rate reserve). Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, NOx- concentration were measured at initial time and after ET. Results A significant reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was seen after ET which was accompanied by markedly increase of NOx- levels (basal: 10 ± 0.9; ET: 16 ± 2 μM). Total cholesterol was significantly reduced (basal: 220 ± 38 and ET: 178 ± 22 mg/dl), whereas triglycerides levels were not modified after ET (basal: 141 ± 89 and ET: 147 ± 8 mg/dl). Conclusion Our study

  19. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  20. Effects of dietary protein concentration on ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching, and plant nitrogen uptake from dairy manure applied to lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lysimeter experiment was designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) concentration on nitrate-N (NO3-N) and ammonia (NH3) losses from dairy manure applied to soil and manure N use for plant growth. Lactating dairy cows were fed diets with 16.7 (HighCP) or 14.8% (LowCP) cru...

  1. Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R.; Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F.

    2011-01-15

    A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

  2. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  3. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  4. Low-disturbance manure incorporation effects on ammonia and nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Dell, Curtis J; Kleinman, Peter J A; Schmidt, John P; Beegle, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    Low-disturbance manure application methods can provide the benefits of manure incorporation, including reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions, in production systems where tillage is not possible. However, incorporation can exacerbate nitrate (NO3⁻) leaching. We sought to assess the trade-offs in NH3 and NO3⁻ losses caused by alternative manure application methods. Dairy slurry (2006-2007) and liquid swine manure (2008-2009) were applied to no-till corn by (i) shallow (<10 cm) disk injection, (ii) surface banding with soil aeration, (iii) broadcasting, and (iv) broadcasting with tillage incorporation. Ammonia emissions were monitored for 72 h after application using ventilated chambers and passive diffusion samplers, and NO3⁻ leaching to 80 cm was monitored with buried column lysimeters. The greatest NH3 emissions occurred with broadcasting (35-63 kg NH3-N ha⁻), and the lowest emissions were from unamended soil (<1 kg NH-N ha⁻¹). Injection decreased NH-N emissions by 91 to 99% compared with broadcasting and resulted in lower emissions than tillage incorporation 1 h after broadcasting. Ammonia-nitrogen emissions from banding manure with aeration were inconsistent between years, averaging 0 to 71% that of broadcasting. Annual NO3⁻ leaching losses were small (<25 kg NO3-N ha⁻¹) and similar between treatments, except for the first winter when NO3⁻ leaching was fivefold greater with injection. Because NO3⁻ leaching with injection was substantially lower over subsequent seasons, we hypothesize that the elevated losses during the first winter were through preferential flow paths inadvertently created during lysimeter installation. Overall, shallow disk injection yielded the lowest NH3 emissions without consistently increasing NO3⁻ leaching, whereas manure banding with soil aeration conserved inconsistent amounts of N. PMID:22565274

  5. Low-disturbance manure incorporation effects on ammonia and nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Dell, Curtis J; Kleinman, Peter J A; Schmidt, John P; Beegle, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    Low-disturbance manure application methods can provide the benefits of manure incorporation, including reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions, in production systems where tillage is not possible. However, incorporation can exacerbate nitrate (NO3⁻) leaching. We sought to assess the trade-offs in NH3 and NO3⁻ losses caused by alternative manure application methods. Dairy slurry (2006-2007) and liquid swine manure (2008-2009) were applied to no-till corn by (i) shallow (<10 cm) disk injection, (ii) surface banding with soil aeration, (iii) broadcasting, and (iv) broadcasting with tillage incorporation. Ammonia emissions were monitored for 72 h after application using ventilated chambers and passive diffusion samplers, and NO3⁻ leaching to 80 cm was monitored with buried column lysimeters. The greatest NH3 emissions occurred with broadcasting (35-63 kg NH3-N ha⁻), and the lowest emissions were from unamended soil (<1 kg NH-N ha⁻¹). Injection decreased NH-N emissions by 91 to 99% compared with broadcasting and resulted in lower emissions than tillage incorporation 1 h after broadcasting. Ammonia-nitrogen emissions from banding manure with aeration were inconsistent between years, averaging 0 to 71% that of broadcasting. Annual NO3⁻ leaching losses were small (<25 kg NO3-N ha⁻¹) and similar between treatments, except for the first winter when NO3⁻ leaching was fivefold greater with injection. Because NO3⁻ leaching with injection was substantially lower over subsequent seasons, we hypothesize that the elevated losses during the first winter were through preferential flow paths inadvertently created during lysimeter installation. Overall, shallow disk injection yielded the lowest NH3 emissions without consistently increasing NO3⁻ leaching, whereas manure banding with soil aeration conserved inconsistent amounts of N.

  6. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  7. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  8. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei.

  9. Fluidic Automation of Nitrate and Nitrite Bioassays in Whole Blood by Dissolvable-Film Based Centrifugo-Pneumatic Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Nwankire, Charles E.; Chan, Di-Sien S.; Gaughran, Jennifer; Burger, Robert; Gorkin, Robert; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the full centrifugal microfluidic integration and automation of all liquid handling steps of a 7-step fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay (FLISA) for quantifying nitrate and nitrite levels in whole blood within about 15 min. The assay protocol encompasses the extraction of metered plasma, the controlled release of sample and reagents (enzymes, co-factors and fluorescent labels), and incubation and detection steps. Flow control is implemented by a rotationally actuated dissolvable film (DF) valving scheme. In the valves, the burst pressure is primarily determined by the radial position, geometry and volume of the valve chamber and its inlet channel and can thus be individually tuned over an extraordinarily wide range of equivalent spin rates between 1,000 RPM and 5,500 RPM. Furthermore, the vapour barrier properties of the DF valves are investigated in this paper in order to further show the potential for commercially relevant on-board storage of liquid reagents during shelf-life of bioanalytical, ready-to-use discs. PMID:24064595

  10. Circulating nitrite and nitrate are associated with job-related fatigue in women, but not in men.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Jiro

    2013-07-01

    A recent study indicated that serum nitrite and nitrate (NOx) is inversely associated with general fatigue. The purpose of this study was to confirm the negative association between nitric oxide (NO) and fatigue and to examine whether NO can prevent fatigue caused by job strain. The subjects, 570 workers (272 men and 298 women), answered self-administered questionnaires and underwent a medical examination. Job strain was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire. Fatigue was evaluated using the Profile of Mood States. Venous blood samples were collected after overnight fasting. Plasma NOx concentration was determined by the ozone-based chemiluminescence assay. Plasma NOx levels were significantly (p < 0.05) negatively associated with fatigue even after adjustment for job strain and potential confounders in women, but not in men. Significant (p < 0.05) interactions showed that, in women, as the level of the job strain worsened, fatigue was exacerbated, but the plasma NOx seemed to buffer the association, even after adjustment for potential confounders and the interaction between job strain and vegetable intake. In women, NO seemed to be inversely associated with fatigue and to buffer the association between job strain and fatigue, but not in men. PMID:23880723

  11. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  12. Involvement of NarK1 and NarK2 Proteins in Transport of Nitrate and Nitrite in the Denitrifying Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Noriega, Chris E.; Rowe, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Two transmembrane proteins were tentatively classified as NarK1 and NarK2 in the Pseudomonas genome project and hypothesized to play an important physiological role in nitrate/nitrite transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The narK1 and narK2 genes are located in a cluster along with the structural genes for the nitrate reductase complex. Our studies indicate that the transcription of all these genes is initiated from a single promoter and that the gene complex narK1K2GHJI constitutes an operon. Utilizing an isogenic narK1 mutant, a narK2 mutant, and a narK1K2 double mutant, we explored their effect on growth under denitrifying conditions. While the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant was only slightly affected in its ability to grow under denitrification conditions, both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants were found to be severely restricted in nitrate-dependent, anaerobic growth. All three strains demonstrated wild-type levels of nitrate reductase activity. Nitrate uptake by whole-cell suspensions demonstrated both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants to have very low yet different nitrate uptake rates, while the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant exhibited wild-type levels of nitrate uptake. Finally, Escherichia coli narK rescued both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants with respect to anaerobic respiratory growth. Our results indicate that only the NarK2 protein is required as a nitrate/nitrite transporter by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under denitrifying conditions. PMID:16391109

  13. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  14. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C).

  15. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

  16. A survey of nitrate and nitrite concentrations in conventional and organic-labeled raw vegetables at retail.

    PubMed

    Nuñez de González, Maryuri T; Osburn, Wesley N; Hardin, Margaret D; Longnecker, Michael; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2015-05-01

    A national survey of the nitrate ( NO3(-)) and nitrite ( NO2(-)) concentrations in raw and highly consumed vegetables available at retail in the United States was conducted. A total of 194 samples of fresh broccoli, cabbage, celery, lettuce, and spinach categorized as conventional or organic by label were collected from 5 major cities in different geographic regions of the United States and analyzed to determine NO3(-) and NO2(-) concentrations. There were no differences in the mean NO2(-) values of conventional compared with organic vegetables taken from the 5 metropolitan areas. However, significant differences in mean pairwise comparisons between some conventional and organic vegetables for NO3(-) content were observed. The mean NO2(-) concentration of both conventional and organic vegetables ranged between 0.1 and 1.2 mg/kg of fresh weight (FW) with the exception of conventional spinach that contained 8.0 mg/kg FW. Mean NO3(-) contents of conventional broccoli, cabbage, celery, lettuce, and spinach were 394, 418, 1496, 851, and 2797 mg/kg FW, respectively, while their organic-labeled counterparts averaged 204, 552, 912, 844, and 1318 mg/kg FW. In most cases, organic vegetables were numerically lower in NO3(-) content than their conventional counterparts. Based on survey results, the finding that low NO3(-) levels were observed in some organic vegetables in different cities may warrant further study to determine if true differences exist, due to production practices, seasonal differences, and the magnitudes of those differences. Furthermore, the geographic differences in NO3(-) content of vegetables may flaw estimates of daily NO2(-) and NO3(-) exposure.

  17. A survey of nitrate and nitrite concentrations in conventional and organic-labeled raw vegetables at retail.

    PubMed

    Nuñez de González, Maryuri T; Osburn, Wesley N; Hardin, Margaret D; Longnecker, Michael; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2015-05-01

    A national survey of the nitrate ( NO3(-)) and nitrite ( NO2(-)) concentrations in raw and highly consumed vegetables available at retail in the United States was conducted. A total of 194 samples of fresh broccoli, cabbage, celery, lettuce, and spinach categorized as conventional or organic by label were collected from 5 major cities in different geographic regions of the United States and analyzed to determine NO3(-) and NO2(-) concentrations. There were no differences in the mean NO2(-) values of conventional compared with organic vegetables taken from the 5 metropolitan areas. However, significant differences in mean pairwise comparisons between some conventional and organic vegetables for NO3(-) content were observed. The mean NO2(-) concentration of both conventional and organic vegetables ranged between 0.1 and 1.2 mg/kg of fresh weight (FW) with the exception of conventional spinach that contained 8.0 mg/kg FW. Mean NO3(-) contents of conventional broccoli, cabbage, celery, lettuce, and spinach were 394, 418, 1496, 851, and 2797 mg/kg FW, respectively, while their organic-labeled counterparts averaged 204, 552, 912, 844, and 1318 mg/kg FW. In most cases, organic vegetables were numerically lower in NO3(-) content than their conventional counterparts. Based on survey results, the finding that low NO3(-) levels were observed in some organic vegetables in different cities may warrant further study to determine if true differences exist, due to production practices, seasonal differences, and the magnitudes of those differences. Furthermore, the geographic differences in NO3(-) content of vegetables may flaw estimates of daily NO2(-) and NO3(-) exposure. PMID:25850811

  18. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  19. Nitrogen cycling in shallow low-oxygen coastal waters off Peru from nitrite and nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Happy; Bourbonnais, Annie; Larkum, Jennifer; Bange, Hermann W.; Altabet, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    O2 deficient zones (ODZs) of the world's oceans are important locations for microbial dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction and subsequent loss of combined nitrogen (N) to biogenic N2 gas. ODZs are generally coupled to regions of high productivity leading to high rates of N-loss as found in the coastal upwelling region off Peru. Stable N and O isotope ratios can be used as natural tracers of ODZ N-cycling because of distinct kinetic isotope effects associated with microbially mediated N-cycle transformations. Here we present NO3- and nitrite (NO2-) stable isotope data from the nearshore upwelling region off Callao, Peru. Subsurface oxygen was generally depleted below about 30 m depth with concentrations less than 10 µM, while NO2- concentrations were high, ranging from 6 to 10 µM, and NO3- was in places strongly depleted to near 0 µM. We observed for the first time a positive linear relationship between NO2-δ15N and δ18O at our coastal stations, analogous to that of NO3- N and O isotopes during NO3- uptake and dissimilatory reduction. This relationship is likely the result of rapid NO2- turnover due to higher organic matter flux in these coastal upwelling waters. No such relationship was observed at offshore stations where slower turnover of NO2- facilitates dominance of isotope exchange with water. We also evaluate the overall isotope fractionation effect for N-loss in this system using several approaches that vary in their underlying assumptions. While there are differences in apparent fractionation factor (ɛ) for N-loss as calculated from the δ15N of NO3-, dissolved inorganic N, or biogenic N2, values for ɛ are generally much lower than previously reported, reaching as low as 6.5 ‰. A possible explanation is the influence of sedimentary N-loss at our inshore stations which incurs highly suppressed isotope fractionation.

  20. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  1. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  2. cis-Acting Sequences Required for NtcB-Dependent, Nitrite-Responsive Positive Regulation of the Nitrate Assimilation Operon in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Kawaguchi, Yuriko; Ohe, Taka-Aki; Omata, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    There are three binding sites for NtcA (nirI, nirII, and nirIII), the global nitrogen regulator of cyanobacteria, in the DNA region between the two divergently transcribed operons (nirA and nirB operons) involved in nitrate assimilation in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. Using the luxAB reporter system, we showed that nirI and nirIII, which are located 23 bp upstream from the −10 promoter element of nirA and nirB, respectively, are required for induction by nitrogen depletion of the nirA and nirB operons, respectively. The induction of nirA operon transcription was a prerequisite for the nitrite-responsive positive regulation of the transcription by NtcB, a LysR-type protein. The NtcA-binding site nirII, located in the middle of the nirA-nirB intergenic region, and a potential binding site for a LysR-type protein (TGCAN5TGCA; designated L1), located between nirI and nirII, were required for the nitrite-responsive, NtcB-dependent enhancement of nirA operon transcription. Although the requirement for the L1 site was consistent with the involvement of the LysR family protein NtcB in transcriptional regulation, NtcB did not bind to the nirA regulatory region in vitro in the presence of nitrite and NtcA, suggesting the involvement of some additional factor(s) in the regulation. An L1-like inverted repeat with the consensus sequence TGCN7GCA was conserved in the nirA promoter region of cyanobacteria, being centered at position −23 with respect to the NtcA-binding site corresponding to nirI, which suggested the common occurrence of nitrite-responsive regulation of the nitrate assimilation operon among cyanobacteria. PMID:9696753

  3. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M.; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much 15N or 34S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200–500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with 15N originated from 15N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both 15N and 34S under dysoxia. The labeling with 15N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  4. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much (15)N or (34)S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200-500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with (15)N originated from (15)N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both (15)N and (34)S under dysoxia. The labeling with (15)N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  5. IL-1 beta does not cause neutrophil degranulation but does lead to IL-6, IL-8, and nitrite/nitrate release when used in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, A C; Hack, C E; Wagstaff, J; van Mierlo, G J; Erenberg, A J; Thomsen, L L; Hoekman, K; Rankin, E M

    1996-01-01

    The use of IL-1 in humans is associated with dose-limiting toxicity which resembles that of TNF-alpha or IL-2. Activation of neutrophils is thought to contribute to the toxicity caused by these two cytokines. We studied the effect of IL-1 in vivo on changes in neutrophil numbers and neutrophil degranulation as well as on the formation of neutrophil agonists, such as complement activation products, and on levels of TNF, IL-6, IL-8, and nitrite/nitrate (as a measure of nitric oxide production). Six patients with metastatic melanoma were treated with 3 ng/kg recombinant human IL-1 beta daily. One hour after the start of the 30-min IL-1 infusion, which caused mild cardiovascular toxicity, plasma levels of IL-6 reached a peak of 25 +/- 9 ng/L (mean +/- SEM), IL-8 reached a peak of 311 +/- 100 ng/L at 2 h, and nitrite/nitrate peaked after 10 h to 89 +/- 27 mumol/L. IL-1 did not induce significant changes in plasma levels of TNF or of the complement activation products C3a and C4b/c. Although IL-1 induced neutrophilia, levels of elastase and lactoferrin did not change. The failure of IL-1 to degranulate neutrophils was confirmed in an ex vivo model with whole blood culture in which doses of up to 100 microgram/L IL-1 beta or IL-1 alpha failed to induce significant elastase or lactoferrin release, whereas TNF, tested as a positive control, was able to do so. These results demonstrate that, unlike TNF, IL-1 does not cause neutrophil degranulation in man, despite its ability to cause neutrophilia and the rapid release of IL-6, IL-8, and nitrite/nitrate.

  6. Dairy slurry application method impacts ammonia emission and nitrate in no-till corn silage.

    PubMed

    Powell, J M; Jokela, W E; Misselbrook, T H

    2011-01-01

    Reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions through slurry incorporation or other soil management techniques may increase nitrate (NO3) leaching, so quantifying potential losses from these alternative pathways is essential to improving slurry N management. Slurry N losses, as NH3 or NO3 were evaluated over 4 yr in south-central Wisconsin. Slurry (i.e., dairy cow [Bos taurus] manure from a storage pit) was applied each spring at a single rate (-75 m3 ha(-1)) in one of three ways: surface broadcast (SURF), surface broadcast followed by partial incorporation using an aerator implement (AER-INC), and injection (INJ). Ammonia emissions were measured during the 120 h following slurry application using chambers, and NO3 leaching was monitored in drainage lysimeters. Yield and N3 uptake of oat (Avena sativa L.), corn (Zea mays L.), and winter rye (Secale cereale L.) were measured each year, and at trial's end soils were sampled in 15- to 30-cm increments to 90-cm depth. There were significant tradeoffs in slurry N loss among pathways: annual mean NH3-N emission across all treatments was 5.3, 38.3, 12.4, and 21.8 kg ha(-1) and annual mean NO3-N leaching across all treatments was 24.1, 0.9, 16.9, and 7.3 kg ha' during Years 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Slurry N loss amounted to 27.1% of applied N from the SURF treatment (20.5% as NH3-N and 6.6% as NO,-N), 23.3% from AER-INC (12.0% as NH3-N and 11.3% as NO3-N), and 9.19% from INJ (4.4% as NH3-N and 4.7% as NO3-N). Although slurry incorporation decreased slurry N loss, the conserved slurry N did not significantly impact crop yield, crop N uptake or soil properties at trial's end.

  7. OBSERVABLE INDICATORS OF THE SENSITIVITY OF PM 2.5 NITRATE TO EMISSION REDUCTIONS, PART II: SENSITIVITY TO ERRORS IN TOTAL AMMONIA AND TOTAL NITRATE OF THE CMAQ-PREDICTED NONLINEAR EFFECT OF SO 2 EMISSION REDUCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic aerosol system of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium can respond nonlinearly to changes in precursor sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. The potential increase in nitrate, when sulfate is reduced and the associated ammonia is released, can negate the sulfate mass...

  8. (PRESENTED AT CMAS) THE NONLINEAR RESPONSE OF NITRATE REPLACEMENT THAT MITIGATES SULFATE REDUCTION: THE GAS RATION AS AN INDICTOR AND SENSITIVITY TO ERRORS IN TOTAL AMMONIA AND TOTAL NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poster presents an assessment, using the CMAQ air quality model, showing the inorganic gas ratio (the ratio of free ammonia to total nitrate) can function as a screening indicator of the winter replacement of sulfate by nitrate when sulfate is reduced. It also presents an as...

  9. Nitrogen polishing in a fully anoxic anammox MBBR treating mainstream nitritation-denitritation effluent.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Holgate, Becky; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    As nitrogen discharge limits are becoming more stringent, short-cut nitrogen systems and tertiary nitrogen polishing steps are gaining popularity. For partial nitritation or nitritation-denitritation systems, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) polishing may be feasible to remove residual ammonia and nitrite from the effluent. Nitrogen polishing of mainstream nitritation-denitritation system effluent via anammox was studied at 25°C in a fully anoxic moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) (V = 0.45 m(3) ) over 385 days. Unlike other anammox based processes, a very fast startup of anammox MBBR was demonstrated, despite nitrite limited feeding conditions (influent nitrite = 0.7 ± 0.59 mgN/L, ammonia = 6.13 ± 2.86 mgN/L, nitrate = 3.41 ± 1.92 mgN/L). The nitrogen removal performance was very stable within a wide range of nitrogen inputs. Anammox bacteria (AMX) activity up to 1 gN/m(2) /d was observed which is comparable to other biofilm-based systems. It is generally believed that nitrate production limits nitrogen removal through AMX metabolism. However, in this study, anammox MBBR demonstrated ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate removal at limited chemical oxygen demand (COD) availability. AMX and heterotrophs contributed to 0.68 ± 0.17 and 0.32 ± 0.17 of TIN removal, respectively. It was speculated that nitrogen removal might be aided by denitratation which could be due to heterotrophs or the recently discovered ability for AMX to use short-chain fatty acids to reduce nitrate to nitrite. This study demonstrates the feasibility of anammox nitrogen polishing in an MBBR is possible for nitritation-denitration systems.

  10. Nitrogen polishing in a fully anoxic anammox MBBR treating mainstream nitritation-denitritation effluent.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Holgate, Becky; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    As nitrogen discharge limits are becoming more stringent, short-cut nitrogen systems and tertiary nitrogen polishing steps are gaining popularity. For partial nitritation or nitritation-denitritation systems, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) polishing may be feasible to remove residual ammonia and nitrite from the effluent. Nitrogen polishing of mainstream nitritation-denitritation system effluent via anammox was studied at 25°C in a fully anoxic moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) (V = 0.45 m(3) ) over 385 days. Unlike other anammox based processes, a very fast startup of anammox MBBR was demonstrated, despite nitrite limited feeding conditions (influent nitrite = 0.7 ± 0.59 mgN/L, ammonia = 6.13 ± 2.86 mgN/L, nitrate = 3.41 ± 1.92 mgN/L). The nitrogen removal performance was very stable within a wide range of nitrogen inputs. Anammox bacteria (AMX) activity up to 1 gN/m(2) /d was observed which is comparable to other biofilm-based systems. It is generally believed that nitrate production limits nitrogen removal through AMX metabolism. However, in this study, anammox MBBR demonstrated ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate removal at limited chemical oxygen demand (COD) availability. AMX and heterotrophs contributed to 0.68 ± 0.17 and 0.32 ± 0.17 of TIN removal, respectively. It was speculated that nitrogen removal might be aided by denitratation which could be due to heterotrophs or the recently discovered ability for AMX to use short-chain fatty acids to reduce nitrate to nitrite. This study demonstrates the feasibility of anammox nitrogen polishing in an MBBR is possible for nitritation-denitration systems. PMID:26333200

  11. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads; Kitzinger, Katharina; Herbold, Craig; Spieck, Eva; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II, we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers, suggests a wide distribution of this extended interaction between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers, which enables nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to indirectly use urea as a source of energy. A soluble formate dehydrogenase lends additional ecophysiological flexibility and allows N. moscoviensis to use formate, with or without concomitant nitrite oxidation, using oxygen, nitrate, or both compounds as terminal electron acceptors. Compared with Nitrospira defluvii from lineage I, N. moscoviensis shares the Nitrospira core metabolism but shows substantial genomic dissimilarity including genes for adaptations to elevated oxygen concentrations. Reciprocal feeding and metabolic versatility, including the participation in different nitrogen cycling processes, likely are key factors for the niche partitioning, the ubiquity, and the high diversity of Nitrospira in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:26305944

  12. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads; Kitzinger, Katharina; Herbold, Craig; Spieck, Eva; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II, we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers, suggests a wide distribution of this extended interaction between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers, which enables nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to indirectly use urea as a source of energy. A soluble formate dehydrogenase lends additional ecophysiological flexibility and allows N. moscoviensis to use formate, with or without concomitant nitrite oxidation, using oxygen, nitrate, or both compounds as terminal electron acceptors. Compared with Nitrospira defluvii from lineage I, N. moscoviensis shares the Nitrospira core metabolism but shows substantial genomic dissimilarity including genes for adaptations to elevated oxygen concentrations. Reciprocal feeding and metabolic versatility, including the participation in different nitrogen cycling processes, likely are key factors for the niche partitioning, the ubiquity, and the high diversity of Nitrospira in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:26305944

  13. The effect of plant growth regulators, nitric oxide, nitrate, nitrite and light on the germination of dimorphic seeds of Suaeda salsa under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiqiang; Liu, Xiaojing; Ajmal Khan, M; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2005-06-01

    Suaeda salsa, a leaf succulent shrub in the family Chenopodiaceae, is one of the most important halophytes in China. Suaeda salsa produces dimorphic seeds (soft brown seeds and hard black seeds). Seeds of S. salsa were collected from the coastal salt flats near Huanghua City, China. Experiments were conducted to determine the salinity-alleviating effect of plant growth regulators, nitric oxide, nitrate, nitrite and light on the germination of dimorphic seeds of S. salsa. Brown seeds had a higher germination rate than black seeds in all experiments. Black seeds were more sensitive to salt in the absence of light in comparison to brown seeds. Brown seeds absorbed water more quickly in comparison to black seeds and were found to be more tolerant of salt stress. Our results showed that 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC, the immediate precursor of ethylene), nitrite, GA(4) and BA improved seed germination in the presence of salt. However, nitrate, GA(1), GA(3) failed to alleviate salt stress. ABA inhibited seed germination and seedling growth. Possible mechanisms involved in the alleviation of salt stress in S. salsa seeds and the ecological adaptation of the seeds to the environment are discussed.

  14. Survey of residual nitrite and nitrate in conventional and organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured meats available at retail in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nuñez De González, Maryuri T; Osburn, Wesley N; Hardin, Margaret D; Longnecker, Michael; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2012-04-18

    A survey of residual nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in cured meats available at retail was conducted to verify concentrations in conventional (C) products and establish a baseline for organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured (ONC) products. In this study, 470 cured meat products representing six major categories were taken from retail outlets in five major metropolitan cities across the United States. Random samples representing both C and ONC type products were analyzed for NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) content (ppm) using an ENO-20 high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a reverse phase column. Generally, there were no differences in NO(2)(-) concentrations between C and ONC meat categories, but a few ONC products surveyed in certain cities were lower in NO(3)(-) content. Pairwise comparisons between cities indicated that NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) contents of all C type products were not appreciably different, and the same was true for most ONC products. Numerical NO(2)(-) values were less variable than NO(3)(-) concentrations within each meat product category. NO(2)(-) concentrations were similar to those previously reported by Cassens ( Cassens , R. G. Residual nitrite in cured meat . Food Technol. 1997a , 51 , 53 - 55 ) in 1997. Residual NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) values in this study were numerically lower than those reported by NAS ( National Academy of Sciences . The Health Effects of Nitrate, Nitrite, and N-Nitroso Compounds ; National Academy Press : Washington, DC , 1981 ) in 1981. Data from this survey provide a benchmark of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) concentrations for ONC products available at retail. PMID:22414374

  15. Survey of residual nitrite and nitrate in conventional and organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured meats available at retail in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nuñez De González, Maryuri T; Osburn, Wesley N; Hardin, Margaret D; Longnecker, Michael; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2012-04-18

    A survey of residual nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in cured meats available at retail was conducted to verify concentrations in conventional (C) products and establish a baseline for organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured (ONC) products. In this study, 470 cured meat products representing six major categories were taken from retail outlets in five major metropolitan cities across the United States. Random samples representing both C and ONC type products were analyzed for NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) content (ppm) using an ENO-20 high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a reverse phase column. Generally, there were no differences in NO(2)(-) concentrations between C and ONC meat categories, but a few ONC products surveyed in certain cities were lower in NO(3)(-) content. Pairwise comparisons between cities indicated that NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) contents of all C type products were not appreciably different, and the same was true for most ONC products. Numerical NO(2)(-) values were less variable than NO(3)(-) concentrations within each meat product category. NO(2)(-) concentrations were similar to those previously reported by Cassens ( Cassens , R. G. Residual nitrite in cured meat . Food Technol. 1997a , 51 , 53 - 55 ) in 1997. Residual NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) values in this study were numerically lower than those reported by NAS ( National Academy of Sciences . The Health Effects of Nitrate, Nitrite, and N-Nitroso Compounds ; National Academy Press : Washington, DC , 1981 ) in 1981. Data from this survey provide a benchmark of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) concentrations for ONC products available at retail.

  16. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  17. Nitrite consumption and associated isotope changes during a river flood event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Juliane; Sanders, Tina; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2016-10-01

    In oceans, estuaries, and rivers, nitrification is an important nitrate source, and stable isotopes of nitrate are often used to investigate recycling processes (e.g. remineralisation, nitrification) in the water column. Nitrification is a two-step process, where ammonia is oxidised via nitrite to nitrate. Nitrite usually does not accumulate in natural environments, which makes it difficult to study the single isotope effect of ammonia oxidation or nitrite oxidation in natural systems. However, during an exceptional flood in the Elbe River in June 2013, we found a unique co-occurrence of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate in the water column, returning towards normal summer conditions within 1 week. Over the course of the flood, we analysed the evolution of δ15N-NH4+ and δ15N-NO2- in the Elbe River. In concert with changes in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and δ15N SPM, as well as nitrate concentration, δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-, we calculated apparent isotope effects during net nitrite and nitrate consumption. During the flood event, > 97 % of total reactive nitrogen was nitrate, which was leached from the catchment area and appeared to be subject to assimilation. Ammonium and nitrite concentrations increased to 3.4 and 4.4 µmol L-1, respectively, likely due to remineralisation, nitrification, and denitrification in the water column. δ15N-NH4+ values increased up to 12 ‰, and δ15N-NO2- ranged from -8.0 to -14.2 ‰. Based on this, we calculated an apparent isotope effect 15ɛ of -10.0 ± 0.1 ‰ during net nitrite consumption, as well as an isotope effect 15ɛ of -4.0 ± 0.1 ‰ and 18ɛ of -5.3 ± 0.1 ‰ during net nitrate consumption. On the basis of the observed nitrite isotope changes, we evaluated different nitrite uptake processes in a simple box model. We found that a regime of combined riparian denitrification and 22 to 36 % nitrification fits best with measured data for the nitrite concentration decrease and isotope increase.

  18. Nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization studies. Final technical progress report, May 1995--May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. Around 1 billion liters of high level waste tank supernatant are present at Hanford, Savannah River Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest quantity of these wastes is in the 149 single shell tanks at Hanford which hold up to 1 million gallons each. These tank waste are typically 4 to 5 molar in nitrate and contain radionuclides, various salts, and heavy metals. INEL high-level waste tank supernatant contains about 0.7 and 0.6 grams per liter of chromium and mercury, respectively. SRP high-level waste tank supernatant contains about 0.2 g/L of chromium. Other heavy metals could well be present at lower levels in theses tank wastes. The major components present in these wastes are summarized in Appendix A. These wastes are currently regulated and managed by the DOE. Under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) DOE is subject to RCRA, which would apply to these tank supernatants. Stabilization of this waste is difficult because nitrates are very mobile. Additionally, vitrification of these wastes produces large quantities of hard-to-manage NO{sub x} emissions. The conversion of sodium nitrate to ammonia is discussed.

  19. Ammonia

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonia ; CASRN 7664 - 41 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  20. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised <1% of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags in both sediments and qPCR for T. thermophilus narG revealed sediment populations of 1.3-1.7 × 10(6) copies g(-1) sediment. These data indicate a highly active nitrogen cycle (N-cycle) in these springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production.

  1. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised <1% of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags in both sediments and qPCR for T. thermophilus narG revealed sediment populations of 1.3-1.7 × 10(6) copies g(-1) sediment. These data indicate a highly active nitrogen cycle (N-cycle) in these springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production. PMID:21631688

  2. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1 μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  3. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D.; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  4. Kinetic and analytical study of the photo-induced degradation of monuron by nitrates and nitrites under irradiation or in the dark.

    PubMed

    Boucheloukh, Hadjira; Sehili, Tahar; Kouachi, Nadia; Djebbar, Kamel

    2012-08-01

    The photo-induced transformation of monuron (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1 dimethylurea) was investigated in an aqueous solution containing nitrates and nitrites at 310 nm and 365 nm, respectively. In both NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-) conditions, the degradation of monuron followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The intermediate products were identified by GC-MS, and the nitration, hydroxylation and coupling reactions were determined. In addition, the oxidation of the N-terminus group, the substitution of chlorine by ˙OH and the nitration by ˙NO(2) radical onto the phenyl ring were observed. The photo-induced transformation of monuron was studied under variable conditions of pH, inducer concentration, substrate concentration, humic acids, oxygen content and salts used as hydroxyl radical scavengers. The photodegradation rates were strongly influenced by all the above parameters. The degradation of monuron was also studied in the dark and in the presence of NO(2)(-) as well as in an aqueous solution with the addition of hydrogen peroxide.

  5. The combined effect of dissolved oxygen and nitrite on N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-04-15

    Both nitrite [Formula: see text] and dissolved oxygen (DO) play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, few studies focused on the combined effect of them on N2O production by AOB as well as the corresponding mechanisms. In this study, N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated under various [Formula: see text] and DO concentrations. At each investigated DO level, both the biomass specific N2O production rate and the N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) increased as [Formula: see text] concentration increased from 3 mg N/L to 50 mg N/L. However, at each investigated [Formula: see text] level, the maximum biomass specific N2O production rate occurred at DO of 0.85 mg O2/L, while the N2O emission factor decreased as DO increased from 0.35 to 3.5 mg O2/L. The analysis of the process data using a mathematical N2O model incorporating both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways indicated that the contribution of AOB denitrification pathway increased as [Formula: see text] concentration increased, but decreased as DO concentration increased, accompanied by a corresponding change in the contribution of NH2OH oxidation pathway to N2O production. The AOB denitrification pathway was predominant in most cases, with the NH2OH oxidation pathway making a comparable contribution only at high DO level (e.g. 3.5 mg O2/L). PMID:25644626

  6. Assessment of Nitrification in Distribution Systems of Waters with Elevated Ammonia Levels

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to monitor ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate in drinking water from the distribution systems of four drinking water utilities in Illinois. A monthly drinking water distribution system water quality monitoring protocol for each water utility in Illinois h...

  7. Abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea under long-term maize cropping systems.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrification involves the oxidation of ammonium and is an important component of the overall N cycle. Nitrification occurs in two steps; first by oxidizing ammonium to nitrite, and then to nitrate. The first step is often the rate limiting step. Until recently ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were though...

  8. Ammonia Nitrogen Transformations in a Reactor with Aggregate made of Sewage Sludge Combustion Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz, Joanna; Mielcarek, Artur; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Białowiec, Andrzej; Gotkowska-Płachta, Anna; Proniewicz, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    The influence of light weight aggregate made of fly ash from sewage sludge thermal treatment (FASSTT LWA) on ammonia nitrogen metabolism, and on quantitative and qualitative changes of microorganisms colonizing the filling, was investigated. Two reactors were used in the experiment. The first was filled with gravel, the other with FASSTT LWA. The reactors were operated with a wastewater hydraulic loading rate of 5 mm(3) mm(-2) d(-1). During the eleven-week experiment, high efficiency of ammonia removal was observed. The lower concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in the effluent indicate that ammonia nitrogen removal resulted not just from nitrification. Nitrate concentration increase was reflected in a decrease in nitrogen removal efficiency. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that in the period when ammonia nitrogen and nitrites were present in the reactor's FASSTT LWA filling, facilitating conditions occurred for the deammonification process. PMID:27456142

  9. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  10. The nitritation performance of biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater under high dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Zebing; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nitritation performance in a biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater. The reactor was operated in continuous feed mode from phases 1 to 3. The dissolved oxygen (DO) was controlled at 3.5-7 mg/L throughout the experiment. The biofilm reactor showed excellent nitritation performance after the inoculation of nitrifying sludge, with the hydraulic retention time being reduced from 24 to 7 hr. Above 90% nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) was maintained in phase 1. Afterwards, nitratation occurred with the low NH4(+)-N concentration in the reactor. The improvement of NH4(+)-N concentration to 20-35 mg/L had a limited effect on the recovery of nitritation. However, nitritation recovered rapidly when sequencing batch feed mode was adopted in phase 4, with the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration above 7 mg/L. The improvement of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity and the combined inhibition effect of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) on the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were two key factors for the rapid recovery of nitritation. Sludge activity was obtained in batch tests. The results of batch tests had a good relationship with the long term operation performance of the biofilm reactor. PMID:27090719

  11. Effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film as determined by use of microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Satoshi; Santegoeds, Cecilia M; De Beer, Dirk

    2003-03-01

    Microelectrode, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses were used to investigate the effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film. Microelectrode measurements of O(2), H(2)S, NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), and pH revealed that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) forced sulfate reduction zones deeper in the agar gel and significantly reduced the in situ sulfide production levels. The sulfate reduction zone was consequently separated from O(2) and NO(2)(-) or NO(3)(-) respiration zones with increasing the concentrations of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). These NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) treatments had only a transient effect on sulfide production. The in situ sulfide production quickly recovered to the previous levels when NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) were removed. The PCR-DGGE and FISH analyses revealed that 2-day-continuous addition of 500 microM NO(3)(-) did not change the metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) community. On the basis of these data, it could be concluded that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) did not kill SRB, but induced the interspecies competition for common carbon source (i.e., acetate) between nitrate-reducing heterotrophic bacteria and SRB and enhanced the oxidation of the produced sulfide, which were main possible causes of the suppression of in situ sulfide production in the agar gel.

  12. Convective heat transfer behavior of the product slurry of the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mattus, A.J.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing liquid form low level radioactive waste (LLW). An experimental study has been conducted to measure the heat transfer properties of the NAC product slurry. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient for both concentration slurries is much higher than that of pure water, which may be due to the higher conductivity of the gibbsite powder. For the 20% concentration slurry, the heat transfer coefficient increased as the generalized Reynolds number and slurry temperature increased. The heat transfer coefficient of 40% is a function of the Reynolds number only. The test results also indicate that the thermal entrance region can be observed only when the generalized Reynolds number is smaller than 1,000. The correlation equation is also developed based on the experimental data in this paper.

  13. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Green, Samuel; Leith, Ian D; Sheppard, Lucy J

    2010-10-01

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components.

  14. Novel process of bio-chemical ammonia removal from air streams using a water reflux system and zeolite as filter media.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Sebastian; Charles, Wipa; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    A novel biofilter that removes ammonia from air streams and converts it to nitrogen gas has been developed and operated continuously for 300 days. The ammonia from the incoming up-flow air stream is first absorbed into water and the carrier material, zeolite. A continuous gravity reflux of condensed water from the exit of the biofilter provides moisture for nitrifying bacteria to develop and convert dissolved ammonia (ammonium) to nitrite/nitrate. The down-flow of the condensed water reflux washes down nitrite/nitrate preventing ammonium and nitrite/nitrate accumulation at the top region of the biofilter. The evaporation caused by the inflow air leads to the accumulation of nitrite to extremely high concentrations in the bottom of the biofilter. The high nitrite concentrations favour the spontaneous chemical oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to nitrogen (N2). Tests showed that this chemical reaction was catalysed by the zeolite filter medium and allowed it to take place at room temperature. This study shows that ammonia can be removed from air streams and converted to N2 in a fully aerated single step biofilter. The process also overcomes the problem of microorganism-inhibition and resulted in zero leachate production. PMID:26363328

  15. Novel process of bio-chemical ammonia removal from air streams using a water reflux system and zeolite as filter media.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Sebastian; Charles, Wipa; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    A novel biofilter that removes ammonia from air streams and converts it to nitrogen gas has been developed and operated continuously for 300 days. The ammonia from the incoming up-flow air stream is first absorbed into water and the carrier material, zeolite. A continuous gravity reflux of condensed water from the exit of the biofilter provides moisture for nitrifying bacteria to develop and convert dissolved ammonia (ammonium) to nitrite/nitrate. The down-flow of the condensed water reflux washes down nitrite/nitrate preventing ammonium and nitrite/nitrate accumulation at the top region of the biofilter. The evaporation caused by the inflow air leads to the accumulation of nitrite to extremely high concentrations in the bottom of the biofilter. The high nitrite concentrations favour the spontaneous chemical oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to nitrogen (N2). Tests showed that this chemical reaction was catalysed by the zeolite filter medium and allowed it to take place at room temperature. This study shows that ammonia can be removed from air streams and converted to N2 in a fully aerated single step biofilter. The process also overcomes the problem of microorganism-inhibition and resulted in zero leachate production.

  16. [Simultaneous Biotransformation of Ammonium and Nitrate via Zero-Valent Iron on Anaerobic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Peng-bing

    2015-12-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to improve the biological autotrophic denitrification process between nitrate and ammonia by anaerobic ammonia oxidation ( ANAMMOX) bacteria. With the addition of ZVI, the biological autotrophic denitrification process could be reacted in the influent condition of pH was 7-8, at 35°C ±0.5°C, the concentration of ammonia was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹ and the concentration of nitrate was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹. The highest conversion rate could be reached to 17.2 mg · (L·h) ⁻¹. With the change of reaction time and the molar ratio of nitrate and ammonia in influent, the final molar conversion ratio of nitrate and ammonia in effluent fluctuated between 1.2-3. 5. The result showed that this autotrophic denitrification process was not belonged to elementary reaction. The mechanism of this autotrophic denitrification process could be summarized that with the reduction of ZVI, the nitrate could be reduced to nitrite. Hereafter, the ANAMMOX process reacted between the nitrite and ammonia. PMID:27011992

  17. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  18. A mixture of nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms affects the δ18O of dissolved nitrate during anaerobic microbial denitrification depending on the δ18O of ambient water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Einsiedl, Florian

    2013-10-01

    The stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O of nitrate are frequently used to determine sources of nitrate and to assess denitrification processes in the environment. Nitrate isotope ratios are thought to be conservative unless involved in (bio-) chemical conversion processes. Thus, stable isotopes are considered to be a reliable tool to determine sources of nitrate in aquatic habitats even after transport and dilution has occurred. Denitrification is known to shift both isotope ratios towards higher δ-values. A fixed ratio of 0.5 for Δδ18O/Δδ15N has been proposed and has been widely used to detect denitrification in terrestrial environments, predominantly in aquifers. However, it is observed in environmental and laboratory studies that this ratio actually varies between less than 0.5 and 1 for uncertain reasons with laboratory studies usually describing a ratio close to 1. Here we report results of anoxic incubation experiments with natural populations of nitrate-reducing microorganisms using sediments from three different environments. In our experiments we used water with a δ18O in excess of 500‰ and found a microbially mediated influence of the oxygen isotopic composition of ambient water on the isotopic composition of the residual dissolved nitrate. We found up to 5.7 ± 2.3% of the oxygen-atoms in the residual dissolved nitrate was exchanged by oxygen-atoms from ambient water within the limited timeframe of the experiments. The fastest incorporation of oxygen-atoms from water into dissolved nitrate correlated with the highest intermittent nitrite concentrations observed in our experiments. In a second series of batch experiments we also found that pure cultures of the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter vulgaris promoted the incorporation of oxygen atoms from ambient water into dissolved nitrate under anoxic conditions. Presumably this happens via a reoxidation of intermediary formed nitrite by the enzyme "nitrite oxidoreductase" (NXR) in concurrence

  19. The Effects of Chronic Nitrate Supplementation and the Use of Strong and Weak Antibacterial Agents on Plasma Nitrite Concentration and Exercise Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, S T J; Wylie, L J; Winyard, P G; Vanhatalo, A; Jones, A M

    2015-12-01

    Chlorhexidine-containing mouthwash (STRONG), which disturbs oral microflora, has been shown to diminish the rise in plasma nitrite concentration ([NO2-]) and attenuate the reduction in resting blood pressure (BP) typically seen after acute nitrate (NO3-) ingestion. We aimed to determine whether STRONG and weaker antiseptic agents attenuate the physiological effects of chronic NO3- supplementation using beetroot juice (BR). 12 healthy volunteers mouth-rinsed with STRONG, non-chlorhexidine mouthwash (WEAK) and deionised water (CON) 3 times a day, and ingested 70 mL BR (6.2 mmol NO3-), twice a day, for 6 days. BP (at rest and during 10 min of treadmill walking) and plasma and salivary [NO3-] and [NO2-] were measured prior to and on day 6 of supplementation. The change in salivary [NO3-] 4 h post final ingestion was higher (P<0.05) in STRONG (8.7±3.0 mM) compared to CON (6.3±0.9 mM) and WEAK (6.0±3.0 mM). In addition, the rise in plasma [NO2-] at 2 h was lower in STRONG compared with WEAK (by 89±112 nM) and CON (by 200±174 nM) and in WEAK compared with CON (all P<0.05). Changes in resting BP were not different between conditions (P>0.05). However, during treadmill walking, the increase in systolic and mean arterial BP was higher 4 h after the final nitrate bolus in STRONG compared with CON (P<0.05) but not WEAK. The results indicate that both strong and weak antibacterial agents suppress the rise in plasma [NO2-] observed following the consumption of a high NO3- diet and the former can influence the BP response during low-intensity exercise.

  20. Part 1. Conducting polymer: Experimental aspects of piezoelectric quartz crystal oscillator and electrodeposited polyvinylferrocene (PVF) film system. Part 2. Voltammetric studies of nitrate and nitrite ions at rotating silver disk and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mensah, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental aspects of the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques have been studied. These two techniques were applied to the investigation of polyvinylferrocene (PVF) film(s) on gold (Au) substrate. Additionally the EQCM and the Ag rotating disk electrodes were employed in tandem to investigate nitrate/nitrite reduction in basic and acidic media. In Chapter 2, a broad historical perspective of QCM, its application in the vacuum community, and the extended use in various liquids and hence the exploitation of the beneficial characteristics for electrochemical purposes (EQCM), are discussed. Chapter 3 treats the relatively new, yet established field of conducting polymer. Imbued in this chapter is the discussion of electrodeposition, rigidity determination, and characterization of PVF film. The studies of electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions are examined in chapters 4 and 5. Reduction in a basic solution is discussed in chapter 4, while chapter 5 looks at reduction in an acid medium.

  1. Isotopic analysis of N and O in nitrite and nitrate by sequential selective bacterial reduction to N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is an important intermediate species in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen, but its role in natural aquatic systems is poorly understood. Isotopic data can be used to study the sources and transformations of NO 2- in the environment, but methods for independent isotopic analyses of NO2- in the presence of other N species are still new and evolving. This study demonstrates that isotopic analyses of N and O in NO2- can be done by treating whole freshwater or saltwater samples with the denitrifying bacterium Stenotrophomonas nitritireducens, which selectively reduces NO2- to N 2O for isotope ratio mass spectrometry. When calibrated with solutions containing NO2- with known isotopic compositions determined independently, reproducible ??15N and ??18O values were obtained at both natural-abundance levels (??0.2-0.5??? for ??15N and ?? 0.4-1.0%o for ??18O) and moderately enriched 15N tracer levels (??20-50%o for ??15N near 5000???) for 5-20 nmol of NO2- (1-20 ??mol/L in 1-5 mL aliquots). This method is highly selective for NO2- and was used for mixed samples containing both NO2- and NO3- with little or no measurable cross-contamination. In addition, mixed samples that were analyzed with S. nitritireducens were treated subsequently with Pseudomonas aureofaciens to reduce the NO3- in the absence of NO 2-, providing isotopic analyses of NO2- and NO3- separately in the same aliquot. Sequential bacterial reduction methods like this one should be useful for a variety of isotopic studies aimed at understanding nitrogen cycling in aquatic environments. A test of these methods in an agricultural watershed in Indiana provides isotopic evidence for both nitrification and denitrification as sources of NO2- in a small stream.

  2. Analytical properties of some commercially available nitrate reductase enzymes evaluated as replacements for cadmium in automated, semiautomated, and manual colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    A multiyear research effort at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) evaluated several commercially available nitrate reductase (NaR) enzymes as replacements for toxic cadmium in longstanding automated colorimetric air-segmented continuous-flow analyzer (CFA) methods for determining nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) in water. This research culminated in USGS approved standard- and low-level enzymatic reduction, colorimetric automated discrete analyzer NOx methods that have been in routine operation at the NWQL since October 2011. The enzyme used in these methods (AtNaR2) is a product of recombinant expression of NaR from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (mouseear cress) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Because the scope of the validation report for these new automated discrete analyzer methods, published as U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 5–B8, was limited to performance benchmarks and operational details, extensive foundational research with different enzymes—primarily YNaR1, a product of recombinant expression of NaR from Pichia angusta in the yeast Pichia pastoris—remained unpublished until now. This report documents research and development at the NWQL that was foundational to development and validation of the discrete analyzer methods. It includes: (1) details of instrumentation used to acquire kinetics data for several NaR enzymes in the presence and absence of known or suspected inhibitors in relation to reaction temperature and reaction pH; and (2) validation results—method detection limits, precision and bias estimates, spike recoveries, and interference studies—for standard- and low-level automated colorimetric CFA-YNaR1 reduction NOx methods in relation to corresponding USGS approved CFA cadmium-reduction (CdR) NOx methods. The cornerstone of this validation is paired sample statistical and graphical analysis of NOx concentrations from more than 3,800 geographically and seasonally diverse surface

  3. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  4. Optimization of a mainstream nitritation-denitritation process and anammox polishing.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Holgate, Becky; Fredericks, Dana; Miller, Mark W; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with an almost 1-year long pilot study of a nitritation-denitritation process that was followed by anammox polishing. The pilot plant treated real municipal wastewater at ambient temperatures. The effluent of high-rate activated sludge process (hydraulic retention time, HRT=30 min, solids retention time=0.25 d) was fed to the pilot plant described in this paper, where a constant temperature of 23 °C was maintained. The nitritation-denitritation process was operated to promote nitrite oxidizing bacteria out-selection in an intermittently aerated reactor. The intermittent aeration pattern was controlled using a strategy based on effluent ammonia and nitrate+nitrite concentrations. The unique feature of this aeration control was that fixed dissolved oxygen set-point was used and the length of aerobic and anoxic durations were changed based on the effluent ammonia and nitrate+nitrite concentrations. The anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) bacteria were adapted in mainstream conditions by allowing the growth on the moving bed bioreactor plastic media in a fully anoxic reactor. The total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal performance of the entire system was 75±15% during the study at a modest influent chemical oxygen demand (COD)/NH4+-N ratio of 8.9±1.8 within the HRT range of 3.1-9.4 h. Anammox polishing contributed 11% of overall TIN removal. Therefore, this pilot-scale study demonstrates that application of the proposed nitritation-denitritation system followed by anammox polishing is capable of relatively high nitrogen removal without supplemental carbon and alkalinity at a low HRT. PMID:26247763

  5. Dry deposition of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium, and nitrate to alpine tundra at Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, G.; Sievering, H.

    2001-01-01

    Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70ngNm-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200ngNm-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to have been at or below about 20ngNm-3. Large deposition velocities (>2cms-1) were determined for nitrate and ammonium and may result from reactions with surface-derived aerosols. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70 ng N m-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200 ng N m-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to

  6. Annual dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and total phosphorous loads for the Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia River basins, 1968-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2006-01-01

    Annual stream-water loads were calculated near the outlet of four of the larger river basins (Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia) in the United States for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3) and total phosphorus using LOADEST load estimation software. Loads were estimated for the period 1968-2004; although loads estimated for individual river basins and chemical constituent combinations typically were for shorter time periods due to limitations in data availability. Stream discharge and water-quality data for load estimates were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with additional stream discharge data for the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The loads were estimated to support national assessments of changes in stream nutrient loads that are periodically conducted by Federal agencies (for example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) and other water- and land-resource organizations. Data, methods, and results of load estimates are summarized herein; including World Wide Web links to electronic ASCII text files containing the raw data. The load estimates are compared to dissolved NO2 + NO3 loads for three of the large river basins from 1971 to 1998 that the USGS provided during 2001 to The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment (The Heinz Center) for a report The Heinz Center published during 2002. Differences in the load estimates are the result of using the most up-to-date monitoring data since the 2001 analysis, differences in how concentrations less than the reporting limit were handled by the load estimation models, and some errors and exclusions in the 2001 analysis datasets (which resulted in some inaccurate load estimates).

  7. High-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporter genes (Nrt2) in Tisochrysis lutea: identification and expression analyses reveal some interesting specificities of Haptophyta microalgae.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Aurélie; Bérard, Jean-Baptiste; Bougaran, Gaël; Carrier, Grégory; Lukomska, Ewa; Schreiber, Nathalie; Fournier, Flora; Charrier, Aurélie F; Rouxel, Catherine; Garnier, Matthieu; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Saint-Jean, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae have a diversity of industrial applications such as feed, food ingredients, depuration processes and energy. However, microalgal production costs could be substantially improved by controlling nutrient intake. Accordingly, a better understanding of microalgal nitrogen metabolism is essential. Using in silico analysis from transcriptomic data concerning the microalgae Tisochrysis lutea, four genes encoding putative high-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporters (TlNrt2) were identified. Unlike most of the land plants and microalgae, cloning of genomic sequences and their alignment with complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences did not reveal the presence of introns in all TlNrt2 genes. The deduced TlNRT2 protein sequences showed similarities to NRT2 proteins of other phyla such as land plants and green algae. However, some interesting specificities only known among Haptophyta were also revealed, especially an additional sequence of 100 amino acids forming an atypical extracellular loop located between transmembrane domains 9 and 10 and the function of which remains to be elucidated. Analyses of individual TlNrt2 gene expression with different nitrogen sources and concentrations were performed. TlNrt2.1 and TlNrt2.3 were strongly induced by low NO3 (-) concentration and repressed by NH4 (+) substrate and were classified as inducible genes. TlNrt2.2 was characterized by a constitutive pattern whatever the substrate. Finally, TlNrt2.4 displayed an atypical response that was not reported earlier in literature. Interestingly, expression of TlNrt2.4 was rather related to internal nitrogen quota level than external nitrogen concentration. This first study on nitrogen metabolism of T. lutea opens avenues for future investigations on the function of these genes and their implication for industrial applications.

  8. Diagnostic significance of nitrates and nitrites and L-arginine, in development of hepatorenal syndrome in patients with end stage alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nickovic, Vanja; Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Goran; Pavlovic, Radmila; Stojanovic, Ivana; Katanic, Radoslav; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Djindjic, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) represents a complication of the end-stage liver cirrhosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze concentrations of nitrates and nitrites (NO2 + NO3) and L-arginine in patients with liver cirrhosis and HRS as a possible predictive marker for the development of HRS. The research was performed in a group of 28 patients with cirrhosis and HRS, a group of 22 patients suffering from cirrhosis without HRS and a control group comprised of 42 healthy voluntary blood donors. In patients with end-stage alcoholic liver cirrhosis, with HRS, the concentrations of NO2 + NO3 increased and correlated with the degree of cirrhosis progression, compared to patients without HRS and significantly higher compared to the control group. The level of NO2 + NO3 was in a positive correlation with the degree of liver damage de Ritis coefficient (HRS = 0.72; cirrhosis: = 0.55; control = -0.10). Significant positive correlation was found between NO2 + NO3 concentration and inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (HRSC = 0.75; cirrhosis = 0.70, control = -0.25). The correlation between NO2 + NO3 concentration and creatinine concentration in patients with HRS was significantly higher compared to patients without HRS (HRS = 0.82; cirrhosis = 0.32; control = -0.25). By using binary regression analysis, on the basis of clinical criteria of HRS diagnosis, the strongest independent positive predictor for HRS development was NO2 + NO3, associated with 45.02 times higher incidence of HRS, compared to arginine (12.7 times higher incidence), creatinine (13.1 times higher incidence), and AST/ALT ratio (10.55 higher incidence of HRS). Since the determination of NO2 + NO3 represents a reliable and easily applicable method, it may be used as an early predictive marker for HRS development.

  9. Metabolism of nitrate in fermented meats: the characteristic feature of a specific group of fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Walter P

    2012-04-01

    Within the universe of food fermentation processes the multi-purpose use of nitrate and/or nitrite is a unique characteristic of meat fermentations. These curing agents play a decisive role in obtaining the specific sensory properties, stability and hygienic safety of products such as fermented sausages, ham and, more recently, emulsion type of sausages. The use of nitrate is the traditional method in curing processes and requires its reduction to reactive nitrite. Thus, nitrate reduction is the key event that is exclusively performed by microorganisms. Under controlled fermentation conditions starter cultures are used that contain staphylococci and/or Kocuria varians, which in addition to strongly affecting sensory properties exhibit efficient nitrate reductase activity. To obtain clean label products some plant sources of nitrate have been in use. When producing thermally treated sausages (e.g. of emulsion type), starter cultures are used that form nitrite before cooking takes place. Staphylococci reduce nitrite to ammonia after nitrate has been consumed. K. varians is devoid of nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate and nitrite reductases are also present in certain strains of lactobacilli. It was shown that their application as starter cultures warrants efficient activity in sausages made with either nitrate or nitrite. NO is formed from nitrite in numerous chemical reactions among which disproportionation and reaction with reductants either added or endogenous in meat are of practical importance. Numerous nitrosation and nitrosylation reactions take place in the meat matrix among which the formation of nitrosomyoglobin is of major sensory importance. Safety considerations in meat fermentation relate to the safe nature of the starter organisms and to the use of nitrate/nitrite. Staphylococci ("micrococci") in fermented meat have a long tradition in food use but have not received the QPS status from the EFSA. They require, therefore, thorough assessment with

  10. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions.

  11. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions. PMID:27050805

  12. A New Perspective on Microbes Formerly Known as Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daims, Holger; Lücker, Sebastian; Wagner, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, nitrite oxidation to nitrate, which is an important process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. NOB were traditionally perceived as physiologically restricted organisms and were less intensively studied than other nitrogen-cycling microorganisms. This picture is in contrast to new discoveries of an unexpected high diversity of mostly uncultured NOB and a great physiological versatility, which includes complex microbe-microbe interactions and lifestyles outside the nitrogen cycle. Most surprisingly, close relatives to NOB perform complete nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and this finding will have far-reaching implications for nitrification research. We review recent work that has changed our perspective on NOB and provides a new basis for future studies on these enigmatic organisms. PMID:27283264

  13. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  14. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad so that the level of sodium nitrite does not exceed 200 parts per million and the level of sodium nitrate does not... sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products...

  15. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  16. Acetate limitation and nitrite accumulation during denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J.; Silverstein, J.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrite accumulated in denitrifying activated sludge mixed liquor when the carbon and electron source, acetate, was limited. If acetate was added to obtain a carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio in the range of 2:1 to 3:1, nitrate was completely consumed at the same rate with no nitrite accumulation, indicating that nitrate concentration controlled the respiration rate as long as sufficient substrate was present. However, when acetate was reduced to a C:N ratio of 1:1, while nitrate continued to be consumed, > 50% of the initial nitrate-nitrogen accumulated as nitrite and 29% persisted as nitrite throughout an endogenous denitrification period of 8--9 h. While nitrite accumulated during acetate-limited denitrification, the specific nitrate reduction rate increased significantly compared with the rate when excess acetate was provided as follows: 0.034 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h versus 0.023 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h, respective. This may be explained by nitrate respiration out-competing nitrite respiration for limited acetate electrons. Complete restoration of balanced denitrification and elimination of nitrite accumulation during denitrification required several weeks after the C:N ratio was increased back to 2:1.

  17. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide. PMID:22283408

  18. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  19. The history of aerobic ammonia oxidizers: from the first discoveries to today.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Maria; Séneca, Joana; Magalhães, Catarina

    2014-07-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, has long been considered a central biological process in the global nitrogen cycle, with its first description dated 133 years ago. Until 2005, bacteria were considered the only organisms capable of nitrification. However, the recent discovery of a chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, changed our concept of the range of organisms involved in nitrification, highlighting the importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as potential players in global biogeochemical nitrogen transformations. The uniqueness of these archaea justified the creation of a novel archaeal phylum, Thaumarchaeota. These recent discoveries increased the global scientific interest within the microbial ecology society and have triggered an analysis of the importance of bacterial vs archaeal ammonia oxidation in a wide range of natural ecosystems. In this mini review we provide a chronological perspective of the current knowledge on the ammonia oxidation pathway of nitrification, based on the main physiological, ecological and genomic discoveries.

  20. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  1. A new type of environment-friendly material and its removal efficiency for nitrate contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Guo, H.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, nitrate contaminated groundwater problem is a growing concern for scholars both at home and abroad. This study developed a new type of environment-friendly material which has the ability to remove nitrate from contaminated groundwater. The material has a certain degree of mechanical strength and uniform sphericity, with waste wood and straw as raw material, to achieve the purpose of using waste treat waste. In this study, the material and fine sand are mixed and filled in glass column, which is wrapped by black tape in order to avoid light, to test the removal ability toward nitrate nitrogen with influent nitrate nitrogen concentration of 50 mg N/L. The material surface is porous, which could facilitate the reaction between the active sites in the material and nitrate in polluted groundwater, and facilitate microbes implanting on the surface. After running for two months, the nitrate nitrogen removal rate is greater than 90%, and the nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen of effluent are lower than the EPA prescribed maximum limit concentration of nitrate in drinking water(N03--N<10mg N/L, NO2--N<1mg N/L), while the ammonia nitrogen in the effluent is less than 1 mg N/L, lower than the maximum limit concentration of ammonia nitrogen in drinking water made by WHO(NH4+-N<1.5mg N/L), indicating its effective removal rate for nitrate and the absence of serious nitrite and ammonia accumulation. The developed material will have a good prospect in removing nitrate from polluted groundwater.

  2. Use of a hydrogen anode for nitrate waste destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E.E.; White, R.E.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1996-10-01

    Processes are being evaluated to separate the high-level radioactive species from the waste and store them permanently in the form of durable solids. The remaining low-level radioactive waste contains species such as nitrites and nitrates that are capable of contaminating ground water. The use of a hydrogen gas-fed anode and an acid analyte in an electrochemical cell used to destroy nitrate is demonstrated. A mixed Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} anolyte is shown to favor nitrate cell performance and the generation of a higher hydroxide ion concentration in the catholyte. The suggested scheme is an apparent method of sodium sulfate disposal and a possible means through which ammonia (to ammonium sulfate, fertilizer) and hydrogen gas could be recycled through the anode side of the reactor. This could result in a substantial savings in the operation of a nitrate destruction cell.

  3. Nitrite-Specific Active Transport System of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Masato; Kobayashi, Masaki; Omata, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Studies on the nitrite uptake capability of a mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 lacking the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter revealed the occurrence of a nitrite-specific active transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) of about 20 μM. Similar to the nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter, the nitrite-specific transporter was reversibly inhibited by ammonium in the medium. PMID:9852027

  4. Leghemoglobin is nitrated in functional legume nodules in a tyrosine residue within the heme cavity by a nitrite/peroxide-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Martha; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Abián, Joaquín; Staudinger, Christiana; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein Tyr nitration is a post-translational modification yielding 3-nitrotyrosine (NO2-Tyr). Formation of NO2-Tyr is generally considered as a marker of nitroxidative stress and is involved in some human pathophysiological disorders, but it has been poorly studied in plants. Leghemoglobin (Lb) is an abundant hemeprotein of legume nodules that plays an essential role as O2 transporter. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used for a targeted search and quantification of NO2-Tyr in Lbs. For all Lbs examined, Tyr30, located in the distal heme pocket, is the major target of nitration. Lower amounts were found for NO2-Tyr25 and NO2-Tyr133. Nitrated Lb and other as yet unidentified nitrated proteins were also detected in nodules of plants not receiving NO3− and were found to decrease during senescence. This demonstrates formation of nitric oxide (•NO) and NO2− by alternative means to nitrate reductase, probably via a NO synthase-like enzyme, and strongly suggests that nitrated proteins perform biological functions and are not merely metabolic byproducts. In vitro assays with purified Lbs revealed that Tyr nitration requires NO2− + H2O2 and that peroxynitrite is not an efficient inducer of nitration, possibly by isomerizing it to NO3−. Nitrated Lb is formed via oxoferryl Lb, which generates nitrogen dioxide and tyrosyl radicals. This mechanism is distinctly different from that involved in heme nitration. Formation of NO2-Tyr in Lbs is a consequence of active metabolism in functional nodules, where Lbs may act as a sink of toxic peroxynitrite and may play a protective role in the symbiosis. PMID:25603991

  5. High-affinity nitrate/nitrite transporters NrtA and NrtB of Aspergillus nidulans exhibit high specificity and different inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naureen; Karabika, Eugenia; Kinghorn, James R.; Glass, Anthony D.M.; Unkles, Shiela E.

    2015-01-01

    The NrtA and NrtB nitrate transporters are paralogous members of the major facilitator superfamily in Aspergillus nidulans. The availability of loss-of-function mutations allowed individual investigation of the specificity and inhibitor sensitivity of both NrtA and NrtB. In this study, growth response tests were carried out at a growth-limiting concentration of nitrate (1 mM) as the sole nitrogen source, in the presence of a number of potential nitrate analogues at various concentrations, to evaluate their effect on nitrate transport. Both chlorate and chlorite inhibited fungal growth, with chlorite exerting the greater inhibition. The main transporter of nitrate, NrtA, proved to be more sensitive to chlorate than the minor transporter, NrtB. Similarly, the cation caesium was shown to exert differential effects, strongly inhibiting the activity of NrtB, but not NrtA. In contrast, no inhibition of nitrate uptake by NrtA or NrtB transporters was observed in either growth tests or uptake assays in the presence of bicarbonate, formate, malonate or oxalate (sulphite could not be tested in uptake assays owing to its reaction with nitrate), indicating significant specificity of nitrate transport. Kinetic analyses of nitrate uptake revealed that both chlorate and chlorite inhibited NrtA competitively, while these same inhibitors inhibited NrtB in a non-competitive fashion. The caesium ion appeared to inhibit NrtA in a non-competitive fashion, while NrtB was inhibited uncompetitively. The results provide further evidence of the distinctly different characteristics as well as the high specificity of nitrate uptake by these two transporters. PMID:25855763

  6. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  7. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  8. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds.

    PubMed

    Latham, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Robin C; Pinchak, William E; Nisbet, David J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  9. Nitrate photochemistry in NaY zeolite: product formation and product stability under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-03-14

    In the atmosphere, mineral dust particles are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides (N2O5, HNO3, NO3, and NO2). Nitrate ions associated with mineral dust particles can undergo further reactions including those initiated by solar radiation. Although nitrate photochemistry in aqueous media is fairly well studied, much less is known about the photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on mineral dust particles. In this study, the photochemistry of nitrate from HNO3 adsorption in NaY zeolite under different environmental conditions has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. NaY zeolite is used as a model zeolite for studying reactions that can occur in confined space such as those found in porous materials including naturally occurring zeolites and clays. Upon nitrate photolysis under dry conditions (relative humidity, RH, < 1%), surface nitrite is formed as the major adsorbed product. Although nitrite has been proposed as a product in the photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on metal oxide particle surfaces, such as on alumina, it has not been previously detected. The stability of adsorbed nitrite in NaY is attributed to the confined three-dimensional structure of the porous zeolite, which contains a charge compensating cation that can stabilize the nitrite ion product. Besides adsorbed nitrite, small amounts of gas phase nitrogen-containing products are observed as well including NO2, NO, and N2O at long irradiation times. The amount of nitrite formed via nitrate photochemistry decreases with increasing relative humidity, whereas gas phase NO and N2O become the only detectable products. Gas-phase NO2 does not observe at RH > 1%. In the presence of gas phase ammonia, ammonium nitrate is formed in NaY zeolite. Photochemistry of ammonium nitrate yields gas phase N2O as the sole gas phase product. Evidence for an NH2 intermediate in the formation of N2O is identified with FTIR spectroscopy for HNO3 adsorption and

  10. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Robin C.; Pinchak, William E.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  11. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds.

    PubMed

    Latham, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Robin C; Pinchak, William E; Nisbet, David J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  12. The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process for the denitration and immobilization of low-level radioactive liquid waste (LLW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguercia, Ivan

    Hazardous radioactive liquid waste is the legacy of more than 50 years of plutonium production associated with the United States' nuclear weapons program. It is estimated that more than 245,000 tons of nitrate wastes are stored at facilities such as the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site in the state of Washington, and the Melton Valley storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee. In order to develop an innovative, new technology for the destruction and immobilization of nitrate-based radioactive liquid waste, the United State Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the research project which resulted in the technology known as the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process. However, inasmuch as the nitrate anion is highly mobile and difficult to immobilize, especially in relatively porous cement-based grout which has been used to date as a method for the immobilization of liquid waste, it presents a major obstacle to environmental clean-up initiatives. Thus, in an effort to contribute to the existing body of knowledge and enhance the efficacy of the NAC process, this research involved the experimental measurement of the rheological and heat transfer behaviors of the NAC product slurry and the determination of the optimal operating parameters for the continuous NAC chemical reaction process. Test results indicate that the NAC product slurry exhibits a typical non-Newtonian flow behavior. Correlation equations for the slurry's rheological properties and heat transfer rate in a pipe flow have been developed; these should prove valuable in the design of a full-scale NAC processing plant. The 20-percent slurry exhibited a typical dilatant (shear thickening) behavior and was in the turbulent flow regime due to its lower viscosity. The 40-percent slurry exhibited a typical pseudoplastic (shear thinning) behavior and remained in the laminar flow regime throughout its experimental range. The reactions were found to be more efficient in the

  13. Links between ammonia oxidizer species composition, functional diversity and nitrification kinetics in grassland soils.

    PubMed

    Webster, Gordon; Embley, T Martin; Freitag, Thomas E; Smith, Zena; Prosser, James I

    2005-05-01

    Molecular approaches have revealed considerable diversity and uncultured novelty in natural prokaryotic populations, but not direct links between the new genotypes detected and ecosystem processes. Here we describe the influence of the structure of communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria on nitrogen cycling in microcosms containing natural and managed grasslands and amended with artificial sheep urine, a major factor determining local ammonia concentrations in these environments. Nitrification kinetics were assessed by analysis of changes in urea, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate concentrations and ammonia oxidizer communities were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified from extracted DNA using ammonia oxidizer-specific primers. In natural soils, ammonia oxidizer community structure determined the delay preceding nitrification, which depended on the relative abundance of two Nitrosospira clusters, termed 3a and 3b. In batch cultures, pure culture and enrichment culture representatives of Nitrosospira 3a were sensitive to high ammonia concentration, while Nitrosospira cluster 3b representatives and Nitrosomonas europaea were tolerant. Delays in nitrification occurred in natural soils dominated by Nitrosospira cluster 3a and resulted from the time required for growth of low concentrations of Nitrosospira cluster 3b. In microcosms dominated by Nitrosospira cluster 3b and Nitrosomonas, no substantial delays were observed. In managed soils, no delays in nitrification were detected, regardless of initial ammonia oxidizer community structure, most probably resulting from higher ammonia oxidizer cell concentrations. The data therefore demonstrate a direct link between bacterial community structure, physiological diversity and ecosystem function.

  14. Liquid and atmospheric ammonia concentrations from a dairy lagoon during an aeration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumburg, Brian; Neger, Manjit; Mount, George H.; Yonge, David; Filipy, Jenny; Swain, John; Kincaid, Ron; Johnson, Kristen

    Ammonia emissions from agriculture are an environmental and human health concern, and there is increasing pressure to reduce emissions. Animal agriculture is the largest global source of ammonia emissions and on a per cow basis dairy operations are the largest emitters. The storage and disposal of the dairy waste is one area where emissions can be reduced, aerobic biological treatment of wastewater being a common and effective way of reducing ammonia emissions. An aeration experiment in a dairy lagoon with two commercial aerators was performed for 1 month. Liquid concentrations of ammonia, total nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate were monitored before, during and after the experiment and atmospheric ammonia was measured downwind of the lagoon using a short-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument with 1 ppbv sensitivity. No changes in either liquid or atmospheric ammonia concentrations were detected throughout the experiment, and neither dissolved oxygen, nitrite nor nitrate could be detected in the lagoon at any time. The average ammonia concentration at 10 sampling sites in the lagoon at a depth of 0.15 m was 650 mg l -1 and at 0.90 m it was 700 mg l -1 NH 3-N. The average atmospheric ammonia concentration 50 m downwind was about 300 ppbv. The 0.90 m depth total nitrogen concentrations and total and volatile solids concentrations decreased during the experiment due to some mixing of the lagoon but the 0.15 m depth concentrations did not decrease indicating that the aerators were not strong enough to mix the sludge off the bottom into the whole water column.

  15. Toxicity of nitrite to fish: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.M. Jr.; Morris, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Nitrite, an intermediate in the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, changes hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not carry oxygen; nitrite may thus cause anoxia in fish and other aquatic organisms. The published literature on nitrite toxicity to fish, which consists of about 40 papers, shows that the ratio of the 24-h LC50 (concentration lethal to half of the test organisms in 24 h) to the 96-h LC50 has a median value of 2.0 and is fairly uniform across species; toxicity tests of differing duration can therefore be standardized to a common duration. In general, chronic effects are difficult to detect at concentrations below one-fifth of the 96-h LC50. Most fish concentrate nitrite in fresh water; chloride in the external environment offsets the toxicity of nitrite by competing with nitrite for uptake through the chloride cells of the gills. Bicarbonate also reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but it is less than 1% as effective as chloride. Calcium reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but much less than chloride; the effects of other metal cations have not been studied. Hydrogen ion concentration of the medium has not been shown to have a discrete effect on the toxicity of nitrite except at extreme concentrations uncharacteristic of the environments in which fish ordinarily live. Nitrite toxicity is exacerbated by low oxygen concentrations because nitrite reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Very small fish seem less sensitive to nitrite than fish of intermediate or large size. Present evidence suggests that salmonids are among the fishes most sensitive to nitrite. The least-sensitive species tested thus far are the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; the largemouth bass does not concentrate nitrite.

  16. Hydrogen anode for nitrate waste destruction. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Kalu, E.E.; White, R.E.

    1996-02-10

    Large quantities of radioactive and hazardous wastes have been generated from nuclear materials production during the past fifty years. Processes are under evaluation to separate the high level radioactive species from the waste and store them permanently in the form of durable solids. The schemes proposed will separate the high level radioactive components, cesium-137 and strontium-90, into a small volume for incorporation into a glass wasteform. The remaining low-level radioactive waste contain species such as nitrites and nitrates that are capable of contaminating ground water. Electrochemical destruction of the nitrate and nitrite before permanent storage has been proposed. Not only will the electrochemical processing destroy these species, the volume of the waste could also be reduced. The use of a hydrogen gas-fed anode and an acid anolyte in an electrochemical cell used to destroy nitrate was demonstrated. A mixed Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} anolyte was shown to favor the nitrate cell performance, and the generation of a higher hydroxide ion concentration in the catholyte. The suggested scheme is an apparent method of sodium sulfate disposal and a possible means through which ammonia (to ammonium sulfate, fertilizer) and hydrogen gas could be recycled through the anode side of the reactor. This could result in a substantial savings in the operation of a nitrate destruction cell.

  17. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea in horizontal flow biofilm reactors treating ammonia-contaminated air at 10 °C.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Seán; Clifford, Eoghan; Kennelly, Colm; Collins, Gavin

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of novel, Horizontal Flow Biofilm Reactor (HFBR) technology for the treatment of ammonia (NH3)-contaminated airstreams. Three laboratory-scale HFBRs were used for remediation of an NH3-containing airstream at 10 °C during a 90-d trial to test the efficacy of low-temperature treatment. Average ammonia removal efficiencies of 99.7 % were achieved at maximum loading rates of 4.8 g NH3 m(3) h(-1). Biological nitrification of ammonia to nitrite (NO2 (-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) was mediated by nitrifying bacterial and archaeal biofilm populations. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) vertically at each of seven sampling zones along the vertical HFBRs. Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira, were the two most dominant bacterial genera detected in the HFBRs, while an uncultured archaeal clone dominated the AOA community. The bacterial community composition across the three HFBRs was highly conserved, although variations occurred between HFBR zones and were driven by physicochemical variables. The study demonstrates the feasibility of HFBRs for the treatment of ammonia-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures; identifies key nitrifying microorganisms driving the removal process; and provides insights for process optimisation and control. The findings are significant for industrial applications of gas oxidation technology in temperate climates. PMID:26879980

  18. Influence of Nitrate on the Hanford 100D Area In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this laboratory study is to determine the influence of nitrate on the Hanford 100D Area in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) barrier longevity. There is a wide spread groundwater plume of 60 mg/L nitrate upgradient of the ISRM barrier with lower nitrate concentrations downgradient, suggestive of nitrate reduction occurring. Batch and 1-D column experiments showed that nitrate is being slowly reduced to nitrite and ammonia. These nitrate reduction reactions are predominantly abiotic, as experiments with and without bactericides present showed no difference in nitrate degradation rates. Nitrogen species transformation rates determined in experiments covered a range of ferrous iron/nitrate ratios such that the data can be used to predict rates in field scale conditions. Field scale reaction rate estimates for 100% reduced sediment (16 C) are: (a) nitrate degradation = 202 {+-} 50 h (half-life), (b) nitrite production = 850 {+-} 300 h, and (c) ammonia production = 650 {+-} 300 h. Calculation of the influence of nitrate reduction on the 100D Area reductive capacity requires consideration of mass balance and reaction rate effects. While dissolved oxygen and chromate reduction rates are rapid and essentially at equilibrium in the aquifer, nitrate transformation reactions are slow (100s of hours). In the limited (20-40 day) residence time in the ISRM barrier, only a portion of the nitrate will be reduced, whereas dissolved oxygen and chromate are reduced to completion. Assuming a groundwater flow rate of 1 ft/day, it is estimated that the ISRM barrier reductive capacity is 160 pore volumes (with no nitrate), and 85 pore volumes if 60 mg/L nitrate is present (i.e., a 47% decrease in the ISRM barrier longevity). Zones with more rapid groundwater flow will be less influenced by nitrate reduction. For example, a zone with a groundwater flow rate of 3 ft/day and 60 mg/L nitrate will have a reductive capacity of 130 pore volumes. Finally, long-term column experiments

  19. The impact of influent total ammonium nitrogen concentration on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Vojtech; Catrysse, Michael; Stryjova, Hana; Jonatova, Ivana; Volcke, Eveline I P; Svehla, Pavel; Bartacek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The application of nitrification-denitrification over nitrite (nitritation-denitritation) with municipal (i.e. diluted and cold (or low-temperature)) wastewater can substantially improve the energy balance of municipal wastewater treatment plants. For the accumulation of nitrite, it is crucial to inhibit nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) with simultaneous proliferation of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The present study describes the effect of the influent total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration on AOB and NOB activity in two moving bed biofilm reactors operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) at 15 °C (SBR I) and 21 °C (SBR II). The reactors were fed with diluted reject water containing 600, 300, 150 and 75 mg TAN L(-1). The only factor limiting NOB activity in these reactors was the high concentrations of free ammonia and/or free nitrous acid (FNA) during the SBR cycles. Nitrite accumulation was observed with influents containing 600, 300 and 150 mg TAN L(-1) in SBR I and 600 and 300 in SBR II. Once nitrate production established in the reactors, the increase of influent TAN concentration up to the original 600 mg TAN L(-1) did not limit NOB activity. This was due to the massive development of NOB clusters throughout the biofilm that were able to cope with faster formation of FNA. The results of the fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis preliminarily showed the stratification of bacteria in the biofilm.

  20. Difficulties in maintaining long-term partial nitritation of ammonium-rich sludge digester liquids in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR).

    PubMed

    Fux, C; Huang, D; Monti, A; Siegrist, H

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen can be eliminated effectively from sludge digester effluents by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), but 55-60% of the ammonium must first be oxidized to nitrite. Although a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with suspended biomass could be used, its hydraulic dilution rate is limited to 0.8-1 d(-1) (30 degrees C). Higher specific nitrite production rates can be achieved by sludge retention, as shown here for a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with Kaldnes carriers on laboratory and pilot scales. The maximum nitrite production rate amounted to 2.7 gNO2-Nm(-2)d(-1) (3 gO2m(-3)d(-1), 30.5 degrees C), thus doubling the dilution rate compared to CSTR operation with suspended biomass for a supernatant with 700 gNH4-Nm(-3). Whenever the available alkalinity was fully consumed, an optimal amount of nitrite was produced. However, a significant amount of nitrate was produced after 11 months of operation, making the effluent unsuitable for anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Because the sludge retention time (SRT) is relatively long in biofilm systems, slow growth of nitrite oxidizers occurs. None of the selection criteria applied - a high ammonium loading rate, high free ammonia or low oxygen concentration - led to selective suppression of nitrite oxidation. A CSTR or SBR with suspended biomass is consequently recommended for full-scale operation. PMID:15303723

  1. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  2. Competition for Ammonia Influences the Structure of Chemotrophic Communities in Geothermal Springs

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Koonce, Evangeline; Howells, Alta; Havig, Jeff R.; Jewell, Talia; de la Torre, José R.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Source waters sampled from Perpetual Spouter hot spring (pH 7.03, 86.4°C), Yellowstone National Park, WY, have low concentrations of total ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, suggesting nitrogen (N) limitation and/or tight coupling of N cycling processes. Dominant small-subunit rRNA sequences in Perpetual Spouter source sediments are closely affiliated with the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii” and the putatively nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacterium Thermocrinis albus, respectively, suggesting that these populations may interact at the level of the bioavailable N pool, specifically, ammonia. This hypothesis was evaluated by using a combination of geochemical, physiological, and transcriptomic analyses of sediment microcosms. Amendment of microcosms with allylthiourea, an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation, decreased rates of acetylene reduction (a proxy for N2 fixation) and nitrite production (a proxy for ammonia oxidation) and decreased transcript levels of structural genes involved in both nitrogen fixation (nifH) and ammonia oxidation (amoA). In contrast, amendment of microcosms with ammonia stimulated nitrite production and increased amoA transcript levels while it suppressed rates of acetylene reduction and decreased nifH transcript levels. Sequencing of amplified nifH and amoA transcripts from native sediments, as well as microcosms, at 2 and 4 h postamendment, indicates that the dominant and responsive populations involved in ammonia oxidation and N2 fixation are closely affiliated with Ca. Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii and T. albus, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that ammonia-oxidizing archaea, such as Ca. Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, have an apparent affinity for ammonia that is higher than that of the diazotrophs present in this ecosystem. Depletion of the bioavailable N pool through the activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea likely represents a strong selective pressure for the inclusion of organisms capable

  3. Competition for ammonia influences the structure of chemotrophic communities in geothermal springs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Koonce, Evangeline; Howells, Alta; Havig, Jeff R; Jewell, Talia; de la Torre, José R; Peters, John W; Boyd, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    Source waters sampled from Perpetual Spouter hot spring (pH 7.03, 86.4°C), Yellowstone National Park, WY, have low concentrations of total ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, suggesting nitrogen (N) limitation and/or tight coupling of N cycling processes. Dominant small-subunit rRNA sequences in Perpetual Spouter source sediments are closely affiliated with the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii" and the putatively nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacterium Thermocrinis albus, respectively, suggesting that these populations may interact at the level of the bioavailable N pool, specifically, ammonia. This hypothesis was evaluated by using a combination of geochemical, physiological, and transcriptomic analyses of sediment microcosms. Amendment of microcosms with allylthiourea, an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation, decreased rates of acetylene reduction (a proxy for N2 fixation) and nitrite production (a proxy for ammonia oxidation) and decreased transcript levels of structural genes involved in both nitrogen fixation (nifH) and ammonia oxidation (amoA). In contrast, amendment of microcosms with ammonia stimulated nitrite production and increased amoA transcript levels while it suppressed rates of acetylene reduction and decreased nifH transcript levels. Sequencing of amplified nifH and amoA transcripts from native sediments, as well as microcosms, at 2 and 4 h postamendment, indicates that the dominant and responsive populations involved in ammonia oxidation and N2 fixation are closely affiliated with Ca. Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii and T. albus, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that ammonia-oxidizing archaea, such as Ca. Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, have an apparent affinity for ammonia that is higher than that of the diazotrophs present in this ecosystem. Depletion of the bioavailable N pool through the activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea likely represents a strong selective pressure for the inclusion of organisms capable of

  4. A peroxynitrite complex of copper: formation from a copper-nitrosyl complex, transformation to nitrite and exogenous phenol oxidative coupling or nitration.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Young; Deepalatha, Subramanian; Puiu, Simona C; Lee, Dong-Heon; Mondal, Biplab; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A; del Rio, Diego; Pau, Monita Y M; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2009-11-01

    Reaction of nitrogen monoxide with a copper(I) complex possessing a tridentate alkylamine ligand gives a Cu(I)-(*NO) adduct, which when exposed to dioxygen generates a peroxynitrite (O=NOO(-))-Cu(II) species. This undergoes thermal transformation to produce a copper(II) nitrito (NO(2) (-)) complex and 0.5 mol equiv O(2). In the presence of a substituted phenol, the peroxynitrite complex effects oxidative coupling, whereas addition of chloride ion to dissociate the peroxynitrite moiety instead leads to phenol ortho nitration. Discussions include the structures (including electronic description) of the copper-nitrosyl and copper-peroxynitrite complexes and the formation of the latter, based on density functional theory calculations and accompanying spectroscopic data. PMID:19662443

  5. Comparative kinetics and reciprocal inhibition of nitrate and nitrite uptake in roots of uninduced and induced barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Travis, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate and NO2- transport by roots of 8-day-old uninduced and induced intact barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) seedlings were compared to kinetic patterns, reciprocal inhibition of the transport systems, and the effect of the inhibitor, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Net uptake of NO3- and NO2- was measured by following the depletion of the ions from the uptake solutions. The roots of uninduced seedlings possessed a low concentration, saturable, low Km, possibly a constitutive uptake system, and a linear system for both NO3- and NO2-. The low Km system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation between 40 and 100 micromolar, whereas the linear system was detected between 100 and 500 micromolar. In roots of induced seedlings, rates for both NO3- and NO2- uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation at about 200 micromolar. In induced roots, two kinetically identifiable transport systems were resolved for each anion. At the lower substrate concentrations, less than 10 micromolar, the apparent low Kms of NO3- and NO2- uptake were 7 and 9 micromolar, respectively, and were similar to those of the low Km system in uninduced roots. At substrate concentrations between 10 and 200 micromolar, the apparent high Km values of NO3- uptake ranged from 34 to 36 micromolar and of NO2- uptake ranged from 41 to 49 micromolar. A linear system was also found in induced seedlings at concentrations above 500 micromolar. Double reciprocal plots indicated that NO3- and NO2- inhibited the uptake of each other competitively in both uninduced and induced seedlings; however, Ki values showed that NO3- was a more effective inhibitor than NO2-. Nitrate and NO2- transport by both the low and high Km systems were greatly inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, whereas the linear system was only slightly inhibited.

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.; Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  7. Biotransformation of pharmaceuticals under nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Gomes, I B; Aga, D S; Omil, F; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-01-15

    The effect of nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions on the biotransformation of several pharmaceuticals in a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge was evaluated in this study by selective activation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrifiers displayed a noticeable capacity to process ibuprofen due to hydroxylation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) to produce 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen. Naproxen was also biotransformed under nitrifying conditions. On the other hand, heterotrophic bacteria present in the nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) biotransformed sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, both nitrifying and heterotrophic activities were ineffective against diclofenac, diazepam, carbamazepine and trimethoprim. Similar biotransformation rates of erythromycin, roxithromycin and fluoxetine were observed under all conditions tested. Overall, results from this study give more evidence on the role of the different microbial communities present in activated sludge reactors on the biological removal of pharmaceuticals. PMID:26479917

  8. Biotransformation of pharmaceuticals under nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Gomes, I B; Aga, D S; Omil, F; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-01-15

    The effect of nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions on the biotransformation of several pharmaceuticals in a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge was evaluated in this study by selective activation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrifiers displayed a noticeable capacity to process ibuprofen due to hydroxylation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) to produce 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen. Naproxen was also biotransformed under nitrifying conditions. On the other hand, heterotrophic bacteria present in the nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) biotransformed sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, both nitrifying and heterotrophic activities were ineffective against diclofenac, diazepam, carbamazepine and trimethoprim. Similar biotransformation rates of erythromycin, roxithromycin and fluoxetine were observed under all conditions tested. Overall, results from this study give more evidence on the role of the different microbial communities present in activated sludge reactors on the biological removal of pharmaceuticals.

  9. Comparison of nitrate tolerance between different populations of the common frog, Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Johansson, M; Räsänen, K; Merilä, J

    2001-09-01

    Euthrophication-associated changes in the physical and biological environment of lakes and ponds are potentially a source of major stress for many aquatic organisms. In Scandinavia, the nitrate concentrations in lakes and ponds decrease towards north due to a naturally lower productivity of the habitats, but also due to lower supplementation of anthropogenic nitrogen. A chronic experiment using ecologically relevant concentrations of sodium nitrate (0-5000 micro gl(-1)) was used to test whether common frog (Rana temporaria L.) larvae from northern parts of Scandinavia are less well adapted to cope with high nitrate concentrations than those from the southern parts. Slight, but significant differences in nitrate tolerance, as measured in terms of growth rate and size at metamorphosis, between the two regions were found. High concentrations of nitrate reduced the growth rates and metamorphic size in north, but not in south. However, there was no clear-cut impact of high nitrate concentrations on developmental rate or on mortality until metamorphosis. The general lack of large effects of nitrate treatment on the response variables suggests that nitrates per se do not pose any significant threat to the development of R. temporaria tadpoles under a natural range of concentrations. This was confirmed in an acute test where results suggest that ammonia and nitrite, compounds seldom found in high concentrations in Fennoscandian lakes, are possibly responsible for the larger negative effects of "nitrate" observed in previous studies of amphibians.

  10. Adding nitrate and phosphate separately or together in the Central Indian Ocean: a nutrient enrichment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Jiang, L.; Wu, Z. J.

    2009-11-01

    Nutrient enrichment experiments were carried out in the Central Indian Ocean during the Chinese First Around-the world Research Cruise, adding nitrate, phosphate, or a mixture of both of them to surface seawater. The concentration of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and phosphate were analyzed spectrophotometrically, the chlorophyll-a concentration with fluorescence analysis, and the temperature variation during the experiment recorded. Addition of nitrate resulted in rapid growth of phytoplankton concomitant with depletion of nitrate in the water samples. No apparent variation occurred in chlorophyll-a concentration when phosphate was added. Combining nitrate and phosphate proved to be best to promote phytoplankton bloom, and nitrate was depleted prior to phosphate. After nitrate was consumed, a substantial amount of phytoplankton survived on the supplied phosphate. No correlation was found between the nitrate to phosphate ratio and chlorophyll-a or phytoplankton growth rate. We also found no correlation between water temperature and chlorophyll-a or phytoplankton growth rate. We conclude that neither nitrate to phosphate ratio nor water temperature control the growth of phytoplankton.

  11. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  12. Nitrites derived from Foneiculum vulgare (fennel) seeds promotes vascular functions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Akila; Sridhara, Sree Rama Chaitanya; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Siamwala, Jamila H; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that nitrites play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Fennel (Foneiculum vulgare) seeds are often used as mouth fresheners after a meal in both the Indian sub-continent and around the world. The present study aims to quantify the nitrite and nitrates in fennel seeds as well as elucidating the effect of fennel derived-nitrites on vascular functions. Results from our study show that fennel seeds contain significantly higher amount of nitrites when compared to other commonly used post-meal seeds. Furthermore our study confirmed the functional effects of fennel derived-nitrites using in vitro and ex vivo models that describe the promotion of angiogenesis, cell migration, and vasorelaxation. We also showed that chewing fennel seeds enhanced nitrite content of saliva. Thus our study indicates the potential role of fennel derived-nitrites on the vascular system.

  13. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs

  14. Correlation between total nitrite/nitrate concentrations and monoamine oxidase (types A and B) and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase enzymatic activities in human mesenteric arteries from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Nunes, S F; Figueiredo, I V; Pereira, J S; Lopes, M C; Caramona, M M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between total nitrite/nitrate concentrations (NOx) and the kinetic parameters of monoamine oxidase enzymes (MAO-A and MAO-B) and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in human mesenteric arteries. Arteries were from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic patients with sigmoid or rectum carcinoma for whom surgery was the first option and who were not exposed to neo-adjuvant therapy. Segments of human inferior mesenteric arteries from non-diabetic (61.1 ± 8.9 years old, 7 males and 5 females, N = 12) and type 2 diabetic patients (65.8 ± 6.2 years old, 8 males and 4 females, N = 12) were used to determine NOx concentrations and the kinetic parameters of MAO-A, MAO-B and SSAO by the Griess reaction and by radiochemical assay, respectively. The NOx concentrations in arteries from diabetic patients did not differ significantly from those of the non-diabetic group (10.28 ± 4.61 vs 10.71 ± 4.32 nmol/mg protein, respectively). In the non-diabetic group, there was a positive correlation between NOx concentrations and MAO-B parameters: Km (r = 0.612, P = 0.034) and Vmax (r = 0.593, P = 0.042), and a negative correlation with the SSAO parameters: Km (r = -0.625, P = 0.029) and Vmax (r = -0.754, P = 0.005). However, in the diabetic group no correlation was found between NOx concentrations and the three kinetic parameters of the enzymes. These results suggest an important function of sympathetic nerves and vascular NOx concentrations in arteries of non-diabetic patients. Thus, these results confirm the importance of a balance between oxidants and antioxidants in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis to prevent oxidative stress.

  15. Method for the fast determination of bromate, nitrate and nitrite by ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and their monitoring in Saudi Arabian drinking water with chemometric data treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Busquets, Rosa; Naushad, Mu

    2016-05-15

    A rapid, sensitive and precise method for the determination of bromate (BrO3(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) in drinking water was developed with Ultra performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MS). The elution of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) was attained in less than two minutes in a reverse phase column. Quality parameters of the method were established; run-to-run and day-to-day precisions were <3% when analysing standards at 10 µg L(-1). The limit of detection was 0.04 µg NO2(-) L(-1) and 0.03 µg L(-1) for both NO3(-)and BrO3(-). The developed UPLC-ESI/MS method was used to quantify these anions in metropolitan water from Saudi Arabia (Jeddah, Dammam and Riyadh areas) and commercial bottled water (from well or unknown source) after mere filtration steps. The quantified levels of NO3(-) were not found to pose a risk. In contrast, BrO3(-) was found above the maximum contaminant level established by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 25% and 33% of the bottled and metropolitan waters, respectively. NO2(-) was found at higher concentrations than the aforementioned limits in 70% and 92% of the bottled and metropolitan water samples, respectively. Therefore, remediation measures or improvements in the disinfection treatments are required. The concentrations of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) were mapped with Principal Component analysis (PCA), which differentiated metropolitan water from bottled water through the concentrations of BrO3(-) and NO3(-) mainly. Furthermore, it was possible to discriminate between well water; blend of well water and desalinated water; and desalinated water. The point or source (region) was found to not be distinctive.

  16. Method for the fast determination of bromate, nitrate and nitrite by ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and their monitoring in Saudi Arabian drinking water with chemometric data treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Busquets, Rosa; Naushad, Mu

    2016-05-15

    A rapid, sensitive and precise method for the determination of bromate (BrO3(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) in drinking water was developed with Ultra performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MS). The elution of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) was attained in less than two minutes in a reverse phase column. Quality parameters of the method were established; run-to-run and day-to-day precisions were <3% when analysing standards at 10 µg L(-1). The limit of detection was 0.04 µg NO2(-) L(-1) and 0.03 µg L(-1) for both NO3(-)and BrO3(-). The developed UPLC-ESI/MS method was used to quantify these anions in metropolitan water from Saudi Arabia (Jeddah, Dammam and Riyadh areas) and commercial bottled water (from well or unknown source) after mere filtration steps. The quantified levels of NO3(-) were not found to pose a risk. In contrast, BrO3(-) was found above the maximum contaminant level established by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 25% and 33% of the bottled and metropolitan waters, respectively. NO2(-) was found at higher concentrations than the aforementioned limits in 70% and 92% of the bottled and metropolitan water samples, respectively. Therefore, remediation measures or improvements in the disinfection treatments are required. The concentrations of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) were mapped with Principal Component analysis (PCA), which differentiated metropolitan water from bottled water through the concentrations of BrO3(-) and NO3(-) mainly. Furthermore, it was possible to discriminate between well water; blend of well water and desalinated water; and desalinated water. The point or source (region) was found to not be distinctive. PMID:26992549

  17. Biofiltration for removal of BOM and residual ammonia following control of bromate formation.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Neemann, Jeffrey J; Rexing, David J; Zegers, Ronald E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrification was developed within a biological filter to simultaneously remove biodegradable organic matter (BOM) and residual ammonia added to control bromate formation during the ozonation of drinking water. Testing was performed at pilot-scale using three filters containing sand and anthracite filter media. BOM formed during ozonation (e.g., assimilable organic carbon (396-572 microg/L), formaldehyde (11-20 microg/L), and oxalate (83-145 microg/L)) was up to 70% removed through biofiltration. Dechlorinated backwash water was required to develop the nitrifying bacteria needed to convert the residual ammonia (0.1-0.5 mg/L NH(3)-N) to nitrite and then to nitrate. Chlorinated backwash water resulted in biofiltration without nitrification. Deep-bed filtration (empty-bed contact time (EBCT) = 8.3 min) did not enhance the development of nitrification when compared with shallow-bed filtration (EBCT = 3.2 min). Variable filtration rates between 4.8 and 14.6 m/h (2 and 6 gpm/sf) had minimal impact on BOM removal. However, conversion of ammonia to nitrite was reduced by 60% when increasing the filtration rate from 4.8 to 14.6 m/h. The results provide drinking water utilities practicing ozonation with a cost-effective alternative to remove the residual ammonia added for bromate control. PMID:17692888

  18. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater. PMID:25693403

  19. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater.

  20. Arsenic removal from geothermal waters with zero-valent iron--effect of temperature, phosphate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Tyruvola, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Nikolaus P; Veranis, Nikolaus; Kallithrakas-Kontos, Nikolaso; Koulouridakis, Pavlos E

    2006-07-01

    Field column studies and laboratory batch experiments were conducted in order to assess the performance of zero-valent iron in removing arsenic from geothermal waters in agricultural regions where phosphates and nitrates were present. A field pilot study demonstrated that iron filings could remove arsenic, phosphate and nitrate from water. In addition, batch studies were performed to evaluate the effect of temperature, phosphate and nitrate on As(III) and As(V) removal rates. All batch experiments were conducted at three temperatures (20, 30 and 40 degrees C). Pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants were calculated for As(III), As(V), phosphate, nitrate and ammonia for all temperatures. As(V) exhibited greater removal rates than As(III). The presence of phosphate and nitrate decreased the rates of arsenic removal. The temperature of the water played a dominant role on the kinetics of arsenic, phosphate and nitrate removal. Nitrate reduction resulted in the formation of nitrite and ammonia. In addition, the activation energy, Eact, and the constant temperature coefficient, theta were determined for each removal process.

  1. Stable partial nitritation for low-strength wastewater at low temperature in an aerobic granular reactor.

    PubMed

    Isanta, Eduardo; Reino, Clara; Carrera, Julián; Pérez, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Partial nitritation for a low-strength wastewater at low temperature was stably achieved in an aerobic granular reactor. A bench-scale granular sludge bioreactor was operated in continuous mode treating an influent of 70 mg N-NH4(+) L(-1) to mimic pretreated municipal nitrogenous wastewater and the temperature was progressively decreased from 30 to 12.5 °C. A suitable effluent nitrite to ammonium concentrations ratio to a subsequent anammox reactor was maintained stable during 300 days at 12.5 °C. The average applied nitrogen loading rate at 12.5 °C was 0.7 ± 0.3 g N L(-1) d(-1), with an effluent nitrate concentration of only 2.5 ± 0.7 mg N-NO3(-) L(-1). The biomass fraction of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the granular sludge decreased from 19% to only 1% in 6 months of reactor operation at 12.5 °C. Nitrobacter spp. where found as the dominant NOB population, whereas Nitrospira spp. were not detected. Simulations indicated that: (i) NOB would only be effectively repressed when their oxygen half-saturation coefficient was higher than that of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria; and (ii) a lower specific growth rate of NOB was maintained at any point in the biofilm (even at 12.5 °C) due to the bulk ammonium concentration imposed through the control strategy.

  2. Stability and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria community structure in different high-rate CANON reactors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Zhuo; Cui, Shaoming; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process, the bioactivity of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) should be effectively inhibited. In this study, the stability of four high-rate CANON reactors and the effect of free ammonia (FA) and organic material on NOB community structure were investigated using DGGE. Results suggested that with the increasing of FA, the ratio of total nitrogen removal to nitrate production went up gradually, while the biodiversity of Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB both decreased. When the CANON reactor was transformed to simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) reactor by introducing organic material, the denitrifiers and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria would compete nitrite or oxygen with NOB, which then led to the biodiversity decreasing of both Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB. The distribution of Nitrobacter-like NOB and Nitrospira-like NOB were evaluated, and finally effective strategies for suppressing NOB in CANON reactors were proposed. PMID:25459821

  3. Inorganic nitrite supplementation for healthy arterial aging

    PubMed Central

    DeVan, Allison E.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This is attributable primarily to adverse changes in arteries, notably, increases in large elastic artery stiffness and endothelial dysfunction mediated by inadequate concentrations of the vascular-protective molecule, nitric oxide (NO), and higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Inorganic nitrite is a promising precursor molecule for augmenting circulating and tissue NO bioavailability because it requires only a one-step reduction to NO. Nitrite also acts as an independent signaling molecule, exerting many of the effects previously attributed to NO. Results of recent studies indicate that nitrite may be effective in the treatment of vascular aging. In old mice, short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation reduces aortic pulse wave velocity, the gold-standard measure of large elastic artery stiffness, and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by normalization of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation. These improvements in age-related vascular dysfunction with nitrite are mediated by reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be linked to increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and health. Increasing nitrite levels via dietary intake of nitrate appears to have similarly beneficial effects in many of the same physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being performed to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing nitrite bioavailability on human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In summary, inorganic nitrite, as well as dietary nitrate supplementation, represents a promising therapy for treatment of arterial aging and prevention of age-associated CVD in humans. PMID:24408999

  4. Interaction of organic carbon, reduced sulphur and nitrate in anaerobic baffled reactor for fresh leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhixuan; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of organic carbon, reduced sulphur and nitrate was examined using anaerobic baffled reactor for fresh leachate treatment by supplementing nitrate and/or sulphide to compartment 3. Nitrate was removed completely throughout the study mostly via denitrification (>80%) without nitrite accumulation. Besides carbon source, various reduced sulphur (e.g. sulphide, elemental sulphur and organic sulphur) could be involved in the nitrate reduction process via sulphur-based autotrophic denitrification when dissolved organic carbon/nitrate ratio decreased below 1.6. High sulphide concentration not only stimulated autotrophic denitrification, but it also inhibited heterotrophic denitrification, resulting in a shift (11-20%) from heterotrophic denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis further confirmed that sulphur-oxidizing nitrate-reducing bacteria were stimulated with increase in the proportion of bacterial population from 18.6% to 27.2% by high sulphide concentration, meanwhile, heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria were inhibited with 25.5% and 66.6% decrease in the bacterial population.

  5. Diversity, Physiology, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding of nitrification. Surprising insights into the physiological distinctiveness of AOA are mirrored by the recognition of the phylogenetic uniqueness of these microbes, which fall within a novel archaeal phylum now known as Thaumarchaeota. The relative importance of AOA in nitrification, compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is still under debate. This minireview provides a synopsis of our current knowledge of the diversity and physiology of AOA, the factors controlling their ecology, and their role in carbon cycling as well as their potential involvement in the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. It emphasizes the importance of activity-based analyses in AOA studies and formulates priorities for future research. PMID:22923400

  6. Losses of Ammonia and Nitrate from Agriculture and Their Effect on Nitrogen Recovery in the European Union and the United States between 1900 and 2050.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Hans J M; Bouwman, Lex; Cassman, Kenneth G; van Es, Harold M; McCrackin, Michelle L; Beusen, Arthur H W

    2015-03-01

    Historical trends and levels of nitrogen (N) budgets and emissions to air and water in the European Union and the United States are markedly different. Agro-environmental policy approaches also differ, with emphasis on voluntary or incentive-based schemes in the United States versus a more regulatory approach in the European Union. This paper explores the implications of these differences for attaining long-term policy targets for air and water quality. Nutrient surplus problems were more severe in the European Union than in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s. The EU Nitrates and National Emission Ceilings directives contributed to decreases in fertilizer use, N surplus, and ammonia (NH) emissions, whereas in the United States they stabilized, although NH emissions are still increasing. These differences were analyzed using statistical data for 1900-2005 and the global IMAGE model. IMAGE could reproduce NH emissions and soil N surpluses at different scales (European Union and United States, country and state) and N loads in the Rhine and Mississippi. The regulation-driven changes during the past 25 yr in the European Union have reduced public concerns and have brought agricultural N loads to the aquatic environment closer to US levels. Despite differences in agro-environmental policies and agricultural structure (more N-fixing soybean and more spatially separated feed and livestock production in the United States than in the European Union), current N use efficiency in US and EU crop production is similar. IMAGE projections for the IAASTD-baseline scenario indicate that N loading to the environment in 2050 will be similar to current levels. In the United States, environmental N loads will remain substantially smaller than in the European Union, whereas agricultural production in 2050 in the United States will increase by 30% relative to 2005, as compared with an increase of 8% in the European Union. However, in the United States, even rigorous mitigation

  7. Losses of Ammonia and Nitrate from Agriculture and Their Effect on Nitrogen Recovery in the European Union and the United States between 1900 and 2050.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Hans J M; Bouwman, Lex; Cassman, Kenneth G; van Es, Harold M; McCrackin, Michelle L; Beusen, Arthur H W

    2015-03-01

    Historical trends and levels of nitrogen (N) budgets and emissions to air and water in the European Union and the United States are markedly different. Agro-environmental policy approaches also differ, with emphasis on voluntary or incentive-based schemes in the United States versus a more regulatory approach in the European Union. This paper explores the implications of these differences for attaining long-term policy targets for air and water quality. Nutrient surplus problems were more severe in the European Union than in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s. The EU Nitrates and National Emission Ceilings directives contributed to decreases in fertilizer use, N surplus, and ammonia (NH) emissions, whereas in the United States they stabilized, although NH emissions are still increasing. These differences were analyzed using statistical data for 1900-2005 and the global IMAGE model. IMAGE could reproduce NH emissions and soil N surpluses at different scales (European Union and United States, country and state) and N loads in the Rhine and Mississippi. The regulation-driven changes during the past 25 yr in the European Union have reduced public concerns and have brought agricultural N loads to the aquatic environment closer to US levels. Despite differences in agro-environmental policies and agricultural structure (more N-fixing soybean and more spatially separated feed and livestock production in the United States than in the European Union), current N use efficiency in US and EU crop production is similar. IMAGE projections for the IAASTD-baseline scenario indicate that N loading to the environment in 2050 will be similar to current levels. In the United States, environmental N loads will remain substantially smaller than in the European Union, whereas agricultural production in 2050 in the United States will increase by 30% relative to 2005, as compared with an increase of 8% in the European Union. However, in the United States, even rigorous mitigation

  8. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Colin M.; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J. Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions. PMID:25506762

  9. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Colin M; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions.

  10. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes is coupled to increased arginine transport by upregulated y(+)LAT2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Milewski, Krzysztof; Skowrońska, Marta; Gajos, Anna; Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-12-01

    One of the aspects of ammonia toxicity to brain cells is increased production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOSs). Previously we showed that ammonia increases arginine (Arg) uptake in cultured rat cortical astrocytes specifically via y(+)L amino acid transport system, by activation of its member, a heteromeric y(+)LAT2 transporter. Here, we tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 underlies ammonia-dependent increase of NO production via inducible NOS (iNOS) induction, and protein nitration. Treatment of rat cortical astrocytes for 48 with 5 mM ammonium chloride ('ammonia') (i) increased the y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake, (ii) raised the expression of iNOS and endothelial NOS (eNOS), (iii) stimulated NO production, as manifested by increased nitrite+nitrate (Griess) and/or nitrite alone (chemiluminescence), and consequently, (iv) evoked nitration of tyrosine residues of proteins in astrocytes. Except for the increase of eNOS, all the above described effects of ammonia were abrogated by pre-treatment of astrocytes with either siRNA silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+)LAT2 protein, or antibody to y(+)LAT2, indicating their strict coupling to y(+)LAT2 activity. Moreover, induction of y(+)LAT2 expression by ammonia was sensitive to Nf-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085, linking y(+)LAT2 upregulation to the Nf-κB activation in this experimental setting as reported earlier and here confirmed. Importantly, ammonia did not affect y(+)LAT2 expression nor y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake activity in the cultured cerebellar neurons, suggesting astroglia-specificity of the above described mechanism. The described coupling of up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 transporter with iNOS in ammonia-exposed astrocytes may be considered as a mechanism to ensure NO supply for protein nitration. Ammonia (NH4(+)) increases the expression and activity of the L-arginine (Arg) transporter (Arg/neutral amino acids [NAA] exchanger) y(+)LAT2 in cultured rat cortical astrocytes by a mechanism

  11. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes is coupled to increased arginine transport by upregulated y(+)LAT2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Milewski, Krzysztof; Skowrońska, Marta; Gajos, Anna; Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-12-01

    One of the aspects of ammonia toxicity to brain cells is increased production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOSs). Previously we showed that ammonia increases arginine (Arg) uptake in cultured rat cortical astrocytes specifically via y(+)L amino acid transport system, by activation of its member, a heteromeric y(+)LAT2 transporter. Here, we tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 underlies ammonia-dependent increase of NO production via inducible NOS (iNOS) induction, and protein nitration. Treatment of rat cortical astrocytes for 48 with 5 mM ammonium chloride ('ammonia') (i) increased the y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake, (ii) raised the expression of iNOS and endothelial NOS (eNOS), (iii) stimulated NO production, as manifested by increased nitrite+nitrate (Griess) and/or nitrite alone (chemiluminescence), and consequently, (iv) evoked nitration of tyrosine residues of proteins in astrocytes. Except for the increase of eNOS, all the above described effects of ammonia were abrogated by pre-treatment of astrocytes with either siRNA silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+)LAT2 protein, or antibody to y(+)LAT2, indicating their strict coupling to y(+)LAT2 activity. Moreover, induction of y(+)LAT2 expression by ammonia was sensitive to Nf-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085, linking y(+)LAT2 upregulation to the Nf-κB activation in this experimental setting as reported earlier and here confirmed. Importantly, ammonia did not affect y(+)LAT2 expression nor y(+)L-mediated Arg uptake activity in the cultured cerebellar neurons, suggesting astroglia-specificity of the above described mechanism. The described coupling of up-regulation of y(+)LAT2 transporter with iNOS in ammonia-exposed astrocytes may be considered as a mechanism to ensure NO supply for protein nitration. Ammonia (NH4(+)) increases the expression and activity of the L-arginine (Arg) transporter (Arg/neutral amino acids [NAA] exchanger) y(+)LAT2 in cultured rat cortical astrocytes by a mechanism

  12. Crp-dependent cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Chen, Haijiang; Wang, Jixuan; Zhou, Guangqi; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is able to respire on a variety of organic and inorganic substrates, including nitrate and nitrite. Conversion of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonium is catalysed by periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases (NAP and NRF) respectively. Global regulator Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) is essential for growth of S. oneidensis on both nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we discovered that crp mutants are not only severely deficient in nitrate or nitrite respiration, but are also hypersensitive to nitrite. This hypersusceptibility phenotype is independent of nitrite respiration. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we obtained 73 Δcrp suppressor strains resistant to nitrite. Transposon insertion sites in 24 suppressor strains were exclusively mapped in the region upstream of the cyd operon encoding a cytochrome bd oxidase, resulting in expression of the operon now driven by a Crp-independent promoter. Further investigation indicated that the promoter in suppressor strains comes from the transposon. Mutational analysis of the cydB gene (encoding the essential subunit II of the bd oxidase) confirmed that the cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to S. oneidensis.

  13. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations. Savannah River Site 200-S Area

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.; Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; ``Just-in-Time`` precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  14. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  15. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  16. A convenient method for preparation of pure standards of peroxyacetyl nitrate for atmospheric analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Torben; Hansen, Anne Maria; Thomsen, Erling Lund

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is synthesized by nitration of peracetic acid (1.2 M), extracted by n- heptane, and purified with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified PAN solution is free of acetyl nitrate. The content of PAN is determined by means of hydrolysis of PAN into nitrite, and determination by ion chromatography of nitrite and nitrate (formed by oxidation of nitrite). The purified PAN solution is used for the calibration of the gas Chromatograph with electron capture detection.

  17. Indirect determination of nitric oxide production by reduction of nitrate with a freeze-thawing-resistant nitrate reductase from Escherichia coli MC1061.

    PubMed

    Arias-Negrete, Sergio; Jiménez-Romero, Luis A; Solís-Martínez, Martha O; Ramírez-Emiliano, Joel; Avila, Eva E; Cuéllar-Mata, Patricia

    2004-05-01

    Preparation of a nitrate reductase lysate of Escherichia coli MC1061 to measure nitrate and nitrite in biologic fluids is described. To obtain the crude bacterial lysate containing nitrate reductase activity, E. coli MC1061 was subjected to 16-20 freeze-thawing cycles, from -70 to 60 degrees C, until nitrite reductase activity was < or = 25%. Nitrate reductase activity was detected mainly in the crude preparation. To validate the nitrate reduction procedure, standard nitrate solutions (1.6-100 microM) were incubated with the nitrate reductase preparation for 3 h at 37 degrees C, and nitrite was estimated by the Griess reaction in a microassay. Nitrate solutions were reduced to nitrite in a range of 60-70%. Importantly, no cofactors were necessary to perform nitrate reduction. The biological samples were first reduced with the nitrate reductase preparation. After centrifugation, samples were deproteinized with either methanol/ether or zinc sulfate and nitrite was quantified. The utility of the nitrate reductase preparation was assessed by nitrate+nitrite determination in serum of animals infected with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica or the bacteria E. coli and in the supernatant of cultured lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Our results indicate that the nitrate reductase-containing lysate provides a convenient tool for the reduction of nitrate to determine nitrate+nitrite in biological fluids by spectrophotometric methods.

  18. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations.

  19. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of urea at gas-diffusion electrodes. 4: Simultaneous reduction of carbon dioxide and nitrate ions with various metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Masami; Yoshida, Kohji; Furuya, Nagakazu

    1998-07-01

    Simultaneous reduction of carbon dioxide and nitrate ions was examined at gas-diffusion electrodes with various catalysts (Cr, Mo, Mn, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, An, Cd, In, Tl, Sn and Pb). The formation of urea, CO, formic acid, nitrite ions, and ammonia at the gas-diffusion electrodes with groups 11--14 catalysts, except for Au, was found in the simultaneous reduction. The maximum faradaic efficiency of urea formation on Zn catalysts is approximately 35% at {minus}1.75 V. The formation of urea at the gas-diffusion electrodes with groups 6--10 catalysts was not found in the simultaneous reduction of CO{sub 2} and nitrate. Relationship of the ability for urea formation to the ability for CO and NH{sub 3} formation was investigated with various catalysts. The ability for urea formation with the catalysts depends on the ability for CO and NH{sub 3} formation. The catalysts with high ability for CO and NU{sub 3} formation could form large amounts of CO-like and ammonia-like precursors. The faradaic efficiency of urea formation for simultaneous reduction with nitrate ions is lower than that with nitrite ions. This result seems to be related to the ability for ammonia-like precursor formation.

  1. Nitrite impacts the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in response to isoniazid and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Bange, Franz C; Nathan, Carl F

    2013-01-01

    When access to molecular oxygen is restricted, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can respire an alternative electron acceptor, nitrate. We found that Mtb within infected primary human macrophages in vitro at physiologic tissue oxygen tensions respired nitrate, generating copious nitrite. A strain of Mtb lacking a functioning nitrate reductase was more susceptible than wild-type Mtb to treatment with isoniazid during infection of macrophages. Likewise, nitrate reductase-deficient Mtb was more susceptible to isoniazid than wild-type Mtb in axenic culture, and more resistant to hydrogen peroxide. These phenotypes were reversed by the addition of exogenous nitrite. Further investigation suggested that nitrite might inhibit the bacterial catalase. To the extent that Mtb itself is the most relevant source of nitrite acting within Mtb, these findings suggest that inhibitors of Mtb's nitrate transporter or nitrate reductase could enhance the efficacy of isoniazid. PMID:24019302

  2. Enhanced formation of fine particulate nitrate at a rural site on the North China Plain in summer: The important roles of ammonia and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liang; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Xu, Caihong; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Junmei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Severe PM2.5 pollution was observed frequently on the North China Plain, and nitrate contributed a large fraction of the elevated PM2.5 concentrations. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the formation pathways of these fine particulate nitrate and the key factors that affect these pathways, field measurements of fine particulate nitrate and related air pollutants were made at a rural site on the North China Plain in the summer of 2013. Extremely high concentrations of fine particulate nitrate were frequently observed at night and in the early morning. The maximum hourly concentration of fine particulate nitrate reached 87.2 μg m-3. This concentration accounted for 29.9% of the PM2.5. The very high NH3 concentration in the early morning significantly accelerated the formation of fine particulate nitrate, as indicated by the concurrent appearance of NH3 and NO3- concentration peaks and a rising neutralization ratio (the equivalent ratio of NH4+ to the sum of SO42- and NO3-). On a number of other episode days, strong photochemical activity during daytime led to high concentrations of O3 at night. The fast secondary formation of fine particulate nitrate was mainly attributed to the hydrolysis of N2O5, which was produced from O3 and NO2. Considering the important roles of NH3 and O3 in fine particulate nitrate formation, we suggest the control of NH3 emissions and photochemical pollution to address the high levels of fine particulate nitrate and the severe PM2.5 pollution on the North China Plain.

  3. Inorganic Nitrite Therapy: Historical perspective and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kevil, Christopher G.; Kolluru, Gopi K.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Giordano, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, investigators studying nitric oxide (NO) biology and metabolism have come to learn that the one electron oxidation product of NO, nitrite anion, serves as a unique player in modulating tissue NO bioavailability. Numerous studies have examined how this oxidized metabolite of NO can act as a salvage pathway for maintaining NO equivalents through multiple reduction mechanisms in permissive tissue environments. Moreover, it is now clear that nitrite anion production and distribution throughout the body can act in an endocrine manner to augment NO bioavailability that is important for physiological and pathological processes. These discoveries have led to renewed hope and efforts for an effective NO based therapeutic agent through the unique action of sodium nitrite as an NO pro-drug. More recent studies also indicate that sodium nitrate may also increase plasma nitrite levels via the enterosalivary circulatory system resulting in nitrate reduction to nitrite by microorganisms found within the oral cavity. In this review, we discuss the importance of nitrite anion in several disease models along with an appraisal of sodium nitrite therapy in the clinic, potential caveats of such clinical uses, and future possibilities of nitrite based therapies. PMID:21619929

  4. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  5. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation.

    PubMed

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  6. Effect of Encapsulating Nitrate in Sesame Gum on In vitro Rumen Fermentation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Mamvura, Chiedza Isabel; Cho, Sangbuem; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Lee, Hong-gu; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation is a method used to protect material from certain undesirable environments, for controlled release at a more favorable time and place. Animal productivity would be enhanced if feed additives are delivered to be utilized at their site of action, bypassing the rumen where they are likely to be degraded by microbial action. A novel method of encapsulation with sesame gum was used to coat nitrate, a known enteric methane mitigating agent, and tested for the effect on methane reduction and other in vitro fermentation parameters using rumen fluid from cannulated Hanwoo steers. Orchard grass was used as basal diet for fermentation. The treatments were matrix (1.1 g sesame gum+0.4 g sesame oil cake) only, encapsulated nitrate (matrix+nitrate [21 mM]), free nitrate (21 mM), and a control that contained no additive. Analyses of fermentation parameters were done at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 48 h time periods. In comparison to control, both free and encapsulated nitrate produced significantly reduced (p<0.01) methane (76% less) and also the total volatile fatty acids were reduced. A significantly higher (p<0.01) concentration of ammonia nitrogen was obtained with the encapsulated nitrate treatment (44%) compared to the free form (28%) and matrix only (20%) (p = 0.014). This might suggest slow release of encapsulated nitrate so that it is fully reduced to ammonia. Thus, this pioneering study found a significant reduction in methane production following the use of sesame gum encapsulated nitrate that shows the potential of a controlled release system in enhancing sustainability of ruminant production while reducing/eliminating the risk of nitrite toxicity. PMID:25358317

  7. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate utilization has been characterized in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. In order to separate nitrate uptake from nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase activity was suppressed with tungstate. Neither nitrite nor the presence of amino acids in the external medium or darkness affects nitrate uptake kinetics. Ammonium strongly inhibits carrier-mediated nitrate uptake, without affecting diffusion transfer. A model is proposed for the uptake and assimilation of nitrate in S. costatum and their regulation by ammonium ions. PMID:16660653

  8. Dietary exposure to benzoates (E210-E213), parabens (E214-E219), nitrites (E249-E250), nitrates (E251-E252), BHA (E320), BHT (E321) and aspartame (E951) in children less than 3 years old in France.

    PubMed

    Mancini, F R; Paul, D; Gauvreau, J; Volatier, J L; Vin, K; Hulin, M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the exposure to seven additives (benzoates, parabens, nitrites, nitrates, BHA, BHT and aspartame) in children aged less than 3 years old in France. A conservative approach, combining individual consumption data with maximum permitted levels, was carried out for all the additives. More refined estimates using occurrence data obtained from products' labels (collected by the French Observatory of Food Quality) were conducted for those additives that exceeded the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Information on additives' occurrence was obtained from the food labels. When the ADI was still exceeded, the exposure estimate was further refined using measured concentration data, if available. When using the maximum permitted level (MPL), the ADI was exceeded for benzoates (1.94 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)), nitrites (0.09 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and BHA (0.39 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) in 25%, 54% and 20% of the entire study population respectively. The main food contributors identified with this approach were current foods as these additives are not authorised in specific infant food: vegetable soups and broths for both benzoates and BHA, delicatessen and meat for nitrites. The exposure estimate was significantly reduced when using occurrence data, but in the upper-bound scenario the ADI was still exceeded significantly by the age group 13-36 months for benzoates (2%) and BHA (1%), and by the age group 7-12 months (16%) and 13-36 months (58%) for nitrites. Measured concentration data were available exclusively for nitrites and the results obtained using these data showed that the nitrites' intake was below the ADI for all the population considered in this study. These results suggest that refinement of exposure, based on the assessment of food levels, is needed to estimate the exposure of children to BHA and benzoates for which the risk of exceeding the ADI cannot be excluded when using occurrence data. PMID:25686474

  9. Dietary exposure to benzoates (E210-E213), parabens (E214-E219), nitrites (E249-E250), nitrates (E251-E252), BHA (E320), BHT (E321) and aspartame (E951) in children less than 3 years old in France.

    PubMed

    Mancini, F R; Paul, D; Gauvreau, J; Volatier, J L; Vin, K; Hulin, M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the exposure to seven additives (benzoates, parabens, nitrites, nitrates, BHA, BHT and aspartame) in children aged less than 3 years old in France. A conservative approach, combining individual consumption data with maximum permitted levels, was carried out for all the additives. More refined estimates using occurrence data obtained from products' labels (collected by the French Observatory of Food Quality) were conducted for those additives that exceeded the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Information on additives' occurrence was obtained from the food labels. When the ADI was still exceeded, the exposure estimate was further refined using measured concentration data, if available. When using the maximum permitted level (MPL), the ADI was exceeded for benzoates (1.94 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)), nitrites (0.09 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and BHA (0.39 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) in 25%, 54% and 20% of the entire study population respectively. The main food contributors identified with this approach were current foods as these additives are not authorised in specific infant food: vegetable soups and broths for both benzoates and BHA, delicatessen and meat for nitrites. The exposure estimate was significantly reduced when using occurrence data, but in the upper-bound scenario the ADI was still exceeded significantly by the age group 13-36 months for benzoates (2%) and BHA (1%), and by the age group 7-12 months (16%) and 13-36 months (58%) for nitrites. Measured concentration data were available exclusively for nitrites and the results obtained using these data showed that the nitrites' intake was below the ADI for all the population considered in this study. These results suggest that refinement of exposure, based on the assessment of food levels, is needed to estimate the exposure of children to BHA and benzoates for which the risk of exceeding the ADI cannot be excluded when using occurrence data.

  10. Lethal effects of elevated pH and ammonia on juveniles of neotropical fish Colosoma macropomum (Pisces, Caracidae).

    PubMed

    de Croux, Parma; Julieta, Maria; Loteste, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the main nitrogenous waste material excreted by gills, then is oxided first to nitrite and then to nitrate. The proportion of ionized-un-ionized ammonia depends on pH and temperature, when this variables increase in a solution containing ammonia the equation goes to left, so the proportion of NH3 increases and the solution becomes more toxic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute lethal effects of elevated pH and ammonia on tambaqui juveniles. With a constant ammonia concentration of 5.0 mg/l NH3, there was no mortality a pH of 6.0 (control) and 7.0; but was of 10-20% a pH of 8.0 and 100% at 9.0. The lethal effects of elevated pH and un-ionized ammonia should be recognized as a potential factor contributing to the variable success of tambaqui production ponds, but this species is highly resistant in comparison with other freshwater fish.

  11. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m3. During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327–183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5–0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  12. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bárbara S.; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  13. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-08-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite using salbutamol sulfate as a reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.K.; Bhatt, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the trace determination of nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup /minus//) is described. Nitrite is reacted with Salbutamol sulfate in acidic medium which gives a yellow color in alkaline medium (less than or equal to pH 7) and can be determined in the presence of several cations and anions. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 1.8 to 27.6 ppm of nitrite with the molar absorptivity 1.8 /times/ 10/sup 3/ 1 /times/ mole /sup /minus/1/ /times/ cm/sup /minus/1/ at 410 nm. The proposed method can also be utilized for the determination of nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup /minus//) after its reduction to nitrite. The method has been applied for the determination of various samples containing traces of nitrite.

  15. Regulation of Nitrite Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a Model Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are sensitive to low concentrations of nitrite, and nitrite has been used to control SRB-related biofouling in oil fields. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model SRB, carries a cytochrome c-type nitrite reductase (nrfHA) that confers resistance to low concentrations of nitrite. The regulation of this nitrite reductase has not been directly examined to date. In this study, we show that DVU0621 (NrfR), a sigma54-dependent two-component system response regulator, is the positive regulator for this operon. NrfR activates the expression of the nrfHA operon in response to nitrite stress. We also show that nrfR is needed for fitness at low cell densities in the presence of nitrite because inactivation of nrfR affects the rate of nitrite reduction. We also predict and validate the binding sites for NrfR upstream of the nrfHA operon using purified NrfR in gel shift assays. We discuss possible roles for NrfR in regulating nitrate reductase genes in nitrate-utilizing Desulfovibrio spp. IMPORTANCE The NrfA nitrite reductase is prevalent across several bacterial phyla and required for dissimilatory nitrite reduction. However, regulation of the nrfA gene has been studied in only a few nitrate-utilizing bacteria. Here, we show that in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not respire nitrate, the expression of nrfHA is induced by NrfR upon nitrite stress. This is the first report of regulation of nrfA by a sigma54-dependent two-component system. Our study increases our knowledge of nitrite stress responses and possibly of the regulation of nitrate reduction in SRB. PMID:26283774

  16. The anoxic plant mitochondrion as a nitrite: NO reductase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2011-07-01

    Under the conditions of oxygen deprivation, accumulating nitrite can be reduced in the mitochondrial electron transport chain forming free radical nitric oxide (NO). By reducing nitrite to NO, plant mitochondria preserve the capacity to oxidize external NADH and NADPH and retain a limited power for ATP synthesis complementing glycolytic ATP production. NO participates in O(2) balance in mitochondria by competitively inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase which can oxidize it to nitrite when oxygen concentration increases. Some of the NO escapes to the cytosol, where the efficient scavenging system involving non-symbiotic hemoglobin oxygenates NO to nitrate and supports continuous anaerobic turnover of nitrogen species.

  17. Evidence for a Role of Calcium in Nitrate Assimilation in Wheat Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Gary M.; Harper, James E.

    1968-01-01

    Severely Ca-deficient Triticum aestivum L. seedlings accumulated high levels of nitrite and moderate levels of nitrate and organic nitrogen, but contained unaltered levels of hydroxylamine. Nitrite accumulation was not related to molybdenum deficiency, or altered cellular pH. Nitrate reductase was decreased by Ca deficiency, apparently by repression of enzyme synthesis from accumulated nitrite and not by inhibition of enzyme activity. Nitrite reductase and NADP diaphorase activities were not affected by Ca deficiency, and Ca did not restore activity to nitrite reductase inactivated by cyanide. The results indicated that the role of Ca is in intracellular transport of nitrite and not in induction or activity of enzymes. Images PMID:16656839

  18. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate uptake has been studied in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. When these cells are incubated in the presence of nitrate, this ion is quickly taken up from the medium, and nitrite is excreted by the cells. Nitrite is excreted following classical saturation kinetics, its rate being independent of nitrate concentration in the incubation medium for nitrate concentration values higher than 3 micromolar. Nitrate uptake shows mixed-transfer kinetics, which can be attributed to the simultaneous contributions of mediated and diffusion transfer. Cycloheximide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibit the carrier-mediated contribution to nitrate uptake, without affecting the diffusion component. When cells are preincubated with nitrate, the net nitrogen uptake is increased. PMID:16660652

  19. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  20. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  1. Nitrous Oxide Metabolism in Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria: Physiology and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Simon, J; Rowley, G; Bedmar, E J; Richardson, D J; Gates, A J; Delgado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) with substantial global warming potential and also contributes to ozone depletion through photochemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. The negative effects of N2O on climate and stratospheric ozone make N2O mitigation an international challenge. More than 60% of global N2O emissions are emitted from agricultural soils mainly due to the application of synthetic nitrogen-containing fertilizers. Thus, mitigation strategies must be developed which increase (or at least do not negatively impact) on agricultural efficiency whilst decrease the levels of N2O released. This aim is particularly important in the context of the ever expanding population and subsequent increased burden on the food chain. More than two-thirds of N2O emissions from soils can be attributed to bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes. In ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, N2O is formed through the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In denitrifiers, nitrate is reduced to N2 via nitrite, NO and N2O production. In addition to denitrification, respiratory nitrate ammonification (also termed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) is another important nitrate-reducing mechanism in soil, responsible for the loss of nitrate and production of N2O from reduction of NO that is formed as a by-product of the reduction process. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the environmental, regulatory and biochemical control of N2O emissions by nitrate-reducing bacteria and point to new solutions for agricultural GHG mitigation. PMID:27134026

  2. Population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria for nitritation achieved in Johannesburg (JHB) process treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Bai, Xinlong; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Anqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-06-01

    Population dynamic of nitrifying bacteria was investigated for nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater. Nitritation was established with nitrite accumulation ratios above 85%. Quantitative PCR indicated that Nitrospira was dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and Nitrobacter was few. During nitritation achieving, Nitrobacter was firstly eliminated, along with inhibition of Nitrospira bioactivities, then Nitrospira percentage declined and was finally washed out. Nitritation establishment depended on inhibiting and eliminating of NOB rather than ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enriching. This is the first study where population dynamics of Nitrobacter and Nitrospira were investigated to reveal mechanism of nitritation in a continuous-flow process. Phylogenetic analysis of AOB indicated that Nitrosomonas-like cluster and Nitrosomonas oligotropha were dominant AOB, accounting for 81.6% of amoA gene clone library. Community structure of AOB was similar to that of complete nitrification system with long hydraulic retention time, but different from that of nitritation reactor with low DO concentration.

  3. An evaluation of liquid ammonia (ammonium hydroxide) as a candidate piscicide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Morton-Starner, R.; Hedwall, Shaula J.

    2013-01-01

    Eradication of populations of nonnative aquatic species for the purpose of reintroducing native fish is often difficult because very few effective tools are available for removing aquatic organisms. This creates the need to evaluate new chemicals that could be used as management tools for native fish conservation. Ammonia is a natural product of fish metabolism and is naturally present in the environment at low levels, yet is known to be toxic to most aquatic species. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of using liquid ammonia as a fisheries management tool by evaluating its effectiveness at killing undesirable aquatic species and its persistence in a pond environment. A suite of invasive aquatic species commonly found in the southwestern USA were introduced into two experimental outdoor ponds located at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Flagstaff, Arizona. Each pond was treated with ammonium hydroxide (29%) at 38 ppm. This target concentration was chosen because previous studies using anhydrous ammonia reported incomplete fish kills in ponds at concentrations less than 30 ppm. Water quality was monitored for 49 d to determine how quickly the natural bacteria in the environment converted the ammonia to nitrate. Ammonia levels remained above 8 ppm for 24 and 18 d, respectively, in ponds 1 and 2. Nitrite levels in each pond began to rise approximately 14 d after dosing with ammonia and stayed above 5 ppm for an additional 21 d in pond 1 and 18 d in pond 2. After 49 d all water in both ponds was drained and no fish, crayfish, or tadpoles were found to have survived the treatment, but aquatic turtles remained alive and appeared unaffected. Liquid ammonia appears to be an effective tool for removing many problematic invasive aquatic species and may warrant further investigation as a piscicide.

  4. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Laura A.; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D.; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  5. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Sauder, Laura A; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  6. Oil Field Souring Control by Nitrate-Reducing Sulfurospirillum spp. That Outcompete Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria for Organic Electron Donors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate injection into oil reservoirs can prevent and remediate souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Nitrate stimulates nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) that compete with SRB for degradable oil organics. Up-flow, packed-bed bioreactors inoculated with water produced from an oil field and injected with lactate, sulfate, and nitrate served as sources for isolating several NRB, including Sulfurospirillum and Thauera spp. The former coupled reduction of nitrate to nitrite and ammonia with oxidation of either lactate (hNRB activity) or sulfide (NR-SOB activity). Souring control in a bioreactor receiving 12.5 mM lactate and 6, 2, 0.75, or 0.013 mM sulfate always required injection of 10 mM nitrate, irrespective of the sulfate concentration. Community analysis revealed that at all but the lowest sulfate concentration (0.013 mM), significant SRB were present. At 0.013 mM sulfate, direct hNRB-mediated oxidation of lactate by nitrate appeared to be the dominant mechanism. The absence of significant SRB indicated that sulfur cycling does not occur at such low sulfate concentrations. The metabolically versatile Sulfurospirillum spp. were dominant when nitrate was present in the bioreactor. Analysis of cocultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac3, Lac6, or Lac15 and Sulfurospirillum sp. strain KW indicated its hNRB activity and ability to produce inhibitory concentrations of nitrite to be key factors for it to successfully outcompete oil field SRB. PMID:17308184

  7. [Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in Tibetan Zoige plateau wetland ].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Youkun; Wang, Xianbin; Gu, Yunfu; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    [ OBJECTIVE ] Investigation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nature environments is important to understand the global nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the AOA community in plateau wetland. Therefore, we studied the composition and diversity of AOA in Zoige plateau wetland swamp soil. [METHODS] Total DNA was extracted from the swamp soil of three typical wetlands including A'xi pastoral area, Maixi pastoral area and Fenqu pastoral area locate in Zoige plateau wetland, and amoA gene was amplified with universally AOA amoA gene primers and then cloned. Then 80 positive clones for each clone library were chosen for further restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and the typical RFLP types were selected for sequencing and clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 98% cutoff using the Mothur software. The MEGA 5. 0 software was used for the amoA gene phylogeny analysis. [RESULTS] A total of 240 positive clones for all 3 libraries were used for RFLP analysis, and 15 specific amoA sequences were sequenced and clustered into 7 OTUs at 98% cutoff. Among them, OTU6 was detected in all of the 3 libraries and included 27% of the total specific clones. The phylogeny analysis showed that the 15 amoA sequences were grouped into 3 subgroups consisted of Zoige Wetland Clade 1 (4 OTUs), Zoige Wetland Clade 2 (2 OTUs) and Zoige Wetland Clade 3 (1 OTU). BLAST analysis showed that all OTUs were affiliated with the phylum Crenarchaeota. Correlation analysis showed that the Shannon diversity index (H') was significantly correlated with ammonia, nitrate/nitrite (P <0. 05). [ CONCLUSION] AOA in the Zoige plateau wetland swamp soil are all belonged to the Crenarchaeota, and their diversity is significantly correlated with soil ammonia, nitrate/nitrite content. PMID:25522598

  8. [Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in Tibetan Zoige plateau wetland ].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Youkun; Wang, Xianbin; Gu, Yunfu; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    [ OBJECTIVE ] Investigation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nature environments is important to understand the global nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the AOA community in plateau wetland. Therefore, we studied the composition and diversity of AOA in Zoige plateau wetland swamp soil. [METHODS] Total DNA was extracted from the swamp soil of three typical wetlands including A'xi pastoral area, Maixi pastoral area and Fenqu pastoral area locate in Zoige plateau wetland, and amoA gene was amplified with universally AOA amoA gene primers and then cloned. Then 80 positive clones for each clone library were chosen for further restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and the typical RFLP types were selected for sequencing and clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 98% cutoff using the Mothur software. The MEGA 5. 0 software was used for the amoA gene phylogeny analysis. [RESULTS] A total of 240 positive clones for all 3 libraries were used for RFLP analysis, and 15 specific amoA sequences were sequenced and clustered into 7 OTUs at 98% cutoff. Among them, OTU6 was detected in all of the 3 libraries and included 27% of the total specific clones. The phylogeny analysis showed that the 15 amoA sequences were grouped into 3 subgroups consisted of Zoige Wetland Clade 1 (4 OTUs), Zoige Wetland Clade 2 (2 OTUs) and Zoige Wetland Clade 3 (1 OTU). BLAST analysis showed that all OTUs were affiliated with the phylum Crenarchaeota. Correlation analysis showed that the Shannon diversity index (H') was significantly correlated with ammonia, nitrate/nitrite (P <0. 05). [ CONCLUSION] AOA in the Zoige plateau wetland swamp soil are all belonged to the Crenarchaeota, and their diversity is significantly correlated with soil ammonia, nitrate/nitrite content.

  9. Ammonia in simulated Hanford double-shell tank wastes: Solubility and effects on surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Radioactive and wastes left from defense materials production activities are temporarily stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State (Tank Waste Science Panel 1991). Some of these wastes are in the form of a thick slurry (``double-shell slurry``) containing sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, organic complexants and buffering agents, complexant fragments and other minor components (Herting et al. 1992a; Herting et al. 1992b; Campbell et al. 1994). As a result of thermal and radiolytic processes, a number of gases are known to be produced by some of these stored wastes, including ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, hydrogen, and methane (Babad et al. 1991; Ashby et al. 1992; Meisel et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1994; Bryan et al. 1993; US Department of Energy 1994). Before the emplacement of a mixer pump, these gases were retained in and periodically released from Tank 241-SY-101, a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site (Babad et al. 1992; US Department of Energy 1994). Gases are believed to be retained primarily in the form of bubbles attached to solid particles (Bryan, Pederson, and Scheele 1992), with very little actually dissolved in the liquid. Ammonia is an exception. The relation between the concentration of aqueous ammonia in such concentrated, caustic mixtures and the ammonia partial pressure is not well known, however.

  10. The kinetics for ammonium and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinyu; Xiao, Pengying; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; Yao, Zongbao; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics for ammonium (NH4(+)) oxidation and nitrite (NO2(-)) oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were studied by respirometry using the nitrifying sludge from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. Modified models were used to estimate kinetics parameters of ammonia and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine. An inhibition effect of hydroxylamine on the ammonia oxidation was observed under different hydroxylamine concentration levels. The self-inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine oxidation and noncompetitive inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine for nitrite oxidation was estimated by simulating exogenous oxygen-uptake rate profiles, respectively. The inhibitive effect of NH2OH on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was stronger than on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work could provide fundamental data for the kinetic investigation of the nitrification process. PMID:26942528

  11. Synthesis and intracrystalline oxidation of nitrite-intercalated layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Nygil; Pradeep Kumar, G.; Rajamathi, Michael

    2009-03-15

    Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The nitrite ion lies flat in these LDHs with its c{sub 2}-axis lying approximately perpendicular to the crystallographic c-axis. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. In the LDHs thus obtained the nitrate ion lies flat with its c{sub 3}-axis parallel to the crystallographic c-axis (D{sub 3h} symmetry) in the interlayer region resulting in lower basal spacing. - Graphical abstract: Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions.

  12. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  13. A Mesophilic, Autotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Thaumarchaeal Group I.1a Cultivated from a Deep Oligotrophic Soil Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Man-Young; Park, Soo-Je; Kim, So-Jeong; Kim, Jong-Geol; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrification plays an important role in the reduction of soil fertility and in nitrate enrichment of groundwater. Various ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are considered to be members of the pool of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil. This study reports the discovery of a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer that belongs to a distinct clade of nonmarine thaumarchaeal group I.1a, which is widespread in terrestrial environments. The archaeal strain MY2 was cultivated from a deep oligotrophic soil horizon. The similarity of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MY2 to those of other cultivated group I.1a thaumarchaeota members, i.e., Nitrosopumilus maritimus and “Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum koreensis,” is 92.9% for both species. Extensive growth assays showed that strain MY2 is chemolithoautotrophic, mesophilic (optimum temperature, 30°C), and neutrophilic (optimum pH, 7 to 7.5). The accumulation of nitrite above 1 mM inhibited ammonia oxidation, while ammonia oxidation itself was not inhibited in the presence of up to 5 mM ammonia. The genome size of strain MY2 was 1.76 Mb, similar to those of N. maritimus and “Ca. Nitrosoarchaeum koreensis,” and the repertoire of genes required for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation in thaumarchaeal group I.1a was conserved. A high level of representation of conserved orthologous genes for signal transduction and motility in the noncore genome might be implicated in niche adaptation by strain MY2. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genomic characteristics, we propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis” for the ammonia-oxidizing archaeal strain MY2. PMID:24705324

  14. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  15. Streamlined ammonia removal from wastewater using biological deammonification process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we evaluated biological deammonification process to more economically remove ammonia from livestock wastewater. The process combines partial nitritation (PN) and anammox. The anammox is a biologically mediated reaction that oxidizes ammonia (NH4+) and releases di-nitrogen gas (N2) unde...

  16. Performance of Denitrifying Microbial Fuel Cell with Biocathode over Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 54.80 ± 0.01 g m−3 d−1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode. PMID:27047462

  17. Nitrite decreases ethanol production by intact soybean roots submitted to oxygen deficiency: a role for mitochondrial nitric oxide synthesis?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley C; Salgado, Ione; Sodek, Ladaslav

    2013-04-01

    Nitrate increases the tolerance of plants to hypoxia, although the mechanisms related to this beneficial effect are still unclear. Recently, we observed that cultivation of soybean plants with nitrate reduced hypoxic accumulation of fermentation end products by isolated root segments compared with the ammonium treatment. Interestingly, the same decrease in the intensity of fermentation was detected when ammonium-grown root segments were incubated with nitrite, suggesting the involvement of this anion in the nitrate-mediated modulation of fermentative metabolism. Here we extended these experiments to intact plants subjected to root hypoxia and observed similar effects of nitrate and nitrite in reducing root ethanol production, which indicates the physiological relevance of the in vitro results. In both experimental systems, nitrite stimulated nitric oxide emission by ammonium-grown roots to levels similar to that of nitrate-cultivated ones. The involvement of mitochondrial reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in the root response to hypoxia is suggested.

  18. Suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. ('herderstassie', shepherd's purse).

    PubMed

    Wiese, W J; Joubert, J P

    2001-09-01

    Nitrite poisoning in pigs was suspected when 4 of 18 pigs died in a piggery near Ellisras in the Northern Province. The pigs showed typical brownish discolouration of the blood at autopsy. It was established that they ingested vegetable tops and weeds from the adjacent garden as part of their daily ration. Of the available plants, only Capsella bursa-pastoris contained nitrites. The drinking water and some of the other plants tested positive for nitrates but not for nitrites. This is the first report of suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris.

  19. Effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in treatment of coal chemical industry wastewater using moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Zhuang, Haifeng; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is more suitable for carbon-limited industrial wastewater. Partial nitrification to nitrite is the primary step to achieve nitrogen removal via nitrite. The effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in a continuous process was investigated by progressively increasing the alkalinity dosage ratio (amount of alkalinity to ammonia ratio, mol/mol). There is a close relationship among alkalinity, pH and the state of matter present in aqueous solution. When alkalinity was insufficient (compared to the theoretical alkalinity amount), ammonia removal efficiency increased first and then decreased at each alkalinity dosage ratio, with an abrupt removal efficiency peak. Generally, ammonia removal efficiency rose with increasing alkalinity dosage ratio. Ammonia removal efficiency reached to 88% from 23% when alkalinity addition was sufficient. Nitrite accumulation could be achieved by inhibiting nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) by free ammonia (FA) in the early period and free nitrous acid in the later period of nitrification when alkalinity was not adequate. Only FA worked to inhibit the activity of NOB when alkalinity addition was sufficient.

  20. Seasonal changes in abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and their nitrification in sand of an eelgrass zone.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yoshifumi; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Takahashi, Reiji; Yoshihara, Kiyoshi; Tokuyama, Tatsuaki

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) within the sand of an eelgrass (Zostera marina) zone were examined by a quantitative PCR of both crenarchaeotal and betaproteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit (amoA) genes together with temperature and concentrations of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate from May 2007 to June 2008 at Tanoura Bay, Shizuoka, Japan. The abundance of both amoAs in the sand between May and June 2007 and between January and March 2008 was 1.5 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than the 10(4) copies g(-1) of estimated amoA between September and December. Archaeal amoA was more diverse than betaproteobacterial amoA. Betaproteobacterial amoA clone libraries were dominated by Nitrosospira-like sequence types. An incubation experiment was conducted with sands collected in February 2008 and community structure was analyzed based on reverse-transcribed amoAs. RNA was extracted from sand incubated for 12 days at 30°C, 17 days at 20°C, and 80 days at 10°C. Different amoA clones were detected from in situ sand and incubated sand. This study reveals clear evidence of seasonal change in the abundance of AOA and AOB within the sand of an eelgrass zone.

  1. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Hannah L.; Fels, Samuel R.; Christensen, Geoff A.; Price, Morgan N.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Zane, Grant M.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes of nitrate application. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702), as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605) that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance

  2. Nitrite Transport Activity of the ABC-Type Cyanate Transporter of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type nitrate/nitrite-bispecific transporter, which has a high affinity for both substrates (Km, ∼1 μM), Synechococcus elongatus has an active nitrite transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) value of 20 μM. We found that this activity depends on the cynABD genes, which encode a putative cyanate (NCO−) ABC-type transporter. Accordingly, nitrite transport by CynABD was competitively inhibited by NCO− with a Ki value of 0.025 μM. The transporter was induced under conditions of nitrogen deficiency, and the induced cells showed a Vmax value of 11 to 13 μmol/mg of chlorophyll per h for cyanate or nitrite, which could supply ∼30% of the amount of nitrogen required for optimum growth. Its relative specificity for the substrates and regulation at transcriptional and posttranslational levels suggested that the physiological role of the bispecific cyanate/nitrite transporter in S. elongatus is to allow nitrogen-deficient cells to assimilate low concentrations of cyanate in the medium. Its contribution to nitrite assimilation was significant in a mutant lacking the ABC-type nitrate/nitrite transporter, suggesting a possible role for CynABD in nitrite assimilation by cyanobacterial species that lack another high-affinity mechanism(s) for nitrite transport. PMID:19286804

  3. Integration of denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite pathway, simultaneous nitritation-denitritation and anammox treating carbon-limited municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Xinlong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-11-01

    High nutrients removal above 90% from carbon-limited municipal sewage was obtained without adding external carbon source. Achieving nitritation was a prerequisite to improve nutrients removal. Denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal using nitrite as electron acceptor was the key pathway in anoxic zone, where nitrogen removal reached above 60% and average denitrifying P removal was 88%. Simultaneous nitritation/denitritation and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) possibly contributed to nitrogen removal of 26-36% in aerobic zone. Quantitative PCR assays presented that the abundance of anammox bacteria under nitritation was more than that under complete nitrification. The largest amount of anammox bacteria was 1.32×10(6)copies/gVSS, about 5.6 times increase over a period of 255days. Nitrite concentration of 17mg/L in aerobic zone inhibited anammox bacteria. Quantitative results suggested possible occurrence of anammox. Based on performance of nitritation, combining heterotrophic denitrification with autotrophic nitrogen removal is an effective strategy to improve nutrients removal from carbon-limited wastewater.

  4. Comment on Egami's concept of the evolution of nitrate respiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambler, M.; Margulis, L.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results suggest that the presence of common nitrogen salts (sodium nitrite and nitrate) in the irradiation medium can markedly protect filamentous blue-green algae from potentially lethal ultraviolet irradiation. The present results as well as general biological arguments of Egami support and extend Egami's original view that anaerobic respiratory pathways using nitrite and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors evolved prior to oxygen requiring aerobic respiratory pathways.

  5. Assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Mikes, V; Chválová, H; Mátlová, L

    1991-01-01

    Two pathways serve for assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans. Glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) catalyzes the assimilation at a high NH4+ concentration. If nitrate serves as the nitrogen source, glutamate is synthesized by glutamate-ammonia ligase and glutamate synthase (NADPH). At a very low NH4+ concentration, all three enzymes are synthesized simultaneously. No direct relationship exists between glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) and glutamate-ammonia ligase in P. denitrificans, while the glutamate synthase (NADPH) activity changes in parallel with that of the latter enzyme. Ammonia does not influence the induction or repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+). The inner concentration of metabolites indicates a possible repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) by the high concentration of glutamine or its metabolic products as in the case when NH4+ is formed by assimilative nitrate reduction. No direct effect of the intermediates of nitrate assimilation on the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) was observed. PMID:1688163

  6. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    PubMed

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  7. Ammonia Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  8. [Effect of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) on chloraminated disinfection attenuation in drinking water distribution system].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Yun-Long; Zhou, Bin-Hui; Zhi, Xing-Hua

    2009-06-15

    The growth of microbe and formation of biofilm in water distribution system were important factors affecting the security of water quality. The number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm of a chloraminated drinking water distribution system in Shanghai was detected by MPN-Griess method, and the relations among AOB, nitrification and chloraminated disinfection were analyzed. Meanwhile, the effects of AOB on chloraminated disinfection fastness and attenuation by simulation experiment were studied. The result indicated that the number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in pipe biofilm was between 1.0 x 10(2)-4.3 x 10(5) MPN/g dry biofilm. Correlation coefficients of AOB with ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were -0.563, 0.603 and -0.563. Correlation coefficients of AOB with total chlorine and mono-chloramine were -0.659 and -0.571. Fastness of AOB to chloramine was higher than heterotrophic bacteria and AOB can deplete more chloramine than HPC.

  9. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhalnina, Kateryna; de Quadros, Patrícia Dörr; Camargo, Flavio A O; Triplett, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. Nitrite produced by AOA and further oxidized to nitrate can cause nitrogen loss from soils, surface and groundwater contamination, and water eutrophication. The AOA discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  10. Impact of free ammonia on anammox rates (anoxic ammonium oxidation) in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Jaroszynski, L W; Cicek, N; Sparling, R; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2012-06-01

    Using a bench scale moving bed bioreactor (MBBR), the effect of free ammonia (FA, NH(3), the un-ionized form of ammonium NH(4)(+)) concentration on anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) was evaluated based on the volumetric nitrogen removal rate (NRR). Although, a detailed microbial analysis was not conducted, the major NRR observed was assumed to be by anammox, based on the nitrogen conversion ratios of nitrite to ammonium and nitrate to ammonium. Since the concentration of free ammonia as a proportion of the total ammonia concentration is pH-dependent, the impact of changing the operating pH from 6.9 to 8.2, was investigated under constant nitrogen loading conditions during continuous reactor operation. Furthermore, the effect of sudden nitrogen load changes was investigated under constant pH conditions. Batch tests were conducted to determine the immediate response of the anammox consortium to shifts in pH and FA concentrations. It was found that FA was inhibiting NRR at concentrations exceeding 2 mg N L(-1). In the pH range 7-8, the decrease in anammox activity was independent of pH and related only to the concentration of FA. Nitrite concentrations of up to 120 mg N L(-1) did not negatively affect NRR for up to 3.5 h. It was concluded that a stable NRR in a moving bed biofilm reactor depended on maintaining FA concentrations below 2 mg N L(-1) when the pH was maintained between 7 and 8.

  11. Role of nitrite in the photochemical formation of radicals in the snow.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Kleffmann, Jörg; Villena, Guillermo; Wiesen, Peter; King, Martin; France, James; Anastasio, Cort; Staebler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in snow can have an important impact on the composition of the atmosphere over snow-covered areas as well as on the composition of the snow itself. One of the major photochemical processes is the photolysis of nitrate leading to the formation of volatile nitrogen compounds. We report nitrite concentrations determined together with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide in surface snow collected at the coastal site of Barrow, Alaska. The results demonstrate that nitrite likely plays a significant role as a precursor for reactive hydroxyl radicals as well as volatile nitrogen oxides in the snow. Pollution events leading to high concentrations of nitrous acid in the atmosphere contributed to an observed increase in nitrite in the surface snow layer during nighttime. Observed daytime nitrite concentrations are much higher than values predicted from steady-state concentrations based on photolysis of nitrate and nitrite indicating that we do not fully understand the production of nitrite and nitrous acid in snow. The discrepancy between observed and expected nitrite concentrations is probably due to a combination of factors, including an incomplete understanding of the reactive environment and chemical processes in snow, and a lack of consideration of the vertical structure of snow.

  12. Inactivation of nitrate reductase alters metabolic branching of carbohydrate fermentation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao; Kumaraswamy, G Kenchappa; Zhang, Shuyi; Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady M; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-05-01

    To produce cellular energy, cyanobacteria reduce nitrate as the preferred pathway over proton reduction (H2 evolution) by catabolizing glycogen under dark anaerobic conditions. This competition lowers H2 production by consuming a large fraction of the reducing equivalents (NADPH and NADH). To eliminate this competition, we constructed a knockout mutant of nitrate reductase, encoded by narB, in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. As expected, ΔnarB was able to take up intracellular nitrate but was unable to reduce it to nitrite or ammonia, and was unable to grow photoautotrophically on nitrate. During photoautotrophic growth on urea, ΔnarB significantly redirects biomass accumulation into glycogen at the expense of protein accumulation. During subsequent dark fermentation, metabolite concentrations--both the adenylate cellular energy charge (∼ATP) and the redox poise (NAD(P)H/NAD(P))--were independent of nitrate availability in ΔnarB, in contrast to the wild type (WT) control. The ΔnarB strain diverted more reducing equivalents from glycogen catabolism into reduced products, mainly H2 and d-lactate, by 6-fold (2.8% yield) and 2-fold (82.3% yield), respectively, than WT. Continuous removal of H2 from the fermentation medium (milking) further boosted net H2 production by 7-fold in ΔnarB, at the expense of less excreted lactate, resulting in a 49-fold combined increase in the net H2 evolution rate during 2 days of fermentation compared to the WT. The absence of nitrate reductase eliminated the inductive effect of nitrate addition on rerouting carbohydrate catabolism from glycolysis to the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway, indicating that intracellular redox poise and not nitrate itself acts as the control switch for carbon flux branching between pathways.

  13. Denitrification of high strength nitrate waste from a nuclear industry using acclimatized biomass in a pilot scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Dhamole, Pradip B; Nair, Rashmi R; D'Souza, Stanislaus F; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Lele, S S

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the performance of acclimatized biomass for denitrification of high strength nitrate waste (10,000 mg/L NO3) from a nuclear industry in a continuous laboratory scale (32 L) and pilot scale reactor (330 L) operated over a period of 4 and 5 months, respectively. Effect of substrate fluctuations (mainly C/NO3-N) on denitrification was studied in a laboratory scale reactor. Incomplete denitrification (95-96 %) was observed at low C/NO3-N (≤2), whereas at high C/NO3-N (≥2.25) led to ammonia formation. Ammonia production increased from 1 to 9 % with an increase in C/NO3-N from 2.25 to 6. Complete denitrification and no ammonia formation were observed at an optimum C/NO3-N of 2.0. Microbiological studies showed decrease in denitrifiers and increase in nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at high C/NO3-N (≥2.25). Pilot scale studies were carried out with optimum C/NO3-N, and sustainability of the process was checked on the pilot scale for 5 months.

  14. Chemical generation of nitric oxide in the mouth from the enterosalivary circulation of dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C; Dougall, H; Johnston, P; Green, S; Brogan, R; Leifert, C; Smith, L; Golden, M; Benjamin, N

    1995-06-01

    High concentrations of nitrite present in saliva (derived from dietary nitrate) may, upon acidification, generate nitrogen oxides in the stomach in sufficient amounts to provide protection from swallowed pathogens. We now show that, in the rat, reduction of nitrate to nitrite is confined to a specialized area on the posterior surface of the tongue, which is heavily colonized by bacteria, and that nitrate reduction is absent in germ-free rats. We also show that in humans increased salivary nitrite production resulting from nitrate intake enhances oral nitric oxide production. We propose that the salivary generation of nitrite is accomplished by a symbiotic relationship involving nitrate-reducing bacteria on the tongue surface, which is designed to provide host defence against microbial pathogens in the mouth and lower gut. These results provide further evidence for beneficial effects of dietary nitrate. PMID:7585121

  15. Effects of Nitrite on Development of Embryos and Early Larval Stages of the Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alison E.; Karimi, Ida; Talwar, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies suggest that high nitrate levels in food and water may cause birth defects or spontaneous abortions in humans. Experimental mammalian studies show that high nitrite levels adversely affect reproductive outcomes, but have not shown congenital malformations. Consequently, the teratogenic potential of nitrite is unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on development of zebrafish embryos and early larval stages were investigated. Eggs were exposed to ethanol (a known teratogen), nitrite, or nitrate for 24 or 96 hours, and larvae examined at 120 hours. Sublethal exposure to 300 mM ethanol for 24 hours caused severe pericardial and yolk sac edema, craniofacial and axial malformations, and swim bladder noninflation. The 96 hour LC50 for nitrite was 411 mg/L. Less severe edema, craniofacial (but not axial) malformations, swim bladder noninflation, and immobility were observed after sublethal exposure to nitrite between 10 and 300 mg/L for 96 hours. Exposure to nitrite for 24 hours at concentrations as high as 2000 mg/L was not lethal. Only axial malformations and swim bladder noninflation were observed at 1500 mg/L. The results demonstrate that sublethal nitrite concentrations cause developmental defects. The type and magnitude of these defects differed after 24 and 96 hours of exposure. PMID:22823424

  16. Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation and Nitrate Respiration in Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Van 'T Riet, J.; Stouthamer, A. H.; Planta, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    The influence of growth conditions on assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reduction in Aerobacter aerogenes was studied. The level of nitrate reductase activity in cells, growing in minimal medium with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, was much lower under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. Further, the enzyme of the aerobic cultures was very sensitive to sonic disintegration, as distinct from the enzyme of anaerobic cultures. When a culture of A. aerogenes was shifted from anaerobic growth in minimal medium with nitrate and NH4+ to aerobiosis in the same medium, but without NH4+, the production of nitrite stopped instantaneously and the total activity of nitrate reductase decreased sharply. Moreover, there was a lag in growth of about 3 hr after such a shift. After resumption of growth, the total enzymatic activity increased again slowly and simultaneously became gradually sensitive to sonic disintegration. These findings show that oxygen inactivates the anaerobic nitrate reductase and represses its further formation; only after a de novo synthesis of nitrate reductase with an assimilatory function will growth be resumed. The enzyme in aerobic cultures was not significantly inactivated by air, only by pure oxygen. The formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex was repressed, however, by NH4+, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex and that of the respiratory enzyme complex are regulated differently. We suggest that both complexes have a different composition, but that the nitrate reductase in both cases is the same protein. PMID:5726295

  17. Validation of a method to directly and specifically measure nitrite in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Kamimura, Sayuri; Kenyon, Nicholas; Khaibullina, Alfia; Wang, Li; de Souza Batista, Celia M; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2015-02-15

    The bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) is influenced by chemical species generated through reactions with proteins, lipids, metals, and its conversion to nitrite and nitrate. A better understanding of the functions played by each of these species could be achieved by developing selective assays able of distinguishing nitrite from other NO species. Nagababu and Rifkind developed a method using acetic and ascorbic acids to measure nitrite-derived NO in plasma. Here, we adapted, optimized, and validated this method to assay nitrite in tissues. The method yielded linear measurements over 1-300 pmol of nitrite and was validated for tissue preserved in a nitrite stabilization solution composed of potassium ferricyanide, N-ethylmaleimide and NP-40. When samples were processed with chloroform, but not with methanol, ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile, reliable and reproducible nitrite measurements in up to 20 sample replicates were obtained. The method's accuracy in tissue was ≈ 90% and in plasma 99.9%. In mice, during basal conditions, brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney cortex had similar nitrite levels. In addition, nitrite tissue levels were similar regardless of when organs were processed: immediately upon collection, kept in stabilization solution for later analysis or frozen and later processed. After ip nitrite injections, rapidly changing nitrite concentrations in tissue and plasma could be measured and were shown to change in significantly distinct patterns. This validated method could be valuable for investigations of nitrite biology in conditions such as sickle cell disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, where nitrite is thought to play a role. PMID:25445633

  18. Corn leaf nitrate reductase - A nontoxic alternative to cadmium for photometric nitrate determinations in water samples by air-segmented continuous-flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, C.J.; Fischer, A.E.; Campbell, W.H.; Campbell, E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Development, characterization, and operational details of an enzymatic, air-segmented continuous-flow analytical method for colorimetric determination of nitrate + nitrite in natural-water samples is described. This method is similar to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 353.2 and U.S. Geological Survey method 1-2545-90 except that nitrate is reduced to nitrite by soluble nitrate reductase (NaR, EC 1.6.6.1) purified from corn leaves rather than a packed-bed cadmium reactor. A three-channel, air-segmented continuous-flow analyzer-configured for simultaneous determination of nitrite (0.020-1.000 mg-N/L) and nitrate + nitrite (0.05-5.00 mg-N/L) by the nitrate reductase and cadmium reduction methods-was used to characterize analytical performance of the enzymatic reduction method. At a sampling rate of 90 h-1, sample interaction was less than 1% for all three methods. Method detection limits were 0.001 mg of NO2- -N/L for nitrite, 0.003 mg of NO3-+ NO2- -N/L for nitrate + nitrite by the cadmium-reduction method, and 0.006 mg of NO3- + NO2- -N/L for nitrate + nitrite by the enzymatic-reduction method. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite by both methods was greater than 95% complete over the entire calibration range. The difference between the means of nitrate + nitrite concentrations in 124 natural-water samples determined simultaneously by the two methods was not significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level.

  19. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a